WorldWideScience

Sample records for wind profiles obtained

  1. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  2. Sensing the wind profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, A.

    2009-03-15

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a synopsis of the theoretical progress of the study that is based on a number of journal papers. The papers, which constitute the second part of the report, aim to analyze, measure, and model the wind prole in and beyond the surface layer by combining observations from cup anemometers with lidars. The lidar is necessary to extend the measurements on masts at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm and over at land at Hoevsoere, Denmark. Both sensing techniques show a high degree of agreement for wind speed measurements performed at either sites. The wind speed measurements are averaged for several stability conditions and compare well with the surface-layer wind profile. At Hoevsoere, it is sufficient to scale the wind speed with the surface friction velocity, whereas at Horns Rev a new scaling is added, due to the variant roughness length. This new scaling is coupled to wind prole models derived for flow over the sea and tested against the wind proles up to 160 m at Horns Rev. The models, which account for the boundary-layer height in stable conditions, show better agreement with the measurements than compared to the traditional theory. Mixing-length parameterizations for the neutral wind prole compare well with length-scale measurements up to 300 m at Hoevsoere and 950 m at Leipzig. The mixing-length-derived wind proles strongly deviate from the logarithmic wind prole, but agree better with the wind speed measurements. The length-scale measurements are compared to the length scale derived from a spectral analysis performed up to 160 m at Hoevsoere showing high agreement. Mixing-length parameterizations are corrected to account for stability and used to derive wind prole models. These compared better to wind speed measurements up to 300 m at Hoevsoere than the surface-layer wind prole. The boundary-layer height is derived in nearneutral and stable conditions based on turbulent momentum uxes only and in unstable conditions

  3. Sensing the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts. The first is a synopsis of the theoretical progress of the study that is based on a number of journal papers. The papers, which constitute the second part of the report, aim to analyze, measure, and model the wind prole in and beyond the surface layer by combining...... observations from cup anemometers with lidars. The lidar is necessary to extend the measurements on masts at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm and over at land at Høvsøre, Denmark. Both sensing techniques show a high degree of agreement for wind speed measurements performed at either sites. The wind speed...... measurements are averaged for several stability conditions and compare well with the surface-layer wind profile. At Høvsøre, it is sufficient to scale the wind speed with the surface friction velocity, whereas at Horns Rev a new scaling is added, due to the variant roughness length. This new scaling is coupled...

  4. On the Escarpment Wind Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Peterson, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment......It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment...

  5. Coherent lidar technology for global wind profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Current lidar systems are proven sensors for atmospheric wind measurement. Ground-based and airborne continuous wave and pulsed CO2 systems were developed and applied to several wind measuring applications. Analytical and hardware feasibility studies indicte the feasibility of measuring the global wind field from a space splatform. A Global Backscater Experiment is planned by NASA to develop a global model of aerosol backscatter using a CO2 laser. Ground-based aerosol backscatter profiles will also be obtained using a ruby and a pulsed CO2 lidar.

  6. A bistatic sodar for precision wind profiling in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Stuart; Hünerbein, Sabine Von; Mikkelsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    A new ground-based wind profiling technology-a scanned bistatic sodar-is described. The motivation for this design is to obtain a "mastlike"wind vector profile in a single atmospheric column extending from the ground to heights of more than 200 m. The need for this columnar profiling arises from...

  7. Quality Control of Wind Data from 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Austin

    2016-01-01

    Upper-level wind profiles obtained from a 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) instrument at Kennedy Space Center are incorporated in space launch vehicle design and day-of-launch operations to assess wind effects on the vehicle during ascent. Automated and manual quality control (QC) techniques are implemented to remove spurious data in the upper-level wind profiles caused from atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts over the 2010-2012 period of record (POR). By adding the new quality controlled profiles with older profiles from 1997-2009, a robust database will be constructed of upper-level wind characteristics. Statistical analysis will determine the maximum, minimum, and 95th percentile of the wind components from the DRWP profiles over recent POR and compare against the older database. Additionally, this study identifies specific QC flags triggered during the QC process to understand how much data is retained and removed from the profiles.

  8. Wind profiler installed in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsley, B. B.; Carey, J.; Woodman, R. F.; Sarango, M.; Urbina, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Ragaini, E.

    A VHF (50 MHz) wind profiler was installed in Antarctica at the Peruvian Base “Machu Picchu” on King George Island from January 21 to 26. The wind profiler will provide a first look at atmospheric dynamics over the region.The profiler—the first of its kind in Antarctica—is a National Science Foundationsponsored cooperative project of the University of Colorado, the Geophysical Institute of Peru, the University of Piura (Peru), and the Peruvian Navy. This venture was also greatly facilitated by Peru's Comision Nacional de Asuntos Antartidos and Consejo Nacional de Ciencias y Tecnologia, with additional logis tics support provided by the Argentinean Navy and the Uruguayan Air Force.

  9. Atmospheric boundary layer wind profile at a flat coastal site – wind speed lidar measurements and mesoscale modeling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2011-01-01

    Wind profiles up to 600m height are investigated. Measurements of mean wind speed profiles were obtained from a novel wind lidar and compared to model simulations from a mesoscale model (WRFARW v3.1). It is found that WRF is able to predict the mean wind profile rather well and typically within 1......–2ms−1 to the individual measured values. WRF underpredicts the normalized wind profile, especially for stable conditions. The effect of baroclinicity on the upper part of the wind profile is discussed....

  10. RESEARCH ON THE AERODYNAMICS OF BLADE PROFILES OF WIND TURBINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POP E.S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Small capacity wind turbine performance is influenced in a large extent by the blade profiles aerodynamics. By this point of view, the paper presents the most important aspects of aerodynamic profiles, and aspects concerning their optimization in order to increase performance. The study of blade profiles polar led to the identification of a reference profile, NACA4418, for which the best aerodynamic lift drag ratio is obtained on a big range of attack angles. A flow analysis on the reference profile is performed, using a CFD model of numerical simulations in order to obtain performance for different wind speeds.

  11. Improved Estimates of Moments and Winds from Radar Wind Profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmus, Jonathan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ghate, Virendra P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) operates nine radar wind profilers (RWP) across its sites. These RWPs operate at 915 MHz or 1290 MHz frequency and report the first three moments of the Doppler spectrum. The operational settings of the RWP were modified in summer, 2015 to have single pulse length setting for the wind mode and two pulse length settings for the precipitation mode. The moments data collected during the wind mode are used to retrieve horizontal winds. The vendor-reported winds are available at variable time resolution (10 mins, 60 mins, etc.) and contain a significant amount of contamination due to noise and clutter. In this data product we have recalculated the moments and the winds from the raw radar Doppler spectrum and have made efforts to mitigate the contamination due to instrument noise in the wind estimates. Additionally, the moments and wind data has been reported in a harmonized layout identical for all locations and sites.

  12. The wind speed profile at offshore wind farm sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B.; Larsen, S. E.; Højstrup, J.; Barthelmie, R.

    2003-04-01

    The first large offshore wind farms are in the planning phase in several countries in Europe. Their economic viability depends on the favourable wind conditions compared to sites on land. The higher energy yield has to compensate the additional installation and maintenance cost. For project planning and siting a reliable prediction of the wind resource is therefore crucial. For turbine design the wind shear of the marine surface layer is an important design parameter, especially since the growing rotor diameter makes turbines more vulnerable for spatial wind speed variations. Compared to land surfaces the roughness of water is very low. It is commonly described either as a constant (as in the wind resource estimation program WAsP) or by means of the Charnock approach, relating sea surface roughness and friction velocity. While this relation works well for the open oceans it has been found inappropriate for coastal areas where waves are not fully developed. Information about the wave field is needed to model the sea surface roughness more accurately (see e.g. Johnson et al. (1998)). The atmospheric stability differs greatly between land and water areas. It is more important offshore compared to land sites due to the low surface roughness of water. The main influence of the atmospheric stability is on the vertical momentum transport, which is reflected in the vertical wind speed profile. It is usually described with Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. However, other effects not described by this approach might also play an important role: For offshore flow the flow regime at coastal sites is affected by the land-sea discontinuity (Højstrup, 1999). An internal boundary layer develops at the coastline and an inhomogeneous flow field might develop in the coastal zone, especially in stable stratification (see e.g. (Smedman et al. (1997)) Recent data from the measurement at Rødsand, 10 km off the Danish coast in the Baltic Sea, include simultaneous wind and wave data from

  13. Wind Profiles and Wave Spectra for Potential Wind Farms in South China Sea. Part I: Wind Speed Profile Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the setting of wind energy harvesting moving from coastal waters to deep waters, the South China Sea has been deemed to offer great potential for the construction of floating wind farms thanks to the abundance of wind energy resources. An engineering model describing the wind profiles and wave spectra specific to the South China Sea conditions, which is the precondition for offshore wind farm construction, has, however, not yet been proposed. In the present study, a series of numerical simulations have been conducted using the Weather Forecast and Research model. Through analyzing the wind and wave information extracted from the numerical simulation results, engineering models to calculate vertical profiles of wind speeds and wave spectra have been postulated. While the present paper focuses on the wind profile model, a companion paper articulates the wave spectrum model. For wind profiles under typhoon conditions, the power-law and log-law models have been found applicable under the condition that the Hellmann exponent α or the friction velocity u * are modified to vary with the wind strength. For wind profiles under non-typhoon conditions, the log-law model is revised to take into consideration the influence of the atmospheric stability.

  14. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Mithu; Valerio Iungo, G.; Ashton, Ryan; Brewer, W. Alan; Choukulkar, Aditya; Delgado, Ruben; Lundquist, Julie K.; Shaw, William J.; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.

  15. ADM-Aeolus: wind profiles from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloe, Jos; Stoffelen, Ad; Marseille, Gert-Jan

    2017-04-01

    ADM-Aeolus is primarily a research and demonstration mission, flying the first Doppler wind lidar in space, scheduled to be launched end of 2017 by ESA. The lidar is operated in the UV at 355 nm wavelength. Part of the emitted signal is scattered back by molecules (Rayleigh scattering) and detected by the instrument Rayleigh channel. Another part of the emitted signal is scattered back by aerosol and cloud particles (Mie scattering), and detected by the Mie channel. The light received is Doppler shifted due to the movement of the scatterers along the laser Line- Of- Sight (LOS) and a horizontal LOS (HLOS) wind component profile is infered which extends from the surface up to a height of about 30 km. The number of rangebins is limited to 24 per channel. The vertical resolution is adjustable and will typically be 250 m close to the surface, 1 km in the free troposphere and 2 km in the stratosphere. The horizontal resolution is adjustable as well, with a raw resolution of around 3 km, but signals will be accumulated into observations of typically 84 km length to improve the signal-to-noise ratio before processing. ADM-Aeolus aims to measure wind component profiles with a quality comparable to radiosonde soundings to expect substantial impact on NWP models. To achieve this, signals measured in clear air will be separated from signals measured in scenes containing clouds or aerosols, before accumulation over 84 km. This requires a feature detection algorithm, which is part of the level-2B (L2B) processing, and based on detection of cross-talk, i.e. detection of Mie signal in the Rayleigh channel signal. This allows the flexibility to position the Rayleigh range bins in the stratosphere, without the need of a co-located Mie range bin. Cross-talk detection is based on comparing the measured and expected signal. The latter is calculated from auxiliary meteorological information obtained from NWP input, typically temperature and pressure, and instrument calibration

  16. Quality assessment of weather radar wind profiles during bird migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleman, I.; van Gasteren, H.; Bouten, W.

    2008-01-01

    Wind profiles from an operational C-band Doppler radar have been combined with data from a bird tracking radar to assess the wind profile quality during bird migration. The weather radar wind profiles (WRWPs) are retrieved using the well-known volume velocity processing (VVP) technique. The X-band

  17. Validation Campaigns for Sea Surface Wind and Wind Profile by Ground-Based Doppler Wind Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhishen; Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Li, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    According to the research frame of ESA-MOST DRAGON Cooperation Program (ID5291), Chinese partners from Ocean Remote Sensing Institute of Ocean University of China have carried out a serial of campaigns for ground-based lidar validations and atmospheric observations. ORSI/OUC Doppler wind lidar has been developed and deployed to accurately measure wind speed and direction over large areas in real time -- an application useful for ADM-Aeolus VAL/CAL, aviation safety, weather forecasting and sports. The sea surface wind campaigns were successfully accomplished at the Qingdao sailing competitions during the 29th Olympic Games. The lidar located at the seashore near the sailing field, and made a horizontal scan over the sea surface, making the wind measurement in real time and then uploading the data to the local meteorological station every 10 minutes. In addition to the sea surface wind campaigns, ORSI/OUC Doppler wind lidar was deployed on the wind profile observations for the China's Shenzhou 7 spacecraft landing zone weather campaigns in September 2008 in Inner Mongolia steppe. Wind profile was tracked by the mobile Doppler lidar system to help to predict the module's landing site. During above ground tests, validation lidar is tested to be able to provide an independent and credible measurement of radial wind speed, wind profile, 3D wind vector, aerosol- backscattering ratio, aerosol extinction coefficient, extinction-to-backscatter ratio in the atmospheric boundary layer and troposphere, sea surface wind vectors, which will be an independent and very effective validation tool for upcoming ADM-Aeolus project.

  18. Three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation lidar for wind profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Radhakrishnan Mylapore, Anand

    2017-03-01

    The development of a three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation (ABC) light detection and ranging (lidar) to measure wind characteristics for wake vortex and plume tracking applications is discussed. This is a direct detection elastic lidar that uses three laser transceivers, operating at 1030-nm wavelength with ˜10-kHz pulse repetition frequency and nanosec class pulse widths, to directly obtain three components of wind velocities. By tracking the motion of aerosol structures along and between three near-parallel laser beams, three-component wind speed profiles along the field-of-view of laser beams are obtained. With three 8-in. transceiver modules, placed in a near-parallel configuration on a two-axis pan-tilt scanner, the lidar measures wind speeds up to 2 km away. Optical flow algorithms have been adapted to obtain the movement of aerosol structures between the beams. Aerosol density fluctuations are cross-correlated between successive scans to obtain the displacements of the aerosol features along the three axes. Using the range resolved elastic backscatter data from each laser beam, which is scanned over the volume of interest, a three-dimensional map of aerosol density can be generated in a short time span. The performance of the ABC wind lidar prototype, validated using sonic anemometer measurements, is discussed.

  19. Assimilation of Wind Profiles from Multiple Doppler Radar Wind Profilers for Space Launch Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Walker, James C.; Leach, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Space launch vehicles utilize atmospheric winds in design of the vehicle and during day-of-launch (DOL) operations to assess affects of wind loading on the vehicle and to optimize vehicle performance during ascent. The launch ranges at NASA's Kennedy Space Center co-located with the United States Air Force's (USAF) Eastern Range (ER) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and USAF's Western Range (WR) at Vandenberg Air Force Base have extensive networks of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation to measure atmospheric winds. Each instrument's technique to measure winds has advantages and disadvantages in regards to use for vehicle engineering assessments. Balloons measure wind at all altitudes necessary for vehicle assessments, but two primary disadvantages exist when applying balloon output on DOL. First, balloons need approximately one hour to reach required altitude. For vehicle assessments this occurs at 60 kft (18.3 km). Second, balloons are steered by atmospheric winds down range of the launch site that could significantly differ from those winds along the vehicle ascent trajectory. Figure 1 illustrates the spatial separation of balloon measurements from the surface up to approximately 55 kft (16.8 km) during the Space Shuttle launch on 10 December 2006. The balloon issues are mitigated by use of vertically pointing Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs). However, multiple DRWP instruments are required to provide wind data up to 60 kft (18.3 km) for vehicle trajectory assessments. The various DRWP systems have different operating configurations resulting in different temporal and spatial sampling intervals. Therefore, software was developed to combine data from both DRWP-generated profiles into a single profile for use in vehicle trajectory analyses. Details on how data from various wind measurement systems are combined and sample output will be presented in the following sections.

  20. The influence of the Wind Speed Profile on Wind Turbine Performance Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Antoniou, Ioannis; Pedersen, Søren M.

    2009-01-01

    . Assuming a certain turbine hub height, the profiles with hub-height wind speeds between 6 m s-1 and 8 m s-1 are normalized at 7 m s-1 and grouped to a number of mean shear profiles. The energy in the profiles varies considerably for the same hub-height wind speed. These profiles are then used as input......To identify the influence of wind shear and turbulence on wind turbine performance, flat terrain wind profiles are analysed up to a height of 160 m. The profiles' shapes are found to extend from no shear to high wind shear, and on many occasions, local maxima within the profiles are also observed...... to a Blade Element Momentum model that simulates the Siemens 3.6 MW wind turbine. The analysis is carried out as time series simulations where the electrical power is the primary characterization parameter. The results of the simulations indicate that wind speed measurements at different heights over...

  1. Wavelet based methods for improved wind profiler signal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lehmann

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we apply wavelet thresholding for removing automatically ground and intermittent clutter (airplane echoes from wind profiler radar data. Using the concept of discrete multi-resolution analysis and non-parametric estimation theory, we develop wavelet domain thresholding rules, which allow us to identify the coefficients relevant for clutter and to suppress them in order to obtain filtered reconstructions.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques – Radio science (remote sensing; signal processing

  2. Research on wind turbine rotor models using NACA profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardar, Ali; Alibas, Ilknur [Department of Agricultural Machinery, Faculty of Agriculture, Uludag University, Gorukle Kampusu, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)

    2008-07-15

    In this study, rotation rates and power coefficients of miniature wind turbine rotor models manufactured using NACA profiles were investigated. For this purpose, miniature rotor models with 310 mm diameter were made from ''Balsa'' wood. When all properties of rotor models were taken into account, a total of 180 various combinations were obtained. Each combination was coded with rotor form code. These model rotors were tested in a wind tunnel measurement system. Rotation rates for each rotor form were determined based on wind speed. Power coefficient values were calculated using power and tip speed rates of wind. Rotor models produced a rotation rate up to 3077 rpm, with a power coefficient rate up to 0.425. Rotor models manufactured by using NACA 4412 profiles with 0 grade twisting angle, 5 grade blade angle, double blades had the highest rotation rate, while those manufactured by using NACA 4415 profiles with 0 grade twisting angle, 18 grade blade angle, 4 blades had the highest power coefficient. (author)

  3. Lidar Wind Profiler for the NextGen Airportal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MassTech, Inc. proposes to develop a Lidar Wind Profiler for standoff sensing of concurrent 3-component wind velocities using an eye-safe, rugged, reliable optical...

  4. Methodology for obtaining wind gusts using Doppler lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, Irene; Gryning, Sven-Erik; O'Connor, Ewan J.

    2017-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed for scaling Doppler lidar observations of wind gusts to make them comparable with those observed at a meteorological mast. Doppler lidars can then be used to measure wind gusts in regions and heights where traditional meteorological mast measurements are not availabl...

  5. Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y. (Inventor); Koch, Grady J. (Inventor); Kavaya, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems, methods, and devices of the present invention enable airborne Doppler Wind LIDAR system measurements and INS/GPS measurements to be combined to estimate wind parameters and compensate for instrument misalignment. In a further embodiment, the wind speed and wind direction may be computed based on two orthogonal line-of-sight LIDAR returns.

  6. CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ DOPPLER WIND PROFILER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ Doppler Wind Profiler dataset was collected by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS),...

  7. Quality Control Algorithms and Proposed Integration Process for Wind Profilers Used by Launch Vehicle Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Impact of winds to space launch vehicle include Design, Certification Day-of-launch (DOL) steering commands (1)Develop "knockdowns" of load indicators (2) Temporal uncertainty of flight winds. Currently use databases from weather balloons. Includes discrete profiles and profile pair datasets. Issues are : (1)Larger vehicles operate near design limits during ascent 150 discrete profiles per month 110-217 seasonal 2.0 and 3.5-hour pairs Balloon rise time (one hour) and drift (up to 100 n mi) Advantages of the Alternative approach using Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) are: (1) Obtain larger sample size (2) Provide flexibility for assessing trajectory changes due to winds (3) Better representation of flight winds.

  8. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Pryor, Sara

    2010-01-01

    extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected...... wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher...... than if humidity fluxes are included, and the results are not very sensitive to the method selected to estimate humidity fluxes....

  9. Evaluation of 5-cm Agent Fate Wind Tunnel Velocity Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER Evaluation of 5-cm Agent Fate Wind Tunnel Velocity Profiles DAAD 13-03-D-0017 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER SAIC Agreement...TERMS (Continued) Evaporation Agent fate Wind tunnel Velocity profile 2 PREFACE The work described in this report was authorized under Contract No. DAAD

  10. On mean wind and turbulence profile measurements from ground-based wind lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Two types of wind lidar?s have become available for ground-based vertical mean wind and turbulence profiling. A continuous wave (CW) wind lidar, and a pulsed wind lidar. Although they both are build upon the same recent 1.55 μ telecom fibre technology, they possess fundamental differences between...... their temporal and spatial resolution capabilities. A literature review of the two lidar systems spatial and temporal resolution characteristics will be presented, and the implication for the two lidar types vertical profile measurements of mean wind and turbulence in the lower atmospheric boundary layer...

  11. The influence of humidity fluxes on offshore wind speed profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Barthelmie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy developments offshore focus on larger turbines to keep the relative cost of the foundation per MW of installed capacity low. Hence typical wind turbine hub-heights are extending to 100 m and potentially beyond. However, measurements to these heights are not usually available, requiring extrapolation from lower measurements. With humid conditions and low mechanical turbulence offshore, deviations from the traditional logarithmic wind speed profile become significant and stability corrections are required. This research focuses on quantifying the effect of humidity fluxes on stability corrected wind speed profiles. The effect on wind speed profiles is found to be important in stable conditions where including humidity fluxes forces conditions towards neutral. Our results show that excluding humidity fluxes leads to average predicted wind speeds at 150 m from 10 m which are up to 4% higher than if humidity fluxes are included, and the results are not very sensitive to the method selected to estimate humidity fluxes.

  12. Long-Term Mean Wind Profiles Based on Similarity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2010-01-01

    in turn facilitates the derivation of a long-term mean wind profile based on Monin–Obukhov similarity theory. The modelled stability distributions exhibit good agreement with measurements from sites having different local conditions. The long-term wind profile formulation is further extended to include...... the influence of the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (h), which becomes relevant for heights above h/3, and the resultant long-term ‘tall’ profile form also matches observations....

  13. Transition Marshall Space Flight Center Wind Profiler Splicing Algorithm to Launch Services Program Upper Winds Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    NASAs LSP customers and the future SLS program rely on observations of upper-level winds for steering, loads, and trajectory calculations for the launch vehicles flight. On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds and provide forecasts to the launch team via the AMU-developed LSP Upper Winds tool for launches at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This tool displays wind speed and direction profiles from rawinsondes released during launch operations, the 45th Space Wing 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP, and output from numerical weather prediction models.The goal of this task was to splice the wind speed and direction profiles from the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) 915-MHz Doppler radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP at altitudes where the wind profiles overlap to create a smooth profile. In the first version of the LSP Upper Winds tool, the top of the 915-MHz DRWP wind profile and the bottom of the 50-MHz DRWP were not spliced, sometimes creating a discontinuity in the profile. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (NE) created algorithms to splice the wind profiles from the two sensors to generate an archive of vertically complete wind profiles for the SLS program. The AMU worked with MSFC NE personnel to implement these algorithms in the LSP Upper Winds tool to provide a continuous spliced wind profile.The AMU transitioned the MSFC NE algorithms to interpolate and fill data gaps in the data, implement a Gaussian weighting function to produce 50-m altitude intervals in each sensor, and splice the data together from both DRWPs. They did so by porting the MSFC NE code written with MATLAB software into Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). After testing the new algorithms in stand-alone VBA modules, the AMU replaced the existing VBA code in the LSP Upper Winds tool with the new

  14. Profile Tests to Optimize the Utilization of Wind Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIRCSI, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have to know the property of air movement in hub height of wind turbine onunderstanding that we want to utilize of wind power economically. We can calculate wind speed fromnear ground measurement to hub height but always have mistake in results depend on applied method.In Hungary the Hungarian Meteorological Service carried out expedition wind measurements withSODAR equipment to study wind potential of the country within a frame of a scientific competition.We analysed SODAR data from Budapest, Paks and Szeged with statistical method looking for answerto our following question: How can frequency distributions of wind speed and wind direction indifferent height change? Are there any differences in form of wind profiles and in wind power indifferent wind direction sector? How can daily course of wind speed and potential of wind energy indifferent height change? At the same time, we suppose that there is a so-called “inflection altitude,”where the daily course of the wind speed and wind energy is random. We try to determine this altitudeon the basis of tower measurements in Paks. Finally we get an example to the distribution of specificwind power according to parts of the day.

  15. Length Scales of the Neutral Wind Profile over Homogeneous Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Mann, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The wind speed profile for the neutral boundary layer is derived for a number of mixing-length parameterizations, which account for the height of the boundary layer. The wind speed profiles show good agreement with the reanalysis of the Leipzig wind profile (950 m high) and with combined cup...... is extended to the entire boundary layer, demonstrating the importance of the boundary layer height as a scaling parameter. The turbulence measurements, performed up to 160-m height only at the Høvsøre site, provide the opportunity to derive the spectral-length scales from two spectral models. Good agreement...

  16. Sodar data about wind profiles in Moscow city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Lokoshchenko

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of wind measurements in the lowermost 500 m air layer above Moscow by Doppler sodar 'MODOS' produced by METEK firm are presented for the period from 2004 to 2008. General features both of the annual cycle of wind profiles and of the diurnal one are being discussed. In average, the highest wind speed values are observed in autumn and in winter, the least ones in spring and in summer. The recordable maximal value of the wind speed averaged over 10 minutes in Moscow city has been found as nearly 31 m/s. The distributions of wind speed values regularly show a positive asymmetry and are close to the logarithmically normal law. For the first time, seasonal dynamics of the skewness coefficient and of the kurtosis of wind distributions are analyzed. The most frequently detected wind directions are South-Western and Western-South-Western; the rarest are directions with an Eastern component. The crossover height of wind profiles varies in average from 60-80 m in autumn and in winter to nearly of 100 m in summer. For the first time, mean values of wind turning during the passing of atmospheric fronts have been received and are studied by sodar data. It was found that right-hand (clockwise turning of wind at cold fronts is more and occurs more quickly compared to warm fronts. The occlusion fronts show intermediate mean values of wind turning.

  17. Retrieval of vertical wind profiles during monsoon from satellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this paper is to study the feasibility of deriving vertical wind profiles from current satellite .... It is clear that the satellite derived winds are not sufficient by themselves for the NWP requirements, due to poor vertical resolution. In the present study we attempt to derive the ..... The solution of matrix equation (7) leads to ...

  18. Field test of a lidar wind profiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wind speeds and wind directions are measured remotely using an incoherent backscatter lidar system operating at a wavelength of 1.06 mm with a maximum repetition rate of 13 Hz. The principle of the measurements is based on following detectable atmospheric structures, which are transported by the

  19. On mean wind and turbulence profile measurements from ground-based wind lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben

    Two types of wind lidar’s have recently become available for ground-based vertical mean wind and turbulence profiling. A continuous wave (CW) wind lidar, and a pulsed wind lidar. Although both types have been build upon recent 1.55 &My telecom fibre technology, there are significant fundamental...... differences between the two lidars temporal and spatial resolution capabilities. A review of the two lidar systems special and temporal resolution characteristics will be presented, and the implication for measurements of mean wind and turbulence in the lower atmospheric boundary layer will be discussed....

  20. Cloud level winds from UV and IR images obtained by VMC onboard Venus Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatuntsev, Igor; Patsaeva, Marina; Titov, Dmitri; Ignatiev, Nikolay; Turin, Alexander; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2017-04-01

    During eight years Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) [1] onboard the Venus Express orbiter has observed the upper cloud layer of Venus. The largest set of images was obtained in the UV (365 nm), visible (513 nm) and two infrared channels - 965 nm and 1010 nm. The UV dayside images were used to study the atmospheric circulation at the Venus cloud tops [2], [3]. Mean zonal and meridional profiles of winds and their variability were derived from cloud tracking of UV images. In low latitudes the mean retrograde zonal wind at the cloud top (67±2 km) is about 95 m/s with a maximum of about 102 m/s at 40-50°S. Poleward from 50°S the zonal wind quickly fades out with latitude. The mean poleward meridional wind slowly increases from zero value at the equator to about 10 m/s at 50°S. Poleward from this latitude, the absolute value of the meridional component monotonically decreases to zero at the pole. The VMC observations suggest clear diurnal signature in the wind field. They also indicate a long term trend for the zonal wind speed at low latitudes to increase from 85 m/s in the beginning of the mission to 110 m/s by the middle of 2012. The trend was explained by influence of the surface topography on the zonal flow [4]. Cloud features tracking in the IR images provided information about winds in the middle cloud deck (55±4 km). In the low and middle latitudes (5-65°S) the IR mean retrograde zonal velocity is about 68-70 m/s. In contrast to poleward flow at the cloud tops, equatorward motions dominate in the middle cloud with maximum speed of 5.8±1.2 m/s at latitude 15°S. The meridional speed slowly decreases to 0 at 65-70°S. At low latitudes the zonal and meridional speed demonstrate long term variations. Following [4] we explain the observed long term trend of zonal and meridional components by the influence of surface topography of highland region Aphrodite Terra on dynamic processes in the middle cloud deck through gravity waves. Acknowledgements: I.V. Khatuntsev

  1. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the QC and splicing methodology for KSC's 50- and 915-MHz DRWP measurements that generates an extensive archive of vertically complete profiles from 0.20-18.45 km. The concurrent POR from each archive extends from April 2000 to December 2009. MSFC NE applies separate but similar QC processes to each of the 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives. DRWP literature and data examination provide the basis for developing and applying the automated and manual QC processes on both archives. Depending on the month, the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives retain 52-65% and 16-30% of the possible data, respectively. The 50- and 915-MHz DRWP QC archives retain 84-91% and 85-95%, respectively, of all the available data provided that data exist in the non- QC'ed archives. Next, MSFC NE applies an algorithm to splice concurrent measurements from both DRWP sources. Last, MSFC NE generates a composite profile from the (up to) five available spliced profiles to effectively characterize boundary layer winds and to utilize all possible 915-MHz DRWP measurements at each timestamp. During a given month, roughly 23,000-32,000 complete profiles exist from 0.25-18.45 km from the composite profiles' archive, and approximately 5,000- 27,000 complete profiles exist from an archive utilizing an individual 915-MHz DRWP. One can extract a variety of profile combinations (pairs, triplets, etc.) from this sample for a given application. The sample of vertically complete DRWP wind measurements not only gives launch vehicle customers greater confidence in loads and trajectory assessments versus using balloon output, but also provides flexibility to simulate different DOL situations across applicable altitudes. In addition to increasing sample size and providing more flexibility for DOL simulations in the vehicle design phase, the spliced DRWP database provides any upcoming launch vehicle program with the capability to utilize DRWP profiles on DOL to compute vehicle steering

  2. Hourly wind profiler observations of the jet stream - Wind shear and pilot reports of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrett, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Hourly wind profiler observations of the jet stream are reported on the basis of over 400 hr of wind and temperature data taken during two prolonged jet stream passages over western and central Pennsylvania during mid-November 1986 and mid-January 1987. The mean wind speed profile with error bars for the 79 hr that the Crown radar was determined to be 'under' the jet stream is shown. A mean speed of 83 m/s for the period was found. A plot of wind shear for the hours of interest is given. Typically, the shear was at a maximum from 3 to 4 km below the level of maximum wind. Thus, an aircraft would have to fly through potentially rough air to reach the fuel savings and relative smoothness of flight at the jet stream level. A good correlation between pilot reports of turbulence and wind shear was found.

  3. On the length-scale of the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Mann, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of simultaneous sonic anemometer observations of wind speed and velocity spectra over flat and homogeneous terrain from 10 up to 160 m height performed at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The mixing length, l, derived from...... the wind speed profile, is found to be linearly proportional to the length-scale of turbulence, derived either from the peak of the vertical velocity spectrum, (λm)w, or from a three-dimensional turbulence spectral model, for a range of atmospheric stability conditions, friction Rossby numbers, and within...... the range of observational heights ((λm)w ∼ 7l). Under very unstable conditions and above 100 m, the local wind shear is low, and the relation between both length-scales is slightly nonlinear. Mixing-length and wind profile models, which depend on both atmospheric stability and friction Rossby number...

  4. Use of ground-based wind profiles in mesoscale forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, Thomas W.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review is presented of recent uses of ground-based wind profile data in mesoscale forecasting. Some of the applications are in real time, and some are after the fact. Not all of the work mentioned here has been published yet, but references are given wherever possible. As Gage and Balsley (1978) point out, sensitive Doppler radars have been used to examine tropospheric wind profiles since the 1970's. It was not until the early 1980's, however, that the potential contribution of these instruments to operational forecasting and numerical weather prediction became apparent. Profiler winds and radiosonde winds compare favorably, usually within a few m/s in speed and 10 degrees in direction (see Hogg et al., 1983), but the obvious advantage of the profiler is its frequent (hourly or more often) sampling of the same volume. The rawinsonde balloon is launched only twice a day and drifts with the wind. In this paper, I will: (1) mention two operational uses of data from a wind profiling system developed jointly by the Wave Propagation and Aeronomy Laboratories of NOAA; (2) describe a number of displays of these same data on a workstation for mesoscale forecasting developed by the Program for Regional Observing and Forecasting Services (PROFS); and (3) explain some interesting diagnostic calculations performed by meteorologists of the Wave Propagation Laboratory.

  5. Analysis of Near Simultaneous Jimsphere and AMPS High Resolution Wind Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelfang, S. I.

    2003-01-01

    The high-resolution wind profile of the Automated Meteorological Profiling System (HRAMPS) is the proposed replacement for the Jimsphere measurement system used to support NASA Shuttle launches from the Eastern Test Range (ETR). Samples of twenty-six ETR near simultaneous Jimsphere and HRAMPS wind profiles were obtained for Shuttle program HRAMPS certification studies. Shuttle systems engineering certification is to ensure that spacecraft and launch vehicle systems performance and safety evaluations for each launch (derived from flight simulations with Jimsphere wind profile data bases) retain their validity when HRAMPS profiles are used on day-of-launch (DOL) in trajectory and loads simulations to support the commit-to-launch decision. This paper describes a statistical analysis of the near simultaneous profiles. In principle the differences between a Jimsphere profile and an HRAMPS profile should be attributed to tracking technology (radar versus GPS tracking of a Jimsphere flight element) and the method for derivation of wind vectors from the raw tracking data. In reality, it is not technically feasible to track the same Jimsphere balloon with the two systems. The aluminized Mylar surface of the standard Jimsphere flight element facilitates radar tracking, but it interferes with HRAMPS during simultaneous tracking. Suspending a radar reflector from an HRAMPS flight element (Jimsphere without aluminized coating) does not produce satisfactory Jimsphere profiles because of intermittent radar returns. Thus, differences between the Jimsphere and HRAMPS profiles are also attributed to differences in the trajectories of separate flight elements. Because of small sample size and a test period limited to one winter season, test measurements during extreme high winds aloft could not have been expected and did not occur. It is during the highest winds that the largest differences between Jimsphere and HRAMPS would occur because the distance between flight elements would be

  6. Sonic Detection and Ranging (SODAR) Wind Profiler Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, Richard L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The SODAR (Sonic Detection and Ranging) wind profiler measures wind profiles and backscattered signal strength between (nominally) 15 meters (m) and 500 m. It operates by transmitting acoustic energy into the atmosphere and measuring the strength and frequency of backscattered energy. The strength of the backscattered signal is determined by the strength of temperature inhomogeneities with size on the order of 10 centimeters (cm). Assuming the scattering elements in the atmosphere are moving with the mean wind, the horizontal wind field can be derived. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mobile Facility (AMF) has a system developed by Scintec, Inc. that transmits a sequence of frequencies to enhance signal determination.

  7. Design and Performance of a Miniature Lidar Wind Profiler (MLWP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Miodek, Mariusz J.

    1998-01-01

    The directional velocity of the wind is one of the most critical components for understanding meteorological and other dynamic atmospheric processes. Altitude-resolved wind velocity measurements, also known as wind profiles or soundings, are especially necessary for providing data for meteorological forecasting and overall global circulation models (GCM's). Wind profiler data are also critical in identifying possible dangerous weather conditions for aviation. Furthermore, a system has yet to be developed for wind profiling from the surface of Mars which could also meet the stringent requirements on size, weight, and power of such a mission. Obviously, a novel wind profiling approach based on small and efficient technology is required to meet these needs. A lidar system based on small and highly efficient semiconductor lasers is now feasible due to recent developments in the laser and detector technologies. The recent development of high detection efficiency (50%), silicon-based photon-counting detectors when combined with high laser pulse repetition rates and long receiver integration times has allowed these transmitter energies to be reduced to the order of microjoules per pulse. Aerosol lidar systems using this technique have been demonstrated for both Q-switched, diode-pumped solid-state laser transmitters (lambda = 523 nm) and semiconductor diode lasers (lambda = 830 nm); however, a wind profiling lidar based on this technique has yet to be developed. We will present an investigation of a semiconductor-laser-based lidar system which uses the "edge-filter" direct detection technique to infer Doppler frequency shifts of signals backscattered from aerosols in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Our investigation will incorporate a novel semiconductor laser design which mitigates the deleterious effects of frequency chirp in pulsed diode lasers, a problem which has limited their use in such systems in the past. Our miniature lidar could be used on a future Mars

  8. Offshore wind profiling using light detection and ranging measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of the ZephlR (R), a continuous-wave, focused light detection and ranging (LiDAR) wind profiler, to observe offshore winds and turbulence characteristics were tested during a 6 month campaign at the tronsformer/platform of Hams Rev, the world's largest wind form......-derived friction velocities and roughness lengths were compared to Charnock's sea roughness model. These overage values were found to be close to the model, although the scatter of the individual estimations of sea roughness length was large. Copyright (C) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  9. Improved observations of turbulence dissipation rates from wind profiling radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. McCaffrey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of turbulence dissipation rates in the planetary boundary layer are crucial for validation of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction models. However, because dissipation rates are difficult to obtain, they are infrequently measured through the depth of the boundary layer. For this reason, demonstrating the ability of commonly used wind profiling radars (WPRs to estimate this quantity would be greatly beneficial. During the XPIA field campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, two WPRs operated in an optimized configuration, using high spectral resolution for increased accuracy of Doppler spectral width, specifically chosen to estimate turbulence from a vertically pointing beam. Multiple post-processing techniques, including different numbers of spectral averages and peak processing algorithms for calculating spectral moments, were evaluated to determine the most accurate procedures for estimating turbulence dissipation rates using the information contained in the Doppler spectral width, using sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower for validation. The optimal settings were determined, producing a low bias, which was later corrected. Resulting estimations of turbulence dissipation rates correlated well (R2 = 0. 54 and 0. 41 with the sonic anemometers, and profiles up to 2 km from the 449 MHz WPR and 1 km from the 915 MHz WPR were observed.

  10. Classifying Vertical Wind Speed Profiles for Offshore Wind Resource and Available Power Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pe, A.; Tippet, S.; Rabenhorst, S. D.; Delgado, R.

    2016-12-01

    Prior to offshore wind farm construction, an accurate estimate of preconstruction energy yield is required to optimize wind farm layout and justify the project's economic viability. Unfortunately, uncertainties exist during this stage due in-part to limited measurements to characterize the offshore wind resource and related uncertainties predicting a turbine's available power. To better understand these preconstruction energy yield uncertainties, Doppler wind lidar and other met-ocean measurements were collected offshore within Maryland's Wind Energy Area from July-August 2013. Given the diversity of vertical wind speed profile (VWP) observations, VWPs are classified based on the goodness-of-fit to several mathematical expressions. Results demonstrate on average VWP typevariability is related to the magnitude of hub-height (100m) wind speed and wind direction (i.e. offshore fetch), as power law, logarithmic-like, VWPs occur during slightly weaker, northeasterly flow, while more unexpected VWPs are associated with stronger, southwesterly flow, from land to sea. In addition, compared to power-law VWP classes, unexpected VWPs types demonstrate slightly warmer air and SSTs, as well as stable surface conditions. Classifying VWPs also provides a useful tool for relating preconstruction offshore wind resource and turbine available power uncertainties. Using an NREL 5MW offshore reference turbine's power curve, buoy extrapolated surface wind to hub-height (100m), lidar measured hub-height, and several Rotor Equivalent Wind (REW) available power estimates are compared. On average, traditional hub-height wind speed power yields the highest available power estimate, approximately 9-70 percent greater than other techniques. Further, unexpected VWPs demonstrate the greatest variability in critical superimposed meteorological controls known to impact turbine performance, thus yield greatest deviation from hub-height power and uncertainty between available power estimates

  11. Profiler measurements of turbulence and wind shear in a snowstorm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.R. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Leblanc, S.G. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Cohn, S.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Ecklund, W.L. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences; Carter, D.A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.; Wilson, J.S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences

    1996-02-01

    Observations of a large and vigorous snowstorm with a UHF wind profiler were used to investigate the intensity of atmospheric turbulence and its relation to the vertical wind shear. Turbulence was estimated from the spread of the Doppler spectrum in the vertical beam of the profiler, after correcting for the contribution of the horizontal wind speed to the spread. Wind shear was computed directly from the measured wind profiles. Over the 24 h duration of the storm, shear values exceeding 0.02 s{sup -1} existed nearly continuously in the lowest few hundred meters of the atmosphere and in a broad elevated layer that slowly descended from 4 km to 2 km. The pattern of Doppler spread in time-height coordinates closely resembled the pattern of wind shear, though a detailed, point-by-point comparison of these two quantities by linear regression yielded a correlation coefficient of only 0.4. Focusing on just the observations in the lowest few hundred meters gave a higher correlation coefficient. The Richardson number as a function of height and time was computed by combining the measured wind shear values with temperature profiles generated by a mesoscale numerical model. We found evidence of weak turbulence even in regions with Ri>1, but a value close to the theoretical threshold of Ri=1/4 separates the more intense turbulence from the weaker. Estimates of the turbulent energy dissipation rate, {epsilon}, based on the Doppler spread, range as high as 500 cm{sup 2} s{sup -3}, the largest values being near the ground. (orig.)

  12. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  13. Knowledge of coronal heating and solar-wind acceleration obtained from observations of the solar wind near 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1992-01-01

    Clues to the nature of the mechanisms responsible for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind can be obtained by contrasting the properties of the quasi-stationary and transient states of the solar wind. Substantial differences exist in the proton temperatures and anisotropies, the entropy, the field strength, the Alfvenicity of fluctuations in the field, the distribution of MHD discontinuities, and the helium abundance of the two types of flow. Those differences are displayed as a function of the solar wind speed. Several signals of wave acceleration can be found in the data for quasi-stationary flows. The relatively smooth velocity dependences of proton temperature, helium abundance, and frequency of occurrence of rotational discontinuities suggest that the acceleration mechanisms for flow from coronal holes, coronal streamers, and the quasi-stationary low-speed flows between them may be basically the same, differing only in degree.

  14. PROFILES WITH COANDA EFFECT, NECESSARIES TO WIND TURBINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Sorina ANGHEL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The air flow separation around profiles and the wind turbine rotor vibration leading to theblade breaking is a well known phenomenon based on which the present work is conceived. The paperis focused on theoretic and experimental researches effectuated on any profiles with Coanda effect,which are followed with the patenting of three similar profiles.In the frame of theoretical researches the molecular attraction forces of adhesion and cohesion in thenumerical integration of viscous fluid flow around a breaking plate even to the angle of 45o areintroduced, highlighting the advantageous Henri Coanda effect.The experimental researches are effectuated on a profile with Coanda effect, measuring with atwo-component strain gauge balance the lift and aerodynamic drag forces for different profile attackangle, highlighting the increasing of the attack angle from the usual value of 11o to over the 27o forthat profile when the flow separation takes place.

  15. GRIP HIGH ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP High Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) dataset was collected by the High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP),...

  16. GPM Ground Validation High Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) OLYMPEX V1a

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) instrument is a Doppler radar designed to measure tropospheric winds through deriving Doppler profiles...

  17. Coastal Wind Profiles In The Mediterranean Area From A Wind Lidar During A Two Year Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullì, Daniel; Avolio, Elenio; Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Torcasio, Rosa Claudia; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2017-04-01

    Reliable measurements of vertical profiles of wind speed and direction are the basis for testing models and methodologies of use for wind energy assessment. Modelling coastal areas further introduce the challenge of the coastal discontinuity, which is often not accurately resolved in meso-scale numerical model. Here, we present the analysis of two year of 10-minute averaged wind speed and direction vertical profiles collected during a two-year period from a Wind- lidar ZEPHIR 300® at a coastal suburban area. The lidar is located at the SUPER SITE of CNR-ISAC section of Lamezia Terme, Italy and both dataset and site are unique in the Mediterranean area. The instrument monitors at 10 vertical levels, from 10 m up to 300 m. The analysis is classified according to season, and wind directions for offshore and offshore flow. For onshore flow, we note an atmospheric layer at around 100 m that likely represents the effect an internal boundary layer caused by the sharp coastal discontinuity of the surface characteristics. For offshore flows, the profiles show a layer ranging between 80m and 100m, which might be ascribed to the land night time boundary layer combined to the impact of the building around the mast.

  18. Monthly and annual percentage levels of wind speed differences computed by using FPS-16 radar/Jimsphere wind profile data from Cape Kennedy, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susko, M.; Kaufman, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The percentage levels of wind speed differences are presented computed from sequential FPS-16 radar/Jimsphere wind profiles. The results are based on monthly profiles obtained from December 1964 to July 1970 at Cape Kennedy, Florida. The profile sequences contain a series of three to ten Jimspheres released at approximately 1.5-hour intervals. The results given are the persistence analysis of wind speed difference at 1.5-hour intervals to a maximum time interval of 12 hours. The monthly percentage of wind speed differences and the annual percentage of wind speed differences are tabulated. The percentage levels are based on the scalar wind speed changes calculated over an altitude interval of approximately 50 meters and printed out every 25 meters as a function of initial wind speed within each five-kilometer layer from near sea level to 20 km. In addition, analyses were made of the wind speed difference for the 0.2 to 1 km layer as an aid for studies associated with take-off and landing of the space shuttle.

  19. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-01-01

    within a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions, which allows a comparison of the models with the average wind profile computed in seven stability classes, showing a better agreement than compared to the traditional surface-layer wind profile. The wind profile is measured by combining cup......Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed...

  20. Revised prediction (estimation) of Cape Kennedy, Florida, wind speed profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, N. B.; Crutcher, H. L.

    1975-01-01

    The prediction of the wind profile maximum speed at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is made for any selected calendar data. The prediction is based on a normal probability distribution model with 15 years of smoothed input data and is static in the sense that no dynamic principles of persistence or synoptic features are considered. Comparison with similar predictions based on 6 years of data shows the same general pattern, but the variability decreased with the increase of sample size.

  1. Estimating Planetary Boundary Layer Heights from NOAA Profiler Network Wind Profiler Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molod, Andrea M.; Salmun, H.; Dempsey, M

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from hourly archived wind profiler data from the NOAA Profiler Network (NPN) sites located throughout the central United States. Unlike previous studies, the present algorithm has been applied to a long record of publicly available wind profiler signal backscatter data. Under clear conditions, summertime averaged hourly time series of PBL heights compare well with Richardson-number based estimates at the few NPN stations with hourly temperature measurements. Comparisons with clear sky reanalysis based estimates show that the wind profiler PBL heights are lower by approximately 250-500 m. The geographical distribution of daily maximum PBL heights corresponds well with the expected distribution based on patterns of surface temperature and soil moisture. Wind profiler PBL heights were also estimated under mostly cloudy conditions, and are generally higher than both the Richardson number based and reanalysis PBL heights, resulting in a smaller clear-cloudy condition difference. The algorithm presented here was shown to provide a reliable summertime climatology of daytime hourly PBL heights throughout the central United States.

  2. Imaging doppler lidar for wind turbine wake profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, David J.

    2015-11-19

    An imaging Doppler lidar (IDL) enables the measurement of the velocity distribution of a large volume, in parallel, and at high spatial resolution in the wake of a wind turbine. Because the IDL is non-scanning, it can be orders of magnitude faster than conventional coherent lidar approaches. Scattering can be obtained from naturally occurring aerosol particles. Furthermore, the wind velocity can be measured directly from Doppler shifts of the laser light, so the measurement can be accomplished at large standoff and at wide fields-of-view.

  3. Quality controls for wind measurement of a 1290-MHz boundary layer profiler under strong wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Zheng, Chaorong; Wu, Yue

    2017-09-01

    Wind profilers have been widely adopted to observe the wind field information in the atmosphere for different purposes. But accuracy of its observation has limitations due to various noises or disturbances and hence need to be further improved. In this paper, the data measured under strong wind conditions, using a 1290-MHz boundary layer profiler (BLP), are quality controlled via a composite quality control (QC) procedure proposed by the authors. Then, through the comparison with the data measured by radiosonde flights (balloon observations), the critical thresholds in the composite QC procedure, including consensus average threshold T 1 and vertical shear threshold T 3 , are systematically discussed. And the performance of the BLP operated under precipitation is also evaluated. It is found that to ensure the high accuracy and high data collectable rate, the optimal range of subsets is determined to be 4 m/s. Although the number of data rejected by the combined algorithm of vertical shear examination and small median test is quite limited, it is proved that the algorithm is quite useful to recognize the outlier with a large discrepancy. And the optimal wind shear threshold T 3 can be recommended as 5 ms -1 /100m. During patchy precipitation, the quality of data measured by the four oblique beams (using the DBS measuring technique) can still be ensured. After the BLP data are quality controlled by the composite QC procedure, the output can show good agreement with the balloon observation.

  4. Complete methodology on generating realistic wind speed profiles based on measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavriluta, Catalin; Spataru, Sergiu; Mosincat, Ioan

    2012-01-01

    The wind speed represents the main exogenous signal applied to a Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) and determines its behavior. The erratic variation of the wind speed, highly dependent on the given site and on the atmospheric conditions, makes the wind speed quite difficult to model. Moreover......, wind modelling for medium and large time scales is poorly treated in the present literature. This paper presents methods for generating realistic wind speed profiles based on real measurements. The wind speed profile is divided in a low- frequency component (describing long term variations...... and modelling methods based on white noise filtering are presented....

  5. A New Approach to Obtain Synthetic Wind Power Forecasts for Integration Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Olauson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available When performing wind integration studies, synthetic wind power forecasts are key elements. Historically, data from operational forecasting systems have been used sparsely, likely due to the high costs involved. Purely statistical methods for simulating wind power forecasts are more common,but have problems mimicking all relevant aspects of actual forecasts. Consequently, a new approach to obtain wind power forecasts for integration studies is proposed, relying on long time series of freely and globally available reforecasts. In order to produce synthetic forecasts with similar properties as operational ditto, some processing (noise addition and error reduction is necessary. Validations with measurements from Belgium and Sweden show that the method is adequate; and distributions, correlations, autocorrelations and power spectral densities of forecast errors correspond well. Furthermore, abrupt changes when forecasts are updated and the existence of level and phase errors are reproduced. The influence from terrain complexity on error magnitude is promising, but more data is necessary for a proper validation.

  6. Marli: Mars Lidar for Global Wind Profiles and Aerosol Profiles from Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Guzewich, S. D.; Smith, M. D.; Riris, H.; Sun, X.; Gentry, B. M.; Yu, A.; Allan, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Analysis Group's Next Orbiter Science Analysis Group (NEXSAG) has recently identified atmospheric wind measurements as one of 5 top compelling science objectives for a future Mars orbiter. To date, only isolated lander observations of martian winds exist. Winds are the key variable to understand atmospheric transport and answer fundamental questions about the three primary cycles of the martian climate: CO2, H2O, and dust. However, the direct lack of observations and imprecise and indirect inferences from temperature observations leave many basic questions about the atmospheric circulation unanswered. In addition to addressing high priority science questions, direct wind observations from orbit would help validate 3D general circulation models (GCMs) while also providing key input to atmospheric reanalyses. The dust and CO2 cycles on Mars are partially coupled and their influences on the atmospheric circulation modify the global wind field. Dust absorbs solar infrared radiation and its variable spatial distribution forces changes in the atmospheric temperature and wind fields. Thus it is important to simultaneously measure the height-resolved wind and dust profiles. MARLI provides a unique capability to observe these variables continuously, day and night, from orbit.

  7. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data and a two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The flow properties of the solar wind from 1 R(sub s) to 1 AU were obtained using a two fluid model constrained by density and scale height temperatures derived from white light observations, as well as knowledge of the electron temperature in coronal holes. The observations were obtained with the white light coronographs on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa (Hawaii), in a north polar coronal hole from 1.16 to 5.5 R(sub s) on 11 Apr. 1993. By specifying the density, temperature, Alfven wave velocity amplitude and heating function at the coronal base, it was found that the model parameters fit well the constraints of the empirical density profiles and temperatures. The optimal range of the input parameters was found to yield a higher proton temperature than electron temperature in the inner corona. The results indicate that no preferential heating of the protons at larger distances is needed to produce higher proton than electron temperatures at 1 AU, as observed in the high speed solar wind.

  8. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) WIND PROFILER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Wind Profiler GCPEx dataset provides post-processed consensus winds and daily quick look plots from the Vaisala...

  9. Mixing height measurements from UHF wind profiling radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angevine, W.M.; Grimsdell, A.W. [CIRES, Univ. of Colorado, and NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, Colorado (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Mixing height in convective boundary layers can be detected by wind profiling radars (profilers) operating at or near 915 MHZ. We have made such measurements in a variety of settings including Alabama in 1992; Nova Scotia, Canada, during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) 1993; Tennessee during the Southern Oxidant Study (SOS) 1994; near a 450 m tower in Wisconsin in 1995; and extensively in Illinois during the Flatland95, `96, and `97 experiments, as well as continuous operations at the Flatland Atmospheric Observatory. Profiler mixing height measurements, like all measurements, are subject to some limitations. The most important of these are due to rainfall, minimum height, and height resolution. Profilers are very sensitive to rain, which dominates the reflectivity and prevents the mixing height from being detected. Because the best height resolution is currently 60 m and the minimum height is 120-150 m AGL, the profiler is not suited for detecting mixing height in stable or nocturnal boundary layers. Problems may also arise in very dry or cold environments. (au) 12 refs.

  10. Simultaneous measurements of wind speed profiles at two sites using Doppler sodars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Y. [Tokyo Institute of Polytechnics, 1583 Iiyama, Atsugi, Kanagawa (Japan); Suda, K. [Sato Kogyo, 47-3 Sanda, Atsugi, Kanagawa (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Nishimatsu Construction, 4054 Nakatsu, Aikawa, Aiko-gun, Kanagawa (Japan); Iwatani, Y. [Nihon University, 2-11-1 Shin-ei, Narashino, Chiba (Japan); Fujii, K. [Wind Engineering Institute, 3-29 Kandajinbocho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ishibashi, R. [Urban Development Corporation, 2683 Ishikawa, Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan); Hibi, K. [Shimizu Corporation, 3-4-17 Etchujima, Koto-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    In the wind-resistant design of buildings and structures, it is very important to accurately assess the design wind speed at a particular site, considering the variation in wind speed with terrain roughness. The authors attempt to find a reasonable method for estimating design wind speed for given terrain roughness, through simultaneous wind observations at altitudes up to 420m at sites with different roughnesses using two sets of Doppler sodars. In this paper, the characteristics of the mean wind speed profiles evaluated for each distinguished wind speed in each wind direction were presented. The longitudinal mean wind speed profiles in the same storms were also compared for two pairs of sites to study the variation in longitudinal mean wind speed as it is affected by inland terrain roughness.

  11. Probabilistic stability and "tall" wind profiles: theory and method for use in wind resource assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Troen, Ib

    2016-01-01

    A model has been derived for calculating the aggregate effects of stability and the finite height of the planetary boundary layer upon the long-term mean wind profile. A practical implementation of this probabilistic extended similarity-theory model is made, including its incorporation within...... to the methodology. Results of the modeling are shown for a number of sites, with discussion of the models’ efficacy and the relative improvement shown by the new model, for situations where a user lacks local heat flux information, as well as performance of the new model using measured flux statistics. Further...

  12. Measurements and modeling of the wind profile up to 600 meters at a flat coastal site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This study shows long-term ABL wind profile features by comparing long-range wind lidar measurements and the output from a mesoscale model. The study is based on one-year pulsed lidar (Wind Cube 70) measurements of wind speed and direction from 100 to 600 meters with vertical resolution of 50...... as function of height. It is found that 1) WRF is generally under predicting both the profiles of the measured wind speed, direction and power density, 2) the scatter of observations to model results of the wind speed does not change significantly with height between 100 and 600 meters, and 3) the scale (A...... meters and time resolution of 10 minutes at a coastal site on the West coast of Denmark and WRF ARW (NCAR) simulations for the same period. The model evaluation is performed based on wind speed, wind direction, as well as statistical parameters of the Weibull distribution of the wind speed time series...

  13. Advanced intermittent clutter filtering for radar wind profiler: signal separation through a Gabor frame expansion and its statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lehmann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A new signal processing method is presented for the suppression of intermittent clutter echoes in radar wind profilers. This clutter type is a significant problem during the seasonal bird migration and often results in large discrepancies between profiler wind measurements and independent reference data. The technique presented makes use of a discrete Gabor frame expansion of the coherently averaged time series data in combination with a statistical filtering approach to exploit the different signal characteristics between signal and clutter. The rationale of this algorithm is outlined and the mathematical methods used are presented in due detail. A first test using data obtained with an operational 482 MHz wind profiler indicates that the method outperforms the previously used clutter suppression algorithm.

  14. Wind Profiles and Wave Spectra for Potential Wind Farms in South China Sea. Part II: Wave Spectrum Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the commercialization of offshore wind energy in China, the South China Sea has been identified as ideal for constructing offshore wind farms, especially for farms consisting of floating wind turbines over deep waters. Since the wind profiles and wave spectra are somewhat primitive for the design of an offshore wind turbine, engineering models describing the wind and wave characteristics in the South China Sea area are necessary for the offshore wind energy exploitation given the meteorological, hydrological, and geographical differences between the South China Sea and the North/Norwegian Sea, where the commonly used wind profile and wave spectrum models were designated. In the present study; a series of numerical simulations were conducted to reveal the wave characteristics in the South China Sea under both typhoon and non-typhoon conditions. By analyzing the simulation results; the applicability of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP spectrum model; in terms of characterizing the wind-induced wave fields in the South China Sea; was discussed. In detail; the key parameters of the JONSWAP spectrum model; such as the Phillips constant; spectral width parameter; peak-enhancement factor, and high frequency tail decay; were investigated in the context of finding suitable values.

  15. Wind lidar profile measurements in the coastal boundary layer: comparison with WRF modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Vincent, Claire Louise

    2012-01-01

    We use measurements from a pulsed wind lidar to study the wind speed profile in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) up to 600 m above the surface at a coastal site. Due to the high availability and quality of wind lidar data and the high vertical range of the measurements, it is possible to study...... WRF is compared to the wind lidar data combined with measurements from a tall meteorological mast, it is found that the model surface layer fluxes are largely overestimated and that the vertical wind speed profile does not have enough shear in the lower part of the PBL, partly as a consequence...... in the amount of observed low level jet. The wind speed predicted by WRF does not improve when a higher resolution is used. Therefore, both the inhomogeneous (westerly) and homogeneous (easterly) flow contribute to a large negative bias in the mean wind speed profile at heights between 100 and 200 m....

  16. On the extension of the wind profile over homogeneous terrain beyond the surface boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Brümmer, B.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of profiles of meteorological measurements from a 160 m high mast at the National Test Site for wind turbines at H phi vs phi re (Denmark) and at a 250 m high TV tower at Hamburg (Germany) shows that the wind profile based on surface-layer theory and Monin-Obukhov scaling is valid up to ...

  17. Charnock's Roughness Length Model and Non-dimensional Wind Profiles Over the Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2008-01-01

    An analysis tool for the study of wind speed profiles over the water has been developed. The profiles are analysed using a modified dimensionless wind speed and dimensionless height, assuming that the sea surface roughness can be predicted by Charnock's roughness length model. In this form, the r...

  18. The Høvsøre Tall Wind-Profile Experiment: A Description of Wind Profile Observations in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Floors, Rogier Ralph; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    at a meteorological mast. The sonic measurements cover the first 100mand the wind lidar measures above 100m every 50min the vertical. Results of the analysis of observations of the horizontal wind-speed components in the range 10–1200 m and surface turbulence fluxes are illustrated in detail, combined with forcing...... for the analysis of vertical wind-speed profiles under a wide range of atmospheric stability, turbulence, and forcing conditions. One of the objectives of the campaign was to serve as a benchmark for flow over flat terrain models. The observations consist of combined wind lidar and sonic anemometer measurements...

  19. Wind profiler observations of a monsoon low-level jet over a tropical Indian station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. R. Kalapureddy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Three-year high-resolution wind observations of the wind profiler have been utilized to characterize the diurnal and seasonal features of the monsoon Low-Level Jet (LLJ over a tropical station, Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, with a focus on the diurnal variability of low-level winds. The Boreal summer monsoon winds show a conspicuously strong westerly LLJ with average wind speed exceeding 20 m s−1. The L-band wind profiler measurements have shown an advantage of better height and time resolutions over the conventional radiosonde method for diurnal wind measurements. An interesting diurnal oscillation of LLJ core has been observed. It is varying in the height range of 1.8±0.6 km with the maximum and minimum intensity noticed during the early morning and afternoon hours, respectively. The jet core (wind maxima height is observed to coincide with the inversion height. Strong wind shears are normally located beneath the LLJ core. The sole wind profiler observations are capable of identifying the monsoon phases, such as onset, break and active spells, etc. The mutual influence between the LLJ and the boundary layer has been discussed. One notices that the observed LLJ diurnal structures depend on the local convective activity, wind shears and turbulence activity associated with boundary layer winds. The day-to-day change in the LLJ structure depends on the latitudinal position of the LLJ core.

  20. Dynamics of large-scale solar-wind streams obtained by the double superposed epoch analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yermolaev, Yu I; Nikolaeva, N S; Yermolaev, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    Using the OMNI data for period 1976-2000 we investigate the temporal profiles of 20 plasma and field parameters in the disturbed large-scale types of solar wind (SW): CIR, ICME (both MC and Ejecta) and Sheath as well as the interplanetary shock (IS). To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: re-scaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide. As the analyzed SW types can interact with each other and change parameters as a result of such interaction, we investigate separately 8 sequences of SW types: (1) CIR, (2) IS/CIR, (3) Ejecta, (4) Sheath/Ejecta, (5) IS/Sheath/Ejecta, (6) MC, (7) Sheath/MC, and (8) IS/Sheath/MC. The main conclusion is that the behavior of parameters in Sheath and in CIR are very similar both qualitatively and quantitatively. Both the high-speed stream (HSS) and the fast ICME play a role of pistons which push the pl...

  1. Seasonality in onshore normalized wind profiles above the surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jesper Nielsen; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to study the seasonal difference in normalized wind speed above the surface layer as it is observed at the 160 m high mast at the coastal site Høvsøre at winds from the sea (westerly). Normalized and stability averaged wind speeds above the surface layer are observed to be 20 to 50...... is to reconstruct the seasonal signal in normalized wind speed and identify the physical process behind. The method proved reasonably successful in capturing the relative difference in wind speed between seasons, indicating that the simulated physical processes are likely candidates to the observed seasonal signal...... in normalized wind speed....

  2. A Mathematical Technique for Estimating True Temperature Profiles of Data Obtained from Long Time Constant Thermocouples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Graeme

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical modeling technique is described for estimating true temperature profiles of data obtained from long time constant thermocouples, which were used in fuel fire tests designed to determine...

  3. Generation of Random Wind Speed Profiles for Evaluation of Stress in WT Power Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigazo, Alberto; Qin, Zian; Liserre, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbines are subjected to wind speed variations that cause a power profile that will stress the overall system. This stress is tranfered to the power converter, resulting in temperature variations of the power devices and, hence, causing the reduction of the lifetime. The lifetime expectation...... changes depending on the real wind speed once the wind turbine is operating. Usually, the real wind speed profiles are employed to evaluate this stress but they do not consider all possible operation conditions and require intensive computations. To solve these issues, this paper proposes the generation...... of random wind speed profiles, based on the measured ones, in order to evaluate the thermal stress of the power devices based on a simplified statistical approach....

  4. Quality and Impact of Indian Doppler Weather Radar Wind Profiles: A Diagnostic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, A.; Prasad, V. S.; Johny, C. J.

    2017-07-01

    In the tropics, efficient weather forecasts require high-quality vertical profiles of winds to overcome improper coupling of mass and wind fields and balance relationships in the region. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) operates the network of Doppler Weather Radar (DWR) in microwave frequencies (S-band or C-band) at various locations in India. The National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF) receives the volume velocity processing (VVP) wind profiles from all DWRs through the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) network in near real time. The radar VVP wind is a mean horizontal wind derived at different heights from radial velocities suitable for numerical weather prediction applications. Three numerical experiments, CNTL (without VVP winds), 3DVAR and HYBRID with the assimilation of VVP winds by means of 3-dimensional variational (3dvar) and hybrid data assimilation systems were conducted using the NCMRWF Global Forecast System (NGFS) model. This study had two objectives: (1) quality assessment of VVP winds and (2) investigation of the impact of VVP wind profiles on NGFS model forecast. The quality of VVP wind profiles was assessed against the NGFS model background and radiosonde wind profiles. The absolute values of zonal and meridional wind observation minus background (O-B) increased with the pressure for all DWRs. All radars exhibited the accepted (rejected) ratio as a decreasing (increasing) function of pressure. The resemblance between the zonal and meridional O-B statistics for 3DVAR and HYBRID experiments is apparently remarkable. The accepted VVP winds and radiosonde winds in both experiments (3DVAR and HYBRID) were consistent. The correlation coefficient ( R) was higher at Patna (Patiala) for zonal (meridional) winds in the 3DVAR experiment and at Patna (Jaipur) in the HYBRID experiment. At Chennai, the R value was lower in both the experiments for both wind components. However, because of the assimilation of VVP winds by

  5. Wind Profiles and Change of Terrain Roughness at Risø

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1972-01-01

    The Risø 125 m tower is situated on a narrow peninsula, surrounded by bays of varying width. The resulting surface roughness changes are clearly reflected by ‘kinks’ in the measured wind profiles, whose characteristics depend on the wind direction. The height of the lowest kink for water-to-land ......The Risø 125 m tower is situated on a narrow peninsula, surrounded by bays of varying width. The resulting surface roughness changes are clearly reflected by ‘kinks’ in the measured wind profiles, whose characteristics depend on the wind direction. The height of the lowest kink for water......-to-land trajectories is in good agreement with theory. The roughness lengths computed for the immediate surrounding of the tower vary with wind direction in a manner consistent with terrain features. However, the roughness lengths of the water estimated from the profiles are unrealistically small. The mean profiles...

  6. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sitnov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7, North America (7, Japan (4, Hawaii (1, Australia (2, and Antarctic (1. The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternation of layers of well-developed quasi-biennial signals, whose phases gradually change with height and thin transitional layers of ill-developed signals, whose phases change abruptly with height. The amplitudes of the effects depend on height and reach the maxima of 3–6nbar in the lower stratosphere. At the majority of sites the effects are found to be approximately in phase between 20 and 23km. Two types of the vertical structures of the temperature QBO effects are found. At most of the sites located equatorward of about 50° the stratospheric temperature anomalies are characterized by downward propagation, whereas at sites situated poleward of about 50° they look as column-like structures. Near the tropopause the effects frequently reveal dipole-like structure, when the stratospheric and tropospheric anomalies are of opposite signs. The amplitudes of the effects are in the range of 0.5–1°C. The vertical structures of the QBO effects of horizontal wind components reveal a diversity of patterns. The amplitudes of the QBO effects of the meridional and zonal winds are comparable and lie in the range of 0.5–2m s–1. As a rule, the maxima of the effects are noticed slightly below the tropopause, as well as in the middle stratosphere. In general, a statistical assurance of the obtained QBO effects is rather poor. However, a considerable part of them reveal similarity, which can be hardly explained by chance. Furthermore, the results agree with possible physical mechanisms of off-equatorial influence of the QBO, as well

  7. Profiles of Wind and Turbulence in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer of Lake Erie

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, H

    2014-06-16

    Prediction of wind resource in coastal zones is difficult due to the complexity of flow in the coastal atmospheric boundary layer (CABL). A three week campaign was conducted over Lake Erie in May 2013 to investigate wind characteristics and improve model parameterizations in the CABL. Vertical profiles of wind speed up to 200 m were measured onshore and offshore by lidar wind profilers, and horizontal gradients of wind speed by a 3-D scanning lidar. Turbulence data were collected from sonic anemometers deployed onshore and offshore. Numerical simulations were conducted with the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model with 2 nested domains down to a resolution of 1-km over the lake. Initial data analyses presented in this paper investigate complex flow patterns across the coast. Acceleration was observed up to 200 m above the surface for flow coming from the land to the water. However, by 7 km off the coast the wind field had not yet reached equilibrium with the new surface (water) conditions. The surface turbulence parameters over the water derived from the sonic data could not predict wind profiles observed by the ZephlR lidar located offshore. Horizontal wind speed gradients near the coast show the influence of atmospheric stability on flow dynamics. Wind profiles retrieved from the 3-D scanning lidar show evidence of nocturnal low level jets (LLJs). The WRF model was able to capture the occurrence of LLJ events, but its performance varied in predicting their intensity, duration, and the location of the jet core.

  8. Three-Dimensional Wind Profiling of Offshore Wind Energy Areas With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-micrometer wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  9. Three-dimensional wind profiling of offshore wind energy areas with airborne Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Cowen, Larry J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Grant, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    A technique has been developed for imaging the wind field over offshore areas being considered for wind farming. This is accomplished with an eye-safe 2-μm wavelength coherent Doppler lidar installed in an aircraft. By raster scanning the aircraft over the wind energy area (WEA), a three-dimensional map of the wind vector can be made. This technique was evaluated in 11 flights over the Virginia and Maryland offshore WEAs. Heights above the ocean surface planned for wind turbines are shown to be within the marine boundary layer, and the wind vector is seen to show variation across the geographical area of interest at turbine heights.

  10. Wind profile modelling using WAsP and "tall" wind measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier Ralph; Kelly, Mark C.; Troen, Ib

    2015-01-01

    A and B in the geostrophic drag law was taken into account by specifying a mean offset between the thermal and surface geostrophic wind vector and a mean magnitude of the thermal wind vector. Wind lidar and mast measurements from 11 different sites (that were not used in determining the empirical...

  11. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with thermal circulation, the

  12. GRIP HIGH ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) is a dual-frequency (Ka- and Ku-band) conical scan system, configured with a nadir viewing antenna...

  13. Status of Test and Analysis Plans For 915 MHz Wind Profiler Replacement Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Barbre/Jacobs, BJ

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate the performance and output of instruments that could replace the current 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) networks at the Eastern Range (ER) and Western Range (WR) over a three month (12 week) period.

  14. Modeling and Analysis of Adjacent Grid Point Wind Speed Profiles within and Above a Forest Canopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tunick, Arnold

    1999-01-01

    Adjacent grid point profile data from the canopy coupled to the surface layer (C-CSL) model are examined to illustrate the model's capability to represent effects of the surface boundary on wind flow...

  15. The Mathematical Representation of Wind Speed and Temperature Profiles in the Unstable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, C.A.

    1970-01-01

    Analytical expressions which specify non-dimensionalized wind speed and potential temperature gradients as functions of stability are integrated. The integrated equations are tested against Swinhank's wind and temperature profiles measured at Kerang, Australia. It is found that a representation s...

  16. One Year of Vertical Wind Profiles Measurements at a Mediterranean Coastal Site of South Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Gullì, Daniel; Avolio, Elenio

    2015-01-01

    To exploit wind energy both onshore and offshore in coastal area the effect of the coastal discontinuity is important. The shape of the vertical wind profiles and the related c parameter of the Weibull distribution are impacted by the atmospheric internal boundary layers developing from the coast...

  17. QBO effects manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Sitnov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of ozonesonde records up to 1998 the responses on the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, manifesting in ozone, temperature, and wind (QBO effects were isolated in the region from the ground to altitudes as high as 35km at 22 stations located in Europe (7, North America (7, Japan (4, Hawaii (1, Australia (2, and Antarctic (1.

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of ozone are represented as an alternation of layers of well-developed quasi-biennial signals, whose phases gradually change with height and thin transitional layers of ill-developed signals, whose phases change abruptly with height. The amplitudes of the effects depend on height and reach the maxima of 3–6nbar in the lower stratosphere. At the majority of sites the effects are found to be approximately in phase between 20 and 23km.

    Two types of the vertical structures of the temperature QBO effects are found. At most of the sites located equatorward of about 50° the stratospheric temperature anomalies are characterized by downward propagation, whereas at sites situated poleward of about 50° they look as column-like structures. Near the tropopause the effects frequently reveal dipole-like structure, when the stratospheric and tropospheric anomalies are of opposite signs. The amplitudes of the effects are in the range of 0.5–1°C.

    The vertical structures of the QBO effects of horizontal wind components reveal a diversity of patterns. The amplitudes of the QBO effects of the meridional and zonal winds are comparable and lie in the range of 0.5–2m s–1. As a rule, the maxima of the effects are noticed slightly below the tropopause, as well as in the middle stratosphere.

    In general, a statistical assurance of the obtained QBO effects is rather poor. However, a considerable part of them reveal similarity

  18. Aerofoil profile modification effects for improved performance of a vertical axis wind turbine blade

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Md. Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Due to the growing need of sustainable energy technologies, wind energy is gaining more popularity day by day. For micro power generation vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is preferred due to its simplicity and easy to install characteristics. This study investigates the effects of profile-modification on a NACA0015 aerofoil used in VAWTs. The profile-modifications being investigated consist of a combination of inward semi-circular dimple and Gurney flap at the lower surface of the aerofoil. ...

  19. Characterizing the height profile of the flux of wind-eroded sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhibao; Qian, Guangqiang

    2007-01-01

    Wind erosion causes severe environmental problems, such as aeolian desertification and dust storms, in arid and semiarid regions. Reliable prediction of the height profile of the wind-eroded sediment flux is crucial for estimation of transport rates, verification of computer models, understanding of particle-modified wind flows, and control of drifting sand. This study defined the basic height profile for the flux of wind-eroded sediment and the coefficients that characterize its equation. Nine grain-size populations of natural sand at different wind velocities were tested in a wind tunnel to measure the flux of sediment at different heights. The resulting flux profiles resemble a golf club with a small back-turn where the flux increases with increasing height within 20 mm above the surface. If the small back-turns are neglected, the flux profiles can be expressed by an exponential-decay function q_{{text{r}}} (z) = a{text{e}}^{{ - bzr }} , where q r( z) is the dimensionless relative flux of sediment at height z, which follows the exponential-decay law proposed by previous researchers for aeolian saltation. Three coefficients (a creep proportion, a relative decay rate, and an average saltation height) are proposed to characterize the height profile. Coefficients a and b in the above equation represent the creep proportion and relative decay rate as a function of height, respectively. Coefficient a varies widely, depending on grain size and wind velocity, but averages 0.09. It is suggested that the grain size and wind velocity must be specified when discussing creep proportion. Coefficients a and b are nearly linearly correlated and decrease as grain size and wind velocity increase. The average saltation height (the average height sediment particles can reach) was a function of grain size and wind velocity, and was well correlated with coefficients a and b.

  20. Ground-Based Remote or In Situ Measurement of Vertical Profiles of Wind in the Lower Troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Newman, Jennifer

    2017-02-24

    Knowledge of winds in the lower troposphere is essential for a range of applications, including weather forecasting, transportation, natural hazards, and wind energy. This presentation focuses on the measurement of vertical profiles of wind in the lower troposphere for wind energy applications. This presentation introduces the information that wind energy site development and operations require, how it used, and the benefits and problems of current measurements from in-situ measurements and remote sensing. The development of commercial Doppler wind lidar systems over the last 10 years are shown, along with the lessons learned from this experience. Finally, potential developments in wind profiling aimed at reducing uncertainty and increasing data availability are introduced.

  1. An evaluation of two automated quality control methods designed for use with hourly wind profiler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Miller

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA has completed the installation of a 30-site demonstration network of wind-profiling radars in the central United States. The network is being used to demonstrate and assess the utility of wind profiler technology in a quasi-operational environment, and to help define operational requirements for possible future national networks. This paper describes two automated quality control methods designed to remove erroneous winds from the hourly network data. Case study examples and statistical evaluation of the performance of each method are also presented.

  2. Aerodynamic Design of a Horizontal Axis Micro Wind Turbine Blade Using NACA 4412 Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Kale, Sandip Achutrao; Varma, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbine blade is a key element to convert wind energy in to mechanical power. This work presents functional design and aerodynamic design of an 800mm long blade of a 600W horizontal axis micro wind turbine using NACA4412 profile. Functional design of blade is carried out by considering use of electrical appliances to meet need of a rural house for low wind speed region. Various theories are available and used by designers for blade design. The chord and twist angle distributions of the p...

  3. Application of wind-profiling radar data to the analysis of dust weather in the Taklimakan Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minzhong; Wei, Wenshou; Ruan, Zheng; He, Qing; Ge, Runsheng

    2013-06-01

    The Urumqi Institute of Desert Meteorology of the China Meteorological Administration carried out an atmospheric scientific experiment to detect dust weather using a wind-profiling radar in the hinterland of the Taklimakan Desert in April 2010. Based on the wind-profiling data obtained from this experiment, this paper seeks to (a) analyze the characteristics of the horizontal wind field and vertical velocity of a breaking dust weather in a desert hinterland; (b) calculate and give the radar echo intensity and vertical distribution of a dust storm, blowing sand, and floating dust weather; and (c) discuss the atmosphere dust counts/concentration derived from the wind-profiling radar data. Studies show that: (a) A wind-profiling radar is an upper-air atmospheric remote sensing system that effectively detects and monitors dust. It captures the beginning and ending of a dust weather process as well as monitors the sand and dust being transported in the air in terms of height, thickness, and vertical intensity. (b) The echo intensity of a blowing sand and dust storm weather episode in Taklimakan is about -1~10 dBZ while that of floating dust -1~-15 dBZ, indicating that the dust echo intensity is significantly weaker than that of precipitation but stronger than that of clear air. (c) The vertical shear of horizontal wind and the maintenance of low-level east wind are usually dynamic factors causing a dust weather process in Taklimakan. The moment that the low-level horizontal wind field finds a shear over time, it often coincides with the onset of a sand blowing and dust storm weather process. (d) When a blowing sand or dust storm weather event occurs, the atmospheric vertical velocity tends to be of upward motion. This vertical upward movement of the atmosphere supported with a fast horizontal wind and a dry underlying surface carries dust particles from the ground up to the air to form blown sand or a dust storm.

  4. Lidar Wind Profiler for the NextGen Airportal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a standoff sensor that can measure 3D components of wind velocity in the vicinity of an airport has the potential to improve airport throughput,...

  5. The Wind Profile in the Coastal Boundary Layer: Wind Lidar Measurements and Numerical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Vincent, Claire Louise; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally it has been difficult to verify mesoscale model wind predictions against observations in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Here we used measurements from a wind lidar to study the PBL up to 800 m above the surface at a flat coastal site in Denmark during a one month period in autu...

  6. CAMEX-4 MIPS 915 MHZ DOPPLER WIND PROFILER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) is a mobile atmospheric profiling system. It includes a 915 MHz Doppler...

  7. Changes in Jupiter's Zonal Wind Profile Preceding and During the Juno Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Joshua; Wong, Michael H.; de Pater, Imke; Simon, Amy A.; Orton, Glenn S.; Rogers, John H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Cosentino, Richard G.; Januszewski, William; Morales-Juberias, Raul; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present five epochs of WFC3 HST Jupiter observations taken between 2009-2016 and extract global zonal wind profiles for each epoch. Jupiter's zonal wind field is globally stable throughout these years, but significant variations in certain latitude regions persist. We find that the largest uncertainties in the wind field are due to vortices or hot-spots, and show residual maps which identify the strongest vortex flows. The strongest year-to-year variation in the zonal wind profiles is the 24 deg N jet peak. Numerous plume outbreaks have been observed in the Northern Temperate Belt and are associated with decreases in the zonal velocity and brightness. We show that the 24 deg N jet peak velocity and brightness decreased in 2012 and again in late 2016, following outbreaks during these years. Our February 2016 zonal wind profile was the last highly spatially resolved measurement prior to Juno s first science observations. The final 2016 data were taken in conjunction with Juno's perijove 3 pass on 11 December 2016, and show the zonal wind profile following the plume outbreak at 24 deg N in October 2016.

  8. Changes in Jupiter's Zonal Wind Profile preceding and during the Juno mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollefson, Joshua; Wong, Michael H.; de Pater, Imke; Simon, Amy A.; Orton, Glenn S.; Rogers, John H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Cosentino, Richard G.; Januszewski, William; Morales-Juberías, Raúl; Marcus, Philip S.

    2017-11-01

    We present five epochs of WFC3 HST Jupiter observations taken between 2009-2016 and extract global zonal wind profiles for each epoch. Jupiter's zonal wind field is globally stable throughout these years, but significant variations in certain latitude regions persist. We find that the largest uncertainties in the wind field are due to vortices or hot-spots, and show residual maps which identify the strongest vortex flows. The strongest year-to-year variation in the zonal wind profiles is the 24°N jet peak. Numerous plume outbreaks have been observed in the Northern Temperate Belt and are associated with decreases in the zonal velocity and brightness. We show that the 24°N jet peak velocity and brightness decreased in 2012 and again in late 2016, following outbreaks during these years. Our February 2016 zonal wind profile was the last highly spatially resolved measurement prior to Juno's first science observations. The final 2016 data were taken in conjunction with Juno's perijove 3 pass on 11 December 2016, and show the zonal wind profile following the plume outbreak at 24°N in October 2016.

  9. Wind profiles, momentum fluxes and roughness lengths at Cabauw revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, J.W.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the results of an experiment focusing on wind speed and momentum fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer up to 200 m. The measurements were conducted in 1996 at the Cabauw site in the Netherlands. Momentum fluxes are measured using the K-Gill Propeller Vane. Estimates of the roughness

  10. Results of the NASA Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Operational Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre', Robert E., Jr.; Decker, Ryan K.; Leahy, Frank B.; Huddleston, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the new Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). The goal of the OAT was to verify the data quality of the new DRWP against the performance of the previous DRWP in order to use wind data derived by the new DRWP for space launch vehicle operations support at the Eastern Range. The previous DRWP was used as a situational awareness asset for mission operations to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. The Marshall Space Flight Center's Natural Environments Branch assessed data from the new DRWP collected during Jan-Feb 2015 against a specified set of test criteria. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. Evaluation of the DRWP's coherence between five-minute wind pairs found the effective vertical resolution to be Nyquist-limited at 300 m for both wind components. In addition, the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal was quantified. This paper documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis.

  11. Weibull-k Revisited: “Tall” Profiles and Height Variation of Wind Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Troen, Ib; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    with height is less understood. Previously we derived a probabilistic model based on similarity theory for calculating the effects of stability and planetary boundary-layer depth upon long-term mean wind profiles. However, some applications (e.g. wind energy estimation) require the Weibull shape parameter (k...... of the models’ efficacy and applicability. The latter includes a comparative evaluation of Wieringa-type empirical models and perturbed-geostrophic forms with regard to surface-layer behaviour, as well as for heights where climatological wind-speed variability is not dominated by surface effects....

  12. Superhydrophobic wind turbine blade surfaces obtained by a simple deposition of silica nanoparticles embedded in epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmouch, Rachid; Ross, Guy G.

    2010-11-01

    Samples of wind turbine blade surface have been covered with a superhydrophobic coating made of silica nanoparticles embedded in commercial epoxy paint. The superhydrophobic surfaces have a water contact angle around 152°, a hysteresis less than 2° and a water drop sliding angle around 0.5°. These surfaces are water repellent so that water drops cannot remain motionless on the surface. Examination of coated and uncoated surfaces with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, together with measurements of water contact angles, indicates that the air trapped in the cavity enhances the water repellency similarly to the lotus leaf effect. Moreover, this new coating is stable under UVC irradiation and water pouring. The production of this nanoscale coating film being simple and low cost, it can be considered as a suitable candidate for water protection of different outdoor structures.

  13. Clear air boundary layer spaced antenna wind measurement with the Multiple Antenna Profiler (MAPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Cohn

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Spaced antenna (SA wind measurement techniques are applied to Multiple Antenna Profiler (MAPR data to evaluate its performance in clear air conditions. MAPR is a multiple antenna 915 MHz wind profiler developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR and described in Cohn et al. (1997, designed to make high resolution wind measurements. Previous reported measurements with MAPR were restricted to precipitation because of low signal to noise (SNR and signal to ground-clutter (SCR ratios. By using a standard pulse-coding technique and upgrading the profiler control software, increases in average power and SNR were achieved, making routine measurements in clear air possible. Comparison of winds measured by MAPR and by a sonic anemometer on a nearby 300 m tower show correlation coefficients in the range of R2 = 0.75 – 0.80, and an average absolute error of ~ 1.4 m s - 1 . This compares favorably with the agreement typically found in wind profiler comparisons. We also consider the use of the parameter ah , which is related to the value of the cross-correlation function at its zero crossing. This parameter is a data quality indicator and possibly a key component in a ground clutter removal technique.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (mesoscale meteorology; instruments and techniques – Radio science (remote sensing

  14. Clear air boundary layer spaced antenna wind measurement with the Multiple Antenna Profiler (MAPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Cohn

    Full Text Available Spaced antenna (SA wind measurement techniques are applied to Multiple Antenna Profiler (MAPR data to evaluate its performance in clear air conditions. MAPR is a multiple antenna 915 MHz wind profiler developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR and described in Cohn et al. (1997, designed to make high resolution wind measurements. Previous reported measurements with MAPR were restricted to precipitation because of low signal to noise (SNR and signal to ground-clutter (SCR ratios. By using a standard pulse-coding technique and upgrading the profiler control software, increases in average power and SNR were achieved, making routine measurements in clear air possible. Comparison of winds measured by MAPR and by a sonic anemometer on a nearby 300 m tower show correlation coefficients in the range of R2 = 0.75 – 0.80, and an average absolute error of ~ 1.4 m s - 1 . This compares favorably with the agreement typically found in wind profiler comparisons. We also consider the use of the parameter ah , which is related to the value of the cross-correlation function at its zero crossing. This parameter is a data quality indicator and possibly a key component in a ground clutter removal technique.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (mesoscale meteorology; instruments and techniques – Radio science (remote sensing

  15. A comparison of mixing depths observed by ground-based wind profilers and an airborne lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B.; Senff, C. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing depth is one of the most important parameters in air pollution studies because it determines the vertical extent of the `box` in which pollutants are mixed and dispersed. During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS95), scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) deployed four 915-MHz boundary-layer radar/wind profilers (hereafter radars) in and around the Nashville, Tennessee metropolitan area. Scientists from NOAA/ETL also operated an ultraviolet differential absorption lidar (DIAL) onboard a CASA-212 aircraft. Profiles from radar and DIAL can be used to derive estimates of the mixing depth. The methods used for both instruments are similar in that they depend on information derived from the backscattered power. However, different scattering mechanisms for the radar and DIAL mean that different tracers of mixing depth are measured. In this paper we compare the mixing depth estimates obtained from the radar and DIAL and discuss the similarities and differences that occur. (au)

  16. Estimates of boundary layer parameters using measured wind and temperature profile near the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Z.; Rajkovic, B.

    2009-09-01

    In almost every application related to planetary boundary layer, PBL, two parameters are of the most relevance, "friction" velocity and PBL height. The first is connected to near surface processes, while the second one appears in the problems related to the whole BL or its substantial portions. One of the most famous parametrizations of the of the PBL height is h ~u*o- f. This paper looks into this formulation for different stability classes and mean daily variation of wind and these parameters, using the approach made by Holstlag (1984), to estimate diabatic wind profile where zo is independent of stability, but depends on wind direction. The second procedure used here is the one suggested by Kramm (1989), where zo is a function of stability and u*o depends on zo and L, the Monin-Obukhov length scale, and all of them, u_*o, zo and L, are simultaneously calculated through the least square method. From these parameters two methods for wind extrapolations with height are analyzed, Beljaars and Holstlag (1990), and Grining amd Batchvarova (2007). The wind data came form the Caubauw wind mast 1987, while the second set is wind and temperature gradient from the Panonian region, synoptic weather station 13168 near the city of Novi Sad, Serbia. Finally we analyze the difference between extrapolated and measured wind speed at Caubauw mast for different values of friction velocity, roughness length and Obukhov length.

  17. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001.

    Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events.

    In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations.

    Effects of the wind profile at night on wind turbine sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, GP

    2004-01-01

    Since the start of the operation of a 30 MW, 17 turbine wind park, residents living 500 in and more from the park have reacted strongly to the noise; residents up to 1900 in distance expressed annoyance. To assess actual sound immission, long term measurements (a total of over 400 night hours in 4

  18. Direct Detection 1.6?m DIAL / Doppler Lidar for Measurements of CO2 Concentration and Wind Profiles (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial distribution and their variation in time is one of the essential information for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. Moreover, wind information is an important parameter for transport simulations and inverse estimation of surface CO2 flux. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and the Doppler wind lidar with the range resolution is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 profiles and wind profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer and lower troposphere from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a scanning 1.6 μm DIAL and incoherent Doppler lidar system for simultaneously measuring CO2 concentration and wind speed profiles. Our 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the Optical Parametric Generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd: YAG laser with high repetition rate (500 Hz) and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency operating at the photon counting mode, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter to detect a Doppler shift, and a 25 cm telescope [1] [2]. We had developed an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) system for 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL[3]. To achieve continuous tuning of the resonant OPO output without mode hopping, it is necessary to vary the OPO cavity length synchronously with the seed-frequency. On the other hand, the OPG does not require a cavity and instead rely on sufficient conversion efficiency to be obtained with a single pass through the crystal. The single-frequency oscillation of the OPG was achieved by injection seeding. The CO2-DIAL was operated with the range-height indicator (RHI) mode, and the 2-D measurement provided inhomogeneity in the boundary layer. Vertical CO2 concentration profiles and wind profiles were also measured simultaneously. The elevation angle was fixed at 52 deg and CO2 concentration profiles were obtained up to 1 km altitude with 200 m height resolution. Vertical

  19. Nowcasting Thermodynamic Profiles Using a Triangle of Wind Profilers in an Advection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    etica MX ECO .L~. ine I nk.Do~ iesidct iing motionn. component to the 900 mb winds over McPherson at 1800 GMT. The 900 mb wind fallacy does not...ed., 1982: Thunderstorms: A Social , Scientific and Technological Documentary; Vol. 2: Thunderstorm Morphology and Dynamics. Washington, D.C., 603 pp

  1. High Temporal Resolution Tropospheric Wind Profile Observations at NASA Kennedy Space Center During Hurricane Irma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan; Barbre, Robert; Huddleston, Lisa; Wilfong, Tim; Brauer, Tom

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operates a 48-MHz Tropospheric/Stratospheric Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (TDRWP) on a continual basis generating wind profiles between 2-19 km in the support of space launch vehicle operations. A benefit of the continual operability of the system is the ability to provide unique observations of severe weather events such as hurricanes. On the evening of 10 September 2017, Hurricane Irma passed within 100 miles to the west of KSC through the middle of the Florida peninsula. The hurricane was responsible for power outages to approximately 2/3 of Florida's population. This paper will describe the characteristics of the tropospheric wind observations from the TDRWP during Irma, provide a comparison to previous TDRWP observations from Hurricane Matthew in 2016, and discuss lessons learned regarding dissemination of TDRWP data during the event.

  2. Thermal Loading and Lifetime Estimation for Power Device Considering Mission Profiles in Wind Power Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    As a key component in the wind turbine system, the power electronic converter and its power semiconductors suffer from complicated power loadings related to environment, and are proven to have high failure rates. Therefore, correct lifetime estimation of wind power converter is crucial...... for the reliability improvement and also for cost reduction of wind power technology. Unfortunately, the existing lifetime estimation methods for the power electronic converter are not yet suitable in the wind power application, because the comprehensive mission profiles are not well specified and included....... Consequently, a relative more advanced approach is proposed in this paper, which is based on the loading and strength analysis of devices and takes into account different time constants of the thermal behaviors in power converter. With the established methods for loading and lifetime estimation for power...

  3. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized for a...

  4. The influence of thermal effects on the wind speed profile of the coastal marine boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The wind speed profile in a coastal marine environment is investigated with observations from the measurement program Rodsand, where meteorological data are collected with a 50 m high mast in the Danish Baltic Sea, about 11 km from the coast. When compared with the standard Monin-Obukhov theory t...

  5. Accuracy of the Wind Speed Profile in the Lower PBL as Simulated by the WRF Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shimada, Susumu; Ohsawa, Teruo; Chikaoka, Saaya; Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2011-01-01

    ...) operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). In this study, we examine whether such a positive bias can be seen at other WINDAS stations from a comparison of the WRF-simulated wind speed profile using the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic...

  6. Dynamics of large-scale solar-wind streams obtained by the double superposed epoch analysis. 2. CIR.vs.Sheath and MC.vs.Ejecta comparisons

    CERN Document Server

    Yermolaev, Yu I; Nikolaeva, N S; Yermolaev, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    This work is a continuation of our previous paper [Yermolaevetal2015] which describes the average temporal profiles of interplanetary plasma and field parameters in large-scale solar-wind (SW) streams: CIR, ICME (both MC and Ejecta) and Sheath as well as the interplanetary shock (IS). Like in the previous work we use data of OMNI database, our catalog of large-scale solar-wind phenomena during 1976--2000 [Yermolaevetal2009] and the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method [Yermolaevetal2010]: re-scaling the duration of interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide. We present new detailed results of comparison of two pair phenomena: (1) both types of compression regions (CIR.vs.Sheath) and (2) both types of ICMEs (MC.vs.Ejecta). Obtained data allows us to suggest that the formation of all types of compression regions has the same physical mechanism irrespective of piston (High-Speed Stream (HSS) or ICME) type and differences are...

  7. Features of energetic particle radial profiles inferred from geosynchronous responses to solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the radial profile of phase space density of relativistic electrons at constant adiabatic invariants is crucial for identifying the source for them within the outer radiation belt. The commonly used method is to convert flux observed at fixed energy to phase space density at constant first, second and third adiabatic invariants, which requires an empirical global magnetic field model and thus might produce some uncertainties in the final results. From a different perspective, in this paper we indirectly infer the shape of the radial profile of phase space density of relativistic electrons near the geosynchronous region by statistically examining the geosynchronous energetic flux response to 128 solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements during the years 2000 to 2003. We thus avoid the disadvantage of using empirical magnetic field models. Our results show that the flux response is species and energy dependent. For protons and low-energy electrons, the primary response to magnetospheric compression is an increase in flux at geosynchronous orbit. For relativistic electrons, the dominant response is a decrease in flux, which implies that the phase space density decreases toward increasing radial distance at geosynchronous orbit and leads to a local peak inside of geosynchronous orbit. The flux response of protons and non-relativistic electrons could result from a phase density that increases toward increasing radial distance, but this cannot be determined for sure due to the particle energization associated with pressure enhancements. Our results for relativistic electrons are consistent with previous results obtained using magnetic field models, thus providing additional confirmation that these results are correct and indicating that they are not the result of errors in their selected magnetic field model.

  8. Examination of objective analysis precision using wind profiler and radiosonde network data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P. [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    One of the principal research strategies that has emerged from the science team of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the use of a single column model (SCM). The basic assumption behind the SCM approach is that a cloud and radiation parameterization embedded in a general circulation model can be effectively tested and improved by extracting that column parameterization from the general circulation model and then driving this single column at the lateral boundaries of the column with diagnosed large-scale atmospheric forcing. A second and related assumption is that the large-scale atmospheric state, and hence the associated forcing, can be characterized directly from observations. One of the primary reasons that the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is located in Lamont, Oklahoma, is because Lamont is at the approximate center of the NOM Wind Profiler Demonstration Array (WPDA). The assumption was that hourly average wind profiles provided by the 7 wind profilers (one Lamont and six surrounding it in a hexagon) coupled with radiosonde launches every three hours at 5 sites (Lamont plus four of the six profiler locations forming the hexagon) would be sufficient to characterize accurately the large-scale forcing at the site and thereby provide the required forcing for the SCM. The goal of this study was to examine these three assumptions.

  9. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  10. Comparison of Temperature Measurements in the Middle Atmosphere by Satellite with Profiles Obtained by Meteorological Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Richard A.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Feofilov, Artem; Bedrick, M.; Rose, R. Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Measurements using the inflatable falling sphere technique have occasionally been used to obtain temperature results from density data and thereby provide comparison with temperature profiles obtained by satellite sounders in the mesosphere and stratosphere. To insure density measurements within narrow time frames and close in space, the inflatable falling sphere is launched within seconds of the nearly overhead satellite pass. Sphere measurements can be used to validate remotely measured temperatures but also have the advantage of measuring small-scale atmospheric features. Even so, with the dearth of remaining falling spheres available (the manufacture of these systems has been discontinued), it may be time to consider whether the remote measurements are mature enough to stand alone. Three field studies are considered, one in 2003 from Northern Sweden, and two in 2010 from the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific and from Barking Sands, Hawaii. All three sites are used to compare temperature retrievals between satellite and in situ falling spheres. The major satellite instruments employed are SABER, MLS, and AIRS. The comparisons indicate that remotely measured temperatures mimic the sphere temperature measurements quite well. The data also confirm that satellite retrievals, while not always at the exact location required for detailed studies in space and time, compare sufficiently well to be highly useful. Although the falling sphere will provide a measurement at a specific location and time, satellites only pass a given location daily or less frequently. This report reveals that averaged satellite measurements can provide temperatures and densities comparable to those obtained from the falling sphere, thereby providing a reliable measure of global temperature

  11. Determination of the meniscus shape of a negative ion beam from an experimentally obtained beam profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, M.; Kojima, A.; Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Aprile, D.; Baltador, C.; Barbisan, M.; Delogu, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Marconato, N.; Nishikiori, R.; Pimazzoni, A.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Tobari, H.; Umeda, N.; Veltri, P.; Watanabe, K.; Yoshida, M.; Antoni, V.; Kashiwagi, M.

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the physics mechanism of a negative ion extraction in negative ion sources, an emission surface of the negative ions around an aperture at a plasma grid, so-called a meniscus, has been analyzed by an inverse calculation of the negative ion trajectory in a two dimensional beam analysis code. In this method, the meniscus is defined as the final position of the negative ion trajectories which are inversely calculated from the measured beam profile to the plasma grid. In a case of the volume-produced negative ions, the calculated meniscus by the inverse calculation was similar to that obtained in conventional beam simulation codes for positive ion extractions such as BEAMORBT and SLACCAD. The negative ion current density was uniform along the meniscus. This indicates that the negative ions produced in the plasma are transported to the plasma grid uniformly as considered in the transportation of the positive ions. However, in a surface production case of negative ions, where the negative ions are generated near the plasma grid with lower work function by seeding cesium, the current density in the peripheral region of the meniscus close to the plasma grid surface was estimated to be 2 times larger than the center region, which suggested that the extraction process of the surface-produced negative ions was much different with that for the positive ions. Because this non-uniform profile of the current density made the meniscus shape strongly concave, the beam extracted from the peripheral region could have a large divergence angle, which might be one of origins of so-called beam halo. This is the first results of the determination of the meniscus based on the experiment, which is useful to improve the prediction of the meniscus shape and heat loads based on the beam trajectories including beam halo.

  12. Preliminary study of the offshore wind and temperature profiles at the North of the Yucatan Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler-Bientz, Rolando, E-mail: sbientz@msn.com [CREST, Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University (United Kingdom); Energy Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Autonomous University of Yucatan (Mexico); Watson, Simon [CREST, Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University (United Kingdom); Infield, David [Institute of Energy and Environment, University of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Ricalde-Cab, Lifter [Energy Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Autonomous University of Yucatan (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first study that reports the properties of the vertical wind resources for the offshore conditions of the North coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. {yields} A significant and detailed analysis of the thermal patterns has revealed a complex structure of the atmospheric boundary layer close to the shore. {yields} The structure of the diurnal wind patterns was assessed to produce an important reference for the wind resource availability in the study region. {yields} It was identified that the sea breeze blows in directions almost parallel to the shoreline of the North of the Yucatan Peninsula during the majority of the 24 h cycle. {yields} The analysis of the offshore data revealed a persistent non-uniform surface boundary layer developed as result of the advection of a warn air over a cold sea. - Abstract: The stability conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer, the intensity of the wind speeds and consequently the energy potential available in offshore conditions are highly influenced by the distance from the coastline and the differences between the air and sea temperatures. This paper presents a preliminary research undertook to study the offshore wind and temperature vertical profiles at the North-West of the Yucatan Peninsula coast. Ten minute averages were recorded over approximately 2 years from sensors installed at two different heights on a communication tower located at 6.65 km from the coastline. The results have shown that the offshore wind is thermally driven by differential heating of land and sea producing breeze patterns which veer to blow parallel to the coast under the action of the Coriolis force. To investigate further, a dataset of hourly sea surface temperatures derived from GEOS Satellite thermal maps was combined with the onsite measured data to study its effect on the vertical temperature profile. The results suggested largely unstable conditions and the potentially development of a shallow Stable Internal

  13. Lidar Wind Profiler Comparison to Weather Balloon for Support of Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Landings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtas, Franzeska; Teets, Edward H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison study by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA and the Naval Post Graduate School Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies, Marina, CA was conducted to show the advantages of an airborne wind profiling lidar system in reducing drift uncertainty along a reentry vehicle descent trajectory. This effort was in support of the once planned Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle ground landing. A Twin Otter Doppler Wind Lidar was flown on multiple flights along the approximate ground track of an ascending weather balloons launched from the Marina Municipal Airport. The airborne lidar used was a 5-milli-Joules, 2-micron infrared laser with a 10-centimeter telescope and a two-axis scanner. Each lidar wind profile contains data for an altitude range between the surface and flight altitude of 2,700 meters, processed on board every 20 seconds. In comparison, a typical weather balloon would traverse that same altitude range with a similar data set available in approximately 15-20 minutes. These tests were conducted on November 15 & 16, 2007. Results comparing the balloon and a 10 minute multiple lidar profile averages show a best case absolute difference of 0.18 m/s (0.35 knots) in speed and 1 degree in direction during light and variable (less than 5 knots, without constant direction) wind conditions. These limited test results indicated a standard deviation wind velocity and direction differences of 0.71 m/s (1.3 knots) and 7.17 degrees for 1800Z, and 0.70 m/s (1.3 knots) and 6.79 degrees, outside of cloud layer.

  14. KSC 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents analysis results of the Kennedy Space Center updated 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). This test was designed to demonstrate that the new DRWP operates in a similar manner to the previous DRWP for use as a situational awareness asset for mission operations at the Eastern Range to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. Data examination and two analyses showed that the updated DRWP meets the specifications in the OAT test plan and performs at least as well as the previous DRWP. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 5,426 wind component reports from 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square (RMS) wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. The DRWP's effective vertical resolution (EVR) was found to be 300 m for both the westerly and southerly wind component, which the best EVR possible given the DRWP's vertical sampling interval. A third analysis quantified the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal by assessing the number of first-guess propagations at each altitude. This report documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis. It also shows that analysis of the updated DRWP produced results that were at least as good as the previous DRWP with proper rationale. The report recommends acceptance of the updated DRWP for situational awareness usage as per the OAT's intent.

  15. Assessment studies on the inversion of satellite to satellite electron content to obtain electron density profiles in the ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hochegger, G P

    2000-01-01

    The electron content data, obtained by satellite-to-satellite occultations of radio signals can lead to height profiles of electron density by discrete inversion. Since there is no possibility to verify such profiles by means of other measurements (practically never measurements at the same time and same location) it was necessary to simulate occultation scenarios by means of an ionosphere model to obtain a large number of comparisons sufficient for investigations on a statistical basis. The obtained electron contents were inverted and compared with electron density height profiles, obtained with the same ionospheric model for the occultation point. The differences between these profiles were investigated (difference between the F2-peak maxima, the height of the maxima, the shape of the topside and bottom side ionosphere). Since simulations were done for chosen locations (250 randomly spread on the globe) for every month and every second hour and for two solar activity levels (HSA and LSA), a whole year was '...

  16. Millimeter Wave Radar for Atmospheric Turbulence Characterization and Wind Profiling for Improved Naval Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-29

    we consider the capabilities of a millimeter-wave radar to make atmospheric air flow measurements relevant to naval operations . The measurements could...Conclusions 14 References 14 1iii Millimeter Wave Radar for Atmospheric Turbulence Characterization and Wind Profiling for Improved Naval Operations Ben Rock... operations . We begin with a discussion of previous efforts to mitigate the aforementioned difficulties, and argue that millimeter wave radar techniques can be

  17. Seasonal and diurnal changes in wind variability from Flatland VHF profiler observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastrom, G.D. [Saint Cloud State Univ., MN (United States). Dept. of Earth Sci.; Clark, W.L. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.; Zandt, T.E. van [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.; Warnock, J.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.

    1996-02-01

    Climatological results are presented on the hourly variance of the wind observed in the mid-troposphere (3 to 9 km MSL). This quantity roughly indicates the energy in the atmospheric wind field for variations with periods roughly less than 1 hour. Observations are from the Flatland VHF research wind profiler, located near Champaign/Urbana, Illinois, well away from significant orographic features. The period of record covers two years, September 1990 through August 1992. The values of the variance of the winds along vertical and oblique (15 degrees from zenith in the cardinal directions) beams are presented versus height, season, time-of-day, and beam pointing direction. It is found that the hourly variance values have approximately lognormal frequency distribution. The mean hourly variance is significantly larger for the oblique wind observations than for the vertical. Mean wind variances also tend to be larger in the east/west steering plane than in the north/south plane. The mean variance generally increases with height, but faster than would be expected if it were due solely to the decrease in atmospheric density, implying the presence of local source/sinks of wind energy. The rate of change with height is noticeably different for the vertical and oblique beams, being much less for the vertical beam, in some seasons even decreasing with height. With respect to season, the mean hourly variance is smallest in the summer and largest in the winter. With respect to diurnal changes, the variance is maximum during the afternoon for spring, summer, and autumn, with the maximum up to a factor of two larger than the minimum. In winter, the diurnal change is much smaller, with little indication of an afternoon maximum. (orig.)

  18. Performance simulation of a spaceborne infrared coherent lidar for measuring tropospheric wind profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Kyoka, Gamo; Mizutani, Kohei; Chikako, Takahashi; Itabe, Toshikazu; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Kubota, Takuji; Okamoto, Kozo; Oki, Riko; Satoh, Masaki; Satoh, Yohei

    2014-05-01

    An effort has begun in Japan to develop a spaceborne instrument for measuring tropospheric winds. This project is a collaboration between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI, Japan) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) [1,2]. The aim is to measure the horizontal wind field in the troposphere on a global scale with a precision better than 3 ms-1, and a vertical and horizontal (along the satellite ground track) resolution better than 1 km and 100 km, respectively. In order to support the definition and the development of the instrument, an end-to-end simulator has been implemented including modules for i) simulating the time-dependent laser shot return power, ii) for averaging the spectral power of several returns and iii) for estimating the line-of-sight wind from the Doppler shift of the averaged spectra. The simulations take into account the satellite position and motion along the orbit track, the observational and instrumental characteristics, a 3-D representation of the relevant atmospheric parameters (i.e. wind field, cloud coverage and aerosols distribution) and the Earth surface characteristics. The simulator and the method for estimating the line-of-sight wind will be presented. We will show the results obtained for a payload composed of two 2-μm coherent LIDARs looking in orthogonal directions, and for a satellite moving on a low orbit. The precision, accuracy and the vertical and horizontal resolution of the wind estimates will be discussed. References: [1] S. Ishii, T. Iwasaki, M. Sato, R. Oki, K. Okamoto, T. Ishibashi, P. Baron, and T. Nishizawa, Future Doppler lidar wind measurement from space in Japan, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8529, 2012 [2] S. Ishii, H. Iwai, K. Mizutani, P. Baron, T. Itabe, H. Fukuoka, T. Ishikawa, A. Sato and A. Asai, 2-μm coherent LIDAR for CO2 and wind measurements, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8872, 2013

  19. GPM GROUND VALIDATION HIGH ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) is a dual-frequency (Ka- and Ku-band) conical scan system, configured with a nadir viewing antenna...

  20. Seminal plasma protein profiles of ejaculates obtained by internal artificial vagina and electroejaculation in Brahman bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, J P A; Moura, A A; Nouwens, A S; McGowan, M R; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate if differences exist in the seminal plasma protein profile from mature Brahman bulls using two methods of semen collection: internal artificial vagina (IAV) and electroejaculation (EEJ). Semen was collected four times from three bulls on the same day and parameters were assessed immediately post-collection. Seminal plasma proteins were evaluated by 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Semen volume was greater (P < 0.05) for EEJ (4.6 ± 0.35 mL) than for IAV (1.86 ± 0.24 mL) but sperm concentration was greater in IAV (1505 ± 189 × 10(6) sperm/mL) than in EEJ samples (344 ± 87 × 10(6) sperm/mL). Sperm motility and the percentage of normal sperm were not different between treatments. Total concentration of seminal plasma proteins was greater for samples collected by IAV as compared to EEJ (19.3 ± 0.9 compared with 13.0 ± 1.8 mg/mL, P < 0.05; respectively). Based on 2-D gels, 22 spots had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from IAV samples, corresponding to 21 proteins identified as transferrin, albumin, epididymal secretory glutathione peroxidase, among others. Thirty-three spots, corresponding to 26 proteins, had a greater volume (P < 0.05) in gels derived from EEJ samples. These proteins were identified as spermadhesin-1, Bovine Sperm Protin 1, 3 and 5 isoforms, angiogenin-1, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, clusterin, nucleobindin-1, cathepsins, spermadhesin Z13, annexins, among others. Thus, proteins in greater amounts in samples obtained by IAV and EEJ were mainly of epididymal origin and accessory sex glands, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Proposal to Simultaneously Profile Wind and CO2 on Earth and Mars With 2-micron Pulsed Lidar Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Ismail, Syed; Emmitt, David

    2005-01-01

    2-micron lidar technology has been in use and under continued improvement for many years toward wind measurements. But the 2-micron wavelength region is also rich in absorption lines of CO2 (and H2O to a lesser extent) that can be exploited with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to make species concentration measurements. A coherent detection receiver offers the possibility of making combined wind and DIAL measurements with wind derived from frequency shift of the backscatter spectrum and species concentration derived from power of the backscatter spectrum. A combined wind and CO2 measurement capability is of interest for applications on both Earth and Mars. CO2 measurements in the Earth atmosphere are of importance to studies of the global carbon cycle. Data on vertically-resolved CO2 profiles over large geographical observations areas are of particular interest that could potentially be made by deploying a lidar on an aircraft or satellite. By combining CO2 concentration with wind measurements an even more useful data product could be obtained in the calculation of CO2 flux. A challenge to lidar in this application is that CO2 concentration measurements must be made with a high level of precision and accuracy to better than 1%. The Martian atmosphere also presents wind and CO2 measurement problems that could be met with a combined DIAL/Doppler lidar. CO2 concentration in this scenario would be used to calculate atmospheric density since the Martian atmosphere is composed of 95% CO2. The lack of measurements of Mars atmospheric density in the 30-60 km range, dust storm formation and movements, and horizontal wind patterns in the 0-20 km range pose significant risks to aerocapture, and entry, descent, and landing of future robotic and human Mars missions. Systematic measurement of the Mars atmospheric density and winds will be required over several Mars years, supplemented with day-of-entry operational measurements. To date, there have been 5

  2. Dynamics of Large-Scale Solar-Wind Streams Obtained by the Double Superposed Epoch Analysis: 2. Comparisons of CIRs vs. Sheaths and MCs vs. Ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaev, Y. I.; Lodkina, I. G.; Nikolaeva, N. S.; Yermolaev, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    This work is a continuation of our previous article (Yermolaev et al. in J. Geophys. Res. 120, 7094, 2015), which describes the average temporal profiles of interplanetary plasma and field parameters in large-scale solar-wind (SW) streams: corotating interaction regions (CIRs), interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs including both magnetic clouds (MCs) and ejecta), and sheaths as well as interplanetary shocks (ISs). As in the previous article, we use the data of the OMNI database, our catalog of large-scale solar-wind phenomena during 1976 - 2000 (Yermolaev et al. in Cosmic Res., 47, 2, 81, 2009) and the method of double superposed epoch analysis (Yermolaev et al. in Ann. Geophys., 28, 2177, 2010a). We rescale the duration of all types of structures in such a way that the beginnings and endings for all of them coincide. We present new detailed results comparing pair phenomena: 1) both types of compression regions ( i.e. CIRs vs. sheaths) and 2) both types of ICMEs (MCs vs. ejecta). The obtained data allow us to suggest that the formation of the two types of compression regions responds to the same physical mechanism, regardless of the type of piston (high-speed stream (HSS) or ICME); the differences are connected to the geometry ( i.e. the angle between the speed gradient in front of the piston and the satellite trajectory) and the jumps in speed at the edges of the compression regions. In our opinion, one of the possible reasons behind the observed differences in the parameters in MCs and ejecta is that when ejecta are observed, the satellite passes farther from the nose of the area of ICME than when MCs are observed.

  3. Energy profiling of demersal fish: a case-study in wind farm artificial reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Troch, Marleen; Reubens, Jan T; Heirman, Elke; Degraer, Steven; Vincx, Magda

    2013-12-01

    The construction of wind farms introduces artificial hard substrates in sandy sediments. As Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and pouting (Trisopterus luscus) tend to aggregate in order to feed around these reefs, energy profiling and trophic markers were applied to study their feeding ecology in a wind farm in the Belgian part of the North Sea. The proximate composition (carbohydrates, proteins and lipids) differed significantly between liver and muscle tissue but not between fish species or between their potential prey species. Atlantic cod showed to consume more energy than pouting. The latter had a higher overall energy reserve and can theoretically survive twice as long on the available energy than cod. In autumn, both fish species could survive longer on their energy than in spring. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were found in high concentrations in fish liver. The prey species Jassa and Pisidia were both rich in EPA while Jassa had a higher DHA content than Pisidia. Energy profiling supported the statement that wind farm artificial reefs are suitable feeding ground for both fish species. Sufficient energy levels were recorded and there is no indication of competition.

  4. Background Pressure Profiles for Sonic Boom Vehicle Testing in the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Shaw, Stephen; Adamson, Eric; Simerly, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify test facilities that offer sonic boom measurement capabilities, an exploratory test program was initiated using wind tunnels at NASA research centers. The subject of this report is the sonic boom pressure rail data collected in the Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The purpose is to summarize the lessons learned based on the test activity, specifically relating to collecting sonic boom data which has a large amount of spatial pressure variation. The wind tunnel background pressure profiles are presented as well as data which demonstrated how both wind tunnel Mach number and model support-strut position affected the wind tunnel background pressure profile. Techniques were developed to mitigate these effects and are presented.

  5. Thermal profile analysis of Doubly-Fed induction generator based wind power converter with air and liquid cooling methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede; Lau, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    Today, wind power generation system keeps on moving from onshore to offshore and also upscaling in size. As the lifetime of the wind power converter is prolonged to 20–25 years, this paper will investigate and compare different cooling methods for power modules — the air cooling and the liquid...... cooling seen from a thermal profile assessment point of view. Firstly, an analytical approach from loss profile to thermal profile for the power semiconductor is proposed and verified in a 2 MW Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) based wind turbine system. Then, the typical air cooling and liquid...... cooling in wind power converter are analyzed and compared in terms of the mean junction temperature and the junction temperature fluctuation. It is concluded that the liquid cooling approach has a similar junction temperature fluctuation but gives a lower mean junction temperature than the air cooling...

  6. Statistical analysis of wind profile in the surface layer at the Alcântara launching center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Ferreira Gisler

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Statistical analysis of the wind profile made at an anemometric tower installed at the Alcântara Launching Center was based on wind data (direction and wind speed collected between 1995 up to 1999, which was carried out at six different levels: 6.0, 10.0, 16.3, 28.5, 43.0, and 70.0 m. This analysis was made for typical rainy months (March and dry (September season, in the Alcântara Launching Center area. The analyzed data total during the wet season (March was 76,882 wind profiles (time interval of ten minutes and during the dry season (September was of 109,809 profiles. It was computed the mean wind speed (or intensity of the wind, standard deviation, median, mode, and the prevailing wind direction. The predominant direction was from NE with 33 and 40% for wet and dry seasons, respectively. The average values of wind speed showed a dependency with height and it was observed that the highest levels of the anemometric tower have the strongest wind speed in the dry period (8.2 ms-¹. The values of average wind speeds observed were 6.4 ms-¹ for the dry season and 4.1 ms-¹ during the wet one. The normal and Weibull statistical distributions were adjusted to the observed data set. Results show that the wind speed is adjusted to a 95% level (α=0.05 for the normal and Weibull statistical distributions. The Weibull distribution for the entire period presented and adjust to values between 3.0 and 9.0 ms-¹, and the normal one showed a good fit for values between 4.0 and 9.0 ms-¹.

  7. 915-MHz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  8. 915-Mhz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  9. Assessment of Atmospheric Wet Profiles Obtained from COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guirong Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmosperic profiles derived from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC radio occultation (RO measurements make up for the lack of operational radiosonde soundings with a high spatiotemporal distribution, and their performance over China is assessed in this paper. COSMIC-retrieved atmospheric wet profiles from 2014 to 2015 are compared to the contemporaneous radiosonde profiles from 120 stations, and the vertical mean differences are used. The results show that the vertical mean biases of temperature, pressure and vapor pressure are −0.10 K, 0.69 hPa and −0.01 hPa, respectively, and that for refractivity is 0.17 N. Moreover, the temperature differences are positively correlated with station altitude, yet both the pressure and vapor pressure differences are negatively correlated with station latitude, as is the refractivity difference. The large temperature difference arising from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP region may be associated with the complex topography of the area and the limitations in the background model used in the COSMIC profile retrieval. Furthermore, negative refractivity bias between COSMIC and radiosonde data occurs below 5 km and is large in wet southern China, with a value of less than 1%. This result may be related to more humid conditions and super-refraction.

  10. A brief history of the development of wind-profiling or MST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Van Zandt

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the wind-profiling or MST radar technique is reviewed from its inception in the late 1960s to the present. Extensions of the technique by the development of boundary-layer radars and the radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS technique to measure temperature are documented. Applications are described briefly, particularly practical applications to weather forecasting, with data from networks of radars, and scientific applications to the study of rapidly varying atmospheric phenomena such as gravity waves and turbulence.

    Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques · Radio science (remote sensing; instruments and techniques

  11. A brief history of the development of wind-profiling or MST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Van Zandt

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the wind-profiling or MST radar technique is reviewed from its inception in the late 1960s to the present. Extensions of the technique by the development of boundary-layer radars and the radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS technique to measure temperature are documented. Applications are described briefly, particularly practical applications to weather forecasting, with data from networks of radars, and scientific applications to the study of rapidly varying atmospheric phenomena such as gravity waves and turbulence.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques · Radio science (remote sensing; instruments and techniques

  12. Size effects in winding roll formed profiles: A study of carcass production for flexible pipes in offshore industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Nielsen, Morten Storgaard; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Carcass production of flexible offshore oil and gas pipes implies winding and interlocking of a roll formed stainless steel profile around a mandrel in a spiral shape. The location of the dividing point between the left and right half of the s-shaped profile in the finished carcass is very...... important as it directly influences carcass flexibility. The target location of the dividing point can be difficult to achieve since undesired degrees of freedom in the winding stage allows the profile to change geometry. The present work investigates this issue by performing production tests of a single...

  13. Aerodynamic performance of NACA four-digit profiles in small-scale wind turbines for small farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Alexandre Costa Rocha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, there are many places that do not have access to electric energy, mainly in rural areas with small farms. This situation has accentuated the importance of renewable energy sources, such as wind energy. This work consisted of the design, construction and field testing of two small three-bladed wind turbines with two different aerodynamic profiles. The aim of the study was to compare the profile influence on the turbine aerodynamic performance. Using the blade element momentum (BEM theory, two wind turbines were designed and built with different cross-section aerodynamic profiles (NACA 0012 (symmetric and 4412 (chambered. Following statistical analysis, the results of the field tests demonstrated that the performances of the turbines are similar when the rotational speed is near the designed value (?=5. However, when the rotational speed is under or above the designed value, the NACA 4412 profile yields superior performance

  14. Iron ions distribution profile obtained by irradiating the silicon single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemukhin, A. A.; Kozhemiako, A. V.; Balakshin, Y. V.; Chernysh, V. S.

    2017-11-01

    Iron ions with energies of 90 and 250 keV and the irradiation dose of 1016 ions/cm2 and xenon ions with energies of 100 keV and dose 7,7×1014 cm-2, 200 keV and dose 2,6 × 1014 cm-2 were implanted in the single crystal of silicon (110). The distribution profiles of implanted impurity, as well as the distribution profiles of the radiation defects in the crystal lattice, were studied by the Rutherford backscattering method in combination with channeling. The experimental results were compared with the results of simulations of binary collisions of the Monte Carlo method in the TRIM program. It is shown that the difference between the experimental data and the calculation program TRIM is more than 35% in all cases.

  15. Profile and imbalance cost of wind energy in 2012; Profiel- en onbalanskosten van windenergie in 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieuwenhout, F.D.J.; Lensink, S. [ECN Beleidsstudies, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brand, A.J. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-03-28

    This paper describes the method to determine the profile and imbalance costs of wind energy under the SDE+ scheme (Renewable Energy Incentive Plus). This method was first applied in the advice on the final correction figures for 2012. For 2012, the sum of profile and imbalance charges is set at 12.4% of the market index. This implies a slight increase with respect to the percentage in previous years (11%) [Dutch] Deze notitie beschrijft de methode om de profiel- en onbalanskosten van windenergie te bepalen in het kader van de SDE+-regeling (Stimuleringsregeling Duurzame Energie Plus). Deze methode is voor het eerst toegepast in het advies over de definitieve correctiebedragen 2012. Voor 2012 is de som van profiel- en onbalanskosten bepaald op 12,4% van de marktindex. Dit impliceert een geringe stijging ten opzichte van het percentage in voorgaande jaren (11%)

  16. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day-of-launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers to include NASA's Launch Services Program and NASA's Ground Systems Development and Operations Program. They currently do not have the capability to display and overlay profiles of upper-level observations and numerical weather prediction model forecasts. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool in the form of a graphical user interface (GUI) that will allow them to plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50 MHz tropospheric wind profiling radar, KSC Shuttle Landing Facility 915 MHz boundary layer wind profiling radar and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Processing System (AMPS) radiosondes, and then overlay forecast wind profiles from the model point data including the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model, Rapid Refresh (RAP) model and Global Forecast System (GFS) model to assess the performance of these models. The AMU developed an Excel-based tool that provides an objective method for the LWOs to compare the model-forecast upper-level winds to the KSC wind profiling radars and CCAFS AMPS observations to assess the model potential to accurately forecast changes in the upperlevel profile through the launch count. The AMU wrote Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripts to automatically retrieve model point data for CCAFS (XMR) from the Iowa State University Archive Data Server (http://mtarchive.qeol.iastate.edu) and the 50 MHz, 915 MHz and AMPS observations from the NASA/KSC Spaceport Weather Data Archive web site (http://trmm.ksc.nasa.gov). The AMU then developed code in Excel VBA to automatically ingest and format the observations and model point data in Excel to ready the data for generating Excel charts for the LWO's. The resulting charts allow the LWOs to independently initialize the three models 0

  17. Retrieval of convective boundary layer wind field statistics from radar profiler measurements in conjunction with large eddy simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Scipión

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The daytime convective boundary layer (CBL is characterized by strong turbulence that is primarily forced by buoyancy transport from the heated underlying surface. The present study focuses on an example of flow structure of the CBL as observed in the U.S. Great Plains on June 8, 2007. The considered CBL flow has been reproduced using a numerical large eddy simulation (LES, sampled with an LES-based virtual boundary layer radar (BLR, and probed with an actual operational radar profiler. The LES-generated CBL flow data are then ingested by the virtual BLR and treated as a proxy for prevailing atmospheric conditions. The mean flow and turbulence parameters retrieved via each technique (actual radar profiler, virtual BLR, and LES have been cross-analyzed and reasonable agreement was found between the CBL wind parameters obtained from the LES and those measured by the actual radar. Averaged vertical velocity variance estimates from the virtual and actual BLRs were compared with estimates calculated from the LES for different periods of time. There is good agreement in the estimates from all three sources. Also, values of the vertical velocity skewness retrieved by all three techniques have been inter-compared as a function of height for different stages of the CBL evolution, showing fair agreement with each other. All three retrievals contain positively skewed vertical velocity structure throughout the main portion of the CBL. Radar estimates of the turbulence kinetic energy (eddy dissipation rate (ε have been obtained based on the Doppler spectral width of the returned signal for the vertical radar beam. The radar estimates were averaged over time in the same fashion as the LES output data. The agreement between estimates was generally good, especially within the mixing layer. Discrepancies observed above the inversion layer may be explained by a weak turbulence signal in particular flow configurations. The virtual BLR produces voltage

  18. Standard Test Method for Obtaining Char Density Profile of Ablative Materials by Machining and Weighing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the char density profile of a charred ablator that can be used with the following limitations: 1.1.1 The local surface imperfections must be removed, and the char must be able to be machined off in a plane parallel to the char-virgin material interface before the density profiles can be determined. 1.1.2 The char must be strong enough to withstand the machining and handling techniques employed. 1.1.3 The material should have orderly density variations. The total thickness of the char and degradation zone must be larger than the machining thicknesses required. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.2.1 Exception—Certain inch-pound equivalent units are included in parentheses for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establis...

  19. Magnetic resonance metabolic profiling of breast cancer tissue obtained with core needle biopsy for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Choi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether metabolic profiling of core needle biopsy (CNB samples using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS could be used for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. After institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained, CNB tissue samples were collected from 37 malignant lesions in 37 patients before NAC treatment. The metabolic profiling of CNB samples were performed by HR-MAS MRS. Metabolic profiles were compared according to pathologic response to NAC using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA. Various metabolites including choline-containing compounds were identified and quantified by HR-MAS MRS in all 37 breast cancer tissue samples obtained by CNB. In univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations and metabolic ratios of CNB samples obtained with HR-MAS MRS were not significantly different between different pathologic response groups. However, there was a trend of lower levels of phosphocholine/creatine ratio and choline-containing metabolite concentrations in the pathologic complete response group compared to the non-pathologic complete response group. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between the pathologic response groups. This study showed OPLS-DA multivariate analysis using metabolic profiles of pretreatment CNB samples assessed by HR- MAS MRS may be used to predict pathologic response before NAC, although we did not identify the metabolite showing statistical significance in univariate analysis. Therefore, our preliminary results raise the necessity of further study on HR-MAS MR metabolic profiling of CNB samples for a large number of cancers.

  20. Profiling wind and greenhouse gases by infrared-laser occultation: results from end-to-end simulations in windy air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Plach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The new mission concept of microwave and infrared-laser occultation between low-Earth-orbit satellites (LMIO is designed to provide accurate and long-term stable profiles of atmospheric thermodynamic variables, greenhouse gases (GHGs, and line-of-sight (l.o.s. wind speed with focus on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS. While the unique quality of GHG retrievals enabled by LMIO over the UTLS has been recently demonstrated based on end-to-end simulations, the promise of l.o.s. wind retrieval, and of joint GHG and wind retrieval, has not yet been analyzed in any realistic simulation setting. Here we use a newly developed l.o.s. wind retrieval algorithm, which we embedded in an end-to-end simulation framework that also includes the retrieval of thermodynamic variables and GHGs, and analyze the performance of both stand-alone wind retrieval and joint wind and GHG retrieval. The wind algorithm utilizes LMIO laser signals placed on the inflection points at the wings of the highly symmetric C18OO absorption line near 4767 cm−1 and exploits transmission differences from a wind-induced Doppler shift. Based on realistic example cases for a diversity of atmospheric conditions, ranging from tropical to high-latitude winter, we find that the retrieved l.o.s. wind profiles are of high quality over the lower stratosphere under all conditions, i.e., unbiased and accurate to within about 2 m s−1 over about 15 to 35 km. The wind accuracy degrades into the upper troposphere due to the decreasing signal-to-noise ratio of the wind-induced differential transmission signals. The GHG retrieval in windy air is not vulnerable to wind speed uncertainties up to about 10 m s−1 but is found to benefit in the case of higher speeds from the integrated wind retrieval that enables correction of wind-induced Doppler shift of GHG signals. Overall both the l.o.s. wind and GHG retrieval results are strongly encouraging towards further development and

  1. Breast cancer: determining the genetic profile from ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy specimens obtained during the diagnostic workups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Ruiz, J A; Zabalza Estévez, I; Mieza Arana, J A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of determining the genetic profile of primary malignant tumors of the breast from specimens obtained by ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsies during the diagnostic imaging workup. This is a retrospective study in 13 consecutive patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer by B-mode ultrasound-guided 12 G core needle biopsy. After clinical indication, the pathologist decided whether the paraffin block specimens seemed suitable (on the basis of tumor size, validity of the sample, and percentage of tumor cells) before sending them for genetic analysis with the MammaPrint® platform. The size of the tumors on ultrasound ranged from 0.6cm to 5cm. In 11 patients the preserved specimen was considered valid and suitable for use in determining the genetic profile. In 1 patient (with a 1cm tumor) the pathologist decided that it was necessary to repeat the core biopsy to obtain additional samples. In 1 patient (with a 5cm tumor) the specimen was not considered valid by the genetic laboratory. The percentage of tumor cells in the samples ranged from 60% to 70%. In 11/13 cases (84.62%) it was possible to do the genetic analysis on the previously diagnosed samples. In most cases, regardless of tumor size, it is possible to obtain the genetic profile from tissue specimens obtained with ultrasound-guided 12 G core biopsy preserved in paraffin blocks. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Dataset on metabolomics profile of acute leukemia blood obtained by the NMR methods

    OpenAIRE

    Bogaychuk, Alexander; Zyubin, Andrey; Lavrova, Anastasiya; Kupriyanova, Galina; Babak, Svetlana; Dambieva, Mariya; Demin, Maksim; Borisova, Anastasiya; Opryshko, Nikita

    2017-01-01

    This article contains NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) experimental data, obtained by the NMR Varian 400?MHz spectrometer (USA) which can be used for the metabolites identification in human blood. Data include analyzed NMR spectra of plasma proteins extracted from human blood of 24 patients (0?5 years old) with the confirmed acute leukemia diagnosis. Data can provide information about metabolites and their concentration in blood.

  3. Dataset on metabolomics profile of acute leukemia blood obtained by the NMR methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaychuk, Alexander; Zyubin, Andrey; Lavrova, Anastasiya; Kupriyanova, Galina; Babak, Svetlana; Dambieva, Mariya; Demin, Maksim; Borisova, Anastasiya; Opryshko, Nikita

    2017-04-01

    This article contains NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) experimental data, obtained by the NMR Varian 400 MHz spectrometer (USA) which can be used for the metabolites identification in human blood. Data include analyzed NMR spectra of plasma proteins extracted from human blood of 24 patients (0-5 years old) with the confirmed acute leukemia diagnosis. Data can provide information about metabolites and their concentration in blood.

  4. Dataset on metabolomics profile of acute leukemia blood obtained by the NMR methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bogaychuk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article contains NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance experimental data, obtained by the NMR Varian 400 MHz spectrometer (USA which can be used for the metabolites identification in human blood. Data include analyzed NMR spectra of plasma proteins extracted from human blood of 24 patients (0–5 years old with the confirmed acute leukemia diagnosis. Data can provide information about metabolites and their concentration in blood.

  5. Measurements of the Spatial Variability of Mean Wind Profiles Using Multiple Doppler Lidars over Distances less than 1 Km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, R. M.; Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Iungo, V.; Pichugina, Y. L.; Quelet, P. T.; Wolfe, D. E.; Oncley, S.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A. M.; Delgado, R.; McCaffrey, K.

    2015-12-01

    Small differences in wind speed can translate to large differences in wind energy (WE) revenues, so WE decision making requires accurate measurements of wind profiles through the turbine rotor layer of the lower atmosphere. Advances in understanding and modeling of boundary-layer processes, also needed by WE, requires such measurements through an even deeper layer—at least the lowest few hundreds of meters. An important use for such accurate measured wind-profile data is in the initiation and verification of NWP models. This prospect raises several fundamental questions, such as, what does the modeled profile represent, how was the measured profile determined, and what if the profile had been measured from a different site within the grid cell? To address these questions, two experiments were conducted at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in modestly complex terrain downwind of the mountains. The Lidar Uncertainty Measurement Experiment (LUMEX) in June-July 2014 featured 5 Doppler lidars (2 scanning), and XPIA in April-May 2015, 11 Doppler lidars, including 5 scanning systems. Two broad goals of these projects were to assess differences in scanning and other data acquisition procedures on the measurements, addressed in (Pichugina et al.) at this conference, and to evaluate the effects of varying spatial separations on differences in the measured winds, addressed in the present paper. Sonic anemometers every 50 m on the 300-m BAO tower were used as a reference for the wind calculations, as well as another profile location. Lidar scan data indicated terrain-related regions of stronger flow within the scan volume of more than 1 m/s that were at least semi-recurrent. This variability produced significant differences in mean rotor-level winds by 2 identical profiling lidars separated by 500 m. During XPIA, four of the scanning Doppler lidars performed intersecting elevation scans (vertical-slice or "RHI") to create 'virtual towers' at various separation

  6. Stochastic Modeling of Lift and Drag Dynamics to Obtain Aerodynamic Forces with Local Dynamics on Rotor Blade under Unsteady Wind Inflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ramzan Luhur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution provides the development of a stochastic lift and drag model for an airfoil FX 79-W-151A under unsteady wind inflow based on wind tunnel measurements. Here we present the integration of the stochastic model into a well-known standard BEM (Blade Element Momentum model to obtain the corresponding aerodynamic forces on a rotating blade element. The stochastic model is integrated as an alternative to static tabulated data used by classical BEM. The results show that in comparison to classical BEM, the BEM with stochastic approach additionally reflects the local force dynamics and therefore provides more information on aerodynamic forces that can be used by wind turbine simulation codes

  7. RANS study of unsteady flow around a profile blade : application to stall of horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkheir, N. [Khemis Miliana Univ., Ain Defla (Algeria); Dizene, R. [Univ. des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Algiers (Algeria). Laboratoire de Mecanique Avancee; Khelladi, S.; Massouh, F.; Dobrev, I. [Arts et Metiers Paris Tech., Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    The shape of an airfoil is designed to achieve the best aerodynamic performance. An aerofoil section undergoes dynamic stall when subjected to any form of unsteady angle of pitch. The study of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) under wind operating conditions is complex because it is subject to instantaneous speed and wind direction variation. When turbine blades are driven into a dynamic stall, the lift coefficient drops suddenly resulting in a degradation in aerodynamic performance. This study presented steady and unsteady wind load predictions over an oscillating S809 airfoil tested in a subsonic wind tunnel. A model of sinusoidal pitch oscillations was used. The values for the angles of attack in steady state ranged from -20 to +40 degrees. The model considered 3 frequencies and 2 amplitudes. The two-dimensional numerical model simulated the instantaneous change of wind direction with respect to the turbine blade. Results were compared with data measurements of S809 aerofoil. Reasonable deviations were obtained between the predicted and experimental results for pitch oscillations. The URANS approach was used to predict the stall while the software FLUENT was used for the numerical solution. It was concluded that the behaviour of the unsteady flow in the wind farm must be considered in order to obtain an accurate estimate of the wind turbine aerodynamic load. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Quality and Trace Element Profile of Tunisian Olive Oils Obtained from Plants Irrigated with Treated Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Benincasa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the use of treated wastewater (TWW to irrigate olive plants was monitored. This type of water is characterized by high salinity and retains a substantial amount of trace elements, organic and metallic compounds that can be transferred into the soil and into the plants and fruits. In order to evaluate the impact of TWW on the overall quality of the oils, the time of contact of the olives with the soil has been taken into account. Multi-element data were obtained using ICP-MS. Nineteen elements (Li, B, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Mo, Ba and La were submitted for statistical analysis. Using analysis of variance, linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis it was possible to differentiate between oils produced from different batches of olives whose plants received different types of water. Also, the results showed that there was correlation between the elemental and mineral composition of the water used to irrigate the olive plots and the elemental and mineral composition of the oils.

  9. Application of 50 MHz doppler radar wind profiler to launch operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Robin S.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Smith, Steve A.; Wilfong, Timothy L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study where a significant wind shift, not detected by jimspheres, was detected by the 50 MHz DRWP (Doppler Radar Wind Profiler) and evaluated to be acceptable prior to the launch of a Shuttle. This case study illustrates the importance of frequent upper air wind measurements for detecting significant rapidly changing features as well as for providing confidence that the features really exist and are not due to instrumentation error. Had the release of the jimsphere been timed such that it would have detected the entire wind shift, there would not have been sufficient time to release another jimsphere to confirm the existence of the feature prior to the scheduled launch. We found that using a temporal median filter on the one minute spectral estimates coupled with a constraining window about a first guess velocity effectively removes nearly all spurious signals from the velocity profile generated by NASA's 50 MHz DRWP while boosting the temporal resolution to as high as one profile every 3 minutes. The higher temporal resolution of the 50 MHz DRWP using the signal processing algorithm described in this paper ensures the detection of rapidly changing features as well as provides the confidence that the features are genuine. Further benefit is gained when the profiles generated by the DRWP are examined in relation to the profiles measured by jimspheres and/or rawinsondes. The redundancy offered by using two independent measurements can dispel or confirm any suspicion regarding instrumentation error or malfunction and wind profiles can be examined in light of their respective instruments' strengths and weaknesses.

  10. A PROPOSAL FOR OBSERVATION OF ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN THE TROPOSPHERE AND LOWER STRATOSPHERE OVER ANTARCTICA WITH A NETWORK OF WIND PROFILERS

    OpenAIRE

    カンザワ, ヒロシ; Hiroshi, KANZAWA

    1992-01-01

    The wind profiler is a powerful tool to study atmospheric circulation and transport processes because it can measure not only horizontal components but also the vertical component of wind. A wind profiler developed originally by the U.S. NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories/Wave Propagation Laboratory can measure winds from 0.5-17km above the surface with an altitude resolution of 250m and time resolution under 1 hour. The profiler uses a 400MHz UHF band, and the area of the antenna is ab...

  11. Research on improved design of airfoil profiles based on the continuity of airfoil surface curvature of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Aerodynamic of airfoil performance is closely related to the continuity of its surface curvature, and airfoil profiles with a better aerodynamic performance plays an important role in the design of wind turbine. The surface curvature distribution along the chord direction and pressure distributio...

  12. Risø 1978: Further Investigations into the Effects of Local Terrain Irregularties on Tower-Measured Wind Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, E. W.; Taylor, P. A.; Højstrup, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    Observations of flow over complex terrain taken at Risø during June–July 1978 and numerical studies confirm earlier findings that small variations in surface elevation have significant effects on mean wind profiles. Measured shear stresses in the nonequilibrium region of the flow are consistent w...

  13. Burning carbon monoxide in the settling chamber of a hotshot wind tunnel for obtaining the CO2 test gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumskii, V. V.; Yaroslavtsev, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    A method of formation and heating of CO2 as a test gas in the settling chamber of a hotshot wind tunnel is considered. To form and heat CO2, the chamber is filled with a source gas mixture of CO, O2, and CO2, and after initiation, these substances participate in an exothermic chemical reaction in accordance with the formula CO + 0.5 O2 + xCO2 = (1 + x)CO2. A stoichiometric ratio of the concentrations of carbon monoxide CO and oxygen is used. Variation of the number of moles x of ballast CO2 in the left part of the chemical formula allows changing the temperature of the resultant test gas in a wide range. Experiments in the IT-302M hotshot wind tunnel carried out at ITAM SB RAS have shown that a pressure increase during an isochoric process in the settling chamber due to the joint effect of heat released in the reaction CO + 0.5 O2 and an electric charge provides the completeness of CO combustion almost equal to unity. The time of reaction completion at its initiation by an electric arc is no more than several milliseconds.

  14. The protein profile of Theobroma cacao L. seeds as obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertazzo, Antonella; Agnolin, Fabio; Comai, Stefano; Zancato, Mirella; Costa, Carlo V L; Seraglia, Roberta; Traldi, Pietro

    2011-07-30

    The water-soluble protein profile of the seeds of green, red, and yellow Theobroma cacao L. fruits has been determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS). The seeds were powdered under liquid nitrogen and defatted. The residues were dialyzed and lyophilized. The obtained samples were suspended in the matrix solution of sinapinic acid. The obtained MALDI mass spectra showed the presence of a wide number of proteins with molecular weight ranging from 8000 to 13,000 Da and a cluster of peaks centered at 21,000 Da that were attributed to albumin. The abundance of this peak was found to depend on the different portion of the seed (husk, apical and cortical parts); however, the MALDI mass spectra obtained from the different varieties of cocoa were practically superimposable. Changes in the protein profiles were also observed after the cocoa seeds were treated by fermentation and roasting, which are processes usually employed for the commercial production of cocoa. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Observations and physical interpretations of the solar wind flow properties as obtained from white light coronagraph aboard SPARTAN 201-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard; Ofman, Leon

    1995-01-01

    The solar corona was observed with an externally occulted White Light Coronagraph (WLC) carried on the SPARTAN 201-1 spacecraft on 11-12 Apr. 1993. With observations from WLC and the ground based Mauna Loa White Light Coronagraph, a large number of polar plumes both in the north and south polar holes were traced from 1.16 to 5.5 Rs. Flow properties of the solar wind in coronal holes have been determined (Habbal et al., 1995) by using a two fluid model constrained by density profiles and scale height temperatures from the white light observations, and interplanetary measurements of the flow speed and proton mass flux from Ulysses' south polar passage. Provisions for acceleration by Alfven waves, as well as electron and proton heating, are included in the momentum and the energy equations respectively. The model computations fit remarkably well the empirical constraints of the two different density structures (plumes and coronal holes) for a range of input parameters. In this study we investigate the physical nature of the heating function used in the two-fluid model. Alfven waves have been suggested as the possible source of heating that accelerates the solar wind (Ofman and Davila, 1995). We utilize the density contrast observed in WLC data in the plume and ambient coronal hole region to estimate the Alfven wave frequencies responsible for heating these structures. The source heating function utilized in the two fluid model of the solar wind acceleration will be compared with the resonant Alfven wave heating function.

  16. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data, Ulysses observations and a two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Using the empirical constraints provided by observations in the inner corona and in interplanetary space. we derive the flow properties of the solar wind using a two fluid model. Density and scale height temperatures are derived from White Light coronagraph observations on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa, from 1.16 to 5.5 R, in the two polar coronal holes on 11-12 Apr. 1993. Interplanetary measurements of the flow speed and proton mass flux are taken from the Ulysses south polar passage. By comparing the results of the model computations that fit the empirical constraints in the two coronal hole regions, we show how the effects of the line of sight influence the empirical inferences and subsequently the corresponding numerical results.

  17. Data Acquisition and Processing System for Airborne Wind Profiling with a Pulsed, 2-Micron, Coherent-Detection, Doppler Lidar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyon, J. Y.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    A data acquisition and signal processing system is being developed for a 2-micron airborne wind profiling coherent Doppler lidar system. This lidar, called the Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN), is based on a Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser transmitter and 15-cm diameter telescope. It is being packaged for flights onboard the NASA DC-8, with the first flights in the summer of 2010 in support of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign for the study of hurricanes. The data acquisition and processing system is housed in a compact PCI chassis and consists of four components such as a digitizer, a digital signal processing (DSP) module, a video controller, and a serial port controller. The data acquisition and processing software (DAPS) is also being developed to control the system including real-time data analysis and display. The system detects an external 10 Hz trigger pulse and initiates the data acquisition and processing process, and displays selected wind profile parameters such as Doppler shift, power distribution, wind directions and velocities. Doppler shift created by aircraft motion is measured by an inertial navigation/GPS sensor and fed to the signal processing system for real-time removal of aircraft effects from wind measurements. A general overview of the system and the DAPS as well as the coherent Doppler lidar system is presented in this paper.

  18. Wind Energy Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsubara, Kazuyo [Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    An overview is given of wind energy in Japan: Background; Wind Energy in Japan; Japanese Wind Energy Industry; Government Supports; Useful Links; Major Japanese Companies; Profiles of Major Japanese Companies; Major Wind Energy Projects in Japan.

  19. Mission-profile based multi-objective optimization of power electronics converter for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gohil, Ghanshyamsinh; Teodorescu, Remus; Kerekes, Tamas

    2017-01-01

    To help mitigate some of the challenges associated with the wide spread adoption of the stochastic wind power, wind turbine with full-scale power converter (Type D) is preferred. Since full power is processed by the power converter in a type D wind turbine, it is important to improve its efficien...

  20. Profile aerodynamic modeling of blades constructed of fibre vegetable for small wind turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Josà heldenir Pinheiro Bezerra

    2014-01-01

    Power generation wind-power in cities of Cearà donât represent a significant percentage of the power generation in the state. Although Cearà has favorable winds to use a small commercial windâs turbines, this isnât a practice that belongs to these cities. Possible causes of the low rate might be: few researches for development of compatible equipment with low winds and low cost, the fact that Brazilian companies doesnât offer wind generators appropriate for the area, most of the equipment use...

  1. How to Obtain a 100% Reliable Grid with Clean, Renewable Wind, Water, and Solar Providing 100% of all Raw Energy for All Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, M. Z.; Delucchi, M. A.; Cameron, M. A.; Frew, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    The greatest concern facing the large-scale integration of wind, water, and solar (WWS) into a power grid is the high cost of avoiding load loss caused by WWS variability and uncertainty. This talk discusses the recent development of a new grid integration model to address this issue. The model finds low-cost, no-load-loss, non-unique solutions to this problem upon electrification of all U.S. energy sectors (electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industry) while accounting for wind and solar time-series data from a 3-D global weather model that simulates extreme events and competition among wind turbines for available kinetic energy. Solutions are obtained by prioritizing storage for heat (in soil and water); cold (in ice and water); and electricity (in phase-change materials, pumped hydro, hydropower, and hydrogen); and using demand response. No natural gas, biofuels, or stationary batteries are needed. The resulting 2050-2055 U.S. electricity social cost for a full system is much less than for fossil fuels. These results hold for many conditions, suggesting that low-cost, stable 100% WWS systems should work many places worldwide. The paper this talk is based on was published in PNAS, 112, 15,060-15,065, 2015, doi:10.1073/pnas.1510028112.

  2. Profiling Radar Observations and Numerical Simulations of a Downslope Wind Storm and Rotor on the Lee of the Medicine Bow Mountains in Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Pokharel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a downslope wind storm event observed over the Medicine Bow range (Wyoming, USA on 11 January 2013. The University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA made four along-wind passes over a five-hour period over the mountain of interest. These passes were recognized as among the most turbulent ones encountered in many years by crew members. The MacCready turbulence meter aboard the UWKA measured moderate to severe turbulence conditions on each pass in the lee of the mountain range, with eddy dissipation rate values over 0.5 m2/3 s−1. Three rawinsondes were released from an upstream location at different times. This event is simulated using the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecast (WRF model at an inner- domain resolution of 1 km. The model produces a downslope wind storm, notwithstanding some discrepancies between model and rawinsonde data in terms of upstream atmospheric conditions. Airborne Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR vertical-plane Doppler velocity data from two beams, one pointing to the nadir and one pointing slant forward, are synthesized to obtain a two-dimensional velocity field in the vertical plane below flight level. This synthesis reveals the fine-scale details of an orographic wave breaking event, including strong, persistent downslope acceleration, a strong leeside updraft (up to 10 m·s−1 flanked by counter-rotating vortices, and deep turbulence, extending well above flight level. The analysis of WCR-derived cross-mountain flow in 19 winter storms over the same mountain reveals that cross-mountain flow acceleration and downslope wind formation are difficult to predict from upstream wind and stability profiles.

  3. Results of the Updated NASA Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Operational Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre', Robert E., Jr.; Deker, Ryan K.; Leahy, Frank B.; Huddleston, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    We present here the methodology and results of the Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) performed on the new Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP). On day-of-launch (DOL), space launch vehicle operators have used data from the DRWP to invalidate winds in prelaunch loads and trajectory assessments due to the DRWP's capability to quickly identify changes in the wind profile within a rapidly-changing wind environment. The previous DRWP has been replaced with a completely new system, which needs to undergo certification testing before being accepted for use in range operations. The new DRWP replaces the previous three-beam system made of coaxial cables and a copper wire ground plane with a four-beam system that uses Yagi antennae with enhanced beam steering capability. In addition, the new system contains updated user interface software while maintaining the same general capability as the previous system. The new DRWP continues to use the Median Filter First Guess (MFFG) algorithm to generate a wind profile from Doppler spectra at each range gate. DeTect (2015) contains further details on the upgrade. The OAT is a short-term test designed so that end users can utilize the new DRWP in a similar manner to the previous DRWP during mission operations at the Eastern Range in the midst of a long-term certification process. This paper describes the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch's (MSFC NE's) analyses to verify the quality and accuracy of the DRWP's meteorological data output as compared to the previous DRWP. Ultimately, each launch vehicle program has the responsibility to certify the system for their own use.

  4. Metabolomics profiling of pre-and post-anesthesia plasma samples of colorectal patients obtained via Ficoll separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghini, Veronica; Unger, Florian T; Tenori, Leonardo; Turano, Paola; Juhl, Hartmut; David, Kerstin A

    2015-01-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the metabolic consequences of general anesthesia in the plasma of two groups of patients with diagnosis for non-metastatic colorectal cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer with liver-metastasis, respectively. Patients were treated with etomidate or propofol, two frequently used sedation agents. Plasma samples were obtained via Ficoll separation. Here, we demonstrated that this procedure introduces a number of limitations for NMR-based metabolomics studies, due to the appearance of spurious signals. Nevertheless, the comparison of the (1)H NMR metabolomic profiles of patients treated with etomidate or propofol at equipotent dose ranges was still feasible and proved that both agents significantly decrease the plasma levels of several NMR-detectable metabolites. Consequently, samples collected during anesthesia are not suitable for metabolic profiling studies aimed at patient stratification, because interpersonal variability are reduced by the overall depression of metabolites levels. On the other hand, this study showed that plasma metabolomics could represent a valuable tool to monitor the effect of different sedation agents and/or the individual metabolic response to anesthesia, providing hints for an appropriate tuning of personalized sedation procedures. In our reference groups, the metabolomic signatures were slightly different in patients anesthetized with etomidate versus propofol. The importance of standardized collection procedures and availability of exhaustive metadata of the experimental design for the accurate evaluation of the significance of the observed changes in metabolites levels are critically discussed.

  5. The Profile Envision and Splice Tool (PRESTO): Developing an Atmospheric Wind Analysis Tool for Space Launch Vehicles Using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Tropospheric winds are an important driver of the design and operation of space launch vehicles. Multiple types of weather balloons and Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) systems exist at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), co-located on the United States Air Force's (USAF) Eastern Range (ER) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), that are capable of measuring atmospheric winds. Meteorological data gathered by these instruments are being used in the design of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and other space launch vehicles, and will be used during the day-of-launch (DOL) of SLS to aid in loads and trajectory analyses. For the purpose of SLS day-of-launch needs, the balloons have the altitude coverage needed, but take over an hour to reach the maximum altitude and can drift far from the vehicle's path. The DRWPs have the spatial and temporal resolutions needed, but do not provide complete altitude coverage. Therefore, the Natural Environments Branch (EV44) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed the Profile Envision and Splice Tool (PRESTO) to combine balloon profiles and profiles from multiple DRWPs, filter the spliced profile to a common wavelength, and allow the operator to generate output files as well as to visualize the inputs and the spliced profile for SLS DOL operations. PRESTO was developed in Python taking advantage of NumPy and SciPy for the splicing procedure, matplotlib for the visualization, and Tkinter for the execution of the graphical user interface (GUI). This paper describes in detail the Python coding implementation for the splicing, filtering, and visualization methodology used in PRESTO.

  6. Accounting for the speed shear in wind turbine power performance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael; Gottschall, Julia

    2011-01-01

    itself depends on the wind speed profile, especially for large turbines. Therefore, it is important to characterize the wind profile in front of the turbine, and this should be preferably achieved by measuring the wind speed over the vertical range between lower and higher rotor tips. In this paper, we...... describe an experiment in which wind speed profiles were measured in front of a multimegawatt turbine using a ground–based pulsed lidar. Ignoring the vertical shear was shown to overestimate the kinetic energy flux of these profiles, in particular for those deviating significantly from a power law profile....... As a consequence, the power curve obtained for these deviant profiles was different from that obtained for the ‘near power law’ profiles. An equivalent wind speed based on the kinetic energy derived from the measured wind speed profile was then used to plot the performance curves. The curves obtained for the two...

  7. Frequency spectra and vertical profiles of wind fluctuations in the summer Antarctic mesosphere revealed by MST radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaoru; Kohma, Masashi; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Continuous observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes at heights from 81-93 km were performed using the first Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scatter radar in the Antarctic over the three summer periods of 2013/2014, 2014/2015, and 2015/2016. Power spectra of horizontal and vertical wind fluctuations, and momentum flux spectra in a wide-frequency range from (8 min)-1 to (20 days) -1 were first estimated for the Antarctic summer mesosphere. The horizontal (vertical) wind power spectra obey a power law with an exponent of approximately -2 (-1) at frequencies higher than the inertial frequency of (13 h)-1 and have isolated peaks at about 1 day and a half day. In addition, an isolated peak of a quasi-2 day period is observed in the horizontal wind spectra but is absent from the vertical wind spectra, which is consistent with the characteristics of a normal-mode Rossby-gravity wave. Zonal (meridional) momentum flux spectra are mainly positive (negative), and large fluxes are observed in a relatively low-frequency range from (1 day)-1 to (1 h)-1. A case study was performed to investigate vertical profiles of momentum fluxes associated with gravity waves and time mean winds on and around 3 January 2015 when a minor stratospheric warming occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. A significant momentum flux convergence corresponding to an eastward acceleration of 200 m s-1 d-1 was observed before the warming and became stronger after the warming when mean zonal wind weakened. The strong wave forcing roughly accorded with the Coriolis force of mean meridional winds.

  8. Generating Variable Wind Profiles and Modeling Their Effects on Small-Arms Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    flight . We know, however, that this is not how wind behaves. Through application of wind variation methodologies and data analysis on the variation of... flight 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 42 19a. NAME OF...Contents List of Figures iv List of Tables iv 1. Introduction 1 2. Analyzing Wind Data 2 3. Calculation of Horizontal Deflection and Equivalent

  9. Antioxidant activity, cytotoxic activity and metabolic profiling of juices obtained from saffron (Crocus sativus L.) floral by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Rosa, Antonella; Montoro, Paola; Fenu, Maurizio Antonio; Pizza, Cosimo

    2016-05-15

    Juices obtained from cold-pressed saffron (Crocus sativus L.) floral by-products were evaluated as a potential source of compounds with antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. Floral by-products were split in two batches for extraction 24 and 48h after flower harvesting, respectively. The in vitro anti-oxidant activity of these extracts was tested using the FRAP and DPPH assays, and two biological models of lipid oxidation (activity in preventing cholesterol degradation and protection against Cu(2+)-mediated degradation of the liposomal unsaturated fatty acids). The cytotoxic activity was evaluated using the MTT assay. The results show that extracts obtained 48h post-harvest contained higher levels of total polar phenols and had the highest antioxidant activity in all of the performed assays. The LC-DAD and LC-ESI-(HR)MS(n) metabolic profiles showed high levels of kaempferol derivatives and anthocyanins. This study suggests that juices from saffron floral by-products could potentially be used to develop new products for the food and health industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Temperature profile and wind speed data collected from buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER for 1977-07-26 (NCEI Accession 7800034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and wind speed data were collected using buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 26 July 1977 to 26 July 1977. Data were...

  11. A Study on the Effect of Nudging on Long-Term Boundary Layer Profiles of Wind and Weibull Distribution Parameters in a Rural Coastal Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Floors, Rogier

    2013-01-01

    By use of 1 yr of measurements performed with a wind lidar up to 600-m height, in combination with a tall meteorological tower, the impact of nudging on the simulated wind profile at a flat coastal site (Høvsøre) in western Denmark using the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research...

  12. Large-eddy simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer: Influence of unsteady forcing, baroclinicity, inversion strength and stability on the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard

    The largest wind turbines today often reach heights where traditional models of the wind speed and how it varies with height no longer can be expected to apply. For accurate assessment of wind energy resources and loads on wind turbines, there is a need for better understanding of the flow of air...... of the large-scale pressure forcing, when using LES for prediction of real-world wind profiles. In the Høvsøre case study, simulated wind speeds agree well with measurements throughout the ABL, but only when the applied forcing follows a height- and time-dependent pressure gradient estimated from continuous...... LIDAR measurements of the wind speed above the ABL. Including unsteadiness and baroclinic effects in the forcing also improves agreement with measurements in the Hamburg case study, but not as unambiguously as in the Høvsøre case study. It is concluded that the measurements available at and around...

  13. Transcriptome profiling of sheep granulosa cells and oocytes during early follicular development obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnet Agnes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful achievement of early folliculogenesis is crucial for female reproductive function. The process is finely regulated by cell-cell interactions and by the coordinated expression of genes in both the oocyte and in granulosa cells. Despite many studies, little is known about the cell-specific gene expression driving early folliculogenesis. The very small size of these follicles and the mixture of types of follicles within the developing ovary make the experimental study of isolated follicular components very difficult. The recently developed laser capture microdissection (LCM technique coupled with microarray experiments is a promising way to address the molecular profile of pure cell populations. However, one main challenge was to preserve the RNA quality during the isolation of single cells or groups of cells and also to obtain sufficient amounts of RNA. Using a new LCM method, we describe here the separate expression profiles of oocytes and follicular cells during the first stages of sheep folliculogenesis. Results We developed a new tissue fixation protocol ensuring efficient single cell capture and RNA integrity during the microdissection procedure. Enrichment in specific cell types was controlled by qRT-PCR analysis of known genes: six oocyte-specific genes (SOHLH2, MAEL, MATER, VASA, GDF9, BMP15 and three granulosa cell-specific genes (KL, GATA4, AMH. A global gene expression profile for each follicular compartment during early developmental stages was identified here for the first time, using a bovine Affymetrix chip. Most notably, the granulosa cell dataset is unique to date. The comparison of oocyte vs. follicular cell transcriptomes revealed 1050 transcripts specific to the granulosa cell and 759 specific to the oocyte. Functional analyses allowed the characterization of the three main cellular events involved in early folliculogenesis and confirmed the relevance and potential of LCM-derived RNA. Conclusions

  14. The impact of in-canopy wind profile formulations on heat flux estimation using the remote sensing-based two-source model for an open orchard canopy in southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammalleri, C.; Anderson, M. C.; Ciraolo, G.; D'Urso, G.; Kustas, W. P.; La Loggia, G.; Minacapilli, M.

    2010-07-01

    scintillometer and an eddy covariance tower collected over an olive orchard characterized by moderate fractional vegetation cover (≈35%) and relatively tall crop height (≈3.5 m). TSEB fluxes for the 7 image acquisition dates generated using both the Massman and Goudriaan in-canopy wind profile formulations give close agreement with measured fluxes, while the Lalic et al. equations yield poor results. The Massman wind profile scheme slightly outperforms that of Goudriaan, but it requires an additional parameter describing the roughness of the underlying vegetative surface. This parameter is not directly obtainable using remote sensing, hence this study suggests that the Goudriaan formulation for landscape applications is most suitable when detailed site-specific information regarding canopy architecture is unavailable.

  15. Joint profiling of greenhouse gases, isotopes, thermodynamic variables, and wind from space by combined microwave and IR laser occultation: the ACCURATE concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, G.; Schweitzer, S.

    2008-12-01

    The ACCURATE (Atmospheric Climate and Chemistry in the UTLS Region And climate Trends Explorer) mission was conceived at the Wegener Center in late 2004 and subsequently proposed in 2005 by an international team of more than 20 scientific partners from more than 12 countries to an ESA selection process for next Earth Explorer Missions. While the mission was not selected for formal pre-phase A study, it received very positive evaluation and was recommended for further development and demonstration. ACCURATE employs the occultation measurement principle, known for its unique combination of high vertical resolution, accuracy and long-term stability, in a novel way. It systematically combines use of highly stable signals in the MW 17-23/178-196 GHz bands (LEO-LEO MW crosslink occultation) with laser signals in the SWIR 2-2.5 μm band (LEO-LEO IR laser crosslink occultation) for exploring and monitoring climate and chemistry in the atmosphere with focus on the UTLS region (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere, 5-35 km). The MW occultation is an advanced and at the same time compact version of the LEO-LEO MW occultation concept, studied in 2002-2004 for the ACE+ mission project of ESA for frequencies including the 17-23 GHz band, complemented by U.S. study heritage for frequencies including the 178-196 GHz bands (R. Kursinski et al., Univ. of Arizona, Tucson). The core of ACCURATE is tight synergy of the IR laser crosslinks with the MW crosslinks. The observed parameters, obtained simultaneously and in a self-calibrated manner based on Doppler shift and differential log-transmission profiles, comprise the fundamental thermodynamic variables of the atmosphere (temperature, pressure/geopotential height, humidity) retrieved from the MW bands, complemented by line-of-sight wind, six greenhouse gases (GHGs) and key species of UTLS chemistry (H2O, CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, CO) and four CO2 and H2O isotopes (HDO, H218O, 13CO2, C18OO) from the SWIR band. Furthermore, profiles of

  16. Fat characteristics and fatty acid profile of sea cucumbers (Holothuria Scabra obtained from the coasts of the Bushehr province -Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Jadavi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sea cucumbers are belonging to echinoderms and one of the important members of the food chain in temperate ecosystems and tropical coral reefs. The medicinal and nutritional uses of these invertebrates are primordial and are important as ecological, biological and economic properties. Holothuria Scabra, as one of the most valuable commercial species of sea cucumber in the world, is the dominant species in many Persian Gulf coasts such as the Bushehr province coasts. Conspicuous characteristics such as the use of inexpensive foods in their culture, the rather rapid, easy and low cost growth and reproduction, the possibility of culture with other fish, reduce the organic substrate in pools, the broad tolerance in water factors changes such as salinity and temperature it has selected them to culture.It seems they are containing the significant amounts of nutrients, especially appreciated fatty acids. Therefore, the aims of the current study are determination of total fat content, quality and quantity evaluations of some physicochemical parameters such as acid value (AV, peroxide value (PV, and refractive index (RI as well as, identify the profile of fatty acids in the fat. Materials & Methods: In this study, after collecting the 36 samples of sea cucumbers from the coasts of the bushehr province, sample preparation, and extraction of fat, their fatty acids profile were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC-FID. Results: The peroxide and the acid values were 0.62±0.0435 and 0.7553±0.0034. The optical refractive index of the oil was 1467 at 26°C, and total fat was also 2%. Among 19 identified fatty acids obtained from the GC analysis of Holothuria Scabra oil, fatty acids: heneicosanoic acid, linoleic acid, palimitic acid, stearic acid, linoleic acid, and Meristic acid, with respectively amounts of 40.81%, 27.5%, 15.24%, 4.73%, 4.46% and 2.38% had the highest values, and other fatty acids were negligible

  17. Comparative analysis of gas production profiles obtained with buffalo and sheep ruminal fluid as the source of inoculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabrò, S.; López, S.; Piccolo, V.; Dijkstra, J.; Dhanoa, M.S.; France, J.

    2005-01-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to investigate effects of inoculum source (i.e., sheep versus buffalo rumen fluid) on gas production profiles, and to evaluate the suitability of various mathematical equations to fit the profiles and provide accurate values of degradation attributes. Incubations were

  18. Analysis of cytokine profile and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma obtained by open systems and commercial columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Antonioli, Eliane; Bucci, Daniella Zanetti; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ferretti, Mario; Ejnisman, Benno; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate growth factors and cytokines in samples of platelet-rich plasma obtained by three different centrifugation methods. Peripheral blood of six individuals with no hematological diseases, aged 18 to 68 years, was drawn to obtain platelet-rich plasma, using the open method and commercial columns by Medtronic and Biomet. The products obtained with the different types of centrifugation were submitted to laboratory analysis, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by flow cytometry assays, the concentration of fibroblast growth factors-2 (FGF-2) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1). The diverse separation methods generated systematically different profiles regarding number of platelets and leukocytes. The Medtronic system yielded a product with the highest concentration of platelets, and the open method, with the lowest concentration of platelets. The results of cytokine analysis showed that the different types of centrifugation yielded products with high concentrations of interleukin 8, interleukin 1β. The open system resulted in a product with high levels of interleukin 6. Other cytokines and chemokines measured were similar between systems. The product obtained with the open method showed higher levels of TGF-β1 in relation to other systems and low FGF-2 levels. The formed elements, growth factors and cytokines in samples of platelet-rich plasma varied according to the centrifugation technique used. Avaliar fatores de crescimento e citocinas em amostras de plasma rico em plaquetas obtidas por três diferentes métodos de centrifugação. Foi coletado sangue periférico de seis indivíduos, sem doença hematológica, com idades entre 18 e 68 anos, para obtenção de plasma rico em plaquetas, utilizando o método aberto e sistemas comerciais das empresas Medtronic e Biomet. Os produtos obtidos com os diferentes tipos de centrifugação foram submetidos às análises laboratoriais, incluindo citocinas próinflamatórias e quimiocinas

  19. Influence of curing profile and fibre architecture on the fatigue resistance of composite materials for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    -ray computer tomography. Thereby, it has been found during ex-situ fatigue studies, that the fatigue failure mechanism is highly influenced by transverse cracking in the so-called backing bundles which is present in order to ease the handling during the dry fabric layup during wind turbine blade manufacturing...... been investigated during a variety of curing profiles of the used epoxy material system. Thereby, it is possible to observe that even though the overall chemical shrinkage of the epoxy material system is independent on the chosen curing profile, the location of the gel-point and thereby the amount...... of shrinkage occurring in the solid state is highly influenced. During the study, it is therefore documented that even though a short mould time may be beneficial lowering the manufacturing cost, it has a drawback on the fatigue life time. In addition, it can be expected that the internal part of the thick...

  20. Observations of Downwind Development of Wind Speed and Variance Profiles at Bognaes and Comparison with Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Højstrup, Jørgen; Peterson, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric flow over a change in surface roughness are reported. Both wind speed and turbulence characteristics were measured. Although the observation site departed from the ideal assumed in roughness change models, it was found that the predictions of `second-order closure...

  1. Depth profiles of the Doppler-broadening S parameter for polymers obtained with two measuring patterns: The role of accumulated charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19 Yuquan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, P.; Lu, E.Y.; Cao, X.Z.; Yu, R.S. [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19 Yuquan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, B.Y., E-mail: wangboy@ihep.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Radiation and Nuclear Energy Technology, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 19 Yuquan Lu, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Depth profiles of S parameter for polymers were obtained with two patterns. • Charges induced by high energy incident positrons can influenced the depth profile. • Depth profiles obtained with energy increase pattern can give real characteristics. - Abstract: Depth profiles of Doppler broadening S parameter for oxygen containing polymer polycarbonate (PC), fluoropolymer poly (tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and chlorine containing polymer polyvinylchloride-unplasticized (UPVC) were obtained with two measuring patterns, i.e. energy increase pattern and energy decrease pattern. The two curves can’t coincide with each other for that a trough appeared between 1 and 5 keV in the curve obtained with energy decrease pattern. It was found that charges induced by high energy incident positrons greatly influenced the annihilation of low energy incident positrons, while charges induced by low energy incident positrons showed little influence on the annihilation of high energy incident positrons. With energy increase measuring pattern, charges induced by low energy incident positrons showed little influence on the annihilation of later incident high energy positrons, thus the measurement can give the depth profile of S parameter in polymer as it was.

  2. The impact of in-canopy wind profile formulations on heat flux estimation in an open orchard using the remote sensing-based two-source model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammalleri, C.; Anderson, M. C.; Ciraolo, G.; Durso, G.; Kustas, W. P.; La Loggia, G.; Minacapilli, M.

    2010-12-01

    For open orchard and vineyard canopies containing significant fractions of exposed soil (>50%), typical of Mediterranean agricultural regions, the energy balance of the vegetation elements is strongly influenced by heat exchange with the bare soil/substrate. For these agricultural systems a "two-source" approach, where radiation and turbulent exchange between the soil and canopy elements are explicitly modelled, appears to be the only suitable methodology for reliably assessing energy fluxes. In strongly clumped canopies, the effective wind speed profile inside and below the canopy layer can strongly influence the partitioning of energy fluxes between the soil and vegetation components. To assess the impact of in-canopy wind profile on model flux estimates, an analysis of three different formulations is presented, including algorithms from Goudriaan (1977), Massman (1987) and Lalic et al. (2003). The in-canopy wind profile formulations are applied to the thermal-based two-source energy balance (TSEB) model developed by Norman et al. (1995) and modified by Kustas and Norman (1999). High resolution airborne remote sensing images, collected over an agricultural area located in the western part of Sicily (Italy) comprised primarily of vineyards, olive and citrus orchards, are used to derive all the input parameters needed to apply the TSEB. The images were acquired from June to October 2008 and include a relatively wide range of meteorological and soil moisture conditions. A preliminary sensitivity analysis of the three wind profile algorithms highlights the dependence of wind speed just above the soil/substrate to leaf area index and canopy height over the typical range of canopy properties encountered in these agricultural areas. It is found that differences among the models in wind just above the soil surface are most significant under sparse and medium fractional cover conditions (15-50%). The TSEB model heat flux estimates are compared with micro

  3. The impact of in-canopy wind profile formulations on heat flux estimation in an open orchard using the remote sensing-based two-source model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cammalleri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For open orchard and vineyard canopies containing significant fractions of exposed soil (>50%, typical of Mediterranean agricultural regions, the energy balance of the vegetation elements is strongly influenced by heat exchange with the bare soil/substrate. For these agricultural systems a "two-source" approach, where radiation and turbulent exchange between the soil and canopy elements are explicitly modelled, appears to be the only suitable methodology for reliably assessing energy fluxes. In strongly clumped canopies, the effective wind speed profile inside and below the canopy layer can strongly influence the partitioning of energy fluxes between the soil and vegetation components. To assess the impact of in-canopy wind profile on model flux estimates, an analysis of three different formulations is presented, including algorithms from Goudriaan (1977, Massman (1987 and Lalic et al. (2003. The in-canopy wind profile formulations are applied to the thermal-based two-source energy balance (TSEB model developed by Norman et al. (1995 and modified by Kustas and Norman (1999. High resolution airborne remote sensing images, collected over an agricultural area located in the western part of Sicily (Italy comprised primarily of vineyards, olive and citrus orchards, are used to derive all the input parameters needed to apply the TSEB. The images were acquired from June to October 2008 and include a relatively wide range of meteorological and soil moisture conditions. A preliminary sensitivity analysis of the three wind profile algorithms highlights the dependence of wind speed just above the soil/substrate to leaf area index and canopy height over the typical range of canopy properties encountered in these agricultural areas. It is found that differences among the models in wind just above the soil surface are most significant under sparse and medium fractional cover conditions (15–50%. The TSEB model heat flux estimates are compared with micro

  4. WindScanner.eu - a new Remote Sensing Research Infrastructure for On- and Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Siggaard Knudsen, Søren; Sjöholm, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    call for multi-height multi point measurement strategies of wind speed and wind shear within the turbines entire rotor plane. The development of our new remote sensing-based WindScanner.dk facility as well as the first measurement results obtained to date are here presented, including a first wind...... and a rotor diameter of 154 meters; hence its blade tips reaches almost 200 meters into the sky. The wind speed profiles over the rotor planes are consequently no longer representatively measured by a single cup anemometer at hub height from a nearby met-mast; power curve assessment as well as turbine control...

  5. Influence of DNA extraction on oral microbial profiles obtained via 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Abusleme

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The advent of next-generation sequencing has significantly facilitated characterization of the oral microbiome. Despite great efforts in streamlining the processes of sequencing and data curation, upstream steps required for amplicon library generation could still influence 16S rRNA gene-based microbial profiles. Among upstream processes, DNA extraction is a critical step that could represent a great source of bias. Accounting for bias introduced by extraction procedures is important when comparing studies that use different methods. Identifying the method that best portrays communities is also desirable. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to evaluate bias introduced by different DNA extraction procedures on oral microbiome profiles. Design: Four DNA extraction methods were tested on mock communities consisting of seven representative oral bacteria. Additionally, supragingival plaque samples were collected from seven individuals and divided equally to test two commonly used DNA extraction procedures. Amplicon libraries of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced via 454-pyrosequencing. Results: Evaluation of mock communities revealed that DNA yield and bacterial species representation varied with DNA extraction methods. Despite producing the lowest yield of DNA, a method that included bead beating was the only protocol capable of detecting all seven species in the mock community. Comparison of the performance of two commonly used methods (crude lysis and a chemical/enzymatic lysis+column-based DNA isolation on plaque samples showed no effect of extraction protocols on taxa prevalence but global community structure and relative abundance of individual taxa were affected. At the phylum level, the latter method improved the recovery of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Spirochaetes over crude lysis. Conclusion: DNA extraction distorts microbial profiles in simulated and clinical oral samples, reinforcing the

  6. A comparison of boundary-layer heights inferred from wind-profiler backscatter profiles with diagnostic calculations using regional model forecasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltink, H.K.; Holtslag, A.A.M. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Inst., KNMI, De Bilt (Netherlands)

    1997-10-01

    From October 1994 through January 1997 the Tropospheric Energy Budget Experiment (TEBEX) was executed by KNMI. The main objectives are to study boundary layer processes and cloud variability on the sub-grid scale of present Global Climate Models and to improve the related sub-grid parametrizations. A suite of instruments was deployed to measure a large number of variables. Measurements to characterize ABL processes were focussed around the 200 m high meteorological observation tower of the KNMI in Cabauw. In the framework of TEBEX a 1290 MHz wind-profiler/RASS was installed in July 1994 at 300 m from tower. Data collected during TEBEX are used to assess the performance of a Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO). This climate model runs also in a operational forecast mode once a day. The diagnostic ABL-height (h{sub model}) is calculated from the RACMO forecast output. A modified Richardson`s number method extended with an excess parcel temperature is applied for all stability conditions. We present the preliminary results of a comparison of h{sub model} from forecasts with measured h{sub TS} derived from profiler and sodar data for July 1995. (au)

  7. HPLC Evaluation of Phenolic Profile, Nutritive Content, and Antioxidant Capacity of Extracts Obtained from Punica granatum Fruit Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Kumar Middha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study revealed polyphenolic content, nutritive content, antioxidant activity, and phenolic profile of methanol and aqueous extracts of Punica granatum peel extract. For this, extracts were screened for possible antioxidant activities by free radical scavenging activity (DPPH, hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. The total phenolics and flavonoid recovered by methanolic (MPE and the water extract (AQPE were ranged from 185 ± 12.45 to 298.00 ± 24.86 mg GAE (gallic acid equivalents/gm and 23.05 ± 1.54 to 49.8 ± 2.14 quercetin (QE mg/g, respectively. The EC50 of herbal extracts ranged from 100 µg/ml (0.38 quercetin equivalents, for AQPE, 168 µg/ml (0.80 quercetin equivalents, for MPE. The phenolic profile in the methanolic extracts was investigated by chromatographic (HPLC method. About 5 different flavonoids, phenolic acids, and their derivatives including quercetin (1, rutin (2, gallic acid (3, ellagic acid (4, and punicalagin as a major ellagitannin (5 have been identified. Among both extracts, methanolic extract was the most effective. This report may be the first to show nutritive content and correlation analysis to suggest that phenols and flavonoids might contribute the high antioxidant activity of this fruit peel and establish it as a valuable natural antioxidant source applicable in the health food industry.

  8. Wind turbines and bat mortality: Doppler shift profiles and ultrasonic bat-like pulse reflection from moving turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Chloe V; Flint, James A; Lepper, Paul A

    2010-10-01

    Bat mortality resulting from actual or near-collision with operational wind turbine rotors is a phenomenon that is widespread but not well understood. Because bats rely on information contained in high-frequency echoes to determine the nature and movement of a target, it is important to consider how ultrasonic pulses similar to those used by bats for echolocation may be interacting with operational turbine rotor blades. By assessing the characteristics of reflected ultrasonic echoes, moving turbine blades operating under low wind speed conditions (<6 m s(-1)) were found to produce distinct Doppler shift profiles at different angles to the rotor. Frequency shifts of up to ±700-800 Hz were produced, which may not be perceptible by some bat species. Monte Carlo simulation of bat-like sampling by echolocation revealed that over 50 rotor echoes could be required by species such as Pipistrellus pipistrellus for accurate interpretation of blade movement, which may not be achieved in the bat's approach time-window. In summary, it was found that echoes returned from moving blades had features which could render them attractive to bats or which might make it difficult for the bat to accurately detect and locate blades in sufficient time to avoid a collision.

  9. An Inverse Method for Obtaining the Attenuation Profile and Small Variations in the Sound Speed and Density Profiles of the Ocean Bottom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    L’-(Pl’ Ing k eriiel for pr,,-fdi 7-1J41 .) 1 ~ Figure 7-30: fEC’.NL Ir. k crud L’ fr pr’cifl T-1.4 (c) P-7 Figure 7-31: L-- 1PH I :r,. - I. ’.1 7-14...Further, the data in the low frequency range are spread over a wide range of values of attenuation and there is no consistent pattern to justify a...studying the peak to null difference in the measured interference pattern . 4 3.2 Determination of the attenuation profile from the plane-wave

  10. Obtaining representative community profiles of anaerobic digesters through optimisation of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Karst, Søren Michael

    RNA gene amplicon sequencing is rapid, cheap, high throughput, and has high taxonomic resolution. However, biases are introduced in multiple steps of this approach, including non-representative DNA extraction and uneven taxonomic coverage of selected PCR primers, potentially giving a skewed view...... of the community composition . As such sample specific optimisation and standardisation of DNA extraction, as well PCR primer selection, are essential to minimising the potential for such biases. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for optimized community profiling of anaerobic digesters. The Fast......DNA SPIN kit was selected and the mechanical lysis parameters optimised for extraction of genomic DNA from mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digester samples. Different primer sets were compared for targeting the archaea and bacteria, both together and individually . Shotgun sequencing...

  11. Simulative Winding of Roll Formed Profile in Carcass Production for Flexible Pipes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Ormstrup, Casper Alexander; Hartz, Benjamin Arnold Krekeler

    2015-01-01

    In carcass production for flexible pipe systems roll formed profiles are wound around a mandrel forming an interlocking, flexible structure able to withstand collapse from outside water pressure or mechanical crushing. Carcass is often produced in lengths of several kilometres, which implies...

  12. Wind and thermodynamic profiler observations of a late-mature gust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ments of two GF events with a 915 MHz profiler,. May (1999) described detailed structures of vertical motion and virtual temperature. MIPS is capable of providing direct measure- ments of kinematic and thermodynamic variables with fine temporal and vertical resolutions to por- tray the vertical structure of CBZs (Knupp 2006 ...

  13. PMSE and wind profiles from observations above EISCAT Tromsø site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Nozawa, Satonori; Haeggstroem, Ingemar; Tjulin, Anders; Dalin, Peter; Hall, Chris; Anyairo, Charles; Rostami, Sina

    2017-04-01

    One of the processes that are linked to the entry of cosmic dust in atmosphere is the formation of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE). PMSE are strong radar echoes that are observed in the polar summer mesosphere. They are caused by spatial variations in the plasma refractive index which arise in the presence of electrically charged ice particles. The ice particles that are linked to PMSE are often below the optically observable size range and are assumed to form by water ice condensing onto meteoric smoke particles at around 80 to 90 km altitude. The atmosphere at PMSE altitude is influenced by solar radiative forcing from above and gravity waves from below, and while ionization is small, it is highly variable due to a number of different processes. A straightforward quantitative description of the physics leading to PMSE formation is at present still missing. With one of the first tri-static PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF radar we found signs of wind shear in PMSE. The observations suggest that the PMSE contains sublayers that move in different directions horizontally, and this points to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability possibly playing a role in PMSE process. We compare the EISCAT observations to wind observations carried with other radar at the same location and discuss implications for future observations. We acknowledge Chris Meek and Alan Manson who provided MF radar data. EISCAT is an international association supported by research organizations in Norway (NFR), Sweden (VR), Finland (SA), Japan (NIPR and STEL), China (CRIPR), and the United Kingdom (NERC); data are available under http://www. eiscat.se/madrigal/.

  14. Chemical profile and antimicrobial activity of Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina extracts obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazutti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the effects of temperature (20 to 50ºC and pressure (100 to 250 bar on the extraction yield, chemical characteristics and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Peumus boldus Molina obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction. Results showed that the extraction variables affect the extraction yield and the chemical distribution of the major compounds present in the extracts. The extracts were chemically analyzed with regard to 1,8-cineole, trans-sabinene, pinocarveol, pinocarvone, 4-terpineol, ascaridole, piperitone oxide, limonene dioxide and n-eicosane in a GC/MSD. Antimicrobial tests demonstrated that the high-pressure CO2 extracts had activity against 13 bacteria and that better action was verified with extracts obtained at a lower CO2 extraction density and a higher temperature.

  15. Metabolomics profiling of pre-and post-anesthesia plasma samples of colorectal patients obtained via Ficoll separation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghini, Veronica; Unger, Florian T; Tenori, Leonardo; Turano, Paola; Juhl, Hartmut; David, Kerstin A.

    2015-01-01

    1H NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the metabolic consequences of general anesthesia in the plasma of two groups of patients with diagnosis for non-metastatic colorectal cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer with liver-metastasis, respectively. Patients were treated with etomidate or propofol, two frequently used sedation agents. Plasma samples were obtained via Ficoll separation. Here, we demonstrated that this procedure introduces a number of limitations for NMR-based metabolomics...

  16. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Profiling of Thrombotic Material Obtained by Endovascular Thrombectomy in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Muñoz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic material retrieved from acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients represents a valuable source of biological information. In this study, we have developed a clinical proteomics workflow to characterize the protein cargo of thrombi derived from AIS patients. To analyze the thrombus proteome in a large-scale format, we developed a workflow that combines the isolation of thrombus by endovascular thrombectomy and peptide chromatographic fractionation coupled to mass-spectrometry. Using this workflow, we have characterized a specific proteomic expression profile derived from four AIS patients included in this study. Around 1600 protein species were unambiguously identified in the analyzed material. Functional bioinformatics analyses were performed, emphasizing a clustering of proteins with immunological functions as well as cardiopathy-related proteins with blood-cell dependent functions and peripheral vascular processes. In addition, we established a reference proteomic fingerprint of 341 proteins commonly detected in all patients. Protein interactome network of this subproteome revealed protein clusters involved in the interaction of fibronectin with 14-3-3 proteins, TGFβ signaling, and TCP complex network. Taken together, our data contributes to the repertoire of the human thrombus proteome, serving as a reference library to increase our knowledge about the molecular basis of thrombus derived from AIS patients, paving the way toward the establishment of a quantitative approach necessary to detect and characterize potential novel biomarkers in the stroke field.

  17. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  18. Estimating atmospheric stability from observations and correcting wind shear models accordingly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, M.C.; Bierbooms, W.A.A.M.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric stability strongly influences wind shear and thus has to be considered when performing load calculations for wind turbine design. Numerous methods exist however for obtaining stability in terms of the Obukhov length L as well as for correcting the logarithmic wind profile. It is

  19. Gene expression profiles of Beta-cell enriched tissue obtained by laser capture microdissection from subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorella Marselli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells from type 2 diabetes (T2D should provide insights into their abnormal insulin secretion and turnover.Frozen sections were obtained from cadaver pancreases of 10 control and 10 T2D human subjects. Beta-cell enriched samples were obtained by laser capture microdissection (LCM. RNA was extracted, amplified and subjected to microarray analysis. Further analysis was performed with DNA-Chip Analyzer (dChip and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. There were changes in expression of genes linked to glucotoxicity. Evidence of oxidative stress was provided by upregulation of several metallothionein genes. There were few changes in the major genes associated with cell cycle, apoptosis or endoplasmic reticulum stress. There was differential expression of genes associated with pancreatic regeneration, most notably upregulation of members of the regenerating islet gene (REG family and metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7. Some of the genes found in GWAS studies to be related to T2D were also found to be differentially expressed. IGF2BP2, TSPAN8, and HNF1B (TCF2 were upregulated while JAZF1 and SLC30A8 were downregulated.This study made possible by LCM has identified many novel changes in gene expression that enhance understanding of the pathogenesis of T2D.

  20. Metabolite profiling of Clinacanthus nutans leaves extracts obtained from different drying methods by 1H NMR-based metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Noor Haslinda Noor; Latip, Jalifah; Khatib, Alfi

    2016-11-01

    The metabolites of Clinacanthus nutans leaves extracts and their dependence on drying process were systematically characterized using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) multivariate data analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were able to distinguish the leaves extracts obtained from different drying methods. The identified metabolites were carbohydrates, amino acid, flavonoids and sulfur glucoside compounds. The major metabolites responsible for the separation in PLS-DA loading plots were lupeol, cycloclinacosides, betulin, cerebrosides and choline. The results showed that the combination of 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analyses could act as an efficient technique to understand the C. nutans composition and its variation.

  1. Analysis of synthetic profile of CZTS as photovoltaic material obtained with variations of titanium and TiN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, M.; Vera, E.; Gómez, J.; Pineda, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Semiconductor type Cu2ZnTiS4 (CZTiS) and Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS),were synthetized starting from a hydrothermal route from precursor powders such as copper, zinc, tin, titanium isopropoxide and tiocarbammide metal nitrates dissolved in deionized water in concentrations of 1molL-1. Dosed and placed in a steel autoclave equipped with a Teflon jacket under magnetic stirring (150rpm) and at a temperature of 300°C for 24 hours in order to promote the formation of the respective ceramic phases. Segregates have been repeatedly washed with ethanol at all times until obtaining crystalline-looking solids. Subsequently, in order to promote the production of pure crystalline phases, the materials were subjected to a second reaction stage in a tubular furnace at 400°C in flow (50mLmin-1) for the purpose of Reduce the concentration of secondary phases of sulphides. The characterization of the CZTiS and CZTS materials was performed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy where the presence of Kesterite type crystalline structures was confirmed in the two materials revealing that the effect of titanium with a higher ionic radius than tin produces a distortion in the cell of the CZTiS material compared to the report for the CZTS system. The results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), confirm the regular aggregates obtained with composition consistent with the proposal theoretically and validated by Energy-Dispersion X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) techniques and comparison between secondary emission spectra and Retro-dispersed.

  2. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), 32-km North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) interpolated to a 12-km grid, and 13-km Rapid Refresh analyses.

  3. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Emily B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Elmer, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  4. Wind Power Meteorology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Landberg, Lars

    Wind power meteorology has evolved as an applied science, firmly founded on boundary-layer meteorology, but with strong links to climatology and geography. It concerns itself with three main areas: siting of wind turbines, regional wind resource assessment, and short-term prediction of the wind...... resource. The history, status and perspectives of wind power meteorology are presented, with emphasis on physical considerations and on its practical application. Following a global view of the wind resource, the elements of boundary layer meteorology which are most important for wind energy are reviewed......: wind profiles and shear, turbulence and gust, and extreme winds. The data used in wind power meteorology stem mainly from three sources: onsite wind measurements, the synoptic networks, and the re-analysis projects. Wind climate analysis, wind resource estimation and siting further require a detailed...

  5. Molecular structures of fluid phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers obtained from simulation-to-experiment comparisons and experimental scattering density profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučerka, Norbert; van Oosten, Brad; Pan, Jianjun; Heberle, Frederick A; Harroun, Thad A; Katsaras, John

    2015-02-05

    Following our previous efforts in determining the structures of commonly used PC, PG, and PS bilayers, we continue our studies of fully hydrated, fluid phase PE bilayers. The newly designed parsing scheme for PE bilayers was based on extensive MD simulations, and is utilized in the SDP analysis of both X-ray and neutron (contrast varied) scattering measurements. Obtained experimental scattering form factors are directly compared to our simulation results, and can serve as a benchmark for future developed force fields. Among the evaluated structural parameters, namely, area per lipid A, overall bilayer thickness DB, and hydrocarbon region thickness 2DC, the PE bilayer response to changing temperature is similar to previously studied bilayers with different headgroups. On the other hand, the reduced hydration of PE headgroups, as well as the strong hydrogen bonding between PE headgroups, dramatically affects lateral packing within the bilayer. Despite sharing the same glycerol backbone, a markedly smaller area per lipid distinguishes PE from other bilayers (i.e., PC, PG, and PS) studied to date. Overall, our data are consistent with the notion that lipid headgroups govern bilayer packing, while hydrocarbon chains dominate the bilayer's response to temperature changes.

  6. Physicochemical and dissolution profile characterization of pellets containing different binders obtained by the extrusion-spheronization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Georges Issa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of evaluating the behavior of different polymers employed as binders in small-diameter pellets for oral administration, we prepared formulations containing paracetamol and one of the following polymers: PVP, PEG 1500, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and methylcellulose, and we evaluated their different binding properties. The pellets were obtained by the extrusion/spheronization process and were subsequently subjected to fluid bed drying. In order to assess drug delivery, the United States Pharmacopeia (USP apparatus 3 (Bio-Dis was employed, in conjunction with the method described by the same pharmacopeia for the dissolution of paracetamol tablets (apparatus 1. The pellets were also evaluated for granulometry, friability, true density and drug content. The results indicate that the different binders used are capable of affecting production in different ways, and some of the physicochemical characteristics of the pellets, as well as the dissolution test, revealed that the formulations acted like immediate-release products. The pellets obtained presented favorable release characteristics for orally disintegrating tablets. USP apparatus 3 seems to be more adequate for discriminating among formulations than the basket method.Com a finalidade de se avaliar o comportamento de diferentes polímeros empregados como aglutinantes em pellets de pequeno diâmetro para uso oral foram preparadas formulações contendo paracetamol e um dos seguintes polímeros: PVP, PEG 1500, hidroxipropilmetilcelulose e metilcelulose por apresentarem diferentes propriedades aglutinantes. Os pellets foram obtidos pelo processo de extrusão/esferonização e secagem em leito fluidizado. Para avaliar a liberação do fármaco, empregou-se o método 3 da Farmacopeia Americana, também conhecido como Bio-Dis e o método preconizado pela mesma farmacopeia para comprimidos de paracetamol. Os pellets foram avaliados, ainda, com relação à granulometria, friabilidade

  7. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) HIGH-ALTITUDE IMAGING WIND AND RAIN AIRBORNE PROFILER (HIWRAP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain dataset was collected from the High-altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne...

  8. Clonality, virulence determinants, and profiles of resistance of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates obtained from a Spanish hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Dahdouh

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen that is showing increasing rates of carbapenem resistance. Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR International Clones (ICs, associated with certain oxacillinases, are being reported globally. This organism also harbors numerous virulence determinants. In this study, we aim at characterizing A. baumannii isolated from a Spanish hospital in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility, clonality, carbapenemase genes harbored, and virulence determinants expressed.Fifty nine clinical bloodstream isolates were obtained from 2009 until 2013. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing was performed according to the CLSI guidelines. PFGE and tri-locus PCR typing were then performed in order to determine local and international clonality. PCRs for the detection of common carbapenemases were also performed. Production of hemolysis, biofilms, siderophores, surface motility, and proteolysis were determined phenotypically. Doubling times for selected strains were also calculated. Finally, statistical analysis for detecting associations between these factors was conducted.Carbapenem non-susceptibility was 84.75%, suggesting the immediate need for intervention. PFGE showed the distribution of the majority of the isolates among 7 clusters. Although all three ICs were detected, IC II was predominant at 71.19%. blaOXA-24-like was the most prevalent carbapenemase (62.71%, followed by blaOXA-58-like (13.56%, and blaOXA-23-like (11.86%. Strains pertaining to IC II, and those harboring blaOXA-24-like, were positively associated with α-hemolysis, production of strong biofilms, and siderophore production. Harboring blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-58-like was associated with attenuated virulence. These associations suggest that an interplay exists between these factors that could be locally exploited.An alarmingly high rate of carbapenem non-susceptibility has been detected in this study. There was a predominance of IC II and blaOXA-24-like, and those

  9. Evaluation of volatile profiles obtained for minimally-processed pineapple fruit samples during storage by headspace-solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francielle Crocetta TURAZZI

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the application of the solid-phase microextraction (SPME technique for the determination and monitoring of the volatile profile of minimally-processed pineapple fruit stored at various temperatures (-12 °C, 4 °C and 25 °C for different periods (1, 4 and 10 days. The SPME fiber coating composed of Car/PDMS presented the best performance. The optimal extraction conditions obtained through a Doehlert design were 60 min at 35 °C. The profiles for the volatile compounds content of the fruit at each stage of storage were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The variation in the volatile profile over time was greater when the fruit samples were stored at 25 °C and at -12 °C compared to 4 °C. Thus, according to the volatile profiles associated with the storage conditions evaluated in this study, packaged pineapple retains best its fresh fruit aroma when stored at 4 °C.

  10. A comparison between Nimbus 5 THIR and ITPR temperatures and derived winds with rawinsonde data obtained in the AVE 2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. E.; Scoggins, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1976-01-01

    During the period of May 11 and 12, 1974, NASA conducted its second Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) over the eastern United States. In this time interval, two Nimbus 5 orbits crossed the AVE II area, providing a series of ITPR soundings as well as THIR data. Horizontal temperature mapping of the AVE II cloud field is examined using two grid print map scales. Implied cloud top heights are compared with maximum radar-echo top reports. In addition, shelter temperatures in areas of clear sky are compared with the surface temperatures as determined from 11.5 micrometer radiometer data of the THIR experiment. The ITPR sounding accuracy is evaluated using interpolated radiosonde temperatures at times nearly coincident with the ITPR soundings. It was found that mean differences between the two data sets were as small as 1.3 C near 500 mb and as large as 2.9 C near the tropopause. The differences between ITPR and radiosonde temperatures at constant pressure levels were sufficient to induce significant differences in the horizontal temperature gradient. Cross sections of geostrophic wind along the orbital tracks were developed using a thermal wind buildup based on the ITPR temperature data and the radiosonde temperature data. Differences between the radiosonde and ITPR geostrophic winds could be explained on the basis of differences in the ITPR and radiosonde temperature gradients.

  11. Mathematical Modeling for Lateral Displacement Induced by Wind Velocity Using Monitoring Data Obtained from Main Girder of Sutong Cable-Stayed Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao-Xin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the health monitoring system installed on the main span of Sutong Cable-Stayed Bridge, GPS displacement and wind field are real-time monitored and analyzed. According to analytical results, apparent nonlinear correlation with certain discreteness exists between lateral static girder displacement and lateral static wind velocity; thus time series of lateral static girder displacement are decomposed into nonlinear correlation term and discreteness term, nonlinear correlation term of which is mathematically modeled by third-order Fourier series with intervention of lateral static wind velocity and discreteness term of which is mathematically modeled by the combined models of ARMA(7,4 and EGARCH(2,1. Additionally, stable power spectrum density exists in time series of lateral dynamic girder displacement, which can be well described by the fourth-order Gaussian series; thus time series of lateral dynamic girder displacement are mathematically modeled by harmonic superposition function. By comparison and verification between simulative and monitoring lateral girder displacements from September 1 to September 3, the presented mathematical models are effective to simulate time series of lateral girder displacement from main girder of Sutong Cable-Stayed Bridge.

  12. Installation and Initial Operation of DOE's 449-MHz Wind Profiling Radars on the U.S. West Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Julia E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Victor R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilczak, J. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); White, A. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ayers, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); King, Clark W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has recently completed the installation of three new wind profiling radars on the Washington and Oregon coasts. These systems operate at a frequency of 449 MHz and provide mean wind profiles to a height of roughly 8 km, with the maximum measurement height depending on time-varying atmospheric conditions. This is roughly half the depth of the troposphere at these latitudes. Each system is also equipped with a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), which provides a measure of the temperature profile to heights of approximately 2 km. Other equipment deployed alongside the radar includes a surface meteorological station and GPS for column water vapor. This project began in fiscal year 2014, starting with equipment procurements and site selection. In addition, environmental reviews, equipment assembly and testing, site access agreements, and infrastructure preparations have been performed. Finally, with equipment deployment with data collection and dissemination, the primary tasks of this project have been completed. The three new wind profiling radars have been deployed at airports near Coos Bay, OR, and Astoria, OR, and at an industrial park near Forks, WA. Data are available through the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory Data Display website, and will soon be made available through the DOE Atmosphere to Electrons data archive and portal as well.

  13. Initial daytime and nighttime SOFDI observations of thermospheric winds from Fabry-Perot Doppler shift measurements of the 630-nm OI line-shape profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Gerrard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present both night and day thermospheric wind observations made with the Second-generation, Optimized, Fabry-Perot Doppler Imager (SOFDI, a novel triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI designed to make 24-h measurements of thermospheric winds from OI 630-nm emission. These results were obtained from the northeastern United States and from under the magnetic equator at Huancayo, Peru and demonstrate the current instrument capability for measurements of Doppler shifts for either night or day. We found the uncertainties in the measurements agree with expected values based upon forward modeling calculations; nighttime wind components having an uncertainty of ~20-m s−1 at 30-min resolution and daytime wind components having an uncertainty of ~70-m s−1 at 20-min resolution. The nighttime uncertainties are typically larger than those seen with traditional single-etalon FPIs, which occur at the cost of being able to achieve daytime measurements. The thermospheric wind measurements from Huancayo replicate recently reported CHAMP zonal winds and are in disagreement with current empirical wind climatologies. In addition, we discuss the incorporation of how multiple point heads in the SOFDI instrument will allow for unique studies of gravity wave activity in future measurements.

  14. Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypic Profiles of Sulfadiazine-Resistant and Sensitive Toxoplasma gondii Isolates Obtained from Newborns with Congenital Toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Letícia Azevedo; Reis-Cunha, João Luís; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Vítor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Previous Toxoplasma gondii studies revealed that mutations in the dhps (dihydropteroate synthase) gene are associated with resistance to sulfonamides. Although Brazilian strains are genotypically different, very limited data are available regarding the susceptibility of strains obtained from human to sulfonamides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sulfadiazine (SDZ) against Brazilian isolates of T. gondii and verify whether isolates present polymorphisms in the dhps gene. We also investigated whether the virulence-phenotype and/or genotype were associated with the profile of susceptibility to SDZ. Five T. gondii isolates obtained from newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis were used to verify susceptibility. Mice were infected with 104 tachyzoites and orally treated with different doses of SDZ. The mortality curve was evaluated by the Log-rank test. The presence of polymorphisms in the dhps gene was verified using sequencing. A descriptive analysis for 11 Brazilian isolates was used to assess the association between susceptibility, genotype, and virulence-phenotype. Statistical analysis showed that TgCTBr03, 07, 08, and 16 isolates were susceptible to SDZ, whereas TgCTBr11 isolate presented a profile of resistance to SDZ. Nineteen polymorphisms were identified in dhps exons. Seven polymorphisms corresponded to non-synonymous mutations, with four being new mutations, described for the first time in this study. No association was found between the profile of susceptibility and the virulence-phenotype or genotype of the parasite. There is a high variability in the susceptibilities of Brazilian T. gondii strains to SDZ, with evidence of drug resistance. Despite the large number of polymorphisms identified, the profile of susceptibility to SDZ was not associated with any of the dhps variants identified in this study. Other genetic factors, not yet determined, may be associated with the resistance to SDZ; thus, further studies are needed as a basis

  15. Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypic Profiles of Sulfadiazine-Resistant and Sensitive Toxoplasma gondii Isolates Obtained from Newborns with Congenital Toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Azevedo Silva

    Full Text Available Previous Toxoplasma gondii studies revealed that mutations in the dhps (dihydropteroate synthase gene are associated with resistance to sulfonamides. Although Brazilian strains are genotypically different, very limited data are available regarding the susceptibility of strains obtained from human to sulfonamides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sulfadiazine (SDZ against Brazilian isolates of T. gondii and verify whether isolates present polymorphisms in the dhps gene. We also investigated whether the virulence-phenotype and/or genotype were associated with the profile of susceptibility to SDZ.Five T. gondii isolates obtained from newborns with congenital toxoplasmosis were used to verify susceptibility. Mice were infected with 104 tachyzoites and orally treated with different doses of SDZ. The mortality curve was evaluated by the Log-rank test. The presence of polymorphisms in the dhps gene was verified using sequencing. A descriptive analysis for 11 Brazilian isolates was used to assess the association between susceptibility, genotype, and virulence-phenotype.Statistical analysis showed that TgCTBr03, 07, 08, and 16 isolates were susceptible to SDZ, whereas TgCTBr11 isolate presented a profile of resistance to SDZ. Nineteen polymorphisms were identified in dhps exons. Seven polymorphisms corresponded to non-synonymous mutations, with four being new mutations, described for the first time in this study. No association was found between the profile of susceptibility and the virulence-phenotype or genotype of the parasite.There is a high variability in the susceptibilities of Brazilian T. gondii strains to SDZ, with evidence of drug resistance. Despite the large number of polymorphisms identified, the profile of susceptibility to SDZ was not associated with any of the dhps variants identified in this study. Other genetic factors, not yet determined, may be associated with the resistance to SDZ; thus, further studies are

  16. Conversion of a molecular classifier obtained by gene expression profiling into a classifier based on real-time PCR: a prognosis predictor for gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikuni Nobuhiro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of gene expression profiling was expected to dramatically improve cancer diagnosis. However, despite intensive efforts and several successful examples, the development of profile-based diagnostic systems remains a difficult task. In the present work, we established a method to convert molecular classifiers based on adaptor-tagged competitive PCR (ATAC-PCR (with a data format that is similar to that of microarrays into classifiers based on real-time PCR. Methods Previously, we constructed a prognosis predictor for glioma using gene expression data obtained by ATAC-PCR, a high-throughput reverse-transcription PCR technique. The analysis of gene expression data obtained by ATAC-PCR is similar to the analysis of data from two-colour microarrays. The prognosis predictor was a linear classifier based on the first principal component (PC1 score, a weighted summation of the expression values of 58 genes. In the present study, we employed the delta-delta Ct method for measurement by real-time PCR. The predictor was converted to a Ct value-based predictor using linear regression. Results We selected UBL5 as the reference gene from the group of genes with expression patterns that were most similar to the median expression level from the previous profiling study. The number of diagnostic genes was reduced to 27 without affecting the performance of the prognosis predictor. PC1 scores calculated from the data obtained by real-time PCR showed a high linear correlation (r = 0.94 with those obtained by ATAC-PCR. The correlation for individual gene expression patterns (r = 0.43 to 0.91 was smaller than for PC1 scores, suggesting that errors of measurement were likely cancelled out during the weighted summation of the expression values. The classification of a test set (n = 36 by the new predictor was more accurate than histopathological diagnosis (log rank p-values, 0.023 and 0.137, respectively for predicting prognosis. Conclusion

  17. DOE's 449 MHz Wind Profiling Radars on the U.S. West Coast: Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Wilczak, J. M.; King, Clark W.; Shaw, William J.; White, A. B.; Ayers, Tom

    2016-09-30

    The three coastal wind profilers and associated meteorological instruments located in Forks, WA, Astoria, OR, and North Bend, OR, provide important observations at high temporal and vertical spatial resolution to characterize the meteorological inflow to the western region of the United States. These instruments have been operating for a year or more, and furnish boundary conditions for the modeling efforts of the WFIP2 project. The data have been delivered to archives at both NOAA and the DOE A2e DAP at a data recovery rate in excess of 98%. Site maintenance activities have been relatively minor, with a few component replacements and repairs to RASS foam. Bird mortality surveys have found no bird nests or carcasses, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has regularly been provided survey reports. This project represents a successful collaboration between PNNL and NOAA to procure, test, deploy, maintain, and operate three 449 MHz radar wind profilers.

  18. Average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kataoka

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We report average profiles of the solar wind and outer radiation belt during the extreme flux enhancement of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit (GEO. It is found that seven of top ten extreme events at GEO during solar cycle 23 are associated with the magnetosphere inflation during the storm recovery phase as caused by the large-scale solar wind structure of very low dynamic pressure (<1.0 nPa during rapid speed decrease from very high (>650 km/s to typical (400–500 km/s in a few days. For the seven events, the solar wind parameters, geomagnetic activity indices, and relativistic electron flux and geomagnetic field at GEO are superposed at the local noon period of GOES satellites to investigate the physical cause. The average profiles support the "double inflation" mechanism that the rarefaction of the solar wind and subsequent magnetosphere inflation are one of the best conditions to produce the extreme flux enhancement at GEO because of the excellent magnetic confinement of relativistic electrons by reducing the drift loss of trapped electrons at dayside magnetopause.

  19. Assessment of wind resource for possibility of small wind turbine installation in Ilorin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajao Kajogbola Rasaq

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an evaluation of the wind characteristics of a particular location in University of Ilorin, Nigeria. The daily wind data for this location (lat. 8.48N, long. 4.67E at three different heights of 10 m, 20 m and 30 m were measured over a period of six months. Although there seems to be flashes of higher wind speed at H = 20 m due to not too far away trees having more leaves up there and causing occasional turbulence, consistent wind availability still occurs at H = 30 m. The mean wind speed obtained at H = 30 m was 5.5 m/h (2.5 m/s which is close to the cut-in wind speed of most modern commercially available small wind turbines. The results obtained ascertained that the wind speed increases with height that produces more power and the resulting wind profile may be useful in determining the type of wind turbine that may be suitable for this location. The adoption of wind energy technology will improve electricity supply, ensure greater energy mix and enhance the overall economic development in Nigeria.

  20. Application of model-based spectral analysis to wind-profiler radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Boyer

    Full Text Available A classical way to reduce a radar’s data is to compute the spectrum using FFT and then to identify the different peak contributions. But in case an overlapping between the different echoes (atmospheric echo, clutter, hydrometeor echo. . . exists, Fourier-like techniques provide poor frequency resolution and then sophisticated peak-identification may not be able to detect the different echoes. In order to improve the number of reduced data and their quality relative to Fourier spectrum analysis, three different methods are presented in this paper and applied to actual data. Their approach consists of predicting the main frequency-components, which avoids the development of very sophisticated peak-identification algorithms. The first method is based on cepstrum properties generally used to determine the shift between two close identical echoes. We will see in this paper that this method cannot provide a better estimate than Fourier-like techniques in an operational use. The second method consists of an autoregressive estimation of the spectrum. Since the tests were promising, this method was applied to reduce the radar data obtained during two thunder-storms. The autoregressive method, which is very simple to implement, improved the Doppler-frequency data reduction relative to the FFT spectrum analysis. The third method exploits a MUSIC algorithm, one of the numerous subspace-based methods, which is well adapted to estimate spectra composed of pure lines. A statistical study of performances of this method is presented, and points out the very good resolution of this estimator in comparison with Fourier-like techniques. Application to actual data confirms the good qualities of this estimator for reducing radar’s data.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (tropical meteorology- Radio science (signal processing- General (techniques applicable in three or more fields

  1. Application of model-based spectral analysis to wind-profiler radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, E.; Petitdidier, M.; Corneil, W.; Adnet, C.; Larzabal, P.

    2001-08-01

    A classical way to reduce a radar’s data is to compute the spectrum using FFT and then to identify the different peak contributions. But in case an overlapping between the different echoes (atmospheric echo, clutter, hydrometeor echo. . . ) exists, Fourier-like techniques provide poor frequency resolution and then sophisticated peak-identification may not be able to detect the different echoes. In order to improve the number of reduced data and their quality relative to Fourier spectrum analysis, three different methods are presented in this paper and applied to actual data. Their approach consists of predicting the main frequency-components, which avoids the development of very sophisticated peak-identification algorithms. The first method is based on cepstrum properties generally used to determine the shift between two close identical echoes. We will see in this paper that this method cannot provide a better estimate than Fourier-like techniques in an operational use. The second method consists of an autoregressive estimation of the spectrum. Since the tests were promising, this method was applied to reduce the radar data obtained during two thunder-storms. The autoregressive method, which is very simple to implement, improved the Doppler-frequency data reduction relative to the FFT spectrum analysis. The third method exploits a MUSIC algorithm, one of the numerous subspace-based methods, which is well adapted to estimate spectra composed of pure lines. A statistical study of performances of this method is presented, and points out the very good resolution of this estimator in comparison with Fourier-like techniques. Application to actual data confirms the good qualities of this estimator for reducing radar’s data.

  2. Comparison of the atmospheric stability and wind profiles at two wind farm sites over a long marine fetch in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    that represent long marine fetch are considered. It was observed that within a long marine fetch, the conditions in the North Sea are dominated by unstable [41% at Egmond aan Zee Offshore Wind Farm (OWEZ) and 33% at HR] and near-neutral conditions (49% at OWEZ and 47% at HR), and stable conditions (10% at OWEZ...... was not noticeable. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  3. A five-factor biomarker profile obtained week 4-12 of treatment for improved prognostication in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Anne V; Geertsen, Poul F; Christensen, Ib J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several biomarkers of treatment efficacy have been associated with a better prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The prognostic significance of biomarkers in the early treatment phase is unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a complete national cohort of m......RCC patients receiving first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) or interleukin-2 based immunotherapy (IT) from 2006 to 2010, overall survival (OS) was analysed for baseline International mRCC Database Consortium (IMDC) classification factors and on-treatment time-dependent biomarkers obtained day 1 each...... analyses stratified for TKI and IT (p ≤ 0.04). Concordance (C)-index for IMDC classification alone was 0.625 (95% CI 0.59-0.66) and combined with the five-factor biomarker profile 0.683 (95% CI 0.64-0.72). For patients with good (3-5 factors) and poor (0-2 factors) biomarker profile median OS were 23...

  4. Comparison of biogenic amine and polyphenol profiles of grape berries and wines obtained following conventional, organic and biodynamic agricultural and oenological practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassoni, Annalisa; Tango, Nunzio; Ferri, Maura

    2013-08-15

    The bio-active compounds present in food and beverages have a high potential influence on the future health of humans. The levels of biogenic amines, anthocyanins, polyphenols and antioxidant activity were measured in white (Pignoletto) and red (Sangiovese) grape berries and wines from the Emilia-Romagna region (Italy) obtained following conventional, organic and biodynamic agricultural and oenological practices. No significant difference was shown among the samples coming from different agricultural and winemaking practices. Principal Component Analysis was also performed. Biogenic amine amounts were higher in red than in white berries, while in the wines an opposite trend was observed, with histamine, tyramine and putrescine being the most abundant in Pignoletto wines. Red grapes and wines were richer in anthocyanins and showed higher antioxidant activity than white ones. The total level of polyphenols was similar in red and white berries, but with different metabolite profiles depending on the grape variety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Slow hydrodynamic regime to model B supergiant winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venero, R. O. J.; Cidale, L. S.; Cure, M.; Haucke, M.

    2017-10-01

    Current hydrodynamic solutions for the winds of early-type stars are obtained from the theory of rotating stars with radiation-driven winds. These solutions are separated into two main branches: the fast solution and the slow solutions. The first set is the standard CAK solution, while the second set corresponds to a group of solutions with still poorly known properties. In this work we study the properties of the slow wind regime derived for different values of the line force parameters, and compute the resulting line profiles. Then we fit our synthetic line profiles with observed ones, in order to evaluate the ability of the slow solution to represent the variety of features observed in line profiles originated along the winds. We find that the winds of B supergiants can be well-represented by the slow regime, a result that could give new insights into the true nature of the outflows in early-type stars.

  6. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  7. Stratigraphy of a proposed wind farm site southeast of Block Island: Utilization of borehole samples, downhole logging, and seismic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Dane P. H.

    Seismic stratigraphy, sedimentology, lithostratigraphy, downhole geophysical logging, mineralogy, and palynology were used to study and interpret the upper 70 meters of the inner continental shelf sediments within a proposed wind farm site located approximately two to three nautical miles to the southeast of Block Island, Rhode Island. Core samples and downhole logging collected from borings drilled for geotechnical purposes at proposed wind turbine sites along with seismic surveys in the surrounding area provide the data for this study. Cretaceous coastal plain sediments that consist of non-marine to marine sand, silt, and clay are found overlying bedrock at a contact depth beyond the sampling depth of this study. The upper Cretaceous sediments sampled in borings are correlated with the Magothy/Matawan formations described regionally from New Jersey to Nantucket. An unconformity formed through sub-aerial, fluvial, marine, and glacial erosion marks the upper strata of the Cretaceous sediments separating them from the overlying deposits. The majority of Quaternary deposits overlying the unconformity represent the advance, pulsing, and retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet that reached its southern terminus in the area of Block Island approximately 25,000 to 21,000 years before present. The sequence consists of a basal glacial till overlain by sediments deposited by meltwater environments ranging from deltaic to proglacial lakefloor. A late Pleistocene to early Holocene unconformity marks the top of the glacial sequence and was formed after glacial retreat through fluvial and subaerial erosion/deposition. Overlying the glacial sequence are sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene and Holocene consisting of interbedded gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Sampling of these sediments was limited and surficial reflectors in seismic profiles were masked due to a hard bottom return. However, two depositional periods are interpreted as representing fluvial and estuarine

  8. Latent heat flux measurements over complex terrain by airborne water vapour and wind lidars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kiemle, Christoph; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas; Rahm, Stephan; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the latent heat flux in a convective boundary layer (CBL) are obtained for the first time over complex terrain with airborne water vapour differential absorption lidar and Doppler wind lidar...

  9. Field Aligned Currents Derived From Pressure Profiles Obtained From TWINS ENA Images for Geomagnetic Storms That Occurred On 01 June 2013 and 17 March 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, K.; Perez, J. D.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Field aligned currents (FACs) that flow from the Earth's magnetosphere into the ionosphere are an important coupling mechanism in the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. Assuming pressure balance and charge conservation yields an expression for the FACs in terms of plasma pressure gradients and pressure anisotropy. The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission, the first stereoscopic ENA magnetospheric imager, provides global images of the inner magnetosphere from which ion pressure distributions and pressure anisotropies are obtained. Following the formulations in Vasyliunas (1970), Vasyliunas (1984), and Heinemann (1990), and using results from TWINS observations, we calculate the distributions of field aligned currents for geomagnetic storms on 1 June 2013 and 17 March 2015, in which extended ionospheric precipitation was observed. As previous work has assumed isotropic pressure distributions, we perform calculations both assuming pressure isotropy, and using the pressure anisotropy observed by TWINS, and compare the results from the two storms. References: 1. Vasyliunas, V. M. (1970). Mathematical Models of Magnetospheric Convection and its Coupling to the Ionosphere. Particles and Fields in the Magnetosphere Astrophysics and Space Science Library, 60-71. doi:10.1007/978-94-010-3284-1_6 2. Vasyliunas, V. M. (1984). Fundamentals of current description. Magnetospheric Currents Geophysical Monograph Series, 63-66. doi:10.1029/gm028p0063 3. Heinemann, M. (1990). Representations of currents and magnetic fields in anisotropic magnetohydrostatic plasma. J. Geophys. Res. Journal of Geophysical Research, 95(A6), 7789. doi:10.1029/ja095ia06p07789

  10. The effect of unsteady and baroclinic forcing on predicted wind profiles in Large Eddy Simulations: Two case studies of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    . The applied domain-scale pressure gradient and its height- and time-dependence are estimated from LIDAR measurements of the wind speed above the atmospheric boundary layer in the Høvsøre case, and from radio soundings and a network of ground-based pressure sensors in the Hamburg case. In the two case studies......Due to its fine-resolution requirement and subsequent computational demand, Large Eddy Simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer is limited in most cases to computational domains extending only a few kilometers in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Variations in the flow...... and in relevant atmospheric fields (e.g. temperature) that occur at larger scales must be imposed through boundary conditions or as external forcing. In this work we study the influence of such variations on the wind profile in Large Eddy Simulations of daytime atmospheric boundary layers, by comparing...

  11. Responses of three-dimensional flow to variations in the angle of incident wind and profile form of dunes: Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ian J.; Hesp, Patrick A.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin G. D.; Bauer, Bernard O.; Namikas, Steven L.; Ollerhead, Jeff

    2009-04-01

    This study reports the responses of three-dimensional near-surface airflow over a vegetated foredune to variations in the conditions of incident flow during an 8-h experiment. Two parallel measurement transects were established on morphologically different dune profiles: i) a taller, concave-convex West foredune transect with 0.5-m high, densely vegetated (45%), seaward incipient foredune, and ii) a shorter, concave-straight East foredune transect with lower, sparsely vegetated (14%) seaward incipient foredune. Five stations on each transect from the incipient dune to the crest were equipped with ultrasonic anemometers at 0.6 and 1.65 m height and logged at 1 Hz. Incident conditions were recorded from a 4-m tower over a flat beach. Winds increased from 6 m s - 1 to > 20 m s - 1 and were generally obliquely onshore (ENE, 73°). Three sub-events and the population of 10-minute averages of key properties of flow ( U, W, S, CV U) from all sample locations on the East transect ( n = 235) are examined to identify location- and profile-specific responses over 52° of the incident direction of flow (from 11 to 63° onshore). Topographic steering and forcing cause major deviations in the properties and vectors of near-surface flow from the regional wind. Topographic forcing on the concave-straight dune profile increases wind speed and steadiness toward the crest, with speed-up values to 65% in the backshore. Wind speed and steadiness of flow are least responsive to changes in incident angle in the backshore because of stagnation of flow and are most responsive at the lower stoss under pronounced streamline compression. On the steeper concave-convex profile, speed and steadiness decrease toward the crest because of stagnation of flow at the toe and flow expansion at the slope inflection point on the lower stoss. Net downward vertical velocity occurs over both profiles, increases toward the crest, and reflects enhanced turbulent momentum conveyance toward the surface. All of

  12. Validation of mixing height determined from vertical profiles of wind and temperature from the DMI-HIRLAM NWP model in comparison with readiosoundings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, A.; Soerensen, J.H.; Nielsen, N.W. [Danish Meteorological Inst., DMI, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    A sensitivity study is performed of vertical profiles from the numerical weather prediction model DMI-HIRLAM (DMI-HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model). The study involves profiles of horizontal wind, temperature and humidity in the lower troposphere up to 2500 meter. Detailed comparisons of analysed as well as forecast profiles are made with measured data from several radio-sonde stations throughout Europe. Methods for estimating the Mixing Height (MH) based on a bulk Richardson number method, the Vogelezang and Holtslag method and parcel methods are also studied. The methods are inter-compared, and MH based on data from DMI-HIRLAM are compared with the corresponding MH based on radiosonde data. For convective conditions the MH estimates are also compared with subjective estimates of the MH. In this paper preliminary results mainly based on data from Jaegersborg (Copenhagen) are presented. Results based on data from 1994-95 show that the resemblance between measured profiles and the DMI-HIRLAM profiles is fairly good in general. Also the estimates of the MH based on DMI-HIRLAM data is in general of nearly the same quality as estimations based on observed data. However, especially in convective conditions there is a tendency by DMI-HIRLAM to underestimate the strength of the mixing and thereby relatively large errors in the estimates of the MH can occur. (au)

  13. Technical note: a proposed method to determine the extent of degradation of a feed in the rumen from the degradation profile obtained with the in vitro gas production technique using feces as the inoculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhanoa, M.S.; France, J.; Crompton, L.A.; Mauricio, R.M.; Kebreab, E.; Mills, J.A.N.; Sanderson, R.; Dijkstra, J.; Lopez, S.

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed to determine the extent of degradation in the rumen involving a two-stage mathematical modeling process. In the first stage, a statistical model shifts (or maps) the gas accumulation profile obtained using a fecal inoculum to a ruminal gas profile. Then, a kinetic model

  14. First middle-atmospheric zonal wind profile measurements with a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rüfenacht

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the wind radiometer WIRA, a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric horizontal wind by observing ozone emission spectra at 142.17504 GHz. Currently, wind speeds in five levels between 30 and 79 km can be retrieved which makes WIRA the first instrument able to continuously measure horizontal wind in this altitude range. For an integration time of one day the measurement error on each level lies at around 25 m s−1. With a planned upgrade this value is expected to be reduced by a factor of 2 in the near future. On the altitude levels where our measurement can be compared to wind data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF very good agreement in the long-term statistics as well as in short time structures with a duration of a few days has been found.

    WIRA uses a passive double sideband heterodyne receiver together with a digital Fourier transform spectrometer for the data acquisition. A big advantage of the radiometric approach is that such instruments can also operate under adverse weather conditions and thus provide a continuous time series for the given location. The optics enables the instrument to scan a wide range of azimuth angles including the directions east, west, north, and south for zonal and meridional wind measurements. The design of the radiometer is fairly compact and its calibration does not rely on liquid nitrogen which makes it transportable and suitable for campaign use. WIRA is conceived in a way that it can be operated remotely and does hardly require any maintenance.

    In the present paper, a description of the instrument is given, and the techniques used for the wind retrieval based on the determination of the Doppler shift of the measured atmospheric ozone emission spectra are outlined. Their reliability was tested using Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, a time series of 11

  15. A simple method to obtain very accurate whole atom Compton profiles from photon scattering doubly differential cross sections in relativistic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajohn, Larry

    2017-04-01

    Compton profiles (CP) are used in many ways such as for assessing the bonding properties of molecules and solids including semiconductors. The simplest approach to obtain a CP from doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) is to use the nonrelativistic (nr) impulse approximation (IA) expression DDCS =KJ where K is the kinematic factor and J is the CP. A relativistic version of this expression to be referred to as RKJ, an approximation to the full relativistic IA expression is used for relativistic regimes, but it does not give accurate results for the inner and middle shells of moderate to heavy atoms. For example the RKJ error ranges from 3% (Z =30) to about 28% (Z =92) for the K-shell and about 3% (Z =50) to 17% (Z =92) for the 2p shell and is at 6% for 3d (Z =92). In the present work, expressions from nonrelativistic hydrogenlike wavefunctions (with a relativistic QED K) to correct RKJ beyond the K-shell to L and M shells were derived such that relativistic contributions as well as screening effects largely cancel for any regime of energy angle and Z. As a result the RKJ error is reduced to less than 2% over 99% of the momentum distribution range of any subshell CP.

  16. First continuous time series of tropical, mid-latitudinal and polar middle-atmospheric wind profile measurements with a ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Murk, Axel; Eriksson, Patrick; Buehler, Stefan A.; Kivi, Rigel; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Duflot, Valentin

    2014-05-01

    Wind is one of the key parameters for the characterisation of the atmosphere and the understanding of its dynamics. Despite this, no continuously operating instrument for wind measurements in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere existed so far. Aiming to contribute to the closing of this data gap by exploiting the potential of microwave radiometry the Institute of Applied Physics of the University of Bern built a ground-based 142 GHz Doppler-spectro-radiometer with the acronym WIRA (WInd RAdiometer). WIRA is specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric horizontal wind and is sensitive to the altitude range between 35 and 70 km. The architecture of the radiometer is fairly compact what makes it transportable and suitable for campaign use. WIRA is conceived in a way that it can be operated remotely and does hardly require any maintenance. The operational use of WIRA started in September 2010. Since a technical upgrade in autumn 2012 which drastically increased the signal to noise ratio of the instrument, the meridional component is permanently measured along with the zonal wind to get a full picture of the horizontal wind field. During the last year the wind retrieval algorithm has been entirely rebuilt and tested. It is now based on the optimal estimation technique (OEM) and uses an upgraded version of the ARTS/QPACK radiative transfer and inversion model. Time series of middle-atmospheric wind from measurement campaigns of 7 to 11 months duration at mid and high latitude sites (Bern, 46°57' N, 7°26' E; Sodankylä, 67°22' N, 26°38' E; Observatoire de Haute-Provence, 43°56' N, 5°43' E) have been obtained. In September 2013 WIRA was moved to Observatoire du Maïdo (21°04' S, 55°23' E) to study the dynamics of the tropical middle atmosphere. The measurements have been compared to the data from the ECMWF model. Generally good agreement has been found in the stratosphere, however systematic discrepancies exist in the mesosphere. At the

  17. Hourly observations of the jet stream - Wind shear, Richardson number and pilot reports of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrett, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations of the jet stream made on the basis of over 400 hr of wind and temperature data taken during two prolonged jet stream passages above western and central Pennsylvania during mid-November 1986 and mid-January 1987. Wind profilers are found to be far better suited for the detailed examination of jet stream structure than are weather balloons. The combination of good vertical resolution with not previously obtained temporal resolution reveals structural details not seen before. Development of probability forecasts of turbulence based on wind profiler-derived shear values appears possible. A good correlation between pilot reports and turbulence and wind shear is found.

  18. Error Correction Method for Wind Speed Measured with Doppler Wind LIDAR at Low Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingyi; Feng, Changzhong; Liu, Zhishen

    2014-11-01

    For the purpose of obtaining global vertical wind profiles, the Atmospheric Dynamics Mission Aeolus of European Space Agency (ESA), carrying the first spaceborne Doppler lidar ALADIN (Atmospheric LAser Doppler INstrument), is going to be launched in 2015. DLR (German Aerospace Center) developed the A2D (ALADIN Airborne Demonstrator) for the prelaunch validation. A ground-based wind lidar for wind profile and wind field scanning measurement developed by Ocean University of China is going to be used for the ground-based validation after the launch of Aeolus. In order to provide validation data with higher accuracy, an error correction method is investigated to improve the accuracy of low altitude wind data measured with Doppler lidar based on iodine absorption filter. The error due to nonlinear wind sensitivity is corrected, and the method for merging atmospheric return signal is improved. The correction method is validated by synchronous wind measurements with lidar and radiosonde. The results show that the accuracy of wind data measured with Doppler lidar at low altitude can be improved by the proposed error correction method.

  19. Modelling Wind for Wind Farm Layout Optimization Using Joint Distribution of Wind Speed and Wind Direction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    quite well in terms of the coefficient of determination R-2. Then, the best of these joint distributions is used in the layout optimization of the Horns Rev 1 wind farm and the choice of bin sizes for wind speed and wind direction is also investigated. It is found that the choice of bin size for wind......Reliable wind modelling is of crucial importance for wind farm development. The common practice of using sector-wise Weibull distributions has been found inappropriate for wind farm layout optimization. In this study, we propose a simple and easily implementable method to construct joint...... distributions of wind speed and wind direction, which is based on the parameters of sector-wise Weibull distributions and interpolations between direction sectors. It is applied to the wind measurement data at Horns Rev and three different joint distributions are obtained, which all fit the measurement data...

  20. The Profile Envision and Splicing Tool (PRESTO): Developing an Atmospheric Wind Analysis Tool for Space Launch Vehicles Using Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Decker, Ryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Launch vehicle programs require vertically complete atmospheric profiles. Many systems at the ER to make the necessary measurements, but all have different EVR, vertical coverage, and temporal coverage. MSFC Natural Environments Branch developed a tool to create a vertically complete profile from multiple inputs using Python. Forward work: Finish Formal Testing Acceptance Testing, End-to-End Testing. Formal Release

  1. An Icelandic wind atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Gudrun; Bjornsson, Halldór; Arason, Þórður; Jónasson, Kristján

    2013-04-01

    While Iceland has ample wind, its use for energy production has been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated from renewable hydro- and geothermal source and adding wind energy has not be considered practical or even necessary. However, adding wind into the energy mix is becoming a more viable options as opportunities for new hydro or geothermal power installation become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland a wind atlas has been developed as a part of the Nordic project "Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing" (IceWind). The atlas is based on mesoscale model runs produced with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and high-resolution regional analyses obtained through the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). The wind atlas shows that the wind energy potential is considerable. The regions with the strongest average wind are nevertheless impractical for wind farms, due to distance from road infrastructure and power grid as well as harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. There is a strong seasonal cycle, with wintertime power densities throughout the island being at least a factor of two higher than during summer. Calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plants making wind energy a viable additional option.

  2. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles at the m......A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles...

  3. Programs to obtain vertical heights from mean sea level and for computing volume of sand/mineral along beaches:A case study with Kalbadevi beach profiling data and results.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ganesan, P.

    II) Program for obtaining volume of sand / mineral along profiles from M.S.L. The listing of the software is given in Annexure: I and Annexure :2 of this report. LOGIC AND FLOW DIAGRAM The logic used in first program ?Program to obtain... data points from second set up = (HC1 ? successive staff readings observed from second set up) 5 The logical flow diagram is given below Fig.1 Flow chart for obtaining vertical heights with respect to mean sea...

  4. On the energy distribution profile of interface states obtained by taking into account of series resistance in Al/TiO{sub 2}/p-Si (MIS) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakma, O., E-mail: osman@pakma.co [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Batman University, Batman (Turkey); Serin, N.; Serin, T. [Department of Engineering Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Altindal, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, Teknikokullar, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-02-15

    The energy distribution profile of the interface states (N{sub ss}) of Al/TiO{sub 2}/p-Si (MIS) structures prepared using the sol-gel method was obtained from the forward bias current-voltage (I-V) characteristics by taking into account both the bias dependence of the effective barrier height ({phi}{sub e}) and series resistance (R{sub s}) at room temperature. The main electrical parameters of the MIS structure such as ideality factor (n), zero-bias barrier height ({phi}{sub b0}) and average series resistance values were found to be 1.69, 0.519 eV and 659 {Omega}, respectively. This high value of n was attributed to the presence of an interfacial insulator layer at the Al/p-Si interface and the density of interface states (N{sub ss}) localized at the Si/TiO{sub 2} interface. The values of N{sub ss} localized at the Si/TiO{sub 2} interface were found with and without the R{sub s} at 0.25-E{sub v} in the range between 8.4x10{sup 13} and 4.9x10{sup 13} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. In addition, the frequency dependence of capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics of the structures have been investigated by taking into account the effect of N{sub ss} and R{sub s} at room temperature. It can be found out that the measured C and G/{omega} are strongly dependent on bias voltage and frequency. -- Research highlights: {yields}We successfully fabricated Al/TiO{sub 2}/p-Si device with interlayer by a sol-gel method. The facts: (i) that the technology of the fabrication of a Al/TiO{sub 2}/p-Si MIS structure much simpler and economical than that for the Si p-n junction and (b) the main advantages of TiO{sub 2} films are low densities of the surface states when compared to SiO{sub 2}.

  5. Satellite winds as a tool for offshore wind resource assessment: The Great Lakes Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doubrawa, Paula; Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Pryor, Sara C.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a new observational wind atlas for the Great Lakes, and proposes a methodology to combine in situ and satellite wind observations for offshore wind resource assessment. Efficient wind energy projects rely on accurate wind resource estimates, which are complex to obtain offshore...... the North American Regional Reanalysis. Generalized wind climates are obtained for each buoy and coastal site with the wind model WAsP, and combined into a single wind speed estimate for the Great Lakes region. The method of classes is used to account for the temporal sparseness in the SAR data set...

  6. 2-μm Coherent DIAL for CO2, H2O and Wind Field Profiling in the Lower Atmosphere: Instrumentation and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibert Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on 2-μm coherent differential absorption lidar (CDIAL measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2, water vapour (H2O absorption and wind field profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer. The CDIAL uses a Tm:fiber pumped, single longitudinal mode Q-switched seeded Ho:YLF laser and a fibercoupled coherent detection. The laser operates at a pulse repetition frequency of 2 kHz and emits an output energy of 10 mJ with a pulse width of 40 ns (FWHM. Experimental horizontal and vertical range-resolved measurements were made in the atmospheric boundary layer and compared to colocated in-situ sensor data.

  7. Wind turbine pitch optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Juelsgaard, Morten; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    We consider a static wind model for a three-bladed, horizontal-axis, pitch-controlled wind turbine. When placed in a wind field, the turbine experiences several mechanical loads, which generate power but also create structural fatigue. We address the problem of finding blade pitch profiles......% compared to any constant pitch profile while sacrificing at most 7% of the maximum attainable output power. Using iterative learning, we show that very similar performance can be achieved by using only load measurements, with no knowledge of the wind field or wind turbine model....... for maximizing power production while simultaneously minimizing fatigue loads. In this paper, we show how this problem can be approximately solved using convex optimization. When there is full knowledge of the wind field, numerical simulations show that force and torque RMS variation can be reduced by over 96...

  8. Diurnal Evolution and Annual Variability of Boundary Layer Height in the Columbia River Gorge through the `Eye' of Wind Profiling Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, L.; Djalalova, I.; Konopleva-Akish, E.; Kenyon, J.; Olson, J. B.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) is a DoE- and NOAA-sponsored program whose goal is to improve the accuracy of numerical weather prediction (NWP) forecasts in complex terrain. WFIP2 consists of an 18-month (October 2015 - March 2017) field campaign held in the Columbia River basin, in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. As part of WFIP2 a large suite of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation has been deployed, including, among several others, a network of eight 915-MHz wind profiling radars (WPRs) equipped with radio acoustic sounding systems (RASSs), and many surface meteorological stations. The diurnal evolution and annual variability of boundary layer height in the area of WFIP2 will be investigated through the `eye' of WPRs, employing state-of-the-art automated algorithms, based on fuzzy logic and artificial intelligence. The results will be used to evaluate possible errors in NWP models in this area of complex terrain.

  9. A comparative study of structure of vertical motions in the lower troposphere over Pune, a tropical Indian station in March 2004 and 2005 using Wind Profiler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Deshpande

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available An extended heat wave condition affected Pune (18.31° N, 73.58° E, India and surrounding region during the pre-monsoon month of March 2004, when surface temperatures were observed to be above normal. In contrast, March 2005 showed a long spell of below normal temperatures. The vertical velocity measurements from UHF (404 MHz Wind Profiler at Pune have been used to understand the role of vertical motions in the lower troposphere in maintenance of long spells of above (in March 2004 and below (in March 2005 normal surface temperatures over the station. The altitude profiles of vertical wind velocities showed different behavior in the two contrasting years 2004 and 2005. It is observed that for a major part of the month and at all heights, downward motions (subsidence dominate during March 2004. Strong downward motions persisted for spells of 2 to 3 days when high surface temperatures (above 38°C were recorded over this station. A positive relation between surface temperature anomalies and depth of subsidence points to the role of subsidence. March 2005 showed the persistence of upward motion for longer time duration during morning hours which prevented the surface temperatures from reaching high values with weak subsidence during afternoon hours. This is supported by observation of more frequent and organized thermal plumes extending right into the free troposphere. There are distinct episodes of advective warmings during March 2004 while March 2005 showed weak or absence of temperature advection from north. Hence a combination of meridional transport of heat and persistent subsidence in the lower troposphere seemed to have led to recording of above normal surface temperatures during March 2004 over the station.

  10. Phytochemical profile, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracts obtained from erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis) fruit using compressed propane and supercritical CO2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernandes, Ciro E. F; Scapinello, Jaqueline; Bohn, Aline; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L; Magro, Jacir Dall; Palliga, Marshall; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Tres, Marcus V

    .... The aim of this work to evaluate phytochemical properties, total phenolic compounds, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Ilex paraguariensis fruits obtained from supercritical CO2...

  11. Programs to obtain vertical heights from mean sea level and for computing volume of sand/mineral along beaches: A case study with Kalbadevi beach profiling data and results

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ganesan, P.

    Two programs have been developed to process profile data, for obtaining vertical heights with respect to mean sea level (M.S.L.) and for computation of volume of heavy mineral / sand accumulation or erosion along the beaches. The final output...

  12. Inorganic profile of some Brazilian medicinal plants obtained from ethanolic extract and ''in natura'' samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.O.M.; de Sousa, P.T.; Salvador, V.L.R.; Sato, I.M.

    2004-10-03

    The Anadenathera macrocarpa, Schinus molle, Hymenaea courbaril, Cariniana legalis, Solidago microglossa and Stryphnodendron barbatiman, were collected ''in natura'' samples (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) from different commercial suppliers. The pharmaco-active compounds in ethanolic extracts had been made by the Mato Grosso Federal University (UFMT). The energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectrometry was used for the elemental analysis in different parts of the plants and respective ethanolic extracts. The Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Rb, S, Sr and Zn concentrations were determined by the fundamental parameters method. Some specimens showed a similar inorganic profile for ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples and some ones showed a distinct inorganic profile. For example, the Anadenathera macrocarpa showed a similar concentration in Mg, P, Cu, Zn and Rb elements in ''in natura'' and ethanolic extract samples; however very different concentration in Na, S, Cl, K , Ca, Mn, Fe and Sr was observed in distinctive samples. The Solidago microglossa showed the K, Ca, Cl, S, Mg, P and Fe elements as major constituents in both samples, suggesting that the extraction process did not affect in a considerable way the ''in natura'' inorganic composition. The elemental composition of the different parts of the plants (leaves, flowers, barks and seeds) has been also determined. For example, the Schinus molle specimen showed P, K, Cl and Ca elements as major constituents in the seeds, Mg, K and Sr in the barks and Mg, S, Cl and Mn in the leaves, demonstrating a differentiated elementary distribution. These inorganic profiles will contribute to evaluate the quality control of the Brazilian herbaceous trade and also will assist to identify which parts of the medicinal plants has greater therapeutic effect.

  13. Routine use of microarray-based gene expression profiling to identify patients with low cytogenetic risk acute myeloid leukemia: accurate results can be obtained even with suboptimal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Blétière Diane Raingeard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling has shown its ability to identify with high accuracy low cytogenetic risk acute myeloid leukemia such as acute promyelocytic leukemia and leukemias with t(8;21 or inv(16. The aim of this gene expression profiling study was to evaluate to what extent suboptimal samples with low leukemic blast load (range, 2-59% and/or poor quality control criteria could also be correctly identified. Methods Specific signatures were first defined so that all 71 acute promyelocytic leukemia, leukemia with t(8;21 or inv(16-AML as well as cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia samples with at least 60% blasts and good quality control criteria were correctly classified (training set. The classifiers were then evaluated for their ability to assign to the expected class 111 samples considered as suboptimal because of a low leukemic blast load (n = 101 and/or poor quality control criteria (n = 10 (test set. Results With 10-marker classifiers, all training set samples as well as 97 of the 101 test samples with a low blast load, and all 10 samples with poor quality control criteria were correctly classified. Regarding test set samples, the overall error rate of the class prediction was below 4 percent, even though the leukemic blast load was as low as 2%. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values of the class assignments ranged from 91% to 100%. Of note, for acute promyelocytic leukemia and leukemias with t(8;21 or inv(16, the confidence level of the class assignment was influenced by the leukemic blast load. Conclusion Gene expression profiling and a supervised method requiring 10-marker classifiers enable the identification of favorable cytogenetic risk acute myeloid leukemia even when samples contain low leukemic blast loads or display poor quality control criterion.

  14. GC profiles of volatile constituents from human urine obtained by closed loop stripping, purge and trap technique and simultaneous stem distillation-extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestmann, H J; Haberkorn, K; Vostrowsky, O; Ferstl, R; Eggert, F

    1996-01-01

    Different techniques like "closed loop stripping" [CLSA], "purge and trap" [PTI], and continuous steam distillation extraction [SDE] were used to establish GC profiles of major histocompatibility complex-associated volatile constituents of human urine and statistically evaluated for reliability. Of the three methods investigated, PTI appeared to be superior for the detection of very volatile substances, whereas SDE was the most efficient one with respect to yield. A number of short to medium-chain ketones, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-styrene, menthol and nicotine were identified in preliminary analyses.

  15. Estimated Drag Coefficients and Wind Structure of Hurricane Frances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, S. E.; Niiler, P. P.; Stammer, D.; Terrill, E.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Coupled Boundary Layers Air Sea Transfer (CBLAST) experiment, an array of drifters and floats was deployed from an aircraft just ahead of Hurricane Frances during it's passage to the northwest side of the Caribbean Island chain in August, 2004. The ocean and surface air conditions prior to, during, and after Hurricane Frances were documented by multiple sensors. Two independent estimates of the surface wind field suggest different storm structures. NOAA H*WINDS, an objectively analyzed product using a combination of data collected at the reconnaissance flight level, GPS profilers (dropwindsondes), satellites, and other data, suggest a 40km radius of maximum wind. A product based on the radial momentum equation balance using \\ital{in-situ} surface pressure data and wind direction measurements from the CBLAST drifter array suggests that the radius of maximum winds was 15km. We used a regional version of the MITGCM model with closed boundaries and realistic temperature and salinity fields which was forced with these wind field products to determine which wind field leads to circulation and SST structures that are most consistent with observed sea surface temperature fields and float profile data. Best estimates of the surface wind structure are then used to estimate the appropriate drag coefficient corresponding to the maximum velocity. Our results are compared with those obtained previously.

  16. Wind Power Curve Modeling in Simple and Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskaya, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wharton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Irons, Z. [Enel Green Power North America, Andover, MA (United States); Qualley, G. [Pentalum, Colleyville, TX (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Our previous work on wind power curve modeling using statistical models focused on a location with a moderately complex terrain in the Altamont Pass region in northern California (CA). The work described here is the follow-up to that work, but at a location with a simple terrain in northern Oklahoma (OK). The goal of the present analysis was to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding information beyond the hub-height wind speed, such as wind speeds at other heights, as well as other atmospheric variables, to the power prediction model at this new location and compare the results to those obtained at the CA site in the previous study. While we reach some of the same conclusions at both sites, many results reported for the CA site do not hold at the OK site. In particular, using the entire vertical profile of wind speeds improves the accuracy of wind power prediction relative to using the hub-height wind speed alone at both sites. However, in contrast to the CA site, the rotor equivalent wind speed (REWS) performs almost as well as the entire profile at the OK site. Another difference is that at the CA site, adding wind veer as a predictor significantly improved the power prediction accuracy. The same was true for that site when air density was added to the model separately instead of using the standard air density adjustment. At the OK site, these additional variables result in no significant benefit for the prediction accuracy.

  17. Quantitative reconstruction of Ta/Si multilayer depth profiles obtained by Time-of-Flight-Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) using Cs{sup +} ion sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063 Guangdong (China); Hofmann, S. [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly MPI for Metals Research), Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Wang, J.Y., E-mail: wangjy@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063 Guangdong (China); Chakraborty, B.R. [Sophisticated Instrumentation Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr.K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2015-09-30

    Measured sputter depth profiles of Ta/Si multilayers consisting of 10 alternating layers of Si (10.5 nm thickness) and Ta (7.5 nm thickness) obtained by sputtering with Cs{sup +} ions of 1 keV energy, impinging under an angle of 45°, were re-evaluated by application of the Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI) model for profile reconstruction. To be able to perform the latter, a decrease of the sputtering rate with sputtered depth, a strong and sputtering time dependent matrix effect of the detected Si{sup +} ion intensity as well as preferential sputtering of Si have to be taken into account. The results disclose a similar depth resolution for the Si and Ta layers composed of atomic mixing and roughness contributions. The depth resolution increases with the sputtered depth from 4.2 to 6.8 nm at 50 and 300 s sputtering time, respectively. Except for the first and the last two layers (Nos. 19 and 20), by application of the MRI model a full reconstruction of the measured profiles of the Si and Ta multilayer structure was obtained with a mean error of about ± 5%. - Highlights: • Full MRI model quantification of ToF-SIMS multilayer profiles • Correction for matrix effect and depth dependent sensitivity factor • Correction for composition dependent preferential sputtering effect • Profile representation in true depth scale coordinates based on correction 3 • Disclosing depth dependent depth resolution by atomic mixing and roughness components.

  18. The UTRC wind energy conversion system performance analysis for horizontal axis wind turbines (WECSPER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egolf, T. A.; Landgrebe, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The theory for the UTRC Energy Conversion System Performance Analysis (WECSPER) for the prediction of horizontal axis wind turbine performance is presented. Major features of the analysis are the ability to: (1) treat the wind turbine blades as lifting lines with a prescribed wake model; (2) solve for the wake-induced inflow and blade circulation using real nonlinear airfoil data; and (3) iterate internally to obtain a compatible wake transport velocity and blade loading solution. This analysis also provides an approximate treatment of wake distortions due to tower shadow or wind shear profiles. Finally, selected results of internal UTRC application of the analysis to existing wind turbines and correlation with limited test data are described.

  19. ValidWind applications: wind power prospecting, aerosol transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, T.; Marchant, A.; Apedaile, T.; Scholes, D.; Simmons, J.; Bradford, B.

    2010-10-01

    The ValidWind™ system employs an XL200 laser rangefinder to track small, lightweight, helium-filled balloons (0.33 meters, 0.015 kg). We record their trajectories (range resolution 0.5 meters) and automatically produce local wind profiles in real time. Tracking range is enhanced beyond 2 km by applying retro-reflector tape to the balloons. Aerodynamic analysis shows that ValidWind balloon motion is well coupled to the local wind within relaxation times { 1 second, due to drag forces at subcritical Reynolds numbers Re wind as opposed to being fixed in space. In a field campaign involving many balloons, slight variations in ground level winds at launch lead to trajectory patterns that we analyze to derive 3D maps of the vertical and horizontal wind profiles downwind of the launch area. Field campaigns are focused on likely sites for wind power generation and on facilities from which airborne particulates are emitted. We describe results of wind measurements in Utah near the cities of Clarkston, Logan, and Ogden. ValidWind is a relatively inexpensive wind sensor that is easily and rapidly transported and deployed at remote sites. It is an ideal instrument for wind prospecting to support early decisions required, for example, in siting meteorology towers. ValidWind provides high-resolution, real time characterization of the average and changing 3D wind fields in which wind power turbines and other remote sensors must operate.

  20. Wind Tunnel Measurements at LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    The optimization of airfoil profiles specifically designed for wind turbine application was initiated in the late 80’s [67, 68, 30, 15]. The first attempts to reduce airfoil noise for wind turbines made use of airfoil trailing edge serration. Themodification of airfoil shapes targeted at noise...... reduction is more recent. An important effort was produced in this direction within the SIROCCO project. This latter work involved measurements on full size wind turbines and showed that trailing edge serration may proved a viable solution for mitigating wind turbine noise though it has not been implemented...... on commercial wind turbine yet. It should be mentioned here that the attenuation of turbulent inflow noise using wavy leading edge has recently been investigated [55], but this technique has still to be further validated for practical applications. In this paper, it is proposed to optimize an airfoil which...

  1. A Compendium of Wind Statistics and Models for the NASA Space Shuttle and Other Aerospace Vehicle Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, O. E.; Adelfang, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    The wind profile with all of its variations with respect to altitude has been, is now, and will continue to be important for aerospace vehicle design and operations. Wind profile databases and models are used for the vehicle ascent flight design for structural wind loading, flight control systems, performance analysis, and launch operations. This report presents the evolution of wind statistics and wind models from the empirical scalar wind profile model established for the Saturn Program through the development of the vector wind profile model used for the Space Shuttle design to the variations of this wind modeling concept for the X-33 program. Because wind is a vector quantity, the vector wind models use the rigorous mathematical probability properties of the multivariate normal probability distribution. When the vehicle ascent steering commands (ascent guidance) are wind biased to the wind profile measured on the day-of-launch, ascent structural wind loads are reduced and launch probability is increased. This wind load alleviation technique is recommended in the initial phase of vehicle development. The vehicle must fly through the largest load allowable versus altitude to achieve its mission. The Gumbel extreme value probability distribution is used to obtain the probability of exceeding (or not exceeding) the load allowable. The time conditional probability function is derived from the Gumbel bivariate extreme value distribution. This time conditional function is used for calculation of wind loads persistence increments using 3.5-hour Jimsphere wind pairs. These increments are used to protect the commit-to-launch decision. Other topics presented include the Shuttle Shuttle load-response to smoothed wind profiles, a new gust model, and advancements in wind profile measuring systems. From the lessons learned and knowledge gained from past vehicle programs, the development of future launch vehicles can be accelerated. However, new vehicle programs by their very

  2. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) toolkit (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline Draxl: NREL

    2014-01-01

    Regional wind integration studies require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high penetration scenarios. The wind datasets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as being time synchronized with available load profiles.As described in this presentation, the WIND Toolkit fulfills these requirements by providing a state-of-the-art national (US) wind resource, power production and forecast dataset.

  3. Water Vapor, Temperature and Wind Profiles within Maize Canopy under in-Field Rainwater Harvesting with Wide and Narrow Runoff Strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weldemichael A. Tesfuhuney

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Micrometeorological measurements were used to evaluate heat and water vapor to describe the transpiration (Ev and soil evaporation (Es processes for wide and narrow runoff strips under in-field rainwater harvesting (IRWH system. The resulting sigmoid-shaped water vapor (ea in wide and narrow runoff strips varied in lower and upper parts of the maize canopy. In wide runoff strips, lapse conditions of ea extended from lowest measurement level (LP to the upper middle section (MU and inversion was apparent at the top of the canopy. The virtual potential temperature (θv profile showed no difference in middle section, but the lower and upper portion (UP had lower  in narrow, compared to wide, strips, and LP-UP changes of 0.6 K and 1.2 K were observed, respectively. The Ev and Es within the canopy increased the ea concentration as determined by the wind order of magnitude. The ea concentration reached peak at about 1.6 kPa at a range of wind speed value of 1.4–1.8 m∙s−1 and 2.0–2.4 m∙s−1 for wide and narrow treatments, respectively. The sparse maize canopy of the wide strips could supply more drying power of the air in response to atmospheric evaporative demand compared to narrow strips. This is due to the variation in air flow in wide and narrow runoff strips that change gradients in ea for evapotranspiration processes.

  4. Evaluation of the Wind Flow Variability Using Scanning Doppler Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, S. C.; Pichugina, Y. L.; Brewer, A.

    2016-12-01

    Better understanding of the wind flow variability at the heights of the modern turbines is essential to accurately assess of generated wind power and efficient turbine operations. Nowadays the wind energy industry often utilizes scanning Doppler lidar to measure wind-speed profiles at high spatial and temporal resolution.The study presents wind flow features captured by scanning Doppler lidars during the second Wind Forecast and Improvement Project (WFIP 2) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This 18-month long experiment in the Columbia River Basin aims to improve model wind forecasts complicated by mountain terrain, coastal effects, and numerous wind farms.To provide a comprehensive dataset to use for characterizing and predicting meteorological phenomena important to Wind Energy, NOAA deployed scanning, pulsed Doppler lidars to two sites in Oregon, one at Wasco, located upstream of all wind farms relative to the predominant westerly flow in the region, and one at Arlington, located in the middle of several wind farms.In this presentation we will describe lidar scanning patterns capable of providing data in conical, or vertical-slice modes. These individual scans were processed to obtain 15-min averaged profiles of wind speed and direction in real time. Visualization of these profiles as time-height cross sections allows us to analyze variability of these parameters with height, time and location, and reveal periods of rapid changes (ramp events). Examples of wind flow variability between two sites of lidar measurements along with examples of reduced wind velocity downwind of operating turbines (wakes) will be presented.

  5. Influence of the Laser Spot Size, Focal Beam Profile, and Tissue Type on the Lipid Signals Obtained by MALDI-MS Imaging in Oversampling Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Marcel; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Soltwisch, Jens

    2016-12-01

    To improve the lateral resolution in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) beyond the dimensions of the focal laser spot oversampling techniques are employed. However, few data are available on the effect of the laser spot size and its focal beam profile on the ion signals recorded in oversampling mode. To investigate these dependencies, we produced 2 times six spots with dimensions between 30 and 200 μm. By optional use of a fundamental beam shaper, square flat-top and Gaussian beam profiles were compared. MALDI-MSI data were collected using a fixed pixel size of 20 μm and both pixel-by-pixel and continuous raster oversampling modes on a QSTAR mass spectrometer. Coronal mouse brain sections coated with 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid matrix were used as primary test systems. Sizably higher phospholipid ion signals were produced with laser spots exceeding a dimension of 100 μm, although the same amount of material was essentially ablated from the 20 μm-wide oversampling pixel at all spot size settings. Only on white matter areas of the brain these effects were less apparent to absent. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that these findings can presumably be attributed to different matrix morphologies depending on tissue type. We propose that a transition in the material ejection mechanisms from a molecular desorption at large to ablation at smaller spot sizes and a concomitant reduction in ion yields may be responsible for the observed spot size effects. The combined results indicate a complex interplay between tissue type, matrix crystallization, and laser-derived desorption/ablation and finally analyte ionization.

  6. Compositional Shift in Fatty Acid Profiles of Lipids Obtained from Oleaginous Yeasts upon the Addition of Essential Oil from Citrus sinensis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Bijaya K; Rakshit, Sudip K

    2017-12-01

    Tailoring lipids from oleaginous yeasts to contain specific types of fatty acid is of considerable interest to food, fuel, and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, the essential oil obtained from Citrus sinesus L. has been used to alter the fatty acid composition of two common oleaginous yeasts, Rhodosporidium toruloides and Cryptococcus curvatus. With increasing levels of essential oil in the medium, the metabolic flux of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway shifted towards saturated fatty acid production. Essential oil reduced the activities of elongase and ∆9 desaturase. This made the lipid obtained from both these yeasts rich in saturated fatty acids. At certain specific concentrations of the essential oil in the medium, the lipid obtained from R. toruloides and C. curvatus cultures was similar to mahuwa butter and palm oil, respectively. Limonene is the major constituents of orange essential oil. Its effect on one of the oleaginous yeasts, R. toruloides, was also studied separately. Effects similar to orange essential oil were obtained with limonene. Thus, we can conclude that limonene in orange essential oil brings about compositional change of microbial lipid produced in this organism.

  7. Metric of the 2–6 day sea-surface temperature response to wind stress in the Tropical Pacific and its sensitivity to the K-Profile Parameterization of vertical mixing

    KAUST Repository

    Wagman, Benjamin M.

    2014-05-04

    Uncertainty in wind forcing has long hampered direct tests of ocean model output against observations for the purpose of refining the boundary layer K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) of oceanic vertical mixing. Considered here is a short-term metric that could be sensitive to the ways in which the KPP directly affects the adjustment of sea surface temperatures for a given change in wind stress. In particular a metric is developed based on the lagged correlation between the 2–6 day filtered wind stress and sea surface temperature. The metric is normalized by estimated observational and model uncertainties such that the significance of differences may be assessed. For this purpose multiple wind reanalysis products and their blended combinations were used to represent the range of forcing uncertainty, while perturbed KPP parameter model runs explore the sensitivity of the metric to the parameterization of vertical mixing. The correlation metric is sensitive to perturbations to most KPP parameters, in ways that accord with expectations, although only a few parameters show a sensitivity on the same order as the sensitivity to switching between wind products. This suggests that uncertainties in wind forcing continue to be a significant limitation for applying direct observational tests of KPP physics. Moreover, model correlations are biased high, suggesting that the model lacks or does not resolve sources of variability on the 2–6 day time scale.

  8. Some challenges of wind modelling for modern wind turbines: The Weibull distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekatarina; Floors, Rogier

    2012-01-01

    Wind power assessments, as well as forecast of wind energy production, are key issues in wind energy and grid related studies. However the hub height of today’s wind turbines is well above the surface layer. Wind profiles studies based on mast data show that the wind profile above the surface layer...... and the turning of the wind direction with height will be touched upon, but we mainly will discuss the long term distribution of the wind speed, which is often represented by a Weibull distribution. It was found that above 100 meters both the measured scale (A) and shape (k) parameter are larger than predicted...

  9. State of the Art and Trends in Wind Resource Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Probst

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the significant rise of the utilization of wind energy the accurate assessment of the wind potential is becoming increasingly important. Direct applications of wind assessment techniques include the creation of wind maps on a local scale (typically 5 20 km and the micrositing of wind turbines, the estimation of vertical wind speed variations, prospecting on a regional scale (>100 km, estimation of the long-term wind resource at a given site, and forecasting. The measurement of wind speed and direction still widely relies on cup anemometers, though sonic anemometers are becoming increasingly popular. Moreover, remote sensing by Doppler techniques using the backscattering of either sonic beams (SODAR or light (LIDAR allowing for vertical profiling well beyond hub height are quickly moving into the mainstream. Local wind maps are based on the predicted modification of the regional wind flow pattern by the local atmospheric boundary layer which in turn depends on both topographic and roughness features and the measured wind rose obtained from one or several measurement towers within the boundaries of the planned development site. Initial models were based on linearized versions of the Navier-Stokes equations, whereas more recently full CFD models have been applied to wind farm micrositing. Linear models tend to perform well for terrain slopes lower than about 25% and have the advantage of short execution times. Long-term performance is frequently estimated from correlations with nearby reference stations with concurrent information and continuous time series over a period of at least 10 years. Simple methods consider only point-to-point linear correlations; more advanced methods like multiple regression techniques and methods based on the theory of distributions will be discussed. Both for early prospecting in regions where only scarce or unreliable reference information is available, wind flow modeling on a larger scale (mesoscale is becoming

  10. Modelling Wind for Wind Farm Layout Optimization Using Joint Distribution of Wind Speed and Wind Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Feng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliable wind modelling is of crucial importance for wind farm development. The common practice of using sector-wise Weibull distributions has been found inappropriate for wind farm layout optimization. In this study, we propose a simple and easily implementable method to construct joint distributions of wind speed and wind direction, which is based on the parameters of sector-wise Weibull distributions and interpolations between direction sectors. It is applied to the wind measurement data at Horns Rev and three different joint distributions are obtained, which all fit the measurement data quite well in terms of the coefficient of determination . Then, the best of these joint distributions is used in the layout optimization of the Horns Rev 1 wind farm and the choice of bin sizes for wind speed and wind direction is also investigated. It is found that the choice of bin size for wind direction is especially critical for layout optimization and the recommended choice of bin sizes for wind speed and wind direction is finally presented.

  11. Validation of Sodar Measurements for Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2006-01-01

    -ground noise. Instead, using the SODAR as a profiler to establish representative wind speed profiles was successful. These wind speed profiles are combined with low height reference measurements to establish reliable hub height wind speed distributions. Representative wind speed profiles can be establish...... the project and a new remote power system has been designed. A direct comparison between SODAR and cup measurements revealed a limitation for the SODAR measurements during different weather conditions, especially since the SODAR was not able to measure wind speeds above 15 m/s due to an increasing back...

  12. HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(2) analytical profile of extracts obtained from purple sweet potato after green ultrasound-assisted extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenzhou; Guan, Qingyan; Koubaa, Mohamed; Barba, Francisco J; Roohinejad, Shahin; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Yang, Xinsun; Li, Shuyi; He, Jingren

    2017-01-15

    Ultrasound pre-treatment (UAE) was applied to assist the extraction of valuable compounds (polyphenols (especially anthocyanins), and proteins) from purple sweet potato (PSP). Under optimum conditions (ultrasound time (40min); supplementary hot extraction (80°C) up to 120min; pH: 2.5; ethanol concentration: 58%), the highest concentrations of polyphenols (3.877mg/g), anthocyanins (0.293mg/g), and proteins (0.753mg/g) were found, with minimal specific energy consumption (8406J/mg). Moreover, anthocyanin and non-anthocyanin polyphenols in PSP extract from optimized extraction temperature were identified using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(2). The major identified anthocyanins were peonidin-3-caffeoyl-p-hydroxybenzoyl sophoroside-5-glucoside, peonidin-3-(6″-caffeoyl-6‴-feruloyl sophoroside)-5-glucoside, cyanidin-3-caffeoyl-p-hydroxybenzoyl sophoroside-5-glucoside, whereas the major identified non-anthocyanin molecules were quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid-3-glucose. The amount of the predominant anthocyanin and non-anthocyanin compounds from PSP extract obtained after UAE was higher than that extracted after conventional solvent extraction. The results obtained in this work demonstrated the efficiency of UAE for the recovery of anthocyanins from PSP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Constraints on Porosity and Mass Loss in O-star Winds from the Modeling of X-ray Emission Line Profile Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2013-01-01

    We fit X-ray emission line profiles in high resolution XMM-Newton and Chandra grating spectra of the early O supergiant Zeta Pup with models that include the effects of porosity in the stellar wind. We explore the effects of porosity due to both spherical and flattened clumps. We find that porosity models with flattened clumps oriented parallel to the photosphere provide poor fits to observed line shapes. However, porosity models with isotropic clumps can provide acceptable fits to observed line shapes, but only if the porosity effect is moderate. We quantify the degeneracy between porosity effects from isotropic clumps and the mass-loss rate inferred from the X-ray line shapes, and we show that only modest increases in the mass-loss rate (40%) are allowed if moderate porosity effects (h(sub infinity) less than approximately R(sub *)) are assumed to be important. Large porosity lengths, and thus strong porosity effects, are ruled out regardless of assumptions about clump shape. Thus, X-ray mass-loss rate estimates are relatively insensitive to both optically thin and optically thick clumping. This supports the use of X-ray spectroscopy as a mass-loss rate calibration for bright, nearby O stars

  14. A five-factor biomarker profile obtained week 4-12 of treatment for improved prognostication in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, Anne V; Geertsen, Poul F; Christensen, Ib J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several biomarkers of treatment efficacy have been associated with a better prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The prognostic significance of biomarkers in the early treatment phase is unclear. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a complete national cohort of m......RCC patients receiving first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) or interleukin-2 based immunotherapy (IT) from 2006 to 2010, overall survival (OS) was analysed for baseline International mRCC Database Consortium (IMDC) classification factors and on-treatment time-dependent biomarkers obtained day 1 each...... cycle week 4-12 after treatment initiation with multivariate analysis and bootstrap validation. RESULTS: A total of 735 patients received first-line TKI (59%) or IT (41%). Median OS was overall 14.0 months and 33.4, 18.5, and 5.8 months for baseline IMDC favourable, intermediate, and poor risk groups...

  15. Protein profiles of Taenia solium cysts obtained from skeletal muscles and the central nervous system of pigs: Search for tissue-specific proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Perea, José; Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl José; Villalobos, Nelly; Carrero, Julio César; Sciutto, Edda; Soberón, Xavier; Laclette, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Taeniasis/cysticercosis caused by the tapeworm Taenia solium is a parasite disease transmitted among humans and pigs, the main intermediate host. The larvae/cysts can lodge in several tissues of the pig, i.e. skeletal muscles and different locations of the central nervous system. The molecular mechanisms associated to tissue preferences of the cysts remain poorly understood. The major public health concern about this zoonosis is due to the human infections by the larval form in the central nervous system, causing a highly pleomorphic and debilitating disease known as neurocysticercosis. This study was aimed to explore the 2DE protein maps of T. solium cysts obtained from skeletal muscles and central nervous system of naturally infected pigs. The gel images were analyzed through a combination of PDQuest™ and multivariate analysis. Results showed that differences in the protein patterns of cysts obtained from both tissues were remarkably discrete. Only 7 protein spots were found specifically associated to the skeletal muscle localization of the cysts; none was found significantly associated to the central nervous system. The use of distinct protein fractions of cysts allowed preliminary identification of several tissue-specific antigenic bands. The implications of these findings are discussed, as well as several strategies directed to achieve the complete characterization of this parasite's proteome, in order to extend our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue localization of the cysts and to open avenues for the development of immunological tissue-specific diagnosis of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical Analysis of the Oils Obtained from Acrocomia aculeata (Jacq. Lodd: Mapping Absorption-Emission Profiles in an Induced Oxidation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan P. de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrocomia aculeata is a palm tree typical of the Brazilian savanna. Oils extracted from the pulp and kernel of Acrocomia aculeata fruits have gained considerable attention mainly due to their nutritional and medicinal features. Despite their potential applications, a detailed analysis of their oxidative stability is still needed. The present study shows a close analysis of the oxidative stability of the oils obtained from the kernel and pulp of Acrocomia aculeata fruits, evaluating the influence of the intrinsic antioxidants and the fatty acid composition on the oil’s thermal stability. A complete characterization of the physical-chemical and optical properties of the oils was performed. The results showed that 66% of the fatty acids present in the pulp oil are unsaturated, while 75% are saturated in the kernel oil. A higher content of intrinsic antioxidants was obtained in the pulp oil, and an induction period (at 110 °C of 65 and 43 h was determined for the pulp and kernel oil, respectively. Additionally, oil absorption increases due to the formation of degradation products, and a new fluorescent compound was formed during the oil oxidation process at 110 °C. Even though the pulp presented a high content of unsaturated fatty acids, the pulp oil was more stable than the kernel oil due to its higher content of intrinsic antioxidant, especially carotenoids. The results also demonstrated that oil oxidation can be optically determined by analyzing the absorption at 232 and 270 nm, as well as the emission at 424 nm.

  17. From local wind energy resource to national wind power production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf-Gerrit Früh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Wind power is one of the most established renewable power resources yet it is also one of the most volatile resources. This poses a key challenge for successfully integrating wind power at a large scale into the power grid. Here we present an analysis of the time scales associated with wind power from hourly to seasonal fluctuations and how combining spatially distributed wind power sources helps to reduce its volatility. The analysis, based on observed wind speeds, is then generalised in a simple statistical model to develop a tool which can estimate the power output profile from a particular consortium of wind power sources. As the estimator only uses the local, or the mean national, wind resource and the mean distance between the sites to estimate the joint power output profile, it can be used by developers to estimate the reliability of their joint power output and to form the most effective consortium.

  18. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

    2013-10-01

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

  19. Influence of the wind direction on the chloride profiles of structures close to the Caribbean Sea. The case of the Turiguanó- Coco Key Viaduct in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez García, E. J.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of chlorides profiles is important to predict concrete structures service life, among other factors. However, reported results are, in general, from small specimens exposed to specific atmospheres instead of real structures. The objective of this work was the obtention and interpretation of the chlorides profiles forms from several bridges of the Turiguanó-Coco Key viaduct in Cuba. The results verified data from other authors but on different structural elements and similar atmospheres. The form of the chloride profile for structures similar to those in the viaduct bridges, exposed to tropical marine atmosphere, is consistent and changes in intensity with the winds direction and the blocking to them by parts of the structure. The possible effect of the wet and drying process is also discussed.

    En años recientes se le ha dado importancia a la interpretación de los perfiles de cloruros en el hormigón armado con fines de predicción de vida útil, entre otros. Sin embargo, los datos que se han constatado pertenecen, por lo general, a experimentos sobre probetas que han sido expuestas, por un tiempo determinado, a atmósferas específicas más que a estructuras reales. El objetivo de este trabajo fue la obtención e interpretación de la forma de los perfiles de cloruros de varios puentes del viaducto Turiguanó-Cayo Coco en Cuba. Los resultados ratificaron los datos encontrados por otros autores en otros elementos y ambientes similares, pero en un tipo de estructura diferente. En todos los casos estudiados se pudo verificar que, la forma del perfil de concentración de cloruros para estructuras similares a los puentes del viaducto estudiado expuestas a un ambiente tropical marino, es consistente y cambia de intensidad con la dirección de los vientos y del apantallamiento a los mismos por parte de la estructura y de sus partes. Se discute el posible efecto del mojado y secado.

  20. Analysis of turbulent wake behind a wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Nasrin Arjomand; Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2013-01-01

    and momentum conservations, the selfsimilarity of mean velocity profile and the eddy viscosity closure. The theoretical approach is validated using the numerical results obtained from large eddy simulations with an actuator line technique at 0.1% and 3% ambient turbulence level and ambient wind velocity of 10...... m/s, and 0.1% ambient turbulence level and ambient wind velocity of 7 m/s. The obtained results showed that neglecting the nonlinear term of velocity in the momentum equation in the far wake region cannot be a fair assumption, unlike what is generally assumed in most of text books of fluid mechanics...

  1. Real Time Extraction Kinetics of Electro Membrane Extraction Verified by Comparing Drug Metabolism Profiles Obtained from a Flow-Flow Electro Membrane Extraction-Mass Spectrometry System with LC-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, David; Jensen, Henrik; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2015-01-01

    alternative to conventional protein precipitation followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for studying drug metabolism. Comparison of EME-MS with LC-MS for drug metabolism analysis demonstrated for the first time that real time extraction of analytes by EME is possible. Metabolism kinetics...... were investigated for three different drugs: amitriptyline, promethazine, and methadone. By comparing the EME-MS extraction profiles of the drug substances and formed drug metabolites with the metabolism profiles obtained by conventional protein precipitation followed by LC-MS good correlation......A simple to construct and operate, "dip-in" electromembrane extraction (EME) probe directly coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for rapid extraction and real time analysis of various analytes was developed. The setup demonstrated that EME-MS can be used as a viable...

  2. Simultaneous Fault Detection and Sensor Selection for Condition Monitoring of Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenna Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Data collected from the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA system are used widely in wind farms to obtain operation and performance information about wind turbines. The paper presents a three-way model by means of parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC for wind turbine fault detection and sensor selection, and evaluates the method with SCADA data obtained from an operational farm. The main characteristic of this new approach is that it can be used to simultaneously explore measurement sample profiles and sensors profiles to avoid discarding potentially relevant information for feature extraction. With K-means clustering method, the measurement data indicating normal, fault and alarm conditions of the wind turbines can be identified, and the sensor array can be optimised for effective condition monitoring.

  3. Analysis of wind energy potential and vibrations caused by wind turbine on its basement

    OpenAIRE

    Kaláb, Zdeněk; Hanslian, David; Stolárik, Martin; Pinka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with study of wind energy potential and experimental measurement of vibrations caused by wind turbine. Study area was wind park Horní Loděnice – Lipina. To obtain frequency distribution of wind speed, two models were used for calculation. Experimental seismological measurement was performed in near surroundings of the wind turbine. At low wind speed without significant wind gust, only negligible vibrations were measured. Web of Science 19 3 159 151

  4. Hydraulic conductivity obtained by instantaneous profile method using retention curve and neutron probes and Genuchten model; Condutividade hidraulica obtida pelo metodo do perfil instantaneo utilizando curva de retencao e sonda de neutrons e pelo modelo de Genuchten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berretta, Ana Lucia Olmedo

    1999-07-01

    The hydraulic conductivity is one of the most important parameters to understand the movement of water in the unsaturated zone. Reliable estimations are difficult to obtain, once the hydraulic conductivity is highly variable. This study was carried out at 'Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz', Universidade de Sao Paulo, in a Kandiudalfic Eutrudox soil. The hydraulic conductivity was determined by a direct and an indirect method. The instantaneous profile method was described and the hydraulic conductivity as a function of soil water content was determined by solving the Richards equation. Tensiometers were used to estimate the total soil water potential, and the neutron probe and the soil retention curve were used to estimate soil water content in the direct method. The neutron probe showed to be not adequately sensible to the changes of soil water content in this soil. Despite of the soil retention curve provides best correlation values to soil water content as a function of water redistribution time, the soil water content in this soil did not vary too much till the depth of 50 cm, reflecting the influence of the presence of a Bt horizon. The soil retention curve was well fitted by the van Genuchten model used as an indirect method. The values of the van Genuchten and the experimental relative hydraulic conductivity obtained by the instantaneous profile method provided a good correlation. However, the values estimated by the model were always lower than that ones obtained experimentally. (author)

  5. Influence of wind conditions on wind turbine loads and measurement of turbulence using lidars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sathe, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Variations in wind conditions influence the loads on wind turbines significantly. In order to determine these loads it is important that the external conditions are well understood. Wind lidars are well developed nowadays to measure wind profiles upwards from the surface. But how turbulence can be

  6. Wind Tunnel Measurements at LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    This section presents the results obtained during the experimental campaign that was conducted in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov from August 16th to 26th, 2010. The goal of this study is to validate the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model through measurements of the boundary...... layer turbulence characteristics and the far-field noise generated by the acoustic scattering of the turbulent boundary layer vorticies as they convect past the trailing edge. This campaign was conducted with a NACA0015 airfoil section that was placed in the wind tunnel section. It is equipped with high...

  7. Wind Atlas of Bay of Bengal with Satellite Wind Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadi, Navila Rahman

    The objective of this study is to obtain appropriate offshore location in the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh for further development of wind energy. Through analyzing the previous published works, no offshore wind energy estimation has been found here. That is why, this study can be claimed as the first...... footstep towards offshore wind energy analysis for this region. Generally, it is difficult to find offshore wind data relative to the wind turbine hub heights, therefore a starting point is necessary to identify the possible wind power density of the region. In such scenario, Synthetic aperture radars (SAR......) have proven useful. In this study, SAR based dataset- ENVISAT ASAR has been used for Wind Atlas generation. Furthermore, a comparative study has been performed with Global Wind Atlas (GWA) to determine a potential offshore wind farm. Additionally, the annual energy production of that offshore windfarm...

  8. The aerodynamics of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Troldborg, Niels

    2013-01-01

    In the paper we present state-of-the-art of research in wind turbine aerodynamics. We start be giving a brief historical review and a survey over aerodynamic research in wind energy. Next, we focus on some recent research results obtained by our wind energy group at Department of Mechanical...

  9. Simulation of shear and turbulence impact on wind turbine performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Courtney, Michael; Larsen, Torben J.

    Aerodynamic simulations (HAWC2Aero) were used to investigate the influence of the speed shear, the direction shear and the turbulence intensity on the power output of a multi-megawatt turbine. First simulation cases with laminar flow and power law wind speed profiles were compared to the case...... of a uniform inflow. Secondly, a similar analysis was done for cases with direction shear. In each case, we derived a standard power curve (function of the wind speed at hub height) and power curves obtained with various definitions of equivalent wind speed in order to reduce the scatter due to shear. Thirdly......, the variations of the power output and the power curve were analysed for various turbulence intensities. Furthermore, the equivalent speed method was successfully tested on a power curve resulting from simulations cases combining shear and turbulence. Finally, we roughly simulated the wind speed measurements we...

  10. Wind Farms: Modeling and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soleimanzadeh, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    is minimized. The controller is practically feasible. Yet, the results on load reduction in this approach are not very significant. In the second strategy, the wind farm control problem has been divided into below rated and above rated wind speed conditions. In the above rated wind speed pitch angle and power....... Distributed controller design commences with formulating the problem, where a structured matrix approach has been put in to practice. Afterwards, an H2 control problem is implemented to obtain the controller dynamics for a wind farm such that the structural loads on wind turbines are minimized.......The primary purpose of this work is to develop control algorithms for wind farms to optimize the power production and augment the lifetime of wind turbines in wind farms. In this regard, a dynamical model for wind farms was required to be the basis of the controller design. In the first stage...

  11. Probabilistic Capacity Assessment of Lattice Transmission Towers under Strong Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Serving as one key component of the most important lifeline infrastructure system, transmission towers are vulnerable to multiple nature hazards including strong wind and could pose severe threats to the power system security with possible blackouts under extreme weather conditions, such as hurricanes, derechoes, or winter storms. For the security and resiliency of the power system, it is important to ensure the structural safety with enough capacity for all possible failure modes, such as structural stability. The study is to develop a probabilistic capacity assessment approach for transmission towers under strong wind loads. Due to the complicated structural details of lattice transmission towers, wind tunnel experiments are carried out to understand the complex interactions of wind and the lattice sections of transmission tower and drag coefficients and the dynamic amplification factor for different panels of the transmission tower are obtained. The wind profile is generated and the wind time histories are simulated as a summation of time-varying mean and fluctuating components. The capacity curve for the transmission towers is obtained from the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA method. To consider the stochastic nature of wind field, probabilistic capacity curves are generated by implementing IDA analysis for different wind yaw angles and different randomly generated wind speed time histories. After building the limit state functions based on the maximum allowable drift to height ratio, the probabilities of failure are obtained based on the meteorological data at a given site. As the transmission tower serves as the key nodes for the power network, the probabilistic capacity curves can be incorporated into the performance based design of the power transmission network.

  12. Wind Power in Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    Georgia has good wind power potential. Preliminary analyses show that the technical wind power potential in Georgia is good. Meteorological data shows that Georgia has four main areas in Georgia with annual average wind speeds of over 6 m/s and two main areas with 5-6 m/s at 80m. The most promising areas are the high mountain zone of the Great Caucasus, The Kura river valley, The South-Georgian highland and the Southern part of the Georgian Black Sea coast. Czech company Wind Energy Invest has recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Georgian authorities for development of the first wind farm in Georgia, a 50MW wind park in Paravani, Southern Georgia, to be completed in 2014. Annual generation is estimated to 170.00 GWh and the investment estimated to 101 million US$. Wind power is suited to balance hydropower in the Georgian electricity sector Electricity generation in Georgia is dominated by hydro power, constituting 88% of total generation in 2009. Limited storage capacity and significant spring and summer peaks in river flows result in an uneven annual generation profile and winter time shortages that are covered by three gas power plants. Wind power is a carbon-free energy source well suited to balance hydropower, as it is available (often strongest) in the winter and can be exported when there is a surplus. Another advantage with wind power is the lead time for the projects; the time from site selection to operation for a wind power park (approximately 2.5 years) is much shorter than for hydro power (often 6-8 years). There is no support system or scheme for renewable sources in Georgia, so wind power has to compete directly with other energy sources and is in most cases more expensive to build than hydro power. In a country and region with rapidly increasing energy demands, the factors described above nevertheless indicate that there is a commercial niche and a role to play for Georgian wind power. Skra: An example of a wind power development

  13. Experimental and numerical modeling of wind flow over complex topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Ashkan

    Wind mapping is of utmost importance in various wind engineering, wind environment, and wind energy applications. The available wind atlases usually provide wind data with low resolutions relative to the wind turbine height and size and usually neglect the effect of topographic features with relatively large or sudden changes in elevation. Developing a cost effective methodology to predict the wind patterns and to obtain wind maps over any topographic terrain is absolutely needed for wind turbine/farm siting. As the previous analytic and empirical attempts to resolve the flow over topographic features were limited to basic geometries that hardly exist in nature, applying Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurement techniques in wind tunnel and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques in numerical simulation of the flow over topography seems to be the best alternative solution to the problem. PIV measurements and CFD simulations are carried out on a 1:3000 scale model of complex topographic area. Three distinct topographic features are investigated: a valley, a ridge and a hill. The PIV measurements compare well with hot-wire based mean velocity profiles for the three cases. Moreover, the turbulence intensity profiles match well for flow regions without recirculation. The ridge wake region shows discrepancies between the two techniques which are attributed to the complexity of the flow in this region and limitations of both techniques. A procedure incorporating Geographic Information System (GIS) and surface modeling techniques is introduced to build the CFD model of a complex terrain starting from the existing topography maps with desired resolutions. Moreover, a new approach is made to simulate the terrain roughness up to ultimate roughness heights, by implementing arrays of bell-shaped roughness elements in the CFD model. The velocity profiles and velocity vectors were compared with the PIV measurements and were found to be in good agreement near the ground

  14. Wind Structure and Wind Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    The purpose of this note is to provide a short description of wind, i.e. of the flow in the atmosphere of the Earth and the loading caused by wind on structures. The description comprises: causes to the generation of windhe interaction between wind and the surface of the Earthhe stochastic nature...... of windhe interaction between wind and structures, where it is shown that wind loading depends strongly on this interaction...

  15. Influence of atmospheric stability on wind turbine loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sathe, Ameya; Mann, Jakob; Barlas, Thanasis K.

    2013-01-01

    is up to 3% only. The wind profiles and turbulence under diabatic conditions have contrasting influences on the loads; for example, under stable conditions, loads induced by the wind profile are larger because of increased wind shear, whereas those induced by turbulence are lower because of less......Simulations of wind turbine loads for the NREL 5 MW reference wind turbine under diabatic conditions are performed. The diabatic conditions are incorporated in the input wind field in the form of wind profile and turbulence. The simulations are carried out for mean wind speeds between 3 and 16 m s1...... at the turbine hub height. The loads are quantified as the cumulative sum of the damage equivalent load for different wind speeds that are weighted according to the wind speed and stability distribution. Four sites with a different wind speed and stability distribution are used for comparison. The turbulence...

  16. Obtención de modelo matemático para el desarrollo del perfil del ala de una aeronave. // Obtaining a mathematical model for the development of the profile of the airship wing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cabrera Pedroso

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo está dirigido a brindar un modelo matemático que permita el cálculo y determinación de una funciónanalítica para la obtención del perfil de un ala de geometría simétrica y variable de una aeronave con el empleo de métodoscomputacionales. En el artículo se analiza los métodos para la elaboración de sistemas de cálculo basados en modelosmatemáticos obtenidos en MATLAB 7.0 e implementados con el software LabVIEW 6.0 a través de programas de diseñosasistidos por computadoras en AUTOCAD (AUTOLISP. Los diferentes tópicos abordados dan a los interesados una ideaglobal del desarrollo de esta tecnología computacional y su aplicación a ramas de la mecánica, así como la metodologíaseguida para obtener el perfil aerodinámico de un ala. También se exponen aspectos generales del empleo de la funciónAUTOLISP y el código fuente del programa diseñado.Palabras claves: perfil de alas, modelos matemáticos, AutoCAD, AutoLISP, medición experimental.__________________________________________________________________________Abstract.This article was carried out to obtain a mathematical model that allows the calculation and determination of an analyticfunction of symmetrical geometry profile and variable. In the article it is analyzed the methods for the elaboration ofsystem of calculations based on mathematical models obtained with the software language LabVIEW 6.0 and it is used todeveloping the program attended by the computers AUTOCAD (AUTOLISP. The approached topics give to the interestedparties a global idea of the development it gives this technology and their application to branches of the mechanicalspecialties, as well as the followed methodology to obtain the aerofoil profile of a wing. General aspects are also exposedof the employment of the function AUTOLISP and the source code on the sketch program.Key words: Wing profiles, mathematical models, AutoCAD, AutoLISP, experimental measurement.

  17. On the Weak-Wind Problem in Massive Stars: X-Ray Spectra Reveal a Massive Hot Wind in mu Columbae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Oskinova, Lidia M.; Ignace, Richard; Waldron, Wayne L.; Todt, Helge; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Kitamoto, Shunji

    2012-01-01

    Mu Columbae is a prototypical weak-wind O star for which we have obtained a high-resolution X-ray spectrum with the Chandra LETG/ACIS instrument and a low-resolution spectrum with Suzaku. This allows us, for the first time, to investigate the role of X-rays on the wind structure in a bona fide weak-wind system and to determine whether there actually is a massive hot wind. The X-ray emission measure indicates that the outflow is an order of magnitude greater than that derived from UV lines and is commensurate with the nominal wind-luminosity relationship for O stars. Therefore, the "weak-wind problem"--identified from cool wind UV/optical spectra--is largely resolved by accounting for the hot wind seen in X-rays. From X-ray line profiles, Doppler shifts, and relative strengths, we find that this weak-wind star is typical of other late O dwarfs. The X-ray spectra do not suggest a magnetically confined plasma-the spectrum is soft and lines are broadened; Suzaku spectra confirm the lack of emission above 2 keV. Nor do the relative line shifts and widths suggest any wind decoupling by ions. The He-like triplets indicate that the bulk of the X-ray emission is formed rather close to the star, within five stellar radii. Our results challenge the idea that some OB stars are "weak-wind" stars that deviate from the standard wind-luminosity relationship. The wind is not weak, but it is hot and its bulk is only detectable in X-rays.

  18. Insuring wind energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Guglielmo; Petroni, Filippo; Prattico, Flavio

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an insurance contract that the supplier of wind energy may subscribe in order to immunize the production of electricity against the volatility of the wind speed process. The other party of the contract may be any dispatchable energy producer, like gas turbine or hydroelectric generator, which can supply the required energy in case of little or no wind. The adoption of a stochastic wind speed model allows the computation of the fair premium that the wind power supplier has to pay in order to hedge the risk of inadequate output of electricity at any time. Recursive type equations are obtained for the prospective mathematical reserves of the insurance contract and for their higher order moments. The model and the validity of the results are illustrated through a numerical example.

  19. Wind Energy Study and Energy Cost of Wind Electricity Generation in Nigeria: Past and Recent Results and a Case Study for South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluseyi O. Ajayi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed the wind energy potential of ten selected sites in the south western region of Nigeria and carried out a cost benefit analysis of wind power generation at those sites. Twenty four years’ (1987 to 2010 wind speed data at 10 m height obtained from the Nigerian meteorological agency were employed to classify the sites wind profiles for electricity generation. The energy cost analysis of generating wind electricity from the sites was also carried out. The outcome showed that sites in Lagos and Oyo States were adequately suited for large scale generation with average wind speeds ranged between 2.9 and 5.8 m/s. Those from other sites may be suitable for small scale generation or as wind farms, with several small turbines connected together, to generate large enough wind power. The turbine matching results shows that turbines cut-in and rated wind speeds of between 2.0 and 3.0 m/s, and between 10 and 12.0 m/s respectively will be very suited to all the sites, particularly those in locations outside Lagos and Oyo States. The energy cost analysis shows that generation cost can be as low as 0.02 €/kWh and as high as 5.03/kWh, depending on the turbine model employed.

  20. FACTS Devices for Large Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamczyk, Andrzej Grzegorz; Teodorescu, Remus; Rodriguez, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Growing number of wind turbines is changing electricity generation profile all over the world. However, high wind energy penetration affects power system safety and stability. For this reason transmission system operators (TSO) impose more stringent connection requirements on the wind power plant...

  1. Wind Turbines Adaptation to the Variability of the Wind Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Yuriy; Martynenko, Gennadii; Misaylov, Vitaliy; Soliannikova, Iuliia

    2010-05-01

    WIND TURBINES ADAPTATION TO THE VARIABILITY OF THE WIND FIELD The subject of our scientific research is wind power turbines (WPT) with the horizontal axis which were now common in the world. Efficient wind turbines work is largely determined by non-stationarity of the wind field, expressed in its gustiness, the presence of vertical and horizontal shifts of wind speed and direction. At critical values of the wind parameters WPT has aerodynamic and mechanical overload, leading to breakdowns, premature wear and reduce the life of the wind turbine. To prevent accidents at the peak values of wind speed it is used the regulatory system of windwheels. WPT control systems provide a process orientation of the wind turbine rotor axis in the line of the mean wind. Wind turbines are also equipped with braking device used to protect against breakdowns when a significant increase in the wind. In general, all these methods of regulation are not always effective. Thus, in practice there may be situations when the wind speed is many times greater than the stated limit. For example, if there are microbursts in the atmospheric boundary layer, low-level wind shears caused by its gust front, storms, etc. It is required for a wind power turbine adaptation to intensive short-term wind impulses and considerable vertical wind shifts that the data about them shall be obtained ahead of time. To do this it is necessary to have the information on the real structure of the wind field in the area of the blade sweep for the minimum range against the wind that is determined by the mean speed and the system action time. The implementation of acoustic and laser traditional wind sounding systems is limited by ambient acoustic noise, by heavy rain, snowfall and by fog. There are free of these disadvantages the inclined radioacoustic sounding (IRASS) technique which works for a system of remote detection and control of wind gusts. IRASS technique is realized as low-potential Doppler pulse radar

  2. Nova Scotia wind atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    In order to stimulate growth of the wind energy sector in the province of Nova Scotia and to optimize the development of an important renewable energy source in the province, the Nova Scotia Department of Energy has launched the Nova Scotia wind atlas project. The atlas provides valuable information regarding the identification of the optimal locations to install wind farm turbines, both at the large utility scale level and at the private or small business levels. This article presented information on the wind atlas website and on wind resource maps. Background information on the project was presented. The wind resource maps were developed in partnership by the K.C, Irving Chair in Sustainable Development at Moncton University and the Applied Geomatics Research Group at the Nova Scotia Community College. The wind resource maps are available for viewing on the website where users can click on tile section to obtain enlarged versions of wind resource maps for different parts of the province of Nova Scotia. The maps were developed using computer modelling. 7 figs.

  3. Continuous supersonic plasma wind tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Nielsen, P.

    1969-01-01

    The normal magnetic field configuration of a Q device has been modified to obtain a 'magnetic Laval nozzle'. Continuous supersonic plasma 'winds' are obtained with Mach numbers ~3. The magnetic nozzle appears well suited for the study of the interaction of supersonic plasma 'winds' with either...

  4. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-04-13

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  6. Weather Research and Forecasting model simulation of an onshore wind farm: assessment against LiDAR and SCADA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Christian; Garcia-Cartagena, Edgardo J.; Zhan, Lu; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    The integration of wind farm parameterizations into numerical weather prediction models is essential to study power production under realistic conditions. Nevertheless, recent models are unable to capture turbine wake interactions and, consequently, the mean kinetic energy entrainment, which are essential for the development of power optimization models. To address the study of wind turbine wake interaction, one-way nested mesoscale to large-eddy simulation (LES) were performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF). The simulation contains five nested domains modeling the mesoscale wind on the entire North Texas Panhandle region to the microscale wind fluctuations and turbine wakes of a wind farm located at Panhandle, Texas. The wind speed, direction and boundary layer profile obtained from WRF were compared against measurements obtained with a sonic anemometer and light detection and ranging system located within the wind farm. Additionally, the power production were assessed against measurements obtained from the supervisory control and data acquisition system located in each turbine. Furthermore, to incorporate the turbines into very coarse LES, a modification to the implementation of the wind farm parameterization by Fitch et al. (2012) is proposed. This work was supported by the NSF, Grants No. 1243482 (WINDINSPIRE) and IIP 1362033 (WindSTAR), and TACC.

  7. Influence of refraction on wind turbine noise

    OpenAIRE

    Makarewicz, Rufin

    2013-01-01

    A semi-empirical method is applied to calculate the time-average sound level of wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by wind shear refraction. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular sou...

  8. A high performance finite element model for wind farm modeling in forested areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Herbert; Avila, Matias; Folch, Arnau; Cosculluela, Luis; Prieto, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Wind energy has grown significantly during the past decade and is expected to continue growing in the fight against climate change. In the search for new land where the impact of the wind turbines is small several wind farms are currently being installed in forested areas. In order to optimize the distribution of the wind turbines within the wind farm the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved over the domain of interest using either commercial or in house codes. The existence of a canopy alters the Atmospheric Boundary Layer wind profile close to the ground. Therefore in order to obtain a more accurate representation of the flow in forested areas modification to both the Navier Stokes and turbulence variables equations need to be introduced. Several existing canopy models have been tested in an academic problem showing that the one proposed by Sogachev et. al gives the best results. This model has been implemented in an in house CFD solver named Alya. It is a high performance unstructured finite element code that has been designed from scratch to be able to run in the world's biggest supercomputers. Its scalabililty has recently been tested up to 100000 processors in both American and European supercomputers. During the past three years the code has been tuned and tested for wind energy problems. Recent efforts have focused on the canopy model following industry needs. In this work we shall benchmark our results in a wind farm that is currently being designed by Scottish Power and Iberdrola in Scotland. This is a very interesting real case with extensive experimental data from five different masts with anemometers at several heights. It is used to benchmark both the wind profiles and the speed up obtained between different masts. Sixteen different wind directions are simulated. The numerical model provides very satisfactory results for both the masts that are affected by the canopy and those that are not influenced by it.

  9. Pulsation-induced atmospheric dynamics in M-type AGB stars. Effects on wind properties, photometric variations and near-IR CO line profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.; Eriksson, K.; Nowotny, W.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Wind-driving in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is commonly attributed to a two-step process. First, matter in the stellar atmosphere is levitated by shock waves, induced by stellar pulsation, and second, this matter is accelerated by radiation pressure on dust, resulting in a wind. In dynamical atmosphere and wind models the effects of the stellar pulsation are often simulated by a simplistic prescription at the inner boundary. Aims: We test a sample of dynamical models for M-type AGB stars, for which we kept the stellar parameters fixed to values characteristic of a typical Mira variable but varied the inner boundary condition. The aim was to evaluate the effect on the resulting atmosphere structure and wind properties. The results of the models are compared to observed mass-loss rates and wind velocities, photometry, and radial velocity curves, and to results from 1D radial pulsation models. The goal is to find boundary conditions which give realistic atmosphere and wind properties. Methods: Dynamical atmosphere models are calculated, using the DARWIN code for different combinations of photospheric velocities and luminosity variations. The inner boundary is changed by introducing an offset between maximum expansion of the stellar surface and the luminosity and/or by using an asymmetric shape for the luminosity variation. Ninety-nine different combinations of theses two changes are tested. Results: The model atmospheres are very sensitive to the inner boundary. Models that resulted in realistic wind velocities and mass-loss rates, when compared to observations, also produced realistic photometric variations. For the models to also reproduce the characteristic radial velocity curve present in Mira stars (derived from CO Δv = 3 lines), an overall phase shift of 0.2 between the maxima of the luminosity and radial variation had to be introduced. This is a larger phase shift than is found by 1D radial pulsation models. Conclusions: We find that a group

  10. Optimal Operation Planning of Wind Farm Installed BESS Using Wind Power Forecast Data of Wind Turbine Generators Considering Forecast Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogimi, Kazuki; Kamiyama, Shota; Palmer, Michael; Yona, Atsushi; Senju, Tomonobu; Funabashi, Toshihisa

    2013-06-01

    In order to solve the problems of global warming and depletion of energy resource, renewable energy systems such as wind generation are getting attention. However, wind power fluctuates due to variation of wind speed, and it is difficult to perfectly forecast wind power. This paper describes a method to use power forecast data of wind turbine generators considering wind power forecast error for optimal operation. The purpose in this paper is to smooth the output power fluctuation of a wind farm and to obtain more beneficial electrical power for selling.

  11. Wind farm repowering: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selva, L. [Renewable Energy Eng. (Spain); Canas, M.; Gomez, E.; Pujante, A [Renewable Energy Research Inst., Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Control Eng. (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    Wind farm repowering involves the replacement of smaller and middle sized wind turbines, with state-of-the-art multi-megawatt turbines. In this paper, a detailed study of the repowering of a wind farm is presented, by computing the generated active power from existing wind turbines and the new ones. The active power generated with the wind turbines are totalized to obtain the yearly generated energy and analyzed, thus economic studies take the repowering cost into account too. (au)

  12. Extreme winds in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, L.; Rathmann, O.; Hansen, S.O.

    1999-02-01

    Wind-speed data from four sites in Denmark have been analyzed in order to obtain estimates of the basic wind velocity which is defined as the 50-year wind speed under standard conditions, i.e. ten-minute averages at the height 10 m over a uniform terrain with the roughness length 0.05 m. The sites are, from west, Skjern (15 years), Kegnaes (7 years), Sprogoe (20 years), and Tystofte (15 years). The data are ten minute averages of wind speed, wind direction, temperature and pressure. The last two quantities are used to determine the air density {rho}. The data are cleaned for terrain effects by means of a slightly modified WASP technique where the sector speed-up factors and roughness lengths are linearly smoothed with a direction resolution of one degree. Assuming geotropic balance, all the wind-velocity data are transformed to friction velocity u{sub *} and direction at standard conditions by means of the geotropic drag law for neutral stratification. The basic wind velocity in 30 deg. sectors are obtained through ranking of the largest values of the friction velocity pressure 1/2{rho}u{sub *}{sup 2} taken both one every two months and once every year. The main conclusion is that the basic wind velocity is significantly larger at Skjern, close to the west coast of Jutland, than at any of the other sites. Irrespective of direction, the present standard estimates of 50-year wind are 25 {+-} 1 m/s at Skern and 22 {+-} 1 m/s at the other three sites. These results are in agreement with those obtained by Jensen and Franck (1970) and Abild (1994) and supports the conclusion that the wind climate at the west coast of Jutland is more extreme than in any other part of the country. Simple procedures to translate in a particular direction sector the standard basic wind velocity to conditions with a different roughness length and height are presented. It is shown that a simple scheme makes it possible to calculate the total 50-year extreme load on a general structure without

  13. Doppler Lidar in the Wind Forecast Improvement Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichugina Yelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will provide an overview of some projects in support of Wind Energy development involving Doppler lidar measurement of wind flow profiles. The high temporal and vertical resolution of these profiles allows the uncertainty of Numerical Weather Prediction models to be evaluated in forecasting dynamic processes and wind flow phenomena in the layer of rotor-blade operation.

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments obtained during the R/V Discovery EEL_2011_D365 Cruise Along Extended Ellett Line from 2011-05-20 to 2011-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0157258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157258 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data obtained during the R/V Discovery EEL_2011_D365 Cruise Along Extended Ellett...

  15. Dose profile for electron beams obtained with CaSO{sub 4}:Ce,Eu thermoluminescent dosimeters; Perfil de dose de feixes de eletrons obtidos com dosimetros termoluminescentes de CaSO{sub 4}:Ce,Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Maira G.; Rodrigues, Leticia L.C., E-mail: mgnunes@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energerticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    The calcium sulphate activated with cerium and europium (CaSO{sub 4}:Ce,Eu) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) recently developed at Nuclear and Energy Research Institute as well as the calcium sulphate activated with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}: Dy) and lithium fluoride activated with magnesium and titanium, (LiF:Mg,Ti; TLD-100) TLDs, with long term applications in dosimetry and considered as standards, were used to obtain the dose profile for 3.43, 5.48, 8.27 and 11.67 MeV electron beams generated by a linear accelerator Clinac 2100-C (Varian) in the reference conditions defined by the TRS-398 code of practice. The routine dosimetry of the electron beams, performed with a calibrated ionization chamber, ensures that the electron beams fulfill the requirements of flatness and symmetry established in this code of practice. Thus, as the TRS-398 Code of Practice requirements are fulfilled by the measurements performed with the new TLD type, CaSO{sub 4}:Ce,Eu may be applied in clinical dosimetry of high energy electron beams. (author)

  16. Wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeoman, J.C. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    This evaluation of wind turbines is part of a series of Technology Evaluations of possible components and subsystems of community energy systems. Wind turbines, ranging in size from 200 W to 10 MW, are discussed as candidates for prime movers in community systems. Estimates of performance characteristics and cost as a function of rated capacity and rated wind speed are presented. Data concerning material requirements, environmental effects, and operating procedures also are given and are represented empirically to aid computer simulation.

  17. Estimating near-shore wind resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier Ralph; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Peña, Alfredo

    grid spacings were performed for each of the two schemes. An evaluation of the wind profile using vertical profilers revealed small differences in modelled mean wind speed between the different set-ups, with the YSU scheme predicting slightly higher mean wind speeds. Larger differences between...... RMSE and correlation coefficient. Using a finer grid spacing of 1 and 0.5 km did not give better results and sensitivity to the input of different SST and land cover data in the RUNE area was small. The difference in mean wind speed between all simulations over a region 80 km around the RUNE area were......An evaluation and sensitivity study using the WRF mesoscale model to estimate the wind in a coastal area is performed using a unique data set consisting of scanning, profiling and floating lidars. The ability of the WRF model to represent the wind speed was evaluated by running the model for a four...

  18. Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganley, Jason; Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    2016-03-15

    Wind energy is a variable and uncertain renewable resource that has long been used to produce mechanical work, and has developed into a large producer of global electricity needs. As renewable sources of energy and feedstocks become more important globally to produce sustainable products, many different processes have started adopting wind power as an energy source. Many times this is through a conversion to hydrogen through electrolysis that allows for a more continuous process input. Other important pathways include methanol and ammonia. As the demand for sustainable products and production pathways increases, and wind power capital costs decrease, the role of wind power in chemical and energy production seems poised to increase significantly.

  19. Experimental determination of pure rotary stability derivatives using curved and rolling flow wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutze, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of using a curved and rolling flow wind tunnel to extract pure rotary stability derivatives is presented. Descriptions of the curved flow and the rolling flow test sections of the Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel are given including methods for obtaining the proper velocity profiles and correcting the data acquired. Results of testing current fighter configurations in this facility are presented with particular attention given to comparing pure rotary derivatives with combined rotary and unsteady derivatives obtained by standard oscillation tests. Also the effect of curved and rolling flow on lateral static stability derivatives is examined.

  20. UARS Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AT V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AT data product consists of daily, 65.536 second interval time-ordered vertical profiles of meridional and zonal wind...

  1. UARS Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AL V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AL data product consists of daily, 4 degree increment latitude-ordered vertical profiles of meridional and zonal wind...

  2. Offshore wind speed and wind power characteristics for ten ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At Athos and Mykonos, increasing linear trends were estimated. At all the stations the chosen wind turbine could produce energy for more than 70% of the time. The wind speed distribution was found to be well represented by Weibull parameters obtained using Maximum likelihood method compared to WAsP and Method of ...

  3. Wind farm performance - Power Analysis of a wind turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Esquinas Herrera, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Wind conditions from a wind farm situated in Ørland were analyzed based on a ten minute measurements in order to obtain the power and efficiency curves. The results from the analysis were compared with different curves provided from the company Vestas and with theoretical terms. Moreover, it was shown how is affected the power curve of the wind turbine by the wake effect of the other turbines. The different ways of plotting these curves based on wind speed either from the anemometer of the wi...

  4. Wind noise under a pine tree canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that infrasonic wind noise levels are lower for arrays placed in forests and under vegetation than for those in open areas. In this research, the wind noise levels, turbulence spectra, and wind velocity profiles are measured in a pine forest. A prediction of the wind noise spectra from the measured meteorological parameters is developed based on recent research on wind noise above a flat plane. The resulting wind noise spectrum is the sum of the low frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-shear interaction near and above the tops of the trees and higher frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction near the ground within the tree layer. The convection velocity of the low frequency wind noise corresponds to the wind speed above the trees while the measurements showed that the wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction is near stationary and is generated by the slow moving turbulence adjacent to the ground. Comparison of the predicted wind noise spectrum with the measured wind noise spectrum shows good agreement for four measurement sets. The prediction can be applied to meteorological estimates to predict the wind noise under other pine forests.

  5. Long-Term Profiles of Wind and Weibull Distribution Parameters up to 600 m in a Rural Coastal and an Inland Suburban Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    at a flat rural coastal site in western Denmark and at an inland suburban area near Hamburg in Germany. Simulations with the weather research and forecasting numerical model were carried out in both forecast and analysis configurations. The scatter between measured and modelled wind speeds expressed...... distributions are different their variances are nearly the same. It is suggested to use the shape parameter for climatological mesoscale model evaluation. Based on the new measurements, a parametrization of the shape parameter for practical applications is suggested....

  6. MCMC for Wind Power Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaefthymiou, G.; Klöckl, B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper contributes a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for the direct generation of synthetic time series of wind power output. It is shown that obtaining a stochastic model directly in the wind power domain leads to reduced number of states and to lower order of the Markov chain at equal

  7. Measurements of Coastal Winds and Temperature. Sensor Evaluation, Data Quality, and Wind Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heggem, Tore

    1997-12-31

    The long Norwegian coastline has excellent sites for wind power production. This thesis contains a documentation of a measurement station for maritime meteorological data at the coast of Mid-Norway, and analysis of temperature and wind data. It discusses experience with different types of wind speed and wind direction sensors. Accurate air temperature measurements are essential to obtain information about the stability of the atmosphere, and a sensor based on separately calibrated thermistors is described. The quality of the calibrations and the measurements is discussed. A database built up from measurements from 1982 to 1995 has been available. The data acquisition systems and the programs used to read the data are described, as well as data control and gap-filling methods. Then basic statistics from the data like mean values and distributions are given. Quality control of the measurements with emphasis on shade effects from the masts and direction alignment is discussed. The concept of atmospheric stability is discussed. The temperature profile tends to change from unstable to slightly stable as maritime winds passes land. Temperature spectra based on two-year time series are presented. Finally, there is a discussion of long-term turbulence spectra calculated from 14 years of measurements. The lack of a gap in the one-hour region of the spectra is explained from the overweight of unstable atmospheric conditions in the dominating maritime wind. Examples of time series with regular 40-minute cycles, and corresponding effect spectra are given. The validity of local lapse rate as a criterion of atmospheric stability is discussed. 34 refs., 86 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Analysis of Wind Energy Potential and Optimum Wind Blade Design for Jamshoro Wind Corridor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYED UMAID ALI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pakistan is facing energy crisis since last decade. This crisis can be effectively handled by utilizing alternative energy resources. Pakistan has a huge wind energy potential of about 50,000MW. The contribution of costal area of Sindh, Pakistan in the total wind energy potential is about 43000MW. The Jamshoro wind corridor has the highest wind potential of all coastal areas of Sindh. In this paper a wind blade design has been developed and optimized for Jamshoro wind corridor. The theoretical blade design include the airfoil selection, appropriate chord length selection and optimization of twist angle. The designed blade has been analyzed using Q-blade. Considering the Jamshorowind conditions, blade of around 43 meters have been designed and optimized theoretically. Then the theoretical design is also been checked and verified in Q-blade. Theoretical optimization includes using different combinations of NACA profiles and using exhaustive iterative method to get optimized twist angle. This ensures the design with maximum power output with respect to wind speed of Jamshoro. For low wind speeds, theoretical results and simulated results in Q-blade were almost same but for high wind speeds, results were significantly different due to limitation of iterations in theoretical design

  9. Static and dynamic wind turbine simulator using a converter controlled dc motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monfared, Mohammad; Rastegar, Hasan [Department of Electrical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran); Madadi Kojabadi, Hossein [Department of Electrical Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz 51335-1996 (Iran)

    2008-05-15

    This paper describes a new wind turbine simulator for dynamic conditions. The authors have developed an experimental platform to simulate the static and dynamic characteristics of real wind energy conversion system. This system consists of a 3 kW dc motor, which drives a synchronous generator. The converter is a 3 kW single-phase half-controlled converter. MATLAB/Simulink real time control software interfaced to I/O board and a converter controlled dc motor are used instead of a real wind turbine. A MATLAB/Simulink model is developed that obtains wind profiles and, by applying real wind turbine characteristics in dynamics and rotational speed of dc motor, calculates the command shaft torque of a real wind turbine. Based on the comparison between calculated torques with command one, the shaft torque of dc motor is regulated accordingly by controlling armature current demand of a single-phase half-controlled ac-dc converter. Simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of proposed wind turbine simulator in emulating and therefore evaluating various turbines under a wide variety of wind conditions. (author)

  10. Wind power assessment in Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, J. [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay). Instituto de Mecanica de los Fluidos e Ingenieria Ambiental; Nunes, V. [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay). Instituto de Ingeneria Electrica

    1996-09-01

    The wind power as a large alternative energy source appear in Uruguay. A nested method to obtain the mean wind velocity time series at complex terrain sites and describe the turbulence was developed. Sites with mean velocity over 9m/s and capacity factor over 40% were found. The aerodynamic interferences loss between wind generators using a numerical model were evaluated and a numerical model was developed to design an optimal cluster wind farm. As bulk result, an installed capacity of 300MW with a cost production less than 0.065U$S/kW.h can be estimated over the all studied Region. (author)

  11. Extrapolating Satellite Winds to Turbine Operating Heights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wind retrievals from satellite sensors are typically performed for the standard level of 10 m. This restricts their full exploitation for wind energy planning, which requires wind information at much higher levels where wind turbines operate. A new method is presented for the vertical......-term stability correction that is based on numerical weather prediction (NWP) model outputs. The effect of the long-term stability correction on the wind profile is significant. The method is applied to Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar scenes acquired over the south Baltic Sea. This leads to maps...

  12. A Comparative Study of CFD Models of a Real Wind Turbine in Solar Chimney Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Gholamalizadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A solar chimney power plant consists of four main parts, a solar collector, a chimney, an energy storage layer, and a wind turbine. So far, several investigations on the performance of the solar chimney power plant have been conducted. Among them, different approaches have been applied to model the turbine inside the system. In particular, a real wind turbine coupled to the system was simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD in three investigations. Gholamalizadeh et al. simulated a wind turbine with the same blade profile as the Manzanares SCPP’s turbine (FX W-151-A blade profile, while a CLARK Y blade profile was modelled by Guo et al. and Ming et al. In this study, simulations of the Manzanares prototype were carried out using the CFD model developed by Gholamalizadeh et al. Then, results obtained by modelling different turbine blade profiles at different turbine rotational speeds were compared. The results showed that a turbine with the CLARK Y blade profile significantly overestimates the value of the pressure drop across the Manzanares prototype turbine as compared to the FX W-151-A blade profile. In addition, modelling of both blade profiles led to very similar trends in changes in turbine efficiency and power output with respect to rotational speed.

  13. Prescribed wind shear modelling with the actuator line technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Troldborg, Niels

    2007-01-01

    A method for prescribing arbitrary steady atmospheric wind shear profiles combined with CFD is presented. The method is furthermore combined with the actuator line technique governing the aerodynamic loads on a wind turbine. Computation are carried out on a wind turbine exposed to a representative...... steady atmospheric wind shear profile with and without wind direction changes up through the atmospheric boundary layer. Results show that the main impact on the turbine is captured by the model. Analysis of the wake behind the wind turbine, reveal the formation of a skewed wake geometry interacting...

  14. Intraday Trading of Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skajaa, Anders; Edlund, Kristian; Morales González, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we tackle the problem of a wind power producer participating in a short-term electricity market that allows for the continuous, but potentially illiquid, intraday trading of energy. Considering the realistic case of a wind farm operating in the western Danish price area of Nord Pool......, we build a simple but effective algorithm for the wind power producer to fully benefit from the Elbas intraday market. We then investigate the sensitivity of the obtained benefits to the maximum volume of energy the wind power producer is willing to trade in the intraday market, the ultimate aim...... of the trade (either to decrease energy imbalances or to increase profits) and to the installed capacity of the wind farm. Our numerical results reveal that the wind power producer can substantially increase his revenues by partaking in the intraday market but with diminishing returns to scale—a result that we...

  15. Dune formation under bimodal winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parteli, Eric J R; Durán, Orencio; Tsoar, Haim; Schwämmle, Veit; Herrmann, Hans J

    2009-12-29

    The study of dune morphology represents a valuable tool in the investigation of planetary wind systems--the primary factor controlling the dune shape is the wind directionality. However, our understanding of dune formation is still limited to the simplest situation of unidirectional winds: There is no model that solves the equations of sand transport under the most common situation of seasonally varying wind directions. Here we present the calculation of sand transport under bimodal winds using a dune model that is extended to account for more than one wind direction. Our calculations show that dunes align longitudinally to the resultant wind trend if the angle(w) between the wind directions is larger than 90 degrees. Under high sand availability, linear seif dunes are obtained, the intriguing meandering shape of which is found to be controlled by the dune height and by the time the wind lasts at each one of the two wind directions. Unusual dune shapes including the "wedge dunes" observed on Mars appear within a wide spectrum of bimodal dune morphologies under low sand availability.

  16. Wind turbines. Unsteady aerodynamics and inflow noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riget Broe, B.

    2009-12-15

    Aerodynamical noise from wind turbines due to atmospheric turbulence has the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics. Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil. An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input. The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models for lift distribution is for completely anisotropic turbulence and the other for perfectly isotropic turbulence, and so is also the corresponding models for the lift fluctuations derived from the models for lift distribution. The models for lift distribution and lift are compared with pressure data which are obtained by microphones placed flush with the surface of an aerofoil. The pressure data are from two experiments in a wind tunnel, one experiment with a NACA0015 profile and a second with a NACA63415 profile. The turbulence is measured by a triple wired hotwire instrument in the experiment with a NACA0015 profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model by the measurements

  17. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solverEllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel...

  18. Fast and slow radiation-driven wind solutions using ZEUS-3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.; ud-Doula, A.; Santillán, A.

    2014-10-01

    Currently, the theory of radiation-driven winds of massive stars possess three known solutions for the velocity and density profiles of the stellar winds, namely: the fast, Ω -slow and δ -slow solutions. In order to confirm their stability we use a time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic code called ZEUS-3D, and then we compare their results with the stationary solutions from our numerical hydrodynamic code. ZEUS-3D needs an initial trial solution to start to integrate, for this we use the stationary solution (from our code) or a β-law for the velocity field. In both cases we obtain the same results. Fast and both slow stationary solutions are attained in ZEUS-3D and are all stable. Furthermore, there is a very good agreement with the velocity and density fields from ZEUS-3D and our code, having differences between the terminal velocities lower than 3%. In addition, we found that ZEUS-3D is very sensitive to the boundary conditions (base density and velocity profile), in some cases we obtain kinks in the velocity profiles, similar to the ones obtained by Madura et al. (2007) for stars with high rotation. Such kinks are most likely the result of the wind being mass overloaded, but further investigation is needed to understand its nature better. Currently, we are exploring the effects of small perturbation at the base of the wind in order to study possible transitions or oscillations between δ-slow and fast solutions.

  19. Wind Power Prediction Considering Nonlinear Atmospheric Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the effect of nonlinear atmospheric disturbances on wind power prediction. A Lorenz system is introduced as an atmospheric disturbance model. Three new improved wind forecasting models combined with a Lorenz comprehensive disturbance are put forward in this study. Firstly, we define the form of the Lorenz disturbance variable and the wind speed perturbation formula. Then, different artificial neural network models are used to verify the new idea and obtain better wind speed predictions. Finally we separately use the original and improved wind speed series to predict the related wind power. This proves that the corrected wind speed provides higher precision wind power predictions. This research presents a totally new direction in the wind prediction field and has profound theoretical research value and practical guiding significance.

  20. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  1. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ...-005, QF07-257-004] Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4, LLC, Exelon Wind 5, LLC, Exelon Wind 6, LLC, Exelon Wind 7, LLC, Exelon Wind 8, LLC, Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel Energy...

  2. Calm winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of calm winds is of societal importance in connection with distribution pollution from natural sources (dust, volcanic gases and ash) as well as antropogenic sources. Time series from a multitude of automatic weather stations in Iceland have been explored and the climatology of calmness is established. This climatology underlines the importancec of not only abscence of large scale winds, but more importantly, the presence of surface inversions. Calmness is most frequent in summer, with secondary maxima in autumn and winter. The autumn calmness coincides with a period when frequency of synoptic scale cyclones does not increase, while the frequency of surface inversions increases rapidly. There is a very strong diurnal cycle in frequency of calm winds in the summer. The data indiates strongly that the nocturnal calmness is a result of a surface inversion, not the abscence of sea breeze. The frequency of calm winds is not only low at the coast, but also in the mountains, in spite of higher surface roughness away from the sea. The frequency of calm winds is much greater inside valleys and fjords than anywhere else. There are indications that open water in fjords has limited effect on the frequecy of calm winds along the fjord.

  3. LIDAR wind speed measurements at a Taiwan onshore wind park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Ta-Hui; Hsuan, Chung-Yao; Li, Yu-Cheng; Yang, Ya-Fei; Tai, Tzy-Hwan; Huang, Chien-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of wind speed and wind direction were carried out using a Leosphere Windcube LIDAR system at a Taiwan onshore wind park. The Lidar shot a total of five laser beams to the atmosphere to collect the light-of-sight (LOS) velocity. Four beams were sent successively in four cardinal directions along a 28° scanning cone angle, followed by a fifth, vertical beam. An unchangeable sampling rate of approximately 1.2 Hz was set in the LIDAR system to collect the LOS velocity. The supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data from two GE 1.5 MW wind turbines near the LIDAR deployment site were acquired for the whole measuring period from February 4 to February 16 of 2015. The SCADA data include the blade angular velocity, the wind velocity measured at hub height from an anemometer mounted on the nacelle, the wind turbine yaw angle, and power production; each parameter was recorded as averages over 1-min periods. The data analysis involving the LIDAR measurements and the SCADA data were performed to obtain the turbulent flow statistics. The results show that the turbine power production has significant dependence to the wind speed, wind direction, turbulence intensity and wind shear.

  4. The observable properties of cool winds from galaxies, AGN, and star clusters - I. Theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Thompson, Todd A.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Martin, Crystal L.

    2017-11-01

    Winds arising from galaxies, star clusters, and active galactic nuclei are crucial players in star and galaxy formation, but it has proven remarkably difficult to use observations of them to determine physical properties of interest, particularly mass fluxes. Much of the difficulty stems from a lack of a theory that links a physically realistic model for winds' density, velocity and covering factors to calculations of light emission and absorption. In this paper we provide such a model. We consider a wind launched from a turbulent region with a range of column densities, derive the differential acceleration of gas as a function of column density, and use this result to compute winds' absorption profiles, emission profiles and emission intensity maps in both optically thin and optically thick species. The model is sufficiently simple that all required computations can be done analytically up to straightforward numerical integrals, rendering it suitable for the problem of deriving physical parameters by fitting models to observed data. We show that our model produces realistic absorption and emission profiles for some example cases, and argue that the most promising methods of deducing mass fluxes are based on combinations of absorption lines of different optical depths, or on combining absorption with measurements of molecular line emission. In the second paper in this series, we expand on these ideas by introducing a set of observational diagnostics that are significantly more robust than those commonly in use, and that can be used to obtain improved estimates of wind properties.

  5. A Reinforced Blade for a Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a reinforced blade for a wind turbine having elongated reinforcing members in the blade extending substantially in the plane of the profile chord in order to strengthen the blade against edgewise and flapwise forces....

  6. 77 FR 29633 - Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII, LLC, Alta Wind XIII, LLC, Alta Wind XIV, LLC, Alta Wind XV, LLC, Alta Windpower Development, LLC, TGP Development... 385.207, Alta Wind VII, LLC, Alta Wind IX, LLC, Alta Wind X, LLC, Alta Wind XI, LLC, Alta Wind XII...

  7. Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar Post Data Processing Software DAPS-LV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y. (Inventor); Koch, Grady J. (Inventor); Kavaya, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems, methods, and devices of the present invention enable post processing of airborne Doppler wind LIDAR data. In an embodiment, airborne Doppler wind LIDAR data software written in LabVIEW may be provided and may run two versions of different airborne wind profiling algorithms. A first algorithm may be the Airborne Wind Profiling Algorithm for Doppler Wind LIDAR ("APOLO") using airborne wind LIDAR data from two orthogonal directions to estimate wind parameters, and a second algorithm may be a five direction based method using pseudo inverse functions to estimate wind parameters. The various embodiments may enable wind profiles to be compared using different algorithms, may enable wind profile data for long haul color displays to be generated, may display long haul color displays, and/or may enable archiving of data at user-selectable altitudes over a long observation period for data distribution and population.

  8. Wind tunnel-based assessment of wind field in complex topographic terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangan, Horia [WindEEE Research Institute (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the assessment of wind fields in complex topographic terrain based on wind tunnels. It comprises mesoscale modeling, wind tunnel simulation, benchmarking microscale simulations and the windEEE dome. The modeling is categorized into maps for complex terrain, linear models limited to generic topography, measurement techniques for wind tunnel testing and CFD simulations linked with wind tunnel test results required for benchmarking. The wind tunnel testing is discussed in detail using topographic features like valleys, hills and ridges. Instantaneous and mean velocity vectors are calculated for the ridge and mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles are presented for a hill. Flow is measured over the whole domain using both qualitative and quantitative techniques. These techniques can also be used to simulate low-level nocturnal currents, downbursts and tornados in the actual physical environment. The impact on wind farms and turbines of these local storms can also be calculated.

  9. Offshore vertical wind shear: Final report on NORSEWInD’s work task 3.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Mikkelsen, Torben; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    .6 Results input into satellite maps The nature of the offshore vertical wind shear is investigated using acquired data from the NORSEWInD network of mast and wind lidar stations. The importance of the knowledge of the vertical wind speed profile and wind shear is first illustrated for the evaluation...... of power outputs. Background related to the parametrization of the vertical wind speed profile and the behavior of the vertical wind shear in and beyond the atmospheric surface layer is presented together with the application of the long-term atmospheric stability parameters for the analysis of the long......-term vertical wind speed profile. Observed vertical wind shears are illustrated for all NORSEWInD wind lidar and meteorological stations in terms of wind shear roses, distributions, and diurnal and monthly evolutions. A multi-variational correlation analysis is performed to study the vertical wind shear...

  10. WIND TURBINES FOR WIND POWER INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barladean A.S.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of wind turbine choice for wind power stations is examined in this paper. It is shown by comparison of parameters and characteristics of wind turbines, that for existing modes and speeds of wind in territory of Republic of Moldova it is necessary to use multi-blade small speed rotation wind turbines of fan class.

  11. Numerical simulation of the divergence of a wind turbine airfoil : part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramdenee, D.; Minea, I.S.; Tardiff d' Hamonville, T.; Illinca, A. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de Recherche en Energie Eolienne

    2010-07-01

    The development of larger, more flexible wind turbine blades is creating the need for an improved understanding of the mechanisms surrounding unsteady flow-structure interactions. This 2-part study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to identify and model the aerodynamic and aeroelastic phenomena around wind turbine blades. Aeroelastic divergence was modelled using coupled aerodynamic and elastic models with an ANSYS software program. The fluid-structure interactions of an NACA0012 airfoil were simulated in order to determine the divergence phenomenon created by aerodynamic loads and transient fluid flow. The airfoil profile was fixed and exempted from all rotational degrees of liberty while being subjected to a constant flow of velocity. The fixing was then removed and the constant flow was compared with a shock wave on the airfoil profile. The profile then oscillated with damped amplitude due to the aerodynamic damping imposed. Results of the analysis will be compared with results obtained in future studies. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  12. Wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  13. Mean wind field in the urban atmospheric boundary layer by sodar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, V. P.

    2008-05-01

    Two-year uninterrupted sodar measurements of vertical profiles of wind speed and direction in the height range 40 to 250-500 m were carried out in two points of Moscow megalopolis. Seasonal and diurnal courses of mean speed profiles, wind speed distributions, wind roses and occurrence of strong and weak wind speed events are shown. Influence of urban heat island and orography on wind field is discussed.

  14. Foil clouds measurements of the winter wind field and their analysis over northern Norway in the height of 75 to 100 km. Durchfuehrung und Analyse von Folienwolkenmessungen des Windfeldes im Winter ueber Nordnorwegen in 75 bis 100 km Hoehe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, A.

    1991-04-01

    Slowly descending foil chaff clouds tracked by radar after deployment from meteorological rockets were employed in the study of small scale dynamics of the upper mesosphere at Andenes, 69{sup 0} N, 16{sup 0} E, Norway, as part of the DYANA atmospheric science campaign January to March 1990. Vertical profiles of the horizontal wind are deduced from data obtained in 22 experiments, plus a number of independent measurements, after analyzing possible systematic experimental errors/resolution limits (cloud extent, low fall speed). Profiles of vertical wind velocity are given, too, but systematic errors often dominante. Wind variation with height is seen to be mostly dominated by internal gravity waves; often few wavelengths seem prominent in the instantaneous vertical wave structure. Induced windshear is examined in connection with static stability, leading to vertical profiles of the Richardson number. The new set of data reduction software developped, e.g. special fitting Splines, allows quick, standardized and accurate wind determination. (orig.).

  15. Obtaining of inulin acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Khusenov, Arslonnazar; Rakhmanberdiev, Gappar; Rakhimov, Dilshod; Khalikov, Muzaffar

    2014-01-01

    In the article first obtained inulin ester inulin acetate, by etherification of inulin with acetic anhydride has been exposed. Obtained product has been studied using elementary analysis and IR spectroscopy.

  16. Social Acceptance of Wind: A Brief Overview (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, E.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses concepts and trends in social acceptance of wind energy, profiles recent research findings, and discussions mitigation strategies intended to resolve wind power social acceptance challenges as informed by published research and the experiences of individuals participating in the International Energy Agencies Working Group on Social Acceptance of Wind Energy

  17. Establishing a Comprehensive Wind Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeter, Sanford [Purdue University

    2012-09-30

    This project was directed at establishing a comprehensive wind energy program in Indiana, including both educational and research components. A graduate/undergraduate course ME-514 - Fundamentals of Wind Energy has been established and offered and an interactive prediction of VAWT performance developed. Vertical axis wind turbines for education and research have been acquired, instrumented and installed on the roof top of a building on the Calumet campus and at West Lafayette (Kepner Lab). Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations have been performed to simulate these urban wind environments. Also, modal dynamic testing of the West Lafayette VAWT has been performed and a novel horizontal axis design initiated. The 50-meter meteorological tower data obtained at the Purdue Beck Agricultural Research Center have been analyzed and the Purdue Reconfigurable Micro Wind Farm established and simulations directed at the investigation of wind farm configurations initiated. The virtual wind turbine and wind turbine farm simulation in the Visualization Lab has been initiated.

  18. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  19. Description of the North Sea wind climate for wind energy applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coelingh, J.P.; Wijk, A.J.M. van; Cleijne, J.W.; Pleune, R.

    1992-01-01

    In The Netherlands it is foreseen that wind turbines will be installed on offshore locations in the North Sea before the year 2010. Therefore adequate knowledge of the offshore wind climate should be obtained, both for the estimation of energy yields and for the determination of wind load

  20. Remote Sensing Wind and Wind Shear System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contents: Remote sensing of wind shear and the theory and development of acoustic doppler; Wind studies; A comparison of methods for the remote detection of winds in the airport environment; Acoustic doppler system development; System calibration; Airport operational tests.

  1. Wind tunnel AVERT model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian DOBRE

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The AVERT project aims to asses the oscillatory blowing on the flap for a high-lift configuration (wing with flap, and involves both experimental (low speed wind tunnel INCAS and numerical activities.At low speed the active flow control may lead to a reduction or elimination of the flow separation on the high-lift devices, such as flaps, and involves the introduction or re distribution of momentum within the boundary layer.High-lift systems utilized as particular profiles at a certain offset of the main wing may solve the disagreement between the requirements of cruise flight and landing, especially for low velocity take-off.

  2. National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, John P. [ABB Inc; Liu, Shu [ABB Inc; Ibanez, Eduardo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Pennock, Ken [AWS Truepower; Reed, Greg [University of Pittsburgh; Hanes, Spencer [Duke Energy

    2014-07-30

    The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS) considers the availability and potential impacts of interconnecting large amounts of offshore wind energy into the transmission system of the lower 48 contiguous United States. A total of 54GW of offshore wind was assumed to be the target for the analyses conducted. A variety of issues are considered including: the anticipated staging of offshore wind; the offshore wind resource availability; offshore wind energy power production profiles; offshore wind variability; present and potential technologies for collection and delivery of offshore wind energy to the onshore grid; potential impacts to existing utility systems most likely to receive large amounts of offshore wind; and regulatory influences on offshore wind development. The technologies considered the reliability of various high-voltage ac (HVAC) and high-voltage dc (HVDC) technology options and configurations. The utility system impacts of GW-scale integration of offshore wind are considered from an operational steady-state perspective and from a regional and national production cost perspective.

  3. Influence of stability on the flux-profile relationships for wind speed, Φm, and temperature, Φh, for the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yagüe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from SABLES98 experimental campaign have been used in order to study the influence of stability (from weak to strong stratification on the flux-profile relationships for momentum, Φm, and heat, Φh. Measurements from 14 thermocouples and 3 sonic anemometers at three levels (5.8, 13.5 and 32 m for the period from 10 to 28 September 1998 were analysed using the framework of the local-scaling approach (Nieuwstadt, 1984a; 1984b, which can be interpreted as an extension of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (Obukhov, 1946. The results show increasing values of Φm and Φh with increasing stability parameter ζ=z/Λ, up to a value of ζ≈1–2, above which the values remain constant. As a consequence of this levelling off in Φm and Φh for strong stability, the turbulent mixing is underestimated when linear similarity functions (Businger et al., 1971 are used to calculate surface fluxes of momentum and heat. On the other hand when Φm and Φh are related to the gradient Richardson number, Ri, a different behaviour is found, which could indicate that the transfer of momentum is greater than that of heat for high Ri. The range of validity of these linear functions is discussed in terms of the physical aspects of turbulent intermittent mixing.

  4. Modelling of offshore wind turbine wakes with the wind farm program FLaP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, B.; Waldl, H.P.; Guerrero, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    behind one rotor. Here an approach based on the simplified Reynolds equation with eddy viscosity closure is chosen. The single-wakemodel is combined with a model for the vertical wind speed profile and a wind farm model, which takes care of the interaction of all wakes in a wind farm. The wake model has...... intensities in the wake are compared for single-, double- and quintuple-wake cases with different mean wind speed, turbulence intensity and atmospheric stability. It is found that within the measurement uncertainties the results of the wake model compare well with the measurements for the most important...... ambient conditions. The effect of the low turbulence intensity offshore on the wake development is modelled well for Vindeby wind farm. Deviations are found when atmospheric stability deviates from near-neutral conditions. For stable atmospheric conditions both the free vertical wind speed profile...

  5. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  6. Evaluation of wind capacity credit considering key system parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P.; Karki, R.; Billinton, R. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Power Systems Research Group

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed the importance of considering the capacity credit of wind sources given that wind power penetration in power generation continues to increase. The capacity credit of a wind source is the amount of conventional capacity that can be replaced by wind energy without the loss of system reliability. As such, the reliability benefit of adding a wind energy conversion system to a power system must be analyzed. A quantitative index was used to examine the effect of key system variables on system reliability in order to estimate wind capacity credit as a function of wind penetration in electric power systems. The size and the composition of the generating system were among the parameters examined along with the wind regime at the wind farm locations and the wind power penetration level. The method for evaluating the adequacy of a power system includes separate steps for wind data modeling, wind turbine generator (WTG) modeling, combined wind and conventional generation unit modeling, load modeling and convolution of generation and load models to obtain the system risk indices. The loss of load expectation (LOLE) was also used as the risk index for reliability evaluation. The different factors that affect the capacity credit of WTG were combined to obtain the general relationship between the effective capacity ratio (ECR) and the wind penetration level (WPL). The study showed that WTG capacity credit is highly influenced by the WPL, and the wind regime at the wind farm location. The size and composition of the system and the generating units, and the LOLE reliability criterion did not have much influence on the ECR of wind sources. The obtained results were combined to produce a general approximate relationship between the wind capacity credit and the wind penetration. It was concluded that the general approximation of capacity credit of wind sources presented in this study could prove useful in determining the capacity credit of wind sources at different

  7. Colliding Stellar Wind Models with Orbital Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Francis P.; O'Connor, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    We present thin-shell models for the collision between two ballistic stellar winds, including orbital motion.The stellar orbits are assumed circular, so that steady-state solutions exist in the rotating frame, where we include centrifugal and Coriolis forces. Exact solutions for the pre-shock winds are incorporated. Here we discuss 2-D model results for equal wind momentum-loss rates, although we allow for the winds to have distinct speeds and mass loss rates. For these unequal wind conditions, we obtain a clear violation of skew-symmetry, despite equal momentum loss rates, due to the Coriolis force.

  8. Conditional prediction intervals of wind power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Kariniotakis, Georges

    2010-01-01

    A generic method for the providing of prediction intervals of wind power generation is described. Prediction intervals complement the more common wind power point forecasts, by giving a range of potential outcomes for a given probability, their so-called nominal coverage rate. Ideally they inform...... on the characteristics of prediction errors for providing conditional interval forecasts. By simultaneously generating prediction intervals with various nominal coverage rates, one obtains full predictive distributions of wind generation. Adapted resampling is applied here to the case of an onshore Danish wind farm...... to the case of a large number of wind farms in Europe and Australia among others is finally discussed....

  9. Frequency Based Fault Detection in Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain lower cost of energy for wind turbines fault detection and accommodation is important. Expensive condition monitoring systems are often used to monitor the condition of rotating and vibrating system parts. One example is the gearbox in a wind turbine. This system is operated...... gearbox. Only the generator speed measurement which is available in even simple wind turbine control systems is used as input. Consequently this proposed scheme does not need additional sensors and computers for monitoring the condition of the wind gearbox. The scheme is evaluated on a wide-spread wind...

  10. Effectiveness of WRF wind direction for retrieving coastal sea surface wind from synthetic aperture radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeyama, Yuko; Ohsawa, Teruo; Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Wind direction is required as input to the geophysical model function (GMF) for the retrieval of sea surface wind speed from a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The present study verifies the effectiveness of using the wind direction obtained from the weather research and forecasting model...... directions: the meso‐analysis of the Japan Meteorological Agency (MANAL), the SeaWinds microwave scatterometer on QuikSCAT and the National Center for Environmental Prediction final operational global analysis data (NCEP FNL). In comparison with the errors of the SAR‐retrieved wind speeds obtained using...

  11. Statistical Modelling of Wind Proles - Data Analysis and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Tryggvi; Pinson, Pierre

    The aim of the analysis presented in this document is to investigate whether statistical models can be used to make very short-term predictions of wind profiles.......The aim of the analysis presented in this document is to investigate whether statistical models can be used to make very short-term predictions of wind profiles....

  12. A case study of the Great Plains low-level jet using wind profiler network data and a high resolution mesoscale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, S.; Fast, J.D.; Bian, X.; Stage, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) has important effects on the life cycle of clouds and on radiative and surface heat and moisture fluxes at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. This diurnal phenomenon governs the transport and convergence of low-level moisture into the region and often leads to the development of clouds and precipitation. A full understanding of the life cycle of clouds at the SGP CART site and their proper representation in single column and global climate models cannot be obtained without an improved understanding of this important phenomenon.

  13. Maine coast winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, Richard

    2000-01-28

    The Maine Coast Winds Project was proposed for four possible turbine locations. Significant progress has been made at the prime location, with a lease-power purchase contract for ten years for the installation of turbine equipment having been obtained. Most of the site planning and permitting have been completed. It is expect that the turbine will be installed in early May. The other three locations are less suitable for the project, and new locations are being considered.

  14. Assessment of wind energy potential and cost estimation of wind-generated electricity at hilltops surrounding the city of Maroua in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaoga, Dieudonné Kidmo; Bogno, Bachirou; Aillerie, Michel; Raidandi, Danwe; Yamigno, Serge Doka; Hamandjoda, Oumarou; Tibi, Beda

    2016-07-01

    In this work, 28 years of wind data, measured at 10m above ground level (AGL), from Maroua meteorological station is utilized to assess the potential of wind energy at exposed ridges tops of mountains surrounding the city of Maroua. The aim of this study is to estimate the cost of wind-generated electricity using six types of wind turbines (50 to 2000 kW). The Weibull distribution function is employed to estimate Weibull shape and scale parameters using the energy pattern factor method. The considered wind shear model to extrapolate Weibull parameters and wind profiles is the empirical power law correlation. The results show that hilltops in the range of 150-350m AGL in increments of 50, fall under Class 3 or greater of the international system of wind classification and are deemed suitable to outstanding for wind turbine applications. A performance of the selected wind turbines is examined as well as the costs of wind-generated electricity at the considered hilltops. The results establish that the lowest costs per kWh are obtained using YDF-1500-87 (1500 kW) turbine while the highest costs are delivered by P-25-100 (90 kW). The lowest costs (US) per kWh of electricity generated are found to vary between a minimum of 0.0294 at hilltops 350m AGL and a maximum of 0.0366 at hilltops 150m AGL, with corresponding energy outputs that are 6,125 and 4,932 MWh, respectively. Additionally, the matching capacity factors values are 38.05% at hilltops 150m AGL and 47.26% at hilltops 350m AGL. Furthermore, YDF-1500-87 followed by Enercon E82-2000 (2000 kW) wind turbines provide the lowest cost of wind generated electricity and are recommended for use for large communities. Medium wind turbine P-15-50 (50 kW), despite showing the best coefficients factors (39.29% and 48.85% at hilltops 150 and 350m AGL, in that order), generates electricity at an average higher cost/kWh of US0.0547 and 0.0440 at hilltops 150 and 350m AGL, respectively. P-15-50 is deemed a more advantageous option

  15. On the Use of Coupled Wind, Wave, and Current Fields in the Simulation of Loads on Bottom-Supported Offshore Wind Turbines during Hurricanes: March 2012 - September 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eungsoo [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Manuel, Lance [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Curcic, Milan [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Chen, Shuyi S. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Phillips, Caleb [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Veers, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, potential offshore wind plant sites have been identified along the Atlantic seaboard and in the Gulf of Mexico. It is imperative that we define external conditions associated with hurricanes and severe winter storms and consider load cases for which wind turbines may need to be designed. We selected two hurricanes, Ike (2008) and Sandy (2012), and investigated the effect these tropical storms would have on bottom-supported offshore wind turbines that were hypothetically in or close to their path as they made landfall. For realistic turbine loads assessment, it is important that the coupled influences of the changing wind, wave, and current fields are simulated throughout the evolution of the hurricanes. We employed a coupled model--specifically, the University of Miami Coupled Model (UMCM)--that integrates atmospheric, wave, and ocean components to produce needed wind, wave, and current data. The wind data are used to generate appropriate vertical wind profiles and full wind velocity fields including turbulence; the current field over the water column is obtained by interpolated discrete output current data; and short-crested irregular second-order waves are simulated using output directional wave spectra from the coupled model. We studied two monopile-supported offshore wind turbines sited in 20 meters of water in the Gulf of Mexico to estimate loads during Hurricane Ike, and a jacket space-frame platform-supported offshore wind turbine sited in 50 meters of water in the mid-Atlantic region to estimate loads during Hurricane Sandy. In this report we discuss in detail how the simulated hurricane wind, wave, and current output data are used in turbine loads studies. In addition, important characteristics of the external conditions are studied, including the relative importance of swell versus wind seas, aerodynamic versus hydrodynamic forces, current velocity effects, yaw control options for the turbine, hydrodynamic drag versus inertia forces

  16. Designing laboratory wind simulations using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Križan, Josip; Gašparac, Goran; Kozmar, Hrvoje; Antonić, Oleg; Grisogono, Branko

    2015-05-01

    While experiments in boundary layer wind tunnels remain to be a major research tool in wind engineering and environmental aerodynamics, designing the modeling hardware required for a proper atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) simulation can be costly and time consuming. Hence, possibilities are sought to speed-up this process and make it more time-efficient. In this study, two artificial neural networks (ANNs) are developed to determine an optimal design of the Counihan hardware, i.e., castellated barrier wall, vortex generators, and surface roughness, in order to simulate the ABL flow developing above urban, suburban, and rural terrains, as previous ANN models were created for one terrain type only. A standard procedure is used in developing those two ANNs in order to further enhance best-practice possibilities rather than to improve existing ANN designing methodology. In total, experimental results obtained using 23 different hardware setups are used when creating ANNs. In those tests, basic barrier height, barrier castellation height, spacing density, and height of surface roughness elements are the parameters that were varied to create satisfactory ABL simulations. The first ANN was used for the estimation of mean wind velocity, turbulent Reynolds stress, turbulence intensity, and length scales, while the second one was used for the estimation of the power spectral density of velocity fluctuations. This extensive set of studied flow and turbulence parameters is unmatched in comparison to the previous relevant studies, as it includes here turbulence intensity and power spectral density of velocity fluctuations in all three directions, as well as the Reynolds stress profiles and turbulence length scales. Modeling results agree well with experiments for all terrain types, particularly in the lower ABL within the height range of the most engineering structures, while exhibiting sensitivity to abrupt changes and data scattering in profiles of wind-tunnel results. The

  17. On hurricane parametric wind and applications in storm surge modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ning; Chavas, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    This study revisits the parametric modeling of the hurricane surface wind field composed of the storm vortex and the environmental background flow. First, we investigate the parametric representation of the surface background wind by analyzing its empirical relationship with storm movement. A marked deceleration and counter-clockwise rotation of the surface background wind from the storm translation vector is detected, a result predicted by the Ekman theory but rarely applied in wind and surge modeling. Then, we examine the various parameters used to model the wind field and, through numerical simulations, quantify their induced uncertainties in the extreme wind and surge estimates at two coastal sites. Our analyses show that, over the range of accepted values and methods in the literature, the local wind and surge estimates are most sensitive to uncertainties in the surface wind reduction factor and storm wind profile but less sensitive to uncertainties in other wind parameters, such as inflow angle and surface background wind (varying in the observed range). The surge is more sensitive than the wind to uncertainties in the wind parameters, and these sensitivities are comparable to the sensitivity of the surge to the uncertainty in the sea surface drag coefficient. We also find that some commonly used wind parameters unsupported by theory or observations can induce significant errors in the wind and surge estimates. The results of this study provide new insights and references for future hurricane wind and surge analysis.

  18. 46 CFR 28.575 - Severe wind and roll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... wind speed for profile element “n” on a vessel; S=64 (19.5, if metric units are used) for a vessel that... to the waterline for profile element n, in feet (meters); An=projected lateral area for profile... profile element n, in feet; and W=displacement of the loaded vessel, in pounds (Newtons). (c) The angle of...

  19. Generic calibration procedures for nacelle-based profiling lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borraccino, Antoine; Courtney, Michael; Wagner, Rozenn

    In power performance testing, it has been demonstrated that the effects of wind speed and direction variations over the rotor disk can no longer be neglected for large wind turbines [1]. A new generation of commercial nacelle-based lidars is now available, offering wind profiling capabilities...... to calibrate profiling nacelle lidars....

  20. Current and turbulence measurements at the FINO1 offshore wind energy site: analysis using 5-beam ADCPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoday-Paskyabi, Mostafa; Fer, Ilker; Reuder, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    We report concurrent measurements of ocean currents and turbulence at two sites in the North Sea, one site at upwind of the FINO1 platform and the other 200-m downwind of the Alpha Ventus wind farm. At each site, mean currents, Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity and production of turbulent kinetic energy are obtained from two bottom-mounted 5-beam Nortek Signature1000s, high-frequency Doppler current profiler, at a water depth of approximately 30 m. Measurements from the two sites are compared to statistically identify the effects of wind farm and waves on ocean current variability and the turbulent structure in the water column. Profiles of Reynolds stresses are found to be sensible to both environmental forcing and the wind farm wake-induced distortions in both boundary layers near the surface and the seabed. Production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence intensity exhibit approximately similar, but less pronounced, patterns in the presence of farm wake effects.

  1. Current and turbulence measurements at the FINO1 offshore wind energy site: analysis using 5-beam ADCPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoday-Paskyabi, Mostafa; Fer, Ilker; Reuder, Joachim

    2017-11-01

    We report concurrent measurements of ocean currents and turbulence at two sites in the North Sea, one site at upwind of the FINO1 platform and the other 200-m downwind of the Alpha Ventus wind farm. At each site, mean currents, Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity and production of turbulent kinetic energy are obtained from two bottom-mounted 5-beam Nortek Signature1000s, high-frequency Doppler current profiler, at a water depth of approximately 30 m. Measurements from the two sites are compared to statistically identify the effects of wind farm and waves on ocean current variability and the turbulent structure in the water column. Profiles of Reynolds stresses are found to be sensible to both environmental forcing and the wind farm wake-induced distortions in both boundary layers near the surface and the seabed. Production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence intensity exhibit approximately similar, but less pronounced, patterns in the presence of farm wake effects.

  2. Flight in low-level wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of studies of wind shear hazard to aircraft operation are summarized. Existing wind shear profiles currently used in computer and flight simulator studies are reviewed. The governing equations of motion for an aircraft are derived incorporating the variable wind effects. Quantitative discussions of the effects of wind shear on aircraft performance are presented. These are followed by a review of mathematical solutions to both the linear and nonlinear forms of the governing equations. Solutions with and without control laws are presented. The application of detailed analysis to develop warning and detection systems based on Doppler radar measuring wind speed along the flight path is given. A number of flight path deterioration parameters are defined and evaluated. Comparison of computer-predicted flight paths with those measured in a manned flight simulator is made. Some proposed airborne and ground-based wind shear hazard warning and detection systems are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of both types of systems are discussed.

  3. Extreme Winds from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Mann, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    .05 m, i.e. the so-called standard wind. The software Wind Analysis and Application Program will then use this standard wind in a flow model, with the roughness, orography and obstacles around the turbine site to obtain the site-specific wind. The annual maximum method is used to calculate the 50 year......, is needed for places where the extreme wind events are of mesoscale origin. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  4. Comparing Patent and Scientific Literature in Airborne Wind Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Anny Key de Souza Mendonça; Caroline Rodrigues Vaz; Álvaro Guillermo Rojas Lezana; Cristiane Alves Anacleto; Edson Pacheco Paladini

    2017-01-01

    Airborne Wind Energy (AWE) is a renewable energy technology that uses wind power devices rather than traditional wind turbines that take advantage of the kinetic wind energy, and remain in the air due to aerodynamic forces. This article aims to compare the scientific literature with the patents on wind power with tethered airfoils, to obtain better insights into the literature of this area of knowledge. The method used in this study was a comparative bibliometric analysis, using the Web of Sc...

  5. Analytical Method for Estimating Energy Output of Small Wind Turbines Integrated in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovac M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of the analytical approach for estimating the wind energy potential at locations around buildings in urban areas that are suitable for installing Small Wind Turbines (SWT. This development is performed in three steps. In order to analyze the flow pattern in a typical urban geometry, the first step consisted of a series of numerical simulations, where an assumed urban configuration (specified building size and respective distances between the buildings was varied with an incremental value, and for each analyzed configuration different incoming wind conditions (different reference wind velocity were incrementally imposed. In the second step the velocity profiles in the characteristic cutlines around the central building under investigation were extracted from the respective realizations of urban flow numerical solutions, and an analytical expression was derived approximating all extracted velocity profiles to fit the best an assumed flow pattern. The derived analytical expression was cross-plotted with the results of a fully three-dimensional realistic urban flow numerical solution, and the obtained matching level was satisfactory. Finally, using the derived expression, in the third step the estimation of SWT energy output was defined based on the average wind velocity information at given location and the related urban configuration characteristics.

  6. directional considerations for extreme wind climatic events in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    analysis is performed, taking into account directional wind information, as described in krishnasamy [2]. Wind speed data obtained from the meteorological section of the. Nigerian Civil Aviation Lagos were used for analysis. 5. DESIGN OF THE LINE SPAN. In order to obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of wind directions, ...

  7. Harmonic Aspects of Offshore Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocewiak, Lukasz Hubert; Bak, Claus Leth; Hjerrild, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the aim, the work and the findings of a PhD project entitled "Harmonics in Large Offshore Wind Farms". It focuses on the importance of harmonic analysis in order to obtain a better performance of future wind farms. The topic is investigated by the PhD project at Aalborg...... University (AAU) and DONG Energy. The objective of the project is to improve and understand the nature of harmonic emission and propagation in wind farms (WFs), based on available information, measurement data and simulation tools. The aim of the project is to obtain validated models and analysis methods...... of offshore wind farm (OWF) systems....

  8. Perfil de beta talassemia heterozigota obtido a partir de análise data mining em banco de dados The profile of beta thalassemia obtained by data mining analysis in a database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. B. Domingos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the phenotypic expression of heterozygous beta thalassemia reflect the formation of different populations. To better understand the profile of heterozygous beta-thalassemia of the Brazilian population, we aimed at establishing parameters to direct the diagnosis of carriers and calculate the frequency from information stored in an electronic database. Using a Data Mining tool, we evaluated information on 10,960 blood samples deposited in a relational database. Over the years, improved diagnostic technology has facilitated the elucidation of suspected beta thalassemia heterozygote cases with an average frequency of 3.5% of referred cases. We also found that the Brazilian beta thalassemia trait has classic increases of Hb A2 and Hb F (60%, mainly caused by mutations in beta zero thalassemia, especially in the southeast of the country.

  9. Active Power Dispatch Method for a Wind Farm Central Controller Considering Wake Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Su, Chi; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Optimization (PSO) is used to obtain the optimal wind power for each wind turbine. A case study is carried out. The available wind power of the wind farm was compared between the traditional dispatch method and the proposed dispatch method with the consideration of the wake effect.......With the increasing integration of the wind power into the power system, wind farm are required to be controlled as a single unit and have all the same control tasks as conventional power plants. The wind farm central controller receives control orders from Transmission System Operator (TSO...... efficient of upstream wind turbines in the wind farm influences the downstream wind speed which determines the available wind power of the downstream wind turbine. Optimize the wind power production of each wind turbine in the wind farm by the optimization of the pitch angle and tip-speed-ratio of each...

  10. Health impact of wind farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Mroczek, Bozena; Karakiewicz, Beata; Kassolik, Krzysztof; Andrzejewski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    Wind power is employed worldwide as an alternative source of energy. At the same time, however, the health effects of wind turbines have become a matter of discussion. The purpose of this study is a critical review of available reports providing arguments both for and against the construction of wind farms. The authors also attempt to propose recommendations in accordance with the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) guidelines. In the case of exposure to wind farms, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) is impossible. To obtain the highest-level recommendations, analysis of case-control studies or cohort studies with control groups should be performed. Preferably, it should include geostatistical analysis conducted with the use of variograms and the kriging technique. Combinations of key words were entered into the Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge (SM) and the Internet search engine Google. SHORT DESCRIPTION OF STATE OF THE ART: The nuisance caused by wind turbines is stereotypically linked with the noise that they produce. Nevertheless, the visual aspect of wind farms, opinions about them, and sensitivity to sound seem to be of the greater importance. To date, the direct correlations between the vicinity of modern wind farms, the noise that wind turbines make, and possible consequences to health have not been described in peer reviewed articles. Health effects are more probably associated with some environmental factors leading to annoyance or frustration. All types of studies share the same conclusion: wind turbines can provoke annoyance. As with any project involving changes in the local environment, a certain level of irritation among the population can be expected. There are elected officials and government representatives who should decide what level of social annoyance is acceptable, and whether wind power advantages outweigh its potential drawbacks. The influence of wind turbines on human emotional and physical health is a relatively new field of research. Further

  11. Wind conditions for wind turbine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B.

    1999-04-01

    Delegates from Europe and USA attended the meeting and discussed general aspects of wind conditions for wind turbine design. The subjects and the presented papers covered a very broad range of aspects of wind conditions and related influence on the wind turbine. (EHS)

  12. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  13. High resolution wind measurements for offshore wind energy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son Van (Inventor); Neumann, Gregory (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method, apparatus, system, article of manufacture, and computer readable storage medium provide the ability to measure wind. Data at a first resolution (i.e., low resolution data) is collected by a satellite scatterometer. Thin slices of the data are determined. A collocation of the data slices are determined at each grid cell center to obtain ensembles of collocated data slices. Each ensemble of collocated data slices is decomposed into a mean part and a fluctuating part. The data is reconstructed at a second resolution from the mean part and a residue of the fluctuating part. A wind measurement is determined from the data at the second resolution using a wind model function. A description of the wind measurement is output.

  14. Stratosphere and lower mesosphere wind observation and gravity wave activities of the wind field in China using a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Xue, Xianghui; Sun, Dongsong; Han, Yuli; Chen, Chong; Zheng, Jun; Li, Zimu; Zhou, Anran; Han, Yan; Wang, Guocheng; Chen, Tingdi

    2017-08-01

    Since the mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar of the University of Science and Technology of China was developed in 2013, more than 100 days of valid nighttime wind data from 15 to 60 km altitude were obtained during recent 3 years. The observation locations cover the northwest (midlatitude) of China: Delingha (37.371°N, 97.374°E), Xinzhou (38.425°N, 112.729°E), and Jiuquan (39.741°N, 98.495°E). Recently, we have extracted perturbations of the wind profiles from the wind field measurements and we have found that inertia gravity waves and mountain waves existed at the same time. The results of wind field and several gravity waves cases are shown in this paper. Typical characteristics of the gravity waves are analyzed in this midlatitude area of China. A 2-D fast Fourier transform of the wind perturbation shows that a dominant stationary wave mode and a downward wave mode exist simultaneously in the spectrum. A band-pass 2-D filter was applied to the spectrum followed by inverse fast Fourier transform to separate inertia gravity waves from stationary mountain waves. The horizontal wavelength is retrieved using hodograph methods, indicating that the inertia waves are generated thousands of kilometers away. Observed mountain waves from a combination of vertical wind and leaned line of sight wind measurements show a small-angle leaned wave front from the horizontal direction. This kind of gravity wave observation of the stratospheric wind field and its wave patterns is rare and significant for the study of atmospheric dynamics.

  15. CFD-based design load analysis of 5MW offshore wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T. T.; Ryu, G. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    The structure and aerodynamic loads acting on NREL 5MW reference wind turbine blade are calculated and analyzed based on advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and unsteady Blade Element Momentum (BEM). A detailed examination of the six force components has been carried out (three force components and three moment components). Structure load (gravity and inertia load) and aerodynamic load have been obtained by additional structural calculations (CFD or BEM, respectively,). In CFD method, the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes approach was applied to solve the continuity equation of mass conservation and momentum balance so that the complex flow around wind turbines was modeled. Written in C programming language, a User Defined Function (UDF) code which defines transient velocity profile according to the Extreme Operating Gust condition was compiled into commercial FLUENT package. Furthermore, the unsteady BEM with 3D stall model has also adopted to investigate load components on wind turbine rotor. The present study introduces a comparison between advanced CFD and unsteady BEM for determining load on wind turbine rotor. Results indicate that there are good agreements between both present methods. It is importantly shown that six load components on wind turbine rotor is significant effect under Extreme Operating Gust (EOG) condition. Using advanced CFD and additional structural calculations, this study has succeeded to construct accuracy numerical methodology to estimate total load of wind turbine that compose of aerodynamic load and structure load.

  16. Generation of intermediately-long sea waves by weakly sheared winds

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyavski, V M; Golbraikh, E; Mond, M

    2010-01-01

    The present work concerns the numeric modeling of the sea-wave instability under the effect of the logarithmic-wind profile at hurricane conditions. Non-linear effects, such as wave breaking, foam production, etc. Powell et al. (2003), Shtemler et al. (2010) are ignored. The central point of the study is the calculation of the wave growth rate, which is proportional to the fractional input energy from the wind to the wave exponentially varied with time. The present modeling demonstrates that the Miles-type model applying Charnock's formula for roughness to the hurricane-wind parameters underestimates the growth rate from 5 to 40 times as compared with the model employing the roughness and friction velocity adopted from experimental data for hurricane winds.1 This occurs due to Charnock's formula fails at large wind speeds. The stability characteristics found on the base of the hurricane-wind experimental parameters are consistent with the other results of the observations. Obtained in the present study a maxi...

  17. Wind Spires as an Alternative Energy Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid Rashidi, Ph.D., P.E.

    2012-10-30

    This report discloses the design and development of an innovative wind tower system having an axisymmetric wind deflecting structure with a plurality of symmetrically mounted rooftop size wind turbines near the axisymmetric structure. The purpose of the wind deflecting structure is to increase the ambient wind speed that in turn results in an overall increase in the power capacity of the wind turbines. Two working prototypes were constructed and installed in the summer of 2009 and 2012 respectively. The system installed in the Summer of 2009 has a cylindrical wind deflecting structure, while the tower installed in 2012 has a spiral-shape wind deflecting structure. Each tower has 4 turbines, each rated at 1.65 KW Name-Plate-Rating. Before fabricating the full-size prototypes, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses and scaled-down table-top models were used to predict the performance of the full-scale models. The performance results obtained from the full-size prototypes validated the results obtained from the computational models and those of the scaled-down models. The second prototype (spiral configuration) showed at a wind speed of 11 miles per hour (4.9 m/s) the power output of the system could reach 1,288 watt, when a typical turbine installation, with no wind deflecting structure, could produce only 200 watt by the same turbines at the same wind speed. At a wind speed of 18 miles per hour (8 m/sec), the spiral prototype produces 6,143 watt, while the power generated by the same turbines would be 1,412 watt in the absence of a wind deflecting structure under the same wind speed. Four US patents were allowed, and are in print, as the results of this project (US 7,540,706, US 7,679,209, US 7,845,904, and US 8,002,516).

  18. Phytochemical profile and mechanisms involved in the anti-nociception caused by the hydroethanolic extract obtained from Tocoyena formosa (Cham. & Schltdl.) K. Schum (Jenipapo-bravo) leaves in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesário, Francisco Rafael Alves Santana; de Albuquerque, Thaís Rodrigues; de Lacerda, Giovana Mendes; de Oliveira, Maria Rayane Correia; Rodrigues, Lindaiane Bezerra; Martins, Anita Oliveira Brito Pereira Bezerra; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Júnior, Lucindo José Quintans; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Vale, Mariana Lima; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar

    2018-01-01

    Tocoyena formosa, a small ornamental tree growing in the dry regions of central Brazil, is commonly known as 'genipapo do bravo'. This is a medicinal plant traditionally used as an analgesic for rheumatic pain, lower back pain and myalgia, however its use is carried out without scientific evidence, which thus justifies the development of studies to investigate and prove its therapeutic potential. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the phytochemical profile of Tocoyena formosa (Cham. & Schlecht.) K. Schum (TFLHE) and the mechanisms involved in its anti-nociceptive effect. The TFLHE revealed the presence of gallic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ellagic acid, rutin, quercetin and luteolin. The TFLHE at doses of 200 and 400mg/kg significantly decreased acetic acid-induced abdominal contortions, the reaction time for the formalin test in both phases and increased the paw withdrawal time in the hot plate thermal stimulus test. The 200mg/kg dose also significantly inhibited the plantar mechanical hyperalgesia intensity induced by formalin within 24h. with the TFLHE did not cause significant changes in motor performance and coordination in the Rota Rod test. The investigation on the possible mechanism of antinociceptive action of TFLHE indicates the involvement of opioid, glutamatergic, nitric oxide/cGMP and vanilloid systems. It is concluded that the TFLHE has an antinociceptive effect promoted by the aforementioned mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Educational Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Bielskus

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes an educational wind tunnel produced by the Department of Building Energetics (DBE of Vilnius Gediminas Technical University. The equipment could be used for performing laboratory works and simple research. The article presents the projection of inflow and outlet velocity in the working chamber of DBE wind tunnel and carries out actual noise level measurement. The received data are compared with information on the level of noise generated by the fan considering instructions provided by the manufacturer. In order to assess the reliability of the computer program, simulation applying PHOENICS software has been conducted. The aim of modeling is to simulate a pilot model and to compare the obtained results with those of an analogous test presented in scientific articles.Article in Lithuanian

  20. First observation of mesospheric wind shear as high as 330 m s−1 km−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Offermann

    Full Text Available Mesospheric wind profiles with an altitude resolution of 25 m have been obtained by means of radar tracking of foil chaff clouds. Such experiments were performed during winter 1990 at Biscarrosse, France (44°N, 1°W. On one flight, a wind shear as high as 330 m s–1 km–1 at 87.4 km and a region of dynamical instability between 86 and 88 km was measured. This wind shear is believed to be the largest value ever measured in the mesosphere. The region of dynamical instability results from a superposition of two wave motions, and is found to link well with enhanced turbulence and small-scale wave activity.

  1. Symbolic Solution Approach to Wind Turbine based on Doubly Fed Induction Generator Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cañas–Carretón, M.; Gómez–Lázaro, E.; Martín–Martínez, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative approach based on symbolic computations to simulate wind turbines equipped with Doubly–Fed Induction Generator (DFIG). The actuator disk theory is used to represent the aerodynamic part, and the one-mass model simulates the mechanical part. The 5th......–order induction generator is selected to model the electric machine, being this approach suitable to estimate the DFIG performance under transient conditions. The corresponding non–linear integro-differential equation system has been reduced to a linear state-space system by using an ad-hoc local linearization...... This novel Symbolic Computation (SYMB) method has been implemented by using two different software-packages, with the purpose of solving simultaneously a remarkable number of individual wind turbines models submitted to different wind speed profiles and/or grid voltage waveforms. The obtained results...

  2. Wind Statistics Offshore based on Satellite Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Mouche, Alexis; Badger, Merete

    2009-01-01

    -based observations become available. At present preliminary results are obtained using the routine methods. The first step in the process is to retrieve raw SAR data, calibrate the images and use a priori wind direction as input to the geophysical model function. From this process the wind speed maps are produced....... Results comparing satellite scatterometer winds to offshore meteorological observations have shown good results, and more comparisons are planned in this respect during the Norsewind project....

  3. Rotor equivalent wind speed for power curve measurement – comparative exercise for IEA Wind Annex 32

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Cañadillas, B.; Clifton, A.

    2014-01-01

    A comparative exercise has been organised within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Annex 32 in order to test the Rotor Equivalent Wind Speed (REWS) method under various conditions of wind shear and measurement techniques. Eight organisations from five countries participated in the exercise...... or various lidars). The participants carried out two preliminary steps in order to reach consensus on how to implement the REWS method. First, they all derived the REWS for one 10 minute wind speed profile. Secondly, they all derived the power curves for one dataset. The main point requiring consensus...

  4. Wind gusts simulations using regional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, M.; Rubinstein, K. G.; Kurbatov, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    Wind gusts are extreme event which can cause severe damage. They can reach significant values even at medium winds. However numerical atmospheric models are designed to represent average winds, not gusts. There are several methods to estimate wind gusts. They range from simple gust factor methods to complex methods using different variables that can be resolved by regional numeric weather models. Gusts can be considered as reflection from upper layers of the atmosphere or as fluctuations of wind speed connected with turbulence. Most frequently used methods were realized using WRF-ARW model forecasts. They are compared with each other and their performance in different cases was analyzed. Wind gusts obtained using different methods were compared to measurements on meteorological station network over European part of Russia as well as with high frequency wind speed measurements in several points. Most methods underestimate wind gusts except one which overestimates in many cases. A new combined method is suggested according to the results. According to stability type of atmospheric boundary layer different methods for estimation were chosen. These lead to obtain predictability of wind gust over 22 m/s over 80% in autumn and winter season. There are still some underestimate in summer season. Some methods used to detect convective instability areas with high probability of severe wind gusts. The authors acknowledge the support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Project 16-05-00822 A)

  5. Prospecting for Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapp, Andy; Schreuders, Paul; Reeve, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Many people use wind to help meet their needs. Over the years, people have been able to harness or capture the wind in many different ways. More recently, people have seen the rebirth of electricity-generating wind turbines. Thus, the age-old argument about technology being either good or bad can also be applied to the wind. The wind can be a…

  6. Careers in Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming, Drew; Hamilton, James

    2011-01-01

    As a common form of renewable energy, wind power is generating more than just electricity. It is increasingly generating jobs for workers in many different occupations. Many workers are employed on wind farms: areas where groups of wind turbines produce electricity from wind power. Wind farms are frequently located in the midwestern, western, and…

  7. The Wind Energy Potential of Kurdistan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefi, Farzad; Moshtagh, Jamal; Moradi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In the current work by using statistical methods and available software, the wind energy assessment of prone regions for installation of wind turbines in, Qorveh, has been investigated. Information was obtained from weather stations of Baneh, Bijar, Zarina, Saqez, Sanandaj, Qorveh, and Marivan. The monthly average and maximum of wind speed were investigated between the years 2000-2010 and the related curves were drawn. The Golobad curve (direction and percentage of dominant wind and calm wind as monthly rate) between the years 1997-2000 was analyzed and drawn with plot software. The ten-minute speed (at 10, 30, and 60 m height) and direction (at 37.5 and 10 m height) wind data were collected from weather stations of Iranian new energy organization. The wind speed distribution during one year was evaluated by using Weibull probability density function (two-parametrical), and the Weibull curve histograms were drawn by MATLAB software. According to the average wind speed of stations and technical specifications of the types of turbines, the suitable wind turbine for the station was selected. Finally, the Divandareh and Qorveh sites with favorable potential were considered for installation of wind turbines and construction of wind farms.

  8. Laboratory modelling of the wind-wave interaction with modified PIV-method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Caulliez, Guillemette; Bopp, Maximilian; Jaehne, Bernd

    Laboratory experiments on studying the structure of the turbulent air boundary layer over waves were carried out at the Wind-Wave Flume of the Large Thermostratified Tank of the Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS), in conditions modeling the near water boundary layer of the atmosphere under strong and hurricane winds and the equivalent wind velocities from 10 to 48 m/s at the standard height of 10 m. A modified technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to obtain turbulent pulsation averaged velocity fields of the air flow over the water surface curved by a wave and average profiles of the wind velocity. The main modifications are: 1) the use of high-speed video recording (1000-10000 frames/sec) with continuous laser illumination helps to obtain ensemble of the velocity fields in all phases of the wavy surface for subsequent statistical processing; 2) the development and application of special algorithms for obtaining form of the curvilinear wavy surface of the images for the conditions of parasitic images of the particles and the droplets in the air side close to the surface; 3) adaptive cross-correlation image processing to finding the velocity fields on a curved grid, caused by wave boarder; 4) using Hilbert transform to detect the phase of the wave in which the measured velocity field for subsequent appropriate binning within procedure obtaining the average characteristics.

  9. Laboratory modelling of the wind-wave interaction with modified PIV-method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeev Daniil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments on studying the structure of the turbulent air boundary layer over waves were carried out at the Wind-Wave Flume of the Large Thermostratified Tank of the Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS, in conditions modeling the near water boundary layer of the atmosphere under strong and hurricane winds and the equivalent wind velocities from 10 to 48 m/s at the standard height of 10 m. A modified technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV was used to obtain turbulent pulsation averaged velocity fields of the air flow over the water surface curved by a wave and average profiles of the wind velocity. The main modifications are: 1 the use of high-speed video recording (1000-10000 frames/sec with continuous laser illumination helps to obtain ensemble of the velocity fields in all phases of the wavy surface for subsequent statistical processing; 2 the development and application of special algorithms for obtaining form of the curvilinear wavy surface of the images for the conditions of parasitic images of the particles and the droplets in the air side close to the surface; 3 adaptive cross-correlation image processing to finding the velocity fields on a curved grid, caused by wave boarder; 4 using Hilbert transform to detect the phase of the wave in which the measured velocity field for subsequent appropriate binning within procedure obtaining the average characteristics.

  10. Improving Maryland's Offshore Wind Energy Resource Estimate Using Doppler Wind Lidar Technology to Assess Microtmeteorology Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Pé, Alexandra; Wesloh, Daniel; Antoszewski, Graham; Daham, Farrah; Goudarzi, Navid; Rabenhorst, Scott; Delgado, Ruben

    2016-06-01

    There is enormous potential to harness the kinetic energy of offshore wind and produce power. However significant uncertainties are introduced in the offshore wind resource assessment process, due in part to limited observational networks and a poor understanding of the marine atmosphere's complexity. Given the cubic relationship between a turbine's power output and wind speed, a relatively small error in the wind speed estimate translates to a significant error in expected power production. The University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) collected in-situ measurements offshore, within Maryland's Wind Energy Area (WEA) from July-August 2013. This research demonstrates the ability of Doppler wind lidar technology to reduce uncertainty in estimating an offshore wind resource, compared to traditional resource assessment techniques, by providing a more accurate representation of the wind profile and associated hub-height wind speed variability. The second objective of this research is to elucidate the impact of offshore micrometeorology controls (stability, wind shear, turbulence) on a turbine's ability to produce power. Compared to lidar measurements, power law extrapolation estimates and operational National Weather Service models underestimated hub-height wind speeds in the WEA. In addition, lidar observations suggest the frequent development of a low-level wind maximum (LLWM), with high turbinelayer wind shear and low turbulence intensity within a turbine's rotor layer (40m-160m). Results elucidate the advantages of using Doppler wind lidar technology to improve offshore wind resource estimates and its ability to monitor under-sampled offshore meteorological controls impact on a potential turbine's ability to produce power.

  11. UARS Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AL V011 (UARWI3AL) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AL data product consists of daily, 4 degree increment latitude-ordered vertical profiles of meridional and zonal wind...

  12. UARS Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AT V011 (UARWI3AT) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) Level 3AT data product consists of daily, 65.536 second interval time-ordered vertical profiles of meridional and zonal wind...

  13. Lidar-based Research and Innovation at DTU Wind Energy - a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, T.

    2014-06-01

    As wind turbines during the past decade have increased in size so have the challenges met by the atmospheric boundary-layer meteorologists and the wind energy society to measure and characterize the huge-volume wind fields surpassing and driving them. At the DTU Wind Energy test site "Østerild" for huge wind turbines, the hub-height of a recently installed 8 MW Vestas V164 turbine soars 143 meters up above the ground, and its rotor of amazing 164 meters in diameter make the turbine tips flicker 225 meters into the sky. Following the revolution in photonics-based telecommunication at the turn of the Millennium new fibre-based wind lidar technologies emerged and DTU Wind Energy, at that time embedded within Rise National Laboratory, began in collaboration with researchers from wind lidar companies to measure remote sensed wind profiles and turbulence structures within the atmospheric boundary layer with the emerging, at that time new, all-fibre-based 1.55 μ coherent detection wind lidars. Today, ten years later, DTU Wind Energy routinely deploys ground-based vertical profilers instead of met masts for high-precision measurements of mean wind profiles and turbulence profiles. At the departments test site "Høvsøre" DTU Wind Energy also routinely calibrate and accredit wind lidar manufactures wind lidars. Meanwhile however, new methodologies for power curve assessment based on ground-based and nacelle based lidars have also emerged. For improving the turbines power curve assessments and for advancing their control with feed-forward wind measurements experience has also been gained with wind lidars installed on turbine nacelles and integrated into the turbines rotating spinners. A new mobile research infrastructure WindScanner.dk has also emerged at DTU Wind Energy. Wind and turbulence fields are today scanned from sets of three simultaneously in space and time synchronized scanning lidars. One set consists of three fast scanning continuous-wave based wind lidars

  14. 75 FR 23263 - Alta Wind I, LLC; Alta Wind II, LLC; Alta Wind III, LLC; Alta Wind IV, LLC; Alta Wind V, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alta Wind I, LLC; Alta Wind II, LLC; Alta Wind III, LLC; Alta Wind IV, LLC; Alta Wind V, LLC; Alta Wind VI, LLC; Alta Wind VII, LLC; Alta Wind VIII, LLC; Alta Windpower... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 285.207 (2009), Alta Wind I, LLC, Alta Wind II...

  15. [Erythromycin ethylsuccinate obtaining possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Cătălina Daniela; Stefanache, Alina; Tântaru, Gladiola; Poiată, Antonia; Dumitrache, M; Diaconu, D E; Profire, Lenuţa

    2008-01-01

    In this study we tried to improve the erythromycin ethylsuccinate obtaining, having in view to separate the erythromycin ester by crystallization in water. The erythromycin acylation and the erythromycin ethylsuccinate crystallization were realized, following the next steps: 1. the acylation of the erythromycin with a methylene chloride solution of monoethylsuccinyl chloride, at 25-28 degrees C for 3 hours in the presence of NaHCO3; 2. the transfer of the erythromycin ethylsuccinate from methylene chloride solution in acetone solution by distillation of mixture methylene chloride: acetone 1:1 at 25-28 degrees C; 3. erythromycin ethylsuccinate separation by crystallization in water at pH = 8-8.5 and 5 degrees C for 90 minutes. The quality control for the erythromycin ester was performed according to the Xth edition of Romanian Pharmacopoeia standards using national standard for erythromycin ethylsuccinate and national standard for erythromycin with an activity of 1: 937 U and 2.02% humidity. The Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 was used as a test microorganism and a thin layer cromatography was performed for qualitative control. 13.1 g of erythromycin ethylsuccinate were obtained with an output of the process of 82.02%. Using water for the separation of erythromycin ethylsuccinate the output of the process is greater (82.02%) than in case of using petroleum ether (74.14%) or hexane (80.25%). The thin layer cromatography revealed an Rf = 0.56 and the microbiological activity of the erythromycin ethylsuccinate was 98.7% compared with the standard. Using water instead of hexane or petroleum ether is gainful for the separation of erythromycin ethylsuccinate from the reaction medium. The obtained erythromycin ethylsuccinate corresponds to the Xth edition of Romanian Pharmacopoeia standards. So, the raw materials consumption is decreased, the costs are cut down, the obtained product purity is high and the output of the process is greater.

  16. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  17. Rotor equivalent wind speed for power curve measurement - comparative exercise for IEA Wind Annex 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R.; Cañadillas, B.; Clifton, A.; Feeney, S.; Nygaard, N.; Poodt, M.; St. Martin, C.; Tüxen, E.; Wagenaar, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    A comparative exercise has been organised within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Annex 32 in order to test the Rotor Equivalent Wind Speed (REWS) method under various conditions of wind shear and measurement techniques. Eight organisations from five countries participated in the exercise. Each member of the group has derived both the power curve based on the wind speed at hub height and the power curve based on the REWS. This yielded results for different wind turbines, located in diverse types of terrain and where the wind speed profile was measured with different instruments (mast or various lidars). The participants carried out two preliminary steps in order to reach consensus on how to implement the REWS method. First, they all derived the REWS for one 10 minute wind speed profile. Secondly, they all derived the power curves for one dataset. The main point requiring consensus was the definition of the segment area used as weighting for the wind speeds measured at the various heights in the calculation of the REWS. This comparative exercise showed that the REWS method results in a significant difference compared to the standard method using the wind speed at hub height in conditions with large shear and low turbulence intensity.

  18. Comparing model-based predictions of a wind turbine wake to LiDAR measurements in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Andrew; Jones, Paddy; Boyce, Dean; Bowman, Neil

    2013-04-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques to the measurement of wind characteristics offers great potential to accurately predict the atmospheric boundary layer flow (ABL) and its interactions with wind turbines. An understanding of these interactions is important for optimizing turbine siting in wind farms and improving the power performance and lifetime of individual machines. In particular, Doppler wind Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) can be used to remotely measure the wind characteristics (speed, direction and turbulence intensity) approaching a rotor. This information can be utilised to improve turbine lifetime (advanced detection of incoming wind shear, wind veer and extreme wind conditions, such as gusts) and optimise power production (improved yaw, pitch and speed control). LiDAR can also make detailed measurements of the disturbed wind profile in the wake, which can damage surrounding turbines and reduce efficiency. These observational techniques can help engineers better understand and model wakes to optimize turbine spacing in large wind farms, improving efficiency and reducing the cost of energy. NEL is currently undertaking research to measure the disturbed wind profile in the wake of a 950 kW wind turbine using a ZephIR Dual Mode LiDAR at its Myres Hill wind turbine test site located near Glasgow, Scotland. Myres Hill is moderately complex terrain comprising deep peat, low lying grass and heathers, localised slopes and nearby forest, approximately 2 km away. Measurements have been obtained by vertically scanning at 10 recorded heights across and above the rotor plane to determine the wind speed, wind direction and turbulence intensity profiles. Measurement stations located at various rotor diameters downstream of the turbine were selected in an attempt to capture the development of the wake and its recovery towards free stream conditions. Results of the measurement campaign will also highlight how the wake behaves as a result of sudden gusts

  19. Characterization of wind velocities in the wake of a full scale wind turbine using three ground-based synchronized WindScanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazicioglu, Hasan; Angelou, Nikolas; Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh

    2016-01-01

    The wind energy community is in need of detailed full-field measurements in the wake of wind turbines. Here, three dimensional(3D) wind vector field measurements obtained in the near-wake region behind a full-scale test turbine are presented. Specifically, the wake of a NEG Nordtank turbine, inst...

  20. On the Weibull distribution for wind energy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The two parameter Weibull distribution is traditionally used to describe the long term fluctuations in the wind speed as part of the theoretical framework for wind energy assessment of wind farms. The Weibull distribution is described by a shape and a scale parameter. Here, based on recent long......-term measurements performed by a wind lidar, the vertical profile of the shape parameter will be discussed for a sub-urban site, a coastal site and a marine site. The profile of the shape parameter was found to be substantially different over land and sea. A parameterization of the vertical behavior of the shape...

  1. The Wind Energy Potential of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Bjornsson, Halldór; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Jónasson, Kristján; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2014-05-01

    While Iceland has an abundant wind energy resource, its use for electrical power production has so far been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated primarily from hydro- and geothermal sources, and adding wind energy has so far not been considered practical or even necessary. However, wind energy is becoming a more viable option, as opportunities for new hydro- or geothermal power installations become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland, a wind atlas has been developed as part of the joint Nordic project 'Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing' (IceWind). Downscaling simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to determine the large-scale wind energy potential of Iceland. Local wind speed distributions are represented by Weibull statistics. The shape parameter across Iceland varies between 1.2 and 3.6, with the lowest values indicative of near-exponential distributions at sheltered locations, and the highest values indicative of normal distributions at exposed locations in winter. Compared with summer, average power density in winter is increased throughout Iceland by a factor of 2.0 - 5.5. In any season, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 - 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 - 1500 W m-2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations of 500 - 1000 m above mean sea level, power density is independent of the distance to the coast. In addition to seasonal and spatial variability, differences in average wind speed and power density also exist for different wind directions. Along the coast in winter, power density of onshore winds is higher by 100 - 700 W m-2 than that of offshore winds. The regions with the highest average wind speeds are impractical for wind farms, due to the distances from road

  2. Flow separation on wind turbines blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corten, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    separation line, which causes the terms with the chord-wise speed or accelerations to disappear. The conclusion is that the chord-wise pressure gradient balances the Coriolis force. By doing so we obtain a simple set of equations that can be solved analytically. Subsequently, our model predicts that the convective term with the radial velocity (vrvr/r) is dominant in the equation for the r-direction, precisely the term that was neglected in Snel's analysis. 3. Multiple Power Levels Several large commercial wind turbines demonstrate drops in maximum power levels up to 45%, under apparently equal conditions. Earlier studies attempting to explain this effect by technical malfunctioning, aerodynamic instabilities and blade contamination effects estimated with computational fluid dynamics, have not yet yielded a plausible result. We formulated many hypotheses, three of which were useful. By taking stall flag measurements and making two other crucial experiments, we could confirm one of those three hypotheses: the insect hypothesis. Insects only fly in low wind, impacting upon the blades at specific locations. In these conditions, the insectual remains are located at positions where roughness has little influence on the profile performance, so that the power is not affected. In high winds however, the flow around the blades has changed. As a result, the positions at which the insects have impacted at low winds are very sensitive to contamination. So the contamination level changes at low wind when insects fly and this level determines the power in high winds when insects do not fly. As a consequence we get discrete power levels in high winds. The other two hypotheses, which did not cause the multiple power levels for the case we studied, gave rise to two new insights. First, we expect the power to depend on the wind direction at sites where the shape of the terrain concentrates the wind. In this case the power level of all turbine types, including pitch regulated ones, will be

  3. Tower Winds - Cape Kennedy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitized data taken from Wind Gust Charts. Record contains hourly wind directions and speed with a peak wind recorded at the end of each day. Sorted by: station,...

  4. The role of titanium oxide concentration profile of titanium oxide of RuO2-TiO2 coatings obtained by the sol-gel procedure on its electrochemical behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR V. PANIC

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the role of TiO2 in the deactivation mechanism of an active RuO2–TiO2 coating, an additional TiO2 layer was introduced in the support|coating interphase of regular Ti//[RuO2–TiO2] anode in one case and on the surface of the coating in the other. The electrochemical behavior of these, with TiO2 enriched, anodes was compared with the behavior of anodes with regular RuO2–TiO2 coatings, which were subjected to an accelerated stability test. A high-frequency semicircle in the complex plane plot, obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, for a regular RuO2–TiO2 coating corresponds to TiO2 enrichment in the coating as a consequence of anode corrosion. In the case of the coatings with additional TiO2 layers, a high-frequency semicircle was not observed. The additional TiO2 layers increase the coating overall resistance and influence the coating impedance behavior at low frequencies. Similar equivalent electrical circuits were used to analyze the impedance behavior of coatings having an additional TiO2 layer at different position within RuO2–TiO2 coating.

  5. Comparison Between The Characteristics Of Wind Power ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data on wind speed and global solar radiation over the period 1985 – 1999 for Onne obtained from the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) stationed at Onne, Nigeria have been compiled and evaluated, to determine the wind power which is compared with the global solar radiation energies. Monthly and ...

  6. Wind Farm Power Forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Haouas, Nabiha; Bertrand, Pierre R.

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting annual wind power production is useful for the energy industry. Until recently, attention has only been paid to the mean annual wind power energy and statistical uncertainties on this forecasting. Recently, Bensoussan et al. (2012) have pointed that the annual wind power produced by one wind turbine is a Gaussian random variable under a reasonable set of assumptions. Moreover, they can derive both mean and quantiles of annual wind power produced by one wind ...

  7. Modelling Wind for Wind Farm Layout Optimization Using Joint Distribution of Wind Speed and Wind Direction

    OpenAIRE

    Ju Feng; Wen Zhong Shen

    2015-01-01

    Reliable wind modelling is of crucial importance for wind farm development. The common practice of using sector-wise Weibull distributions has been found inappropriate for wind farm layout optimization. In this study, we propose a simple and easily implementable method to construct joint distributions of wind speed and wind direction, which is based on the parameters of sector-wise Weibull distributions and interpolations between direction sectors. It is applied to the wind measurement data a...

  8. Superconducting Wind Turbine Generators

    OpenAIRE

    Yunying Pan; Danhzen Gu

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy is well known as a renewable energy because its clean and less polluted characteristic, which is the foundation of development modern wind electricity. To find more efficient wind turbine is the focus of scientists around the world. Compared from conventional wind turbines, superconducting wind turbine generators have advantages at zero resistance, smaller size and lighter weight. Superconducting wind turbine will inevitably become the main trends in this area. This paper intends ...

  9. Small power wind turbine (Type DARRIEUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel STERE

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This presentation focuses on the calculation for small vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT for an urban application. The fixed-pitch straight – bladed vertical axis wind turbine (SB-VAWT is one of the simplest types of wind turbine and accepts wind from any angle (no yaw system. This turbine is useful for moderate wind speeds (3 - 6 m/s. A case study is presented based upon the use of well documented symmetrical NACA 0012 turbine blade profile. We describe a solution for VAWT. To perform a linear static analysis in the structure, the commercial finite element analysis code ANSYS is used because of its flexibility for handling information in files written in a more or less free format.

  10. Wind Power Today: Federal Wind Program Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-04-01

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind research conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today is to show how DOE supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry.

  11. Wind flow through shrouded wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    THROUGH SHROUDED WIND TURBINES by Jonathan P. Scheuermann March 2017 Thesis Advisor: Muguru Chandrasekhara Second Reader: Kevin Jones THIS......CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Wall pressure distributions and cross section flow distribution on wind turbine shroud designs, determined

  12. Advanced structural wind engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kareem, Ahsan

    2013-01-01

    This book serves as a textbook for advanced courses as it introduces state-of-the-art information and the latest research results on diverse problems in the structural wind engineering field. The topics include wind climates, design wind speed estimation, bluff body aerodynamics and applications, wind-induced building responses, wind, gust factor approach, wind loads on components and cladding, debris impacts, wind loading codes and standards, computational tools and computational fluid dynamics techniques, habitability to building vibrations, damping in buildings, and suppression of wind-induced vibrations. Graduate students and expert engineers will find the book especially interesting and relevant to their research and work.

  13. Wind energy bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-05-01

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  14. Satellite information for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.; Astrup, Poul; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2004-01-01

    An introduction to satellite information relevant for wind energy applications is given. It includes digital elevation model (DEM) data based on satellite observations. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is useful for regional scale wind resourcestudies. Comparison results from complex...... in WASP combined with topography and roughness information to assess the coastal wind power potential. Scatterometer wind data are observed ~ twice per day, whereas SAR only are obtained 3 to 8 timesmonthly. The relatively low number of samples and the absolute uncertainty within the maps, ~ 1.3 ms-1...

  15. Evaluation of the DeepWind concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Borg, Michael; Gonzales Seabra, Luis Alberto

    The report describes the DeepWind 5 MW conceptual design as a baseline for results obtained in the scientific and technical work packages of the DeepWind project. A comparison of DeepWi nd with existing VAWTs and paper projects are carried out and the evaluation of the concept in terms of cost......, as well as the technical and scientific recommendations are performed. The work is a result of the contributions within the DeepWind project which is supported by the European Commission, Grant 256769 FP7 Energy 2010 - Future emerging technologies, and by the DeepWind beneficiaries: DTU(DK), AAU...

  16. Small wind planning and building successful installations

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Nolan

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a cohesive guide to achieving successful small wind installations. It is a comprehensive information resource from one of the world's most experienced small wind professionals, covering all the key issues for small wind system development, from site and machine selection to international standards compliance. Engineers who are tasked with planning and developing these small wind systems, from choosing the best site and accurately estimating likely power output to obtaining proper permitting and troubleshooting operational inefficiencies, will find this book an ess

  17. Wind turbine airfoil catalogue

    OpenAIRE

    Bertagnolio, F.; Sørensen, Niels N.; Johansen, Jeppe; Fuglsang, P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is two-sided. Firstly, experimental results obtained for numerous sets of airfoil measurements (mainly intended for wind turbine applications) are collected and compared with computational results from the 2D Navier-Stokes solverEllipSys2D, as well as results from the panel method code XFOIL. Secondly, we are interested in validating the code EllipSys2D and finding out for which airfoils it does not perform well compared to the experiments, as well as why, when it does so...

  18. Wind resource modelling for micro-siting - Validation at a 60-MW wind farm site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J.C.; Gylling Mortensen, N. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Said, U.S. [New and Renewable Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1999-03-01

    This paper investigates and validates the applicability of the WAsP-model for layout optimization and micro-siting of wind turbines at a given site for a 60-MW wind farm at Zafarana at the Gulf of Suez in Egypt. Previous investigations show large gradients in the wind climate within the area. For the design and optimization of the wind farm it was found necessary to verify the WAsP extrapolation of wind atlas results from 2 existing meteorological masts located 5 and 10 km, respectively, from the wind farm site. On-site measurements at the 3.5 x 3.5 km{sup 2} wind farm site in combination with 7 years of near-site wind atlas measurements offer significant amounts of data for verification of wind conditions for micro-siting. Wind speeds, wind directions, turbulence intensities and guests in 47.5 m a.g.l. have been measured at 9 locations across the site. Additionally, one of the site masts is equipped as a reference mast, measuring both vertical profiles of wind speed and temperature as well as air pressure and temperature. The exercise is further facilitated by the fact that winds are highly uni-directional; the north direction accounting for 80-90% of the wind resource. The paper presents comparisons of 5 months of on-site measurements and modeled predictions from 2 existing meteorological masts located at distances of 5 and 10 km, respectively, from the wind farm site. Predictions based on terrain descriptions of the Wind Atlas for the Gulf of Suez 1991-95 showed over-predictions of wind speeds of 4-10%. With calibrated terrain descriptions, made based on measured data and a re-visit to critical parts of the terrain, the average prediction error of wind speeds was reduced to about 1%. These deviations are smaller than generally expected for such wind resource modeling, clearly documenting the validity of using WAsP modeling for micro-siting and layout optimization of the wind farm. (au)

  19. On the vertical structure of wind gusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suomi, I.; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The increasing size of wind turbines, their height and the area swept by their blades have revised the need for understanding the vertical structure of wind gusts. Information is needed for the whole profile. In this study, we analyzed turbulence measurements from a 100m high meteorological mast...... at the Danish National Test Station for Large Wind Turbines at Høvsøre in Denmark. The site represents flat, homogeneous grassland with an average gust factor of 1.4 at 10m and 1.2 at 100m level. In a typical surface-layer gust parametrization, the gust factor is composed of two components, the peak factor...

  20. Lidar-based Research and Innovation at DTU Wind Energy – a Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    with the emerging, at that time new, all-fibre-based 1.55 μ coherent detection wind lidars. Today, ten years later, DTU Wind Energy routinely deploys ground-based vertical profilers instead of met masts for high-precision measurements of mean wind profiles and turbulence profiles. At the departments test site...... and turbulence fields have been achieved: 1) of the free wind aloft, 2) over complex terrain, 3) at coastal ranges with land-sea interfaces, 4) offshore, 5) in turbine inflow induction zone, and 6) of the complex and turbulent flow fields in the wakes inside wind parks....

  1. Quantifying the Available Offshore Wind Resource in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, M.; Seim, H.

    2016-02-01

    We present a study of wind profile measurements for improvement upon the wind resource estimation of coastal North Carolina. The site of measurement, near Cape Hatteras, is interesting because of its proximity to an open sound condition to the north and west, as well as its oceanic boundary to the south and east, including the thermally dynamic influence of the Gulf Stream. Such an environment has been found to complicate wind speed estimation at wind turbine hub height. Early exploration of the profiles collected during 2012-2014 from the surface to 200 m revealed distinct characteristics unique to winds coming from Pamlico Sound, as compared to those coming from the Atlantic. In order to quantify the effect of atmospheric stability on the wind profiles, an aggregation of ancillary data was collected, including surface sea and air temperature, and surface humidity to calculate a Monin-Obukhov Similarity scaling parameter. The ancillary data, in combination with knowledge of upwind conditions, topography, and ocean thermal structure, is being used to test the ability of simple theory to reproduce the structure of wind profiles from the two environments assuming nested internal boundary layers. This work will provide a more refined method of estimating the available wind resource for use in offshore wind energy development in this particular coastal region.

  2. Kaji Eksperimental Kinerja Turbin Angin Sumbu Vertikal Tipe Darrieus H 4 Blade Profile Naca 2415 dengan Variasi Sudut Pitch

    OpenAIRE

    Kusuma, Muh Wira Tri; Aziz, Azridjal; Mainil, Rahmat Iman

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy including renewable energy development. In previous research for the wind turbine of vertical type Darrieus H profile naca 2415 still slightly, thus lifted the title research on the performance of vertical wind turbine type Darrieus H profile naca 2415. The purpose of this research is to find the effect on the performance of the pitch angle for the vertical wind turbine type darrieus H with profile NACA 2415. This research uses experimental method, with varying wind speed and angl...

  3. Wind farm induced changes in wind speed and surface fluxes over the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Fabien; van Lipzig, Nicole; Meyers, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Offshore wind farm deployment in the North Sea is foreseen to expand dramatically in the coming years. The strong expansion of offshore wind parks is likely to affect the regional climatology on the North Sea. We assess this impact by conducting a regional climate model simulation over future wind farms built near the German coast. In order to achieve this, the wind farm parameterisation of Fitch et al. 2012, where wind farms are parameterised as elevated sources of turbulent kinetic energy and sinks of momentum ( Blahak et al 2010 and Fitch et al 2012) is implemented in COSMO-CLM at a 1.5 km resolution. As a first step, COSMO-CLM's ability to reproduce wind profiles over the North Sea is evaluated using wind speed data from the FINO1 meteorological mast, toghether with QuikScat scatterometer data, for a time period of 2000-2008. Subsequently, the impact of windfarms on the regional climate over a period of ten years (1999-2008) is assessed. A large scale wind farm can create wakes which depending on the wind direction could affect the power production of a neighbouring farm. Furthermore, wind farms decelerate the flow and create a vertical circulation in the inflow region. As a result, changes in vertical fluxes of moisture are observed. This leads to enhanced low level cloud cover which may trigger changes in precipitation.

  4. Adaptive Extremum Control and Wind Turbine Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Xin

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is divided into two parts, i.e., adaptive extremum control and modelling and control of a wind turbine. The rst part of the thesis deals with the design of adaptive extremum controllers for some processes which have the behaviour that process should have as high e ciency as possible...... in parameters, and thus directly lends itself to parameter estimation and adaptive control. The extremum control law is derived based on static optimization of a performance function. For a process with nonlinearity at output the intermediate signal between the linear part and nonlinear part plays an important...... role. If it can be emphasis on control design. The models have beenvalidated by experimental data obtained from an existing wind turbine. The e ective wind speed experienced by the rotor of a wind turbine, which is often required by some control methods, is estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind...

  5. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  6. The vertical-axis wind turbine - Unsteady aerodynamic forces on a Darrieus rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chezlepretre, B.

    1980-11-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic forces on a Darrieus wind turbine can give rise to fatigue cracking and vibrations in the rotor blades. The present paper presents an experimental and theoretical study of aerodynamic forces during blade rotation. Measurements of pressure differences between homologous points on either side of the rotor were obtained for a two-bladed Darrieus wind turbine with NACA 0012 profiles operating at speeds up to 600 rotations/min. Pressure fluctuation spectra and normal aerodynamic forces were then computed for various rotor tip speed/wind speed ratios. Calculations were also performed in terms of a quasi-steady multitude model of the flow traversing the upstream and downstream sections of the wind turbine treated separately. Good agreement between predicted and observed values of peak pressure and the development of aerodynamic forces on the upstream side is obtained, while less good agreement is obtained on the downstream side, due to uncertainties associated with the operation of this side in the wake of the upstream side. Results also demonstrate that the centripetal forces exceed the centrifugal forces by a factor of 2 to 3, and the presence of nonnegligible levels of harmonic vibrations.

  7. Optimized Estimation of Surface Layer Characteristics from Profiling Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreene Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New sampling techniques such as tethered-balloon-based measurements or small unmanned aerial vehicles are capable of providing multiple profiles of the Marine Atmospheric Surface Layer (MASL in a short time period. It is desirable to obtain surface fluxes from these measurements, especially when direct flux measurements are difficult to obtain. The profiling data is different from the traditional mean profiles obtained at two or more fixed levels in the surface layer from which surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and latent heat are derived based on Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST. This research develops an improved method to derive surface fluxes and the corresponding MASL mean profiles of wind, temperature, and humidity with a least-squares optimization method using the profiling measurements. This approach allows the use of all available independent data. We use a weighted cost function based on the framework of MOST with the cost being optimized using a quasi-Newton method. This approach was applied to seven sets of data collected from the Monterey Bay. The derived fluxes and mean profiles show reasonable results. An empirical bias analysis is conducted using 1000 synthetic datasets to evaluate the robustness of the method.

  8. Study of hydrogen production from wind power in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiche-Hamane, Lilia; Belhamel, Maiouf; Benyoucef, Boumedienne; Hamane, Mustapha [Centre for Development of Renewable Energies (CDER), Alger (Algeria)

    2010-07-01

    An overview of the potentiality of hydrogen production from wind power in Algeria has been given in this study. Wind resource assessment has been presented in cartographic form and windy sites have been identified for wind power application. A system constituted by a wind turbine, an electrolyser and a power conditioning device have been proposed for the study of hydrogen production in the southwest region of Algeria. For this purpose, the transient system simulation program (TRNSYS) have been used. The results obtained showed the sensitivity of hydrogen production to the wind resource trend and the importance of optimisation of the electrolyser according to the power produced by the wind turbine. (orig.)

  9. New design chart for basic wind speeds in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, André T.; Corrêa, Márcio R. S.

    2013-01-01

    The design charts for basic wind speeds currently in use in Brazil [1] were created in 1977, based on wind speed records from 1950 to 1974. The database covered up to 25 years of wind records obtained in 49 weather stations, totaling 919 stationyears of data. Since 1974, additional 37 years of wind records became available, but have not been incorporated in the design code. Hence, the updated wind charts proposed in this paper are long overdue. In this paper, 62 years of wind records in Brazi...

  10. Temporal Wind Pairs for Space Launch Vehicle Capability Assessment and Risk Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Space launch vehicles incorporate upper-level wind assessments to determine wind effects on the vehicle and for a commit to launch decision. These assessments make use of wind profiles measured hours prior to launch and may not represent the actual wind the vehicle will fly through. Uncertainty in the winds over the time period between the assessment and launch introduces uncertainty in assessment of vehicle controllability and structural integrity that must be accounted for to ensure launch safety. Temporal wind pairs are used in engineering development of allowances to mitigate uncertainty. Five sets of temporal wind pairs at various times (0.75, 1.5, 2, 3 and 4-hrs) at the United States Air Force Eastern Range and Western Range, as well as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Wallops Flight Facility are developed for use in upper-level wind assessments on vehicle performance. Historical databases are compiled from balloon-based and vertically pointing Doppler radar wind profiler systems. Various automated and manual quality control procedures are used to remove unacceptable profiles. Statistical analyses on the resultant wind pairs from each site are performed to determine if the observed extreme wind changes in the sample pairs are representative of extreme temporal wind change. Wind change samples in the Eastern Range and Western Range databases characterize extreme wind change. However, the small sample sizes in the Wallops Flight Facility databases yield low confidence that the sample population characterizes extreme wind change that could occur.

  11. Full scale experimental analysis of wind direction changes (EOD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2007-01-01

    the magnitudes of a joint gust event defined by a simultaneously wind speed- and direction change in order to obtain an indication of the validity of the magnitudes specified in the IEC code. The analysis relates to pre-specified recurrence periods and is based on full-scale wind field measurements. The wind...

  12. Models for simulation of transient events in a wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Hansen, A. D.; Bindner, H.

    2002-01-01

    with different tools with each other and with measurements. This present paper limits to describe the models including our reflections on which effects we expect to be essential for obtaining useful simulation results. The models comprise the substation, where the wind farm is connected, the power collection...... system in the wind farm, and electric, mechanical and aerodynamic models for the wind turbines....

  13. Auto-correlation analysis of ocean surface wind vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nature of the inherent temporal variability of surface winds is analyzed by comparison of winds obtained through different measurement methods. In this work, an auto-correlation analysis of a time series data of surface winds measured in situ by a deep water buoy in the Indian Ocean has been carried out. Hourly time ...

  14. Estudo da ocorrência de fluxos no perfil vertical do vento na baixa atmosfera com análise das componentes principais (ACP e a sua relação com a precipitação no Rio Grande do Sul Vertical wind profile uses a principal component analysis, and of their relation to precipitation in Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Souza Corrêa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo busca-se entender as relações dos Jatos de Nível Baixo (JNB e dos fluxos no perfil vertical do vento na geração de convecção em escala sinótica e a sua associação com a precipitação, observa-se o perfil vertical do vento através de radiossondagens realizadas no Aeroporto Internacional Salgado Filho em Porto Alegre, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Estimam-se características predominantes da dinâmica dos fluxos dentro da baixa atmosfera, descrevendo a interação dos JNB e fluxos na geração da precipitação. Os JNB associados neste intenso transporte apresentam uma tendência de estarem ligados a eventos convectivos noturnos e na geração de Sistemas Convectivos de Mesoescala (SCM, que geram elevados índices pluviométricos que podem causar importante influência econômica. Utiliza-se a técnica da Análise das Componentes Principais para realização deste estudo, comparando suas componentes com a precipitação de sessenta e quatro estações pluviométricas sobre Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. O emprego desta metodologia facilita o entendimento da complexidade das interações das diferentes escalas meteorológicas envolvidas nos processos sinóticos de macro e mesoescala, mostrando neste método uma melhor representação das características dinâmicas dos processos baroclínicos na convecção. Em tal complexidade, o trabalho realizado pelos JNB e os fluxos nesta interação são o de serem uma escala efetiva de transporte de vapor de água na baixa atmosfera ao nível de mesoescala e de escala continental.This study analyses the relation between Low-Level Jets (LLJ and Flows in the vertical wind profiles generating convection at the synoptic scale, and associated events of rainfall, using vertical wind profiles obtained by radiosonde at the Salgado Filho International Airport in Porto Alegre, the State of Rio Grande do Sul. The LLJs involved in this large-scale transport tend to be associated with

  15. Numerical study of ocean wave effect on offshore wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lian; Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Wind power at sea has become increasingly important in renewable energy study. For energy harvesting, winds over oceans have many advantages over winds on land, for example, larger and open surface area, faster wind speed, and more wind resource close to high population regions. On the other hand, the presence of ocean waves introduces complexities to wind turbines. There is a critical need to study the dynamical interactions among marine atmospheric boundary layer, ocean wave field, and floating turbines. In this research, we study offshore wind farm by performing large-eddy simulations for winds coupled with potential-flow-theory based simulations for broadband irregular waves, with the wind turbines represented by an actuator disk model. Our results show that windseas at different development stages result in different sea-surface roughness and have an appreciable effect on wind profile and the energy extraction rate of the turbines. If swells are present, swell-to-wind momentum and energy transfer further changes the wind field to introduce oscillations in as well as modify the mean of the wind power. DY and LS acknowledge the support of NSF-CBET-1341062. CM acknowledges the support of NSF-AGS-1045189 and NSF-OISE-1243482.

  16. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    available wind speed and direction observations over the ocean and for a better understanding of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). The sea surface temperature (SST) has a direct impact on the marine atmospheric boundary layer, as the top few meters of the ocean have the same heat capacity...... as the entire atmosphere above. Under conditions of light winds and strong solar insolation, warming of the upper oceanic layer may occur. In this PhD study, remote sensing from satellites is used to obtain information for the near-surface ocean wind and the sea surface temperature over the North Sea...... and the Baltic Sea. The aim is to evaluate their potential use and demonstrate their applicability within the context of offshore wind energy; for the quantication of the wind resources and for the identication of diurnal warming of the sea surface temperature. Space-borne observations of wind are obtained from...

  17. A Comparison of Wind Flow Models for Wind Resource Assessment in Wind Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Landry

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the accuracy of various coupled mesoscale-microscale wind flow modeling methodologies for wind energy applications. This is achieved by examining and comparing mean wind speeds from several wind flow modeling methodologies with observational measurements from several 50 m met towers distributed across the study area. At the mesoscale level, with a 5 km resolution, two scenarios are examined based on the Mesoscale Compressible Community Model (MC2 model: the Canadian Wind Energy Atlas (CWEA scenario, which is based on standard input data, and the CWEA High Definition (CWEAHD scenario where high resolution land cover input data is used. A downscaling of the obtained mesoscale wind climate to the microscale level is then performed, where two linear microscale models, i.e., MsMicro and the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP, are evaluated following three downscaling scenarios: CWEA-WAsP, CWEA-MsMicro and CWEAHD-MsMicro. Results show that, for the territory studied, with a modeling approach based on the MC2 and MsMicro models, also known as Wind Energy Simulation Toolkit (WEST, the use of high resolution land cover and topography data at the mesoscale level helps reduce modeling errors for both the mesoscale and microscale models, albeit only marginally. At the microscale level, results show that the MC2-WAsP modeling approach gave substantially better results than both MC2 and MsMicro modeling approaches due to tweaked meso-micro coupling.

  18. Optimization and Reliability Problems in Structural Design of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Reliability-based cost-benefit optimization formulations for wind turbines are presented. Some of the improtant aspects for stochastic modeling of loads, strengths and models uncertainties for wind turbines are described. Single wind turbines and wind turbines in wind farms with wake effects...... reliability index equal to 3. An example with fatigue failure indicates that the reliability level is almost the same for single wind turbines and for wind turbines in wind farms if the wake effects are modeled equivalently in the design equation and the limit state equation....... are discussed. Limit state equations are presented for fatigue limit states and for ultimate limit states with extreme wind load, and illustrated by bending failure. Illustrative examples are presented, and as a part of the results optimal reliability levels are obtained which corresponds to an annual...

  19. Emergency wind erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  20. Obtaining Crosswind from Single-Aperture Optical Scintillometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dinther, D.; Hartogensis, O. K.

    2010-09-01

    scintillometers (MWS) were running along additional measurements including wind, for more detail see Beyrich et al. (2009). At the Haarweg a Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS) and a Boundary Layer Scintillometer (BLS) are running along with wind measurements. We obtain spectra of scintillometer signals with Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT). For LITFASS ten minutes averaged crosswind obtained from spectra of LAS and MWS are comparable to crosswind measured at the boundary layer station. However for short averaging times (e.g. one minute) spectra obtained with FFT become more fickle, thereby making it more difficult to obtain fC2. However short averaging times are preferable, since no time variation of the crosswind are also preferable. Therefore the use of wavelets to obtain the spectra for these short averaging times (?1 minute) is investigated. Other points we will investigate are the effects of different magnitudes of crosswind and spatial variability of the terrain height of the scintillometer path on the spectrums. We expect that a variable crosswind speed will cause a smoothing of the spectrum, thereby making it more difficult to obtain the value of fC2. A variable crosswind speed can be caused by a variable terrain height, which is investigated through wind profiles. Literature: Andreas, E.L. (2000). 'Obtaining surface momentum and sensible heat fluxes from crosswind scintillometers'. Journal of atmospheric and oceanic technology 17 3-16. Beyrich, F., Bange, J., Hartogensis, O., Raasch, S. (2009). Validation of scintillometer measurements over a heterogeneous landscape: The LITFASS-2009 Experiment. In: Proceedings 9th Annual Meeting of the European Meteorological Society (EMS), Toulouse, France. Furger, M., Drobinksi, P., Prévôt, A.S.H., Weber, R.O., Graber, W.K., Neininger, B. (2001). 'Comparison of horizontal and vertical scintillometer crosswinds during strong foehn with lidar and aircraft measurements'. Journal of atmospheric and oceanic technology 18 1975

  1. Apparatus and method for using radar to evaluate wind flow fields for wind energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    2017-02-21

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind flow field using one or more radars. Data is collected from the one or more radars, and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind flow field. The one or more radars are positioned to have a portion of the wind flow field within a scanning sector of the one or more radars.

  2. Wind power forecasting for a real onshore wind farm on complex terrain using WRF high resolution simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ángel Prósper Fernández, Miguel; Casal, Carlos Otero; Canoura Fernández, Felipe; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo

    2017-04-01

    Regional meteorological models are becoming a generalized tool for forecasting wind resource, due to their capacity to simulate local flow dynamics impacting wind farm production. This study focuses on the production forecast and validation of a real onshore wind farm using high horizontal and vertical resolution WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model simulations. The wind farm is located in Galicia, in the northwest of Spain, in a complex terrain region with high wind resource. Utilizing the Fitch scheme, specific for wind farms, a period of one year is simulated with a daily operational forecasting set-up. Power and wind predictions are obtained and compared with real data provided by the management company. Results show that WRF is able to yield good wind power operational predictions for this kind of wind farms, due to a good representation of the planetary boundary layer behaviour of the region and the good performance of the Fitch scheme under these conditions.

  3. Control and Protection of Wind Power Plants with VSC-HVDC Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Wind power plants are the fastest growing source of renewable energy. The European Union expects to generate 230 GW wind power, in which the offshore wind power is expected to contribute 40 GW. Offshore wind power plants have better wind velocity profile leading to a higher energy yield. Europe has a huge potential of offshore wind energy, which is a green and sustainable resource. All these have led to the development of offshore wind power plants.However, overall cost of the offshore instal...

  4. Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mark Z; Archer, Cristina L

    2012-09-25

    Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical energy, which returns to the atmosphere as heat to regenerate some potential and kinetic energy. As the number of wind turbines increases over large geographic regions, power extraction first increases linearly, but then converges to a saturation potential not identified previously from physical principles or turbine properties. These saturation potentials are >250 terawatts (TW) at 100 m globally, approximately 80 TW at 100 m over land plus coastal ocean outside Antarctica, and approximately 380 TW at 10 km in the jet streams. Thus, there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining half (approximately 5.75 TW) or several times the world's all-purpose power from wind in a 2030 clean-energy economy.

  5. Study of wind variability over Moscow city by sodar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, V. P.

    2008-05-01

    We used sodar data to obtain spatial, diurnal and seasonal variability of wind speed variances. Comparison of measurements at two sites in Moscow megalopolis and at the rural site (45 km from Moscow) was carried out. A good agreement between sodar and in-situ measurements by ultrasonic anemometer in rural and urban observations was obtained. Variances of radial velocities measured at sodar inclined antennae were compared with vertical wind variance as well as with wind components variances by sonic data. Experience in measuring of meso-scale wind variability by averaged on short time intervals data is demonstrated. Measurement of other statistical characteristics like vertical wind variances is discussed.

  6. Comparative study of the behavior of wind-turbines in a wind farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migoya, Emilio; Crespo, Antonio; Garcia, Javier; Manuel, Fernando; Jimenez, Angel [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), Madrid (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, Laboratorio de Mecanica de Fluidos; Moreno, Fermin [Comision Nacional de la Energia, Madrid (Spain); Costa, Alexandre [Energia Eolica, Division de Energias Renovables, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    The Sotavento wind farm is an experimental wind farm which has different types of wind turbines. It is located in an area whose topography is moderately complex, and where wake effects can be significant. One of the objectives of Sotavento wind farm is to compare the performances of the different machines; particularly regarding power production, maintenance and failures. However, because of wakes and topography, the different machines are not working under identical conditions. Two linearized codes have been used to estimate topography effects: UPMORO and WAsP. For wind directions in which topography is abrupt, the non-linear flow equations have been solved with the commercial code FLUENT, although the results are only qualitatively used. For wake effects, the UPMPARK code has been applied. As a result, the incident velocity over each wind turbine is obtained, and the power production is estimated by means of the power curve of each machine. Experimental measurements give simultaneously the wind characteristics at the measuring stations, the wind velocity, at the nacelle anemometer, and the power production of each wind turbine. These experimental results are employed to validate the numerical predictions. The main objective of this work is to deduce and validate a relationship between the wind characteristics measured in the anemometers and the wind velocity and the power output in each machine. (author)

  7. Simulation of shear and turbulence impact on wind turbine power performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Courtney, M.S.; Larsen, T.J.; Paulsen, U.S.

    2010-01-15

    Aerodynamic simulations (HAWC2Aero) were used to investigate the influence of the speed shear, the direction shear and the turbulence intensity on the power output of a multi-megawatt turbine. First simulation cases with laminar flow and power law wind speed profiles were compared to the case of a uniform inflow. Secondly, a similar analysis was done for cases with direction shear. In each case, we derived a standard power curve (function of the wind speed at hub height) and power curves obtained with various definitions of equivalent wind speed in order to reduce the scatter due to shear. Thirdly, the variations of the power output and the power curve were analysed for various turbulence intensities. Furthermore, the equivalent speed method was successfully tested on a power curve resulting from simulations cases combining shear and turbulence. Finally, we roughly simulated the wind speed measurements we may get from a LIDAR mounted on the nacelle of the turbine (measuring upwind) and we investigated different ways of deriving an equivalent wind speed from such measurements. (author)

  8. Large-Eddy Simulation of Waked Turbines in a Scaled Wind Farm Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; McLean, D.; Campagnolo, F.; Yu, T.; Bottasso, C. L.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the numerical simulation of waked scaled wind turbines operating in a boundary layer wind tunnel. The simulation uses a LES-lifting-line numerical model. An immersed boundary method in conjunction with an adequate wall model is used to represent the effects of both the wind turbine nacelle and tower, which are shown to have a considerable effect on the wake behavior. Multi-airfoil data calibrated at different Reynolds numbers are used to account for the lift and drag characteristics at the low and varying Reynolds conditions encountered in the experiments. The present study focuses on low turbulence inflow conditions and inflow non-uniformity due to wind tunnel characteristics, while higher turbulence conditions are considered in a separate study. The numerical model is validated by using experimental data obtained during test campaigns conducted with the scaled wind farm facility. The simulation and experimental results are compared in terms of power capture, rotor thrust, downstream velocity profiles and turbulence intensity.

  9. Calculation of Wind Compensation for Launching of Unguided Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robert L., Jr.; Harris, Ronald J.

    1961-01-01

    A method for calculating wind compensation for unguided missiles s derived which has a greater degree of flexibility than the previously proposed methods. Utilization of the wind-compensation technique is demonstrated by using the Shotput vehicle as a model. Postflight simulations of four of these missiles with the use of measured winds show that if the winds are known, very good accuracy can be obtained by using the proposed method.

  10. Atomic Physics of Shocked Plasma in Winds of Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure

  11. Atmospheric stability assessment for the characterization of offshore wind conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz Rodrigo, J.; Cantero, E.; García, B.; Borbón, F.; Irigoyen, U.; Lozano, S.; Fernande, P. M.; Chávez, R. A.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the Fino-1 offshore met mast database, different instrument set-ups and methodologies for stability characterization have been tested using non-dimensional numbers like the gradient and bulk Richardson number, and their equivalences with the Obukhov parameter ζ = z/L, which can be measured locally with the use of a sonic anemometer. These equivalences depend to a large extent on the suitability of empirical stability functions obtained in horizontally-homogeneous conditions. The bulk Richardson number method, based on Grachev and Fairall (1997) empirical function, is the least demanding measurement method for stability characterization offering a more practical approach to wind farm designers than using the sonic method. Alternatively, the AMOK method, used by FUGA wake model and also based on the bulk Richardson number, assumes surface-layer theory and avoids using stability functions, which results in a more robust formulation. A 9-class stability classification based on Sorbjan and Grachev (2010) is used to generalize the categorization of wind conditions. Based on flux-profile analysis it was concluded that unfortunately the local ζ is not sufficient to describe the scaling behaviour of the stable boundary layer. Indeed, larger wind shear than predicted by classical onshore stability functions is found, probably as a result of lower boundary layer depths.

  12. Wind power. [electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A historical background on windmill use, the nature of wind, wind conversion system technology and requirements, the economics of wind power and comparisons with alternative systems, data needs, technology development needs, and an implementation plan for wind energy are presented. Considerable progress took place during the 1950's. Most of the modern windmills feature a wind turbine electricity generator located directly at the top of their rotor towers.

  13. Wind Power Utilization Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    wind causes the bladed -rotor turbine to rotate at low speed about the hori- zontal drive shaft that is always parallel to the force of the wind . The...current meter. Another form of a vertical axis wind turbine is a vertically straight- bladed wind turbine with cyclically pitched blades (see Figure 4.15...The expres- sions for the rotor torque for a Darrieus machine can be found in Reference 4.16. The Darrieus wind turbine

  14. Roles of Wind Shear at Different Vertical Levels, Part I: Cloud System Organization and Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qian; Fan, Jiwen; Hagos, Samson M.; Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-07-07

    Understanding of critical processes that contribute to the organization of mesoscale convective systems is important for accurate weather forecast and climate prediction. In this study, we investigate the effects of wind shear at different vertical levels on the organization and properties of cloud systems using the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model with a spectral-bin microphysical scheme. The sensitivity experiments are performed by increasing wind shear at the lower (0-5 km), middle (5-10 km), upper (> 10 km) and the entire troposphere, respectively, based on a control run for a mesoscale convective system (MCS) with weak wind shear. We find that increasing wind shear at the both lower and middle vertical levels reduces the domain-accumulated precipitation and the occurrence of heavy rain, while increasing wind shear at the upper levels changes little on precipitation. Although increasing wind shear at the lower-levels is favorable for a more organized quasi-line system which leads to enlarged updraft core area, and enhanced updraft velocities and vertical mass fluxes, the precipitation is still reduced by 18.6% compared with the control run due to stronger rain evaporation induced by the low-level wind shear. Strong wind shear in the middle levels only produces a strong super-cell over a narrow area, leading to 67.3% reduction of precipitation over the domain. By increasing wind shear at the upper levels only, the organization of the convection is not changed much, but the increased cloudiness at the upper-levels leads to stronger surface cooling and then stabilizes the atmosphere and weakens the convection. When strong wind shear exists over the entire vertical profile, a deep dry layer (2-9 km) is produced and convection is severely suppressed. There are fewer very-high (cloud top height (CTH) > 15 km) and very-deep (cloud thickness > 15 km) clouds, and the precipitation is only about 11.8% of the control run. The changes in cloud microphysical

  15. WindScanner.dk - a new Remote Sensing based Research Infrastructure for on- and offshore Wind Energy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben

    Recent measurement achievements obtained with new 3D remote sensing based WindScanners will be presented. Our new WindScanner research infrastructure (www.windscanner.dk) development based on remote sensing wind lidars will be presented and first results shown. Wind velocity 3D vector measurements...... obtained in planetary boundary layer turbulent flow have been acquired from both ground-based and wind turbine-integrated space by time and space synchronized scanning lidars. Results to date include: turbulent inflow over complex terrain scanned in a horizontal-vertical 2D scan plane, and 2-dimensional...

  16. Wind-induced ocean circulation along California and Baja California coasts in June 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg Paklar, Gordana; Koračin, Darko; Dorman, Clive

    2009-09-01

    The circulation along the California Coast in June 1999 was influenced by strong upwelling-favourable winds. To study the ocean circulation and upwelling variability, the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) was setup for the California and Baja California coasts and it was forced with interactively computed wind stress and surface heat fluxes. Atmospheric fields used in the surface flux estimates during the POM runs were obtained from Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) outputs, while the sea surface temperatures (SST) were prescribed by the ocean model. One-way coupled air-sea modelling was used in the process-oriented approach to asses the influence of the wind stress, wind stress curl, initial density gradients, and nesting procedure with global model for the predicted circulation and accompanied upwelling. Hourly SSTs measured at twelve buoys operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) were used to evaluate sensitivity modelling studies via root-mean-squared-errors (RMSE). Low-pass filtered currents measured at 15 stations along central and southern Californian coast were also used in the ocean model evaluation procedures. In order to resolve the particular roles and importance of the wind stress vs. wind stress curl in driving coastal upwelling, besides baseline experiment we performed a numerical experiment with curl-free wind forcing. Modelled surface currents obtained in the baseline experiment indicate southward and southwestward flow in the deep ocean areas and alternating equatorward and poleward current near the shore. Wind stress curl appeared to be crucial both for the current field structure and SST distribution. The inshore poleward current obtained in the baseline experiment and evidenced by direct measurements was replaced with an equatorward current in the curl-free experiment. Furthermore, a significant temperature drop occurred along the entire coast in the curl-free experiment, whereas in the baseline the areas of maximum upwelling were confined to the

  17. GALILEO PROBE DOPPLER WIND EXPERIMENT DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A total of seven data sets are used to derive the wind profile. These include two trajectory data files (probe and orbiter), three frequency data files including the...

  18. AEROMAN - technical demands on modern wind energy converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenke, T.; Knuenz, D.

    1982-12-01

    Profiles of demand on modern wind power plants are described as deduced from the requirements of modern energy supply systems. Questions regarding the range of application, mode of operation and energy balance from the main points of emphasis of the discussion. The small wind power plant AEROMAN serves as an example to point out solutions put into reality.

  19. Wind farm optimization using evolutionary algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ituarte-Villarreal, Carlos M.

    In recent years, the wind power industry has focused its efforts on solving the Wind Farm Layout Optimization (WFLO) problem. Wind resource assessment is a pivotal step in optimizing the wind-farm design and siting and, in determining whether a project is economically feasible or not. In the present work, three (3) different optimization methods are proposed for the solution of the WFLO: (i) A modified Viral System Algorithm applied to the optimization of the proper location of the components in a wind-farm to maximize the energy output given a stated wind environment of the site. The optimization problem is formulated as the minimization of energy cost per unit produced and applies a penalization for the lack of system reliability. The viral system algorithm utilized in this research solves three (3) well-known problems in the wind-energy literature; (ii) a new multiple objective evolutionary algorithm to obtain optimal placement of wind turbines while considering the power output, cost, and reliability of the system. The algorithm presented is based on evolutionary computation and the objective functions considered are the maximization of power output, the minimization of wind farm cost and the maximization of system reliability. The final solution to this multiple objective problem is presented as a set of Pareto solutions and, (iii) A hybrid viral-based optimization algorithm adapted to find the proper component configuration for a wind farm with the introduction of the universal generating function (UGF) analytical approach to discretize the different operating or mechanical levels of the wind turbines in addition to the various wind speed states. The proposed methodology considers the specific probability functions of the wind resource to describe their proper behaviors to account for the stochastic comportment of the renewable energy components, aiming to increase their power output and the reliability of these systems. The developed heuristic considers a

  20. Small Wind Technology Diffusion in Suburban Areas of Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Culotta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Among renewable energy resources, wind energy became more attractive in the last decade. Wind farm installations dramatically increased in areas where climatic conditions, topography, and environment have allowed their development. The installation of wind turbines, usually carried out in remote areas, recently began to cover areas identified by a complex terrain such as urban and suburban zones. Although these new plant choices are characterized by lower productivity, there is increasing interest in wind energy production in both urban and suburban areas. In this work the authors have carried out an energy analysis developed from a sample of small wind turbines available on the market. This study shows how variable the energy production of a small wind turbine can be according to many design and context parameters: wind profiles, installation height, land use, and characteristics of the turbine.