WorldWideScience

Sample records for wind industry association

  1. Industrial initiatives in the wind industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edworthy, J.

    1992-01-01

    Industrial initiatives are methods of lobbying and marketing to increase the activity, revenues, profits, and commercial viability of an industry. They may be undertaken by industry individuals or firms, industry groups, government agencies, or combinations of all these. In Canada, one example of an industrial initiative is the Canadian Wind Energy Association. Other initiatives relevant to the wind power industry include Technology Inflow Programs sponsored by External Affairs Canada, used for visiting foreign firms with the view to licensing foreign technology, and Industrial Research Assistance Programs to develop or adapt new technologies in partnership with government. The Conservation/Renewable Energy Council, Small Power Producers of Alberta, and Independent Power Producers Society of Ontario are also active in supporting wind energy initiatives. In other countries, notable initiatives for wind energy include the Danish wind turbine warranty guarantee program. The Western Wind Industry Network of Canada conducts regional lobbying. It is suggested that in Canada, more such networks are needed, as well as joint ventures with utilities and governments, and more work with the regulatory agencies, to promote wind energy

  2. Canadian wind energy industry directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The companies and organizations involved, either directly or indirectly, in the wind energy industry in Canada, are listed in this directory. Some U.S. and international companies which are active or interested in Canadian industry activities are also listed. The first section of the directory is an alphabetical listing which includes corporate descriptions, company logos, addresses, phone and fax numbers, e-mail addresses and contact names. The second section contains 54 categories of products and services associated with the industry

  3. Second wind in the offshore wind industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, Edouard; Neyme, Eric; Deboos, Christophe; Villageois, Jean-Remy; Gouverneur, Philippe; Gerard, Bernard; Fournier, Eric; Petrus, Raymond; Lemarquis, David; Dener, Marc; Bivaud, Jean-Pierre; Lemaire, Etienne; Nielsen, Steffen; Lafon, Xavier; Lagandre, Pierre; Nadai, Alain; Pinot de Villechenon, Edouard; Westhues, Markus; Herpers, Frederick; Bisiaux, Christophe; Sperlich, Miriam; Bales, Vincent; Vandenbroeck, Jan; His, Stephane; Derrey, Thierry; Barakat, Georges; Dakyo, Brayima; Carme, Laurent; Petit, Frederic; Ytournel, Sophie; Westhues, Markus; Diller, Armin; Premont, Antoine de; Ruer, Jacques; Lanoe, Frederic; Declercq, Jan; Holmager, Morten; Fidelin, Daniel; Guillet, Jerome; Dudziak, Gregory; Lapierre, Anne; Couturier, Ludovic; Audineau, Jean-Pierre; Rouaix, Eric; De Roeck, Yann-Herve; Quesnel, Louis; Duguet, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    After several keynote addresses, this publication contains contributions and Power Point presentations proposed during this conference on the development of offshore wind energy. The successive sessions addressed the following issues: the offshore mass production of electricity (examples of Denmark and Belgium, laying and protecting offshore cables), the space, economic and environmental planning (the Danish experience, the role of the Coastal area integrated management, importance of the public debate, so on), the logistics of port infrastructures (simulation tools, example of Bremerhaven, issues related to project management), innovation at the core of industrial strategies (high power wind turbines, the 6 MW Alstom turbine, chain value and innovation in offshore wind energy, the Vertiwing innovating project of a floating wind turbine, a bench test in Charleston, foundations, gravity base structures, the British experience, the Danish experience), the economic and organisational conditions for development, the validation and certification of technologies

  4. Opportunities in Canada's growing wind energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovshin Moss, S.; Bailey, M.

    2006-01-01

    Investment in Canada's wind sector is projected to reach $8 billion by 2012, and growth of the sector is expected to create over 16,000 jobs. Canada's wind energy capacity grew by 54 per cent in 2005 alone, aided in part by supportive national policies and programs such as the Wind Power Production Incentive (WPPI); the Canadian Renewable Conservation Expense (CRCE) and Class 43.1 Capital Cost Allowance; and support for research and development. Major long-term commitments for clean power purchases, standard offer contracts and renewable portfolio standards in several provinces are encouraging further development of the wind energy sector. This paper argued that the development of a robust Canadian wind turbine manufacturing industry will enhance economic development, create opportunities for export; and mitigate the effects of international wind turbine supply shortages. However, it is not known whether Canadian wind turbine firms are positioned to capitalize on the sector's recent growth. While Canada imports nearly all its large wind turbine generators and components, the country has technology and manufacturing strengths in advanced power electronics and small wind systems, as well as in wind resource mapping. Wind-diesel and wind-hydrogen systems are being developed in Canada, and many of the hybrid systems will offer significant opportunities for remote communities and off-grid applications. Company partnerships for technology transfer, licensing and joint ventures will accelerate Canada's progress. A recent survey conducted by Industry Canada and the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) indicated that the total impact of wind energy related expenditures on economic output is nearly $1.38 billion for the entire sector. Annual payroll for jobs in Canada was estimated at $50 million, and substantial employment growth in the next 5 years is expected. Canada offers a strong industrial supply base capable of manufacturing wind turbine generators and

  5. Modeling Innovations Advance Wind Energy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 1981, Glenn Research Center scientist Dr. Larry Viterna developed a model that predicted certain elements of wind turbine performance with far greater accuracy than previous methods. The model was met with derision from others in the wind energy industry, but years later, Viterna discovered it had become the most widely used method of its kind, enabling significant wind energy technologies-like the fixed pitch turbines produced by manufacturers like Aerostar Inc. of Westport, Massachusetts-that are providing sustainable, climate friendly energy sources today.

  6. Green opportunities : occupations in the wind industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguidelo, M.; Alvarez, C.; Zhang, Z. [Niagara College, St. Catharines, ON (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    This paper examined potential employment occupations in the wind industry for the region of Niagara, Ontario. The report was presented as part of a labour market plan designed to identify strategies for strengthening Niagara's economic base and promoting regional prosperity. Studies have indicated that wind energy represents a significant opportunity to create new green jobs in Canada's manufacturing sector. It is estimated that more than 2 million jobs will be created in the global wind energy sector by 2020. The green energy deal between the Government of Ontario and the Korean consortium is expected to create over 16,000 jobs. Business in the Niagara region that were related to the wind power sector were presented, and details of the Niagara Development Corridor were provided. The different types of wind occupation and employment data for the region were included along with education and training requirements. The report demonstrated that Ontario universities and colleges must respond to the education and workforce training demands of the green economy. Increased communication between industry, trade unions, and wind training program developers is required. 26 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs., 2 appendices.

  7. Industrial wind turbines and adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Roy D; Krogh, Carmen M E; Horner, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Some people living in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWTs) report experiencing adverse health and socioeconomic effects. This review considers the hypothesis that annoyance from audible IWTs is the cause of these adverse health effects. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published since 2000 that included the terms "wind turbine health," "wind turbine infrasound," "wind turbine annoyance," "noise annoyance" or "low frequency noise" in the title or abstract. Industrial wind turbines produce sound that is perceived to be more annoying than other sources of sound. Reported effects from exposure to IWTs are consistent with well-known stress effects from persistent unwanted sound. If placed too close to residents, IWTs can negatively affect the physical, mental and social well-being of people. There is sufficient evidence to support the conclusion that noise from audible IWTs is a potential cause of health effects. Inaudible low-frequency noise and infrasound from IWTs cannot be ruled out as plausible causes of health effects.

  8. IPP partnerships : forging Canada's wind industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Following the request for proposal (RFP)-fueled explosion in renewable energy source development over the past 3 years, independent power producer (IPP) financial expertise has become critical to successful project implementation. This presentation reviewed aspects of Canadian wind market related to independent power producer (IPP) investment activity. A map of major Canadian wind farms operational at the end of 2005 was provided, as well as a map of provinces with utility RFP activity. Planned projects were listed by MW. Recent provincial RFP winners were listed. It was suggested that project execution experience and financial security were highly valued in the recent Hydro-Quebec and Ontario RFP solicitations. Developer consolidation and scaling is likely to continue as large wind IPPs are in the best position to maximize efficiency gains in project economics. Financial strength will continue to be key to winning provincial wind RFPs, and Quebec and Ontario RFPs are likely to be dominated by players with balance sheet security. Smaller developers are losing their competitive position in RFP negotiations as more national and international energy giants move into the wind industry. The consolidation trend is ramping up quickly, and may be closing the window in which international investors can find acquisition targets with experience and viable projects. It was concluded that while small developers with robust projects still exist, they are being acquired at a rapid rate. refs., tabs., figs

  9. Industrial wind. Strategic Road-map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therond, Pierre-Guy; Le Tirant, Alain; Vergnet, Marc; Hita-Perona, Sebastien; Bonnefond, Thierry; Guignard, Jean-Philippe; Roudil, Jean-Philippe; Villageois, Jean-Remy; Meyronneinc, Jean-Paul; Hua, Xavier; Herlaut, Fabienne; Maurel, Olivier; Boulnois, Renald; Lapeyre, Dominique; Mairet, Franck; Bongrain, Marie-Pierre; Kariniotakis, Georges; Rapin, Marc

    2012-06-01

    Since 2010, the ADEME has been managing four programmes within the scope of 'Future Investments'. Groups of research experts from various industrial fields, research bodies and research programming and financing agencies are responsible, within the scope of collective works, for producing strategic road-maps. These are used to launch Calls for Expressions of Interest (CEI). With regard to wind energy, the purpose of this road-map is to: - Highlight the industrial, technological, environmental and societal challenges encountered in the development of 'Industrial Wind'; - Draw up middle and long-term coherent, shared visions of the socio-technical systems or technologies in question; - Identify the technological, organisational, environmental and socio-economic obstacles, and therefore initiate (or pursue) the development of high-performance and economically viable technologies; - Promote the research, development and demonstration requirements ('technological demonstrators' to validate innovative technological solutions), experimentation requirements and technology platforms to be deployed ('pilot' projects to be tested under real circumstances: 'pre-commercial' unit prototypes then 'pre-commercial pilot farms') to improve the competitiveness of offers and companies within this sector, to reach the ambitious objectives set within the framework of the Grenelle Environnement and to promote and support the development of a French wind energy industry. These needs can then act as a basis for: - drawing up CEIs; - programming research within the ADEME and other institutions such as the Agence nationale de la recherche (ANR - French National Research Agency), the Comite strategique national sur la recherche energie (French national strategic committee for energy research) and the Alliance nationale de coordination de la recherche pour l'energie (ANCRE - French national alliance for the coordination of energy

  10. Proceedings of the wind energy industry conference : develop, innovate, export : held in conjunction with Quebec's first wind energy industry gala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This conference was dedicated to the wind energy industry and business opportunities in Quebec, the rest of Canada and abroad. It was held in conjunction with Quebec's first wind energy industry gala which highlighted the organizations and individuals that have made outstanding contributions to the wind power sector in Quebec over the past three years. The entire conference focused on current and future requests for proposals in Quebec, innovation, and exports. Some fifteen reputed speakers shared their knowledge and experience regarding technological development and technical support available in Quebec. It was intended to clarify current and future issues affecting the wind power industry and to build key relations with leading wind energy players. The sessions of the conference were entitled: the wind energy industry in Quebec and Canada; issues surrounding requests for proposals; the players involved in the request for proposals; visual impacts of wind farms; data transmission during wind farm construction; innovating to move ahead of the crowd; innovation in practice; exporting as a means of development; and, exports in practice. A tour of the Baie-des-Sable wind farm was also provided. The conference featured 24 presentations, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Wind energy in industrial areas. Results of an attitude survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoolderman, J.A.; Huiberts, R.G.J.

    2000-06-01

    The feasibility of installing wind turbines in industrial parks in the Netherlands has been investigated. An overview is given of possibilities and constraints to fit in wind turbines in industrial areas, based on the results of a literature study, a market consultation of sectoral organizations, representatives of local industrial circles and industrial experts in the field of renewable energy. Also a telephone survey was carried out among 130 entrepreneurs in the Netherlands to determine their attitudes towards the use of sustainable energy and wind energy in industrial parks. The results of the attitude study are published in this report. The main report is a separate report for which a separate abstract has been prepared. The intermediate results were discussed at a meeting (23 February 2000), in which representatives from the industry, provinces, municipalities and the government participated

  12. Adapting ORAP to wind plants : industry value and functional requirements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-08-01

    Strategic Power Systems (SPS) was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to assess the feasibility of adapting their ORAP (Operational Reliability Analysis Program) tool for deployment to the wind industry. ORAP for Wind is proposed for use as the primary data source for the CREW (Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind) database which will be maintained by Sandia to enable reliability analysis of US wind fleet operations. The report primarily addresses the functional requirements of the wind-based system. The SPS ORAP reliability monitoring system has been used successfully for over twenty years to collect RAM (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability) and operations data for benchmarking and analysis of gas and steam turbine performance. This report documents the requirements to adapt the ORAP system for the wind industry. It specifies which existing ORAP design features should be retained, as well as key new requirements for wind. The latter includes alignment with existing and emerging wind industry standards (IEEE 762, ISO 3977 and IEC 61400). There is also a comprehensive list of thirty critical-to-quality (CTQ) functional requirements which must be considered and addressed to establish the optimum design for wind.

  13. Proceedings of the Canadian Wind Energy Association's 2009 wind matters conference : wind and power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This conference provided a forum for wind energy and electric power industry experts to discuss issues related to wind and power systems. An overview of wind integration studies and activities in Canada and the United States was provided. New tools and technologies for facilitating the integration of wind and improve market conditions for wind energy developers were presented. Methods of increasing wind penetration were evaluated, and technical issues related to wind interconnections throughout North America were reviewed. The conference was divided into the following 5 sessions: (1) experiences with wind integration, and lessons learned, (2) update on ongoing wind integration initiatives in Canada and the United States, (3) initiatives and tools to facilitate wind integration and market access, (4) developments in wind interconnection and grid codes, (5) wind energy and cold weather considerations, and (6) challenges to achieving the 20 per cent WindVision goal in Canada. The conference featured 21 presentations, of which 13 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  14. Subcontractors and Component Suppliers in the Swedish Wind Power Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Linn

    2003-05-01

    This paper studies the Swedish component suppliers in the wind power industry. This group has not received much attention so far, and today very little is known. This study addresses the fact that the Swedish component suppliers have not been able to penetrate the wind power market despite the Swedish industry's strength in mechanical and electrical engineering. The aims of this paper were to gather information regarding the existing production and to identify factors that affect the Swedish component suppliers' scope to penetrate the wind turbine market. To date, although Sweden has spent considerable amounts of money on projects involving wind turbines, there is no series production of large wind turbines in Sweden. The historical development of the wind turbine industry suggests this alone would have inhibited the development of component production in Sweden. Yet, the country's proximity and good access to large wind turbine producing countries should be an advantage. Various factors and issues are identified and discussed in this paper that are relevant for the Swedish component suppliers' scope to penetrate the wind turbine market. These include market and product development, buyer-supplier relationships, export and sourcing behaviors, and time of market entry. This is a first step towards increasing the knowledge of Swedish component production and it is recognized that more studies are required. Various areas where relevant knowledge is largely missing or scarce are identified and discussed as well, and should serve as relevant starting points for continued research.

  15. Subcontractors and Component Suppliers in the Swedish Wind Power Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Linn

    2003-05-01

    This paper studies the Swedish component suppliers in the wind power industry. This group has not received much attention so far, and today very little is known. This study addresses the fact that the Swedish component suppliers have not been able to penetrate the wind power market despite the Swedish industry's strength in mechanical and electrical engineering. The aims of this paper were to gather information regarding the existing production and to identify factors that affect the Swedish component suppliers' scope to penetrate the wind turbine market. To date, although Sweden has spent considerable amounts of money on projects involving wind turbines, there is no series production of large wind turbines in Sweden. The historical development of the wind turbine industry suggests this alone would have inhibited the development of component production in Sweden. Yet, the country's proximity and good access to large wind turbine producing countries should be an advantage. Various factors and issues are identified and discussed in this paper that are relevant for the Swedish component suppliers' scope to penetrate the wind turbine market. These include market and product development, buyer-supplier relationships, export and sourcing behaviors, and time of market entry. This is a first step towards increasing the knowledge of Swedish component production and it is recognized that more studies are required. Various areas where relevant knowledge is largely missing or scarce are identified and discussed as well, and should serve as relevant starting points for continued research

  16. Assessing the value of wind generation in future carbon constrained electricity industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vithayasrichareon, Peerapat; MacGill, Iain F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs a novel Monte-Carlo based generation portfolio assessment tool to explore the implications of increasing wind penetration and carbon prices within future electricity generation portfolios under considerable uncertainty. This tool combines optimal generation mix techniques with Monte Carlo simulation and portfolio analysis methods to determine expected overall generation costs, associated cost uncertainty and expected CO 2 emissions for different possible generation portfolios. A case study of an electricity industry with coal, Combined Cycle Gas Turbines (CCGT), Open Cycle Gas Turbines (OCGT) and wind generation options that faces uncertain future fossil-fuel prices, carbon pricing, electricity demand and plant construction costs is presented to illustrate some of the key issues associated with growing wind penetrations. The case study uses half-hourly demand and wind generation data from South Eastern Australia, and regional estimates of new-build plant costs and characteristics. Results suggest that although wind generation generally increases overall industry costs, it reduces associated cost uncertainties and CO 2 emissions. However, there are some cases in which wind generation can reduce the overall costs of generation portfolios. The extent to which wind penetration affects industry expected costs and uncertainties depends on the level of carbon price and the conventional technology mix in the portfolios. - Highlights: ► A probabilistic portfolio analysis tool to assess generation portfolios with wind power. ► Explore the impacts of wind penetrations and carbon prices under uncertainties. ► Wind generation increases overall portfolio costs but reduces cost risks and emissions. ► The value of wind power depends on the carbon price and the technology mix. ► Complex interactions between wind penetration level and carbon pricing.

  17. Distributed Wind Resource Assessment: State of the Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Jason [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tinnesand, Heidi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Baring-Gould, Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO) goals, researchers from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) are investigating the Distributed Wind Resource Assessment (DWRA) process, which includes pre-construction energy estimation as well as turbine site suitability assessment. DWRA can have a direct impact on the Wind Program goals of maximizing stakeholder confidence in turbine performance and safety as well as reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). One of the major components of the LCOE equation is annual energy production. DWRA improvements can maximize the annual energy production, thereby lowering the overall LCOE and improving stakeholder confidence in the distributed wind technology sector by providing more accurate predictions of power production. Over the long term, one of the most significant benefits of a more defined DWRA process could be new turbine designs, tuned to site-specific characteristics that will help the distributed wind industry follow a similar trajectory to the low-wind-speed designs in the utility-scale industry sector. By understanding the wind resource better, the industry could install larger rotors, capture more energy, and as a result, increase deployment while lowering the LCOE. a direct impact on the Wind Program goals of maximizing stakeholder confidence in turbine performance and safety as well as reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). One of the major components of the LCOE equation is annual energy production. DWRA improvements can maximize the annual energy production, thereby lowering the overall LCOE and improving stakeholder confidence in the distributed wind technology sector by providing more accurate predictions of power production. Over the long term, one of the most significant benefits of a more defined DWRA process could be new turbine designs, tuned to site-specific characteristics that

  18. Prospects for a wind pump industry in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, S.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1977 considerable effort has been made in Sri Lanka to develop and disseminate wind pumping systems primarily in the small-scale agricultural sector in the island's dry zone. Through close cooperation with the Consultancy Services Wind Energy Developing Countries (CWD) in the Netherlands this programme has been successful in developing the necessary hardware but the broad objective of promoting wide spread use of wind pumping in Sri Lanka is yet to materialize. In analyzing probable reasons for this, the paper highlights that the basic arguments underlying the origin of the project in 1976, such as foreign exchange savings and local industrial development, became irrelevant to the post 1977 political and economic policies of the new government. Thus, the general economic framework adopted in Sri Lanka since 1977 does not seem to provide the necessary pre-conditions for development of a local industry for wind pumps. Due to this reason and the fact that kerosene oil used in conventional agriculturla pumps is subsidized, the ability of wind pumps to compete in the wind pump market seems highly constrained. It is concluded that under such conditions the prospects for the manufacturing and marketing of wind pumps on an industrial scale are not very favourable

  19. Feasibility of industrial wind energy schemes - final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, G.

    1998-01-01

    This document is the final report of an investigation into the feasibility of using wind turbines as on-site generation (i.e. on the customer''s side of the meter) to meet a proportion of the electricity demand on industrial sites in the UK. It was thought that this could become a promising market for wind energy outside support mechanisms such as the Non Fossil Fuel Obligation and equivalents, for the following principal reasons: electricity which displaces purchases from a Public Electricity Supplier (PES) or Second Tier Support (STS) has a higher value than electricity sold direct to a PES or STS; there could be seasonal and diurnal correlation between the output of wind turbines and electricity prices; and due to existing infrastructure, realisation of such projects could be simpler and cheaper than for new wind farms. Six industrial sites participated in the project, covering a wide range of industries, locations, and wind regimes. For each site, a year of concurrent wind data and demand data was produced. Practical aspects of the implementation of such schemes, and the results of the time step analyses, were discussed with the participating sites and the host PESs for each site. (author)

  20. Circular economy opportunity in the wind industry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellini, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to identify how the circular economy can be an opportunity for the French wind industry. A broad review of circular economy issues for the wind industry value chain has been conducted in order to be used as a decision making tool for ADEME and the wind industry stakeholders. First of all, a 'flow analysis' (including material, logistic and services related to wind power) has been carried out in order to highlight the specific challenges of circular economy for the wind sector. The strategic opportunities that meet these issues have then been identified. A selection of six opportunities has been further investigated to assess the benefits, to analyze the barriers and to identify actions that ADEME could initiate to foster these opportunities. These investigated opportunities are the following: - To structure a recycling chain for wind blades; - To promote the business model of the extension of wind turbine's lifetime; - To promote skills improvement of local providers for reconditioning and maintenance services; - To adapt the offshore hubs to integrate dismantling activity of onshore equipments; - To increase the manufacturing capacity of wind towers in France to increase local sourcing; - To encourage the creation of a leading French manufacturer to optimize the supply chain. In the light of this analysis, it can be concluded that circular economy represents a strategic opportunity for the French wind energy sector. The opportunities we focused on make up a consistent set of initiatives that improve the environmental, economic and social performance of the wind energy sector by strengthening industrial activities and services throughout all the life cycle: manufacturing stage (optimization of logistics flows and local manufacturing), use phase (maintenance, repair) and end-of-life phase of wind turbine (dismantling, recycling). While the sector has so far been focused on better solving technological challenges and

  1. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An InternationalComparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-11-15

    This article examines the importance of national and sub-national policies in supporting the development of successful global wind turbine manufacturing companies. We explore the motivations behind establishing a local wind power industry, and the paths that different countries have taken to develop indigenous large wind turbine manufacturing industries within their borders. This is done through a cross-country comparison of the policy support mechanisms that have been employed to directly and indirectly promote wind technology manufacturing in twelve countries. We find that in many instances there is a clear relationship between a manufacturer's success in its home country market and its eventual success in the global wind power market. Whether new wind turbine manufacturing entrants are able to succeed will likely depend in part on the utilization of their turbines in their own domestic market, which in turn will be influenced by the annual size and stability of that market. Consequently, policies that support a sizable, stable market for wind power, in conjunction with policies that specifically provide incentives for wind power technology to be manufactured locally, are most likely to result in the establishment of an internationally competitive wind industry.

  2. Private wind powered electricity generators for industry in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabit, S. S.; Stark, J.

    This paper investigates the impact of the provisions of the new Energy Act, 1983 on industrial wind-powered private generators of electricity and the effects of published tariffs on various industrial working patterns. Up to 30 percent savings can be achieved in annual electricity bill costs for an industrial generator/user of electricity working a single daily shift, if located in a favorable, 7 m/s mean annual wind speed regime. Variation of the availability charge between Electricity Boards about a base value of 0.70 pounds sterling/kVA was found to have insignificant (+ or - 1.3 percent) impact on total electricity bill costs. It was also shown that for industrial users of electricity, the simpler two-rate purchase terms were commercially adequate when compared with the four-rate alternative where expensive metering becomes necessary.

  3. Transmission and wind investment in a deregulated electricity industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurovich-Horvat, Lajos; Boomsma, Trine Krogh; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of dispersed renewable energy technologies requires transmission network expansion. Besides the transmission system operator (TSO), restructuring of electricity industries has introduced a merchant investor (MI), who earns congestion rents from constructing new lines. We compare these tw...... proportion of energy is produced by wind. In effect, withholding of generation capacity by producers prompts more transmission investment since the TSO aims to increase welfare by subsidizing wind and the MI creates more flow to maximize profit.......Adoption of dispersed renewable energy technologies requires transmission network expansion. Besides the transmission system operator (TSO), restructuring of electricity industries has introduced a merchant investor (MI), who earns congestion rents from constructing new lines. We compare these two...... market designs via a stochastic bi-level programming model that has either the MI or the TSO making transmission investment decisions at the upper level and power producers determining generation investment and operation at the lower level while facing wind power variability. We find that social welfare...

  4. Industrial Wind Turbine Development and Loss of Social Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the loss of social justice reported by individuals living in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWTs). References indicate that some individuals residing in proximity to IWT facilities experience adverse health effects. These adverse health effects are severe enough that some families have abandoned their homes.…

  5. Occupational Health and Industrial Wind Turbines: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Robert W.; Ambrose, Stephen E.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines (IWTs) are being installed at a fast pace globally. Researchers, medical practitioners, and media have reported adverse health effects resulting from living in the environs of IWTs. While there have been some anecdotal reports from technicians and other workers who work in the environs of IWTs, little is known about the…

  6. Occupational contact dermatitis in the wind energy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárraga-Piñones, G; Heras-Mendaza, F; Conde-Salazar, L

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, wind energy coverage in Spain increased by 16%, making the country the world's fourth largest producer in a fast-developing industry that is also a source of employment. Occupational skin diseases in this field have received little attention. The present study aims to describe the main characteristics of skin diseases affecting workers in the wind energy industry and the allergens involved. We performed a descriptive, observational study of workers from the wind energy industry with suspected contact dermatitis who were referred to the occupational dermatology clinic of the National School of Occupational Medicine (Escuela Nacional de Medicina del Trabajo) between 2009 and 2011. We took both a clinical history and an occupational history, and patients underwent a physical examination and patch testing with the materials used in their work. We studied 10 workers (8 men, 2 women), with a mean age of 33.7 years. The main finding was dermatitis, which affected the face, eyelids, forearms, and hands. Sensitization to epoxy resins was detected in 4 workers, 1 of whom was also sensitized to epoxy curing agents. One worker was sensitized to bisphenol F resin but had a negative result with epoxy resin from the standard series. In the 5 remaining cases, the final diagnosis was irritant contact dermatitis due to fiberglass. Occupational skin diseases are increasingly common in the wind energy industry. The main allergens are epoxy resins. Fiberglass tends to produce irritation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  7. China’s impact on the global wind power industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lema, Rasmus; Berger, Axel; Schmitz, Hubert

    China’s economic rise has transformed the global economy in a number of manufacturing industries. This paper investigates whether China’s transformative influence extends to the new green economy. Drawing on the debate about how China is driving major economic changes in the world – the ‘Asian...... drivers’ debate – it identifies five corridors of influence and investigates their relevance for the wind energy industries. Starting with the demand side, it suggests that the size and rapid growth of the Chinese market have a major influence on competitive parameters in the global wind power industry....... While Western firms have found ways of participating in the growth of the Chinese market, the government's procurement regimes benefit Chinese firms. The latter have made big investments and learned fast, accumulating production capabilities that have led to changes in the global pecking order of lead...

  8. China’s Impact on the Global Wind Power Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lema, Rasmus; Berger, Axel; Schmitz, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    China’s economic rise has transformed the global economy in a number of manufacturing industries. This paper investigates whether China’s transformative influence extends to the new green economy. Drawing on the debate about how China is driving major economic changes in the world – the “Asian...... drivers” debate – it identifies five corridors of influence and investigates their relevance for the wind energy industries. Starting with the demand side, it suggests that the size and rapid growth of the Chinese market have a major influence on competitive parameters in the global wind power industry....... While Western firms have found ways of participating in the growth of the Chinese market, the government’s procurement regimes benefit Chinese firms. The latter have invested heavily and learned fast, accumulating production capabilities that have led to changes in the global pecking order of lead firms...

  9. Survey of employment in the UK wind energy industry 1993-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, G.

    1996-01-01

    Employment opportunities in the United Kingdom wind power industry are reviewed and compared to job availability in Europe, Canada and the USA, using a postal questionnaire. Most jobs were in manufacturing with consultancy and contract research forming another large group; with over two-thirds being in medium to microsized organizations, a size distribution similar to the manufacturing sector of the United Kingdom economy. Professional and management occupations account for over half of the total jobs making the wind industry a highly skilled area. Estimates suggest that, taking account of direct jobs, and those indirectly associated with the wind power industry, only about 2200 full-time equivalent jobs currently exist in the United Kingdom. (UK)

  10. Impacts of Large Scale Wind Penetration on Energy Supply Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kabouris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Large penetration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES impacts Energy Supply Industry (ESI in many aspects leading to a fundamental change in electric power systems. It raises a number of technical challenges to the Transmission System Operators (TSOs, Distribution System Operators (DSOs and Wind Turbine Generators (WTG constructors. This paper aims to present in a thorough and coherent way the redrawn picture for Energy Systems under these conditions. Topics related to emergent technical challenges, technical solutions required and finally the impact on ESI due to large wind power penetration, are analyzed. Finally, general conclusions are extracted about the ESI current and future state and general directions are recommended.

  11. A National Skills Assessment of the U.S. Wind Industry in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leventhal, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This report examines today’s domestic wind workforce, projected workforce needs as the industry grows, and how existing and new programs can meet the wind industry's future education and training needs.

  12. Transmission and wind investment in a deregulated electricity industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurovich-Horvat, Lajos; Boomsma, Trine Krogh; Fleten, Stein-Erik

    2013-01-01

    carrying out investment in wind farms. In this paper, we analyse the interaction between the two conflicting objectives under various assumptions about the electricity market structure and the degree of producers' market power. Via a three-node illustrative example, we show that a merchant investor......The transition to a more sustainable energy system requires investment in renewable energy technologies such as wind. Due to the dispersed nature of sites for wind farms, concomitant expansion of the transmission network is also necessary. While the two objectives could be reconciled within...... the auspices of a regulated welfare-maximising planner, recent restructuring of electricity industries has introduced a merchant model for transmission investment, which provides congestion rents from construction of a new line. Thus, the merchant investor's incentives are different from those of producers...

  13. Combining Ordinary Kriging with wind directions to identify sources of industrial odors in Portland, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, Ted C; Wright, Samantha G; Simpson, Logan K; Walker, Joe L; Kolmes, Steven A; Houck, James E; Velasquez, Sandra C

    2018-01-01

    This study combines Ordinary Kriging, odor monitoring, and wind direction data to demonstrate how these elements can be applied to identify the source of an industrial odor. The specific case study used as an example of how to address this issue was the University Park neighborhood of Portland, Oregon (USA) where residents frequently complain about industrial odors, and suspect the main source to be a nearby Daimler Trucks North America LLC manufacturing plant. We collected 19,665 odor observations plus 105,120 wind measurements, using an automated weather station to measure winds in the area at five-minute intervals, logging continuously from December 2014 through November 2015, while we also measured odors at 19 locations, three times per day, using methods from the American Society of the International Association for Testing and Materials. Our results quantify how winds vary with season and time of day when industrial odors were observed versus when they were not observed, while also mapping spatiotemporal patterns in these odors using Ordinary Kriging. Our analyses show that industrial odors were detected most frequently to the northwest of the Daimler plant, mostly when winds blew from the southeast, suggesting Daimler's facility is a likely source for much of this odor.

  14. Onshore industrial wind turbine locations for the United States up to March 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, Jay E; Kramer, Louisa A; Ancona, Zach H; Garrity, Christopher P

    2015-11-24

    Wind energy is a rapidly growing form of renewable energy in the United States. While summary information on the total amounts of installed capacity are available by state, a free, centralized, national, turbine-level, geospatial dataset useful for scientific research, land and resource management, and other uses did not exist. Available in multiple formats and in a web application, these public domain data provide industrial-scale onshore wind turbine locations in the United States up to March 2014, corresponding facility information, and turbine technical specifications. Wind turbine records have been collected and compiled from various public sources, digitized or position verified from aerial imagery, and quality assured and quality controlled. Technical specifications for turbines were assigned based on the wind turbine make and model as described in public literature. In some cases, turbines were not seen in imagery or turbine information did not exist or was difficult to obtain. Uncertainty associated with these is recorded in a confidence rating.

  15. Onshore industrial wind turbine locations for the United States up to March 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, James E.; Kramer, Louisa; Ancona, Zachary H.; Garrity, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Wind energy is a rapidly growing form of renewable energy in the United States. While summary information on the total amounts of installed capacity are available by state, a free, centralized, national, turbine-level, geospatial dataset useful for scientific research, land and resource management, and other uses did not exist. Available in multiple formats and in a web application, these public domain data provide industrial-scale onshore wind turbine locations in the United States up to March 2014, corresponding facility information, and turbine technical specifications. Wind turbine records have been collected and compiled from various public sources, digitized or position verified from aerial imagery, and quality assured and quality controlled. Technical specifications for turbines were assigned based on the wind turbine make and model as described in public literature. In some cases, turbines were not seen in imagery or turbine information did not exist or was difficult to obtain. Uncertainty associated with these is recorded in a confidence rating.

  16. Supply chain integration opportunities for the offshore wind industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    with means to overcome their current supply chain challenges. Design/methodology/approach - A comprehensive literature review was conducted involving 162 articles published in 29 peer-reviewed journals. The papers were analyzed in terms of the dimensions of SCI, research methodology, unit of analysis, level...... of analysis, type of industry and manufacturing environment being studied, integrative practices, integrative barriers and the link between SCI and performance. Findings - While SCI has been evolving to become an influential topic in the field of supply chain management, scholars have overlooked industrial......Purpose - This paper surveys the literature on supply chain integration (SCI) to identify the state of research in the various types of studied industries and manufacturing environments. The purpose of this paper is to identify academic discoveries that could provide offshore wind projects...

  17. Wind energy industry in Germany. Turnover and employment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keuper, A.; Schmidt, A.

    1994-01-01

    As a consequence of the growing wind energy market in Germany the importance of the industry in this business are has grown. In 1994 the turnover will go beyond 500 million DM, and the number of employees will reach 2,900. The turnover and the number of employees are increasing in spite of the higher efficiency. In 1994 only 5 employees are needed by a manufacturer to install 1 MW rated power instead of 15 in 1989, and the ratio of installed power to manufacturer's turnover has risen from 0,25 W/DM in 1988 to 0,455 W/DM in 1994. On the other hand the turnover of the manufacturers per employee has increased from 80,000 DM in 1988 to 440,000 DM in 1994. Economic development has considerably been advanced by subsidies for the application of wind energy technology. (orig.)

  18. Design as if people matter: aesthetic guidelines for the wind industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    1995-01-01

    Opinion surveys show that wind has high public support, but a worrisome NIMBY factor. This support erodes once specific projects are proposed. Because support is fragile and can be squandered by ill-conceived projects, the industry must do everything it can to ensure that wind turbines and wind power plants become good neighbours. One means of maximizing acceptance is to incorporate aesthetic guidelines into the design of wind turbines and wind power plants. (Author)

  19. Proceedings of the Canadian Wind Energy Association's 2010 annual conference and exhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The wind power industry is now experiencing rapid growth in many of the developed countries who seek to expand their renewable energy portfolios and reduce harmful emissions into the atmosphere. The annual Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) conference and exhibition provides a forum for members of the wind power industry as well as various other experts and stakeholders to exchange information and to discuss innovations and technologies designed to increase wind power capacity in Canada. The environmental impacts of wind turbines were examined, as well as some of the issues that are currently inhibiting growth of the wind power industry. New construction and operational strategies were presented. Business approaches for ensuring adequate investment in the industry were reviewed, and recommendations for government regulations and renewable energy investment incentives were provided. Advances in forecasting were outlined, and issues currently influencing the electric power industry in relation to wind power, reliability, and growth were also discussed. Methods of ensuring the reliability and safety of turbines in the event of icing and other meteorological events were also presented. The conference was divided into the following 5 tracks over a 3 day period: (1) project assessment, (2) project development, (3) business development, (4) technical, and (5) small wind. Each track was further sub-divided into sessions that covered a range of topics. Twenty-nine presentations were included in a poster session. The conference featured 118 presentations, of which 108 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs.

  20. Sustainable development of the wind power industry in a complex environment: a flexibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Zhu, Jiang; Zuo, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As a new and developing green energy business in emerging economies such as China, the wind power industry chain faces some complex issues that are further compounded by turbulent internal and external environments. To deal with the complex environment, the wind power industry needs to improve its level of flexibility so that it can become more adaptable to the changing environment. Hence it is important to explore the dynamics of the wind power industry chain flexibility with respect to the ever changing environment. This study uses questionnaire surveys and expert interviews to identify the influential flexibility components of the wind power industry chain. Subsequently a fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM) methodology was used to establish a flexibility operating mechanism model. The research found that special attention should be paid to competition flexibility, technology flexibility, and intellectual property and talent flexibility. Policies play a pivotal role in regulating the driving effects of these components of flexibility with the aim being long term sustainability of a healthy level of overall flexibility of the wind power industry chain. This should in turn facilitate the sustainable development of the industry. - Highlights: • Wind power industry shall improve flexibility to deal with complex environment. • Critical components of flexibility of wind power industry chain were identified. • An operating mechanism model for flexibility of wind power industry is proposed. • Fuzzy cognitive mapping method is employed to model the dynamics of flexibility. • Policies play a pivotal role in fostering an industry environment toward flexibility

  1. Wind energy in industrial areas optional, but not obvious. A study on the chances and constraints for the use of wind energy in industrial parks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoolderman, J.A.; Verbeet, E.; Jochems, A.; Versteeg, K.

    2000-06-01

    The feasibility of installing wind turbines in industrial parks in the Netherlands has been investigated. An overview is given of possibilities and constraints to fit in wind turbines in industrial areas, based on the results of a literature study, a market consultation of sectoral organizations, representatives of local industrial circles and industrial experts in the field of renewable energy. Also a telephone survey was carried out among 130 entrepreneurs in the Netherlands to determine their attitudes towards the use of sustainable energy and wind energy in industrial parks. The results of the attitude study are published in a separate report for which a separate abstract has been prepared. The intermediate results were discussed at a meeting (23 February 2000), in which representatives from the industry, provinces, municipalities and the government participated

  2. Advancing the Growth of the U.S. Wind Industry: Federal Incentives, Funding, and Partnership Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Energy Technologies Office (WETO) works to accelerate the development and deployment of wind power. The office provides information for researchers, developers, businesses, manufacturers, communities, and others seeking various types of federal assistance available for advancing wind projects. This fact sheet outlines the primary federal incentives for developing and investing in wind power, resources for funding wind power, and opportunities to partner with DOE and other federal agencies on efforts to move the U.S. wind industry forward.

  3. Development of a localisation strategy for the South African Wind Energy Industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available . This has been the case for many wind-energy companies and industry growth may happen through acquisitions, organic growth, mergers and other business processes. However, for such an evolutionary path to grow, a stable home market is required... promote wind technology manufacturing in 12 countries. Lewis and Wiser first examined strategies for local industry development, including models for wind-turbine manufacturing, technology acquisition and incentives for technology transfers...

  4. CanWEA/CME wind industry supply chain opportunities for Canadian manufacturers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    Between 1999 and 2009, worldwide wind energy production capacity has increased at an average annual rate of 25 percent. One of the most important opportunities for Canada's industrial supply base involves providing products and services to the North American wind energy industry. This report discussed global wind energy development, with particular reference to North American wind energy development; United States wind energy development; and Canadian wind energy development. The energy price benefit of wind was also discussed. Other topics that were discussed included the aging infrastructure, market growth and greenhouse gas reduction commitments; provincial wind development opportunities; and wind development opportunities for the Canadian supply chain. The report concluded with some recommended actions to encourage a globally competitive Canadian wind supply industry. Recommendations were provided under the headings of communication; partnership facilitation; capability development; and policy to develop a sustainable Canadian supply chain. It was concluded that a priority should be placed on accelerating the development of a Canadian supply chain for the wind power industry to ensure maximum economic benefit for Canadian business. 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. The economical accounting of the industrial wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poizat, F.

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this document is the description of the implementing mechanism concerning the wind energy, of February 2000 for the principles and July 2006 for the investment program of the Government on the purchase obligation of the wind electricity by EDF. The laws and orders, the cost of the wind energy are detailed and discussed. (A.L.B.)

  6. National Skills Assessment of the U.S. Wind Industry in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levanthal, M.; Tegen, S.

    2013-06-01

    A robust workforce is essential to developing domestic wind power projects, including manufacturing, siting, operations, maintenance, and research capabilities. The purpose of our research is to better understand today's domestic wind workforce, projected workforce needs as the industry grows, and how existing and new programs can meet the wind industry's future education and training needs. Results presented in this report provide the first published investigation into the detailed makeup of the wind energy workforce, educational infrastructure and training needs of the wind industry. Insights from this research into the domestic wind workforce will allow the private sector, educational institutions, and federal and state governmental organizations to make workforce-related decisions based on the current employment and training data and future projections in this report.

  7. Wind speed and direction shears with associated vertical motion during strong surface winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M. B.; Camp, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Strong surface winds recorded at the NASA 150-Meter Ground Winds Tower facility at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are analyzed to present occurrences representative of wind shear and vertical motion known to be hazardous to the ascent and descent of conventional aircraft and the Space Shuttle. Graphical (percentage frequency distributions) and mathematical (maximum, mean, standard deviation) descriptions of wind speed and direction shears and associated updrafts and downdrafts are included as functions of six vertical layers and one horizontal distance for twenty 5-second intervals of parameters sampled simultaneously at the rate of ten per second during a period of high surface winds.

  8. Towards a Joint Action Plan for Research and Development in the Offshore Wind Service Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Piirainen, Kalle A.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a joint action plan (JAP) for research and development and innovation (RDI) in the offshore wind service industry in Denmark, Germany, Norway and the UK. Offshore wind servicing (OWS) is in this context defined as both assembly and installation of offshore wind farms as well...... for a innovation. The JAP is built on this foundation together with stakeholders from the four regions, comprising representatives from R&D and education, policy makers and offshore wind industry. Following the workshop, the ECOWindS consortium has been developing the proposed action plan further based...

  9. Canadian Wind Energy Association small wind conference proceedings : small wind policy developments (turbines of 300 kW or less)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The small wind session at the Canadian Wind Energy Association's (CanWEA) annual conference addressed policies affecting small wind, such as net metering, advanced renewable tariffs and interconnections. It also addressed CanWEA's efforts in promoting small wind turbines, particularly in remote northern communities, small businesses and within the residential sector. Small wind systems are typically installed in remote communities to offset utility supplied electricity at the retail price level. In certain circumstances, small wind and hybrid systems can produce electricity at less than half the cost of traditional electricity sources, which in remote communities is typically diesel generators. Small wind turbines require different materials and technologies than large wind turbines. They also involve different local installation requirements, different by-laws, tax treatment and environmental assessments. Small wind turbines are typically installed for a range of factors, including energy independence, energy price stability and to lower environmental impacts of traditional power generation. The small wind session at the conference featured 14 presentations, of which 4 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  10. Government intervention in green industries: lessons from the wind turbine and the organic food industries in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Carsten; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2011-01-01

    . While the electricity market share of wind energy reached 20% in 2007, organic food consumption lags behind with a food market share of approximately 8.5% in 2007. This paper compares the packages of policy instruments applied in the two industrial sectors and assesses whether differences in instrument......Government intervention in green infant industries may be justified as a strategy to increase the provision of public goods. How should government policies be designed to promote such industries? One way to analyse this question is to compare government intervention in green infant industries...... in which it has been successful with green infant industries in which it has been less successful. The Danish government has intervened intensively in the wind turbine industry and organic farming sector mainly for environmental reasons since 1992 and 1987 respectively, but with very different impacts...

  11. Social assessment of wind power. Part 4: International position and development conditions of the Danish wind turbine industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnoee, P.; Joergensen, U.

    1995-12-01

    Today, the Danish wind turbine industry is positioned as a global market leader on a fast growing international market. The conclusion and observation of this report are: 1. The international market for wind power is likely to grow fast over the next 5 years (a self-reinforcing development) and the Danish wind turbine industry has the potential to increase export from the present DKK 2 billion per year to DKK 4 billion per year. 2. The leading market position is achieved after the collapse of the California market in 1987. The last four years have been export-driven growth together with the development of complementary assets to support a strong product technology. 3. The Danish position might be threatened by the new competitors, but it is our view that it takes 2-3 years before they have equivalent competences, and since the Danish companies are presently also mobilizing resources and competences it is not likely that they are easily outperformed. 4. A continued installation of wind power in Denmark is important to support the sustaining of the international position in the coming years. Through, it is not the volume size of the domestic market, but rather a stable market which serves as a home base for the industry. Not only for the reference and testing of new wind turbines, but also the knowledge networks between manufacturers and suppliers and between manufacturers and the Test Station for Windmills at Risoe. (EG) 51 refs

  12. Baseload, industrial-scale wind power: An alternative to coal in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, D.J.; Williams, R.H. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States); Xie Shaoxiong; Zhang Shihui [Ministry of Electric Power, Beijing (China)

    1996-12-31

    This report presents a novel strategy for developing wind power on an industrial-scale in China. Oversized wind farms, large-scale electrical storage and long-distance transmission lines are integrated to deliver {open_quotes}baseload wind power{close_quotes} to distant electricity demand centers. The prospective costs for this approach to developing wind power are illustrated by modeling an oversized wind farm at Huitengxile, Inner Mongolia. Although storage adds to the total capital investment, it does not necessarily increase the cost of the delivered electricity. Storage makes it possible to increase the capacity factor of the electric transmission system, so that the unit cost for long-distance transmission is reduced. Moreover, baseload wind power is typically more valuable to the electric utility than intermittent wind power, so that storage can be economically attractive even in instances where the cost per kWh is somewhat higher than without storage. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Birds and Bird Habitat: What Are the Risks from Industrial Wind Turbine Exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Terry; Harrington, M. Elizabeth; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Bird kill rate and disruption of habitat has been reported when industrial wind turbines are introduced into migratory bird paths or other environments. While the literature could be more complete regarding the documentation of negative effects on birds and bird habitats during the planning, construction, and operation of wind power projects,…

  14. A Brief History of the Wind Turbine Industries in Denmark and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jens; Brandstrup, Lotte; Goddard,III, Robert D

    2004-01-01

    The history of wind-power used to produce electricity dates back to the late 19th century and early 20th century when the two pioneering countries in the industry, Denmark and the United States, developed the first electricity-producing wind turbines. Ever since then both countries have invested...

  15. Who? What? Why? Wind power and the finance industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rave, K.

    1999-01-01

    This article focuses on the financing of wind energy projects and examines worldwide energy markets. Questioning raised include who invests in energy project and seeks financing; where is the project to be sited and under what legal background the investment is to be made; and how much power can be generated and the effect of this on the proposal feasibility. The provision of a stable basis for financing, the probable integration of wind power into energy services, the use of wind energy to supply the carbon dioxide reductions obligations, and the opportunities for financial services are discussed

  16. Analysis of typical world countries' wind power and PV industry policies and their enlightenment to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Yang, Lijun; Qiu, Hongji; Li, Yuanfei; Peng, Lilin

    2017-01-01

    The wind power and PV are the key fields of clean energy development in China in recent years. However, there are still many aspects of problems in wind power and PV industries at present, such as the insufficient consumptive ability and the limitation of market competition capability. The effective leading and support of government in the aspect of policies is especially needed in order to solve these problems. Based on the analysis of main policies system of wind power and PV in our country, Spain, the United Kingdom and Germany are chosen as typical countries because of their wind power and PV industries are relatively developed. Their policies of wind power and PV industries are studied respectively from five aspects, namely macroscopic laws, development planning, administrative policies, fiscal and tax policies and price policies. Then the comparison among typical countries and China is made and the exiting problems in China's policies of wind power and PV industries are summed up. Finally, the suggestions to promote China's wind power and PV industries development are presented.

  17. The discourse of "social licence to operate": case study of the Australian wind industry

    OpenAIRE

    Nina L. Hall

    2014-01-01

    Social Licence to Operate is a concept from the mining industry that reflects the ongoing acceptance or approval for a development granted by local stakeholders. It is now being applied by wind farm developers. Using the Australian wind industry as a case study, this discourse analysis examined how Social Licence to Operate is perceived and operationalised, and the key themes in this conceptual and applied discourse. Discourse analysis acknowledges that language choices are not accidental and...

  18. Directory of the manufacturers and suppliers for the French wind power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    With over 5, 660 MW installed in end-2010, France ranks fourth in Europe, behind Germany, Spain and Italy. The wind power industry currently employs almost 11, 000 people in France throughout the value chain. In 2009, the first edition of this directory listed over one hundred companies working in around twenty different areas. Encouraged by these initial positive results, and with the help of ADEME, the French syndicate for renewable energies (SER) asked Capgemini Consulting to undertake a study to identify and raise awareness among French industrials likely to enter into the wind energy market. The French Ministry for Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea, along with the Ministry for the Economy, Finance and Employment, were involved in the work. 400 companies were questioned as part of the study. Over 150 replies testified to the dynamic character of the wind power market in France and overseas, and the opportunities for diversification that it represents for traditional industries like metallurgy, aeronautics, defence and shipyards, etc. The study led to the creation of the initiative Windustry France, which currently groups over 300 companies either active in the French wind power market or set to enter it. Windustry France is a showcase of the industrial know-how that can be used in the wind power industry both onshore and offshore. It includes local set-ups developed around major fields of activity (e.g. car industry, aeronautics, mechanics, etc.) and industrial port zones (Dunkerque, Rouen/Le Havre, Brest, Nantes Saint-Nazaire, Bordeaux, etc.). Several ministries, regional stakeholders and authorities are also involved (local authorities, Regional directorates for industry, research and the environment (DReal) networks and chambers of commerce and industry), all of which contribute to making Windustry France a collective approach to industrial policy. The 2010-2011 edition of the directory of manufacturers and suppliers for the wind power

  19. Industry evolution, submarket dynamics and strategic behavior among firms in offshore wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Drejer, Ina; Gjerding, Allan Næs

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes to the understanding of competition and industry evolution by analysing how submarket dynamics and agency influence the development of the emerging industrial field of Danish offshore wind energy. We argue that industry evolution is sensitive to the balance between...... integration, overlap and disintegration across submarkets. This balance depends on how strategic intent and behaviour influence submarket dynamics, leading to the conclusion that effects of agency and managerial intent should play a more prominent role in studies of industry evolution....

  20. Towards a Joint Action Plan for Research and Development in the Offshore Wind Service Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Piirainen, Kalle A.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2015-01-01

    The poster presents a joint action plan (JAP) for research and development and innovation (RDI) in the offshore wind service industry in Denmark, Germany,Norway and the UK. Offshore wind servicing (OWS) is in this context defined as both assembly and installation of offshore wind farms as well...... of an ongoing project ECOWindS, funded by the EU FP7. The overall aim of ECOWindS is to reduce OWS’s contribution to the cost of offshore wind energy production by strengthening the cooperation in the existing regional networks within OWS....

  1. Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Ted [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goodrich, Alan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-12

    This briefing provides an overview of supply chain developments in the global wind industry and a detailed assessment of blade manufacturing considerations for U.S. end-markets. The report discusses the international trade flows of wind power equipment, blade manufacturing and logistical costs, and qualitative issues that often influence factory location decisions. To help guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, this report offers a comprehensive perspective of both quantitative and qualitative factors that affect selected supply chain developments in the growing wind power industry.

  2. China's wind industry: Leading in deployment, lagging in innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Long T.; Branstetter, Lee; Azevedo, Inês M.L.

    2017-01-01

    China's massive carbon emissions and air pollution concerns have led its government to embrace clean energy innovation as a means of transitioning to a more sustainable energy system. We address the question of whether China's wind industry has become an important source of clean energy technology innovation. We find that in terms of wind capacity expansion, China has delivered enormous progress, increasing its wind capacity from virtually no wind capacity in the early 2000s to 140 GW by 2015. However, in terms of innovation and cost competitiveness, the outcomes were more limited: Chinese wind turbine manufacturers have secured few international patents and achieved moderate learning rates compared to the global industry's historical learning rate. Leading China-based indigenous producers are likely to remain important global players for the foreseeable future, but further progress in reducing the cost of capital equipment may slow relative to the recent past. However, opportunities in lowering curtailment rates and improving turbine quality can reduce China's overall levelized cost of electricity for wind. - Highlights: • Analyze wind power patenting trends of Chinese inventors and firms. • Many Chinese patents, though few were granted by foreign patent offices. • Chinese international patents are less likely to be cited than foreign counterparts. • China's wind industry managed to reduce production costs, but learning rate is low.

  3. National Offshore Wind Strategy: Facilitating the Development of the Offshore Wind Industry in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, Patrick [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maurer, Ben [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Feinberg, Luke [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duerr, Alana [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Lauren [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Musial, Walt [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beiter, Phillipp [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Golladay, Jennifer [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States); Stromberg, Jessica [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States); Johnson, Isis [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States); Boren, Doug [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States); Moore, Annette [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through its Wind Energy Technologies Office, and U.S. Department of the Interior, through its Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, have jointly produced this updated national strategy to facilitate the responsible development of offshore wind energy in the United States.

  4. Small scale wind power harnessing in Colombian oil industry facilities: Wind resource and technology issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldo, Mauricio; Nieto, Cesar; Escudero, Ana C.; Cobos, Juan C.; Delgado, Fernando

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Looking to improve its national and international standing, Colombia's national oil company, Ecopetrol, has set its goal on becoming involved on the production of energy from multiple sources, most importantly, on having an important percentage of its installed capacity from renewable sources. Part of this effort entices the evaluation of wind power potential on its facilities, including production, transportation and administrative, as well as identifying those technologies most suitable for the specific conditions of an equatorial country such as Colombia. Due to the lack of adequate site information, the first step consisted in superimposing national data to the facilities map of the company; this allowed for the selection of the first set of potential sites. From this set, the terminal at Covenas-Sucre was selected taking into account not only wind resource, but ease of access and power needs, as well as having a more or less representative wind potential in comparison to the rest of the country. A weather station was then installed to monitor wind variables. Measurements taken showed high variations in wind direction, and relatively low velocity profiles, making most commercially available wind turbines difficult to implement. In light of the above, a series of iterative steps were taken, first considering a range of individual Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT), given their capacity to adapt to changing wind directions. However, wind speed variations proved to be a challenge for individual VAWT's, i.e. Darriues turbines do not work well with low wind speeds, and Savonius turbines are not efficient of high wind speeds. As a result, a combined Darrieus- Savonius VAWT was selected given the capacity to adapt to both wind regimes, while at the same time modifying the size and shape of the blades in order to adapt to the lower average wind speeds present at the site. The resulting prototype is currently under construction and is scheduled to

  5. Association Between the Solar Wind Speed, Interplanetary Magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meena Pokharia

    2017-11-27

    Nov 27, 2017 ... Abstract. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the association of the cosmic ray intensity (CRI) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) with high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) and slow speed solar wind streams (SSSWS) for solar cycle −23 and 24. We have found very interesting and ...

  6. Association Between the Solar Wind Speed, Interplanetary Magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the association of the cosmic ray intensity (CRI) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) with high speed solar wind streams (HSSWS) and slow speed solar wind streams (SSSWS) for solar cycle −23 and 24. We have found very interesting and adequate results where CRI ...

  7. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wave-lengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and ...

  8. The discourse of "social licence to operate": case study of the Australian wind industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina L. Hall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social Licence to Operate is a concept from the mining industry that reflects the ongoing acceptance or approval for a development granted by local stakeholders. It is now being applied by wind farm developers. Using the Australian wind industry as a case study, this discourse analysis examined how Social Licence to Operate is perceived and operationalised, and the key themes in this conceptual and applied discourse. Discourse analysis acknowledges that language choices are not accidental and discourse reflects power relationships. The wind industry representatives interviewed considered power over the Social Licence to Operate was shared with community stakeholders. They recognised the stakeholders' power to delay or prevent projects, but rejected the notion that every stakeholder group should have veto power. Social Licence to Operate is seen by the wind industry through a business-oriented perspective, with an emphasis on business risk, and they describe the opposition to wind farms by invoking a metaphor of "battle". The industry respondents described Social Licence to Operate as incorporating the values of trust, transparency and participation—which all contribute to creating "authentic" relationships. These findings can inform Social Licence to Operate research, engagement practices, and also encourage reflection by industry representatives on their implicit intentions for stakeholder engagement.

  9. Assessing the level of integration in the offshore wind industry value chain

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Neri, Ivan; Mikkelsen, Ole Stegmann; Stentoft, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The offshore wind industry (OWI) has experienced an explosive growth within the course of a decade and because of this rapid expansion, the industry has not had the opportunity to integrate well and be-come more efficient. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the integration level of the offshore wind industry value chain. The work relies on a review of international peer-reviewed journals. The empirical basis of the paper is based on interviews with key players in t...

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Regional Resource Centers Report: State of the Wind Industry in the Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowski, Ruth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Oteri, Frank [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Baring-Gould, Ian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St; Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United St

    2016-03-01

    The wind industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are addressing technical challenges to increasing wind energy's contribution to the national grid (such as reducing turbine costs and increasing energy production and reliability), and they recognize that public acceptance issues can be challenges for wind energy deployment. Wind project development decisions are best made using unbiased information about the benefits and impacts of wind energy. In 2014, DOE established six wind Regional Resource Centers (RRCs) to provide information about wind energy, focusing on regional qualities. This document summarizes the status and drivers for U.S. wind energy development on regional and state levels. It is intended to be a companion to DOE's 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report, and 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis that provide assessments of the national wind markets for each of these technologies.

  11. WindVOiCe, a Self-Reporting Survey: Adverse Health Effects, Industrial Wind Turbines, and the Need for Vigilance Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Carmen M. E.; Gillis, Lorrie; Kouwen, Nicholas; Aramini, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines have been operating in many parts of the globe. Anecdotal reports of perceived adverse health effects relating to industrial wind turbines have been published in the media and on the Internet. Based on these reports, indications were that some residents perceived they were experiencing adverse health effects. The purpose…

  12. Accionamiento de un ventilador industrial para prueba de aerogeneradores; Drive of an industrial fan for wind testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Eneldo López Monteagudo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se implementó el control de un ventilador industrial utilizado para prueba de aerogeneradores, el cual es empleado como un dispositivo interno en la elaboración de un túnel de viento, para realizar pruebas de medición de viento. El proyecto consistió en regular la velocidad de un ventilador industrial utilizado en un túnel de viento, para realizar pruebas de sistemas de control en aerogeneradores, generándose señales de viento reguladas en valores constantes, ó que sigan un perfil definido por una base de datos de valores reales medidos con un anemómetro. Para implementar el sistema de control y la comunicación de los dispositivos, se empleó un procesador digital de señales (PDS de Texas Instruments EZDSP2407, que actúa como interfaz para transmitir los datos entre el entorno de programación (VisSim Embedded Control Developer (ECD. Además se utilizó un variador de velocidad de 3HP de la marca SIEMENS modelo Micromaster 420. In this work, a fan control industrial wind turbines used for test, which is used as an internal device in the development of a wind tunnel for testing wind measurement. The project consists of regulating the speed of an industrial fan used in a wind tunnel to test control systems in wind turbines, wind generating regulated signals in constant, or to follow a profile defined by a database of values actual measured with an anemometer. To implement the control system and communication devices, in this project employed a digital signal processor (DSP from Texas Instruments EZDSP2407, which acts as an interface to transmit data between the programming environments (VisSim Embedded Control Developer (ECD. Also uses a variable speed 3HP SIEMENS Micromaster model 420.

  13. Danish and Norwegian wind industry: The relationship between policy instruments, innovation and diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buen, Jorund

    2006-01-01

    This article compares the role of policy instruments in stimulating long-term technological change in Danish and Norwegian wind industry. It concludes that although predictability has periodically been low, Denmark's broad portfolio of policies and measures has been well adapted to the different stages in the development of its wind industry. This has contributed to a high degree of innovation, successful establishment in niche markets, high degree of diffusion and establishment of domestic and international mass markets, and-in recent years-an increasingly successful replacement of senescent technology with new. The motivation of Norway's wind energy policies and measures-at least up until the late 1990s-has been to increase power supply rather than to stimulate industrial development and technological change. Policies and measures have been weaker than in Denmark; have been less stable over time; and stimulated the demand side much less. They have not sufficiently covered the wind industry's perceived needs on different stages in the development of new technology, and have not sufficiently stimulated continuous improvement, learning and new product development (dynamic efficiency) in industry. This has been part of the reason why there has been only a limited extent of innovation and diffusion of wind technology in Norway

  14. The wind energy industry: interplay between the participants; La filiere eolienne: le jeu des acteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florin, D.; Temime, F. [BearingPoint, 92 - Courbevoie (France)

    2008-06-15

    In order to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and combat global warming, France has set itself the objective, within the framework of a European directive, of sourcing 21% of its electricity needs from renewable energies by 2010. Among the various renewable energies, wind energy has a significant part to play, since France has the second highest wind resource potential in Europe, after the UK. Denis Florin and Florian Temime offer an account here of the wind energy industry and the various players within it. After a brief analysis of the world market for wind power, characterized by rising demand and by a supply that is currently in a phase of consolidation, they examine three groups of players in this sector - industrialists tempted by vertical integration, electricity producers and oil companies - and set out their respective strategies and future outlooks with regard to wind energy. (authors)

  15. Fragmentation, Centralisation and Policy Learning: An Example from China’s Wind Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Korsnes

    2014-01-01

    This paper seeks to understand what government mechanisms have allowed China’s wind industry to grow as fast as it has over the past ten years. Instead of formal rules and regulations, this paper focuses on specific sets of institutional conditions that have been crucial in the process of high-speed implementation of wind energy in China. Specifically, fragmentation and centralisation, together with policy experimentation and policy learning, have been fundamental for pol...

  16. Wind power offshore - industrial possibilities for Norway; Vindkraft offshore - industrielle muligheter for Norge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bysveen, S; Hoelseater, O H; Lier-Hansen, S; Hatlen, S; Soensteby, G. (Energiraadet, Oslo (Norway))

    2008-05-15

    The Europeans alteration of energy policy gives Norway a unique possibility to develop new business activity in the contractor industry as well as become a large exporter of renewable energy to Europe. Sea based wind power marks it self as the area with largest potential and is an area where Norway has a large advantage. This possibility is outlined in this report with offshore wind power as the foundation of business development and energy export to the continent

  17. Canada's wind energy industry directory 2007-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Canadian federal and provincial governments have launched programs and policies to promote wind energy technology. The wind energy capacity in Canada has recently surpassed 1000 MW. In addition, numerous proposals for industrial expansion have surfaced in most provinces and territories. It is anticipated that a minimum of 8000 MW of wind energy may be installed in Canada by 2015. There are several micro-, small- and large-scale wind power companies that can provide the goods and services needed to develop a project. The wind industry is composed of component manufacturers, project developers, distributors, installers, suppliers, consulting firms and public utilities. This directory of businesses in the Canadian wind power industry is compiled alphabetically by company names. For each listing, the inventory includes a world wide web address and information on whether the company manufactures components, equipment, towers or turbines. The inventory tags each company according to the services they provide, such as engineering, construction, maintenance, financial, consulting, environmental, equipment sales, or project development.

  18. Turnover and employment in the German wind energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keuper, A.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the fast growing wind energy market in 1994 are the turnover reaching more than 800 million DM, and the number of employees to about 3,700. In 1995 the manufacturers expect to need less than 4 employees to build and to install 1 MW rated power and to decrease the ratio of manufacturer's turnover per installed power unit to about 1900 DM/kW. In spite of this development it is expected that the turnover and the number of employees will increase due to the still fast growing market. (orig.)

  19. Voltage magnitude and margin controller for remote industrial microgrid with high wind penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Yu; Lin, Jin; Song, Yonghua

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the remote industrial microgrid is located at the periphery of the grid, which is weakly connected to the main grid. In order to enhance the voltage stability and ensure a good power quality for industries, a voltage magnitude and margin controller based on wind turbines is ...... is proposed in this paper. This controller includes two parts to improve voltage stability in different time scales by using local measurements. Case studies conducted for a remote microgrid with high wind penetration have proved the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme....

  20. Development and Application of Advanced Weather Prediction Technologies for the Wind Energy Industry (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, W. P.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.; Myers, W.; Johnson, D.

    2010-12-01

    Wind energy decision makers are required to make critical judgments on a daily basis with regard to energy generation, distribution, demand, storage, and integration. Accurate knowledge of the present and future state of the atmosphere is vital in making these decisions. As wind energy portfolios expand, this forecast problem is taking on new urgency because wind forecast inaccuracies frequently lead to substantial economic losses and constrain the national expansion of renewable energy. Improved weather prediction and precise spatial analysis of small-scale weather events are crucial for renewable energy management. In early 2009, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) began a collaborative project with Xcel Energy Services, Inc. to perform research and develop technologies to improve Xcel Energy's ability to increase the amount of wind energy in their generation portfolio. The agreement and scope of work was designed to provide highly detailed, localized wind energy forecasts to enable Xcel Energy to more efficiently integrate electricity generated from wind into the power grid. The wind prediction technologies are designed to help Xcel Energy operators make critical decisions about powering down traditional coal and natural gas-powered plants when sufficient wind energy is predicted. The wind prediction technologies have been designed to cover Xcel Energy wind resources spanning a region from Wisconsin to New Mexico. The goal of the project is not only to improve Xcel Energy’s wind energy prediction capabilities, but also to make technological advancements in wind and wind energy prediction, expand our knowledge of boundary layer meteorology, and share the results across the renewable energy industry. To generate wind energy forecasts, NCAR is incorporating observations of current atmospheric conditions from a variety of sources including satellites, aircraft, weather radars, ground-based weather stations, wind profilers, and even wind sensors on

  1. Demand forecast of turbines in the offshore wind power industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Neri, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    How important is it for a manufacturing company to be able to predict the demand of their products? How much will it lose in inventory costs due to a bad forecasting technique? And what if the product in question is composed of more than 100,000 parts and costs millions of euros a piece? This art......? This article summarises the reasoning followed by a European manufacturer to determine the demand curve of finished offshore wind turbines and how to forecast it for the purpose of production planning.......How important is it for a manufacturing company to be able to predict the demand of their products? How much will it lose in inventory costs due to a bad forecasting technique? And what if the product in question is composed of more than 100,000 parts and costs millions of euros a piece...

  2. Potential risks at an industrial site: A wind tunnel study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaňour, Zbyněk; Jurčáková, Klára; Brych, Karel; Dittrt, František; Dittrich, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 3 (2010), s. 185-190 ISSN 0957-5820 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC 113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : atmospheric turbulence * flow visualization * wind tunnel modeling Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.453, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B8JGG-4Y7P8YF-1&_user=640952&_coverDate=05%2F31%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1433050901&_rerunOrigin= google &_acct=C000034318&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=640952&md5=b036d2c5d747eadc03ff5697ea45e6a2

  3. State of the Offshore Wind Industry in Northern Europe. Lessons Learnt in the First Decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, F.; Grassin, J.; Crockford, A.; Winkel, T.; Ritzen, A.; Folkerts, L.

    2011-03-15

    The offshore wind industry has experienced rapid development over the past ten years and a supply chain is gradually developing towards maturity. Some regions and businesses have successfully taken advantage of this opportunity and have grown into centres for manufacturing, construction and servicing for the offshore wind energy industry. This has generated regional economic growth and jobs. The continued growth of offshore wind is set to provide a major contribution to reaching the EU 2020 CO2 reduction targets of North Sea countries. This is also a valuable opportunity for the development of a major industry that will contribute added economic value and increase potential for exports of leading technology to other regions. There are however, significant challenges to overcome. These relate to the rate at which projects must be realised, the corresponding growth rate in the supply chain and the scale of the investments required. Effective stakeholder management will be necessary to ensure an efficient acquisition of permits and approvals for projects. Clarity on a long-term policy outlook is also a precondition for the investments required in both supply chain and offshore wind projects. National and regional governments can play a key role in providing a solution to this, by being pro-active and enabling. This looks set to enable a progressive spiral of cost reduction and efficiency, allowing further growth of the offshore wind market.

  4. Wind energy industry and environmental bodies - friends not foes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathers, M.

    1998-01-01

    WWF (the World Wide Fund for Nature) is convinced that Climate Change is one of the major long term threats to global biodiversity. At an international level WWF seeks to highlight the actual and predicted effects of Climate Change upon the natural environment, human health, and national economies in order to press governments and industry to set and achieve an ambitious target for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions - 20% by 2005. At the national level, we are working with other NGOs, and industry to promote solutions. WWF is pressing for a reform of government measures to stimulate the renewable energy industry and developing its own 'green electricity' initiative in anticipation of deregulation of the electricity market in 1998. It is hoped that this scheme will both provide a market opportunity to a range of technologies and developers, and give a clear demonstration that there is a strong demand among British consumers for renewable energy. WWF wishes to work with all players, starting perhaps with BWEA and WWF working together on the recently announced DTI 'review of its strategy for the development of renewables technology'. (Author)

  5. The UK electricity market and the wind industry - a perspective of 1998 proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batley, S.L.; Twidell, J.W.; Gibbons, C.

    1997-01-01

    After April 1st 1998, the Public Electricity Supplier monopoly ( in England, Wales and Scotland) over their local franchise market will cease and all customers, regardless of size, will be able to choose their supplier. These changes will have a major impact on the UK wind energy industry. An increased number of Second Tier Suppliers will compete with existing market players for electricity purchase from generators and sale of electricity to consumers. Market changes should improve possibilities for wind generators to obtain a Second Tier Supplier licence and serve the domestic, small demand, market. There may also be market opportunities to sell to specialist 'green' suppliers. The post 1998 changes are of importance to the European Union 'Guarantee of Result' project, which aims to promote small scale wind systems through guaranteed quality and performance of systems. For the Guarantee of Results to be utilised in the UK, all markets for the generated electricity from a wind system must be considered and evaluated. (Author)

  6. The North Sea Offshore Wind Service Industry: Status, perspectives and a joint action plan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Clausen, Niels-Erik; Cronin, Tom

    2018-01-01

    of the two concepts of foresight and innovation systems has been explored by several studies, but ISF takes a further integration of the two concepts. The article presents a set of concrete actions at multiple levels to support the development of the offshore wind service sector. The findings provides...... an input for a concerted effort for supporting both the offshore wind development and the emerging clusters of offshore wind services around the North Sea. In addition, the article addresses the value of the ISF approach to such policy development.......The Offshore Wind Service sector is about to established itself as an industrial sector with an own identity, own organisation, and with large future challenges. The article introduces this new sector, including assessment of present and future market sizes. The overall aim of the research reported...

  7. Towards an Industrial Manufactured Morphing Trailing Edge Flap System for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Bergami, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Several numerical studies in the past 10 years have shown big potentials for load reduction on MW turbines using distributed control for alleviation of the fluctuating loads along the blade span. However, the requirements by the wind turbine industry of robust actuator solutions where the stronge...

  8. Employees' perception on risk and risk management: evidence from Danish offshore wind industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsan, Dewan

    Production of electricity from offshore wind energy is receiving much priority in several develop and developing countries. Nevertheless, this industry is becoming more expensive and challenging due to various operational and policy related risks factors. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to pr......Production of electricity from offshore wind energy is receiving much priority in several develop and developing countries. Nevertheless, this industry is becoming more expensive and challenging due to various operational and policy related risks factors. Therefore, the aim of this paper...... is to provide empirical insight into risks in offshore wind industry as perceived by the workers and managers. The survey has been conducted with the employees who are working in several offshore wind industries in Denmark. It has been revealed that there is a lack of common standard which is resulting...... in a mismatch between the experiences acquired by the supporting companies and the expectations the clients. It has been perceived that complicated project manuals (because of special and increased requirements from the clients) sometimes create more risk exposures. The employees identified that demand from...

  9. Public Health Ethics, Legitimacy, and the Challenges of Industrial Wind Turbines: The Case of Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, Martin

    2011-01-01

    While industrial wind turbines (IWTs) clearly raise issues concerning threats to the health of a few in contrast to claimed health benefits to many, the trade-off has not been fully considered in a public health framework. This article reviews public health ethics justifications for the licensing and installation of IWTs. It concludes that the…

  10. Impacts of Industrial Wind Turbine Noise on Sleep Quality: Results From a Field Study of Rural Residents in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, James D; Bigelow, Philip L; Majowicz, Shannon E; McColl, R Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether grid-connected industrial wind turbines (IWTs) are a risk factor for poor sleep quality, and if IWT noise is associated with sleep parameters in rural Ontarians. A daily sleep diary and actigraphy-derived measures of sleep were obtained from 12 participants from an IWT community and 10 participants from a comparison community with no wind power installations. The equivalent and maximum sound pressure levels within the bedroom were also assessed. No statistically significant differences were observed between IWT residents and non-IWT residents for any of the parameters measured in this study. Actigraphy and sleep diaries are feasible tools to understand the impact of IWTs on the quality of sleep for nearby residents. Further studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to determine whether the lack of statistical significance observed here is a result of sample size, or reflects a true lack of association.

  11. Distributed Wind Cost Reduction: Learning from Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-02-23

    The distributed wind energy industry can learn several lessons from the solar industry regarding reducing soft costs. Suzanne Tegen presented this overview at the 2016 Distributed Wind Energy Association Business Conference in Washington, D.C., on February 23, 2016.

  12. Knowledge Boosting Curriculum for New Wind Industry Professionals Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Ruth H; Rogers, Anthony L

    2012-12-18

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV KEMA) received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop the curriculum for a series of short courses intended to address Topic Area 5 Workforce Development, one of the focus areas to achieve the goals outlined in 20% Wind by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to Electricity Supply. The aim of the curriculum development project was to provide material for instructors to use in a training program to help professionals transition into careers in wind energy. Under this grant DNV KEMA established a knowledge boosting program for the wind energy industry with the following objectives: 1. Develop technical training curricula and teaching materials for six key topic areas that can be implemented in a flexible format by a knowledgeable instructor. The topic areas form a foundation that can be leveraged for subsequent, more detailed learning modules (not developed in this program). 2. Develop an implementation guidance document to accompany the curricula outlining key learning objectives, implementation methods, and guidance for utilizing the curricula. This curriculum is intended to provide experienced trainers course material that can be used to provide course participants with a basic background in wind energy and wind project development. The curriculum addresses all aspects of developing a wind project, that when implemented can be put to use immediately, making the participant an asset to U.S. wind industry employers. The curriculum is comprised of six short modules, together equivalent in level of content to a one-semester college-level course. The student who completes all six modules should be able to understand on a basic level what is required to develop a wind project, speak with a reasonable level of confidence about such topics as wind resource assessment, energy assessment, turbine technology and project economics, and contribute to the analysis and review of project information. The content of

  13. Assessing the level of integration in the offshore wind industry value chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Neri, Ivan; Mikkelsen, Ole Stegmann; Stentoft, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The offshore wind industry (OWI) has experienced an explosive growth within the course of a decade and because of this rapid expansion, the industry has not had the opportunity to integrate well and be-come more efficient. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the integra......The offshore wind industry (OWI) has experienced an explosive growth within the course of a decade and because of this rapid expansion, the industry has not had the opportunity to integrate well and be-come more efficient. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding......, offshore substation, installation vessels and the wind farm developer. The preliminary findings are that the different indus-trial sectors participating in the OWI are not aware of the maturity level of the sector. The fact that some developers are disintegrating the already integrated supply of some...... components highlights the importance of being aware of the industry’s maturity level to take appropriate decisions. On the other hand the strategic alliances taking part in various sectors of the OWI show that some of the players know that they have to join and share the expenses of much needed R...

  14. Wind energy expo '82 and national conference American Wind Energy Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, V. (ed.)

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 41 papers in this conference report. Wind farms, large wind turbines, new wind turbines, marketing small wind systems, programs, performance, and economics, analytic methods, testing, power conversion, and rotor systems are the principal topics covered.

  15. A study of supply-chain capabilities in the Canadian wind power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittholz, H.; Pan, D.

    2004-11-01

    In recent years, Canadian wind energy has developed to a total installed capacity of 439 MW. It is possible that by 2012, the cumulative installed wind power capacity may reach 5,600 MW, representing an investment of $8.4 billion. This analysis of the supply-chain structure in the life cycle of a wind farm identified many potential areas where Canadian companies can offer services. Opportunities for both manufacturers and service providers were presented. It was emphasized that although wind energy is a growth industry, Canada has not participated in the development and commercialization of large wind turbine technology. The technical barriers facing Canadian suppliers regarding wind turbine generator (WTG) assembly and component manufacturing were presented. Currently, Canada imports all large WTGs and components. In order to maximize benefits to the Canadian economy, it was recommended that Canadian companies acquire European technology through licences, joint ventures or foreign investment. Technology transfer funding, training and technical assistance funding, tax incentives for capital equipment and support to universities and colleges were also recommended. It was suggested that Canadian companies should focus on manufacturing rotor blades, towers, base frames, nacelle covers and spinners, flexible drive shafts, disk brakes, vibration mounts, inverters, control cabinets, and generators. tabs., figs

  16. One style to build them all: Corporate culture and innovation in the offshore wind industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Enevoldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how Vestas and Siemens Wind Power manage technological innovation in the offshore wind power industry. It utilizes the concept of open and closed “research styles” to investigate how each company designs, constructs, and maintains offshore wind turbines. The article starts by summarizing three of the main innovation challenges facing the offshore wind sector—harsh conditions, capital intensity, and production bottlenecks—before it delves into the specific details about how Vestas and Siemens Wind Power approach turbine development. It divides this discussion into six distinct segments: resources and expenditures, stakeholder involvement and collaboration, testing and maintenance, control and knowledge management, adaptability of designs, and customization and marketing. The study finds that both Vestas and SWP, despite their corporate and cultural differences, utilize the same elements of closed and open styles. It lastly suggests that the notion of style itself may challenge certain assumptions held by scholars about managing the research and innovation process. - Highlights: • This study explores how Vestas and Siemens approach innovation in offshore wind turbine technology. • Open research styles are inclusive, participatory, cooperative, and flexible. • Closed research styles are exclusive, competitive, centralized, and rigid. • Interestingly, Vestas and Siemens use the same style to manage technological innovation. • They are closed when it comes to resources and expenditures and knowledge movement, but open in all other attributes.

  17. Directory of Wind Power and Renewable Marine Energy Industry in France - 2015-2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macron, Emmanuel; Bal, Jean-Louis

    2015-11-01

    The wind power industry is a dynamic sector that continues to grow, year after year. In 2014 there was a significant increase in wind power both in France and the rest of the world, with installed capacity rising to over 1,000 MW and 51,000 MW respectively. These figures demonstrate the economic importance of the sector, which now sees 75 billion euros invested annually worldwide. France's wind energy industry has everything it needs to become a world-leader in the sector, thanks to its skill and expertise in the fields of mechanics, electrical engineering and civil engineering. To help our businesses grasp the opportunities offered by the wind power market, the Windustry France 2.0 programme aims to strengthen the French subcontracting base, which primarily comprises specialised SMEs and middle-market companies that export their products. So far the programme's steering committee has identified fifty companies, over forty of which have already benefited from the specialist knowledge and expertise, specific to their particular core business, that can help them move into the wind energy industry. For ten of them, the Windustry France 2.0 initiative has already resulted in effective diversification into these sectors, and the opening up of new markets. The recent decision to extend the Windustry France 2.0 industrial structuring programme until October 2016 means that an extra 20 companies will now benefit from the programme, taking the total to 70. It also bears witness to the government's intention to make the sector one of the pillars of New Industrial France. More and more companies are realising that the wind energy sector represents a pathway for strategic growth - our aim is to enable them to enter the sector as quickly and effectively as possible. In the longer term, we will also need to start looking at wind farm maintenance and operation - here too it is vitally important for us to develop a competent French industry in the sector

  18. Failure analysis of collector circuits associated with wind farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifton Ashley P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind farm collector circuits generally comprise several wind turbine generators (WTG’s. WTG’s are connected in parallel to a substation. This connection acts as the point-of-connection to the national electricity grid. The electrical load in these circuits is close to component (power cables and accessories ratings. The objective of this paper is to identify cable joint failure paths; and, develop an understanding of specific contributing factors. All findings presented were established from literature review involving data analysis and discussion with industry experts working across the wind industry. Application of forces, inadequate workmanship, incorrect thermal resistance or other contributing factors, all contribute to high conductor operating temperatures. High conductor operating temperatures highlight issues including insufficient environmental heat transfer due to the use of inadequate cable trenching materials. This in turn results in the imbalanced application of force, experienced at the cable joint, as a direct result of frequent thermal expansion and contraction. For most cable joint failures, the root cause is insulation breakdown due to sustained deterioration of the cross-linked polyethylene insulation. This is a direct result from excessive operating temperatures.

  19. Assessment of solar and wind energy potentials for three free economic and industrial zones of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Kasra; Mostafaeipour, Ali; Sabzpooshani, Majid

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the potential of renewable energy sources of solar and wind in three free economic and industrial zones of Chabahar, Kish and Salafchegan in Iran. Feasibility of harnessing solar energy was investigated by using key solar parameters like monthly mean global, beam and diffuse solar radiation as well as clearness index. It was found that all locations had great potentials for utilizing different solar energy systems. Additionally, the monthly, seasonal, semi-yearly and yearly optimum tilt angles of south-facing solar surfaces were determined. For all zones, adjusting the tilt angle twice a year or in other words, the semi-yearly tilt adjustment for two periods of warm (April–September) and cold (October–March) were highly recommended, since it offers almost the same level of annual solar energy gain (SEG) as those of monthly and seasonal adjustments. Weibull Distribution Function (WDF) was performed for analyzing the wind potentials at different heights. It was found that Chabahar was not suitable for wind energy development, but Kish and Salafchegan with yearly wind powers of 111.28 W/m 2 and 114.34 W/m 2 , respectively ranked in class 2 which are considered marginal for wind power development. Three different wind turbine models were proposed for Kish and Salafchegan. - Highlights: • Feasibility of solar and wind energy for three locations of Iran was investigated. • All locations were suitable for solar energy utilization. • The optimum tilt angles of solar surfaces were determined. • Chabahar was unsuitable, but Kish and Salafchegan were marginal for wind purpose

  20. Decree 158/012. It promotes the celebration of power purchase contracts between UTE and industrial customers that produce electrical energy as a primary source using wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This decree is about the political promotion in relation of new energy ways to supply the industrial sector. Uruguay is developing the knowledge of the availability of the wind resource as well as the technical, economic and social issues associated with its use

  1. Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Ted [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goodrich, Alan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Over the past decade, significant wind manufacturing capacity has been built in the United States in response to an increasingly large domestic market. Recent U.S. manufacturing production levels exceed anticipated near-term domestic demand for select parts of the supply chain, in part due to policy uncertainty, and this is resulting in some restructuring in the industry. Factor location decisions are influenced by a combination of quantitative and qualitative factors; proximity to end-markets is often a key consideration, especially for manufacturers of large wind turbine components. Technology advancements in the wind sector are continuing, and larger blade designs are being pursued in the market, which may increase U.S.-based manufacturing opportunities.

  2. Wind power outlook 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    anon.

    2006-04-15

    This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

  3. Directory of the manufacturers and suppliers for the French wind power industry; Annuaire des fabricants et fournisseurs de l'industrie eolienne 2010-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-11-15

    With over 5, 660 MW installed in end-2010, France ranks fourth in Europe, behind Germany, Spain and Italy. The wind power industry currently employs almost 11, 000 people in France throughout the value chain. In 2009, the first edition of this directory listed over one hundred companies working in around twenty different areas. Encouraged by these initial positive results, and with the help of ADEME, the French syndicate for renewable energies (SER) asked Capgemini Consulting to undertake a study to identify and raise awareness among French industrials likely to enter into the wind energy market. The French Ministry for Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea, along with the Ministry for the Economy, Finance and Employment, were involved in the work. 400 companies were questioned as part of the study. Over 150 replies testified to the dynamic character of the wind power market in France and overseas, and the opportunities for diversification that it represents for traditional industries like metallurgy, aeronautics, defence and shipyards, etc. The study led to the creation of the initiative Windustry France, which currently groups over 300 companies either active in the French wind power market or set to enter it. Windustry France is a showcase of the industrial know-how that can be used in the wind power industry both onshore and offshore. It includes local set-ups developed around major fields of activity (e.g. car industry, aeronautics, mechanics, etc.) and industrial port zones (Dunkerque, Rouen/Le Havre, Brest, Nantes Saint-Nazaire, Bordeaux, etc.). Several ministries, regional stakeholders and authorities are also involved (local authorities, Regional directorates for industry, research and the environment (DReal) networks and chambers of commerce and industry), all of which contribute to making Windustry France a collective approach to industrial policy. The 2010-2011 edition of the directory of manufacturers and suppliers for the wind power

  4. Iowa Lakes Community College: Partnerships for Academic and Economic Success in a Rapidly Evolving Wind-Energy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohni, Mary; Rogers, Jolene; Zeitz, Al

    2007-01-01

    Iowa Lakes Community College responded to a national need for wind-energy technicians. The Wind-Energy and Turbine Program aligned industry and academic competencies with experiential learning components to foster exploration of additional renewable energy applications. Completers understand both the physical and academic rigor a career in wind…

  5. Assessing risk to birds from industrial wind energy development via paired resource selection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tricia A; Brooks, Robert P; Lanzone, Michael; Brandes, David; Cooper, Jeff; O'Malley, Kieran; Maisonneuve, Charles; Tremblay, Junior; Duerr, Adam; Katzner, Todd

    2014-06-01

    When wildlife habitat overlaps with industrial development animals may be harmed. Because wildlife and people select resources to maximize biological fitness and economic return, respectively, we estimated risk, the probability of eagles encountering and being affected by turbines, by overlaying models of resource selection for each entity. This conceptual framework can be applied across multiple spatial scales to understand and mitigate impacts of industry on wildlife. We estimated risk to Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from wind energy development in 3 topographically distinct regions of the central Appalachian Mountains of Pennsylvania (United States) based on models of resource selection of wind facilities (n = 43) and of northbound migrating eagles (n = 30). Risk to eagles from wind energy was greatest in the Ridge and Valley region; all 24 eagles that passed through that region used the highest risk landscapes at least once during low altitude flight. In contrast, only half of the birds that entered the Allegheny Plateau region used highest risk landscapes and none did in the Allegheny Mountains. Likewise, in the Allegheny Mountains, the majority of wind turbines (56%) were situated in poor eagle habitat; thus, risk to eagles is lower there than in the Ridge and Valley, where only 1% of turbines are in poor eagle habitat. Risk within individual facilities was extremely variable; on average, facilities had 11% (SD 23; range = 0-100%) of turbines in highest risk landscapes and 26% (SD 30; range = 0-85%) of turbines in the lowest risk landscapes. Our results provide a mechanism for relocating high-risk turbines, and they show the feasibility of this novel and highly adaptable framework for managing risk of harm to wildlife from industrial development. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  6. Risk management tools from the traditional energy industry to wind energy projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, G.; Marks, R.

    2010-01-01

    Risk-based analysis techniques are used to quantify and prioritize a wide variety of problems within the traditional fossil fuel and nuclear power industries. This poster presentation evaluated some of the risk analysis tools and methods used by the energy industry to quantify and manage wind energy development risks. A comprehensive risk-based approach for identifying the probability and consequences of potential concerns was presented for a sample wind energy project. The process determined objectives in relation to the project's net present value. Contributing domains included the energy production, prices, and operating costs of the project. Decision criteria used to evaluate the desirability of the wind project were then developed. Monte Carlo simulations were the used to aggregate individual risks into an overall total. The contribution of each element to the decision objective was calculated separately. The element outputs were than combined into a measure of aggregate risk exposure. Aggregate results were used to calculate the decision criteria. The decision objective was to determine if the energy cost was less than the avoided cost of other project options. The study showed that the approach can allow decision-makers to mitigate risks. However, the results are dependent on the quality of the input data. tabs., figs.

  7. Proceedings of the wind energy industry conference : develop, innovate, export : held in conjunction with Quebec's first wind energy industry gala; Comptes rendus du colloque sur l'industrie eolienne : developper, innover, exporter : tenue en conjonction avec le premier gala quebecois de l'industrie eolienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This conference was dedicated to the wind energy industry and business opportunities in Quebec, the rest of Canada and abroad. It was held in conjunction with Quebec's first wind energy industry gala which highlighted the organizations and individuals that have made outstanding contributions to the wind power sector in Quebec over the past three years. The entire conference focused on current and future requests for proposals in Quebec, innovation, and exports. Some fifteen reputed speakers shared their knowledge and experience regarding technological development and technical support available in Quebec. It was intended to clarify current and future issues affecting the wind power industry and to build key relations with leading wind energy players. The sessions of the conference were entitled: the wind energy industry in Quebec and Canada; issues surrounding requests for proposals; the players involved in the request for proposals; visual impacts of wind farms; data transmission during wind farm construction; innovating to move ahead of the crowd; innovation in practice; exporting as a means of development; and, exports in practice. A tour of the Baie-des-Sable wind farm was also provided. The conference featured 24 presentations, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  8. Solar wind flows associated with hot heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-05-01

    Solar wind heavy ion spectra measured with the Vela instrumentation have been studied with the goal of determining the solar origins of various solar wind structures which contain anomalously high ionization states. Since the ionization states freeze-in close to the sun they are good indicators of the plasma conditions in the low and intermediate corona. Heavy ion spectra from three different periods throughout the solar cycle have been analyzed. These data are consistent with freezing-in temperatures ranging from approx. 1.5 x 10 6 K to higher than 9 x 10 6 . The spectra indicating hot coronal conditions occur in roughly 1/7 of all measurements and almost exclusively in postshock flows (PSFs), nonshock related helium abundance enhancements (HAEs), or noncompressive density enhancements (NCDEs). The PSFs and HAEs are both probably interplanetary manifestations of solar flares. The observation of several flare-related HAEs which were not preceded by an interplanetary shock suggests that the flare-heated plasma can evolve into the solar wind without producing a noticeable shock at 1 AU. The NCDEs with hot heavy ions differ from the PSF-HAEs in several ways implying that they evolve from events or places with lower temperatures and less energy than those associated with the flares, but with higher temperatures and densities than the quiet corona. Active regions, coronal mass ejections, and equatorial streamers are possible sources for the NCDEs with spectra indicating hot coronal conditions. These events owe their enhanced densities to coronal processes as opposed to interplanetary dynamical processes. Models of the solar wind expansion demonstrate how some NCDEs can have extreme, nonequilibrium ionization distributions

  9. An Industry/Academe Consortium for Achieving 20% wind by 2030 through Cutting-Edge Research and Workforce Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Marr, Jeffrey D.G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Milliren, Christopher [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Kaveh, Mos [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mohan, Ned [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Stolarski, Henryk [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Glauser, Mark [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Arndt, Roger [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2013-12-01

    In January 2010, the University of Minnesota, along with academic and industry project partners, began work on a four year project to establish new facilities and research in strategic areas of wind energy necessary to move the nation towards a goal of 20% wind energy by 2030. The project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with funds made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. $7.9M of funds were provided by DOE and $3.1M was provided through matching funds. The project was organized into three Project Areas. Project Area 1 focused on design and development of a utility scale wind energy research facility to support research and innovation. The project commissioned the Eolos Wind Research Field Station in November of 2011. The site, located 20 miles from St. Paul, MN operates a 2.5MW Clipper Liberty C-96 wind turbine, a 130-ft tall sensored meteorological tower and a robust sensor and data acquisition network. The site is operational and will continue to serve as a site for innovation in wind energy for the next 15 years. Project Areas 2 involved research on six distinct research projects critical to the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 goals. The research collaborations involved faculty from two universities, over nine industry partners and two national laboratories. Research outcomes include new knowledge, patents, journal articles, technology advancements, new computational models and establishment of new collaborative relationships between university and industry. Project Area 3 focused on developing educational opportunities in wind energy for engineering and science students. The primary outcome is establishment of a new graduate level course at the University of Minnesota called Wind Engineering Essentials. The seminar style course provides a comprehensive analysis of wind energy technology, economics, and operation. The course is highly successful and will continue to be offered at the University. The vision of U.S. DOE to

  10. Rate of rotation measurement using back-EMFS associated with windings of a brushless DC motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for measuring rate of rotation. A brushless DC motor is rotated and produces a back electromagnetic force (emf) on each winding thereof. Each winding's back-emf is integrated and multiplied by the back-emf associated with an adjacent winding. The multiplied outputs associated with each winding are combined to produce a directionally sensitive DC output proportional only to the rate of rotation of the motor's shaft.

  11. IFT&E Industry Report Wind Turbine-Radar Interference Test Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlson, Benjamin; LeBlanc, Bruce Philip.; Minster, David G; Estill, Milford; Miller, Bryan Edward; Busse, Franz (MIT LL); Keck, Chris (MIT LL); Sullivan, Jonathan (MIT LL); Brigada, David (MIT LL); Parker, Lorri (MIT LL); Younger, Richard (MIT LL); Biddle, Jason (MIT LL)

    2014-10-01

    Wind turbines have grown in size and capacity with today's average turbine having a power capacity of around 1.9 MW, reaching to heights of over 495 feet from ground to blade tip, and operating with speeds at the tip of the blade up to 200 knots. When these machines are installed within the line-of-sight of a radar system, they can cause significant clutter and interference, detrimentally impacting the primary surveillance radar (PSR) performance. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory (MIT LL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) were co-funded to conduct field tests and evaluations over two years in order to: I. Characterize the impact of wind turbines on existing Program-of-Record (POR) air surveillance radars; II. Assess near-term technologies proposed by industry that have the potential to mitigate the interference from wind turbines on radar systems; and III. Collect data and increase technical understanding of interference issues to advance development of long-term mitigation strategies. MIT LL and SNL managed the tests and evaluated resulting data from three flight campaigns to test eight mitigation technologies on terminal (short) and long-range (60 nmi and 250 nmi) radar systems. Combined across the three flight campaigns, more than 460 of hours of flight time were logged. This paper summarizes the Interagency Field Test & Evaluation (IFT&E) program and publicly- available results from the tests. It will also discuss the current wind turbine-radar interference evaluation process within the government and a proposed process to deploy mitigation technologies.

  12. Electrical production for domestic and industrial applications using hybrid PV-wind system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essalaimeh, S.; Al-Salaymeh, A.; Abdullat, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Modeling and building hybrid system of PV and wind turbine. ► Investigation of the electrical generation under Amman–Jordan’s climate. ► Configuration of theoretical and actual characteristics of the hybrid system. ► Testing effects of dust, inclination and load on the electrical generation. ► Financial analysis for various applications. - Abstract: The present work shows an experimental investigation of using a combination of solar and wind energies as hybrid system for electrical generation under the Jordanian climate conditions. The generated electricity has been utilized for different types of applications and mainly for space heating and cooling. The system has also integration with grid connection to have more reliable system. Measurements included the solar radiation intensity, the ambient temperature, the wind speed and the output power from the solar PV panels and wind turbine. The performance characteristic of the PV panels has been obtained by varying the load value through a variable resistance. Some major factors have been studied and practically measured; one of them is the dust effect on electrical production efficiency for photovoltaic panels. Another factor is the inclination of the PV panels, where varying the angle of inclination has a seasonal importance for gathering the maximum solar intensity. Through mathematical calculation and the collected and measured data, a simple payback period has been calculated of the hybrid system in order to study the economical aspects of installing such a system under Jordanian climate conditions and for different usages and local tariffs including domestic, industrial and commercial applications. It was found through this work that the generated electricity of hybrid system and under Jordanian climate conditions can be utilized for electrical heating and cooling through split units and resistive heaters.

  13. The Value of Wind Technology Innovation: Implications for the U.S. Power System, Wind Industry, Electricity Consumers, and Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Trieu T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lantz, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mowers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-21

    Improvements to wind technologies have, in part, led to substantial deployment of U.S. wind power in recent years. The degree to which technology innovation will continue is highly uncertain adding to uncertainties in future wind deployment. We apply electric sector modeling to estimate the potential wind deployment opportunities across a range of technology advancement projections. The suite of projections considered span a wide range of possible cost and technology innovation trajectories, including those from a recent expert elicitation of wind energy experts, a projection based on the broader literature, and one reflecting estimates based on a U.S. DOE research initiative. In addition, we explore how these deployment pathways may impact the electricity system, electricity consumers, the environment, and the wind-related workforce. Overall, our analysis finds that wind technology innovation can have consequential implications for future wind power development throughout the United States, impact the broader electricity system, lower electric system and consumer costs, provide potential environmental benefits, and grow the U.S. wind workforce.

  14. China's supply of critical raw materials: Risks for Europe's solar and wind industries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabe, Wiebke; Kostka, Genia; Smith Stegen, Karen

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the dependence of the European Union's solar and wind industries on Chinese supply of five critical raw materials: tellurium, gallium, indium, and the rare earths neodymium and dysprosium. Based partly on interviews with experts, this study reviews China's industrial policies that shape the supply of these materials abroad. We also assess the short- and long-term strategies of the European Union and European solar and wind industries to ameliorate potential supply bottlenecks. While these strategies adequately address short-term challenges, we find they pose several long-term risks, such as increasing the dependence on China and hampering European competitiveness in global markets. There is also divergence in the extent to which these two industries are vulnerable to supply bottlenecks and price volatility; because more options are open to them, European solar manufacturers are less exposed to these risks than their counterparts in the offshore wind sector. - Highlights: • China is an important supplier of raw materials used in wind and solar technologies. • China's efforts to control its materials industries affect global supply and prices. • Short- and long-term concerns are less pressing for the European solar sector. • The competitiveness of some technologies in the European wind sector may be at risk. • Some short-term solutions reduce exposure to risks but increase dependence on China.

  15. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole M ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-25

    May 25, 2015 ... pute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of ... hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the ..... velocity Vsw (assuming wind velocity is constant throughout from the source to the place of observation) ...

  16. Assessment of the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative: Addressing Environmental and Siting Issues Associated with Wind Energy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; States, Jennifer C.

    2010-11-09

    The National Wind Coordinating Collaborative (NWCC) is a consensus-based stakeholder group comprised of representatives from the utility, wind industry, environmental, consumer, regulatory, power marketer, agricultural, tribal, economic development, and state and federal government sectors. The purpose of the NWCC is to support the development of an environmentally, economically, and politically sustainable commercial market for wind power (NWCC 2010). The NWCC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) since its inception in 1994. In order to evaluate the impact of the work of the NWCC and how this work aligns with DOE’s strategic priorities, DOE tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a series of informal interviews with a small sample of those involved with NWCC.

  17. Wind energy in the United States and materials required for the land-based wind turbine industry from 2010 through 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The generation of electricity in the United States from wind-powered turbines is increasing. An understanding of the sources and abundance of raw materials required by the wind turbine industry and the many uses for these materials is necessary to assess the effect of this industry's growth on future demand for selected raw materials relative to the historical demand for these materials. The U.S. Geological Survey developed estimates of future requirements for raw (and some recycled) materials based on the assumption that wind energy will supply 20 percent of the electricity consumed in the United States by 2030. Economic, environmental, political, and technological considerations and trends reported for 2009 were used as a baseline. Estimates for the quantity of materials in typical "current generation" and "next generation" wind turbines were developed. In addition, estimates for the annual and total material requirements were developed based on the growth necessary for wind energy when converted in a wind powerplant to generate 20 percent of the U.S. supply of electricity by 2030. The results of the study suggest that achieving the market goal of 20 percent by 2030 would require an average annual consumption of about 6.8 million metric tons of concrete, 1.5 million metric tons of steel, 310,000 metric tons of cast iron, 40,000 metric tons of copper, and 380 metric tons of the rare-earth element neodymium. With the exception of neodymium, these material requirements represent less than 3 percent of the U.S. apparent consumption for 2008. Recycled material could supply about 3 percent of the total steel required for wind turbine production from 2010 through 2030, 4 percent of the aluminum required, and 3 percent of the copper required. The data suggest that, with the possible exception of rare-earth elements, there should not be a shortage of the principal materials required for electricity generation from wind energy. There may, however, be selective

  18. Wind energy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    Wind energy should be an important part of the energy supply mix, both at home and abroad, to provide cleaner air and a more stable fuel supply. Not only can wind energy contribute to solving complex global issues, it also can provide a large market for American technological leadership. Even though utilities are paying more attention to wind in a number of states, there are no plans for major installations of wind power plants in the United States. At the same time, European nations have developed aggressive wind energy development programs, including both ambitious research and development efforts and market incentives. Many countries recognize the importance of the clean energy provided by wind technology and are taking steps to promote their fledgling domestic industries. The emphasis on market incentives is starting to pay off. In 1991, European utilities and developers installed nearly twice as much wind capacity as Americans did. In 1992 the gap will be even greater. This article reviews aggressive incentives offered by European governments to boost their domestic wind industries at home and abroad in this almost $1 billion per year market. By offering substantial incentives - considerably more than the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) is proposing - European nations are ensuring dramatic near-term wind energy development and are taking a major step toward dominating the international wind industry of the 21st century

  19. Windpower `96 - Proceedings of the American Wind Energy Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This document consists of eighty individual papers submitted to this conference. Wind power is discussed from many perspectives ranging from non-technical to technical. The include: energy policy; the world wide market to include Europe, Asia, the Americas, marketing strategies to promote wind power, economics, turbine development, electrical systems, testing, advanced components, utility issues, resource assessment, aerodynamics studies, wind-diesel systems, and dynamic modeling. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Base.

  20. Behind the development of technology: The transition of innovation modes in China’s wind turbine manufacturing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ru Peng; Zhi Qiang; Zhang Fang; Zhong Xiaotian; Li Jianqiang; Su Jun

    2012-01-01

    The market scale of China’s wind turbine manufacturing industry has grown immensely. Despite China still having a limited capacity in terms of technology innovation, the institutional support has promoted the technology capability development of the wind turbine manufacturing industry. This paper explores the driving forces underlying this development by reviewing the transition of the innovation modes and the dynamic interactions among the technology capability, innovation modes, market formation, and wind energy policy. The innovation mode in China began with imitative innovation, then transitioned to cooperative innovation, and has more recently set its sights on attaining truly indigenous innovation. Public policy serves as a key driving force for the evolution of innovation modes, as well as the development of the market. The policy focus has evolved in the following sequence: 1. building the foundation for technological innovation; 2. encouraging technology transfer; 3. enhancing local R and D and manufacturing capabilities; 4. enlarging the domestic market; and 5. cultivating an open environment for global competition and sustainable market development in China. - Highlights: ► New data were provided for China’s wind turbine manufacturing industry. ► The transition of innovation modes in the industry is reviewed. ► The interaction among the technology, market, policy, and innovation mode is explored. ► Public policies are the key driving forces for the transition.

  1. Toward a Case Definition of Adverse Health Effects in the Environs of Industrial Wind Turbines: Facilitating a Clinical Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtry, Robert Y.

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, there are reports of adverse health effects (AHE) in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWT). There was multidisciplinary confirmation of the key characteristics of the AHE at the first international symposium on AHE/IWT. The symptoms being reported are consistent internationally and are characterized by crossover findings…

  2. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole M ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-25

    May 25, 2015 ... Probably, during the early his- tory of solar system formation, strong solar wind might have played a dominant role. 355 .... (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly), we have considered near equatorial coronal hole data with 1 hour time ... thermal or kinetic energy of the solar wind? (iii) at what height in the solar ...

  3. Wind Energy Industry Eagle Detection and Deterrents: Research Gaps and Solutions Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Karin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); DeGeorge, Elise [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-13

    The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA) prohibits the 'take' of these birds. The act defines take as to 'pursue, shoot, shoot at, poison, wound, kill, capture, trap, collect, destroy, molest or disturb.' The 2009 Eagle Permit Rule (74 FR 46836) authorizes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to issue nonpurposeful (i.e., incidental) take permits, and the USFWS 2013 Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance provides a voluntary framework for issuing programmatic take permits to wind facilities that incorporate scientifically supportable advanced conservation practices (ACPs). Under these rules, the Service can issue permits that authorize individual instances of take of bald and golden eagles when the take is associated with, but not the purpose of, an otherwise lawful activity, and cannot practicably be avoided. To date, the USFWS has not approved any ACPs, citing the lack of evidence for 'scientifically supportable measures.' The Eagle Detection and Deterrents Research Gaps and Solutions Workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in December 2015 with a goal to comprehensively assess the current state of technologies to detect and deter eagles from wind energy sites and the key gaps concerning reducing eagle fatalities and facilitating permitting under the BGEPA. During the workshop, presentations and discussions focused primarily on existing knowledge (and limitations) about the biology of eagles as well as technologies and emerging or novel ideas, including innovative applications of tools developed for use in other sectors, such as the U.S. Department of Defense and aviation. The main activity of the workshop was the breakout sessions, which focused on the current state of detection and deterrent technologies and novel concepts/applications for detecting and minimizing eagle collisions with wind turbines. Following the breakout sessions, participants were asked about their individual impressions of the

  4. Advancing the Growth of the U.S. Wind Industry: Federal Incentives, Funding, and Partnership Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind Energy Technologies Office (WETO) works to accelerate the development and deployment of wind power. The office provides information for researchers, developers,businesses, manufacturers, communities, and others seeking various types of federal assistance available for advancing wind projects.

  5. Estimating annoyance to calculated wind turbine shadow flicker is improved when variables associated with wind turbine noise exposure are considered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicescu, Sonia A; Michaud, David S; Feder, Katya; Marro, Leonora; Than, John; Guay, Mireille; Denning, Allison; Bower, Tara; van den Berg, Frits; Broner, Norm; Lavigne, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The Community Noise and Health Study conducted by Health Canada included randomly selected participants aged 18-79 yrs (606 males, 632 females, response rate 78.9%), living between 0.25 and 11.22 km from operational wind turbines. Annoyance to wind turbine noise (WTN) and other features, including shadow flicker (SF) was assessed. The current analysis reports on the degree to which estimating high annoyance to wind turbine shadow flicker (HAWTSF) was improved when variables known to be related to WTN exposure were also considered. As SF exposure increased [calculated as maximum minutes per day (SFm)], HAWTSF increased from 3.8% at 0 ≤ SFm wind turbine-related features, concern for physical safety, and noise sensitivity. Reported dizziness was also retained in the final model at p = 0.0581. Study findings add to the growing science base in this area and may be helpful in identifying factors associated with community reactions to SF exposure from wind turbines.

  6. 78 FR 77447 - California Wind Energy Association, First Solar, Inc. v. California Independent System Operator...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Energy Association, First Solar, Inc. v. California Independent System Operator Corporation, Southern...), California Wind Energy Association and First Solar, Inc. (collectively, Complainants) filed a formal complaint against the California Independent System Operator Corporation (CAISO) and Southern California...

  7. Industrializing Offshore Wind Power with Serial Assembly and Lower-cost Deployment - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Willett [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2017-12-11

    . That design is, in brief: a conventional turbine and tubular tower is mounted on a tripod jacket, in turn atop three suction buckets. Blades are mounted on the tower, not on the hub. The entire structure is built in port, from the bottom up, then assembled structures are queued in the port for deployment. During weather windows, the fully-assembled structures are lifted off the quay, lashed to the vessel, and transported to the deployment site. The vessel analyzed is a shear leg crane vessel with dynamic positioning like the existing Gulliver, or it could be a US-built crane barge. On site, the entire structure is lowered to the bottom by the crane vessel, then pumping of the suction buckets is managed by smaller service vessels. Blades are lifted into place by small winches operated by workers in the nacelle without lift vessel support. Advantages of the selected design include: cost and time at sea of the expensive lift vessel are significantly reduced; no jack up vessel is required; the weather window required for each installation is shorter; turbine structure construction is continuous with a queue feeding the weather-dependent installation process; pre-installation geotechnical work is faster and less expensive; there are no sound impacts on marine mammals, thus minimal spotting and no work stoppage Industrializing Offshore Wind Power 6 of 96 9 for mammal passage; the entire structure can be removed for decommissioning or major repairs; the method has been validated for current turbines up to 10 MW, and a calculation using simple scaling shows it usable up to 20 MW turbines.

  8. Renewables-to-reefs? - Decommissioning options for the offshore wind power industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Katie; Christie, Nikki; Burdon, Daryl; Atkins, Jonathan P; Barnes, Richard; Elliott, Michael

    2015-01-15

    The offshore wind power industry is relatively new but increasing globally, hence it is important that the whole life-cycle is managed. The construction-operation-decommissioning cycle is likely to take 20-30 years and whilst decommissioning may not be undertaken for many years, its management needs to be addressed in both current and future marine management regimes. This can be defined within a Drivers-Activities-Pressures-State Changes-Impacts (on human Welfare)-Responses framework. This paper considers the main decommissioning options - partial or complete removal of all components. A SWOT analysis shows environmental and economic benefits in partial as opposed to complete removal, especially if habitat created on the structures has conservation or commercial value. Benefits (and repercussions) are defined in terms of losses and gains of ecosystem services and societal benefits. The legal precedents and repercussions of both options are considered in terms of the 10-tenets of sustainable marine management. Finally a 'renewables-to-reefs' programme is proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EWeA Offshore 2013 - Side event: 'Offshore wind energy - Potentialities and industrial opportunities in France and in Germany. French-German cross perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genachte, Anne-Benedicte; Kavafyan, Philippe; Wagner, Andreas; Bour, Gregoire

    2013-01-01

    At the EWEA Offshore 2013 exhibition, the French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a side-conference on Offshore wind energy and its Potentialities and industrial opportunities in France and in Germany. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, about 50 participants exchanged views on the conditions for the development of a durable offshore wind energy industry both in France and in Germany. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Supporting industrial development of offshore wind in Europe (Anne-Benedicte Genachte); 2 - Offshore wind energy: the Bremerhaven experience. An asset for the deployment of a complete industrial field in France (Philippe Kavafyan); 3 - Status, Prospects and Challenges for Offshore Wind energy in Germany - incl. Legal Framework and Presentation of cost reduction study results (Andreas Wagner); 4 - Offshore grid connection in Germany - Challenges and recommendations (Gregoire Bour)

  10. Wind Energy Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsubara, Kazuyo [Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    An overview is given of wind energy in Japan: Background; Wind Energy in Japan; Japanese Wind Energy Industry; Government Supports; Useful Links; Major Japanese Companies; Profiles of Major Japanese Companies; Major Wind Energy Projects in Japan.

  11. Associative corporate governance: the steel industry case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis argues for a radical change in the way multinational corporations prepare their decisions, both on a strategic level and on a day-to-day operational level. It proposes and details a new perspective of corporate governance based on the principles of associative democracy as a

  12. Offshore wind energy - Proceedings of the 2009 Le Havre International Meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, Bernard; Rufenacht, Antoine; Marchand, Philippe; Perrot, Jean-Yves; Blanchard, Loic; Leredde, Bruno; Gouverneur, Philippe; Buch, Mette; Westra, Chris; Deswartes, Fabien; Kaelble, Laure; Lutsen, Didier; Kolb, Jean-Mathieu; Moine, Sebastien; Kipke, Ruediger; Coelingh, Jan; Fagot, Guillaume; Noury, Bruno; Herpers, Frederick; Bersani, Catherine; Lanoe, Frederic; Grosdemange, Didier; Uhl, Frederic; Lapierre, Anne; Dumarquez, Philippe; Ruer, Jacques; Huberson, Serge; Barakat, Georges; Cooke, Richard; Reisse, Eric; Bihel, Pierre-Nicolas; Mohr, Rainer; Goesswein, Jens; Brossard, Jerome; Duval, Stephane; Bonnefond, Thierry; Jacquemin, Jerome; His, Stephane; Fazio, Bertrand; Theobald, Fabrice; Boeuf, Marc; Ruer, Jacques; Mercher, Gerard; Poitou, Pascal; Lemarquis, David; Bal, Jean-Louis; Abonnel, Cyrille; Mouslim, Hakim; Rousset, Jean-Marc; Brochard, Emmanuel; Lengyel, Jacques; Antolini, Andre; Gerard, Bernard

    2009-11-01

    This document gathers keynote addresses, contributions and Power Point presentations of a colloquium on the development of offshore wind energy. This colloquium comprises several sessions: the strategy of offshore wind energy development, the planning of wind energy development, the keys of wind energy development, the associated environmental, technological and industrial challenges, the industrial and port deployment for the development of marine energies

  13. Association Between the Solar Wind Speed, Interplanetary Magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meena Pokharia

    2017-11-27

    Nov 27, 2017 ... HSSWS. SSSWS. Figure 1. Annual distribution of solar wind streams for solar cycle −24. data center (http://omniweb.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi/nx1.cgi). A comparison of HSSWS and SSSWS with CRI has been done. The correlation of CRI with IMF and V.B is also discussed in this study. 3. Results and discussion.

  14. An intense geomagnetic storm associated with slow solar wind ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The storm is summarized using the low-latitude magnetic index, Dst and is interpreted using available interplanetary data: proton number density, solar wind flow speed, plasma temperature, interplanetary magnetic field southward component Bz, plasma beta and dawn-dusk electric field. Our results show the magnetic ...

  15. Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

  16. Wind energy in 1996: Looking forward, looking back

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher, R.

    1996-12-31

    Opinions on the world market for wind power are presented in this paper. A brief review of progress in wind energy is given. The impact of world market forces and restructuring of the electric industry in the U.S. on the wind energy market are discussed. An outline of the American Wind Energy Association`s Renewables Portfolio Standard is presented. Legislative activities in wind energy are also reviewed.

  17. Can expectations produce symptoms from infrasound associated with wind turbines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Fiona; Dodd, George; Schmid, Gian; Gamble, Greg; Petrie, Keith J

    2014-04-01

    The development of new wind farms in many parts of the world has been thwarted by public concern that subaudible sound (infrasound) generated by wind turbines causes adverse health effects. Although the scientific evidence does not support a direct pathophysiological link between infrasound and health complaints, there is a body of lay information suggesting a link between infrasound exposure and health effects. This study tested the potential for such information to create symptom expectations, thereby providing a possible pathway for symptom reporting. A sham-controlled double-blind provocation study, in which participants were exposed to 10 min of infrasound and 10 min of sham infrasound, was conducted. Fifty-four participants were randomized to high- or low-expectancy groups and presented audiovisual information, integrating material from the Internet, designed to invoke either high or low expectations that exposure to infrasound causes specified symptoms. High-expectancy participants reported significant increases, from preexposure assessment, in the number and intensity of symptoms experienced during exposure to both infrasound and sham infrasound. There were no symptomatic changes in the low-expectancy group. Healthy volunteers, when given information about the expected physiological effect of infrasound, reported symptoms that aligned with that information, during exposure to both infrasound and sham infrasound. Symptom expectations were created by viewing information readily available on the Internet, indicating the potential for symptom expectations to be created outside of the laboratory, in real world settings. Results suggest psychological expectations could explain the link between wind turbine exposure and health complaints.

  18. Analysis of technological innovation in Danish wind turbine industry - including the Test Station for Windturbines dual roll as research institution and certification authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannemand Andersen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis is to examine the interactions between the Danish wind turbine industry and the Test Station for Wind Turbines. Because these interactions are concerning technological innovation, it follows that the innovation processes within the enterprises must be analyzed and modelled. The study is carried out as an iterative model-developing process using case study methods. The findings from some less structured interviews are discussed with literature and forms a basis for models and new interviews. The thesis is based on interviews with 20 R and D engineers in the Danish wind turbine industry, 7 engineers at The Test Station and 7 people involved in wind power abroad (American and British). The theoretical frame for this thesis is sociology/organizational theory and industrial engineering. The thesis consists of five main sections, dealing with technology and knowledge, innovation processes, organizational culture, innovation and interaction between the Test Station's research activities and the companies' innovation processes, and finally interaction through the Test Stations certification activity. First a taxonomy for technology and knowledge is established in order to clarify what kind of technology the interactions are all about, and what kind of knowledge is transferred during the interactions. This part of the thesis also contains an analysis of the patents drawn by the Danish wind turbine industry. The analysis shows that the Danish wind turbine industry do not use patents. Instead the nature of the technology and the speed of innovation are used to protect the industry's knowledge. (EG) (192 refs.)

  19. Text-Mining and Gamification for the Qualification of Service Technicians in the Maintenance Industry of Offshore Wind Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thies Beinke

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The competition of maintenance services in the offshore wind industry is continually increasing. The quality of the services acts as the distinguishing feature in the industry. Furthermore, there are public standards, which lead to the permanent necessity to offer further education and training programs for employees. To meet the requirements for further training in the specific field of application within the offshore wind industry, a gamified e-learning application has been developed and is introduced in this paper. It consists of a complete solution, which contains the automated analysis of service protocols to identify qualification needs, the involvement of service technicians in the generation of learning materials, the preparation, transmission as well as the further development of those materials in accordance with the principles of e-learning. Finally, the solution contains a gamified mobile application for qualification, which is designed to meet the individual learning needs of the service technicians. This concept paper follows a problem-centred approach. Based on the current state of technology and research, the problem and motivation are identified and the urgency is verified. Furthermore, a detailed specification of the solution and a first implementation approach is presented.

  20. Atmospheric circulation patterns associated with strong wind events in Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Peña

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of having a daily synoptic weather type catalogue and even more, a detailed catalogue for high impact weather events is well recognised by both climatologist and meteorologist communities. In this way the Meteorological Service of Catalonia (SMC has produced some accurate classifications for extreme events, such as hailstorms or strong winds (SW. Within the framework of the MEDEX project, the SMC has been collaborating to increase the level of awareness about these events. Following this line of work, the aim of this study is to characterise the SW events in Catalonia.

    According to the guidelines of the MEDEX project we worked with its SW event database for the period June 1995 to May 2004. We also used the period 2005–2009 to test the methodology. The methodology is based on principal component, cluster and discriminant analyses and applied to four variables: SLP, temperature at 850 hPa and geopotential at 500 hPa on a synoptic-scale and local gust wind. We worked with ERA-Interim reanalysis and applied discriminant analysis to test the quality of the methodology and to classify the events of the validation period.

    We found seven patterns for the SW events. The strongest event corresponds to NW-Flow with the Azores Anticyclone and the passing of a low pressure through the Pyrenees. This methodology has distinguished the summer events in an independent cluster. The results obtained encourage us to follow this line of work.

  1. Industrial wind turbine post-construction bird and bat monitoring: A policy framework for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisé, Jason; Walker, Tony R

    2017-10-01

    Electricity generation from wind energy has proliferated throughout North America and will continue to grow. Given Canada's expected increase in wind energy capacity, consideration of the potential adverse impacts to bird and bat populations is prudent given their sensitivity to these projects. The province of Ontario, Canada is currently the leading jurisdiction for wind energy development, and for provincial guidance on pre- and post-construction monitoring. With uniform monitoring guidance in Ontario, wind energy proponents, and third-party consultants, have developed post-construction monitoring protocols that meet provincial guidance, while also providing standardized reporting. In Atlantic Canada, post-construction guidelines vary between provinces, depending mostly on guidance from the Environment Canada Canadian Wildlife Service and relevant provincial agencies. To ensure quality post-construction monitoring results in Atlantic Canada and other provinces, it is imperative that all Canadian provinces adopt similar approaches to those employed in Ontario. This paper reviews major causes of bird and bat mortalities; reviews Canadian federal and Ontario provincial bird and bat monitoring guidelines to elucidate gaps between environmental assessment (EA) theory and application; summarizes post-construction monitoring protocols from eight bird and bat post-construction monitoring programs used in Ontario; and, proposes recommendations to support future wind development opportunities across Canada and specifically in Atlantic Canada. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Electric Vehicles to Meet Balancing Requirements Associated with Wind Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-07-31

    voiding of automotive manufacturer's battery warranty, and is not feasible for many customers. The second key finding is the change in the required population when PHEV/BEV charging is available at both home and work. Allowing 10% of the vehicle population access to work charging resulted in nearly 80% of the grid benefit. Home-only charging requires, at best, 94% of the current NWPP light duty vehicle fleet to be a PHEV or BEV. With the introduction of full work charging availability, only 8% of the NWPP light duty vehicle fleet is required. Work charging has primarily been associated with mitigating range anxiety in new electric vehicle owners, but these studies indicate they have significant potential for improving grid reliability. The V2GHalf and V2GFull charging strategies of the report utilize grid frequency as an indication of the imbalance requirements. The introduction of public charging stations, as well as the potential for PHEV/BEVs to be used as a resource for renewable generation integration, creates conditions for additional products into the ancillary services market. In the United Kingdom, such a capability would be bid as a frequency product in the ancillary services market. Such a market could create the need for larger, third-party aggregators or services to manage the use of electric vehicles as a grid resource. Ultimately, customer adoption, usage patterns and habits, and feedback from the power and automotive industries will drive the need.

  3. Capacity factor prediction and planning in the wind power generation industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurgur, Cigdem Z. [Department of Management and Marketing, Richard T. Doermer School of Business and Management Sciences, Indiana - Purdue University, 2101 Coliseum Blvd. East, Fort Wayne, IN 46805 (United States); Jones, Michael [Xcel Energy, Denver, CO 80223 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The common practice to calculate wind generation capacity values relies more on heuristic approximations than true system estimations. In this paper we proposed a more accurate method. In the first part of our analysis, a Monte Carlo simulation was created based on Markov chains to provide an independent estimate of the true behavior of wind farm capacity value as a function of system penetration. With this curve as a baseline, a technique for using beta distributions to model the input variables was adopted. A final step to increase accuracy involved the use of numerical convolution within the program to eliminate summation estimates. (author)

  4. Towards an industrial manufactured morphing trailing edge flap system for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Bergami, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    A flap actuation system, the Controllable Rubber Trailing Edge Flap (CRTEF), for distributed load control on a wind turbine blade has been developed in the period from 2006 to 2010 at DTU. The function of the system and its capability to change the lift on a blade section was measured during a wind...... been developed and build, based on a 100kW turbine platform. A 2m (span) x 1m (chord) blade section with the flap system is mounted at the end of a 10m long boom rotated up to 50-60 rpm. Measurements comprise surface pressure measurements for detailed monitoring of the flap actions....

  5. Potential hazards and risks associated with the aquaculture industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquaculture, the farming of aquatic organisms, is fraught with potential hazards and risks which are categorized into occupational, environmental, food safety and public health. This paper reviewed major hazards and risks associated with the aquaculture industry and proffered strategies for their management and control.

  6. Aligning strategy and performance management systems : the case of the wind-farm industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, R.; O'Dwyer, B.; Schneider, R.

    This article presents a case study examining the problems and possibilities of performance management in a wind-farm company. Drawing on Ferreira and Otley’s recently developed performance management systems (PMSs) framework, the study demonstrates how the framework facilitates in-depth, holistic,

  7. Properly Interpreting the Epidemiologic Evidence about the Health Effects of Industrial Wind Turbines on Nearby Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carl V.

    2011-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that wind turbines cause serious health problems in nearby residents, usually stress-disorder-type diseases, at a nontrivial rate. The bulk of the evidence takes the form of thousands of adverse event reports. There is also a small amount of systematically gathered data. The adverse event reports provide compelling…

  8. Emotional tone of ontario newspaper articles on the health effects of industrial wind turbines before and after policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Benjamin; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Newspapers are often a primary source of health information for the public about emerging technologies. Information in newspapers can amplify or attenuate readers' perceptions of health risk depending on how it is presented. Five geographically distinct wind energy installations in Ontario, Canada were identified, and newspapers published in their surrounding communities were systematically searched for articles on health effects from industrial wind turbines from May 2007 to April 2011. The authors retrieved 421 articles from 13 community, 2 provincial, and 2 national newspapers. To measure the emotional tone of the articles, the authors used a list of negative and positive words, informed from previous studies as well as from a random sample of newspaper articles included in this study. The majority of newspaper articles (64.6%, n = 272) emphasized negative rather than positive/neutral tone, with community newspapers publishing a higher proportion of negative articles than provincial or national newspapers, χ(2)(2) = 15.1, p < .001. Articles were more likely to be negative when published 2 years after compared with 2 years before provincial legislation to reduce dependence on fossil fuels (the Green Energy Act), χ(2)(3) = 9.7, p < .05. Repeated public exposure to negative newspaper content may heighten readers' health risk perceptions about wind energy.

  9. An overview of the photovoltaic, wind power, solar water heating and small-scale hydropower supply industries in South Africa up to 1994/95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stassen, G.; Holm, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper contains a broad overview of the South African photovoltaic, solar water heating, wind power and small-scale hydropower industries. Against the general lack of a comprehensive national database on renewable energy supply and demand, this overview attempts to provide general background information on these commercial industries, market trends, local sales figures, export volumes and installed capacity estimates. It also identifies the industry's major constraints, as well as their future outlook. (author). 12 refs., 13 tabs., 4 figs

  10. The role of technology transfer for the development of a local wind component industry in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Pueyo Velasco, Ana; Garcia, Rodrigo; Mendiluce, Maria; Morales, Dario

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to the debate about climate change technology transfer by analysing barriers and enablers for a Chilean company starting up the production of wind blades. Literature on the role of technology transfer for the development and deployment of local renewable energy technologies in developing countries often refers to success stories in Brazil, India and China. Instead, this case study highlights the different challenges faced by smaller emerging economies. The paper argues ...

  11. Materials and Additive Manufacturing for Energy Efficiency in Wind Turbine and Aircraft Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datskos, Panos G [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Clemons, Art [ORNL; Bolton, Paul [Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC; Hollander, Aaron [First Aviation Services Inc., Westport, CT

    2016-05-04

    The purpose of this project was to develop surface treatments which will inhibit the formation of ice on turbine blades and propellers. ORNL worked with Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC and First Aviation Services Inc. to demonstrate a new surface treatment for two primary markets, aviation and wind turbines, as well as secondary markets such as power lines, bridges, boats, roofs and antennas among others. Exploring alternative surface treatments for wind turbines will provide anti-icing properties and erosion/abrasion prevention properties similar to those for aviation applications. A series of superhydrophobic coating materials was synthesized and successfully applied on anti-ice tape materials that could be used in a wide range of wind turbine and aviation applications to prevent ice accumulation. The coatings developed in this project were based on superhydrophobic particles of different geometries and sizes that were homogeneously dispersed in polymeric binders. The superhydrophobic features of the coatings are volumetric and their abrasion resistance was evaluated. Future research will involve the demonstration of anti-icing properties of the surface treatment developed in this project.

  12. Wind patterns associated with the development of daytime thunderstorms over Istria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poljak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The northeastern (NE Adriatic in the northern Mediterranean is the area with (i the highest frequency of thunderstorms in Croatia, and (ii frequent appearances of sea breeze (SB along the coast. This study investigates the impact of the combined large-scale wind (associated with particular synoptic conditions and the SB on the moist convection development over the NE Adriatic. The four selected cases were (i chosen on the basis of a daytime moist convection; (ii supplemented by one of the dominant large-scale winds with seaward (NE, NW and landward (SW, SE directions and (iii simulated by WRF numerical model. The near-surface wind patterns consisted of SBs along the coastline, generated a narrow eastward-moving convergence zone (CZ along the area if the large-scale wind was less than 9 m s−1 (below 500 hPa. Apart from the low-level CZ, the advection of large-scale wind influenced the lifetime and movement of the initial Cb cells. While the local front collision with the NE wind advection caused the thunderstorm to propagate southward, the CZ and fronts interaction determined the afternoon northwestward storm movement against the NW large-scale wind. Due to particular synoptic background, the thunderstorm event in SE case was the shortest with only a minor impact on the SB. While the origins and locations of storm cells were completely controlled by the low-level CZ and the upward advection of low-level moisture at the SB front, the most typical convective case with SW warm-wet wind only partially supported the SB–Cb interaction.

  13. The pressure cold wind system on the impact of industrial boiler economy and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Henan; Qian, Hongli; Jiang, Lei; Yu, Dekai; Li, Guannan; Yuan, Hong

    2017-05-01

    Industrial boiler is one of the most energy-consuming equipment in china, the annual consumption of energy accounts for about one-third of the national energy consumption.Industrial boiler in service at present have several severe problems such as small capacity, low efficiency, high energy consumption and causing severe pollution on environment, the average industrial boiler operation efficiency is only 65%. If the efficiency increased by 15% ∼ 20%, which meet the international advanced level, each year 70 million tons of coal saving and reduce environmental pollution[1]. As energy conservation and emissions reduction becomes the basic national policy of our country, improving the efficiency of industrial boiler energy is facing opportunities and challenges, optimizing the operation mode of the existing units, it is necessary to increase the flexibility of the boiler control.

  14. Offshore wind power. Technological and industrial development from a Norwegian business perspective; Vindkraft til havs. Teknologi- og industriutvikling fra et norsk bedriftsperspektiv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Gard Hopsdal; Steen, Markus

    2011-07-01

    Offshore wind power has become an important component of the energy, industrial and climate policy of several countries surrounding the North Sea. In Norway, the political ambitions for offshore wind remains low, but several companies are nevertheless aiming for a position in the markets emerging nearby. This report addresses Norwegian companies positioning towards the emerging market for offshore wind in the North Sea to learn who they are, and how they approach a technology and market in the making. The report also briefly discusses how company managers assess the alignment between their position, and the Norwegian policy makers' positions and visions of offshore wind. The analysis shows that the majority of firms advocate experience based learning and development, while policy makers mainly stimulate R and D activities. The lack of a domestic market for offshore wind in Norway is seen as a barrier towards integration of experience-based and science-based learning, and impedes the momentum of technological and industrial development due to inadequate mutual understanding between the domains of industry, science, utility, politics and finance. The report is based on in-depth interviews (n=47) with managers of firms involved in offshore wind power as well as an e mail survey (n=147/325).(Author)

  15. Eu-NORSEWInD - Assessment of Viability of Open Source CFD Code for the Wind Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stickland, Matt; Scanlon, Tom; Fabre, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    . The cost of the extra licences can become the limit on the final number of nodes employed. Whilst there are significant benefits to be found when using a commercial code which has a user friendly interface and has undergone significant verification testing the financial advantages of using an open source...... CFD code, which may not have undergone such rigorous verification and may be more difficult to use, are attractive. This paper reports on the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling of the wind flows over the platforms on which the RS systems are mounted and more specifically on a comparison...

  16. Wind Turbine Infra and Low-Frequency Sound: Warning Signs that Were Not Heard

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines are frequently thought of as benign. However, the literature is reporting adverse health effects associated with the implementation of industrial-scale wind developments. This article explores the historical evidence about what was known regarding infra and low-frequency sound from wind turbines and other noise sources…

  17. The role of technology transfer for the development of a local wind component industry in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pueyo, Ana; Garcia, Rodrigo; Mendiluce, Maria; Morales, Dario

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to the debate about climate change technology transfer by analysing barriers and enablers for a Chilean company starting up the production of wind blades. Literature on the role of technology transfer for the development and deployment of local renewable energy technologies in developing countries often refers to success stories in Brazil, India and China. Instead, this case study highlights the different challenges faced by smaller emerging economies. The paper argues that successful technology transfer in a smaller economy like Chile requires: a minimum internal demand and access to regional markets to attract foreign knowledge providers; a focus in the types of technologies where the recipient country or company have a competitive advantage; and active learning processes by the recipient company. Lessons are drawn for improving the design and implementation of technology-push and market-pull policies in small or medium emerging economies. - Highlights: → We analyse the case of a Chilean company starting up wind blades production. → Technology transfer is required as the relevant knowledge is not available in the country. → We examine the factors that enable technology transfer to draw policy conclusions. → We highlight the particularities of medium sized developing countries.

  18. The role of technology transfer for the development of a local wind component industry in Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pueyo, Ana, E-mail: anapueyo@hotmail.com [Technical University of Madrid (UPM)-Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales (ETSII), Madrid (Spain); Garcia, Rodrigo [Centro de Energias Renovables (CER), Santiago de Chile (Chile); Mendiluce, Maria [World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), Geneva (Switzerland); Morales, Dario [InnovaChile-CORFO Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

    2011-07-15

    This paper contributes to the debate about climate change technology transfer by analysing barriers and enablers for a Chilean company starting up the production of wind blades. Literature on the role of technology transfer for the development and deployment of local renewable energy technologies in developing countries often refers to success stories in Brazil, India and China. Instead, this case study highlights the different challenges faced by smaller emerging economies. The paper argues that successful technology transfer in a smaller economy like Chile requires: a minimum internal demand and access to regional markets to attract foreign knowledge providers; a focus in the types of technologies where the recipient country or company have a competitive advantage; and active learning processes by the recipient company. Lessons are drawn for improving the design and implementation of technology-push and market-pull policies in small or medium emerging economies. - Highlights: > We analyse the case of a Chilean company starting up wind blades production. > Technology transfer is required as the relevant knowledge is not available in the country. > We examine the factors that enable technology transfer to draw policy conclusions. > We highlight the particularities of medium sized developing countries.

  19. A Collapsar Model with Disk Wind: Implications for Supernovae Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Tomoyasu; Maeda, Keiichi

    2018-02-01

    We construct a simple but self-consistent collapsar model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and SNe associated with GRBs (GRB-SNe). Our model includes a black hole, an accretion disk, and the envelope surrounding the central system. The evolutions of the different components are connected by the transfer of the mass and angular momentum. To address properties of the jet and the wind-driven SNe, we consider competition of the ram pressure from the infalling envelope and those from the jet and wind. The expected properties of the GRB jet and the wind-driven SN are investigated as a function of the progenitor mass and angular momentum. We find two conditions that should be satisfied if the wind-driven explosion is to explain the properties of the observed GRB-SNe: (1) the wind should be collimated at its base, and (2) it should not prevent further accretion even after the launch of the SN explosion. Under these conditions, some relations seen in the properties of the GRB-SNe could be reproduced by a sequence of different angular momentum in the progenitors. Only the model with the largest angular momentum could explain the observed (energetic) GRB-SNe, and we expect that the collapsar model can result in a wide variety of observational counterparts, mainly depending on the angular momentum of the progenitor star.

  20. Bird Killer, Industrial Intruder or Clean Energy? Perceiving Risks to Ecosystem Services Due to an Offshore Wind Farm

    KAUST Repository

    Klain, Sarah C.

    2017-07-19

    Proposals to develop renewable energy technologies may threaten local values, which can generate opposition. Efforts to explain this opposition have focused on perceived negative aesthetic and environmental impact. Less attention has been paid to a fuller suite of the perceived risks and benefits associated with new energy technologies. This paper thus investigates impacts of an offshore wind farm pertaining to individual perceptions and judgments, and why risks to some ecosystem services might be cause for greater public concern than others. We find that this difference can be attributed to the affective and intuitive ways in which people perceive risk. Our mixed-methods design used interviews (n=27) that involved risk-benefit weighting tasks and an animated visualization to help people imagine an offshore wind farm in a familiar place. We found that affectively-loaded impacts (harm to charismatic wildlife and visual intrusion) were assigned greater weight than more easily quantifiable impacts (displacement of fishing, impact to tourism, cost of compliance with regulations). Interviewees identified increased regional energy self-sufficiency as the most valued potential benefit of an offshore wind farm. These results have implications for ecosystem service assessments generally and, more specifically, for our understanding of ‘affective’ dimensions of development proposals.

  1. Assessing risk to birds from industrial wind energy development via paired resource selection nodels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricia A. Miller; Robert P. Brooks; Michael Lanzone; David Brandes; Jeff Cooper; Kieran O' malley; Charles Maisonneuve; Junior Tremblay; Adam Duerr; Todd. Katzner

    2014-01-01

    When wildlife habitat overlaps with industrial development animals may be harmed. Because wildlife and people select resources to maximize biological fitness and economic return, respectively, we estimated risk, the probability of eagles encountering and being affected by turbines, by overlaying models of resource selection for each entity. This conceptual framework...

  2. Challenges in experimental fatigue testing of glassfibre reinforced polymer matrix composites for wind turbine industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgreen, Freja Naima; Goutianos, Stergios

    has been done to improve the quality of the composite materials used in wind turbine blades. This improvement has been achieved by incorporating high performance glass fibres with improved sizing and exploring new resin formulations. However, the current standardised fatigue test methods still show...... low reproducibility and high scatter (high variance). Therefore, in order to improve the design limits and to reflect the high performance of the composite materials, it is critical to develop improved fatigue test methods. There are three types of uniaxial fatigue test methods, tension......-tension, compressioncompression and tension-compression. Specific challenges exist for each test type regarding the experimental set-up and specimen geometry. Issues for the experimental setup include alignment and load introduction into the specimen. Issues for the test specimen include an specimen geometry that leads...

  3. LEOMA and the US laser industry the good and bad moves for trade associations in emerging high-tech industries

    CERN Document Server

    Hitz, C

    2015-01-01

    Hitz addresses the urgent issues that the Laser and Electro-Optics Manufacturer’s Association (LEOMA) tackled in the late 1980s, which will help guide future trade associations to handle related political and infrastructural issues from the industry. LEOMA- the Laser and Electro-Optics Manufacturers’ Association – is in many ways similar to trade associations that exist, or will exist, in other emerging, high-technology industries. Having dealt successfully with these initial obstacles, LEOMA went on to tackle other issues, perhaps less urgent, that confronted the industry. LEOMA and the US Laser Industry: The Good and Bad Moves for Trade Associations in Emerging High-Tech Industries describes the approaches, both successful and not, to the political and infrastructure issues addressed by the trade association. The intent is to provide guidance to those confronting similar issues, and help them avoid unsuccessful approaches. The key fea ures highlight the problems that were dealt with, and solutions,...

  4. Wind energy and aviation interests - interim guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The impact on aviation of increasing the number of wind farms in the United Kingdom is discussed by the Wind Energy, Defence and Civil Aviation Interests Working Group, comprising the Department of Trade and Industry, the Civil Aviation Authority, the Ministry of Defence, and the British Wind Energy Association. The report offers guidance to wind farm developers, local authorities and statutory consultees within the aviation community: the main thrust of the guidelines is to support the UK Government's wind energy targets. Although the document does not contain in-depth technical discussions, it does provide references to such information.

  5. Substorm Occurrence and Intensity Associated With Three Types of Solar Wind Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Sotirelis, Thomas; Richardson, Ian

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the characteristics of substorms that occurred during three distinct types of solar wind: coronal mass ejection (CME) associated, high-speed streams (HSS), and slow solar wind (SSW). A total number of 53,468 geomagnetic substorm onsets from 1983 to 2009 is used and sorted by the three solar wind types. It is found that the probability density function (PDF) of the intersubstorm time can be fitted by the combination of a dominant power law with an exponential cutoff component and a minor lognormal component, implying that substorms are associated with two distinctly different dynamical processes corresponding, perhaps, to the "externally driven" and "internally driven" processes, respectively. We compare substorm frequency and intensity associated with the three types of solar wind. It is found that the intersubstorm time is the longest during SSW and shortest during CME intervals. The averaged intersubstorm time for the internally driven substorms is 3.13, 3.15, and 7.96 h for CME, HSS, and SSW, respectively. The substorm intensity PDFs, as represented by the peak value of |SML| (the generalization of AL), can be fitted by two lognormal distribution functions. The averaged substorm intensity for either component is largest for CME (292 and 674 nT) and smallest for SSW (265 and 434 nT). We argue that the externally driven substorms are more intense than those driven internally. We conclude that the dynamical process of substorms is controlled mainly by the direct solar wind-magnetosphere coupling, whereas the internally driven process only plays a very modest minor role.

  6. Harnessing wind power with sustained policy support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meera, L. [BITS-Pilani. Dept. of Economics, Hyderabad (India)

    2012-07-01

    The development of wind power in India began in the 1990s, and has significantly increased in the last few years. The ''Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association (IWTMA)'' has played a leading role in promoting wind energy in India. Although a relative newcomer to the wind industry compared with Denmark or the US, a combination of domestic policy support for wind power and the rise of Suzlon (a leading global wind turbine manufacturer) have led India to become the country with the fifth largest installed wind power capacity in the world. Wind power accounts for 6% of India's total installed power capacity, and it generates 1.6% of the country's power. (Author)

  7. Wind energy and social acceptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feurtey, E.

    2008-01-01

    This document was prepared as part of a decentralized collaboration between Quebec and France to share knowledge regarding strategies and best practices in wind power development. It reviewed the social acceptance of Quebec's wind power industry, particularly at the municipal level. The wind industry is growing rapidly in Quebec, and this growth has generated many reactions ranging from positive to negative. The purpose of this joint effort was to describe decision making steps to developing a wind turbine array. The history of wind development in Quebec was discussed along with the various hardware components required in a wind turbine and different types of installations. The key element in implementing wind turbine arrays is to establish public acceptance of the project, followed by a good regulatory framework to define the roles and responsibilities of participants. The production of electricity from wind turbines constitutes a clean and renewable source of energy. Although it is associated with a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, this form of energy can also have negative environmental impacts, including noise. The revenues generated by wind parks are important factors in the decision making process. Two case studies in Quebec were presented. refs., tabs., figs.

  8. Hazardous substances releases associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in industrial settings, Louisiana and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Orr, Maureen F.; Lanier, Kenneth; Koehler, Allison

    2008-01-01

    The scientific literature concerning the public health response to the unprecedented hurricanes striking the Gulf Coast in August and September 2005 has focused mainly on assessing health-related needs and surveillance of injuries, infectious diseases, and other illnesses. However, the hurricanes also resulted in unintended hazardous substances releases in the affected states. Data from two states (Louisiana and Texas) participating in the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system were analyzed to describe the characteristics of hazardous substances releases in industrial settings associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. HSEES is an active multi-state Web-based surveillance system maintained by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). In 2005, 166 hurricane-related hazardous substances events in industrial settings in Louisiana and Texas were reported. Most (72.3%) releases were due to emergency shut downs in preparation for the hurricanes and start-ups after the hurricanes. Emphasis is given to the contributing causal factors, hazardous substances released, and event scenarios. Recommendations are made to prevent or minimize acute releases of hazardous substances during future hurricanes, including installing backup power generation, securing equipment and piping to withstand high winds, establishing procedures to shutdown process operations safely, following established and up-to-date start-up procedures and checklists, and carefully performing pre-start-up safety reviews

  9. Hazardous substances releases associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in industrial settings, Louisiana and Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckart, Perri Zeitz; Orr, Maureen F; Lanier, Kenneth; Koehler, Allison

    2008-11-15

    The scientific literature concerning the public health response to the unprecedented hurricanes striking the Gulf Coast in August and September 2005 has focused mainly on assessing health-related needs and surveillance of injuries, infectious diseases, and other illnesses. However, the hurricanes also resulted in unintended hazardous substances releases in the affected states. Data from two states (Louisiana and Texas) participating in the Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) system were analyzed to describe the characteristics of hazardous substances releases in industrial settings associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. HSEES is an active multi-state Web-based surveillance system maintained by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). In 2005, 166 hurricane-related hazardous substances events in industrial settings in Louisiana and Texas were reported. Most (72.3%) releases were due to emergency shut downs in preparation for the hurricanes and start-ups after the hurricanes. Emphasis is given to the contributing causal factors, hazardous substances released, and event scenarios. Recommendations are made to prevent or minimize acute releases of hazardous substances during future hurricanes, including installing backup power generation, securing equipment and piping to withstand high winds, establishing procedures to shutdown process operations safely, following established and up-to-date start-up procedures and checklists, and carefully performing pre-start-up safety reviews.

  10. Inflow characteristics associated with high-blade-loading events in a wind farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1993-07-01

    The stochastic characteristics of the turbulent inflow have been shown to be of major significance in the accumulation of fatigue in wind turbines. Because most of the wind turbine installations in the US have taken place in multi-turbine or wind farm configurations, the fatigue damage associated with the higher turbulence levels within such arrangements must be taken into account when making estimates of component service lifetimes. The simultaneous monitoring of two adjacent wind turbines over a wide range of turbulent inflow conditions has given the authors more confidence in describing the structural load distributions that can be expected in such an environment. The adjacent testing of the two turbines allowed the authors to postulate that observed similarities in the response dynamics and load distributions could be considered quasi-universal, while the dissimilarities could be considered to result from the differing design of the rotors. The format has also allowed them to begin to define appropriate statistical load distribution models for many of the critical components in which fatigue is a major driver of the design. In addition to the adjacent turbine measurements, they also briefly discuss load distributions measured on a teetered-hub turbine.

  11. Wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a translation of the edition published in the USA under the title of ''wind power: renewable energy for home, farm and business''. In the wake of mass blackouts and energy crises, wind power remains a largely untapped resource of renewable energy. It is a booming worldwide industry whose technology, under the collective wing of aficionados like author Paul Gipe, is coming of age. Wind Power guides us through the emergent, sometimes daunting discourse on wind technology, giving frank explanations of how to use wind technology wisely and sound advice on how to avoid common mistakes. Since the mid-1970's, Paul Gipe has played a part in nearly every aspect of wind energy development from installing small turbines to promoting wind energy worldwide. As an American proponent of renewable energy, Gipe has earned the acclaim and respect of European energy specialists for years, but his arguments have often fallen on deaf ears at home. Today, the topic of wind power is cropping up everywhere from the beaches of Cape Cod to the Oregon-Washington border, and one wind turbine is capable of producing enough electricity per year to run 200 average American households. Now, Paul Gipe is back to shed light on this increasingly important energy source with a revised edition of Wind Power. Over the course of his career, Paul Gipe has been a proponent, participant, observer, and critic of the wind industry. His experience with wind has given rise to two previous books on the subject, Wind Energy Basics and Wind Power for Home and Business, which have sold over 50,000 copies. Wind Power for Home and Business has become a staple for both homeowners and professionals interested in the subject, and now, with energy prices soaring, interest in wind power is hitting an all-time high. With chapters on output and economics, Wind Power discloses how much you can expect from each method of wind technology, both in terms of energy and financial savings. The book updated models

  12. Modeling lifetime of high power IGBTs in wind power applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busca, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    The wind power industry is continuously developing bringing to the market larger and larger wind turbines. Nowadays reliability is more of a concern than in the past especially for the offshore wind turbines since the access to offshore wind turbines in case of failures is both costly and difficult....... Lifetime modeling of future large wind turbines is needed in order to make reliability predictions about these new wind turbines early in the design phase. By doing reliability prediction in the design phase the manufacturer can ensure that the new wind turbines will live long enough. This paper represents...... an overview of the different aspects of lifetime modeling of high power IGBTs in wind power applications. In the beginning, wind turbine reliability survey results are briefly reviewed in order to gain an insight into wind turbine subassembly failure rates and associated downtimes. After that the most common...

  13. The Importance of basic Research for Inventions and Innovations in Wind Industry. Some Experiences from Denmark and China 1973 - 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jørgen Lindgaard; Xinxin, Kong

    districts in Denmark. With the traditional Dutch wind mills at that time it was possible to harvest 7 percent of the energy in the wind. For la Cour it was clear from beginning that this yield percentage should be much higher if wind electricity should be relevant in practice. The solution came with help...

  14. A Comparative Study of Magnetotail, Solar Wind and Ground Observations associated with Substorms and SMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, T.; McPherron, R.; Weygand, J.; Amm, O.; Ge, Y.; Yizengaw, E.; Angelopolous, V.

    2008-12-01

    Convection is the basic response of the magnetosphere to external driving by the solar wind electric field. The supply of solar wind energy into the magnetosphere may lead to different types of magnetospheric response. These include substorms, steady magnetospheric convection (SMC), poleward boundary intensifications, and sawtooth injection events. In a steady state the magnetic flux should be balanced between dayside merging process and tail returning process. However, the magnetic flux moving between the dayside and nightside is seldom in balance and eventually leads to instability in the magnetotail. The imbalance of magnetic flux is one of the main reasons why there are different types of magnetospheric activities. At the present time, the evolution from one mode of geomagnetic activity to another is still not understood. Is it dependent upon solar wind input only or is it controlled by internal magnetospheric processes only? Is it possible that both solar wind and internal magnetospheric processes can influence different dynamic regimes? A clear understanding of this issue would provide us important information concerning how the solar wind couples with the magnetosphere. In this study we have identified several interesting intervals composed of isolated substorms, substorm to SMC and SMC to substorm during THEMIS tail passages. A detailed comparison of solar wind, magnetotail, and ground observations from these events provides a good opportunity to examine the most important processes (quantities) responsible for different modes of activity. Several indices of activity will be estimated and compared such as the auroral electrojet evolution and the associated auroral disturbance. This is particularly interesting because ionospheric dissipation may be the main energy sink for the energy deposited in the magnetosphere and its understanding can reveal important information about how a transition from one mode to another occurs. The high-latitude and mid to low

  15. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the

  16. U.S. aerospace industry opinion of the effect of computer-aided prediction-design technology on future wind-tunnel test requirements for aircraft development programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the U.S. aerospace industry in late 1977 suggests that there will be an increasing use of computer-aided prediction-design technology (CPD Tech) in the aircraft development process but that, overall, only a modest reduction in wind-tunnel test requirements from the current level is expected in the period through 1995. Opinions were received from key spokesmen in 23 of the 26 solicited major companies or corporate divisions involved in the design and manufacture of nonrotary wing aircraft. Development programs for nine types of aircraft related to test phases and wind-tunnel size and speed range were considered.

  17. Transient flows of the solar wind associated with small-scale solar activity in solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor; Kuzin, Sergey; Gburek, Szymon; Ulyanov, Artyom; Kirichenko, Alexey; Shugay, Yulia; Goryaev, Farid

    The data obtained by the modern high sensitive EUV-XUV telescopes and photometers such as CORONAS-Photon/TESIS and SPHINX, STEREO/EUVI, PROBA2/SWAP, SDO/AIA provide good possibilities for studying small-scale solar activity (SSA), which is supposed to play an important role in heating of the corona and producing transient flows of the solar wind. During the recent unusually weak solar minimum, a large number of SSA events, such as week solar flares, small CMEs and CME-like flows were observed and recorded in the databases of flares (STEREO, SWAP, SPHINX) and CMEs (LASCO, CACTUS). On the other hand, the solar wind data obtained in this period by ACE, Wind, STEREO contain signatures of transient ICME-like structures which have shorter duration (<10h), weaker magnetic field strength (<10 nT) and lower proton temperature than usual ICMEs. To verify the assumption that ICME-like transients may be associated with the SSA events we investigated the number of weak flares of C-class and lower detected by SPHINX in 2009 and STEREO/EUVI in 2010. The flares were classified on temperature and emission measure using the diagnostic means of SPHINX and Hinode/EIS and were confronted with the parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density, ion composition and temperature, magnetic field, pitch angle distribution of the suprathermal electrons). The outflows of plasma associated with the flares were identified by their coronal signatures - CMEs (only in few cases) and dimmings. It was found that the mean parameters of the solar wind projected to the source surface for the times of the studied flares were typical for the ICME-like transients. The results support the suggestion that weak flares can be indicators of sources of transient plasma flows contributing to the slow solar wind at solar minimum, although these flows may be too weak to be considered as separate CMEs and ICMEs. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme

  18. Comments for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit)

    Science.gov (United States)

    List of comments for the Cape Wind Associates, LLC, Horseshoe Shoal, Nantucket Sound (Offshore Renewable Energy Project/OCS Air Permit: Massachusetts Plan Approval including nonattainment NSR Appendix A requirements).

  19. Using GPS Transmitters to Explore Movement Ecology and to Assess Risk of the Wind Energy Industry for Swainson's Hawks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Katheryn A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Boal, Clint W. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Groen, Laurie M. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Walker, Jimmy R. [West Texas A & M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Swainson’s hawks (Buteo swainsoni) are a long-distance migratory species that breed in western North America and winter in Argentina. As a grassland species, they can also be found in agricultural settings, such as croplands and pastures. Wind energy is expanding rapidly across the breeding range of the population we chose to study, and we suspect the industry is also expanding in their wintering range and across the migratory pathway. Wind turbines pose a threat to birds, and migratory species may be especially susceptible to turbine-related mortality when these structures are placed in important migratory pathways. The purposes of this longterm study were to examine potential threats that wind energy might pose to Swainson’s hawks on the breeding range, wintering range, and during migration, add to the body of ecological knowledge on migration and wintering habits, and describe breeding habits in a portion of their range that is relatively understudied.

  20. The predictability of wind gusts associated with winter storms over central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantillon, Florian; Knippertz, Peter; Corsmeier, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Wind storms associated with low-pressure systems from the North Atlantic are the most important natural hazard for central Europe. Although the forecast of winter storms has generally improved over the last decades, a detailed prediction of the associated wind gusts is still challenging due to the multiple scales involved. Here we report about new insights into the synoptic-scale predictability of 25 severe storms of the 1995-2015 period using data from the recently available homogeneous re-forecast dataset from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) evaluated against ERA-Interim reanalysis. In contrast to operational predictions, the re-forecast dataset is generated with an identical data assimilation and forecasting system over a time period long enough to allow a statistical analysis of historical events. The predictability of the storms is assessed with two sets of metrics: (a) the position and intensity to investigate the storms' propagation and dynamics and (b) the Storm Severity Index (SSI) to estimate the impact of wind gusts associated with the storms. This analysis shows that the storms are captured by the ensemble re-forecasts up to 2-4 days ahead only, which restricts the use of ensemble mean and spread to relatively short lead times. However, the metrics also show that the storms are correctly predicted at least by some ensemble members up to one week ahead. Following this result, the Extreme Forecast Index (EFI) and Shift of Tails (SOT) are computed from the individual re-forecasts and the model climate. Using these indices, we show that the model has some skill in forecasting the area covered by extreme wind gusts up to 10 days, which indicates clear potential for the early warning of storms. However, a large variability is found between the predictability of individual storms, which does not appear to be related to the storms' characteristics. This may be due to the limited sample of 25 cases, but also suggests that each

  1. Wind turbines fundamentals, technologies, application, economics

    CERN Document Server

    Hau, Erich

    2013-01-01

    "Wind Turbines" addresses all those professionally involved in research, development, manufacture and operation of wind turbines. It provides a cross-disciplinary overview of modern wind turbine technology and an orientation in the associated technical, economic and environmental fields.  In its revised third edition, special emphasis has been given to the latest trends in wind turbine technology and design, such as gearless drive train concepts, as well as on new fields of application, in particular the offshore utilisation of wind energy. The author has gained experience over decades designing wind energy converters with a major industrial manufacturer and, more recently, in technical consulting and in the planning of large wind park installations, with special attention to economics.

  2. Wind for Schools (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2010-05-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

  3. Environmental risks associated to wind erosion in a metal mining area from SE Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Fernandez, G.; Romero Diaz, A.

    2009-07-01

    Soils and mining wastes from the Mediterranean mining area placed in the Sierra Minera Mountains are highly enriched in heavy metals such as lead and zinc, but also other metals such as cadmium and arsenic. Wind erosion in this area could be considered extremely high and hazards associated to this eroded sediments seems to be high because the huge amount of metals present in this wastes. Therefore, combination of high erosion rates and high metal concentration in this mining waste, make those environmental risks can be considered high for the surrounding ecosystems, but also for public health of the nearby villages and towns. In order, to study these wind erosion processes over these mining materials, some experiments for the evaluation of the transportation of soil particles were carried out. Erosion rates in this realm is particularly important during spring months, when increased activity of the eastern winds brings intense soil dragging, with strong effects on the metals dispersion, including the massive removal of sediments. (Author) 16 refs.

  4. Joint R and D in low-carbon technology development in China: A case study of the wind-turbine manufacturing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yuanchun; Zhang Bing; Zou Ji; Bi Jun; Wang Ke

    2012-01-01

    China faces the dual challenges of climate change and increased energy demand. These challenges in turn increase the demand for wind energy development. Along with rapid growth in manufacturing capacity, Chinese companies have aspired to increase their innovation capacity in order to enhance their competitiveness in the market. Joint research and development (R and D) is an attractive path for Chinese companies striving to advance their R and D capacity. This paper examines joint R and D between Chinese wind-turbine manufacturing companies and foreign design firms, assessing the performance of joint R and D activities in China using the structure-conduct-performance (SCP) framework. The study found that joint R and D has improved Chinese companies’ technical capacity, human resources and financial growth. However, the effect on Chinese companies’ innovation capacity is still limited because of unequal technical capacities of the two sides in collaboration, as well as their preference for augmenting profits rather than technical capacity. Current joint R and D mode is only the extension of licensing mode in wind-turbine manufacturing industry. - Highlights: ► Joint R and D is an attractive path for Chinese companies striving to advance R and D capacity. ► We examined the performance of joint R and D in wind-turbine manufacturing industry. ► Joint R and D has improved Chinese companies’ technical capacity. ► The effect of Joint R and D on innovation capacity is still limited.

  5. Model support system using an industrial robot in low-speed wind tunnel; Sangyoyo robot wo mochiita fudo mokei shiji system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T.; Iwasaki, A.; Fujieda, H.; Shigemi, M. [National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo (Japan); Nakayasu, H.; Sagisaka, M. [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-06-01

    A model support system that can set the attitude with an attack angle, sideslip angle, and rotation angle as required by using the mechanism and function of an industrial robot and that can be rapidly moved to the specified position was developed. This system consists of a host computer, robot controller, and robot. A sting for wind tunnel model support and a six-component balance are installed at the tip of a robot arm. The robot has fix freedom levels and can control the attitude of the wind tunnel model. A model with weight capacity of 1470N and precision of {plus_minus}0.5 mm was selected. An A/D input block and external communication function were installed in the robot controller, in consideration of the dynamic floating effect that the machine continuously approaches a ground plate in the wind tunnel test of an experimental machine. The function test of a robot installed in the wind tunnel, the wind tunnel test using a robot, the comparison of aerodynamic data based on the difference of a model support system were investigated. The result showed that this system is very effective.

  6. Innovation and New Path Creation: The Role of Niche Environments in the Development of the Wind Power Industry in Germany and the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Juliet; Simme, James; Conti, Elisa; Povinelli, Fabiana; Kipshagen, Joschka Milan

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore the issues of innovation and new path creation in the UK and Germany, illustrated through the case of the modern wind power industry. Taking an evolutionary perspective drawing on path dependence theory, the paper examines the role of niche environments in the creation of new economic pathways. The research finds that new economic pathways are more likely to develop in places where niche conditions provide receptive environments for innovations to flourish. The pol...

  7. Fatigue testing of a carbon fibre composite wind turbine blade with associated material characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, G.A.; Richardson, D.J. [Univ. of the West of England, Faculty of Engineering, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    Within the EC project JOULE 2, the University of the West of England (UWE) tested a carbon fibre reinforced epoxy (CFRE) full scale wind turbine blade together with an associated material test coupon programme. All the work was closely linked with the manufacturer Polymarine BV of the Netherlands, who designed and manufactured the blade and provided test specimens, the UWE carried out the research into the validation of the design calculations together with a check of the strength and fatigue life of the blade. (au)

  8. Radon effective dose from TENORM waste associated with petroleum industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo-Elmagd, M.; Soliman, H. A.; Daif, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Technically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) associated with petroleum industries can be accumulated with elevated quantities and therefore can threat the workers through external and internal exposure. Measurements of radon-related parameters give information about the radioactivity levels in the TENORM waste using the well-established correlation. Also, it is useful to calculate the internal exposure due to radon inhalation in terms of effective radon dose. Among radon-related parameters, areal exhalation rate is the most suitable for characterising land and objects with only upper surface contamination in the case of petroleum waste. The TENORM in this study is collected from waste storage areas located near oil fields at south Sinai governorate (Egypt). The average values of exhalation rates as measured by Lucas cell based on delay count method are 273 ± 144 and 38 ± 8 Bq m -2 h -1 for scale and sludge, respectively. Whereas, two count method gives results with 18 and 20 % lower values for scale and sludge, respectively with good correlation coefficient of 0.999 and 0.852, respectively. Sealed cup fitted with CR-39 gives results compatible with Lucas cell with minor deviation in case of scale due to its thoron content. The results of CR-39 are qualified by taking into consideration the correction for back diffusion effect. The effective radon dose was calculated for different simulated radioactive waste storage areas with different contaminated areas and air ventilation rate. Minimising the contaminated areas and building up efficient ventilation systems can reduce the internal exposure even in the case of RWSA-containing TENORM with elevated radioactivity. (authors)

  9. Involving Associate Degree Students in an Industry-University Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebski, Wieslaw; Eisenberg, Elliot R.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a project where undergraduate engineering students worked with industry to produce isometric assembly drawings that showed the assembly process used in the production of various products. The drawings were produced using computer-assisted design software. (KR)

  10. Wind energy. Market prospects to 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckle, R.

    2002-01-01

    Renewable energy is becoming an increasingly significant source in the energy portfolio of most countries. Several sources of renewable energy are now being pursued commercially and wind energy is the most advanced in terms of installed electricity generation capacity. Of all types of renewable energy wind energy is the one with which there is the greatest experience - wind wheels and windmills have been used in various forms for hundreds of years. Chapter 1 is an introduction to the market study. Chapter 2 begins with a review of the wind energy industry. Topics included here are the case for wind energy (sustainability, security, non-polluting etc), market structure (the relationship between developers, operators, manufacturers, consortia etc) and environmental issues. This is followed by a discussion of the wind energy market for major countries in terms of installed wind power capacity. Within each country market there is an account of government policy, major wind energy programmes, major projects with information on developers and wind turbine manufacturers. A market analysis is given which includes an economic review, wind energy targets (where they exist) and forecasts to 2006. Chapter 3 is a review of wind turbine applications covering electricity generation for public supply networks, stand alone/community applications, water pumping and water desalination. Chapter 4 provides the basic principles of wind turbine operation and associated technologies. A brief account is given of the development of wind turbines and the main components such as the tower, rotor blades, gearbox, generator and electrical controls. Electricity generation and control are outlined and the challenge of electricity storage is also discussed. Meteorological factors (wind speed etc) and the move towards off-shore wind farms are also covered. Chapter 5 contains profiles of leading wind project developers and wind turbine manufacturers. A selection of existing and proposed wind farms

  11. Suitability analysis of wind energy development on brownfields, landfills and industrial sites in the city of Chicago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorova, Valeryia A.

    In 2011 renewable energy generated only about 5% of total U.S. electricity and 3% came from wind power. Wind power is the oldest and fastest growing renewable energy, and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) anticipates that by 2030 the potential of the U.S. to generate wind power will rise up to 20% (National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2008). Currently, the rural areas serve as the primary choice of wind turbine installation because there are less wind obstacles that create wind turbulence, which in turn is disruptive for the proper functioning of the wind turbines, and allows more laminar (streamline) wind flow. However according to various literatures, the installation of wind turbines in rural areas has its drawbacks. The infrastructure is underdeveloped and usually the selected sites require the construction of new roads and transmission lines. The new construction and occasional deforestation lead to soil erosion and environmental degradation. On top of that transporting energy to cities that are the primary consumers of wind energy results in energy transmission loss. Urban areas, on the other hand, have well developed infrastructure, and the installation of turbines on abandoned and contaminated urban lands which are expensive to clean and rehabilitate for other uses would lower installation costs and would have little environmental degradation effect. The objective of this research was to provide a preliminary wind power suitability analysis for installing medium (100 -1000 kW) and large (1000 - 3000 kW) size wind turbines in urban areas, such as city of Chicago. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and a multi attribute Weighted Linear Combination (WLC) method that is based on the concept of weighted average were primary tools utilized to conduct the analysis. The criteria that were used to select suitable sites were the same criteria used for rural wind farms, such as wind speeds, historic landmarks, avian and wildlife habitat, conservation lands, proximity

  12. Wind-generated Electricity in China: Decreasing Potential, Inter-annual Variability and Association with Changing Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Peter; Chen, Xinyu; McElroy, Michael B

    2017-11-24

    China hosts the world's largest market for wind-generated electricity. The financial return and carbon reduction benefits from wind power are sensitive to changing wind resources. Wind data derived from an assimilated meteorological database are used here to estimate what the wind generated electricity in China would have been on an hourly basis over the period 1979 to 2015 at a geographical resolution of approximately 50 km × 50 km. The analysis indicates a secular decrease in generating potential over this interval, with the largest declines observed for western Inner Mongolia (15 ± 7%) and the northern part of Gansu (17 ± 8%), two leading wind investment areas. The decrease is associated with long-term warming in the vicinity of the Siberian High (SH), correlated also with the observed secular increase in global average surface temperatures. The long-term trend is modulated by variability relating to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the Arctic Oscillation (AO). A linear regression model incorporating indices for the PDO and AO, as well as the declining trend, can account for the interannual variability of wind power, suggesting that advances in long-term forecasting could be exploited to markedly improve management of future energy systems.

  13. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    importantly exploiting cheap labour for industrial purposes from the native population. 13 . During the colonial era manufacturing in the continent was generally at the handicraft and small scale levels. In some colonies this was supplemented by some relatively complex industries producing mainly for export, but also ...

  14. Factors associated with bat mortality at wind energy facilities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundreds of thousands of bats are killed annually by colliding with wind turbines in the U.S., yet little is known about factors causing variation in mortality across wind energy facilities. We conducted a quantitative synthesis of bat collision mortality with wind turbines by re...

  15. Intense Geomagnetic Storms Associated with Coronal Holes Under the Weak Solar-Wind Conditions of Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, S.

    2018-02-01

    The activity of Solar Cycle 24 has been extraordinarily low. The yearly averaged solar-wind speed is also lower in Cycle 24 than in Cycles 22 and 23. The yearly averaged speed in the rising phase of Cycle 21 is as low as that of Cycle 24, although the solar activity of Cycle 21 is higher than that of Cycle 24. The relationship between the solar-wind temperature and its speed is preserved under the solar-wind conditions of Cycle 24. Previous studies have shown that only a few percent of intense geomagnetic storms (minimum Dst < -100 nT) were caused by high-speed solar-wind flows from coronal holes. We identify two geomagnetic storms associated with coronal holes within the 19 intense geomagnetic storms that took place in Cycle 24.

  16. Fault Tolerant Wind Farm Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years the wind turbine industry has focused on optimizing the cost of energy. One of the important factors in this is to increase reliability of the wind turbines. Advanced fault detection, isolation and accommodation are important tools in this process. Clearly most faults are dealt...... with best at a wind turbine control level. However, some faults are better dealt with at the wind farm control level, if the wind turbine is located in a wind farm. In this paper a benchmark model for fault detection and isolation, and fault tolerant control of wind turbines implemented at the wind farm...... control level is presented. The benchmark model includes a small wind farm of nine wind turbines, based on simple models of the wind turbines as well as the wind and interactions between wind turbines in the wind farm. The model includes wind and power references scenarios as well as three relevant fault...

  17. The 1991 Japan Solar Energy Society. Japan Wind Energy Association Joint Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Thie paper summarizes the lectures presented at the research presentation conference held by the Japan Solar Energy Society and the Japan Wind Energy Association. The contents include a lecture relating to photovoltaic cells intended for efficiency improvement; a lecture relating to a light power generation system including the field test reports, improvements on peripheral devices and output characteristics; a lecture relating to optical chemistry; a lecture relating to heat pumps utilizing solar heat and well water; a lecture relating air conditioning utilizing photovoltaic cells; a lecture relating to heat systems utilizing solar heat directly; a lecture relating to heat collection; a lecture relating to cold heat for cooling using earth tubes; a lecture relating to direct utilization of ground water heat and solar heat; a lecture relating to underground heat storage; a lecture relating to accumulation of cold heat and hot heat; a lecture relating to insolation on the amount of insolation and spectroscopy; a lecture relating to light collection intended of energy saving; a lecture relating to improving materials including light collecting plates and thin films; a lecture relating to development and characteristics of solar cars; and a lecture relating to wind energy.

  18. Industrialization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lucy

    . African states as ... regarded as the most important ingredients that went to add value to land and labour in order for countries ... B. Sutcliffe Industry and Underdevelopment (Massachusetts Addison – Wesley Publishing Company. 1971), pp.

  19. Industrialization

    OpenAIRE

    Blundel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization, the historical development that saw cheesemaking transformed from a largely craft-based or artisanal activity, often located on a dairy farm, to a production process that, for the most part, takes place in large ‘cheese factories’ or creameries [See ARTISANAL]. The principal features of modern industrialized cheesemaking, which set it apart from traditional approaches include: high production volumes; sourcing of milk from multiple dairy herds; pasteurization and re-balanci...

  20. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  1. Wind Power Today: (2002) Wind Energy Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-05-01

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind research conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today is to show how DOE supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry. This 2002 edition of Wind Power Today also includes discussions about wind industry growth in 2002, how DOE is taking advantage of low wind speed regions through advancing technology, and distributed applications for small wind turbines.

  2. Power from the Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2004-01-01

    Wind energy is the fastest-growing renewable energy source in the world. Over the last 20 years, the wind industry has done a very good job of engineering machines, improving materials, and economies of production, and making this energy source a reality. Like all renewable energy forms, wind energy's successful application is site specific. Also,…

  3. Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt-Belz, B.; Mohamad, Y.; Velasco, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    Industry plays a key role in the path towards eInclusion. While corporate social responsibility statements of leading companies confirm this, surveys show that there is still a long way to go. Among various reasons for the reluctant take-up of Design for All (DfA) by industry providing Information and Communication Technology (ICT), the lack of relevant knowledge and skills obviously plays a crucial role. Therefore, the DfA@eInclusion project has undertaken to develop curriculum guidelines an...

  4. Size effects in winding roll formed profiles: A study of carcass production for flexible pipes in offshore industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Nielsen, Morten Storgaard; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Carcass production of flexible offshore oil and gas pipes implies winding and interlocking of a roll formed stainless steel profile around a mandrel in a spiral shape. The location of the dividing point between the left and right half of the s-shaped profile in the finished carcass is very...... important as it directly influences carcass flexibility. The target location of the dividing point can be difficult to achieve since undesired degrees of freedom in the winding stage allows the profile to change geometry. The present work investigates this issue by performing production tests of a single...

  5. Developing a multi-modal freight movement plan for the sustainable growth of wind energy related industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    As the demand for wind power increases so too has the popularity of larger and larger turbines. Larger turbines are able to : produce more power for the input they receive but they are also much more difficult to transport. This project examines thes...

  6. A Review of the Current Evidence regarding Industrial Wind Turbines and Property Values from a Homeowner's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulden, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    As more wind energy projects are constructed and placed into operation, their potential downsides are becoming more apparent to a larger number of people. One of the most contentious issues is that of the potential loss of property values for those who happen to own homes close to these projects. This issue may be more parochial and therefore…

  7. Flight Paths of Migrating Golden Eagles and the Risk Associated with Wind Energy Development in the Rocky Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira N. Johnston

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains in northeastern British Columbia have received interest as a site of industrial wind energy development but, simultaneously, have been the subject of concern about wind development coinciding with a known migratory corridor of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos. We tracked and quantified eagle flights that crossed or followed ridgelines slated for one such wind development. We found that hourly passage rates during fall migration peaked at midday and increased by 17% with each 1 km/h increase in wind speed and by 11% with each 1°C increase in temperature. The propensity to cross the ridge tops where turbines would be situated differed between age classes, with juvenile eagles almost twice as likely to traverse the ridge-top area as adults or subadults. During fall migration, Golden Eagles were more likely to cross ridges at turbine heights (risk zone, < 150 m above ground under headwinds or tailwinds, but this likelihood decreased with increasing temperature. Conversely, during spring migration, eagles were more likely to move within the ridge-top area under eastern crosswinds. Identifying Golden Eagle flight routes and altitudes with respect to major weather systems and local topography in the Rockies may help identify scenarios in which the potential for collisions is greatest at this and other installations.

  8. Wind Power Career Chat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  9. Wind engineering in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisse, J.A.; Stigter, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The International Association for Wind Engineering (IAWE) has very few contacts in Africa, the second-largest continent. This paper reviews important wind-related African issues. They all require data on wind climate, which are very sparse in Africa. Wind engineering in Africa can assist in

  10. Forecast skill of synoptic conditions associated with Santa Ana winds in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Jones; Francis Fujioka; Leila M.V. Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    Santa Ana winds (SAW) are synoptically driven mesoscale winds observed in Southern California usually during late fall and winter. Because of the complex topography of the region, SAW episodes can sometimes be extremely intense and pose significant environmental hazards, especially during wildfire incidents. A simple set of criteria was used to identify synoptic-scale...

  11. Analyzing SO2 concentrations and wind directions during a short monitoring campaign at a site far from the industrial pole of La Plata, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratto, Gustavo; Videla, Fabian; Maronna, Ricardo

    2009-02-01

    This article presents and discusses SO2 air quality concentrations (ppbv) together with wind velocities and directions measurements carried out between September 1st and December 21st 2005 at a site located 8.5 km away from the Industrial Pole of La Plata area. As the city and its surroundings have no official monitoring network, the current work enlarges the air quality information available from the zone and sets some initial considerations to the future siting of monitoring stations. The statistical analysis of the data was performed using techniques of tests for outliers and trends, dissimilarity measures and robust regression. In relation to SO2 concentrations, low values were found during this short campaign considering daily averages (with a maximum of 8.5 ppbv) and hourly averages (with a maximum of 25.9 ppbv); World Health Organization guidelines were never surpassed. Nevertheless, a strong dependence between wind directions carrying air pollutants from the Industrial Pole and hourly concentration peaks were found. Due to low monthly SO2 concentrations and because a decreasing time trend was found, the authors propose, as an example, the implementation of an alternative discontinuous method to the continuous analyzer used in the current campaign. Our results state that sampling every 7 days at 13:00-13:59 hours (local time) would be enough to get representative values of the air quality. As a general remark it is possible to highlight that longer and systematic studies should be encouraged to confirm the seasonal wind pattern and to evaluate the air quality.

  12. Local ionospheric electrodynamics associated with neutral wind fields at low latitudes: Kelvin-Helmholtz billows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. St.-Maurice

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Gadanki radar observation of plasma irregularities bearing the signature of Kelvin-Helmholtz billows above 100 km altitude raises the question of the electrodynamical mechanism that would allow the structures to drift with the neutral wind. We show that for locally varying neutral wind fields with the right geometry at night, multiple Hall effects in the electron gas lead to a situation where ions, electrons, and neutrals move together along the component of the wind that changes most rapidly in space. The species must not move together along all directions, however. If this were the case the plasma would be stable and a radar would be unable to observe the wind field. We discuss the stability of the plasma itself for Es layers affected by the Kelvin-Helmholtz wind field and show that a variety of factors have to be taken into account beyond the study of the zeroth order mechanism.

  13. Wind industrialization and province of Santa Cruz contribution to the improvement of global environment through hydrogen use as a fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Carlos Bolcich

    2006-01-01

    In Pico Truncado, Santa Cruz, Patagonia, Argentina, a wind farm with 2,4 MWatt is already installed. Greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced about seven thousand tons/year. A Demo Plant for electrolytic Hydrogen production was officially inaugurated on December 2005. Additionally, UNIDO-ICHET proposed at Koluel Kayke village, close to Pico Truncado, progressive replacement of present energy system by Wind, Water, Electricity and Hydrogen, thus covering all kind of final energy requirements. Natural gas and liquid fuels replacement by Hydrogen will be used for homes, productive micro enterprises, vehicles and general machinery. Demo experiences with fuel cells, ICE electric generator, catalytic heaters, compressors, heat recovery and exergy improvement are in progress. Human resources training and diffusion of Clean Hydrogen Energy Culture to general public, mostly scholars, are of great interest. (authors)

  14. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan Wiser, Mark Bolinger

    2011-06-01

    This report provides a comprehensive overview of trends in the U.S. wind power market in 2010. The report analyzes trends in wind power capacity, industry, manufacturing, turbines, installed project costs, project performance, and wind power prices. It also describes trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers, and discusses financing issues.

  15. Proceedings of CanWEA's 24. annual conference and trade show : fast forward to wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Wind Energy Association's conference and trade show provides an annual forum for wind developers, wind turbine manufacturers, component suppliers and electric utility operators to discuss issues currently facing the wind industry and measures that must be taken to ensure its future growth in Canada. As part of a range of renewable energy initiatives designed to help Canada reach its target commitments for the Kyoto Protocol, the expansion of the wind industry is expected to reduce the country's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and provide significant economic benefits to local communities. However, the wind industry is facing a number of challenges and constraints due to a lack of clear policies from provincial and federal governments. Significant infrastructure investments and financial incentives will need to be put in place in order to provide a secure foundation for future growth. The conference was divided into 3 tracks: (1) wind energy enhancement in Canada; (2) trends in wind research and development; and (3) the business of wind. Presentations examined solutions related to wind energy integration with electricity grids and discussed methods of building social acceptance of wind projects in communities. Advances in forecasting and computerized simulations were presented, and methods of negotiating environmental assessments and planning permit requirements were discussed. The conference also included a small wind pre-conference that addressed issues related to the growth and manufacturing of small wind turbines in Canada. The conference featured 88 presentations, of which 69 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  16. Tropospheric mid-latitude geopotential wave characteristics associated with strong wind events in the North Atlantic/European region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Simon; Simmonds, Ian; Leckebusch, Gregor C.

    2015-04-01

    The variability of strong synoptic scale wind events in the mid-latitudes have long been linked to baroclinic wave activity in the mid troposphere. Previous studies have also shown that greater amplitudes of planetary waves in the mid troposphere are likely to increase the occurrence of regional extremes in temperature and precipitation. In this study we examine whether characteristics of planetary and synoptic mid-latitude waves show systematic anomalies in the North Atlantic/ European region which can be related to the occurrence of a strong surface wind event. We will mainly focus on two questions: 1) Do amplitudes for waves with different wave lengths show a systematic anomaly when a strong wind event occurs? 2) Can phases of the individual wave components be detected that favour strong wind events? In order to decompose the mid-tropospheric flow into longitudinal waves we employ the fast Fourier transform to the meridional mean of the geopotential height in 500hPa between 35° and 60°N for i) the entire latitude belt and ii) for a North Atlantic/European sector (36°W to 36°E). Our definition of strong wind events is based on the Storm Severity Index (SSI) alongside a wind tracking algorithm identifying areas of exceedances of the local 98th percentile of the 10m wind speed. First results using ERA-Interim Reanalysis from 1979 - 2014 for the extended winter season (ONDJFM) for the 50 most intense strong wind systems with respect to the SSI reveal a greater amplitude for all investigated wave numbers. Especially waves with wave lengths below 2000km show an increase of about 25% of the daily standard deviation on average. The distribution of wave phases for the different wave numbers with respect to the location of a strong wind event shows a less homogenous picture. There is however a high proportion of events that can be associated with phases around 3π/4 and 5π/4 of waves with lengths of around 6000km, equivalent to wave number 5 on a planetary scale

  17. Problems pilots face involving wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Educating pilots and the aviation industry about wind shears presents a major problem associated with this meteorological phenomenon. The pilot's second most pressing problem is the need for a language to discuss wind shear encounters with other pilots so that the reaction of the aircraft to the wind shear encounter can be accurately described. Another problem is the flight director which gives a centered pitch command for a given angular displacement from the glide slope. It was suggested that they should instead be called flight path command and should not center unless the aircraft is actually correcting to the flight path.

  18. Mining and sustainable development: environmental policies and programmes of mining industry associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    Mining industry policies and practices have evolved rapidly in the environmental area, and more recently in the social area as well. Mining industry associations are using a variety of methods to stimulate and assist their member companies as they improve their environmental, social and economic performance. These associations provide opportunities for companies to use collaborative approaches in developing and applying improved technology, systems and practices (author)

  19. Estimated Pollution Reduction from Wind Farms in Oklahoma and Associated Economic and Human Health Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Scott Greene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, there has been a recognition of the growing need for different forms of energy outside of fossil fuels. Since the latter half of the twentieth century individuals, corporations, and governments have become increasingly aware of the effects of the emissions of carbon and other harmful pollutants on the environment. With this greater concern has come increasing activity to combat these harmful emissions by using alternative fuel sources to power homes, businesses, and cities. As can be seen from recent trends in their installed capacity, it is clear that renewable energy resources will continue to be more commonly used in the future. As renewable energy increases, a decrease in a range of harmful pollutants from the energy sector will also occur. This paper provides a case study to estimate the potential environmental and health benefits of an increased shift from fossil fuels to renewable fuels for electrical production in Oklahoma. Results illustrate and quantify the specific reduction that wind energy can and will have on air quality, as well as provide a quantification of the associated potential health benefits.

  20. Study of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mortality associated with industrial pollution in Spain, using Poisson models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lope Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs have been linked to proximity to industrial areas, but evidence regarding the health risk posed by residence near pollutant industries is very limited. The European Pollutant Emission Register (EPER is a public register that furnishes valuable information on industries that release pollutants to air and water, along with their geographical location. This study sought to explore the relationship between NHL mortality in small areas in Spain and environmental exposure to pollutant emissions from EPER-registered industries, using three Poisson-regression-based mathematical models. Methods Observed cases were drawn from mortality registries in Spain for the period 1994–2003. Industries were grouped into the following sectors: energy; metal; mineral; organic chemicals; waste; paper; food; and use of solvents. Populations having an industry within a radius of 1, 1.5, or 2 kilometres from the municipal centroid were deemed to be exposed. Municipalities outside those radii were considered as reference populations. The relative risks (RRs associated with proximity to pollutant industries were estimated using the following methods: Poisson Regression; mixed Poisson model with random provincial effect; and spatial autoregressive modelling (BYM model. Results Only proximity of paper industries to population centres (>2 km could be associated with a greater risk of NHL mortality (mixed model: RR:1.24, 95% CI:1.09–1.42; BYM model: RR:1.21, 95% CI:1.01–1.45; Poisson model: RR:1.16, 95% CI:1.06–1.27. Spatial models yielded higher estimates. Conclusion The reported association between exposure to air pollution from the paper, pulp and board industry and NHL mortality is independent of the model used. Inclusion of spatial random effects terms in the risk estimate improves the study of associations between environmental exposures and mortality. The EPER could be of great utility when studying the effects of

  1. Offshore Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The technology behind constructing wind farms offshore began to develop in 1991 when the Vindeby wind farm was installed off the Danish coast (11 Bonus 450 kW turbines). Resource assessment, grid connection, and wind farm operation are significant challenges for offshore wind power just...... concern are the problems associated with locating the turbines close together in a wind farm and the problems of placing several large wind farms in a confined area. The environmental impacts of offshore wind farms are also treated, but not the supply chain, that is, the harbors, the installation vessels...

  2. Final Technical Report Overcoming Critical Barriers to U.S. Wind Power: A University-Industry Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acker, Tom [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Kipple, Allison [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

    2012-10-29

    The objective of this project was to develop a curriculum module involving the design and simulation of a wind turbine generator. Dr. Allison Kipple, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, led development of the module, employing graduate and undergraduate students, and Dr. Tom Acker served as project manager and principal investigator. This objective was achieved resulting in development of curricular materials, implementation and revision of the materials in EE 364, a Northern Arizona University electrical engineering course in “Fundamentals of Electromagnetics,” and via dissemination of the curricular materials to a broad community including other universities.

  3. WindNet: Improving the impact assessment of wind power projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Jones

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Growing international demand for renewable energy has led to rapid growth in the wind power sector and wind farms are becoming an increasingly common feature of landscapes and seascapes in many countries. However, as the most appropriate locations within established markets are taken up, and as wind power penetrates new markets, there is an increasing likelihood that proposed projects will encroach on sensitive landscapes and residential areas. This will present challenges for the industry, particularly due to the impact that public opinion can have upon the outcomes of planning decisions about specific projects. This article introduces the four key dimensions of the WindNet programme, which are helping to elucidate some of the socio-technical debates that will likely shape the future of the wind power sector. The article outlines studies investigating (1 public responses to cumulative landscape and visual impacts, (2 the auditory impact of wind power projects on human health, (3 the science of wind farm design and its implications for planning, and (4 the relevance of the democratic deficit explanation of the so-called "social gap" in wind farm siting. The outcomes of the research being conducted by WindNet stand to help reduce uncertainty within the planning process and assist in providing a more comprehensive and fairer assessment of the possible impacts associated with wind power project development.

  4. Wind-tunnel simulation of lower atmosphere layers. Application to prediction of the environmental impact of an industrial site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, Eric.

    1980-01-01

    Physical simulation of lower atmosphere layers in a wind tunnel is a particularly useful method for understanding the basic effects involved and for studying individual sites in areas with complex relief features. The study described in this report includes four main parts, in which conditions for application of physical model simulation data to atmospheric flows are determined from an analysis of scaling requirements and results of an experimental study of turbulent boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers, followed by an investigation of gas effluent dispersion on a model of a nuclear power plant site. General features of the wind tunnel, methods of measurement and the test data processing programs used are described. By provision of suitable boundary roughness and injection of air at the test section inlet, thick boundary layers with similar internal characteristics to those of the ground-level atmospheric layer are obtained. In particular, air injection has the effect of increasing thickness of the constant-shear zone. A 1/700 scale model of the Paluel site was installed in this turbulent boundary layer to investigate the effect of local cliffs on dispersion of radioactive effluent from chimneys of varying height. The test data represent the mean and turbulent air flow patterns on the site and effluent concentration distribution in the area surrounding the power plant [fr

  5. Wind energy - The facts. An analysis of wind energy in the EU-25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-02-01

    Since the previous edition of Wind Enera - The Facts was published five years ago, the wind energy sector has undergone rapid change and transformation. There has been an explosion in demand for and Interest in a cleaner energy world from politicians, institutions, policy makers and regulators, the media, commentators and the general public. Such interest necessitates a greater depth of understanding of the wind power sector if informed choices and policy decisions are to be made. The European Wind Energy Association (EWEA), and the European Commission's Directorate General for Transport' and Energy have collaborated on this report to provide a detailed overview of the wind power sector. Wind Enera - The Facts provides a comprehenslve overview of the essential issues concerning wind power today: technology, cost, prices, environment, industry and employment, market, and research and development. Wind energy is a relatively young but rapidly expanding industry. Over the past decade, global installed capacity has increased from 2,500 megawatts (MW) in 1992 to just over 40,000 MW at the end of 2003, at an annual growth rate of near 30%. Almost three quarters of this capacity has been installed in Europe. Penetration levels in the electricity sector have reached 20% in Denmark and about 5% in both Germany and Spain. The north German state of Schleswig-Holstein has 1,800 MW of installed wind capacity, enough to meet 30% of the region's total electricity demand, while in Navarra, in Spain, 50% of consumption is met by wind power. If positive policy support continues to develop, EWEA has projected that wind power will achieve an installed capacity of 75,000 MW in the EU-15 by 2010. This would represent an overall contribution to electricity supply of 5.5%. By 2020, this figure is expected to increase to more than 12%, with wind power providing energy equal to the demand of 195 million European household consumers. (au)

  6. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  7. Damage detection in carbon composite material typical of wind turbine blades using auto-associative neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervilis, N.; Barthorpe, R. J.; Antoniadou, I.; Staszewski, W. J.; Worden, K.

    2012-04-01

    The structure of a wind turbine blade plays a vital role in the mechanical and structural operation of the turbine. As new generations of offshore wind turbines are trying to achieve a leading role in the energy market, key challenges such as a reliable Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of the blades is significant for the economic and structural efficiency of the wind energy. Fault diagnosis of wind turbine blades is a "grand challenge" due to their composite nature, weight and length. The damage detection procedure involves additional difficulties focused on aerodynamic loads, environmental conditions and gravitational loads. It will be shown that vibration dynamic response data combined with AANNs is a robust and powerful tool, offering on-line and real time damage prediction. In this study the features used for SHM are Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) acquired via experimental methods based on an LMS system by which identification of mode shapes and natural frequencies is accomplished. The methods used are statistical outlier analysis which allows a diagnosis of deviation from normality and an Auto-Associative Neural Network (AANN). Both of these techniques are trained by adopting the FRF data for normal and damage condition. The AANN is a method which has not yet been widely used in the condition monitoring of composite materials of blades. This paper is trying to introduce a new scheme for damage detection, localisation and severity assessment by adopting simple measurements such as FRFs and exploiting multilayer neural networks and outlier novelty detection.

  8. Wind energy applications guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    anon.

    2001-01-01

    The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

  9. Is Industry Funding Associated with Greater Scholarly Impact Among Academic Neurosurgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Kilic, Suat; Yoo, Nicholas G; Mcleod, Thomas; Svider, Peter F; Baredes, Soly; Folbe, Adam J; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2017-07-01

    To determine the relationship between industry payments and scholarly impact among academic neurosurgeons. Faculty names and academic rank data were obtained from department websites, bibliometric data were obtained from the Scopus database, and industry payment data were obtained from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services open payments database (openpayments.cms.gov). The h-index was used to estimate scholarly impact. Payments were classified as "general," "associated research," and "research payments." Subgroup analyses were done for academic rank, fellowship training, and sex. Among 1008 academic neurosurgeons, scholarly impact was greater among individuals receiving associated research industry support compared with those not receiving it. Scholarly impact also was greater among individuals who received more than $10,000 of any type of industry support compared with individuals who received less than that or no payment. This association also was seen in fellowship-trained surgeons. Female neurosurgeons were less likely than male neurosurgeons to get industry funding and were likely to get less funding. There is a strong association between associated research funding from industry and scholarly impact among academic neurosurgeons. It's unclear whether this association is a result of funding facilitating more research projects that eventually lead to more high-impact publications, if industry is providing more funding to academic neurosurgeons with greater scholarly impact, or whether it represents intrinsic academic activity among a group of neurosurgeons who are more likely to be academically productive and procure funding from all potential sources to increase this activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Wind turbines, is it just wind?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, M.

    2012-01-01

    The author first outlines that wind energy is not only random, but almost absent in extreme situations when it would be needed (for example and notably, very cold weather without wind). He suggests the association of a gas turbine to each wind turbine, so that the gas turbine will replace non operating wind turbines. He notices that wind turbines are not proximity energy as they were said to be, and that profitability in fact requires tens of grouped giant wind turbines. He also outlines the high cost of construction of grids for the connection of these wind turbines. Thus, he states that wind energy is far from being profitable in the present conditions of electricity tariffs in France

  11. Wind Energy Workforce Development & Jobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-11-08

    The United States needs a skilled and qualified wind energy workforce to produce domestic clean power. To assist with wind energy workforce development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are engaged with several efforts.This presentation by Suzanne Tegen describes these efforts, including a wind industry survey, DOE's Wind Career Map, the DOE Wind Vision report, and an in-depth discussion of the Jobs & Economic Development Impacts Model.

  12. Model Agreements for the granting of Associate Member Status Implementation arrangements concerning eligibility for personnel appointments and industrial participation for Associate Member States Progress report by the Management

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Model Agreements for the granting of Associate Member Status Implementation arrangements concerning eligibility for personnel appointments and industrial participation for Associate Member States Progress report by the Management

  13. Assessing the Factors Associated With Iran's Intra-Industry Trade in Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusefzadeh, Hassan; Hadian, Mohammad; Abolghasem Gorji, Hassan; Ghaderi, Hossein

    2015-03-30

    Pharmaceutical industry is a sensitive and profitable industry. If this industry wants to survive, it should be able to compete well in international markets. So, study of Iran's intra-industry trade (IIT) in pharmaceuticals is essential in order to identify competitiveness potential of country and boost export capability in the global arena. This study assessed the factors associated with Iran's intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals with the rest of the world during the 2001-2012 periods using seasonal time series data at the four-digit SITC level. The data was collected from Iran's pharmaceutical Statistics, World Bank and International Trade Center. Finally, we discussed a number of important policy recommendations to increase Iran's IIT in pharmaceuticals. The findings indicated that economies of scale, market structure and degree of economic development had a significantly positive impact on Iran's intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals and tariff trade barriers were negatively related to IIT. Product differentiation and technological advancement didn't have the expected signs. In addition, we found that Iran's IIT in pharmaceuticals have shown an increasing trend during the study period. Thus, the composition of Iran trade in pharmaceuticals has changed from inter-industry trade to intra-industry trade. In order to get more prepared for integration into the global economy, the development of Iran's IIT in pharmaceuticals should be given priority. Therefore, paying attention to IIT could have an important role in serving pharmaceutical companies in relation to pharmaceutical trade.

  14. European Wind Atlas and Wind Resource Research in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling

    to estimate the actual wind climate at any specific site and height within this region. The Danish and European Wind Atlases are examples of how the wind atlas methodology can be employed to estimate the wind resource potential for a country or a sub-continent. Recently, the methodology has also been used...... - from wind measurements at prospective sites to wind tunnel simulations and advanced flow modelling. Among these approaches, the wind atlas methodology - developed at Ris0 National Laboratory over the last 25 years - has gained widespread recognition and is presently considered by many as the industry......-standard tool for wind resource assessment and siting of wind turbines. The PC-implementation of the methodology, the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP), has been applied in more than 70 countries and territories world-wide. The wind atlas methodology is based on physical descriptions and models...

  15. Social responses to wind energy development in Ontario: The influence of health risk perceptions and associated concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Songsore, Emmanuel; Buzzelli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study documents and analyzes the role of health risk perceptions and other associated concerns of wind energy development (henceforth WED) in Ontario. Drawing on the risk society framework, we conduct a longitudinal media content analysis to document and analyze perceptions of and responses to WED over a nine year period. Attention is paid to temporal variations in responses relative to Ontario's Green Energy Act (2009) (henceforth GEA); legislation aimed at the rapid expansion of renewable energy. The study reveals that the most radical forms of resistance to WED on health grounds are driven by perceived injustices in the treatment of potential at-risk citizens and citizens with health concerns. The GEA is fuelling these perceptions of injustices in subtle and nuanced ways, particularly by acting as a major confounder to health risk concerns. Contrary to several existing studies, we problematize the use of financial incentives to foster the development of wind energy. We also provide policy recommendations which include the need for increased public engagement in the WED process, the importance of using third party health and environmental assessments to inform developments as well as the need for post-development strategies to address ongoing community concerns. - Highlights: • We analyze health risk perception-based responses to wind energy development. • Health risks concerns are a major driver of public resistance to wind energy. • Perceptions of injustices strongly fuel resistance to wind energy on health grounds. • Acceptance of turbines does not imply successful coexistence with turbines. • Using financial benefits to promote social acceptance could be problematic

  16. Power Curve Estimation With Multivariate Environmental Factors for Inland and Offshore Wind Farms

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Giwhyun

    2015-04-22

    In the wind industry, a power curve refers to the functional relationship between the power output generated by a wind turbine and the wind speed at the time of power generation. Power curves are used in practice for a number of important tasks including predicting wind power production and assessing a turbine’s energy production efficiency. Nevertheless, actual wind power data indicate that the power output is affected by more than just wind speed. Several other environmental factors, such as wind direction, air density, humidity, turbulence intensity, and wind shears, have potential impact. Yet, in industry practice, as well as in the literature, current power curve models primarily consider wind speed and, sometimes, wind speed and direction. We propose an additive multivariate kernel method that can include the aforementioned environmental factors as a new power curve model. Our model provides, conditional on a given environmental condition, both the point estimation and density estimation of power output. It is able to capture the nonlinear relationships between environmental factors and the wind power output, as well as the high-order interaction effects among some of the environmental factors. Using operational data associated with four turbines in an inland wind farm and two turbines in an offshore wind farm, we demonstrate the improvement achieved by our kernel method.

  17. Multiple Lightning Discharges in Wind Turbines Associated with Nearby Cloud-to-Ground Lightning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candela Garolera, Anna; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Madsen, Søren Find

    2015-01-01

    -triggering video cameras were correlated with data from the U.S. National Lighting Detection Network. In all five events, the correlation showed that a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning stroke with high peak current struck the ground within 10 km of the affected turbines at the time of the currents in the wind...

  18. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role wind energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of wind energy use, the wind energy resource, wind energy technology including intermediate-size and small wind turbines and intermittency of wind power, public attitudes toward wind power, and environmental, siting and land use issues

  19. "My love-hate relationship": Ethical issues associated with nurses' interactions with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Quinn

    2014-08-01

    Ethical issues associated with nurses' interactions with industry have implications for the safety, quality, and cost of healthcare. To date, little work has explored nurse-industry interactions and their associated ethical issues empirically. A phenomenological study was conducted to explore registered nurses' interactions with industry in clinical practice. Five registered nurses working in direct patient care were recruited and individual, in-depth interviews were conducted. The University's Committee on Human Research approved the study. Nurses frequently interacted with industry in their practice and felt ambivalent about these interactions. Nurses described systemic cuts to multiple "goods" central to nursing practice, including patient support, but paradoxically relied on industry resources to deliver these "goods." They relied on a particular conception of trust to navigate these interactions but were left to do so individually on the basis of their experience. Conflicts of interest arose as a result of multiple competing interests, and were frequently mediated through nurses' superiors. Nursing as a profession requires a guiding narrative to aid nurses in interpreting and navigating interactions with industry. A conception of trust that incorporates both the work of caring and attention to social justice could form the basis of these interactions, but would require that nursing take a much more critical stance toward marketing interactions. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjarlais, A. O.

    2007-08-15

    This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures

  1. Set-aside key to creating industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    The Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) submitted a plan of wind energy industry development to the Regie de l'energie of Quebec at its May wind set-aside hearings. According to the plan, CanWEA wants to see Hydro-Quebec buy 10 MW of wind power a year starting in 2001, progressively increasing to 50 MW power per year in four years. According to CanWEA the size of the set-aside must be large enough to foster competition in the turbine manufacturing sector, as well as put a downward pressure on wind energy prices. In 1996, Hydro-Quebec pledged to buy 10 MW of wind power per year over 10 years. It raised the target to 20 MW per year over 10 years in 1997, which was raised to 30 MW per year by a parliamentary commission in the spring of 1998. Hydro-Quebec contends that it cannot buy more than 30 MW, given that some of the utility's large industrial customers won't want to pay the increased cost of wind energy, and before buying any wind power there will have to be a decision about who will pay the additional cost. The Regie de l'energie has the power to decide whether Hydro-Quebec should spread the cost over the entire customer base, or just charge those customers willing to pay. According to the Regie, the wind set-aside is not simply an energy supply question, it is also a matter of developing a wind turbine manufacturing industry. It is this larger objective and other key issues, such as the economic spin-offs from developing wind energy, its role in regional development and its environmental impacts that will determine the the size of the set-aside and the price to be paid for wind power by Hydro-Quebec

  2. Turning to the wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, B.

    1981-10-01

    Consideration is given the economic and technological aspects of both free-stream (horizontal-axis) and cross-wind (vertical-axis) wind energy conversion systems, with attention to operational devices ranging in rotor diameter from 10 to 40 m and in output from 22 to 630 kW. After a historical survey of wind turbine design and applications development, the near-term technical feasibility and economic attractiveness of combined wind/fossil-fueled generator and wind/hydroelectric systems are assessed. Also presented are estimates of wind energy potential extraction in the U.S. and Denmark, the industrial requirements of large-scale implementation, energy storage possibilities such as pumped hydro and flywheels, and cost comparisons of electrical generation by large and small wind systems, coal-fired plants, and light-water fission reactors.

  3. Wind power takes over

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    All over the industrialized world concentrated efforts are being made to make wind turbines cover some of the energy demand in the coming years. There is still a long way to go, however, towards a 'green revolution' as far as energy is concerned, for it is quite futile to use wind power for electric heating. The article deals with some of the advantages and disadvantages of developing wind power. In Norway, for instance, environmentalists fear that wind power plants along the coast may have serious consequences for the stocks of white-tailed eagle and golden eagle. An other factor that delays the large-scale application of wind power in Norway is the low price of electricity. Some experts, however, maintain that wind power may already compete with new hydroelectric power of intermediate cost. The investment costs are expected to go down with one third by 2020, when wind power may be the most competitive energy source to utilize

  4. Wind: French revolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.

    2006-01-01

    Despite having the second best wind resources in Europe after the UK, the wind industry in France lags behind its European counterparts with just 6 W of installed wind capacity per person. The electricity market in France is dominated by the state-owned Electricite de France (EdF) and its nuclear power stations. However, smaller renewable generators are now in theory allowed access to the market and France has transposed the EU renewables directive into national law. The French governement has set a target of generating 10,000 MW of renewable capacity by 2010. The announcement of an increased feed-in tariff and the introduction of 'development zones' (ZDEs) which could allow fast-tracking of planning for wind projects are also expected to boost wind projects. But grid access and adminstrative burdens remain major barriers. In addition, French politicians and local authorities remain committed to nuclear, though encouraged by the European Commission, wind is beginning to gain acceptance; some 325 wind farms (representing 1557 MW of capacity) were approved between February 2004 and January 2005. France is now regarded by the international wind energy sector as a target market. One of France's leading independent wind developers and its only listed wind company, Theolia, is expected to be one of the major beneficiaries of the acceleration of activity in France, though other companies are keen to maximise the opportunities for wind. France currently has only one indigenous manufacturer of wind turbines, but foreign suppliers are winning orders

  5. Association of Industry Payments to Physicians With the Prescribing of Brand-name Statins in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, James S; Franklin, Jessica M; Avorn, Jerry; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2016-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industry payments to physicians may affect prescribing practices and increase costs if more expensive medications are prescribed. Determine the association between industry payments to physicians and the prescribing of brand-name as compared with generic statins for lowering cholesterol. Cross-sectional linkage of the Part D Medicare prescriptions claims data with the Massachusetts physicians payment database including all licensed Massachusetts physicians who wrote prescriptions for statins paid for under the Medicare drug benefit in 2011. The exposure variable was a physician's industry payments as listed in the Massachusetts database. The outcome was the physician's rate of prescribing brand-name statins. We used linear regression to analyze the association between the intensity of physicians' industry relationships (as measured by total payments) and their prescribing practices, as well as the effects of specific types of payments. Among the 2444 Massachusetts physicians in the Medicare prescribing database in 2011, 899 (36.8%) received industry payments. The most frequent payment was for company-sponsored meals (n = 639 [71.1%]). Statins accounted for 1 559 003 prescription claims; 356 807 (22.8%) were for brand-name drugs. For physicians with no industry payments listed, the median brand-name statin prescribing rate was 17.8% (95% CI, 17.2%-18.4%). For every $1000 in total payments received, the brand-name statin prescribing rate increased by 0.1% (95% CI, 0.06%-0.13%; P brand-name prescribing (P = .004); other forms of payments were not. Industry payments to physicians are associated with higher rates of prescribing brand-name statins. As the United States seeks to rein in the costs of prescription drugs and make them less expensive for patients, our findings are concerning.

  6. Determination of possible radiation hazards associated with tin mining industry in West Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, S.J.

    1979-04-01

    A study was made in Malaysia under an IAEA research contract on the possible radiation hazards associated with tin mining industry in Malaysia. The study comprised of the measurement of external radiation levels in various mines, gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of various samples from mines, and measurements of radon and radon daughters concentrations. For radon daughters modified Tsivoglou and Kusnetz methods were used. The study showed that there is, in general, no radiation hazard associated with the tin mining industry in West Malaysia. However, the only likely source that might pose some external radiation hazard is the amang upgrading plant which invariably concentrates either or both 232 Th and 238 U in the final products of the upgrading process. A quantitative and thorough investigation of radiation levels in the amang upgrading industry is necessary to determine the degree of hazard. No significant radon or radon daughters concentrations were noted in the underground mines

  7. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  8. RELATIVE CONTRIBUTION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD BARRIER AND SOLAR WIND SPEED IN ICME-ASSOCIATED FORBUSH DECREASES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Subramanian, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We study 50 cosmic-ray Forbush decreases (FDs) from the Oulu neutron monitor data during 1997–2005 that were associated with Earth-directed interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Such events are generally thought to arise due to the shielding of cosmic rays by a propagating diffusive barrier. The main processes at work are the diffusion of cosmic rays across the large-scale magnetic fields carried by the ICME and their advection by the solar wind. In an attempt to better understand the relative importance of these effects, we analyze the relationship between the FD profiles and those of the interplanetary magnetic field (B) and the solar wind speed (V sw ). Over the entire duration of a given FD, we find that the FD profile is generally (anti)correlated with the B and V sw profiles. This trend holds separately for the FD main and recovery phases too. For the recovery phases, however, the FD profile is highly anti-correlated with the V sw profile, but not with the B profile. While the total duration of the FD profile is similar to that of the V sw profile, it is significantly longer than that of the B profile. Using the convection–diffusion model, a significant contribution of advection by solar wind is found during the recovery phases of the FD.

  9. Recent applications of the cubic-plus-association (CPA) equation of state to industrially important systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folas, Georgios; Derawi, Samer; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2005-01-01

    The cubic-plus-association equation of state (CPA EoS) has been extended to phase equilibria of industrially important binary mixtures of alcohol-hydrocarbon, alcohol/glycol-water systems and mixtures with organic acids. The ability of the model to predict different types of equilibria was tested...

  10. Tobacco industry influence on the definition of tobacco related disorders by the American Psychiatric Association

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, M; Bitton, A; Glantz, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, third edition (DSM-III), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 1980, included the first official definitions by the APA of tobacco dependence and tobacco withdrawal. Tobacco industry efforts to influence the DSM-III were investigated.

  11. 77 FR 13121 - Solar Energy Industries Association: Notice of Petition for Rulemaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. RM12-10-000] Solar Energy Industries Association: Notice of Petition for Rulemaking Take notice that on February 16, 2012, Solar Energy... and Rule 207 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) Rules of Practice and...

  12. Wind energy and social acceptability; Energie eolienne et acceptability sociale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurtey, E. (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    This document was prepared as part of a decentralized collaboration between Quebec and France to share knowledge regarding strategies and best practices in wind power development. It reviewed the social acceptance of Quebec's wind power industry, particularly at the municipal level. The wind industry is growing rapidly in Quebec, and this growth has generated many reactions ranging from positive to negative. The purpose of this joint effort was to describe decision making steps to developing a wind turbine array. The history of wind development in Quebec was discussed along with the various hardware components required in a wind turbine and different types of installations. The key element in implementing wind turbine arrays is to establish public acceptance of the project, followed by a good regulatory framework to define the roles and responsibilities of participants. The production of electricity from wind turbines constitutes a clean and renewable source of energy. Although it is associated with a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, this form of energy can also have negative environmental impacts, including noise. The revenues generated by wind parks are important factors in the decision making process. Two case studies in Quebec were presented. refs., tabs., figs.

  13. Explosively developing extratropical cyclone associated with the high wind-waves along the east coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Ki-Young; Choi, Jin-Yong; Park, Kwang-Soon

    2017-04-01

    An extreme extratropical cyclone struck the northern part of Korea on May 3, 2016 causing significant damage to property on the land due to extreme winds and abnormal high waves in coastal area. The meteorological composite fields for the cyclone show a strong surface wind velocity (up to 45 m s-1) during its mature phase. This study investigated the development mechanisms of an explosive cyclone through numerical simulation and sensitivity experiments using the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model. The trigger mechanism for the explosive cyclogenesis is the strong baroclinic instability and temperature advection associated with upper-level cut-off low and the interaction of potential vorticity (PV) anomalies between the lower- and upper-level. The efficient placement of the high- and low-level jets forms a favorable condition for its development and transportation of water vapor and the instability energy into the cyclone. The sea-state wave simulation of large swell waves along the eastern coast of the Korean Peninsula is obtained using the wave model WAVEWATCHIII (WW3) forced by the 10-m above ground level wind field from the WRF-ARW simulations. The simulation results of WW3 for the significant wave height were compared against buoy observation data at 1-h intervals. The simulated significant wave height systematically underestimated by 0.5 m. However, strong wind field generated by the cyclone is clarified as key features determining the characteristics of the high waves in terms of the temporal growth and decay patterns.

  14. The economical accounting of the industrial wind power; Face au vent: si nous faisions le bilan economique de l'eolien industriel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poizat, F

    2006-11-15

    The aim of this document is the description of the implementing mechanism concerning the wind energy, of February 2000 for the principles and July 2006 for the investment program of the Government on the purchase obligation of the wind electricity by EDF. The laws and orders, the cost of the wind energy are detailed and discussed. (A.L.B.)

  15. Assessing the Factors Associated With Iran’s Intra-Industry Trade in Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusefzadeh, Hassan; Hadian, Mohammad; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Ghaderi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pharmaceutical industry is a sensitive and profitable industry. If this industry wants to survive, it should be able to compete well in international markets. So, study of Iran’s intra-industry trade (IIT) in pharmaceuticals is essential in order to identify competitiveness potential of country and boost export capability in the global arena. Methods: This study assessed the factors associated with Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals with the rest of the world during the 2001–2012 periods using seasonal time series data at the four-digit SITC level. The data was collected from Iran’s pharmaceutical Statistics, World Bank and International Trade Center. Finally, we discussed a number of important policy recommendations to increase Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals. Results: The findings indicated that economies of scale, market structure and degree of economic development had a significantly positive impact on Iran’s intra-industry trade in pharmaceuticals and tariff trade barriers were negatively related to IIT. Product differentiation and technological advancement didn’t have the expected signs. In addition, we found that Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals have shown an increasing trend during the study period. Thus, the composition of Iran trade in pharmaceuticals has changed from inter-industry trade to intra-industry trade. Conclusions: In order to get more prepared for integration into the global economy, the development of Iran’s IIT in pharmaceuticals should be given priority. Therefore, paying attention to IIT could have an important role in serving pharmaceutical companies in relation to pharmaceutical trade. PMID:26156931

  16. The potential of wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge Madsen, P.; Lundsager, P.

    1992-09-01

    Papers presented at the European wind energy conference on the potential of wind farms are presented. The aim of the conference was to bring into focus the problems, experiences and potential of the application of wind power in wind power farms as a contribution to the European and global energy supply. It was considered that the interchange of experience among representatives of science, utilities, industry, environment and energy planning, together with those who represent financial and insurance interests, would create a better understanding of all aspects of wind power for its future successful development. The subjects covered concern surveys of national planning and policies regarding wind energy utilization and national and global development of wind turbine arrays. The performance of some individual wind farms is described. Papers also deal with utility and project planning, wind prediction and certification, wind loads and fatigues, wakes, noise and control. (AB)

  17. The potential of wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge Madsen, P.; Lundsager, P.

    1992-09-01

    Papers presented at the European wind energy conference on the potential of wind farms are presented. The aim of the conference was to bring into focus the problems, experiences and potential of the application of wind power in wind power farms as a contribution to the European and global energy supply. It was considered that the interchange of experience among representatives of science, utilities, industry, environment and energy planning, together with those who represent financial and insurance interests, would create a better understanding of all aspects of wind power for its future successful development. The subjects covered concern surveys of national planning and policies regarding wind energy utilization and national and global development of wind turbine arrays. The performance of some individual wind farms is described. Papers also deal with utility and project planning, wind prediction and certification, wind loads and fatigus, wakes, noise and control. (AB)

  18. Offshore wind farm repowering optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Peng; Enevoldsen, Peter; Hu, Weihao

    2017-01-01

    is focused on optimization of offshore wind farm repowering, which is one option for the wind farm owner at end of life for the offshore wind farm. The LCoE is used as the evaluation index to identify whether it is economical to invest in such a way. In an optimized repowering strategy, different types...... of wind turbines are selected to replace the original wind turbines to reconstruct the wind farm, which is demonstrated to be better than the refurbishment approach which replaces the old wind turbines with the same type. The simulations performed in this research reveal that the reconstructed wind farm......, which consists of multiple types of wind turbine, has a smaller LCoE (10.43%) than the refurbishment approach, which shows the superiority of the proposed method. This research contributes an optimization tool to the wind industry, which consequently drives down the cost of energy produced by offshore...

  19. The physical phenomena associated with stator winding insulation condition as detected by the ramped direct high-voltage method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rux, Lorelynn Mary

    Deregulation of the electric utility industry has increased the need to monitor the state of powerplant equipment, such as critical generators and motors, to improve availability and reduce life cycle costs via condition-based maintenance. To achieve these goals, nondestructive condition assessment and diagnostic tests are necessary to evaluate the quality and condition of a machine's stator winding insulation system. Periodic tests are generally conducted to monitor insulation aging, diagnose problems, or provide some assurance that the winding has a minimum level of electrical strength. The basic principles of insulation testing are presented herein, and the physical mechanisms that affect the current versus voltage response are described. A stator winding insulation model was developed based on this theoretical foundation for use in understanding and analyzing the macroscopic behavior of complex insulation phenomena. A comprehensive, controlled laboratory experiment was conducted on a set of stator coils that were deliberately manufactured with and without insulation defects. Specific defects were chosen to represent the types of insulation problems typically encountered during manufacture or as a result of in-service aging, and included lack of resin cure, loosely-applied insulating tapes, internal conductive contamination, reduced density of the groundwall insulation, and thermal cycling damage. Results are presented from a series of electrical tests conducted on the coil specimens to compare the effectiveness of various test methods in detecting the different insulation problems. The tests included insulation resistance, polarization index, ramped direct voltage, dissipation factor, dielectric spectroscopy, partial discharge, and recovery voltage measurements. Dielectric principles and testing experience obtained during this investigation were applied to a collection of test results obtained by the author from in-service machines during the past ten years

  20. Energy from Offshore Wind: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Ram, B.

    2006-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of the nascent offshore wind energy industry including a status of the commercial offshore industry and the technologies that will be needed for full market development.

  1. About the wind energetics development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebkov, D.S.; Kharitonov, V.P.; Murugov, V.P.; Sokol'skij, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The review of wind power energetics state in USA, Europe, Russia is given. The data of EC on wind power plants production in different periods are presented. The directions of scientific-research works with the purpose of increasing the level of wind power industry of Russia corresponding to economics demands were elaborated. (author). 8 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Association of Gender With Financial Relationships Between Industry and Academic Otolaryngologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Bobian, Michael; Svider, Peter F; Culver, Ashley; Siegel, Bianca; Gray, Stacey T; Baredes, Soly; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Folbe, Adam J

    2017-08-01

    Gender disparities continue to exist in the medical profession, including potential disparities in industry-supported financial contributions. Although there are potential drawbacks to industry relationships, such industry ties have the potential to promote scholarly discourse and increase understanding and accessibility of novel technologies and drugs. To evaluate whether gender disparities exist in relationships between pharmaceutical and/or medical device industries and academic otolaryngologists. An analysis of bibliometric data and industry funding of academic otolaryngologists. Industry payments as reported within the CMS Open Payment Database. Online faculty listings were used to determine academic rank, fellowship training, and gender of full-time faculty otolaryngologists in the 100 civilian training programs in the United States. Industry contributions to these individuals were evaluated using the CMS Open Payment Database, which was created by the Physician Payments Sunshine Act in response to increasing public and regulatory interest in industry relationships and aimed to increase the transparency of such relationships. The Scopus database was used to determine bibliometric indices and publication experience (in years) for all academic otolaryngologists. Of 1514 academic otolaryngologists included in this analysis, 1202 (79.4%) were men and 312 (20.6%) were women. In 2014, industry contributed a total of $4.9 million to academic otolaryngologists. $4.3 million (88.5%) of that went to men, in a population in which 79.4% are male. Male otolaryngologists received greater median contributions than did female otolaryngologists (median [interquartile range (IQR)], $211 [$86-$1245] vs $133 [$51-$316]). Median contributions were greater to men than women at assistant and associate professor academic ranks (median [IQR], $168 [$77-$492] vs $114 [$55-$290] and $240 [$87-$1314] vs $166 [$58-$328], respectively). Overall, a greater proportion of men received

  3. Winds of change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, C.; Short, L.

    1998-01-01

    The British countryside is oversubscribed with multiple and often irreconcilable demands. The siting of wind turbines is but one facet of this situation. While the problems of these demands are widely recognised, there is little understanding or agreement on how to resolve them. The 1996 Future Landscape: New Partnerships was an attempt to address this challenge. The use of wind energy as a case study initiated a partnership between contemporary artists and the wind energy industry. It became clear that artists have an important role to play in creating new ways of seeing that will establish wind turbines as new icons for a sustainable future. (Author)

  4. Wind energy renewable energy and the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Vaughn

    2013-01-01

    As the demand for energy increases, and fossil fuels continue to decrease, Wind Energy: Renewable Energy and the Environment, Second Edition considers the viability of wind as an alternative renewable energy source. This book examines the wind industry from its start in the 1970s until now, and introduces all aspects of wind energy. The phenomenal growth of wind power for utilities is covered along with applications such as wind-diesel, village power, telecommunications, and street lighting.. It covers the characteristics of wind, such as shear, power potential, turbulence, wind resource, wind

  5. Financing wind projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, J.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation reviewed some of the partnership opportunities available from GE Energy. GE Energy's ecomagination commitment has promised to double research investment, make customers true partners and reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). GE Energy's renewable energy team provides a broad range of financial products, and has recently funded 30 wind farms and 2 large solar projects. The company has a diverse portfolio of technology providers and wind regimes, and is increasing their investment in technology. GE Energy recognizes that the wind industry is growing rapidly and has received increased regulatory support that is backed by strong policy and public support. It is expected that Canada will have 3006 wind projects either planned or under construction by 2007. According to GE Energy, successful wind financing is dependent on the location of the site and its wind resources, as well as on the wind developer's power sales agreement. The success of a wind project is also determined by clear financing goals. Site-specific data is needed to determine the quality of wind resource, and off-site data can also be used to provide validation. Proximity to load centres will help to minimize capital costs. Power sales agreements should be based on the project's realistic net capacity factor as well as on the cost of the turbines. The economics of many wind farms is driven by the size of the turbines used. Public consultations are also needed to ensure the success of wind power projects. It was concluded that a good partner will have staying power in the wind power industry, and will understand the time-lines and needs that are peculiar to wind energy developers. refs., tabs., figs

  6. Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

    2011-08-01

    Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

  7. Wind Power Today: 1998 Wind Energy Program Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromly, K.

    1999-06-17

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy manages the Federal Wind Energy Program. The mission of the program is to help the US wind industry to complete the research, testing, and field verification needed to fully develop advanced wind technologies that will lead the world in cost-effectiveness and reliability. This publication, printed annually, provides a summary of significant achievements in wind energy made during the previous calendar year. Articles include wind energy in the Midwest, an Alaskan wind energy project, the US certification program, structural testing, and the federal program in review.

  8. Wind Technology Advancements and Impacts on Western Wind Resources (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-09-01

    Robi Robichaud made this presentation at the Bureau of Land Management West-wide Wind Opportunities and Constraints Mapping (WWOCM) Project public meeting in Denver, Colorado in September 2014. This presentation outlines recent wind technology advancements, evolving turbine technologies, and industry challenges. The presentation includes maps of mean wind speeds at 50-m, 80-m, and 100-m hub heights on BLM lands. Robichaud also presented on the difference in mean wind speeds from 80m to 100m in Wyoming.

  9. The offshore trend: Structural changes in the wind power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markard, Jochen; Petersen, Regula

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the wind power sector has begun to move offshore, i.e. to use space and good wind speeds on the open sea for large scale electricity generation. Offshore wind power, however, is not just technologically challenging but also a capital intensive and risky business that requires particular financial and organizational resources not all potential investors might have. We therefore address the question, what impact offshore wind power may have on ownership and organizational structures in the wind power sector. We compare on- and offshore wind park ownership in Denmark, the UK and Germany. The analysis shows that offshore wind power in all three countries is dominated by large firms, many of which are from the electricity sector. In Denmark and the UK, also investors from the gas and oil industry play an important role in the offshore wind business. This development represents a major shift for countries such as Germany and Denmark, in which the wind power sector has grown and matured on the basis of investments by individuals, farmers, cooperatives and independent project developers. The structural changes by which offshore wind power is accompanied have consequences for turbine manufacturers, project developers, investors, associations and policy makers in the field.

  10. The wind energy takes off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapin, M.; Degobert, Ph.

    2010-01-01

    After having evoked the objectives defined for wind energy production by 2050, the important growth of wind energy in Europe and in other parts of the world, and its importance in terms of business and jobs, this article presents the Denmark model where the wind energy industry is a world leader but now faces the need of a new development model. It comments the investments and incentives implemented in Western countries after the first oil crisis. It outlines the increasing power of wind generators and their technological evolution, the development of offshore wind farms and their cost, and finally the intermittency problem and the case of small wind turbines

  11. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrell, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stehly, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Johnson, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Roberts, J. O. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Parker, Z. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Scott, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little literature that characterizes transportation and logistics challenges and the associated effects on U.S. wind markets. The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address the challenges. The authors primarily relied on interviews with wind industry project developers, original equipment manufacturers, and transportation and logistics companies to obtain the information and industry perspectives needed for this study. They also reviewed published literature on trends and developments in increasing wind turbine size, logistics, and transportation issues.

  12. Wind power today: 1999 Wind Energy program highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis-Taylor, Pat

    2000-04-06

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview for the Department of Energy's Wind Energy Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today is to show how DOE's Wind Energy Program supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy for the 21st century. Content objectives include: Educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain DOE wind energy program objectives and goals; describe program accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry.

  13. CSA guide to Canadian wind turbine codes and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian wind energy sector has become one of the fastest-growing wind energy markets in the world. Growth of the industry has been supported by various government agencies. However, many projects have experienced cost over-runs or cancellations as a result of unclear regulatory requirements, and wind energy developers are currently subject to a variety of approval processes involving several different authorities. This Canadian Standards Association (CSA) guide provided general information on codes and standards related to the design, approval, installation, operation, and maintenance of wind turbines in Canada. CSA codes and standards were developed by considering 5 new standards adopted by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee on Wind Turbines. The standards described in this document related to acoustic noise measurement techniques; power performance measurements of electricity-producing wind turbines; lightning protection for wind turbine generator systems; design requirements for turbines; and design requirements for small wind turbines. The guide addressed specific subject areas related to the development of wind energy projects that involve formal or regulatory approval processes. Subject areas included issues related to safety, environmental design considerations, site selection, and mechanical systems. Information on associated standards and codes was also included

  14. Lake Michigan Offshore Wind Feasibility Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boezaart, Arnold [GVSU; Edmonson, James [GVSU; Standridge, Charles [GVSU; Pervez, Nahid [GVSU; Desai, Neel [University of Michigan; Williams, Bruce [University of Delaware; Clark, Aaron [GVSU; Zeitler, David [GVSU; Kendall, Scott [GVSU; Biddanda, Bopi [GVSU; Steinman, Alan [GVSU; Klatt, Brian [Michigan State University; Gehring, J. L. [Michigan State University; Walter, K. [Michigan State University; Nordman, Erik E. [GVSU

    2014-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to conduct the first comprehensive offshore wind assessment over Lake Michigan and to advance the body of knowledge needed to support future commercial wind energy development on the Great Lakes. The project involved evaluation and selection of emerging wind measurement technology and the permitting, installation and operation of the first mid-lake wind assessment meteorological (MET) facilities in Michigan’s Great Lakes. In addition, the project provided the first opportunity to deploy and field test floating LIDAR and Laser Wind Sensor (LWS) technology, and important research related equipment key to the sitting and permitting of future offshore wind energy development in accordance with public participation guidelines established by the Michigan Great Lakes Wind Council (GLOW). The project created opportunities for public dialogue and community education about offshore wind resource management and continued the dialogue to foster Great Lake wind resource utilization consistent with the focus of the GLOW Council. The technology proved to be effective, affordable, mobile, and the methods of data measurement accurate. The public benefited from a substantial increase in knowledge of the wind resources over Lake Michigan and gained insights about the potential environmental impacts of offshore wind turbine placements in the future. The unique first ever hub height wind resource assessment using LWS technology over water and development of related research data along with the permitting, sitting, and deployment of the WindSentinel MET buoy has captured public attention and has helped to increase awareness of the potential of future offshore wind energy development on the Great Lakes. Specifically, this project supported the acquisition and operation of a WindSentinel (WS) MET wind assessment buoy, and associated research for 549 days over multiple years at three locations on Lake Michigan. Four research objectives were defined for the

  15. Solvation phenomena in association theories with applications to oil & gas and chemical industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Folas, Georgios; Muro Sunè, Nuria

    2008-01-01

    the scientific point of view, solvation phenomena are also very significant because they are present in different types of mixtures and not just those containing two self-associating compounds e.g. water with alcohols or glycols. Mixtures with only one self-associating compound and in some cases even mixtures...... with two non self-associating compounds may exhibit solvation specifically due to hydrogen bonding or more generally due to Lewis acid-Lewis base interactions. As examples can be mentioned mixtures with polar compounds (water, glycols...) and aromatic hydrocarbons and aqueous ether or ester solutions......Association theories e.g. those belonging to the SAFT family account explicitly for self- and cross-association (solvation) phenomena. Such phenomena are of great practical importance as they affect, often dramatically, the phase behaviour of many mixtures of industrial relevance. From...

  16. High penetration wind generation impacts on spot prices in the Australian national electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, Nicholas J.; Boerema, Nicholas D.; MacGill, Iain F.; Outhred, Hugh R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores wind power integration issues for the South Australian (SA) region of the Australian National Electricity Market (NEM) by assessing the interaction of regional wind generation, electricity demand and spot prices over 2 recent years of market operation. SA's wind energy penetration has recently surpassed 20% and it has only a limited interconnection with other regions of the NEM. As such, it represents an interesting example of high wind penetration in a gross wholesale pool market electricity industry. Our findings suggest that while electricity demand continues to have the greatest influence on spot prices in SA, wind generation levels have become a significant secondary influence, and there is an inverse relationship between wind generation and price. No clear relationship between wind generation and demand has been identified although some periods of extremely high demand may coincide with lower wind generation. Periods of high wind output are associated with generally lower market prices, and also appear to contribute to extreme negative price events. The results highlight the importance of electricity market and renewable policy design in facilitating economically efficient high wind penetrations. - Highlights: → In South Australia (SA) wind generation is having an influence on market prices. → Little or no correlation is found between wind generation and demand. → Wind farms in SA are receiving a lower average price than in other States. → The results highlight the importance of appropriate electricity market design.

  17. The medical-industrial complex, professional medical associations, and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofferman, Jerome

    2011-12-01

    Financial relationships among the biomedical industries, physicians, and professional medical associations (PMAs) can be professional, ethical, mutually beneficial, and, most importantly, can lead to improved medical care. However, such relationships, by their very nature, present conflicts of interest (COIs). One of the greatest concerns regarding COI is continuing medical education (CME), especially because currently industry funds 40-60% of CME. COIs have the potential to bias physicians in practice, educators, and those in leadership positions of PMAs and well as the staff of a PMA. These conflicts lead to the potential to bias the content and type of CME presentations and thereby influence physicians' practice patterns and patient care. Physicians are generally aware of the potential for bias when industry contributes funding for CME, but they are most often unable to detect the bias. This may because it is very subtle and/or the educators themselves may not realize that they have been influenced by their relationships with industry. Following Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education guidelines and mandating disclosure that is transparent and complete have become the fallback positions to manage COIs, but such disclosure does not really mitigate the conflict. The eventual and best solutions to ensure evidence-based education are complete divestment by educators and leaders of PMAs, minimal and highly controlled industry funding of PMAs, blind pooling of any industry contributions to PMAs and CME, strict verification of disclosures, clear separation of marketing from education at CME events, and strict oversight of presentations for the presence of bias. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A study of shock-associated magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1992-01-01

    Three major topics were addressed, one theoretical and two observational. The topics were: (1) an attempt to understand the evolution of the large-amplitude magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the foreshock, using a nonlinear wave equation called the Derivative Nonlinear Schrodinger equation (henceforth DNLS) as a model, (2) using the extensive set of ISE data to test for the presence of various nonlinear wave processes which might be present, and (3) a study of plasma turbulence in the interstellar medium which might be physically similar to that in the solar wind. For these investigations we used radioastronomical techniques. Good progress was made in each of these areas and a separate discussion of each is given.

  19. 78 FR 18273 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Purchasing Reef Fish Species Associated With the Hazard of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    .... FDA-2013-D-0269] Draft Guidance for Industry on Purchasing Reef Fish Species Associated With the... availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Purchasing Reef Fish Species Associated With... seafood processors who purchase reef fish how to minimize the risk of ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) from...

  20. Forecasting Downdraft Wind Speeds Associated with Airmass Thunderstorms for Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, Using the WSR-88D

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steen, Travis

    1999-01-01

    .... During the same summer, Air Force Space Command units issued nearly 65% of their weather warnings for convective winds, making the forecasting of convective winds the most frequent challenge to forecasters...

  1. Wind Program Newsletter, May 2016 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Newsletter provides wind industry stakeholders and the public with information about the Wind Program R&D efforts funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. The newsletter comes out twice a year and is sent electronically to subscribers and distributed in hard copy to conference attendees.

  2. Wind Energy. The Facts. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    Considered to be the most important wind energy reference in the world. It presents a detailed overview of the wind energy sector, with the most up-to-date and in-depth information on the essential issues concerning wind power today. The new edition includes chapters on: Technology; Grid integration; The economics of wind; Industry and markets; Environmental issues; and Scenarios and targets

  3. Air pollution from industrial waste gas emissions is associated with cancer incidences in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaowei

    2018-02-27

    Outdoor air pollution may be associated with cancer risk at different sites. This study sought to investigate outdoor air pollution from waste gas emission effects on multiple cancer incidences in a retrospective population-based study in Shanghai, China. Trends in cancer incidence for males and females and trends in waste gas emissions for the total waste gas, industrial waste gas, other waste gas, SO 2 , and soot were investigated between 1983 and 2010 in Shanghai, China. Regression models after adjusting for confounding variables were constructed to estimate associations between waste gas emissions and multiple cancer incidences in the whole group and stratified by sex, Engel coefficient, life expectancy, and number of doctors per 10,000 populations to further explore whether changes of waste gas emissions were associated with multiple cancer incidences. More than 550,000 new cancer patients were enrolled and reviewed. Upward trends in multiple cancer incidences for males and females and in waste gas emissions were observed from 1983 to 2010 in Shanghai, China. Waste gas emissions came mainly from industrial waste gas. Waste gas emissions was significantly positively associated with cancer incidence of salivary gland, small intestine, colorectal, anus, gallbladder, thoracic organs, connective and soft tissue, prostate, kidney, bladder, thyroid, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, lymphatic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, and other unspecified sites (all p gas emissions and the esophagus cancer incidence was observed (p gas emissions was associated with multiple cancer incidences.

  4. American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM): a professional association in service to industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDou, Joseph; Teitelbaum, Daniel T; Egilman, David S; Frank, Arthur L; Kramer, Sharon N; Huff, James

    2007-01-01

    The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) is a professional association that represents the interests of its company-employed physician members. Fifty years ago the ACOEM began to assert itself in the legislative arena as an advocate of limited regulation and enforcement of occupational health and safety standards and laws, and environmental protection. Today the ACOEM provides a legitimizing professional association for company doctors, and continues to provide a vehicle to advance the agendas of their corporate sponsors. Company doctors in ACOEM recently blocked attempts to have the organization take a stand on global warming. Company doctors employed by the petrochemical industry even blocked the ACOEM from taking a position on particulate air pollution. Industry money and influence pervade every aspect of occupational and environmental medicine. The controlling influence of industry over the ACOEM physicians should cease. The conflict of interests inherent in the practice of occupational and environmental medicine is not resolved by the ineffectual efforts of the ACOEM to establish a pretentious code of conduct. The conflicted interests within the ACOEM have become too deeply embedded to be resolved by merely a self-governing code of conduct. The specialty practice of occupational and environmental medicine has the opportunity and obligation to join the public health movement. If it does, the ACOEM will have no further purpose as it exists, and specialists in occupational and environmental medicine will meet with and be represented by public health associations. This paper chronicles the history of occupational medicine and industry physicians as influenced and even controlled by corporate leaders.

  5. A balanced solution to the cumulative threat of industrialized wind farm development on cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus in south-eastern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris P Vasilakis

    Full Text Available Wind farm development can combat climate change but may also threaten bird populations' persistence through collision with wind turbine blades if such development is improperly planned strategically and cumulatively. Such improper planning may often occur. Numerous wind farms are planned in a region hosting the only cinereous vulture population in south-eastern Europe. We combined range use modelling and a Collision Risk Model (CRM to predict the cumulative collision mortality for cinereous vulture under all operating and proposed wind farms. Four different vulture avoidance rates were considered in the CRM. Cumulative collision mortality was expected to be eight to ten times greater in the future (proposed and operating wind farms than currently (operating wind farms, equivalent to 44% of the current population (103 individuals if all proposals are authorized (2744 MW. Even under the most optimistic scenario whereby authorized proposals will not collectively exceed the national target for wind harnessing in the study area (960 MW, cumulative collision mortality would still be high (17% of current population and likely lead to population extinction. Under any wind farm proposal scenario, over 92% of expected deaths would occur in the core area of the population, further implying inadequate spatial planning and implementation of relevant European legislation with scant regard for governmental obligations to protect key species. On the basis of a sensitivity map we derive a spatially explicit solution that could meet the national target of wind harnessing with a minimum conservation cost of less than 1% population loss providing that the population mortality (5.2% caused by the operating wind farms in the core area would be totally mitigated. Under other scenarios, the vulture population would probably be at serious risk of extinction. Our 'win-win' approach is appropriate to other potential conflicts where wind farms may cumulatively threaten

  6. Conference 'onshore and offshore wind energy cost reduction: challenges and opportunities for the industry in France and in Germany'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, Pierre-Marie; Hinsch, Thomas; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Giese, Norbert; Guyet, Quentin; Lenhardt, Edouard; Beinke, Thies; Bodenstab, Marc; Wolff, Nicolas; Burkhardt, Claus; Lessmeister, Andreas L.

    2012-01-01

    The French-German office for Renewable energies (OFAEnR) organised a conference on cost reduction in onshore and offshore wind energy. In the framework of this French-German exchange of experience, about 140 participants exchanged views on the cost allocation in onshore wind energy projects, on their financing, and on the transport and logistics profitability challenges. Concrete examples of operating and maintenance cost reductions in offshore wind energy projects were presented as well. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) made during this event: 1 - Overview of France's onshore and offshore wind support policies (Pierre-Marie Abadie); 2 - Keynote: Framework conditions for cost reductions in the German wind energy sector (Thomas Hinsch); 3 - Cost of onshore wind energy projects in Germany - Status and experience feedback (Anna-Kathrin Wallasch); 4 - Crown estate's Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Pathways Study: how to transpose the conclusions to the German case (Norbert Giese); 5 - Combined Forces for Reliable Supply Chain - French-German Convergence of expertise: strategic partnerships for offshore projects implementation (Quentin Guyet, Edouard Lenhardt); 6 - Reducing costs of onshore and offshore wind energy. Mon2Sea research project - Real-time monitoring of transport and cargo handling of components for the offshore installation of wind turbines (Thies Beinke, Marc Bodenstab); 7 - expertise, Innovation and reduction of cost of energy: Vestas experience (Nicolas Wolff); 8 - Far-Offshore-Wind projects. Results of the First German Offshore Windpark alpha ventus (Claus Burkhardt); 9 - Maintenance for Offshore-Wind parks: examples and good practices for the future (Andreas L. Lessmeister)

  7. Are local wind power resources well estimated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik; Troen, Ib; Jørgensen, Hans E.; Mann, Jakob

    2013-03-01

    Planning and financing of wind power installations require very importantly accurate resource estimation in addition to a number of other considerations relating to environment and economy. Furthermore, individual wind energy installations cannot in general be seen in isolation. It is well known that the spacing of turbines in wind farms is critical for maximum power production. It is also well established that the collective effect of wind turbines in large wind farms or of several wind farms can limit the wind power extraction downwind. This has been documented by many years of production statistics. For the very large, regional sized wind farms, a number of numerical studies have pointed to additional adverse changes to the regional wind climate, most recently by the detailed studies of Adams and Keith [1]. They show that the geophysical limit to wind power production is likely to be lower than previously estimated. Although this problem is of far future concern, it has to be considered seriously. In their paper they estimate that a wind farm larger than 100 km2 is limited to about 1 W m-2. However, a 20 km2 off shore farm, Horns Rev 1, has in the last five years produced 3.98 W m-2 [5]. In that light it is highly unlikely that the effects pointed out by [1] will pose any immediate threat to wind energy in coming decades. Today a number of well-established mesoscale and microscale models exist for estimating wind resources and design parameters and in many cases they work well. This is especially true if good local data are available for calibrating the models or for their validation. The wind energy industry is still troubled by many projects showing considerable negative discrepancies between calculated and actually experienced production numbers and operating conditions. Therefore it has been decided on a European Union level to launch a project, 'The New European Wind Atlas', aiming at reducing overall uncertainties in determining wind conditions. The

  8. Transcontinental Surface Validation of Satellite Observations of Enhanced Methane Anomalies Associated with Fossil Fuel Industrial Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, I.; Culling, D.; Schneising, O.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    A ground-based, transcontinental (Florida to California - i.e., satellite-scale) survey was conducted to understand better the role of fossil fuel industrial (FFI) fugitive emissions of the potent greenhouse gas, methane. Data were collected by flame ion detection gas chromatography (Fall 2010) and by a cavity ring-down sensor (Winter 2012) from a nearly continuously moving recreational vehicle, allowing 24/7 data collection. Nocturnal methane measurements for similar sources tended to be higher compared to daytime values, sometime significantly, due to day/night meteorological differences. Data revealed strong and persistent FFI methane sources associated with refining, a presumed major pipeline leak, and several minor pipeline leaks, a coal loading plant, and areas of active petroleum production. Data showed FFI source emissions were highly transient and heterogeneous; however, integrated over these large-scale facilities, methane signatures overwhelmed that of other sources, creating clearly identifiable plumes that were well elevated above ambient. The highest methane concentration recorded was 39 ppm at an active central valley California production field, while desert values were as low as 1.80 ppm. Surface methane data show similar trends with strong emissions correlated with FFI on large (4° bin) scales and positive methane anomalies centered on the Gulf Coast area of Houston, home to most of US refining capacity. Comparison with SCIAMACHY and GOSAT satellite data show agreement with surface data in the large-scale methane spatial patterns. Positive satellite methane anomalies in the southeast and Mexico largely correlated with methane anthropogenic and wetland inventory models suggests most strong ground methane anomalies in the Gulf of Mexico region were related to dominant FFI input for most seasons. Wind advection played a role, in some cases confounding a clear relationship. Results are consistent with a non-negligible underestimation of the FFI

  9. 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orell, A; Foster, N.

    2015-08-01

    The cover of the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report.According to the 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report, distributed wind reached a cumulative capacity of almost 1 GW (906 MW) in the United States in 2014, reflecting nearly 74,000 wind turbines deployed across all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In total, 63.6 MW of new distributed wind capacity was added in 2014, representing nearly 1,700 units and $170 million in investment across 24 states. In 2014, America's distributed wind energy industry supported a growing domestic industrial base as exports from United States-based small wind turbine manufacturers accounted for nearly 80% of United States-based manufacturers' sales.

  10. Association of proximity to polluting industries, deprivation and mortality in small areas of the Basque Country (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Koldo; Martínez-Rueda, Teresa; Alonso-Fustel, Eva; Cirarda, Francisco B; Audicana, Covadonga; Esnaola, Santiago; Ibáñez, Berta

    2013-02-01

    The study is aimed at assessing social inequities in the location of polluting industries in the Basque Country, and at exploring if the effect on mortality of living near air polluting industries is modified by economic deprivation. This is a cross-sectional ecological study that uses the census sections as analysis units. Mortality from all causes, lung cancer, respiratory diseases and ischaemic heart disease were studied. Ordinal logistic regression models were fitted to assess if proximity of census sections to polluting industries is associated with deprivation. Bayesian Poisson regression models were used to explore if the association between proximity to polluting industries and mortality is modified by socio-economic deprivation. Proximity to a polluting industry and deprivation are positively associated, showing a clear gradient across deprivation quintiles. In women, the risk associated with proximity to metal-processing industries grows as the deprivation of the area increases in the case of total and lung cancer mortality. In men, the interaction terms between proximity and deprivation are positive for total, ischaemic heart disease mortality, with a credibility level approaching 90%. High levels of deprivation are associated with greater risk of mortality, excepting lung cancer in women. There is a higher proportion of more deprived census sections around polluting industries in the Basque Country. Risks of mortality associated with proximity to polluting industries tend to be higher in more deprived areas.

  11. Wind Power Today: Wind Energy Program Highlights 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-05-01

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Energy Program accomplishments for the previous year. The purpose of Wind Power Today is to show how DOE's Wind Energy Program supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry. This 2001 edition of Wind Power Today also includes discussions about wind industry growth in 2001, how DOE is taking advantage of low wind speed regions through advancing technology, and distributed applications for small wind turbines.

  12. Industry Formation and State Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Tries to understand the very different development if the wind turbine indutry in the two countries.US tries a top down R&D driven aproach,and gets no wind turbine industry.Denmark on the other hand gets a blooming wind turbine industry-trough a bottom up aproach-driven by economic incentives....

  13. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2009-07-01

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the past year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with significant federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. This report examines key trends.

  14. Wind Power Today: 2000 Wind Energy Program Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis-Taylor, W.

    2001-05-08

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Energy Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today is to show how DOE's Wind Energy Program supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry.

  15. Wind Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez D, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The general theory of the wind energy conversion systems is presented. The availability of the wind resource in Colombia and the ranges of the speed of the wind in those which is possible economically to use the wind turbines are described. It is continued with a description of the principal technological characteristics of the wind turbines and are split into wind power and wind-powered pumps; and its use in large quantities grouped in wind farms or in autonomous systems. Finally, its costs and its environmental impact are presented

  16. Increasing Industry Support Is Associated with Higher Research Productivity in Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddapati, Venkat; Sachdev, Ridhi; Fu, Michael C; Camp, Christopher L; Marx, Robert G; Dines, Joshua S

    2018-03-21

    Orthopaedic surgeons receive a disproportionately small share of funding from the National Institutes of Health, but they receive the largest amount of funding from industry sources. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between payments from industry partners and research productivity among orthopaedic research authors, as well as to identify predictors of high research productivity. United States-based physicians who published an article in 2016 in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery or The American Journal of Sports Medicine were included in this study. These authors were queried in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Open Payments database (OPD) to determine the amount of industry payments received, and on Scopus, a bibliometric web site, to assess the quantity (total publication count) and quality (Hirsch index [h-index]) of each author's research. Nonparametric testing was used to compare the h-index and the total publication count of authors by payments received and academic position. Multivariate regression was used to identify independent predictors of high research productivity. Of the 766 included authors, 494 (64.5%) received $100,000 in total payments. The h-index increased significantly from a mean (and standard deviation) of 13.1 ± 12.9 to 20.9 ± 14.4, and to 32.3 ± 16.7, from the lowest to highest payment cohorts, as did total publication count. When authors were stratified by academic position (assistant professor, associate professor, full professor, and nonacademic), those who received more industry payments (>$100,000) had a higher h-index and total publication count at all academic levels relative to lower-earning ($100,000 (OR, 5.87), associate professorship (OR, 6.53), full professorship (OR, 33.38), and last authorship (OR, 2.22) (p < 0.001 for all comparisons unless otherwise noted). Although this study does not establish a causal relationship, we identified increasing industry payments as an independent

  17. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad

    in this thesis is a part of a larger endeavor, the Superwind project that focused on identifying the potentials that HTS machines could offer to the wind industry and addressing some of the challenges in the process. In order to identify these challenges, I have designed and constructed an HTS machine......A HTS machine could be a way to address some of the technical barriers offshore wind energy is about to face. Due to the superior power density of HTS machines, this technology could become a milestone on which many, including the wind industry, will rely on in the future. The work presented...... experimental setup which is made to serve as precursor, leading towards an optimized HTS machine concept proposed for wind turbines. In part, the work presented in this thesis will focus on the description of the experimental setup and reasoning behind the choices made during the design. The setup comprises...

  18. Breezing ahead: the Spanish wind energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avia Aranda, Felix; Cruz, I.C.

    2000-01-01

    This article traces the rapid increase in Spain's wind generating capacity, and examines Spain's wind strategy, the assessment of wind power potential at regional level, and the guaranteeing of the market price for power generators using wind energy with yearly reviews of the price of electricity from wind power. Prices payable for electricity generated from renewable sources are listed, and the regional distribution of wind energy production is illustrated. Recent wind power installations in Spain, target levels for wind energy installations, wind farms larger than 1MW installed in 1999, and the impact of the growth of the wind energy market on the manufacturing industry and the manufacturers are discussed. Details of the wind energy capacity in the provinces of Navarra and Galicia are given, and plans for wind energy projects in the New National Plan for Scientific research, Development and Technological innovation (2000-2003) are considered

  19. Association Rule-based Predictive Model for Machine Failure in Industrial Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Lee, Sol-Bee; Park, Jaehoon; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes an association rule-based predictive model for machine failure in industrial Internet of things (IIoT), which can accurately predict the machine failure in real manufacturing environment by investigating the relationship between the cause and type of machine failure. To develop the predictive model, we consider three major steps: 1) binarization, 2) rule creation, 3) visualization. The binarization step translates item values in a dataset into one or zero, then the rule creation step creates association rules as IF-THEN structures using the Lattice model and Apriori algorithm. Finally, the created rules are visualized in various ways for users’ understanding. An experimental implementation was conducted using R Studio version 3.3.2. The results show that the proposed predictive model realistically predicts machine failure based on association rules.

  20. 2014-2015 Offshore Wind Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stehly, Tyler [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Musial, Walter [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report provides data and analysis to assess the status of the U.S. offshore wind industry through June 30, 2015. It builds on the foundation laid by the Navigant Consortium, which produced three market reports between 2012 and 2014. The report summarizes domestic and global market developments, technology trends, and economic data to help U.S. offshore wind industry stakeholders, including policymakers, regulators, developers, financiers, and supply chain participants, to identify barriers and opportunities. Title page contains link to associated data tables posted at http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy15osti/64283_data_tables.xlsx.

  1. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  2. Exploring the Association Between Health Literacy and Psychological Well-Being Among Industry Managers in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Silja; Pfaff, Holger; Soellner, Renate; Pförtner, Timo-Kolja

    2018-03-19

    Industry managers are typically exposed to high work demands but have received limited attention by research, particularly concerning the issue of health literacy and how this relates to their psychological well-being. The aim of this study was to explore the association between health literacy and psychological well-being among managers in Germany. An online survey of a sample of 126 commercial industry managers was conducted. Effects of health literacy on psychological well-being (WHO-5 index) were investigated using path analysis. The findings show a quarter of managers were classified as having poor well-being. Health literacy, namely the facets self-regulation (β = 0.40, P < 0.001), self-perception (β = 0.26, P < 0.001), self-control (β = 0.25, P < 0.01), and proactive approach to health (β = 0.09, P < 0.05), were positively associated with psychological well-being. The study indicates that higher health literacy is associated with decreased risk of poor well-being.

  3. Radiation doses and associated parameters in the Western Australian mineral sand industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshman, I.W.; Hewson, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1983 companies involved in the mining and processing of mineral sands in Western Australia have been required to comply with radiation protection provisions contained within codes of practice adopted under the Mines Regulation Act (1976). Since 1986 the Department of Minerals and Energy of Western Australia has been directly administering the provisions of the Commonwealth of Australia publication: Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (1987). This Code requires monitoring, assessment and reporting of the radiation doses received by workers. Reports of the results of monitoring and association radiation protection activities are submitted on an annual basis to the Department of Minerals and Energy. This paper summarises those monitoring results and identifies any trends in radiological conditions in the mineral sands industry work environment since 1986. Over the last seven years the number of employees in the industry has increased by 73%; the number of designated employees has decreased by 20% and the collective effective dose equivalent to the designated employee workforce has decreased by 74%. Reasons for this improvement will be described. The parameters and assumptions used in determining radiation doses for employees in this industry are reviewed and the implications of the recently adopted ICRP Task Group Lung Model for intake of thorium dust will be discussed. 16 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  4. Amplification of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation associated with the onset of the industrial-era warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kent; Majeed, Haris; Halfar, Jochen; Adey, Walter; Kronz, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    North Atlantic sea surface temperatures experience variability with a periodicity of 60-80 years that is known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). It has a profound imprint on the global climate system that results in a number of high value societal impacts. However the industrial period, i.e. the middle of the 19th century onwards, contains only two full cycles of the AMO making it difficult to fully characterize this oscillation and its impact on the climate system. As a result, there is a clear need to identify paleoclimate records extending into the pre-industrial period that contain an expression of the AMO. This is especially true for extratropical marine paleoclimate proxies where such expressions are currently unavailable. Here we present an annually resolved coralline algal time series from the northwest Atlantic Ocean that exhibits multidecadal variability extending back six centuries. The time series contains a statistically significant trend towards higher values, i.e. warmer conditions, beginning in the 19th century that coincided with an increase in the time series' multidecadal power. We argue that these changes are associated with a regional climate reorganization involving an amplification of the AMO that coincided with onset of the industrial-era warming.

  5. Financing renewables - wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the wind energy markets world-wide, in Europe and in the UK. It outlines the main methods of financing wind energy installations and discusses why different institutional structures have led to different markets in the UK and in Germany, with some concern about the state of the UK onshore industry. The paper looks ahead to the opening up of the potentially much larger offshore wind resource, concluding that in this area, existing UK development and financing structures are well suited. (Author)

  6. Do We Believe the Tobacco Industry Lied to Us? Association with Smoking Behavior in a Military Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesges, Robert C.; Sherrill-Mittleman, Deborah A.; Debon, Margaret; Talcott, G. Wayne; Vanecek, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the dangers of smoking, tobacco companies continue to impede tobacco control efforts through deceptive marketing practices. Media campaigns that expose these practices have been effective in advancing anti-industry attitudes and reducing smoking initiation among young people, yet the association between knowledge of industry practices and…

  7. Offshore Wind Energy Permitting: A Survey of U.S. Project Developers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted a goal to generate 20% of the nation’s electricity from wind power by 2030. Achieving this “20% Wind Scenario” in 2030 requires acceleration of the current rate of wind project development. Offshore wind resources contribute substantially to the nation’s wind resource, yet to date no offshore wind turbines have been installed in the U.S. Progress developing offshore wind projects has been slowed by technological challenges, uncertainties about impacts to the marine environment, siting and permitting challenges, and viewshed concerns. To address challenges associated with siting and permitting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) surveyed offshore wind project developers about siting and project development processes, their experience with the environmental permitting process, and the role of coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) in development of the offshore wind industry. Based on the responses to survey questions, we identify several priority recommendations to support offshore wind development. Recommendations also include considerations for developing supporting industries in the U.S. and how to use Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) to appropriately consider ocean energy among existing ocean uses. In this report, we summarize findings, discuss the implications, and suggest actions to improve the permitting and siting process.

  8. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2010-08-01

    The U.S. wind power industry experienced yet another record year in 2009, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, 2009 was a year of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting the wind power industry and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. The year 2010, meanwhile, is anticipated to be one of some retrenchment, with expectations for fewer wind power capacity additions than seen in 2009. The rapid pace of development and change within the industry has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace, yet the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the fourth in an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the United States wind power market, with a particular focus on 2009.

  9. Cost efficiency of the non-associative flow rule simulation of an industrial component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdos, Lander; de Argandoña, Eneko Saenz; Mendiguren, Joseba

    2017-10-01

    In the last decade, metal forming industry is becoming more and more competitive. In this context, the FEM modeling has become a primary tool of information for the component and process design. Numerous researchers have been focused on improving the accuracy of the material models implemented on the FEM in order to improve the efficiency of the simulations. Aimed at increasing the efficiency of the anisotropic behavior modelling, in the last years the use of non-associative flow rule models (NAFR) has been presented as an alternative to the classic associative flow rule models (AFR). In this work, the cost efficiency of the used flow rule model has been numerically analyzed by simulating an industrial drawing operation with two different models of the same degree of flexibility: one AFR model and one NAFR model. From the present study, it has been concluded that the flow rule has a negligible influence on the final drawing prediction; this is mainly driven by the model parameter identification procedure. Even though the NAFR formulation is complex when compared to the AFR, the present study shows that the total simulation time while using explicit FE solvers has been reduced without loss of accuracy. Furthermore, NAFR formulations have an advantage over AFR formulations in parameter identification because the formulation decouples the yield stress and the Lankford coefficients.

  10. Wind energy, status and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Wijk, A.

    1994-01-01

    Wind energy is diffuse but was widely used before the industrial revolution. The first oil crisis triggered renewed interest in wind energy technology in remote areas. Winds develop when solar radiation reaches the earth's highly varied surface unevenly, creating temperature density and pressure differences. The earth's atmosphere has to circulate to transport heat from the tropics towards the poles. On a global scale, these atmospheric currents work as an immense energy transfer medium. Three main applications can be distinguished: wind pumps, off-grid applications and grid-connected applications. The total generating costs for wind turbine systems are determined by total investments costs, the life time, the operating and maintenance costs, the wind regime (the wind energy potential is proportional to v 3 where v is the wind speed), the efficiency and availability of the wind turbine. The main gains are achieved as a result of improved reliability. The optimum size of a wind turbine depends on the wind speed, the wind turbine costs, the construction costs, the environmental impact and the social costs. The value of wind energy depends on the application that is made of the energy generated and on the costs of alternatives, it can be calculated by the avoided costs of damage to flora, fauna and mankind due to acid rain deposition, enhancement of the greenhouse effect. The environmental aspects are bird hindrance, noise, telecommunication interference and safety. 2 tabs., 1 fig

  11. Online training in WAsP for wind energy professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Badger, Jake; Berg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    are: 1. To teach participants to use the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) 2. To provide participants with enough theory about wind power meteorology to avoid the major pitfalls related to wind resource assessment. WAsP is the wind power industry-standard PC-software for wind resource...

  12. Summertime wind climate in Yerevan: valley wind systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, Artur

    2017-03-01

    1992-2014 wind climatology analysis in Yerevan is presented with particular focus given to the summertime thermally induced valley wind systems. Persistence high winds are observed in Yerevan during July-August months when the study region is strongly affected by a heat-driven plain-plateau circulation. The local valley winds arrive in Yerevan in the evening hours, generally, from 1500 to 1800 UTC, leading to rapid enhancement of wind speeds and dramatic changes in wind direction. Valley-winds significantly impact the local climate of Yerevan, which is a densely populated city. These winds moderate evening temperatures after hot and dry weather conditions observed during summertime afternoons. On the other hand, valley winds result in significantly higher nocturnal temperatures and more frequent occurrence of warm nights (tn90p) in Yerevan due to stronger turbulent mixing of boundary layer preventing strong surface cooling and temperature drop in nighttime and morning hours. The applied WRF-ARW limited area model is able to simulate the key features of the observed spatial pattern of surface winds in Armenia associated with significant terrain channeling, wind curls, etc. By contrast, ECMWF EPS global model fails to capture mesoscale and local wind systems over Armenia. However, the results of statistical verification of surface winds in Yerevan showed that substantial biases are present in WRF 18-h wind forecasts, as well as, the temporal variability of observed surface winds is not reproduced adequately in WRF-ARW model.

  13. Factors Associated With Financial Relationships Between Spine Surgeons and Industry: An Analysis of the Open Payments Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Joseph A; Cook, Ralph W; Hashmi, Sohaib; Schallmo, Michael S; Chun, Danielle S; Barth, Kathryn A; Singh, Sameer K; Patel, Alpesh A; Hsu, Wellington K

    2017-09-15

    A retrospective review of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Database. Utilizing Open Payments data, we aimed to determine the prevalence of industry payments to orthopedic and neurospine surgeons, report the magnitude of those relationships, and help outline the surgeon demographic factors associated with industry relationships. Previous Open Payments data revealed that orthopedic surgeons receive the highest value of industry payments. No study has investigated the financial relationship between spine surgeons and industry using the most recent release of Open Payments data. A database of 5898 spine surgeons in the United States was derived from the Open Payments website. Demographic data were collected, including the type of residency training, years of experience, practice setting, type of medical degree, place of training, gender, and region of practice. Multivariate generalized linear mixed models were utilized to determine the relationship between demographics and industry payments. A total of 5898 spine surgeons met inclusion criteria. About 91.6% of surgeons reported at least one financial relationship with industry. The median total value of payments was $994.07. Surgeons receiving over $1,000,000 from industry during the reporting period represented 6.6% of the database and accounted for 83.5% of the total value exchanged. Orthopedic training (P Financial relationships between spine surgeons and industry are highly prevalent. Surgeon demographics have a significant association with industry-surgeon financial relationships. Our reported value of payments did not include ownership or research payments and thus likely underestimates the magnitude of these financial relationships. 3.

  14. Wind Power Today and Tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-03-01

    Wind Power Today and Tomorrow is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind research conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today and Tomorrow is to show how DOE supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry. This 2003 edition of the program overview also includes discussions about wind industry growth in 2003, how DOE is taking advantage of low wind speed region s through advancing technology, and distributed applications for small wind turbines.

  15. Wind energy - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangi, R.; Oprisan, M.

    1998-01-01

    The current status of wind technology developments in Canada and around the world was reviewed. Information regarding the level of wind turbine deployment was presented. It was shown that significant effort has been made on the national and international level to increase the capacity of this clean, non-polluting form of energy. Wind energy has become competitive with conventional sources of electricity due to lower cost, higher efficiency and improved reliability of generating equipment. The advantages and disadvantages of wind electricity generating systems and the economics and atmospheric emissions of the systems were described. At present, there is about 23 MW of wind energy generating capacity installed in Canada, but the potential is very large. It was suggested that wind energy could supply as much as 60 per cent of Canada's electricity needs if only one per cent of the land with 'good winds' were covered by wind turbines. Recently, the Canadian government has provided an accelerated capital cost allowance for certain types of renewable energies under the Income Tax Act, and the flow-through share financing legislation to include intangible expenses in certain renewable energy projects has been extended. Besides the support provided to the private sector through tax advantages, the Government also supports renewable energy development by purchasing 'green' energy for its own buildings across the country, and by funding a research and development program to identify and promote application of wind energy technologies, improve its cost effectiveness, and support Canadian wind energy industries with technology development to enhance their competitiveness at home and abroad. Details of the Wind Energy Program, operated by Natural Resources Canada, are described. 3 tabs., 5 figs

  16. A Wind Forecasting System for Energy Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jennifer; Lynch, Peter; Sweeney, Conor

    2010-05-01

    Accurate forecasting of available energy is crucial for the efficient management and use of wind power in the national power grid. With energy output critically dependent upon wind strength there is a need to reduce the errors associated wind forecasting. The objective of this research is to get the best possible wind forecasts for the wind energy industry. To achieve this goal, three methods are being applied. First, a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model called WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) is being used to predict wind values over Ireland. Currently, a gird resolution of 10km is used and higher model resolutions are being evaluated to establish whether they are economically viable given the forecast skill improvement they produce. Second, the WRF model is being used in conjunction with ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ensemble forecasts to produce a probabilistic weather forecasting product. Due to the chaotic nature of the atmosphere, a single, deterministic weather forecast can only have limited skill. The ECMWF ensemble methods produce an ensemble of 51 global forecasts, twice a day, by perturbing initial conditions of a 'control' forecast which is the best estimate of the initial state of the atmosphere. This method provides an indication of the reliability of the forecast and a quantitative basis for probabilistic forecasting. The limitation of ensemble forecasting lies in the fact that the perturbed model runs behave differently under different weather patterns and each model run is equally likely to be closest to the observed weather situation. Models have biases, and involve assumptions about physical processes and forcing factors such as underlying topography. Third, Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) is being applied to the output from the ensemble forecasts in order to statistically post-process the results and achieve a better wind forecasting system. BMA is a promising technique that will offer calibrated

  17. Wind Energy Conversion Systems Technology and Trends

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Wind Energy Conversion System covers the technological progress of wind energy conversion systems, along with potential future trends. It includes recently developed wind energy conversion systems such as multi-converter operation of variable-speed wind generators, lightning protection schemes, voltage flicker mitigation and prediction schemes for advanced control of wind generators. Modeling and control strategies of variable speed wind generators are discussed, together with the frequency converter topologies suitable for grid integration. Wind Energy Conversion System also describes offshore farm technologies including multi-terminal topology and space-based wind observation schemes, as well as both AC and DC based wind farm topologies. The stability and reliability of wind farms are discussed, and grid integration issues are examined in the context of the most recent industry guidelines. Wind power smoothing, one of the big challenges for transmission system operators, is a particular focus. Fault ride th...

  18. Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy

    2015-03-12

    With more than 4.5% of the nation's electricity supplied by wind energy today, the Department of Energy has collaborated with industry, environmental organizations, academic institutions, and national laboratories to develop a renewed Wind Vision, documenting the contributions of wind to date and envisioning a future where wind continues to provide key contributions to the nation’s energy portfolio. Building on and updating the 2008 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, the new Wind Vision Report quantifies the economic, environmental, and social benefits of a robust wind energy future and the actions that wind stakeholders can take to make it a reality.

  19. Practices and risks associated with operation of tie-down lashings in the vehicle transport industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraysse, François; Milanese, Steven; Thewlis, Dominic

    2016-12-01

    Load restraint systems in automobile transport utilise tie-down lashings placed over the car's tyres, which are tensioned manually by the operator using a ratchet assembly. This process has been identified as a significant manual handling injury risk. The aim of this study was to gain insight on the current practices associated with tie-down lashings operation, and identify the gaps between current and optimal practice. We approached this with qualitative and quantitative assessments and one numerical simulation to establish: (i) insight into the factors involved in ratcheting; (ii) the required tension to hold the car on the trailer; and (iii) the tension achieved by drivers in practice and associated joint loads. We identified that the method recommended to the drivers was not used in practice. Drivers instead tensioned the straps to the maximum of their capability, leading to over-tensioning and mechanical overload at the shoulder and elbow. We identified the postures and strategies that resulted in the lowest loads on the upper body during ratcheting (using both hands and performing the task with their full body). This research marks the first step towards the development of a training programme aiming at changing practice to reduce injury risks associated with the operation of tie-down lashings in the automobile transport industry. Practitioner Summary: The study investigated current practice associated with the operation of tie-down lashings through qualitative (interviews) and quantitative (biomechanical analysis) methods. Operators tended to systematically over-tension the lashings and consequently overexert, increasing injury risks.

  20. Wind Structure and Wind Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    The purpose of this note is to provide a short description of wind, i.e. of the flow in the atmosphere of the Earth and the loading caused by wind on structures. The description comprises: causes to the generation of windhe interaction between wind and the surface of the Earthhe stochastic nature...... of windhe interaction between wind and structures, where it is shown that wind loading depends strongly on this interaction...

  1. Wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not wind turbines pose a risk to human health is a matter of heated debate. Personal reactions to other environmental exposures occurring in the same settings as wind turbines may be responsible of the reported symptoms. However, these have not been accounted for in previous studies. We...... investigated whether there is an association between residential proximity to wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms, after controlling for personal reactions to other environmental co-exposures. We assessed wind turbine exposures in 454 residences as the distance to the closest wind turbine (Dw) and number...... of wind turbines

  2. Factors associated with the burnout syndrome among professionals in pharmaceutical manufacturing industry and marketing 1234

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vesna R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain authors describe some professions in the healthcare industry as the more susceptible ones to developing a burnout syndrome, while others suggest psychosocial aspects of the workplace as the primary cause in its creation, but not the aspects of the job itself. The main objective of the research was to investigate which specific factors were associated with the burnout syndrome among professionals working in pharmaceutical manufacturing industry and marketing. The study was conducted in June of 2016 as a cross-sectional study and it included 75 university educated professionals from the area of pharmaceutical industry and marketing employed in several local as well as internationally renowned pharmaceutical companies located in Belgrade. The participants were surveyed anonymously. The instruments used in the study were: a general socio-demographic questionnaire, an assertiveness self-evaluation questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. An analysis of the responses in the burnout syndrome self-evaluation questionnaires showed that the highest level of burnout was expressed through reduced personal accomplishment (53%. The average assertiveness scores were the lowest in the individuals who demonstrated the highest level of emotional exhaustion (p=0.003, depersonalization (p=0.004, and the highest inefficiency on professional accomplishment scale (p=0.001. A statistically significant difference was observed in frequency and extent of emotional exhaustion with respect to respondents' gender (x2=10.779; p<0.05, as well as the line of business (x2=6.493; p<0.05. Levels of depersonalization are influenced by: line of work (x2=5.393; p<0.05, age (p=0.004, total years of service (p=0.009 and years of service in the profession (p=0.006. A sense of reduced personal accomplishment is influenced by a respondents' profession (x2=10.922; p<0.05 and line of business (x2=7.283; p<0.05. The results obtained in this study might help in identifying

  3. Nonresearch Industry Payments to Radiologists: Characteristics and Associations With Regional Medical Imaging Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokabi, Nima; Junn, Jacqueline C; Xing, Minzhi; Hemingway, Jennifer; Hughes, Danny R; Duszak, Richard

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate characteristics of nonresearch industry payments to radiologists and associations with regional diagnostic imaging utilization. Using 2014 CMS Open Payment data, all disclosed nonresearch-related industry payments to radiologists were identified. Health Resources and Services Administration Area Health Resources Files were used to identify actual and population-weighted numbers of radiologists by state. Utilizing the 5% random beneficiary sample CMS Research Identifiable Files from 2014, average Medicare imaging spending per beneficiary in each state was calculated. Average frequency and dollar amounts of nonresearch nonroyalty payments to radiologists were calculated at the state level. Using the Pearson correlation coefficient, the relationship between frequency and amounts of nonresearch payments to radiologists versus per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending was evaluated at the state level. Overall, 2,008 radiologists (1,670 diagnostic, 338 interventional) received nonresearch nonroyalty payments from industry, representing 5.2% of all 38,857 radiologists nationwide. A total of 4,975 individual transfers translated to 2.5 ± 1.3 discrete payments per receiving radiologist with a mean of $432 ± $1,976 (median $26; range $1-$34,050). Food and beverage expenses constituted the vast majority of disclosed transfers (4,111; 83%), followed by travel and lodging (444; 9%), consulting fees (279; 6%), and educational expenses (51; 1%). Considerable geographic variation in payments was observed, ranging from 0% of radiologists in Vermont to 12.9% in the District of Columbia. No correlation was identified between average per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending and the proportion of nonresearch-funded radiologists in each state (r = 0.06). Similarly, no correlation was identified between average per-beneficiary Medicare imaging spending and the average nonresearch transfer amount to radiologists in each state (r = -0.08). In 2014, only a small minority of

  4. DOE Collegiate Wind Competition (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2014-02-01

    This presentation for the January Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach webinar outlines the expanded need for workers in the wind industry and provides an overview of the DOE Wind Competition (to be held in May 2014) and the guiding principles of the competition.

  5. Floral trait evolution associated with shifts between insect and wind pollination in the dioecious genus Leucadendron (Proteaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsford, Megan R; Hobbhahn, Nina; Midgley, Jeremy J; Johnson, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Transitions between animal and wind pollination have occurred in many lineages and have been linked to various floral modifications, but these have seldom been assessed in a phylogenetic framework. In the dioecious genus Leucadendron (Proteaceae), transitions from insect to wind pollination have occurred at least four times. Using analyses that controlled for relatedness among Leucadendron species, we investigated how these transitions shaped the evolution of floral structural and signaling traits, including the degree of sexual dimorphism in these traits. Pollen grains of wind-pollinated species were found to be smaller, more numerous, and dispersed more efficiently in wind than were those of insect-pollinated species. Wind-pollinated species also exhibited a reduction in spectral contrast between showy subtending leaves and background foliage, reduced volatile emissions, and a greater degree of sexual dimorphism in color and scent. Uniovulate flowers and inflorescence condensation are conserved ancestral features in Leucadendron and likely served as exaptations in shifts to wind pollination. These results offer insights into the key modifications of male and female floral traits involved in transitions between insect and wind pollination. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. 2013 Distributed Wind Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrell, Alice C.; Rhoads-Weaver, H. E.; Flowers, Larry T.; Gagne, Matthew N.; Pro, Boyd H.; Foster, Nikolas AF

    2014-08-20

    The purpose of this report is to quantify and summarize the 2013 U.S. distributed wind market to help plan and guide future investments and decisions by industry stakeholders, utilities, state and federal agencies, and other interested parties.

  7. Industrial air pollution in rural Kenya: community awareness, risk perception and associations between risk variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omanga, Eunice; Ulmer, Lisa; Berhane, Zekarias; Gatari, Michael

    2014-04-17

    Developing countries have limited air quality management systems due to inadequate legislation and lack of political will, among other challenges. Maintaining a balance between economic development and sustainable environment is a challenge, hence investments in pollution prevention technologies get sidelined in favor of short-term benefits from increased production and job creation. This lack of air quality management capability translates into lack of air pollution data, hence the false belief that there is no problem. The objectives of the study were to: assess the population's environmental awareness, explore their perception of pollution threat to their health; examine the association between specific health hazards. A cross-sectional study was implemented by gathering quantitative information on demographic, health status, environmental perception and environmental knowledge of residents to understand their view of pollution in their neighborhood. Focus group discussions (FGDs) allowed for corroboration of the quantitative data. Over 80% of respondents perceived industrial pollution as posing a considerable risk to them despite the fact that the economy of the area largely depended on the factory. Respondents also argued that they had not been actively involved in identifying solutions to the environmental challenges. The study revealed a significant association between industrial pollution as a risk and, perception of risk from other familiar health hazards. The most important factors influencing the respondents' pollution risk perception were environmental awareness and family health status. This study avails information to policy makers and researchers concerning public awareness and attitudes towards environmental pollution pertinent to development and implementation of environmental policies for public health.

  8. Industrial air pollution in rural Kenya: community awareness, risk perception and associations between risk variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing countries have limited air quality management systems due to inadequate legislation and lack of political will, among other challenges. Maintaining a balance between economic development and sustainable environment is a challenge, hence investments in pollution prevention technologies get sidelined in favor of short-term benefits from increased production and job creation. This lack of air quality management capability translates into lack of air pollution data, hence the false belief that there is no problem. The objectives of the study were to: assess the population’s environmental awareness, explore their perception of pollution threat to their health; examine the association between specific health hazards. Methods A cross-sectional study was implemented by gathering quantitative information on demographic, health status, environmental perception and environmental knowledge of residents to understand their view of pollution in their neighborhood. Focus group discussions (FGDs) allowed for corroboration of the quantitative data. Results Over 80% of respondents perceived industrial pollution as posing a considerable risk to them despite the fact that the economy of the area largely depended on the factory. Respondents also argued that they had not been actively involved in identifying solutions to the environmental challenges. The study revealed a significant association between industrial pollution as a risk and, perception of risk from other familiar health hazards. The most important factors influencing the respondents’ pollution risk perception were environmental awareness and family health status. Conclusion This study avails information to policy makers and researchers concerning public awareness and attitudes towards environmental pollution pertinent to development and implementation of environmental policies for public health. PMID:24742166

  9. Distributed Wind Market Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, T.; Baring-Gould, I.

    2007-11-01

    Distributed wind energy systems provide clean, renewable power for on-site use and help relieve pressure on the power grid while providing jobs and contributing to energy security for homes, farms, schools, factories, private and public facilities, distribution utilities, and remote locations. America pioneered small wind technology in the 1920s, and it is the only renewable energy industry segment that the United States still dominates in technology, manufacturing, and world market share. The series of analyses covered by this report were conducted to assess some of the most likely ways that advanced wind turbines could be utilized apart from large, central station power systems. Each chapter represents a final report on specific market segments written by leading experts in this field. As such, this document does not speak with one voice but rather a compendium of different perspectives, which are documented from a variety of people in the U.S. distributed wind field.

  10. Panorama 2016 - Offshore wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinot, Simon

    2015-11-01

    While onshore wind power is a rapidly growing global industry, the offshore wind power market remains in its consolidation and globalization phase. This most mature of renewable marine energies continues to develop and can no longer be considered a niche industry. This fact sheet evaluates the market over the last several years, looking at its potential and its current rank in terms of electricity production costs. (author)

  11. Superconducting Wind Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad

    in this thesis is a part of a larger endeavor, the Superwind project that focused on identifying the potentials that HTS machines could offer to the wind industry and addressing some of the challenges in the process. In order to identify these challenges, I have design and constructed a HTS machine experimental...... still be optimized towards more competitive alternative to conventional machines. Additionally, by constructing the HTS machine setup we went through most of the issues related to the HTS machine design which we managed to address in rather simple manner using everyday materials and therefore proving......A HTS machine could be a way to address some of the technical barriers offshore wind energy is about to face. Due to the superior power density of HTS machines, this technology could become a milestone on which many, including the wind industry, will rely in the future. The work presented...

  12. Wind energy technology developments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Hauge; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2014-01-01

    turbine blades and towers are very large series-produced components, which costs and quality are strongly dependent on the manufacturing methods. The industrial wind energy sector is well developed in Denmark, and the competitive advantage of the Danish sector and the potential for job creation...

  13. Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2007-06-01

    This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

  14. Medical Schools' Industry Interaction Policies Not Associated With Trainees' Self-Reported Behavior as Residents: Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, James S.; Austad, Kirsten E.; Franklin, Jessica M.; Chimonas, Susan; Campbell, Eric G.; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students attending schools with policies limiting industry/student interactions report fewer relationships with pharmaceutical representatives. Objective To investigate whether associations between students' medical school policies and their more limited industry interaction behaviors persist into residency. Methods We randomly sampled 1800 third-year residents who graduated from 120 allopathic US-based medical schools, using the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. We surveyed them in 2011 to determine self-reported behavior and preferences for brand-name prescriptions, and we calculated the strength of their medical schools' industry interaction policies using the 2008 American Medical Student Association and Institute on Medicine as a Profession databases. We used logistic regression to estimate the association between strength of school policies and residents' behaviors with adjustments for class size, postresidency career plan, and concern about medical school debt. Results We achieved a 44% survey response rate (n = 739). Residents who graduated from schools with restrictive policies were no more or less likely to accept industry gifts or industry-sponsored meals, speak with marketing representative about drug products, attend industry-sponsored lectures, or prefer brand-name medications than residents who graduated from schools with less restrictive policies. Residents who correctly answered evidence-based prescription questions were about 30% less likely to have attended industry-sponsored lectures (OR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.56–0.98). Conclusions Any effect that medical school industry interaction policies had on insulating students from pharmaceutical marketing did not persist in the behavior of residents in our sample. This suggests that residency training environments are important in influencing behavior. PMID:26692972

  15. Adiposity and hypertension associated risk factors in young (<40 yr urban industrial men from Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Prakash Mankar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of hypertension is not only on the rise in urban population, but its precedence is of concern. Aims & Objective: To identify risk factors associated with hypertension among urban young Indian males. (<40yr.  Material & Methods: Young males (<40yr working in Hinjewadi industrial area of Pune, Maharashtra were studied (n=254 for anthropometry, blood pressure and diet, lifestyle, and stress at work. Results: Prevalence of overweight was 72.5% and 48.4 % were obese while 38.2% were centrally obese (WC90. Prevalence of hypertension (HTN was high (25.6% and showed significant association only with BMI.  Non vegetarian diet was a risk factor (OR-1.94;p<0.05 for overweight while lifestyle factors increased risk for obesity (OR-2.1;p<0.05 as also central obesity (OR-1.91;p<0.05.  Among subjects with high BMI, these factors became non-significant and stress alone showed independent influence on HTN (OR-4.43; p<0.05 indicating that their influence was mediated through adiposity. Conclusion: Promoting good dietary practices, healthy lifestyle and better work environment for reducing obesity and consequent risk of NCDs among young urban males is essential in India.

  16. The Japan Home-health Apparatus Industrial Association: investigation of home-use electronic sphygmomanometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaki, O; Terada, H; Niwano, K; Nakanishi, T; Kanai, M; Miyawaki, Y; Souma, T; Tanaka, T; Kusunoki, T

    2001-12-01

    The Japanese Home-health Apparatus Industrial Association is an official independent organization comprising ten departments. That concerned with home electronic sphygmomanometers, which has seven participants from different Japanese manufacturers, has already undertaken and is currently involved in various activities related to voluntary standards for performance validation and quality assurance. Because Japanese companies form a large proportion of manufacturers, these activities are important in terms of autonomic regulation. Although many improvements have been made to home electronic sphygmomanometers, some problems still remain unresolved, especially in terms of measurement reliability and easy operation by lay people. Another aspect of the department's work relates to making proposals on major validation standards, such as those of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, the British Hypertension Society and Comité Européen de Normalisation (CEN). Clinical validation should be discussed in order to define a more accurate standard method of measurement using auscultation and more appropriate criteria that are unaffected by primary blood pressure variation.

  17. Coastal and offshore wind energy generation: is it environmentally benign?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J. C.; Elliott, M.; Cutts, N. D.; Mander, L.; Mendao, V.; Perez-Dominguez, R.; Phelps, A. [Institute of Estuarine and Coastal Studies, University of Hull, Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Wilson, J. C. [Amec, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire, WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Mendao, V. [Projecto Delfim, Centro Portugues de Estudo dos Mamiferos Marinhos, Rua Alto do Duque, 45, 1400-009 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-07-15

    Offshore and coastal wind power is one of the fastest growing industries in many areas, especially those with shallow coastal regions due to the preferable generation conditions available in the regions. As with any expanding industry, there are concerns regarding the potential environmental effects which may be caused by the installation of the offshore wind turbines and their associated infrastructure, including substations and subsea cables. These include the potential impacts on the biological, physical and human environments. This review discusses in detail the potential impacts arising from offshore wind farm construction, and how these may be quantified and addressed through the use of conceptual models. It concludes that while not environmentally benign, the environmental impacts are minor and can be mitigated through good siting practices. In addition, it suggests that there are opportunities for environmental benefits through habitat creation and conservation protection areas. (authors)

  18. Danish wind energy co-operatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranaes, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    An outline is given of the historical development of Danish wind energy cooperatives. Topics covered include wind turbine owners and their relations with parliament and public authorities, the power station companies and the wind turbine industry. Interest in the environment and support of popular cooperative activities in the local community are essential to success. (UK)

  19. Wind Turbine Power Curves Incorporating Turbulence Intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Hedevang Lohse

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a wind turbine in terms of power production (the power curve) is important to the wind energy industry. The current IEC-61400-12-1 standard for power curve evaluation recognizes only the mean wind speed at hub height and the air density as relevant to the power production...

  20. Associations between air pollution in the industrial and suburban parts of Ostrava city and their use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirik, Vitezslav; Brezna, Barbara; Machaczka, Ondrej; Honkysova, Sabina; Miturova, Hana; Janout, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    Selecting the locations and numbers of air quality monitoring stations is challenging as these are expensive to operate. Representative concentrations of pollutants in certain areas are usually determined by measuring. If there are significant correlations with concentrations of other pollutants or with other monitoring sites, however, concentrations could also be computed, partly reducing the costs. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of such possible relationships using data on concentrations of ambient air pollutants obtained in different areas of a larger city. Presented are associations between industrial (IP) and suburban parts (SP) as well as correlations between concentrations of various pollutants at the same site. Results of air pollutant monitoring come from Ostrava, an industrial city in Central Europe with a population of over 300,000. The study showed that certain pollutants were strongly correlated, especially particulate matter (r = 0.940) and ozone (r = 0.923) between the IP and SP. Statistically significant correlations were also found between different pollutants at the same site. The highest correlations were between PM 10 and NO 2 (r IP  = 0.728; r SP  = 0.734), NO 2 and benzo(a)pyrene (r IP  = 0.787; r SP  = 0.697), and NO 2 and ozone (r IP  = -0.706; r SP  = -0.686). This could contribute to more cost-effective solutions for air pollution monitoring in cities and their surroundings by using computational models based on the correlations, optimization of the network of monitoring stations, and the best selection of measuring devices.

  1. Structural Reliability Aspects in Design of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Reliability assessment, optimal design and optimal operation and maintenance of wind turbines are an area of significant interest for the fast growing wind turbine industry for sustainable production of energy. Offshore wind turbines in wind farms give special problems due to wake effects inside...... the farm. Reliability analysis and optimization of wind turbines require that the special conditions for wind turbine operation are taken into account. Control of the blades implies load reductions for large wind speeds and parking for high wind speeds. In this paper basic structural failure modes for wind...

  2. The Distributed Wind Cost Taxonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, Trudy; Jimenez, Tony; Preus, Robert; Tegen, Suzanne; Baring-Gould, Ian

    2017-03-28

    To date, there has been no standard method or tool to analyze the installed and operational costs for distributed wind turbine systems. This report describes the development of a classification system, or taxonomy, for distributed wind turbine project costs. The taxonomy establishes a framework to help collect, sort, and compare distributed wind cost data that mirrors how the industry categorizes information. The taxonomy organizes costs so they can be aggregated from installers, developers, vendors, and other sources without losing cost details. Developing a peer-reviewed taxonomy is valuable to industry stakeholders because a common understanding the details of distributed wind turbine costs and balance of station costs is a first step to identifying potential high-value cost reduction opportunities. Addressing cost reduction potential can help increase distributed wind's competitiveness and propel the U.S. distributed wind industry forward. The taxonomy can also be used to perform cost comparisons between technologies and track trends for distributed wind industry costs in the future. As an initial application and piloting of the taxonomy, preliminary cost data were collected for projects of different sizes and from different regions across the contiguous United States. Following the methods described in this report, these data are placed into the established cost categories.

  3. WindScanner.eu - a new Remote Sensing Research Infrastructure for On- and Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Siggaard Knudsen, Søren; Sjöholm, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    will be disseminated throughout Europe to pilot European wind energy research centers. The new research infrastructure will become an open source infrastructure that also invites collaboration with wind energy related atmospheric scientists and wind energy industry overseas. Recent achievements with 3D Wind......Scanners and spin-off innovation activity are described. The Danish WindScanner.dk research facility is build from new and fast-scanning remote sensing equipment spurred from achievements within fiber optics and telecommunication technologies. At the same time the wind energy society has demanded excessive 3D wind...

  4. Configuration of technology networks in the wind turbine industry. A comparative study of technology management models in European and Chinese lead firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakonsson, Stine Jessen; Kirkegaard, Julia Kirch

    2016-01-01

    or relational ties with key component suppliers, whereas Chinese lead firms modularise and externalise core technology components, hence adopting a more flexible approach to technology management. The latter model mirrors a strategy of overcoming technological barriers by tapping into knowledge through global......Through a comparative analysis of technology management at the component level by wind turbine manufacturers from Europe and China, this article compares strategies of internalisation of core technology components by European and Chinese lead firms and outlines how different internalisation...

  5. Centrifuge and Numerical Modeling of Monopiles for Offshore Wind Towers Installed in Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Murali, Madhuri; Grajales, Francisco; Beemer, Ryan D.; Biscontin, Giovanna; Aubeny, Charles

    2015-01-01

    This is a metadata record relating to an article that cannot be shared due to publisher copyright. Offshore wind power has gained momentum as a means to diversify the world’s energy infrastructure; however, little is still known of the global stiffness behavior of the large diameter low aspect ratio monopiles which have become the foundation of choice for offshore wind towers. Traditionally, offshore foundations have been associated with gravity structures for the oil and gas industry, whi...

  6. A Simple Power Management Scheme with Enhanced Stability for a Solar PV/Wind/Fuel Cell/Grid Fed Hybrid Power Supply Designed for Industrial Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new power conditioner topology with an intelligent power management controller that integrates multiple renewable energy sources such as solar energy, wind energy, and fuel cell energy with battery and AC grid supply as backup to make the best use of their operating characteristics with better reliability than that could be obtained by single renewable energy source based power supply. The proposed embedded controller is programmed to perform MPPT for solar PV panel and WTG, SOC estimation and battery, maintaining a constant voltage at PCC and power flow control by regulating the reference currents of the controller in an instantaneous basis. The instantaneous variation in reference currents of the controller enhances the controller response as it accommodates the effect of continuously varying solar insolation and wind speed in the power management. It also prioritizes the sources for consumption to achieve maximum usage of green energy than grid energy. The simulation results of the proposed power management system with real-time solar radiation and wind velocity data collected from solar centre, KEC, and experimental results for a sporadically varying load demand are presented in this paper and the results are encouraging from reliability and stability perspectives.

  7. Continuing medical education and pharmaceutical industry involvement: An evaluation of policies adopted by Canadian professional medical associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnier, Adrienne; Lexchin, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Professional medical associations (PMAs) play a crucial role in providing accredited continuing medical education (CME) to physicians. Funding from the pharmaceutical industry may lead to biases in CME. This study examines publicly available policies on CME, adopted by Canadian PMAs as of December 2015. Policies were evaluated using an original scoring tool comprising 21 items, two questions about PMAs' general and CME funding from industry, and three enforcement measures. We assessed 236 policies adopted by Canadian PMAs (range, 0 to 32). Medical associations received summative scores that ranged from 0% to 49.2% of the total possible points (maximum score = 63). Twenty-seven associations received an overall score of 0%. The highest mean scores were achieved in the areas of industry involvement in planning CME activities (mean: 1.1/3), presence of a review process for topics of CME activities (mean: 1.1/3), content review for balanced information (mean: 1.1/3), and responsibility of distribution of funds (mean: 1.0/3). The lowest mean scores were achieved in the areas of awards (mean: 0.0/3), industry personnel, representatives, and employees (mean: 0.1/3), distribution of industry-funded educational materials at CME activities (mean: 0.1/3), and distinction between marketing and educational materials (mean: 0.1/3). These results suggest that Canadian PMAs' publicly available policies on industry involvement in CME are generally weak or non-existent; therefore, the accredited CME that is provided to Canadian physicians may be viewed as open to bias. We encourage all Canadian medical associations to strengthen their policies to avoid the potential for industry influence in CME.

  8. Wind Speed Perception and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agdas, Duzgun; Webster, Gregory D.; Masters, Forrest J.

    2012-01-01

    Background How accurately do people perceive extreme wind speeds and how does that perception affect the perceived risk? Prior research on human–wind interaction has focused on comfort levels in urban settings or knock-down thresholds. No systematic experimental research has attempted to assess people's ability to estimate extreme wind speeds and perceptions of their associated risks. Method We exposed 76 people to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph (4.5, 8.9, 13.4, 17.9, 22.3, and 26.8 m/s) winds in randomized orders and asked them to estimate wind speed and the corresponding risk they felt. Results Multilevel modeling showed that people were accurate at lower wind speeds but overestimated wind speeds at higher levels. Wind speed perceptions mediated the direct relationship between actual wind speeds and perceptions of risk (i.e., the greater the perceived wind speed, the greater the perceived risk). The number of tropical cyclones people had experienced moderated the strength of the actual–perceived wind speed relationship; consequently, mediation was stronger for people who had experienced fewer storms. Conclusion These findings provide a clearer understanding of wind and risk perception, which can aid development of public policy solutions toward communicating the severity and risks associated with natural disasters. PMID:23226230

  9. Wind speed perception and risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duzgun Agdas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How accurately do people perceive extreme wind speeds and how does that perception affect the perceived risk? Prior research on human-wind interaction has focused on comfort levels in urban settings or knock-down thresholds. No systematic experimental research has attempted to assess people's ability to estimate extreme wind speeds and perceptions of their associated risks. METHOD: We exposed 76 people to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph (4.5, 8.9, 13.4, 17.9, 22.3, and 26.8 m/s winds in randomized orders and asked them to estimate wind speed and the corresponding risk they felt. RESULTS: Multilevel modeling showed that people were accurate at lower wind speeds but overestimated wind speeds at higher levels. Wind speed perceptions mediated the direct relationship between actual wind speeds and perceptions of risk (i.e., the greater the perceived wind speed, the greater the perceived risk. The number of tropical cyclones people had experienced moderated the strength of the actual-perceived wind speed relationship; consequently, mediation was stronger for people who had experienced fewer storms. CONCLUSION: These findings provide a clearer understanding of wind and risk perception, which can aid development of public policy solutions toward communicating the severity and risks associated with natural disasters.

  10. Wind turbines and infrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provided the results of a study conducted to assess the impacts of wind farm-induced infrasound on nearby residences and human populations. Infrasound occurs at frequencies below those considered as detectable by human hearing. Infrasonic levels caused by wind turbines are often similar to ambient levels of 85 dBG or lower that are caused by wind in the natural environment. This study examined the levels at which infrasound poses a threat to human health or can be considered as an annoyance. The study examined levels of infrasound caused by various types of wind turbines, and evaluated acoustic phenomena and characteristics associated with wind turbines. Results of the study suggested that infrasound near modern wind turbines is typically not perceptible to humans through either auditory or non-auditory mechanisms. However, wind turbines often create an audible broadband noise whose amplitude can be modulated at low frequencies. A review of both Canadian and international studies concluded that infrasound generated by wind turbines should not significantly impact nearby residences or human populations. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  11. China: an emerging offshore wind development hotspot. With a new assessment of China's offshore wind potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinvang, Rasmus; Enslow, Rachel; Beaumont, Hubert

    2010-08-15

    This study provides new and more detailed estimates of the offshore wind energy resources in China, with particular focus on Southern China. The study points out that the offshore wind industry is ramping up in China with at least 11.9GW in the development pipeline per April 2010. The study estimates the offshore wind potential of China (excluding Taiwan) to 11,580TWh/year. The study proves estimates and wind energy resource maps per province. Fujian, Zhejiang and Hainan stand out with the highest offshore wind speeds in China while Guangdong also shows significant potential, with annual wind speed averages of 6.5-10.2m/s and an energy density range of 12-36GWh/km2. Even though current offshore wind development is mainly taking place in Fujian and Jiangsu, this study shows that the potential is likely even greater in other provinces. The study was developed by the Chinese Wind Energy Association (CWEA) and Sun Yat-sen University, and commissioned by WWF as part of a project funded by the Norwegian Agency of development Coopeartion (Norad). Methodology and constraints: The wind resource analysis improves upon previous studies in estimating the wind energy generation potential for offshore wind power in China, with available meteorological data adjusted for influence of typhoons. The study models how much energy offshore wind can produce along China's coast up to 100km from the shore by calculating the energy output of theoretical wind farms by applying the power curve of a 3MW turbine at a 100m hub height. In addition the study further expands by giving special consideration to the deep-sea offshore potential at +50m water depths. The study focuses particularly on the coastline from Shandong down to Hainan. The final results provide good indication of the offshore wind resource in China when comparing one area to the other. The report can therefore be used as a preliminary tool to identifying most interesting provinces and locations for offshore wind

  12. Factors Associated with the Adoption of Food Safety Controls by the Mexican Meat Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Simán, Ema; Martínez-Hernández, Pedro Arturo; García-Muñiz, José G.; Cadena-Meneses, José

    Food marketing at international and domestic markets has focused on processing systems that improve food safety. The objective of this research is to determine the factors influencing the implementation of the HACCP system in the Mexican meat industry, and to identify the main marketing destination of their products. Only 18.5% of enterprises reports fully operational HACCP in their plants. The main destination of their production in the domestic market is supermarkets, suppliers and distributors and specific niches of the domestic market. Exports are to USA, Japan, Korea and Central America and some niches of the domestic market with requirements of higher quality. The four principal factors that motivate enterprises to adopt HACCP are associated with improvement of plant efficiency and profitability, adoption of good practices, improvement of product quality and waste reduction. It is concluded that Mexican enterprises adopt HACCP to successfully remain and face competition by foreign enterprises in the domestic market and to a lesser extent to compete in the international market.

  13. The association between socioeconomic characteristics and consumption of food items among Brazilian industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinholes, Daniele B; Melo, Ione M F; Machado, Carlos Alberto; de Castro Chaves, Hilton; Fuchs, Flavio D; Fuchs, Sandra C

    2012-01-01

    Dietary pattern plays a causative role in the rising of noncommunicable diseases. The SESI (Serviço Social da Indústria) study was designed to evaluate risk factors for noncommunicable diseases. We aimed to describe food items consumed by Brazilian workers and to assess their association with socioeconomic status. Cross-sectional study was carried out among Brazilian industrial workers, selected by multistage sampling, from 157 companies. Interviews were conducted at the work place using standardized forms. 4818 workers were interviewed, aged 35.4 ± 10.7 years, 76.5% were men. The workers had an average of 8.7 ± 4.1 years of schooling and 25.4 ± 4.1 kg/m² of BMI. Men and individuals with less than high school education were less likely to consume dairy products, fruits, and vegetables daily, even after control for confounding factors. Men consumed rice and beans daily more often than women. In comparison to workers aged 50-76 years, those under 30 years old consumed less fruits and green leafy vegetables daily. The food items consumed by Brazilian workers show that there are insufficient consumption according to the guidelines of healthy foods, particularly of dairy products, vegetables, and fruits.

  14. Factors associated with inadequate work ability among women in the clothing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Viviane Gontijo; Sampaio, Rosana Ferreira; Ferreira, Fabiane Ribeiro; Kirkwood, Renata Noce; César, Cibele Comini

    2015-01-01

    Work ability depends on a balance between individual resources and work demands. This study evaluated factors that are associated with inadequate work ability among workers in the clothing industry. We conducted a cross-sectional observational study of 306 workers in 40 small and medium-sized enterprises. We assessed work ability, individual resources, physical and psychosocial demands, and aspects of life outside work using a binary logistic regression model with hierarchical data entry. The mean work ability was 42.5 (SD=3.5); when adjusted for age, only 11% of the workers showed inadequate work ability. The final model revealed that smoking, high isometric physical load, and poor physical environmental conditions were the most significant predictors of inadequate work ability. Good working conditions and worker education must be implemented to eliminate factors that can be changed and that have a negative impact on work ability. These initiatives include anti-smoking measures, improved postures at work, and better physical environmental conditions.

  15. The Association between Socioeconomic Characteristics and Consumption of Food Items among Brazilian Industry Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele B. Vinholes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dietary pattern plays a causative role in the rising of noncommunicable diseases. The SESI (Serviço Social da Indústria study was designed to evaluate risk factors for noncommunicable diseases. We aimed to describe food items consumed by Brazilian workers and to assess their association with socioeconomic status. Methods. Cross-sectional study was carried out among Brazilian industrial workers, selected by multistage sampling, from 157 companies. Interviews were conducted at the work place using standardized forms. Results. 4818 workers were interviewed, aged 35.4±10.7 years, 76.5% were men. The workers had an average of 8.7±4.1 years of schooling and 25.4±4.1 kg/m2 of BMI. Men and individuals with less than high school education were less likely to consume dairy products, fruits, and vegetables daily, even after control for confounding factors. Men consumed rice and beans daily more often than women. In comparison to workers aged 50–76 years, those under 30 years old consumed less fruits and green leafy vegetables daily. Conclusion. The food items consumed by Brazilian workers show that there are insufficient consumption according to the guidelines of healthy foods, particularly of dairy products, vegetables, and fruits.

  16. The Association between Socioeconomic Characteristics and Consumption of Food Items among Brazilian Industry Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinholes, Daniele B.; Melo, Ione M. F.; Machado, Carlos Alberto; de Castro Chaves, Hilton; Fuchs, Flavio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Dietary pattern plays a causative role in the rising of noncommunicable diseases. The SESI (Serviço Social da Indústria) study was designed to evaluate risk factors for noncommunicable diseases. We aimed to describe food items consumed by Brazilian workers and to assess their association with socioeconomic status. Methods. Cross-sectional study was carried out among Brazilian industrial workers, selected by multistage sampling, from 157 companies. Interviews were conducted at the work place using standardized forms. Results. 4818 workers were interviewed, aged 35.4 ± 10.7 years, 76.5% were men. The workers had an average of 8.7 ± 4.1 years of schooling and 25.4 ± 4.1 kg/m2 of BMI. Men and individuals with less than high school education were less likely to consume dairy products, fruits, and vegetables daily, even after control for confounding factors. Men consumed rice and beans daily more often than women. In comparison to workers aged 50–76 years, those under 30 years old consumed less fruits and green leafy vegetables daily. Conclusion. The food items consumed by Brazilian workers show that there are insufficient consumption according to the guidelines of healthy foods, particularly of dairy products, vegetables, and fruits. PMID:22701097

  17. Floating Foundations for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Thøtt

    The concept of harnessing the power of the wind dates all the way back to the first ships traversing the seas. Later, windmills enabled the use of wind power for industrial purposes. Since then, technology has allowed the production of clean renewable energy through the use of wind turbines......-stage physical prototype testing in wave basins without wind generating capabilities, and hence allows testing of a wider range of concepts....

  18. Direct Drive Technology for Wind Turbine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Azar, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Siemens Wind Power have developed direct-drive (DD) wind turbine technology over the past decade to meet the future demand for cost effective and reliable onshore and offshore wind power. The increasing power requirements from the industry resulting in higher torque requirements in the drive train, has made it necessary to reduce the complexity and improve reliability of wind turbines by going to DD generator technology.

  19. Intelligent control on wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Mu; Chen, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    with the wind farm makes the grid more vulnerable. The communication technologies have been considered as a solution to solve the problems according to the IEC 61400-25 series protocols. This paper presents the significance of communication technologies in wind farm system by the simulations on some practical......Since the renewable energy is popularly applied in power industry, especially the smart grid is fast developing all over the world during these years, the reliable connection between a wind farm and the main grid has been focused on. Due to the difficult control on the wind energy, the connection...... scenarios. By delivering the signals among WTs (wind turbines) and control centers, they both are able to recognize another side’s operation situation and to adjust its own state to realize the optimization. A scenario is designed in this paper, in which a fault occurs in wind farm; then the protection...

  20. 2015 Wind Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Barbose, Galen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Darghouth, Naim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hoen, Ben [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mills, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rand, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Millstein, Dev [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Porter, Kevin [Exeter Associates, Columbia, MD (United States); Widiss, Rebecca [Exeter Associates, Columbia, MD (United States); Oteri, Frank [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tian, Tian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This annual report--now in its tenth year--provides a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2015. The report begins with an overview of key installation trends and then covers an array of industry and technology trends. The report also discusses project performance, wind turbine prices, project costs, operations and maintenance expenses, and prices paid for wind power in the United States. The report examines policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market and provides a preview of possible near-term market developments, expenses, and prices paid for wind power in the United States. The report examines policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market and provides a preview of possible near-term market developments.

  1. Deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions associated with fuelwood consumption of the brick making industry in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Syed Ashraful; Starr, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The study focuses on the role of the fired clay brick making industry (BMI) on deforestation and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Sudan. The BMI is based on numerous kilns that use biomass fuel, mainly wood which is largely harvested unsustainably. This results in potential deforestation and land degradation. Fuelwood consumption data was collected using interviews and questionnaires from 25 BMI enterprises in three administrative regions, namely Khartoum, Kassala and Gezira. Annual fuelwood consumption data (t dm yr -1 ) was converted into harvested biomass (m 3 ) using a wood density value of 0.65 t dm m -3 . For annual GHG estimations, the methodological approach outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was used. According to our results, the annual deforestation associated with the BMI for the whole of Sudan is 508.4 x 10 3 m 3 of wood biomass, including 267.6 x 10 3 m 3 round wood and 240.8 x 10 3 m 3 branches and small trees. Total GHG emissions from the Sudanese BMI are estimated at 378 028 t CO 2 , 15 554 t CO, 1778 t CH 4 , 442 t NO X , 288 t NO and 12 t N 2 O per annum. The combined CO 2 -equivalent (global warming potential for 100-year time horizon) of the GHG emissions (excluding NO X and NO) is 455 666 t yr -1 . While these emissions form only a small part of Sudan's total GHG emissions, the associated deforestation and land degradation is of concern and effort should be made for greater use of sustainable forest resources and management

  2. European wind turbine catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The THERMIE European Community programme is designed to promote the greater use of European technology and this catalogue contributes to the fulfillment of this aim by dissemination of information on 50 wind turbines from 30 manufacturers. These turbines are produced in Europe and are commercially available. The manufacturers presented produce and sell grid-connected turbines which have been officially approved in countries where this approval is acquired, however some of the wind turbines included in the catalogue have not been regarded as fully commercially available at the time of going to print. The entries, which are illustrated by colour photographs, give company profiles, concept descriptions, measured power curves, prices, and information on design and dimension, safety systems, stage of development, special characteristics, annual energy production, and noise pollution. Lists are given of wind turbine manufacturers and agents and of consultants and developers in the wind energy sector. Exchange rates used in the conversion of the prices of wind turbines are also given. Information can be found on the OPET network (organizations recognised by the European Commission as an Organization for the Promotion of Energy Technologies (OPET)). An article describes the development of the wind power industry during the last 10-15 years and another article on certification aims to give an overview of the most well-known and acknowledged type approvals currently issued in Europe. (AB)

  3. Inside anti-wind groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rap, C.

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning the opposition to wind turbines was based on the preservation of the landscape. Now as wind farms are more frequent, the reasons to fight them become more concrete: -) the loss of value of properties due to the installation of a wind turbine in the surroundings, -) the noise and the view, or -) the impact on the fauna. More and more people question the choice of wind power as an efficient and reliable source of energy. In France about a few tens of thousand people are registered in associations of opponents to wind energy. These associations have merged into 2 main federations: 'Vent de colere' and 'Federation Environement Durable'. In october 2008 Apaw, a European platform against wind energy, was founded. Apaw gathers 400 federations from 21 European countries. Wind energy opponents are getting momentum, they are becoming experts on how to communicate, how to organize demonstrations, how to take legal actions and on active lobbying. (A.C.)

  4. Regional hydrogen roadmap. Project development framework for the Sahara Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhamou, Khalid [Sahara Wind Inc., Rabat (Morocco); Arbaoui, Abdelaziz [Ecole National Superieure des Arts et Metiers ENSAM Meknes (Morocco); Loudiyi, Khalid [Al Akhawayn Univ. (Morocco); Ould Mustapha, Sidi Mohamed [Nouakchott Univ. (Mauritania). Faculte des Sciences et Techniques

    2010-07-01

    des Arts et Metiers ENSAM of Meknes and the University of Nouakchott this project is funded under the NATO Science for Peace and security collaborative programs. Being associated to the larger scale Sahara Wind Project, this initial NATO funded Project serves as the foundation of an ambitious program aimed at tackling energy scarcity and sustainable development objectives through industrial synergies utilizing hydrogen energy technologies. This combination takes advantage of the significant breakthroughs expected to happen in the near future regarding hydrogen technologies when associated with larger sources of renewable energies. The reliance on the ability of public bodies such as universities, public utilities and other institutions to concretize dynamic partnerships with the local industry and the private sector was key to the success of this program. (orig.)

  5. Technology Roadmaps: Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Wind energy is perhaps the most advanced of the 'new' renewable energy technologies, but there is still much work to be done. This roadmap identifies the key tasks that must be undertaken in order to achieve a vision of over 2 000 GW of wind energy capacity by 2050. Governments, industry, research institutions and the wider energy sector will need to work together to achieve this goal. Best technology and policy practice must be identified and exchanged with emerging economy partners, to enable the most cost-effective and beneficial development.

  6. Atmospheric boundary layer structures associated with the Ora del Garda wind in the Alps as revealed from airborne and surface measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiti, Lavinia; Zardi, Dino; de Franceschi, Massimiliano; Rampanelli, Gabriele

    2013-10-01

    The paper investigates a coupled lake-breeze and valley-wind system, known as Ora del Garda. The latter typically originates on clear-sky days over the northern shore of Lake Garda in the Alps. After channelling into the nearby Sarca Valley and Lakes Valley, this airflow finally breaks out, through an elevated saddle, into the adjacent Adige Valley, where it strongly interacts with the local valley wind. Two flights of an instrumented motorglider explored, under different synoptic conditions, the thermal structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) associated with this wind at selected vertical sections-namely over the lake shore, at mid-valley, and at the junction with the Adige Valley. Data from airborne measurements, as well as from weather stations disseminated along the valley floor, provided the basis for mapping 3D fields of potential temperature over high-resolution grids by means of a Residual Kriging (RK) technique. This representation allowed the identification of site-specific ABL features associated with the Ora del Garda. In particular, a typical daytime coastal-breeze structure is detected in the lake shore region, where the advection of colder air tends to stabilize the atmosphere throughout the ABL depth. Mid-valley vertical profiles from both flights display shallow convective mixed layers, surmounted by deeper weakly stable layers. On the other hand, RK-gridded temperature maps show cross-valley thermal asymmetries, amenable to the complex topography and to the inhomogeneous surface coverage, as well as to a curvature of the valley axis. Finally, in the area where the upper Lakes Valley joins the Adige Valley, specific features associated with the complex interaction between the Ora del Garda and the local up-valley wind are found.

  7. Wind energy. Technology and Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    On this bilingual CD-ROM (English and German), we would like to offer you information on all different aspects of wind energy utilisation. Our aim is the worldwide spread of know-how on wind energy - one basic aim of WWEA. The CD-ROM and the correspondent website www.world-wind-energy.info addresses all who are interested in wind energy, especially on students and learners, staff members of administrations, companies, associations, etc, who want to inform themselves and further their education of wind energy. We hope that this CD-ROM may be use to you and we would appreciate your feedback and comments. (orig.)

  8. Wind galleries: an instrument for environmental impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunino, C.

    1998-01-01

    In the last decades wind galleries for non-aeronautic utilisation have proved to be a useful investigation tool in various fields, such as studies on environmental impact and risk assessment, associated with permanent or incidental release of harmful substances. In this framework the feasibility of a new installation has been evaluated in Italy, having as main target the reproduction of thermal stratification phenomena. The great deal of 'hazardous' industries, often in areas having a complex orography, as well as the high pollution levels in Italian cities, lead to the conclusion that a thermally stratified wind gallery might be an economically viable investment [it

  9. Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States (Highlights); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    This is a four-part Wind Vision project, consisting of Wind Vision Highlights, Executive Summary, a Full Report, and Appendix. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program, in close cooperation with the wind industry, led a comprehensive analysis to evaluate future pathways for the wind industry. The Wind Vision report updates and expands upon the DOE's 2008 report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, and defines the societal, environmental, and economic benefits of wind power in a scenario with wind energy supplying 10% of national end-use electricity demand by 2020, 20% by 2030, and 35% by 2050.

  10. Offshore wind resources at Danish measurement sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelmie, R.J.; Courtney, M.S.; Lange, B.; Nielsen, M.; Sempreviva, A.M. [Risoe National Lab., Dept. of Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics, Roskilde (Denmark); Svenson, J.; Olsen, F. [SEAS, Haslev (Denmark); Christensen, T. [Elsamprojekt, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    In order to characterise wind and turbulence characteristics at prospective offshore wind energy sites, meteorological observations from a number of purpose-built offshore monitoring sites have been analyzed and compared with long wind speed time series. New analyses have been conducted on the data sets focussing on meteorology, turbulence, extreme winds and wind and wave interactions. Relationships between wind speed, turbulence and fetch are highly complex. Minimum turbulence intensity offshore is associated with wind speeds of about 12 m/s. At lower wind speeds, stability effects are important while at higher winds speeds wind and wave interactions appear to dominate. On average, turbulence intensity offshore at 48 m height is approximately 0.08 if no coastal effects are present. However, the effect of the coastal discontinuity persists in wind speed and turbulence characteristics for considerable distances offshore. The majority of the adjustment of appears to occur within 20 km of the coast. (au)

  11. Equilibrium pricing in electricity markets with wind power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Ofir David

    Estimates from the World Wind Energy Association assert that world total wind power installed capacity climbed from 18 Gigawatt (GW) to 152 GW from 2000 to 2009. Moreover, according to their predictions, by the end of 2010 global wind power capacity will reach 190 GW. Since electricity is a unique commodity, this remarkable expansion brings forward several key economic questions regarding the integration of significant amount of wind power capacity into deregulated electricity markets. The overall dissertation objective is to develop a comprehensive theoretical framework that enables the modeling of the performance and outcome of wind-integrated electricity markets. This is relevant because the state of knowledge of modeling electricity markets is insufficient for the purpose of wind power considerations. First, there is a need to decide about a consistent representation of deregulated electricity markets. Surprisingly, the related body of literature does not agree on the very economic basics of modeling electricity markets. That is important since we need to capture the fundamentals of electricity markets before we introduce wind power to our study. For example, the structure of the electric industry is a key. If market power is present, the integration of wind power has large consequences on welfare distribution. Since wind power uncertainty changes the dynamics of information it also impacts the ability to manipulate market prices. This is because the quantity supplied by wind energy is not a decision variable. Second, the intermittent spatial nature of wind over a geographical region is important because the market value of wind power capacity is derived from its statistical properties. Once integrated into the market, the distribution of wind will impact the price of electricity produced from conventional sources of energy. Third, although wind power forecasting has improved in recent years, at the time of trading short-term electricity forwards, forecasting

  12. 75 FR 73107 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0589] Draft Guidance for Industry on Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION...

  13. Joint submission of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The manufacturing company members of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries are proud to have played their part in the development of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in Ontario, and the achievement of the very real benefits discussed in this paper, which greatly outweigh the hypothetical risks

  14. Wind power in the 90's. Pure energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The status, historical background and future prospects of wind energy in Denmark are described. Furthermore, the certification system of wind turbines, the electric supply system, wind farms, economy, practical experience, environmental impacts and exports are dealt with. A list of useful addresses within the Danish wind industry is included

  15. Collision and displacement vulnerability among marine birds of the California Current System associated with offshore wind energy infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Josh; Kelsey, Emily C.; Felis, Jonathan J.; Pereksta, David M.

    2016-10-27

    With growing climate change concerns and energy constraints, there is an increasing need for renewable energy sources within the United States and globally. Looking forward, offshore wind-energy infrastructure (OWEI) has the potential to produce a significant proportion of the power needed to reach our Nation’s renewable energy goal. Offshore wind-energy sites can capitalize open areas within Federal waters that have persistent, high winds with large energy production potential. Although there are few locations in the California Current System (CCS) where it would be acceptable to build pile-mounted wind turbines in waters less than 50 m deep, the development of technology able to support deep-water OWEI (>200 m depth) could enable wind-energy production in the CCS. As with all human-use of the marine environment, understanding the potential impacts of wind-energy infrastructure on the marine ecosystem is an integral part of offshore wind-energy research and planning. Herein, we present a comprehensive database to quantify marine bird vulnerability to potential OWEI in the CCS (see https://doi.org/10.5066/F79C6VJ0). These data were used to quantify marine bird vulnerabilities at the population level. For 81 marine bird species present in the CCS, we created three vulnerability indices: Population Vulnerability, Collision Vulnerability, and Displacement Vulnerability. Population Vulnerability was used as a scaling factor to generate two comprehensive indicies: Population Collision Vulnerability (PCV) and Population Displacement Vulnerability (PDV). Within the CCS, pelicans, terns (Forster’s [Sterna forsteri], Caspian [Hydroprogne caspia], Elegant [Thalasseus elegans], and Least Tern [Sternula antillarum]), gulls (Western [Larus occidentalis] and Bonaparte’s Gull [Chroicocephalus philadelphia]), South Polar Skua (Stercorarius maccormicki), and Brandt’s Cormorant (Phalacrocorax penicillatus) had the greatest PCV scores. Brown Pelican (Pelicanus occidentalis

  16. Canadian Estimate of Bird Mortality Due to Collisions and Direct Habitat Loss Associated with Wind Turbine Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan. Zimmerling

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimated impacts on birds from the development and operation of wind turbines in Canada considering both mortality due to collisions and loss of nesting habitat. We estimated collision mortality using data from carcass searches for 43 wind farms, incorporating correction factors for scavenger removal, searcher efficiency, and carcasses that fell beyond the area searched. On average, 8.2 ± 1.4 birds (95% C.I. were killed per turbine per year at these sites, although the numbers at individual wind farms varied from 0 - 26.9 birds per turbine per year. Based on 2955 installed turbines (the number installed in Canada by December 2011, an estimated 23,300 birds (95% C.I. 20,000 - 28,300 would be killed from collisions with turbines each year. We estimated direct habitat loss based on data from 32 wind farms in Canada. On average, total habitat loss per turbine was 1.23 ha, which corresponds to an estimated total habitat loss due to wind farms nationwide of 3635 ha. Based on published estimates of nest density, this could represent habitat for ~5700 nests of all species. Assuming nearby habitats are saturated, and 2 adults displaced per nest site, effects of direct habitat loss are less than that of direct mortality. Installed wind capacity is growing rapidly, and is predicted to increase more than 10-fold over the next 10-15 years, which could lead to direct mortality of approximately 233,000 birds / year, and displacement of 57,000 pairs. Despite concerns about the impacts of biased correction factors on the accuracy of mortality estimates, these values are likely much lower than those from collisions with some other anthropogenic sources such as windows, vehicles, or towers, or habitat loss due to many other forms of development. Species composition data suggest that < 0.2% of the population of any species is currently affected by mortality or displacement from wind turbine development. Therefore, population level impacts are unlikely

  17. 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, R; Bolinger, M.

    2015-08-01

    According to the 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report, total installed wind power capacity in the United States grew at a rate of eight percent in 2014, bringing the United States total installed capacity to nearly 66 gigawatts (GW), which ranks second in the world and meets 4.9 percent of U.S. end-use electricity demand in an average year. In total, 4,854 MW of new wind energy capacity were installed in the United States in 2014. The 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report also finds that wind energy prices are at an all-time low and are competitive with wholesale power prices and traditional power sources across many areas of the United States. Additionally, a new trend identified by the 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report shows utility-scale turbines with larger rotors designed for lower wind speeds have been increasingly deployed across the country in 2014. The findings also suggest that the success of the U.S. wind industry has had a ripple effect on the American economy, supporting 73,000 jobs related to development, siting, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries.

  18. Impact of industrial effluents on geochemical association of metals within intertidal sediments of a creek

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Volvoikar, S.P.; Nayak, G.N.

    Metal speciation studies were carried out on three intertidal core sediments of the industrially impacted Dudh creek located along west coast of India Metals indicated a drastic increase in the bioavailable fraction towards the surface of the cores...

  19. Wind energy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesto, E.

    1992-02-01

    Interest in wind energy as a supplementary source for the production of electricity has recently gained renewed momentum due to widespread concern about environmental impacts from the large scale use of fossil fuels and nuclear energy. In addition, political unrest in the Middle East has drawn attention to the importance of national energy self-sufficiency. European government administrations, however, have not yet fully appreciated the real worth of the 'clean energy' afforded by wind energy. In this regard, the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA) is acting as a strong voice to inform the public and energy planners by stimulating international wind energy R ampersand D cooperation, and organizing conferences to explain the advantages of wind energy. In October 1991, EWEA published a strategy document giving a picture of the real possibilities offered by wind energy within the geographical, social, and European economic context. This paper provides an overview of the more significant features to emerge from this document which represents a useful guideline for wind power plant technical/economic feasibility studies in that it contains brief notes on resource availability, land requirements, visual and acoustic impacts, turbine sizing, performance, interconnection to utility grids, maintenance and operating costs, safety, as well as, on marketing aspects

  20. Self-reported well-being and associated factors among industrial workers in Brazil: findings from a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Shana Ginar da; Duca, Giovâni Firpo Del; Nahas, Markus Vinícius

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to estimate self-perception of well-being and associated factors among industrial workers in Brazil. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with a representative sample from 23 Brazilian states and the Federal District. Self-reported of well-being was investigated by questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression was used in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. For 93% of the 47,477 industrial workers, the perception of well-being was positive. Those who...

  1. The economics of offshore wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Richard; Vasilakos, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the main issues associated with the economics of offshore wind. Investment in offshore wind systems has been growing rapidly throughout Europe, and the technology will be essential in meeting EU targets for renewable energy in 2020. Offshore wind suffers from high installation and connection costs, however, making government support essential. We review various support policies used in Europe, concluding that tender-based feed-in tariff schemes, as used in Denmark, may be best for providing adequate support while minimising developers' rents. It may prove economic to build an international offshore grid connecting wind farms belonging to different countries that are sited close to each other. - Research Highlights: → Market trends for investment in offshore wind generation. → Cost analysis and comparison of offshore and onshore wind farms. → Review of policy support schemes in Europe for offshore wind generators and implications.

  2. Energy Markets in the United States: The Influence of Politics, Regulations, and Markets on Energy Development in the Oil and Gas and Wind Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Karen Kay

    2011-12-01

    My dissertation focuses on the influence of politics, policies, and markets in determining oil and natural gas and wind energy development. In the first chapter, I examine the role of federal elected political influence and market factors in determining the acres of oil and natural gas leases issued on Bureau of Management (BLM) lands in the western United States between 1978 and 2008. I seek to determine if the political party and ideology of the federal political environment influence the number of acres that are leased and if there is disparate federal political influence in states that have a large amount of federal lands. Using a random effects Tobit model for a 17-state sample of the westernmost states in the contiguous United States, I find that more conservative federal political influence leads to additional leasing. The results are consistent across Senate committee leaders, Senate majority leadership, and the President's office. The further found that the influence of politics on leasing is not stronger in states with more federal lands. In the second chapter, I analyze the influence of state and federal political party changes and market factors on state oil and natural gas permitting. My findings, using a first-differenced empirical model for two samples, a 19-state sample, from 1990--2007, and a 14-state sample, from 1977--2007, indicate that the influence of state political party changes are trumped by economic factors. Oil and gas prices are the main drivers of permitting changes, while the state political party changes for the state legislatures and Governor's office are consistently not significant. In the third chapter I focus on the role of electricity markets and renewable energy regulation in wind development across the United States. My findings, using a random effects Tobit model with a 25-state sample, from 1994--2008, indicate that the implementation of state Renewables Portfolio Standards (RPS), the Federal Production Tax Credit (PTC

  3. Wind Doesn't Just Stop at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Wind turbines are increasingly being installed in complex terrain such as the pre-Alpine regions of Germany, Austria, and other European Alpine regions, mountainous regions across USA and Canada, and many other parts of the world. In these areas, the system of the atmosphere, terrain, geology, people, and power system has is deeply interconnected but couplings are not completely known. This leads to challenging development conditions, increased cost of energy compared to flat terrain, and sometimes to tensions between different stakeholders. In this presentation, an overview of the wind energy system will be presented, and the challenges of developing wind energy in complex terrain will be highlighted. Results from several recent measurement campaigns and associated modelling carried out by members of WindForS will be used as examples. WindForS is a southern Germany-based research consortium of more than 20 groups at higher education and research institutes, with strong links to government and industry. Finally, the new WindForS wind energy research facility in complex terrain will be introduced. The new test site will be located in the hilly, forested terrain of the Swabian Alps between Stuttgart and Germany, and will consist of two wind turbines with four meteorological towers. The test site will be used for accompanying ecological research and will also have mobile eddy covariance measurement stations as well as bird and bat monitoring systems. Seismic and noise monitoring systems are also planned. The large number of auxiliary measurements at this facility are intended to allow the complete atmosphere-wind turbine-environment-people system to be characterized. A major focus of the presentation will be on opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration between the atmospheric science and geosciences communities and other stakeholders.

  4. [Playing of wind instruments is associated with an obstructive pattern in the spirometry of adolescents with a good aerobic resistance capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell, Javier; Granell, Jose; Ruiz, Diana; Tapias, Jose A

    2011-03-01

    There is controversy in the medical literature regarding the beneficial or detrimental effects of playing wind musical instruments on the respiratory system. The aim of this study is to analyse this relationship, taking the physical condition of the subjects into consideration. Cross-sectional observational study. Public institution with coordinated medium grade musical instruction and primary and secondary education. Young performers (between 13 and 17 years). We collected basic epidemiological parameters (gender, age, weight, size, heath status), and each subject underwent a fitness test ("course navette" cardiorespiratory fitness test) and a forced spirometry. We included 90 students, 53 females and 37 males. Thirty two were wind instrument players and 58 studied other instruments. The two groups were homogeneous with respect to gender, age and body mass index. The maximum oxygen uptake showed no significant difference (P=0.255), further demonstrating an adequate level of fitness compared to the general population. FVC was normal and similar in both groups (P=0.197). The FEV(1) percentage and the FEV(1)/FVC ratio were significantly lower (Pstudy of wind instruments was associated with an obstructive spirometric pattern in young musicians with a normal level of physical fitness. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Interchange Reconnection Associated with a Confined Filament Eruption: Implications for the Source of Transient Cold-dense Plasma in Solar Winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Li, Gang; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2017-01-01

    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancelations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.

  6. Interchange Reconnection Associated with a Confined Filament Eruption: Implications for the Source of Transient Cold-dense Plasma in Solar Winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai 264209 (China); Li, Gang [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Xiang, Yongyuan, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650216 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancelations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.

  7. Power Smoothing of a Variable-Speed Wind Turbine Generator in Association With the Rotor-Speed-Dependent Gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeonhee; Kang, Moses; Muljadi, Eduard; Park, Jung-Wook; Kang, Yong Cheol

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a power-smoothing scheme for a variable-speed wind turbine generator (WTG) that can smooth out the WTG's fluctuating power caused by varying wind speeds, and thereby keep the system frequency within a narrow range. The proposed scheme employs an additional loop based on the system frequency deviation that operates in conjunction with the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control loop. Unlike the conventional, fixed-gain scheme, its control gain is modified with the rotor speed. In the proposed scheme, the control gain is determined by considering the ratio of the output of the additional loop to that of the MPPT loop. To improve the contribution of the scheme toward maintaining the frequency while ensuring the stable operation of WTGs, in the low rotor speed region, the ratio is set to be proportional to the rotor speed; in the high rotor speed region, the ratio remains constant. The performance of the proposed scheme is investigated under varying wind conditions for the IEEE 14-bus system. The simulation results demonstrate that the scheme successfully operates regardless of the output power fluctuation of a WTG by adjusting the gain with the rotor speed, and thereby improves the frequency-regulating capability of a WTG.

  8. ewec 2007 - Europe's premier wind energy event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaviaropoulos, T.

    2007-01-01

    This online collection of papers - the ewec 2007 proceedings - reflects the various sessions and lectures presented at the ewec wind-energy convention held in Milan in 2007. The first day's sessions looked at the following topics: Renewable Energy Roadmap, the changing structure of the wind industry, politics and programmes, aerodynamics and innovation in turbine design, wind resources and site characterisation (2 sessions), energy scenarios, harmonisation of incentive schemes, structural design and materials, forecasting, integration studies, integrating wind into electricity markets, wind-turbine electrical systems and components, as well as loads, noise and wakes. The second day included sessions on offshore: developments and prospects, extreme wind conditions and forecasting techniques, small wind turbines, distributed generation and autonomous systems cost effectiveness, cost effectiveness of wind energy, financing wind energy concepts, wind and turbulence, wind power plants and grid integration, offshore technology, global challenges and opportunities, aero-elasticity, loads and control, operations and maintenance, carbon trading and the emission trading schemes, investment strategies of power producers, wind power plants and grid integration, wind turbine electrical systems and components, and wakes. The third day offered sessions on environmental issues, condition monitoring, operation and maintenance, structural design and materials, the Up-Wind workshop, winning hearts and minds, offshore technology, advances in measuring methods and advancing drive-train reliability. In a closing session the conference was summarised, awards for poster contributions were made and the Poul la Cour Prize was presented

  9. Wind turbines and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rideout, K.; Copes, R.; Bos, C.

    2010-01-01

    This document summarized the potential health hazards associated with wind turbines, such as noise and low frequency sound, vibration and infrasound; electromagnetic fields (EMF); shadow flicker; and ice throw and structural failure. Various symptoms can be attributed to wind turbines, including dizziness, sleep disruption, and headaches. A review of available research regarding potential health affects to residents living in close proximity to wind turbines showed that the sound level associated with wind turbines at common residential setbacks is not sufficient to damage hearing, but may lead to annoyance and sleep disturbance. Research has shown that wind turbines are not a significant source of EMF exposure, and although shadows caused by the blades may be annoying, they are not likely to cause epileptic seizures at normal operational speeds. The risk of injury from ice throw can be minimized with setbacks of 200 to 400 m. Examples of Canadian wind turbine setback guidelines and regulations were also offered. It was concluded that setbacks and operational guidelines can be utilized in combination to address safety hazards, sound levels, land use issues, and impacts on people. 46 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  10. Wind turbines and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rideout, K.; Copes, R.; Bos, C. [National Colaborating Centre for Environmental Health, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    This document summarized the potential health hazards associated with wind turbines, such as noise and low frequency sound, vibration and infrasound; electromagnetic fields (EMF); shadow flicker; and ice throw and structural failure. Various symptoms can be attributed to wind turbines, including dizziness, sleep disruption, and headaches. A review of available research regarding potential health affects to residents living in close proximity to wind turbines showed that the sound level associated with wind turbines at common residential setbacks is not sufficient to damage hearing, but may lead to annoyance and sleep disturbance. Research has shown that wind turbines are not a significant source of EMF exposure, and although shadows caused by the blades may be annoying, they are not likely to cause epileptic seizures at normal operational speeds. The risk of injury from ice throw can be minimized with setbacks of 200 to 400 m. Examples of Canadian wind turbine setback guidelines and regulations were also offered. It was concluded that setbacks and operational guidelines can be utilized in combination to address safety hazards, sound levels, land use issues, and impacts on people. 46 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  11. Prosperity Games prototyping with the board of governors of the Electronic Industries Association, January 20--21, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermann, M.; VanDevender, J.P.

    1994-08-01

    Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Prosperity Game conducted under the sponsorship of the Electronic Industries Association. Almost all of the players were from the electronics industry. The game explored policy changes that could enhance US competitiveness in the manufacturing of consumer electronics. Four teams simulated a presidentially appointed commission comprised of high-level representatives from government, industry, universities and national laboratories. A single team represented the foreign equivalent of this commission, formed to develop counter strategies for any changes in US policies. The deliberations and recommendations of these teams provide valuable insights as to the views of this industry concerning policy changes, foreign competition, and the development, delivery and commercialization of new technologies.

  12. Regulatory issues associated with exclusion, exemption, and clearance related to the mining and minerals processing industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, P.; Woude, S. van der; Keenan, N.; Guy, S.

    1997-01-01

    The concepts of exclusion, exemption and clearance have been established in international recommendations and, standards for radiation protection and the management of radioactive waste in recent years. The consistent application of these concepts has given rise to various problems in different spheres of use. This is particularly the case in the mining and minerals processing industries dealing with materials exhibiting elevated concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. This paper takes the South African mining industry as an example and highlights some of the issues that have arisen in applying these concepts within a regulatory control regime. (author)

  13. Association between source-specific particulate matter air pollution and hs-CRP: local traffic and industrial emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Frauke; Fuks, Kateryna; Moebus, Susanne; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Memmesheimer, Michael; Jakobs, Hermann; Bröcker-Preuss, Martina; Führer-Sakel, Dagmar; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Hoffmann, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Long-term exposures to particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5 and PM10) and high traffic load have been associated with markers of systemic inflammation. Epidemiological investigations have focused primarily on total PM, which represents a mixture of pollutants originating from different sources. We investigated associations between source-specific PM and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease. We used data from the first (2000-2003) and second examination (2006-2008) of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall study, a prospective population-based German cohort of initially 4,814 participants (45-75 years of age). We estimated residential long-term exposure to local traffic- and industry-specific fine particulate matter (PM2.5) at participants' residences using a chemistry transport model. We used a linear mixed model with a random participant intercept to estimate associations of source-specific PM and natural log-transformed hs-CRP, controlling for age, sex, education, body mass index, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking variables, physical activity, season, humidity, and city (8,204 total observations). A 1-μg/m3 increase in total PM2.5 was associated with a 4.53% increase in hs-CRP concentration (95% CI: 2.76, 6.33%). hs-CRP was 17.89% (95% CI: 7.66, 29.09%) and 7.96% (95% CI: 3.45, 12.67%) higher in association with 1-μg/m3 increases in traffic- and industry-specific PM2.5, respectively. RESULTS for PM10 were similar. Long-term exposure to local traffic-specific PM (PM2.5, PM10) was more strongly associated with systemic inflammation than total PM. Associations of local industry-specific PM were slightly stronger but not significantly different from associations with total PM.

  14. Associations of cancer site and type with occupation and industry from the Third National Cancer Survey Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R R; Stegens, N L; Goldsmith, J R

    1977-10-01

    From the Third National Cancer Survey (TNCS) Interview Study of 7,518 incident cases, lifetime histories of occupations and industries were studied for associations with specific cancer sites and types while controlling for age, sex, race, education, use of cigarettes or alcohol, and geographic location. Lung cancer patients were found more often than expected among several categories including trucking, air transportation, wholesaling, painting, building construction, building maintenance, and manufacturing (furniture, transportation equipment, and food products). Controlling for cigarette smoking did not change these associations. Leukemia and multiple myeloma were associated with sales personnel of both sexes, whereas lymphomas and Hodgkin's disease were excessive among women working in the medical industry. Other associations included rectal cancer with several retail industries; prostate cancer with ministers, farmers, plumbers, and coal miners; malignant melanoma with school teachers; and invasive cervical cancer with women working in hotels and restaurants. Breast cancer patients were more common among women who were teachers or other professionals and who worked in business and finance (even after controlling for education). Many other findings are presented in detailed tables. Results are reported mainly as a research resource for use by other investigators doing work in this field. Suggestions are given for future studies.

  15. How is post-industrial decline associated with the geography of physical activity? Evidence from the Health Survey for England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Esther; Jones, Andy; Southall, Humphrey

    2014-03-01

    In recent decades, the prevalence of physical activity has declined considerably in many developed countries, which has been related to rising levels of obesity and several weight-related medical conditions, such as coronary heart disease. There is evidence that areas exhibiting particularly low levels of physical activity have undergone a strong transition away from employment in physically demanding occupations. It is proposed that such processes of deindustrialisation may be causally linked to unexplained geographical disparities in physical activity. This study investigates how geographical variations in deindustrialisation are associated with current levels of physical activity across different activity domains and relevant macro-economic time periods in England. The analysis includes data on 27,414 adults from the Health Survey for England 2006 and 2008 who reported total, occupational, domestic, recreational and walking activity. Based on employment change in industries associated with heavy manual work, a local measurement of industrial decline was developed, covering the period 1841-2001. We applied a multilevel modelling approach to study associations between industrial decline and physical activity. Results indicate that the process of deindustrialisation appears to be associated with patterns of physical activity and that this is independent of household income. The effects observed were generally similar for men and women. However, the nature of the association differed across areas, time periods and employment types; in particular, residents of districts characterised by a history of manufacturing and mining employment had increased odds of reporting low activity levels. We conclude that post-industrial change may be a factor in explaining present-day variations in physical activity, emphasising the plausible impact of inherited cultures and regional identities on health related behaviours. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The association of the original OSHA chemical hazard communication standard with reductions in acute work injuries/illnesses in private industry and the industrial releases of chemical carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Arthur

    2014-02-01

    OSHA predicted the original chemical Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) would cumulatively reduce the lost workday acute injury/illness rate for exposure events by 20% over 20 years and reduce exposure to chemical carcinogens. JoinPoint trend software identified changes in the rate of change of BLS rates for days away from work for acute injuries/illnesses during 1992-2009 for manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries for both chemical, noxious or allergenic injury exposure events and All other exposure events. The annual percent change in the rates was used to adjust observed numbers of cases to estimate their association with the standard. A case-control study of EPA's Toxic Release Inventory 1988-2009 data compared carcinogen and non-carcinogens' releases. The study estimates that the HCS was associated with a reduction in the number of acute injuries/illnesses due to chemical injury exposure events over the background rate in the range 107,569-459,395 (Hudson method/modified BIC model) depending on whether the HCS is treated as a marginal or sole factor in the decrease. Carcinogen releases have declined at a substantially faster rate than control non-carcinogens. The previous HCS standard was associated with significant reductions in chemical event acute injuries/illnesses and chemical carcinogen exposures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Built Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Forsyth, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sinclair, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Oteri, F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The market currently encourages BWT deployment before the technology is ready for full-scale commercialization. To address this issue, industry stakeholders convened a Rooftop and Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the National Wind Technology Center, located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. This report summarizes the workshop.

  18. 2015 Distributed Wind Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrell, Alice C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Foster, Nikolas A.F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Homer, Juliet S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Scott L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) annual Distributed Wind Market Report provides stakeholders with statistics and analysis of the market along with insights into its trends and characteristics. By providing a comprehensive overview of the distributed wind market, this report can help plan and guide future investments and decisions by industry, utilities, federal and state agencies, and other interested parties.

  19. Panorama 2013 - Offshore wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinot, Simon

    2012-10-01

    While onshore wind power is already a well-developed global industry, offshore wind power is still in the consolidation and globalization phase. The most mature of marine renewable energies is beginning to venture off the European coast and even to other continents, driven by public policies and the ever increasing number of players joining this promising market, which should evolve into deeper waters thanks to floating structures. (author)

  20. U.S. small wind market 2010 report: developments and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, Larry

    2011-01-01

    As changes occur in the economy and in government policy, significant changes will also take place in the renewable energy market. In this presentation, the American Wind Energy Association discusses small wind developments that took place in the United States in 2010. The analysis included in the presentation illustrated that a shift had taken place from small wind to larger wind turbines connected to the grid. There were many other changes in the small wind sector in the United States, including the development of the institutional framework, the setting up of four wind test centers, and the adoption of a number of federal and state policies. Some of these policy changes included tax credits, grants, net metering, certifications, and incentives. The American Wind Energy Association also recognized that the small wind industry is facing a number of challenges, including the entry into the market of non-certified turbines, planning and zoning ordinances, resistance from the utilities, and a loss of environmental focus on the part of the public.

  1. Nonparametric Stochastic Model for Uncertainty Quantifi cation of Short-term Wind Speed Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Shehhi, A. M.; Chaouch, M.; Ouarda, T.

    2014-12-01

    Wind energy is increasing in importance as a renewable energy source due to its potential role in reducing carbon emissions. It is a safe, clean, and inexhaustible source of energy. The amount of wind energy generated by wind turbines is closely related to the wind speed. Wind speed forecasting plays a vital role in the wind energy sector in terms of wind turbine optimal operation, wind energy dispatch and scheduling, efficient energy harvesting etc. It is also considered during planning, design, and assessment of any proposed wind project. Therefore, accurate prediction of wind speed carries a particular importance and plays significant roles in the wind industry. Many methods have been proposed in the literature for short-term wind speed forecasting. These methods are usually based on modeling historical fixed time intervals of the wind speed data and using it for future prediction. The methods mainly include statistical models such as ARMA, ARIMA model, physical models for instance numerical weather prediction and artificial Intelligence techniques for example support vector machine and neural networks. In this paper, we are interested in estimating hourly wind speed measures in United Arab Emirates (UAE). More precisely, we predict hourly wind speed using a nonparametric kernel estimation of the regression and volatility functions pertaining to nonlinear autoregressive model with ARCH model, which includes unknown nonlinear regression function and volatility function already discussed in the literature. The unknown nonlinear regression function describe the dependence between the value of the wind speed at time t and its historical data at time t -1, t - 2, … , t - d. This function plays a key role to predict hourly wind speed process. The volatility function, i.e., the conditional variance given the past, measures the risk associated to this prediction. Since the regression and the volatility functions are supposed to be unknown, they are estimated using

  2. Wind prices are down - but are they too low?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milborrow, D.

    1998-01-01

    The highly competitive nature of the NFFO and SRO bidding processes may be putting undue pressure on manufacturers' profit margins, restricting funds for investment and RandD. Taking the wider view, RandD in the wind industry is very modest relative to its output. Nevertheless, the wind industry is delivering increasingly reliable and cost effective wind turbines. The needs for further RandD are critically examined and the paper includes assessments of future wind energy price trends. (Author)

  3. Wind energy

    CERN Document Server

    Woll, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Across the country, huge open spaces are covered in gently turning wind turbines. In Wind Energy, explore how these machines generate electricity, learn about the history of wind power, and discover the latest advances in the field. Easy-to-read text, vivid images, and helpful back matter give readers a clear look at this subject. Features include a table of contents, infographics, a glossary, additional resources, and an index. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Core Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  4. Probabilistic Modeling of Wind Turbine Drivetrain Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafsanjani, Hesam Mirzaei

    Wind energy is one of several energy sources in the world and a rapidly growing industry in the energy sector. When placed in offshore or onshore locations, wind turbines are exposed to wave excitations, highly dynamic wind loads and/or the wakes from other wind turbines. Therefore, most componen....../nodules on fatigue life of cast iron samples. The cast iron samples scanned by 3D tomography equipment at the DTU Wind Energy (Risø campus), and the distribution of nodules are used to estimate the fatigue life....

  5. Federal Wind Energy Program. Program summary. [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    The objective of the Federal Wind Energy Program is to accelerate the development of reliable and economically viable wind energy systems and enable the earliest possible commercialization of wind power. To achieve this objective for small and large wind systems requires advancing the technology, developing a sound industrial technology base, and addressing the non-technological issues which could deter the use of wind energy. This summary report outlines the projects being supported by the program through FY 1977 toward the achievement of these goals. It also outlines the program's general organization and specific program elements.

  6. Load Extrapolation During Operation for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2008-01-01

    In the recent years load extrapolation for wind turbines has been widely considered in the wind turbine industry. Loads on wind turbines during operations are normally dependent on the mean wind speed, the turbulence intensity and the type and settings of the control system. All these parameters...... must be taken into account when characteristic load effects during operation are determined. In the wind turbine standard IEC 61400-1 a method for load extrapolation using the peak over threshold method is recommended. In this paper this method is considered and some of the assumptions are examined...

  7. Association of soil cadmium contamination with ceramic industry: A case study in a Chinese town

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Q. Lin; Liu, Cong; Wu, H. Yun; Jin, Yang; Hua, Ming; Zhu, B. Wan; Chen, Kai; Huang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Soil cadmium (Cd) contamination is attributable to many sources, among which the ceramic industry is probably an important contributor whose relationship will be explored in this study. Upon studying a town in southeastern China that is quite famous for its ceramics, we observed that the soil Cd distribution agreed with the local ceramic industry's distribution in space and time from 2004 to 2014. Ceramic and pigment samples from a typical factory were selected in a case study, and a sediment core from a nearby river was collected. First, an application of the geo-accumulation index suggested that the sediment was very strongly polluted by Cd (mean 1874 mg/kg). Second, sediment dating indicated that the Cd concentration surge and the establishment of the factory were proximate in time (2002–2004). Third, principal component analysis showed high loading of Cd (0.947) solely, suggesting that the factory was most likely responsible for the Cd pollution found in the sediments of a nearby river. Finally, we infer that the soil cadmium pollution in the whole area may be related to the region's prosperous ceramic industry. Local government should reinforce controls of the ceramic industry and implement effective countermeasures. - Highlights: • The sediment is strongly polluted by Cd in a Chinese town. • Cd concentration surged when the nearby ceramic factory was established. • Cd is solely loaded in a principal component and abundant in the ceramic pigments. • The local ceramic industry may be responsible for the soil Cd contamination

  8. Terminology Guideline for Classifying Offshore Wind Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiter, Philipp [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Musial, Walt [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to establish a clear and consistent vocabulary for conveying offshore wind resource potential and to interpret this vocabulary in terms that are familiar to the oil and gas (O&G) industry. This involves clarifying and refining existing definitions of offshore wind energy resource classes. The terminology developed in this guideline represents one of several possible sets of vocabulary that may differ with respect to their purpose, data availability, and comprehensiveness. It was customized to correspond with established offshore wind practices and existing renewable energy industry terminology (e.g. DOE 2013, Brown et al. 2015) while conforming to established fossil resource classification as best as possible. The developers of the guideline recognize the fundamental differences that exist between fossil and renewable energy resources with respect to availability, accessibility, lifetime, and quality. Any quantitative comparison between fossil and renewable energy resources, including offshore wind, is therefore limited. For instance, O&G resources are finite and there may be significant uncertainty associated with the amount of the resource. In contrast, aboveground renewable resources, such as offshore wind, do not generally deplete over time but can vary significantly subhourly, daily, seasonally, and annually. The intent of this guideline is to make these differences transparent and develop an offshore wind resource classification that conforms to established fossil resource classifications where possible. This guideline also provides methods to quantitatively compare certain offshore wind energy resources to O&G resource classes for specific applications. Finally, this guideline identifies areas where analogies to established O&G terminology may be inappropriate or subject to misinterpretation.

  9. Materials of 44. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Scientific assemblies of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry are the most important chemical meeting organised annually in Poland. Basic as well as application studies in all chemical branches have been extensively presented. The next subjects was proposed as scientific sessions and symposia topics: solid state chemistry; didactics of chemistry; electrochemistry; biologically active compounds; geochemistry; organic chemistry; physical chemistry; environment quality and protection; coordination chemistry; chemical technology; polymers; explosive materials; analytical chemistry; theoretical chemistry

  10. Estimation of Aerobic Capacity and Determination of Its Associated Factors among Male Workers of Industrial Sector of Shiraz City, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rajaei Fard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims   In order to physiologically fit the job to the worker’s capability, maximum aerobic capacity (VO2-max is used. This study was conducted to estimate VO2-max and determine its associated factors among workers of industrial sector of Shiraz city.   Methods  In this cross-sectional study, 500 healthy male workers employed in Shiraz city industries participated voluntarily. Subjects’ aerobic capacity was assessed by ergocycle test according to Astrand protocol for 6 minutes. A questionnaire consisted of two parts covering demographic, anthropometric and physiological characteristics was used as data collecting tool.   Results    Mean and standard deviation of age of workers was 32.01 and 7.66 years, respectively. Worker’s aerobic capacity was estimated to be 2.69±0.263 1.min-1 . The results showed that there was association between VO2-max and age, weight and BMI while no association was found between VO2-max and height. Also, statistical analysis revealed association between VO2-max and smoking and exercise per week (P<0.05. Nature of work , shift working, job satisfaction and fatigue had no association with aerobic capacity. Based on the results, regression equations were developed for estimation of aerobic capacity.  Conclusion  Aerobic capacity had association with age, weight, BMI, exercise and smoking.  

  11. EDITORIAL: Wind energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jakob; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Morthorst, Poul-Erik

    2008-01-01

    Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33 GW up from 2 GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1 GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also

  12. Health effects of wind turbines in working environments - a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Alice; Schefter, Christiane; Girbig, Maria; Murta, Vanise Cleto; Seidler, Andreas

    2018-01-23

    Objectives The wind industry is a growing economic sector, yet there is no overview summarizing all exposures emanating from wind turbines throughout their life cycle that may pose a risk for workers` health. The aim of this scoping review was to survey and outline the body of evidence around the health effects of wind turbines in working environments in order to identify research gaps and to highlight the need for further research. Methods A scoping review with a transparent and systematic procedure was conducted using a comprehensive search strategy. Two independent reviewers conducted most of the review steps. Results Twenty articles of varying methodical quality were included. Our findings of the included studies indicate that substances used in rotor blade manufacture (epoxy resin and styrene) cause skin disorders, and respectively, respiratory ailments and eye complaints; exposure to onshore wind turbine noise leads to annoyance, sleep disorders, and lowered general health; finally working in the wind industry is associated with a considerable accident rate, resulting in injuries or fatalities. Conclusions Due to the different work activities during the life cycle of a wind turbine and the distinction between on- and offshore work, there are no specific overall health effects of working in the wind sector. Previous research has primarily focused on evaluating the effects of working in the wind industry on skin disorders, accidents, and noise consequences. There is a need for further research, particularly in studying the effect of wind turbine work on psychological and musculoskeletal disorders, work-related injury and accident rates, and health outcomes in later life cycle phases.

  13. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  14. Wind farms in the land of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crie-Wiesner, H.

    2012-01-01

    At the beginning of the 2000 years, the wind industry began a flourishing period in the Usa which rose hopes for replacing ailing steel and coal industry and failing car manufacturing. Some wind turbine manufacturers settled into the vacant huge halls of steelworks. Since then this industrial renaissance has known ups and downs because of the economic crisis and the changes in the energy policy of the government. In the 2005-2006 period only 52% of the component parts of wind turbines were manufactured in the Usa, now this rate has increased to reach 68%. Today the global situation is gloomy with turbine production over-capacity. (A.C.)

  15. Proceedings of the Newfoundland Ocean Industries Association NOIA 2008 conference : a billion barrels and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This conference provided a forum for industry experts to discuss the region's oil and gas activities in relation to current global market dynamics. Updates on current oil and gas operations were provided and new projects planned for the region were outlined. Political and socio-economic factors relevant to the oil and gas industry were reviewed. Methods of improving current technologies and attracting new employees were also discussed. The conference was divided into the following 5 sessions: (1) strength, opportunity and change, (2) global energy-global technologies, (3) realizing the potential, (4) human resources solutions, and (5) $100 oil, the good, the bad, and the ugly, panel discussion. The conference featured 29 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  16. Amplification of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation associated with the onset of the industrial-era warming

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, G. W. K.; Halfar, J.; Majeed, H.; Adey, W.; Kronz, A.

    2017-01-01

    North Atlantic sea surface temperatures experience variability with a periodicity of 60–80 years that is known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). It has a profound imprint on the global climate system that results in a number of high value societal impacts. However the industrial period, i.e. the middle of the 19th century onwards, contains only two full cycles of the AMO making it difficult to fully characterize this oscillation and its impact on the climate system. ...

  17. NWTC Helps Chart the World's Wind Resource Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provide the wind industry, policymakers, and other stakeholders with applied wind resource data, information, maps, and technical assistance. These tools, which emphasize wind resources at ever-increasing heights, help stakeholders evaluate the wind resource and development potential for a specific area.

  18. Association between Local Illumination and Visual Fatigue among the Research and Development Staffs of Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Mashkoori

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Work proper lighting means a safe, healthy and comfort conditions for work under a lighting system that includes qualitative and quantitative features. This study aimed to evaluate the surface local lighting of works and eye fatigue among research and development staffs of an automotive industry. Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive study in Research and Development Department of an automotive industry in 2015, 126 official staffs were selected randomly. A demographic questionnaire and the Visual Fatigue Questionnaire (Persian Version were used for data gathering. Hagner EC1 Luxmeter was used to measure the local lighting. Data were analyzed by SPSS 20 software, through descriptive statistics. Findings: The lighting in 382 stations (75.8% was improper and less than standard. The minimum and maximum intensity of light was between 22.4lux in station 2 (inventory department and 581lux in station 4 (systems and methods department. The overall intensity in more than 50% units, except the Systems and Methods Department, were less than the standard (300lux. 40.4% of the participants had severe eye fatigue, 28.6% had moderate visual fatigue, 28.6% had low visual fatigue and only 2.4% had no visual fatigue. The average of visual fatigue was 3.50±1.97. Conclusion: The workplace lighting and the eye fatigue of computer users in the Research and Development Department of the studied automotive industry are not in an acceptable condition.

  19. The benefits and barriers associated with prices to manage industrial demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominie, A.E.; Brunetto, T.

    1990-01-01

    Implementation of demand-side management (DSM) programs for the industrial sector is not the same as for the commercial or residental sectors. This difference is derived from sectoral characteristics such as global competition, uniqueness of production facilities, cash flow and budget constraints, and the relationship and trust of a customer with an electric utility. Experience has shown the success of DSM programs in industry to depend on factors such as market philosophies emphasizing fulfilling the needs of customers, the ability to measure and reward performance for achieving specific conservation and load management goals, technical expertise, short-term payback, size of risk, and degree of operational disturbance caused by the program. Time-of-use pricing for the industrial sector has been the subject of very few studies in Canada. Most of these studies show that hourly rate differentiation was not beneficial and that seasonal time-of-use rates would provide little benefit due to the nature of the load and the utility system. An outline is presented of time-of-use concepts in current Canadian utility rate structures. 1 tab

  20. The benefits and barriers associated with using prices to manage industrial demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominie, A.E.; Brunetto, T.

    1990-01-01

    Implementation of demand-side management (DSM) programs for the industrial sector is not the same as for the commercial or residental sectors. This difference is derived from sectoral characteristics such as global competition, uniqueness of production facilities, cash flow and budget constraints, and the relationship and trust of a customer with an electric utility. Experience has shown the success of DSM programs in industry to depend on factors such as market philosophies emphasizing fulfilling the needs of customers, the ability to measure and reward performance for achieving specific conservation and load management goals, technical expertise, short-term payback, size of risk, and degree of operational disturbance caused by the program. Time-of-use pricing for the industrial sector has been the subject of very few studies in Canada. Most of these studies show that hourly rate differentiation was not beneficial and that seasonal time-of-use rates would provide little benefit due to the nature of the load and the utility system. An outline is presented of time-of-use concepts in current Canadian utility rate structures. 1 tab

  1. Assessment of the emission of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs from an industrial area over a nearby town using a selective wind direction sampling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Karell; Austrui, Joan Rivera [Lab. of Dioxins, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry Department, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Jover, Eric [FEMAN group, IN2UB, Applied Physics and Optics Department, Physics Faculty, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Abalos, Manuela; Rivera, Josep [Lab. of Dioxins, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry Department, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Abad, Esteban, E-mail: esteban.abad@idaea.csic.e [Lab. of Dioxins, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry Department, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-03-15

    The development of new sampling devices or strategies to assess the concentration of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the environment has increased in the last two decades. In this study, a selective sampling device was used to evaluate the impact of potential local sources of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (dl-PCBs) emissions on the ambient air levels of such compounds in a town near an important industrial estate. Average concentrations of target compounds of up to 2.5 times for PCDD/Fs and 2 times for dl-PCBs were found to come from the industrial state confirming this area as the main responsible for the majority of such compounds reaching the town. This finding was supported by a PCDD/F and dl-PCB sample profile analysis and a principal component analysis (PCA), which established a direct link between the dioxin-like compounds found in the samples collected in the town and their source. - Selective ambient air samplers provide a valuable information on POP emission sources

  2. HACCP and the management of healthcare associated infections: are there lessons to be learnt from other industries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Hospital cleaning and healthcare associated infections (HCAIs) continue to attract adverse media attention and consumer concern. Parallels exist with similar publicity relating to cleaning and food safety in the food industry almost 13 years earlier. This paper examines some of the management solutions developed in the food industry, and discusses their application to healthcare delivery. The food industry is managing food safety by adopting a dual approach based on pre-requisite programmes and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP). How these differ is described and how the approaches and terminology can be adapted for use in healthcare is discussed. The food industry is moving towards external certification of safety using national and international standards. The HACCP approach, a management tool and a central requirement of these standards, is evolving and there is interest worldwide from the healthcare community. Its application to the decontamination of endoscopes, using conventional HACCP, is presented, as well as suggestions for a simplified format for managing patient-related procedures. Taking this type of approach to the management of HCAIs could provide greater transparency, reduce infection rates and increase consumer confidence. Potential problems in adopting HACCP, including cost and human resource, are discussed. The HACCP method/approach has previously been mentioned in the medical literature but this paper is one of the few to examine, from basic principles, its infection control application within a broader approach to quality assurance.

  3. [Risk factors associated with work-related accidents in the construction industry in the Valley of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento-Salinas, Rodrigo; López-Rojas, Pablo; Marín-Cotoñieto, Irma Araceli; Godínez-Rocha, Arturo; Haro-García, Luis; Salinas-Tovar, Santiago

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to describe construction-industry, work-related accident prevalence in, associated factors in, and potential impact on affiliated workers of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, IMSS) in the Valley of Mexico. Prevalent cases in a retrospective case-control design. These include 385 construction-industry workers who were found to have construction work-related accidents in 2001. Controls comprised 385 active construction-industry workers without work-related accident background paired by gender, workplace, and worksite. Work-related accident prevalence in construction workers was 5.5%; most important risk factors and etiology fraction (Ef) included the following: age 16-20 years odds ratio, OR = 1.58, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.40-10.7, p = 0.001, Ef 0.36; eventual insurance, OR = 3.7, 95% CI, 2.16-26.45, p = 0.001), Ef, 0.72, and no training for job, OR = 5.3, 95% CI, 4.9-69.2, p = 0.01), Ef: 0.81. Variables not showing significance were included salary, work shift, and workday. Work-related accident prevalence maintains its preponderance in the Valley of Mexico construction industry; identified risk factors are potentially modifiable, among which job training acquires unquestionable relevance.

  4. Changes in intestinal tight junction permeability associated with industrial food additives explain the rising incidence of autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of autoimmune diseases is increasing along with the expansion of industrial food processing and food additive consumption. The intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junction, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self-antigens. As a result, particular attention is being placed on the role of tight junction dysfunction in the pathogenesis of AD. Tight junction leakage is enhanced by many luminal components, commonly used industrial food additives being some of them. Glucose, salt, emulsifiers, organic solvents, gluten, microbial transglutaminase, and nanoparticles are extensively and increasingly used by the food industry, claim the manufacturers, to improve the qualities of food. However, all of the aforementioned additives increase intestinal permeability by breaching the integrity of tight junction paracellular transfer. In fact, tight junction dysfunction is common in multiple autoimmune diseases and the central part played by the tight junction in autoimmune diseases pathogenesis is extensively described. It is hypothesized that commonly used industrial food additives abrogate human epithelial barrier function, thus, increasing intestinal permeability through the opened tight junction, resulting in entry of foreign immunogenic antigens and activation of the autoimmune cascade. Future research on food additives exposure-intestinal permeability-autoimmunity interplay will enhance our knowledge of the common mechanisms associated with autoimmune progression. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. 78 FR 29364 - Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ...-005, QF07-257-004] Exelon Corporation, Exelon Wind 1, LLC, Exelon Wind 2, LLC, Exelon Wind 3, LLC, Exelon Wind 4, LLC, Exelon Wind 5, LLC, Exelon Wind 6, LLC, Exelon Wind 7, LLC, Exelon Wind 8, LLC, Exelon Wind 9, LLC, Exelon Wind 10, LLC, Exelon Wind 11, LLC, High Plains Wind Power, LLC v. Xcel Energy...

  6. The Zambian wildlife ranching industry: scale, associated benefits, and limitations affecting its development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Lindsey

    Full Text Available The number and area of wildlife ranches in Zambia increased from 30 and 1,420 km(2 in 1997 to 177 and ∼6,000 km(2 by 2012. Wild ungulate populations on wildlife ranches increased from 21,000 individuals in 1997 to ∼91,000 in 2012, while those in state protected areas declined steeply. Wildlife ranching and crocodile farming have a turnover of ∼USD15.7 million per annum, compared to USD16 million from the public game management areas which encompass an area 29 times larger. The wildlife ranching industry employs 1,200 people (excluding jobs created in support industries, with a further ∼1,000 individuals employed through crocodile farming. Wildlife ranches generate significant quantities of meat (295,000 kg/annum, of which 30,000 kg of meat accrues to local communities and 36,000 kg to staff. Projected economic returns from wildlife ranching ventures are high, with an estimated 20-year economic rate of return of 28%, indicating a strong case for government support for the sector. There is enormous scope for wildlife ranching in Zambia due to the availability of land, high diversity of wildlife and low potential for commercial livestock production. However, the Zambian wildlife ranching industry is small and following completion of field work for this study, there was evidence of a significant proportion of ranchers dropping out. The industry is performing poorly, due to inter alia: rampant commercial bushmeat poaching; failure of government to allocate outright ownership of wildlife to landowners; bureaucratic hurdles; perceived historical lack of support from the Zambia Wildlife Authority and government; a lack of a clear policy on wildlife ranching; and a ban on hunting on unfenced lands including game ranches. For the wildlife ranching industry to develop, these limitations need to be addressed decisively. These findings are likely to apply to other savanna countries with large areas of marginal land potentially suited to wildlife

  7. Assessment and perspective of the French wind sector. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, Jerome; Ranchin, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    This report first proposes an inventory of public and private research laboratories already involved in the field of wind energy, an inventory of their expertise, and an inventory of education and training programs in this field. The next part proposes a comparative study of research and education in the field of wind energy among European countries: presentation of French industrial actors, overview of the world wind energy industry, overview of the situation in some countries (Germany, Denmark, Spain and United States), overview of research in these countries and in France, overview of European education and comparison with France. The authors then report an identification of industrial R and D needs with a description of the French sector (industrial actors, public bodies and professional association, R and D laboratories), an analysis of the main development modalities (site selection, environmental study, town planning document, public survey, construction permit, connection to the grid), an analysis of main obstacles (connection, intermittency, environment as a source of conflicts and stakes, opponents), a brief evocation of tariffs, and an analysis of technology (current research themes, analysis of existing R and D European strategies). The last part reports an identification of strengths of the French research, and states some restructuring proposals

  8. Extreme winds over Europe in the ENSEMBLES regional climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Outten

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Extreme winds cause vast amounts of damage every year and represent a major concern for numerous industries including construction, afforestation, wind energy and many others. Under a changing climate, the intensity and frequency of extreme events are expected to change, and accurate projections of these changes will be invaluable to decision makers and society as a whole. This work examines four regional climate model downscalings over Europe following the SRES A1B scenario from the "ENSEMBLE-based Predictions of Climate Changes and their Impacts" project (ENSEMBLES. It investigates the projected changes in the 50 yr return wind speeds and the associated uncertainties. This is accomplished by employing the peaks-over-threshold method with the use of the generalised Pareto distribution. The models show that, for much of Europe, the 50 yr return wind is projected to change by less than 2 m s−1, while the uncertainties associated with the statistical estimates are larger than this. In keeping with previous works in this field, the largest source of uncertainty is found to be the inter-model spread, with some locations showing differences in the 50 yr return wind of over 20 m s−1 between two different downscalings.

  9. Wind Energy Department annual progress report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, B.D.; Riis, U. (eds.)

    2003-12-01

    Research and development activities of the Wind Energy Department range from boundary layer meteorology, fluid dynamics, and structural mechanics to power and control engineering as well as wind turbine loading and safety. The overall purpose of our work is to meet the needs for knowledge, methods and procedures from government, the scientific community, and the wind turbine industry in particular. Our assistance to the wind turbine manufacturers serve to pave the way for technological development and thus further the exploitation of wind energy worldwide. We do this by means of research and innovation, education, testing and consultancy. In providing services for the wind turbine industry, we are involved in technology development, design, testing, procedures for operation and maintenance, certification and international wind turbine projects s as well as the solution of problems encountered in the application of wind energy, e.g. grid connection. A major proportion of these activities are on a commercial basis, for instance consultancy, software development, accredited testing of wind turbines and blades as well as approval and certification in co-operation with Det Norske Veritas. The departments activities also include research into atmospheric physics and environmental issues related to the atmosphere. One example is the development of online warning systems for airborne bacteria and other harmful substances. The department is organized in programmes according to its main scientific and technical activities. Research programmes: 1) Aeroelastic Design, AED; 2) Atmospheric Phyrics, ATM; 3) Electrical DEsign and Control, EDS; 4) Wind Power Meteorology, VKM; 5) Wind Turbines, VIM; 6) Wind Turbine Diagnostics, VMD. Commercial programmes: 1) The Test Station for Large Wind Turbines, Hoevsoere, HOeV; 2) Risoe Wind Consult, INR; 3) Wind Turbine Testing; 4) Sparkaer Blade Test Centre.(au)

  10. THE ACTORS OF A WIND POWER CLUSTER: A CASE OF A WIND POWER CAPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari M. Sarja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Raahe is a medium-sized Finnish town on the western coast of Northern Finland. It has declared itself to become the wind power capital of Finland. The aim of this paper is to find out what being a wind power capital can mean in practice and how it can advance the local industrial business. First, the theoretical framework of this systematic review study was formed by searching theoretical information about the forms of industrial clusters, and it was then examined what kinds of actors take part in these types of clusters. Finally, the actors of the case area were studied. The core companies of wind power clusters are the wind turbine manufacturers, component manufacturers, developers of the wind farms, wind power operators, and service and maintenance organizations. Understanding of the wind power cluster structure may help decision makers to develop the best possible conditions for the emergence of clusters.

  11. THE ACTORS OF A WIND POWER CLUSTER: A CASE OF A WIND POWER CAPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari M. Sarja

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Raahe is a medium-sized Finnish town on the western coast of Northern Finland. It has declared itself to become the wind power capital of Finland. The aim of this paper is to find out what being a wind power capital can mean in practice and how it can advance the local industrial business. First, the theoretical framework of this systematic review study was formed by searching theoretical information about the forms of industrial clusters, and it was then examined what kinds of actors take part in these types of clusters. Finally, the actors of the case area were studied. The core companies of wind power clusters are the wind turbine manufacturers, component manufacturers, developers of the wind farms, wind power operators, and service and maintenance organizations. Understanding of the wind power cluster structure may help decision makers to develop the best possible conditions for the emergence of clusters.

  12. Marketing Approach of Brazilian Wind Energy Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Silva de Souza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Prospects for the wind energy market have proposed changes of focus to managerial issues. The objective of this article is to map the specific market factors from Brazilian wind energy industry, in order to develop reflections and considerations on the subject, towards to the managerial, strategic and commercial development of the sector. Through an exploratory methodology in empirical format, and by a SWOT analysis of Telescopic Observations Strategic Framework, were found results that show funding and grants determined by Brazilian government, as the big question of the wind energy industry marketing, allowing the economic viability of wind energy projects. Further, it appears that the wind energy industry is eager to investments and has great potential for new business, but there are problems within the producing companies which that have to be assessed, such as the competitiveness capability, the high equipment costs, the installation locations limitations and lack of specialized employees with specific skills and capacities.

  13. Wind resource assessment and siting analysis in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, A.; Mizzoni, G.; Rossi, E.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, the wind power industry has matured; consequently, in many countries a lot of wind energy applications have been programmed. Many of them are already realized and running. As such, there is a direct necessity to identify a sizeable number of wind power plant sites. Choosing the right sites to match specific Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) is also needed to harness this clean energy from the points of view of industrial viability and project financing. As a pre-requisite to install a wind turbine at a particular site, it is necessary to have knowledge of the theoretical available wind energy at the site, as well as, of the practicability of the design in matching the characteristics of the WECS. In this paper, ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technology, Energy and Environment) wind siting and resource assessment activities, currently on-going in different regions in Italy, along with the present status and future prospects of the wind power industry

  14. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan [Navigant Consulting, Inc.

    2013-02-22

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development

  15. Relationship between Relativistic Electron Flux in the Inner Magnetosphere and ULF Pulsation on the Ground Associated with Long-term Variations of Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, K.; Nagatsuma, T.; Troshichev, O. A.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Saita, S.; Yoshikawa, A.; Yumoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study the relativistic electron flux (0.59-1.18MeV) measured by Standard Dose Monitor (SDOM) onboard DRTS (KODAMA) satellite at the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) is analyzed to investigate the long term (from 2002 to 2014) variations of the electron flux enhancement (REF) during the passage of Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) and/or Coronal Mass Ejection (CMEs). The long term variations of the REF clearly shows the 27-days period associated with the high speed solar wind velocity caused by the CIRs, whereas it is very few that the enhancement of REF lasts for several days after passage of CMEs. The 27-days period enhancement of REF represents the quite strong peak in 2003 when the high speed stream of the solar wind were quit active. We also conducted the same analysis for the Pc5 pulsations observed on the ground. The ground magnetic variations data globally observed by National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and International Center for Space Weather Science and Education (ICSWSE) Kyushu University are used to investigate the long term variations of Pc5 power. The same signature in the REF variations is shown in the time variability of the Pc5 power on the ground. These results indicate that the solar wind condition strongly affects the acceleration process of the relativistic electron flux by the ULF wave. In particular the dependence of the REF and Pc5 variations on the sector structures and their seasonal variations strongly suggest that the relationship between Pc5 and REF variations could be controlled by the Russell-McPherron effect.

  16. 2014 Wind Program Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    The Wind Program Peer Review Meeting was held March 24-28, 2014 in Arlington, VA. Principle investigators from the Energy Department, National Laboratories, academic, and industry representatives presented the progress of their DOE-funded research. This report documents the formal, rigorous evaluation process and findings of nine independent reviewers who examined the technical, scientific, and business results of Wind Program funded projects, as well as the productivity and management effectiveness of the Wind Program itself.

  17. Pricing offshore wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitt, Andrew C.; Kempton, Willett; Smith, Aaron P.; Musial, Walt; Firestone, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Offshore wind offers a very large clean power resource, but electricity from the first US offshore wind contracts is costlier than current regional wholesale electricity prices. To better understand the factors that drive these costs, we develop a pro-forma cash flow model to calculate two results: the levelized cost of energy, and the breakeven price required for financial viability. We then determine input values based on our analysis of capital markets and of 35 operating and planned projects in Europe, China, and the United States. The model is run for a range of inputs appropriate to US policies, electricity markets, and capital markets to assess how changes in policy incentives, project inputs, and financial structure affect the breakeven price of offshore wind power. The model and documentation are made publicly available. - Highlights: → We calculate the Breakeven Price (BP) required to deploy offshore wind plants. → We determine values for cost drivers and review incentives structures in the US. → We develop 3 scenarios using today's technology but varying in industry experience. → BP differs widely by Cost Scenario; relative policy effectiveness varies by stage. → The low-range BP is below regional market values in the Northeast United States.

  18. Enrichment and solubility of trace metals associated with magnetic extracts in industrially derived contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S G; Wang, H Y; Chen, Y Y

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic fractions (MFs) in industrially derived contaminated soils were extracted with a magnetic separation procedure. Total, soluble, and bioaccessible Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in the MFs and non-magnetic fractions (NMFs) were analyzed using aqua regia and extraction tests, such as deionized water, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and gastric juice simulation (GJST) test. Compared with the non-magnetic fractions, soil MFs were enriched with Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni. Extraction tests indicated that soil MFs contained higher water, TCLP, and GJST-extractable Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations than the soil NMFs. The TCLP-extractable Pb concentration in the MFs exceeded the USEPA hazardous waste criteria, suggesting that soil MFs have a potentially environmental pollution risk. Solubility of trace metals was variable in the different extraction tests, which has the order of GJST > TCLP > water. TCLP test showed Cu and Zn were more mobile than Cr and Pb while bioaccessibility of trace metal defined by GJST test showed the order of Cu ≈ Cr ≈ Zn > Pb. These findings suggested that the MFs in the industrially derived contaminated soils had higher possibility of polluting water bodies, and careful environmental impact assessment was necessary.

  19. Radiological problems associated with TENORM at the oil extraction and production industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazineu, Maria Helena P.; Antonio Filho, Joao

    2005-01-01

    The presence of TENORM in the oil industry occurs either as scales, which accumulate in the inner part of the pipelines that carry oil or water produced during the extraction process, or as sludge which accumulates in the bottom of tanks, separators or any other kind of equipment where this material can be trapped in. The main pathways by which the radionuclides can affect the employees are internal radiocontamination and external exposure to the highly penetrating radiation. Internal contamination occurs mainly during equipment cleaning and decontamination activities. The objective of this work was to measure the external exposure and evaluate the equivalent dose which the workers at the oil industries are submitted to. Exposure rates were measured at different locations in two different PETROBRAS oil extraction and production units in the State of Sergipe - Brazil. Measurements were made around pipelines and equipment by using a portable survey meter. A maximum value of 700 μSvh -1 at a five centimeter distance from a storage drum was measured. The very high values for the equivalent doses measured at the oil extraction and processing units indicate the necessity of establishing specific rules for the correct handling of the material. It is also necessary to signalize these areas of high radioactivity and make sure that the exposure time will be kept at a minimum. (author)

  20. Wind Tunnel Tests for Wind Pressure Distribution on Gable Roof Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path. PMID:24082851

  1. WIND TURBINES FOR WIND POWER INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barladean A.S.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of wind turbine choice for wind power stations is examined in this paper. It is shown by comparison of parameters and characteristics of wind turbines, that for existing modes and speeds of wind in territory of Republic of Moldova it is necessary to use multi-blade small speed rotation wind turbines of fan class.

  2. Lessons learned from Ontario wind energy disputes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Stewart; Mabee, Warren; Baxter, Jamie; Christidis, Tanya; Driver, Liz; Hill, Stephen; McMurtry, J. J.; Tomkow, Melody

    2016-02-01

    Issues concerning the social acceptance of wind energy are major challenges for policy-makers, communities and wind developers. They also impact the legitimacy of societal decisions to pursue wind energy. Here we set out to identify and assess the factors that lead to wind energy disputes in Ontario, Canada, a region of the world that has experienced a rapid increase in the development of wind energy. Based on our expertise as a group comprising social scientists, a community representative and a wind industry advocate engaged in the Ontario wind energy situation, we explore and suggest recommendations based on four key factors: socially mediated health concerns, the distribution of financial benefits, lack of meaningful engagement and failure to treat landscape concerns seriously. Ontario's recent change from a feed-in-tariff-based renewable electricity procurement process to a competitive bid process, albeit with more attention to community engagement, will only partially address these concerns.

  3. Wind energy curriculum development at GWU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Stephen M [GWU

    2013-06-08

    A wind energy curriculum has been developed at the George Washington University, School of Engineering and Applied Science. Surveys of student interest and potential employers expectations were conducted. Wind industry desires a combination of mechanical engineering training with electrical engineering training. The curriculum topics and syllabus were tested in several graduate/undergraduate elective courses. The developed curriculum was then submitted for consideration.

  4. Closed-loop wind farm control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, J.W.; Pao, L.; Fleming, P

    2017-01-01

    For wind farm control, the current practice in industry is that every turbine has its own wind turbine controller that will optimize its own performance in terms of power output, load mitigation, and/or reference tracking. However, in several national American and European1 research projects,

  5. Wind energy mission analysis. Final report. [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-02-18

    The development of wind energy systems in the U.S. is discussed under the following headings: baseline power systems; assessment of wind potential; identification of high potential applications; electric utilities; residential application; paper industry application; agriculture application; and remote community applications.

  6. Wind Turbine Aerodynamics from an Aerospace Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Garrel, Arne; ten Pas, Sebastiaan; Venner, Cornelis H.; van Muijden, Jaap

    2018-01-01

    The current challenges in wind turbine aerodynamics simulations share a number of similarities with the challenges that the aerospace industry has faced in the past. Some of the current challenges in the aerospace aerodynamics community are also relevant for today’s wind turbine aerodynamics

  7. Wind power: breakthrough to global dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horrighs, W.

    1996-01-01

    The beginning of the 1980s saw the start of wind-turbine manufacture. Soon it had become a booming industrial sector, thanks mainly to the spirit of some young entrepreneurs and political support in many countries. But the wind-power market has assumed global dimensions and major structural changes have to be faced. (author)

  8. Stratigraphic cross sections of the Niobrara interval of the Cody Shale and associated rocks in the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Thomas M.

    2017-02-07

    The Wind River Basin in Wyoming is one of many structural and sedimentary basins that formed in the Rocky Mountain foreland during the Laramide orogeny. The basin is nearly 200 miles long, 70 miles wide, and encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range, Owl Creek uplift, and southern Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east, the Granite Mountains on the south, and Wind River Range on the west.Many important conventional oil and gas fields producing from reservoirs ranging in age from Mississippian through Tertiary have been discovered in this basin. In addition, an extensive unconventional overpressured basin-centered gas accumulation has been identified in Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the deeper parts of the basin. It has long been suggested that various Upper Cretaceous marine shales, including the Cody Shale, are the principal hydrocarbon source rocks for many of these accumulations. With recent advances and success in horizontal drilling and multistage fracture stimulation, there has been an increase in exploration and completion of wells in these marine shales in other Rocky Mountain Laramide basins that were traditionally thought of only as hydrocarbon source rocks.The two stratigraphic cross sections presented in this report were constructed as part of a project carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey to characterize and evaluate the undiscovered continuous (unconventional) oil and gas resources of the Niobrara interval of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale in the Wind River Basin in central Wyoming. The primary purpose of the cross sections is to show the stratigraphic relationship of the Niobrara equivalent strata and associated rocks in the lower part of the Cody Shale in the Wind River Basin. These two cross sections were constructed using borehole geophysical logs from 37 wells drilled for oil and gas exploration and production, and one surface section along East Sheep Creek

  9. The Role of Industrial Relations Centers, Proceedings of a Regional Meeting of the International Industrial Relations Association (Chicago, May 17-18, 1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Industrial Relations Research Inst.

    This meeting was held to exchange views on organization, operation, and goals of industrial relations centers, institutes, and schools. The opening speaker outlined the structure and functions of the international organization and of the regional conferences. The first paper, "Administrative Arrangements in Industrial Relations Centers," was based…

  10. Wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C.

    1982-01-01

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  11. Risks associated with volcanic ash fallout from Mt.Etna with reference to industrial filtration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milazzo, Maria Francesca; Ancione, Giuseppa; Salzano, Ernesto; Maschio, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The recent eruption of the Icelandic volcano has focused the worldwide attention on volcanic ash effects for the population, road, rail and air traffic and production activities. This paper aims to study of technological (industrial) accidental scenarios triggered by ash fallout and, more specifically, to define and quantify the potential damage on filtration systems. Malfunctions due to the filter clogging and service interruptions caused by the rupture of the filtering surface have been analysed in order to define the vulnerability of the equipment to such damages. Results are given in terms of threshold values of deposit on the filtering surface and exceedance probability curves of ash concentrations and the duration of the ash emission. This data can be easily implemented in the standard risk assessment with the aim to include the estimation of Natural-Technological (Na-Tech) hazards

  12. Nutrient discharge from China’s aquaculture industry and associated environmental impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bleeker, Albert; Liu, Junguo

    2015-04-01

    China’s aquaculture industry accounts for the largest share of the world’s fishery production, and provides a principal source of protein for the nation’s booming population. However, the environmental effects of the nutrient loadings produced by this industry have not been systematically studied or reviewed. Few quantitative estimates exist for nutrient discharge from aquaculture and the resultant nutrient enrichment in waters and sediments. In this paper, we evaluate nutrient discharge from aquacultural systems into aquatic ecosystems and the resulting nutrient enrichment of water and sediments, based on data from 330 cases in 51 peer-reviewed publications. Nitrogen use efficiency ranged from 11.7% to 27.7%, whereas phosphorus use efficiency ranged from 8.7% to 21.2%. In 2010, aquacultural nutrient discharges into Chinese aquatic ecosystems included 1044 Gg total nitrogen (184 Gg N from mariculture; 860 Gg N freshwater culture) and 173 Gg total phosphorus (22 Gg P from mariculture; 151 Gg P from freshwater culture). Water bodies and sediments showed high levels of nutrient enrichment, especially in closed pond systems. However, this does not mean that open aquacultural systems have smaller nutrient losses. Improvement of feed efficiency in cage systems and retention of nutrients in closed systems will therefore be necessary. Strategies to increase nutrient recycling, such as integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, and social measures, such as subsidies, should be increased in the future. We recommend the recycling of nutrients in water and sediments by hybrid agricultural-aquacultural systems and the adoption of nutrient use efficiency as an indicator at farm or regional level for the sustainable development of aquaculture; such indicators; together with water quality indicators, can be used to guide evaluations of technological, policy, and economic approaches to improve the sustainability of Chinese aquaculture.

  13. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsevski, Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States); Afjeh, Abdollah [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Jamali, Mohsin [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Bingman, Verner [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States)

    2014-04-04

    using different evaluation criteria, and an Android application for collection of field data using mobile and tablet devices . In summary, the simulations of two- and three-blade wind turbines suggested that two-bladed machines could produce comparable annual energy as the three-blade wind turbines but have a lighter tower top weight, which leads to lower cost of energy. In addition, the two-blade rotor configuration potentially costs 20% less than a three blade configuration that produces the same power at the same site. The cost model analysis predicted a potential cost savings of approximately 15% for offshore two-blade wind turbines. The foundation design for a wind turbine in Lake Erie is likely to be driven by ice loads based on the currently available ice data and ice mechanics models. Hence, for Lake Eire, the cost savings will be somewhat smaller than the other lakes in the Great Lakes. Considering the size of cranes and vessels currently available in the Great Lakes, the cost optimal wind turbine size should be 3 MW, not larger. The surveillance data from different monitoring systems suggested that bird and bat passage rates per hour were comparable during heavy migrations in both spring and fall seasons while passage rates were significantly correlated to wind directions and wind speeds. The altitude of migration was higher during heavy migrations and higher over water relative to over land. Notable portions of migration on some spring nights occurred parallel the shoreline, often moving perpendicular to southern winds. The birds approaching the Western basin have a higher propensity to cross than birds approaching the Central basin of Lake Erie and as such offshore turbine development might be a better option further east towards Cleveland than in the Western basin. The high stopover density was more strongly associated with migration volume the following night rather than the preceding night. The processed mean scalar wind speeds with temporal resolutions

  14. Modelling of associating mixtures for applications in the oil & gas and chemical industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Folas, Georgios; Muro Sunè, Nuria

    2007-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria of associating mixtures cannot often be satisfactorily modelled using conventional models such as cubic equations of state. CPA (cubic-plus-association) is an equation of state (EoS), which combines the SRK EoS with the association term of SAFT. For non......-polar (non self-associating) compounds it reduces to SRK. The model was first published in 1996 and since then it has been developed and applied with success to binary systems containing water-alkanes and alcohol/glycol/acid-alkanes (both VLE and LLE) as well as ternary and multicomponent (V)LLE for water......-alcohol (glycol)-alkanes and certain acid and amine-containing mixtures. Recent results include glycol-aromatic hydrocarbons including multiphase, multicomponent equilibria and gas hydrate calculations in combination with the van der Waals-Platteeuw model. This article will outline some new applications...

  15. National symposium on commissioning and operating experiences in heavy water plants and associated chemical industries [Preprint volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    A symposium on commissioning and operating experiences in heavy water plants and associated chemical industries (SCOPEX-92) was organised to share the experience and exchange the ideas among plant operators, designers, consultants and vendors in the areas of operation, commissioning and equipment performance. This pre-print volume has been brought out as an integrated source of information on commissioning and operation of heavy water plants. The following aspects of heavy water plants are covered: commissioning and operation, instrumentation and control, and safety and environment. (V.R.)

  16. Abstracts Book of Jubilee Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Scientific Assemblies of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry are most important chemical discussion forum organised annually in Poland. Basic as well as application studies in all chemical branches have been extensively presented. The next subjects was proposed as sections and symposia topics: organic chemistry, physical chemistry (chemical kinetics, catalysis, thermodynamics), membranes and membrane processes, biological chemistry, biotechnology, metalorganic compounds and complexes, polymer chemistry, crystallochemical study, spectroscopy in nowadays chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, chemistry and technology of coal, high-energetic materials, environment protection, didactics in chemistry, radiation chemistry, photochemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry and technology of carbohydrates, theoretical and computer chemistry, young scientists forum, history of chemistry

  17. Summaries of the 40. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Annual 40. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry has been held in Gdansk on 22-26 September 1997. The most valuable scientific results obtained in Polish Laboratories have been presented in 22 main sections and 7 symposia directed especially at following subjects: analytical chemistry, biochemistry, solid state chemistry and material science, physical chemistry, heteroorganic and coordination chemistry, medical and pharmaceutical chemistry, metalorganic chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry, polymers chemistry, chemistry and environment protection, theoretical chemistry, chemical didactics, photochemistry, radiation chemistry and chemical kinetics, chemical engineering, catalysis, crystallochemistry, chemical technology, electrochemistry, and instrumental methods

  18. Wind Magnetic Clouds for the Period 2013 - 2015: Model Fitting, Types, Associated Shock Waves, and Comparisons to Other Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.; Berdichevsky, D. B.; Szabo, A.

    2018-04-01

    We give the results of parameter fitting of the magnetic clouds (MCs) observed by the Wind spacecraft for the three-year period 2013 to the end of 2015 (called the "Present" period) using the MC model of Lepping, Jones, and Burlaga ( J. Geophys. Res. 95, 11957, 1990). The Present period is almost coincident with the solar maximum of the sunspot number, which has a broad peak starting in about 2012 and extending to almost 2015. There were 49 MCs identified in the Present period. The modeling gives MC quantities such as size, axial attitude, field handedness, axial magnetic-field strength, center time, and closest-approach vector. Derived quantities are also estimated, such as axial magnetic flux, axial current density, and total axial current. Quality estimates are assigned representing excellent, fair/good, and poor. We provide error estimates on the specific fit parameters for the individual MCs, where the poor cases are excluded. Model-fitting results that are based on the Present period are compared to the results of the full Wind mission from 1995 to the end of 2015 (Long-term period), and compared to the results of two other recent studies that encompassed the periods 2007 - 2009 and 2010 - 2012, inclusive. We see that during the Present period, the MCs are, on average, slightly slower, slightly weaker in axial magnetic field (by 8.7%), and larger in diameter (by 6.5%) than those in the Long-term period. However, in most respects, the MCs in the Present period are significantly closer in characteristics to those of the Long-term period than to those of the two recent three-year periods. However, the rate of occurrence of MCs for the Long-term period is 10.3 year^{-1}, whereas this rate for the Present period is 16.3 year^{-1}, similar to that of the period 2010 - 2012. Hence, the MC occurrence rate has increased appreciably in the last six years. MC Type (N-S, S-N, All N, All S, etc.) is assigned to each MC; there is an inordinately large percentage of All S

  19. Feasibility of small wind turbines in Ontario: Integrating power curves with wind trends

    OpenAIRE

    Ashtine, Masaō; Bello, Richard; Higuchi, Kaz

    2016-01-01

    Micro-scale/small wind turbines, unlike larger utility-scale turbines, produce electricity at a rate of 300 W to 10 kW at their rated wind speed and are typically below 30 m in hub-height. These wind turbines have much more flexibility in their costs, maintenance and siting owing to their size and can provided wind energy in areas much less suited for direct supply to the grid system. The small wind industry has been substantially slow to progress in Ontario, Canada, and there is much debate ...

  20. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bolinger, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Barbose, Galen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Darghouth, Naim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hoen, Ben [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mills, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Porter, Kevin [Exeter Associates, Columbia, MD (United States); Buckley, Michael [Exeter Associates, Columbia, MD (United States); Fink, Sari [Exeter Associates, Columbia, MD (United States); Oteri, Frank [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The U.S. wind power industry is facing uncertain times. With 2011 capacity additions having risen from 2010 levels and with a further sizable increase expected in 2012, there are – on the surface – grounds for optimism. Key factors driving growth in 2011 included continued state and federal incentives for wind energy, recent improvements in the cost and performance of wind power technology, and the need to meet an end-of-year construction start deadline in order to qualify for the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. At the same time, the currently-slated expiration of key federal tax incentives for wind energy at the end of 2012 – in concert with continued low natural gas prices and modest electricity demand growth – threatens to dramatically slow new builds in 2013.

  1. Wind energy - The facts. Vol. 1: Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, P.; Garrad, A.; Jamieson, P.; Snodin, H.; Tindal, A. (comps.) [Gerrad Hassan and partners (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    The politics and economics of wind energy have played an important role in the development of the industry and contributed to its present success. Engineering is, however, pivotal. As the wind industry has become better established, the central place of engineering has become overshadowed by other issues. This is a tribute to the success of the engineers and their turbines. This volume addresses the key engineering Issues: 1) The turbines - their past achievements and future challenges - a remarkable tale of technical endeavour and entrepreneurship. 2) The wind - its characteristics and reliability - how can it be measured, quantified and harnessed? 3) The wind farms - an assembly of individual turbines into wind power stations or wind farms - their optimisation and development. 4) The grid - transporting the energy from remote locations with plentiful wind energy to the loads - the key technical and strategic challenges. This volume provides an historical overview of turbine development, describes the present status and considers future challenges. This is a remarkable story starting in the nineteenth century and then accelerating through the last two decades of the twentieth century on a course very similar to the early days of aeronautics. The story is far from finished but it has certainly started with a vengeance. Wind must be treated with great respect. The speed of the wind on a site has a very powerful effect on the economics of a wind farm; it provides both the fuel to generate electricity and the loads to destroy the turbine. This volume describes how it can be quantified, harnessed and put to work in an economic and predictable manner. The long-term behaviour of the wind is described as well as its short-term behaviour. The latter can be successfully forecast to allow wind energy to participate in electricity markets. In order for wind to live up to its raw potential promise, individual turbines must be assembled into wind farms or wind power stations

  2. Wind resource in the urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Joseph Kearney

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy technologies, such as wind turbines, have to be considered for new building over 1000m2 under the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (2002. Accurate assessment of the wind resource is a key component in the success of a wind installation. Designers, planners and architects also need wind data from urban areas to support low-energy building design, natural ventilation, air quality, pollution control, insurance and wind engineering. Over the last six years instrumentation has been installed at the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT in two separate locations to monitor the wind. The data has shown that the wind resource will vary quite considerably on a given site and this is due to local variations in topography, and other factors associated with wind and turbulence in the built environment. Difficulties were encountered in measuring the wind and turbulence on site. IEC 61400-12-1: 2005 states that “... analytical tools (anemometers presently available offer little help in identifying the impact of these variables, and experimental methods encounter equally-serious difficulties.” The practical experience of measuring wind in the urban environment informed the development of a prototype anemometer that may be capable of digitally mapping accurate real-time three-dimensional data on wind speed, wind direction and, uniquely in the field of wind instrumentation, wind turbulence.

  3. 2016 Fee Wind energy directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    France is currently engaged in the energy transition where ambitious goals are at stake to allow the country to be one of the leading European countries in renewable energies. The cost of onshore wind is getting more and more competitive and for this reason, wind energy professionals are committed in contributing actively to reach the 32 % objective of renewable energies in the final energy consumption and 40 % of renewable energies in the electricity mix for 2030. 2014 was marked by a swift growth of the installed onshore wind energy, the positive trend is confirmed in 2015 with more than 500 MW connected to the grid in the first half of the year, corresponding to the annual forecast of 1,200 MW for 2015. Thanks to the energy transition law, operational policies will be implemented through the multi-annual energy programming (PPE- programmation pluriannuelle de l'energie). France will therefore continue increasing its development of renewable energies. This law will also allow France to develop offshore wind energy and to strengthen its position regarding wind energy: with an objective of 15 GW of fixed offshore wind energy and 6 GW of floating wind energy to be built in the 2030 horizon, the sector will be able to guarantee its development, especially in the current context of strong worldwide competition. Some 10,000 direct and indirect jobs are awaited for offshore wind energy on the national territory and wind energy professionals underline that the development of the offshore wind sector will contribute to the economic dynamism of the country. This sector is thus a job creating sector as confirmed in the figures of the wind employment monitor (observatoire de l'emploi) in France, recording a significant growth in 2013 with 10,800 jobs. This upward trend was confirmed in 2014. This proves the continuous commitment of the wind industry in seeing the success of the energy transition in France in a context marked by numerous energy and climate events

  4. Proceedings of the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats Workshop: Understanding and Resolving Bird and Bat Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Susan Savitt (ed.)

    2004-09-01

    Most conservation groups support the development of wind energy in the US as an alternative to fossil and nuclear-fueled power plants to meet growing demand for electrical energy. However, concerns have surfaced over the potential threat to birds, bats, and other wildlife from the construction and operation of wind turbine facilities. Co-sponsored by the American Bird Conservancy (ABC) and the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats Workshop was convened to examine current research on the impacts of wind energy development on avian and bat species and to discuss the most effective ways to mitigate such impacts. On 18-19 May 2004, 82 representatives from government, non-government organizations, private business, and academia met to (1) review the status of the wind industry and current project development practices, including pre-development risk assessment and post-construction monitoring; (2) learn what is known about direct, indirect (habitat), and cumulative impacts on birds and bats from existing wind projects; about relevant aspects of bat and bird migration ecology; about offshore wind development experience in Europe; and about preventing, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts; (3) review wind development guidelines developed by the USFWS and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife; and (4) identify topics needing further research and to discuss what can be done to ensure that research is both credible and accessible. These Workshop Proceedings include detailed summaries of the presentations made and the discussions that followed.

  5. Wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the wind power. It presents the principles, the technology takes off, its applications and technology focus, the global market trends and the outlooks and Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  6. Wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portilla S, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    The wind energy or eolic energy is a consequence of solar energy, the one which is absorbed by the atmosphere and is transformed into energy of movement of large bulks of air. In this process the atmosphere acts as the filter to the solar radiation and demotes the ultraviolet beams that result fatal to life in the Earth. The ionosphere is the most external cap and this is ionized by means of absorption process of ultraviolet radiation arising to the Sun. The atmosphere also acts as a trap to the infrared radiation, it that results from the continual process of energetic degradation. In this way, the interaction between Earth - Atmospheres, is behaved as a great greenhouse, maintaining the constant temperatures, including in the dark nights. Processes as the natural convection (that occur by the thermodynamic phenomenon), equatorial calmness, trade winds and against trade winds and global distribution of the air currents are described. The other hand, techniques as the transformation of the wind into energy and its parameters also are shown

  7. Central Appalachia in advanced capitalism: its coal industry structure and coal operator associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walls, D.S.

    1978-01-01

    This study traces the origins of the notion that Appalachia constitutes a unique social-problem region, examines the models of Appalachian problems popularized during the 1960s, proposes an alternative framework for situating the Central Appalachian coalfields, and examines aspects of the coal industry's structure in the Central Appalachian region. The idea of Appalachia as a distinctive social problem region was created between 1890 and 1930 by a social movement affiliated with various Protestant church home mission boards and organizationally focused in the Conference of Southern Mountain Workers and Berea College. The movement stressed an environmental explanation of regional problems. During the 1960s, three explanatory models of Appalachian poverty and underdevelopment achieved prominence: the subculture of poverty model, the regional development model, and the internal colonialism model. Each contributed to a regionalized conception of Appalachian problems. Empirical studies show the subculture of poverty model to fail as an explanation of regional underdevelopment. In the absence of a critique of domination and a redistribution of power and wealth, the regional development model serves as a rationalization of existing structures of privilege. The internal colonialism model provides a critique of domination, but not the most appropriate one. This study argues that the above models should not be viewed as mutually exclusive formulations, and that they may be reconstructed to represent different dimensions of social existence.

  8. ARPEL: A regional petroleum association serving the Latin American oil industry since 1965

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brussoni, A.

    1993-12-31

    Established in 1965 as a non-governmental international organization aimed to foster the information exchange, cooperation and mutual assistance among its member companies, as well as to promote the economic integration of the Latin American petroleum Sector. Its original name standing for `Association for Reciprocal Assistance of Latin American State Oil Companies` was modified in May, 1993 simultaneously with its by-laws for `Association for Reciprocal Assistance of Latin American Oil Companies`, responding to the sweeping changes of the oil sector in the region. Since May the membership has been opened to the private regional companies.

  9. A kernel plus method for quantifying wind turbine performance upgrades

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Giwhyun

    2014-04-21

    Power curves are commonly estimated using the binning method recommended by the International Electrotechnical Commission, which primarily incorporates wind speed information. When such power curves are used to quantify a turbine\\'s upgrade, the results may not be accurate because many other environmental factors in addition to wind speed, such as temperature, air pressure, turbulence intensity, wind shear and humidity, all potentially affect the turbine\\'s power output. Wind industry practitioners are aware of the need to filter out effects from environmental conditions. Toward that objective, we developed a kernel plus method that allows incorporation of multivariate environmental factors in a power curve model, thereby controlling the effects from environmental factors while comparing power outputs. We demonstrate that the kernel plus method can serve as a useful tool for quantifying a turbine\\'s upgrade because it is sensitive to small and moderate changes caused by certain turbine upgrades. Although we demonstrate the utility of the kernel plus method in this specific application, the resulting method is a general, multivariate model that can connect other physical factors, as long as their measurements are available, with a turbine\\'s power output, which may allow us to explore new physical properties associated with wind turbine performance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Association Between Substance Use and the Perpetration of Family Violence in Industrialized Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choenni, Vandhana; Hammink, Alice; van de Mheen, Dike

    2017-01-01

    This review examines the association between alcohol and illicit drug use and the perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV) and child maltreatment (CM). In clinical populations, alcohol use is related to IPV, although other variables are also known to influence this relationship. Studies in specialized social/health care and in the community have also demonstrated the association between alcohol use and IPV. Although data on the association between illicit drug use and IPV are less clear, in most studies perpetration seems related to the use of cannabis and cocaine. The occurrence of CM is related to alcohol use in specialized social/health care and community populations but has not been extensively investigated in clinical samples. These findings also apply to studies on the association between illicit drug use and CM. Moreover, many studies on CM fail to distinguish between the effects of alcohol and those of illicit drugs. This review concludes with recommendations for future research about substance use and family violence and discusses implications for prevention and treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Methodology to evaluate the energy associated to the industrial solid wastes: application in a metropolitan region of Campinas, Sao Paulo state, Brazil; Metodologia para avaliacao da energia associada ao residuo solido industrial: aplicacao a regiao metropolitada de Campinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Tereza Rosana Orrico [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Curso de Pos-graduacao em Planejamento de Sistemas Energeticos; Teixeira, Egle Novaes [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Silva, Ennio Peres da [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico. Lab. de Hidrogenio

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this work is to the application of a methodology to evaluate the energy associated to the industrial solid wastes in the metropolitan region of Campinas. The methodological route proposed is: the characterization of the research area and the production/management of the industrial solid wastes; the energetic classification and the qualitative/quantitative research of the energy associated to the industrial solid wastes; and, the valuation of the applicability of the energetic utilization mechanisms proposed to the region. This methodology when applied at the Campinas metropolitan region proved to be valid and it resulted in a synthetically presentation of the social and environmental reality of the industrial sector and the destination of the wastes, as well as it indicated the potentialities related to the energetic utilization of the industrial solid waste in the region. With the obtained results it was shown the importance of the the production and the destination of the industrial solid wastes in the Campinas metropolitan region , and the meaning, in terms of electric potency, of the values of the energy associated to the wastes with a known factor of energetic conversion shown in the researched sample. (author)

  12. Self-reported well-being and associated factors among industrial workers in Brazil: findings from a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana Ginar da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this study was to estimate self-perception of well-being and associated factors among industrial workers in Brazil. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with a representative sample from 23 Brazilian states and the Federal District. Self-reported of well-being was investigated by questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression was used in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. For 93% of the 47,477 industrial workers, the perception of well-being was positive. Those who had the highest chances of being in the category of best perception of well-being were: male workers (OR = 1.35; 95%CI: 1.28; 1.43; those aged under thirty years old (OR = 1.24; 95%CI: 1.12; 1.39; those from Southern Brazil (OR = 1.99; 95%CI: 1.83; 2.16; and people with a high income. The prevalence of positive well-being was high. Sociodemographic, behavioral and social support characteristics, as well as the characteristics related to self-report on health were associated with well-being.

  13. Integron gene cassettes and degradation of compounds associated with industrial waste: the case of the Sydney tar ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E Koenig

    Full Text Available Integrons are genetic platforms that accelerate lateral gene transfer (LGT among bacteria. They were first detected on plasmids bearing single and multiple drug resistance determinants in human pathogens, and it is abundantly clear that integrons have played a major role in the evolution of this public health menace. Similar genetic elements can be found in nonpathogenic environmental bacteria and in metagenomic environmental DNA samples, and it is reasonable to suppose that integrons have facilitated microbial adaptation through LGT in niches outside infectious disease wards. Here we show that a heavily impacted estuary, exposed for almost a century to products of coal and steel industries, has developed a rich and unique cassette metagenome, containing genes likely to aid in the catabolism of compounds associated with industrial waste found there. In addition, we report that the most abundant cassette recovered in this study is one that encodes a putative LysR protein. This autoregulatory transcriptional regulator is known to activate transcription of linked target genes or unlinked regulons encoding diverse functions including chlorocatechol and dichlorophenol catabolism. Finally, only class 1 integrase genes were amplified in this study despite using different primer sets, and it may be that the cassettes present in the Tar Ponds will prove to be associated with class 1 integrase genes. Nevertheless, our cassette library provides a snapshot of a complex evolutionary process involving integron-meditated LGT likely to be important in natural bioremediation.

  14. Estimation of avoidable skin cancers and cost-savings to government associated with regulation of the solarium industry in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Nicholas; Gordon, Louisa; Gies, Peter; Green, Adèle C

    2009-03-01

    In Australia there is growing concern about the expanding solarium industry, and the additive effect of persons seeking exposure to artificial ultraviolet radiation (UVR) against already intense background levels of solar UVR. We estimated the numbers of potential skin cancers prevented through regulation of solaria and the associated cost-savings to the Federal Government. A lifetime decision-analytic model was created using relative risk estimates based on a meta-analysis of the literature assessing the link between skin cancer risk and solarium use. The costs were limited to those incurred by Medicare Australia, for the medical care of individuals treated for skin cancer. With stricter regulations, we estimated between 18 and 31 melanomas, 200-251 squamous cell carcinomas and associated costs of $AU 256,054 would be avoided per 100,000 persons. Our base findings were sensitive to estimates for prevalence of use, skin cancer risk and discounting rates. Continued growth in the Australian solarium industry is likely to inflate the already substantial skin cancer burden. Subject to some limitations, our study indicates that by successfully enforcing solarium regulations to prohibit use by minors and by those with fair skin colour, the Federal Government could expect favourable cost and health benefits.

  15. Work ability index (WAI) and its association with psychosocial factors in one of the petrochemical industries in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumi, Adel; Rostamabadi, Akbar; Nasl Saraji, Gabraeil; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, work ability index (WAI) has been a common practical tool to measure individuals' work ability in many European, Asian and South American countries. However, there is no study concerning work ability in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the work ability index in an Iranian petrochemical job setting and to examine its relationship with psychosocial factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 420 male workers in various occupations. Work ability was evaluated using the WAI questionnaire developed by FIOH; the Job content questionnaire (JCQ) was used to assess psychosocial factors. The mean WAI score was 39.1 (SD=5.7) among workers in the studied petrochemical industry. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed a significant association between mean WAI score and age, job tenure, educational level, rest and sleep status and vocational education. Moreover, the results showed that skill discretion, coworker support and supervisor support were positively associated with the mean WAI score. On the other hand, it was inversely associated with job demands, job strain and job insecurity. This study was the first research to determine WAI in an important industry in Iran. Overall, work ability was in the "Good" category among the workers in the studied field. On the basis of the WAI guidelines, this level should be maintained and promoted to excellent level by providing supportive countermeasures. The WAI score was significantly associated with psychosocial factors. The results showed that even in heavy physical work, factors such as job insecurity, skill discretion, job strain and social support play an important role in maintaining work ability. A positive combination of "psychosocial characteristics" of the job with "individual resources" can promote work ability in such occupations.

  16. Wind resource characterization in the Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Yip, Chak Man Andrew

    2015-12-28

    Wind energy is expected to contribute to alleviating the rise in energy demand in the Middle East that is driven by population growth and industrial development. However, variability and intermittency in the wind resource present significant challenges to grid integration of wind energy systems. These issues are rarely addressed in the literature of wind resource assessment in the Middle East due to sparse meteorological observations with varying record lengths. In this study, the wind field with consistent space–time resolution for over three decades at three hub heights (50m, 80m, 140m) over the whole Arabian Peninsula is constructed using the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) dataset. The wind resource is assessed at a higher spatial resolution with metrics of temporal variations in the wind than in prior studies. Previously unrecognized locations of interest with high wind abundance and low variability and intermittency have been identified in this study and confirmed by recent on-site observations. In particular, the western mountains of Saudi Arabia experience more abundant wind resource than most Red Sea coastal areas. The wind resource is more variable in coastal areas along the Arabian Gulf than their Red Sea counterparts at a similar latitude. Persistent wind is found along the coast of the Arabian Gulf.

  17. Wind Energy Department. Annual progress report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrumsager, B.; Larsen, S.; Hauge Madsen, P. (eds.)

    2002-10-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2001. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2001 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  18. Wind Energy Department. Annual progress report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrumsager, B.; Larsen, S.; Hauge Madsen, P.

    2002-10-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2001. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2001 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  19. Design Load Basis for Offshore Wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Anand; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Wang, Shaofeng

    2016-01-01

    DTU Wind Energy is not designing and manufacturing wind turbines and does therefore not need a Design Load Basis (DLB) that is accepted by a certification body. However, to assess the load consequences of innovative features and devices added to existing offshore turbine concepts or new offshore...... turbine concept developed in our research, it is useful to have a full DLB that follows the current design standard and is representative of a general DLB used by the industry. It will set a standard for the offshore wind turbine design load evaluations performed at DTU Wind Energy, which is aligned...

  20. Urban small wind turbine applications for reducing GHC emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullis, S.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text:' There are advantages to power generation at or near the points of consumption and this is still true for low carbon sustainable power sources, including wind. Consequently, there is interest in wind power generation in cities and suburbs. The potential now exists for realistic power small-scale generation in building mounted turbines. This presentation provides the benefits and obstacles to their use, as well as details of such turbines and the design and operations requirements for them. The main issues associated with locating turbines in cities and suburbs are: the highly turbulent, unsteady wind in the urban/suburban environment produces lower power outputs; vibration is a large concern on mounting turbines on buildings, and safety (turbine failure or even just ice shedding) with pedestrians below. Past and current thinking has just been straightforward in that it is not worth it, and the previous attempts at simply mounting small-scale turbines on rooftops has done more harm than good to the reputation of the small wind, and wind in general, industries. Recently there has been a reconsideration of urban small wind led by reputable companies such as Quiet Revolution (UK), Turby (NL) and Cleanfield (Canada) combined with academic research. A common feature of all of these companies is the use of vertical axis turbines (VAWTs) to help deal with the highly turbulent, unsteady urban winds. Large-scale VAWTs enjoyed a brief flurry of interest in the 1970s and 80s with large amounts of research done at Sandia and NRC in Canada. Vibration and fatigue in the large-scale turbines were among the issues that led to their decline. These, particularly vibration, remain issues for small-scale turbines, but there are some mitigating strategies available. These are now leading to the development of reputable, practical and reliable turbines that can become part of the urban/suburban environment. (author)

  1. Wind generator with electronic variable-speed drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, A.; Buchheit, N.; Jakobsen, H.

    1996-12-31

    Variable speed drives have been inserted between the network and the generator on certain recent wind power facilities. They have the following advantages: the drive allows the wind generator to operate at low speed with a significant reduction in acoustic noise, an important point if the facilities are sited near populated areas; the drive optimizes energy transfer, providing a gain of 4 to 10 %; the drive can possibly replace certain mechanical parts (the starting system and it in some cases, the reduction gear); the drive not only provides better transient management in relation to the network for less mechanical stress on the wind generator, it is also able to control reactive power. One commercial drive design sold by several manufacturers has already been installed on several wind generators with outputs of between 150 and 600 kw. In addition, such a solution is extremely well suited to mixed renewable energy systems. This design uses two inverse rectifier type converters and can therefore exchange energy in both directions. The equivalent drive with a single IGBT converter on the motor side and a diode converter on the network side is the solution most widely adopted throughout industry (with more than 50, 000 units installed in France per year). It still remains to be seen whether such a solution could be profitable in wind generator application (since the cost of the drive is quite high). This technical analysis is more destined for the converter-machine assembly specialists and is presented in this document, paying particular attention as it does to the modelling of the `wind energy - generator - drive - network` assembly, the associated drive command and control strategies and the simulations obtained during various transients. A 7.5 kW test bed has been installed in the Laboratoire d`Electronique de Puissance de Clamart, enabling tests to be carried out which emulate the operation of a wind generator.

  2. Study of fatigue, depression, and associated factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus in industrial workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a significant health problem and imposes great physical, financial and psychological burden among the affected population. Among people with diabetes, fatigue is a pervasive and distressing complaint, which is further accentuated by presence of depression. Objective: To assess the prevalence of fatigue and depression and associated clinical and socio demographic correlates in type 2diabetes. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study included 100 patients of diabetes type 2 and equal number of healthy controls between the ages of 18 to 70 years . A detailed evaluation of socio demographic and clinical parameters was made. Participants were also assessed for presence of depression and fatigue using PHQ-9 and Fatigue Severity Scale(FSSrespectively. Results: Fatigue and depression was found in 68 % and 53 % of diabetic participants. Diabetic patients were 10.37 times and 4.80 times more likely to suffer from fatigue and depression respectively. Both fatigue and depression were found to be significantly associated with duration of illness, fasting and post prandial blood glucose level ,diabetic complications and Body Mass Index (BMI. Fatigue was also strongly correlated with depression in study sample. Conclusions: Fatigue and depression are reasonably correlated with type 2 diabetes. Various clinical parameters of diabetes are strongly associated with both fatigue and depression. Fatigue itself has significant correlation with depression in type 2 diabetes. Regular monitoring of biochemical parameters are paramount to predict the development of fatigue and depression in type 2 diabetes.

  3. The development of an avian wind sensitivity map for South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retief, Ernst; Anderson, M. D.; Harebottle, D.; Jenkins, A.; Simmons, R.; Smit, H.A.; Rooyen, C. Van; Smallie, J.

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Wind energy is a relative new industry in South Africa. This provides South Africans with the opportunity to ensure that wind farms are placed in areas that are of low sensitivity to birds. With this in mind two environmental NGOs, BirdLife South Africa and the Endangered Wildlife Trust, designed an Avian Wind Sensitivity Map to provide guidance to the wind farm industry about the location of wind turbines. The map is the first of its kind in Africa. The purpose of the map is to provide an indication of the geographic areas in South Africa where the possible establishment of wind farms might have a negative impact on birds. Such a map will identify areas of bird sensitivity, i.e. sites where threatened, endemic and vulnerable bird species occur. The map was designed using a variety of data sources, specifically data acquired through citizen science projects - such as the Southern African Bird Atlas Project 2 and the Coordinated Waterbird Counts Project. The data were analysed using data priority scores based on the conservation concern of each species as well as the risk associated with a species to fly into wind turbines and associated infrastructures. The formal protection status of a geographic area was also taken into account. Extensive use was made of GIS tools to collate, analyse and present the data. A number of African countries are considering establishing wind farms. The lessons learnt during the design process can be used by other African countries as the basis for similar maps which can serve as a mitigation measure against the loss of vulnerable species. (Author)

  4. Wind Loads on Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrbye, Claes; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Wind loads have to be taken into account when designing civil engineering structures. The wind load on structures can be systematised by means of the wind load chain: wind climate (global), terrain (wind at low height), aerodynamic response (wind load to pressure), mechanical response (wind...... pressure to structural response) and design criteria. Starting with an introduction of the wind load chain, the book moves on to meteorological considerations, atmospheric boundary layer, static wind load, dynamic wind load and scaling laws used in wind-tunnel tests. The dynamic wind load covers vibrations...... induced by wind turbulence, vortex shedding, flutter and galloping. The book gives a comprehensive treatment of wind effects on structures and it will be useful for consulting engineers designing wind-sensitive structures. It will also be valuable for students of civil engineering as textbook...

  5. Wind energy conversion 1994. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, G.

    1995-01-01

    At the British Wind Energy Association's 16th Annual Conference, held in Stirling, over 60 high quality papers were presented, including a session devoted to 'Wind Energy in Scotland'. Under the Non Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) wind energy has experienced rapid growth in England and Wales and with Scotland now having its own 'Scottish Renewables Obligation' (SRO) the opportunity to tap one of Europe's most important renewable energy resources now exists. The main contemporary issues concerning wind farming today, namely technical, social, economic and environmental were examined in the Geoff Pontin Memorial Lecture, which focused on these aspects in the context of grid integrated wind energy development. The remaining conference themes included machine development, aerodynamics and control, small machines, fatigue and dynamics, public attitudes, noise emissions, electrical integration, resource measurement, and standards, safety and planning. (author)

  6. Wind Energy Program overview, Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    Wind energy research has two goals: (1) to gain a fundamental understanding of the interactions between wind and wind turbines; and (2) to develop the basic design tools required to develop advanced technologies. A primary objective of applied research activities is to develop sophisticated computer codes and integrate them into the design, testing, and evaluation of advanced components and systems, Computer models have become a necessary and integral part of developing new high-tech wind energy systems. A computer-based design strategy allows designers to model different configurations and explore new designs before building expensive hardware. DOE works closely with utilities and the wind industry in setting its applied research agenda. As soon as research findings become available, the national laboratories transfer the information to industry through workshops, conferences, and publications.

  7. Trends in Wind Energy Technology Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Flemming; Madsen, Peter Hauge; Tande, John O.

    2011-01-01

    . The development of new and larger turbines to some extent stagnated, and costs even rose due to high demand and rising materials costs. We believe, however – and this is supported by recent trends – that the next decade will be a new period of technology development and further scale-up, leading to more cost-effective....... The huge potential of wind, the rapid development of the technology and the impressive growth of the industry justify the perception that wind energy is changing its role to become the future backbone of a secure global energy supply. Between the mid-1980s, when the wind industry took off, and 2005 wind...... turbine technology has seen rapid development, leading to impressive increases in the size of turbines, with corresponding cost reductions. From 2005 to 2009 the industry’s focus seems to have been on increasing manufacturing capacity, meeting market demand and making wind turbines more reliable...

  8. 2016 Offshore Wind Technologies Market Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, Walter; Beiter, Philipp; Schwabe, Paul; Tian, Tian; Stehly, Tyler; Spitsen, Paul; Robertson, Amy; Gevorgian, Vahan

    2017-08-08

    The 2016 Offshore Wind Technologies Market Report was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is intended to provide offshore wind policymakers, regulators, developers, researchers, engineers, financiers, and supply chain participants, with quantitative information about the offshore wind market, technology, and cost trends in the United States and worldwide. In particular, this report is intended to provide detailed information on the domestic offshore wind industry to provide context to help navigate technical and market barriers and opportunities. The scope of the report covers the status of the 111 operating offshore wind projects in the global fleet through December 31, 2016, and provides the status and analysis on a broader pipeline of 593 projects at some stage of development. In addition, this report provides a wider assessment of domestic developments and events through the second quarter of 2017 to provide a more up-to-date discussion of this dynamically evolving industry.

  9. EU-NORSEWIND - Delivering Offshore Wind Speed Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oldroyd, Andy; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Stickland, M.T.

    of the offshore wind climatology and likely wind resource. As the wind industry starts to look in detail at the wind regime offshore, the need for more physical data becomes apparent. As well as the normal AEP requirements for project finance, baseline data is required in order to better understand the local...... of large scale wind farms in relatively concentrated geographical areas. NORSEWInD has a clear remit, the delivery of offshore wind speed data at a nominal project hub height acquired in offshore locations. The project will use a multi-instrument approach, combining mast technology, LiDAR remote sensing...... and satellite based observations to compile a large and novel wind speed dataset suitable for use in the wind industry. The data will also feed into key areas such as forecasting and MESOSCALE modelling improvements. The result is a large database accessible via a web based interface utilising GIS...

  10. Valuation of switchable tariff for wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wang; Sheble, Gerald B.; Lopes, Joao A. Pecas; Matos, Manuel Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The current fixed tariff remuneration for wind energy is not compatible with the deregulation of the electric power industry. The time-varying and location-dependent value of renewable energy is not acknowledged. The newly announced switchable tariff for wind energy in the Spanish electricity market provides a promising solution to compensating renewable energy within the deregulated electric power industry. The new switchable tariff provides wind generators more flexibility in operating wind generation assets. Such flexibilities provide option value in coordinating the seasonality of wind energy, demand on electric power and electricity prices movement. This paper models and valuates the flexibility on switching tariff as real compound options for wind generators. Numerical examples valuate wind generation assets under fixed tariff, spot market price taking, and yearly and monthly switchable tariffs. The optimal switching strategies are identified. The impacts of the switchable tariff on sitting criteria and values of wind generation assets are investigated. An improvement on the yearly switchable tariff is suggested to further reduce the operation risk of wind generators and fully explore the efficiency provided by competitive electricity markets. (author)

  11. Stellar winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weymann, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    It is known that a steady outflow of material at comparable rates of mass loss but vastly different speeds is now known to be ubiquitous phenomenon among both the luminous hot stars and the luminous but cool red giants. The flows are probably massive enough in both cases to give rise to significant effects on stellar evolution and the mass balance between stars and the interstellar medium. The possible mechanisms for these phenomena as well as the methods of observation used are described. In particular, the mass-loss processes in stars other than the sun that also involve a steady flow of matter are considered. The evidence for their existence is described, and then the question of whether the process thought to produce the solar wind is also responsible for producing these stellar winds is explored

  12. Factors associated with hearing loss among workers of the airline industry in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, O S; Kim, M J

    2001-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major occupational hazard. Occupational noise exposure threatens the hearing of many workers. In addition to noise exposure in the workplace, multiple factors affect individual susceptibility to NIHL. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with hearing loss in airport workers. A cross-sectional epidemiological design was used. Study subjects were 255 high noise-exposed full-time male workers at a large metropolitan airport in Korea. Data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire, blood pressure measurement, audiological assessment, and a record review of baseline hearing and noise levels of locations where the employee worked. The result of multivariate analysis showed that both occupational noise exposure (noise exposure level, years of noise exposure) and personal risk factors including non-occupational noise exposure, history of ear disease, ototoxic drug use, cigarette smoking, hypertension, and use of hearing protective devices (HPDs) were significantly associated with hearing loss. An aggressive hearing conservation program is needed at the airport, emphasizing both job-related noise exposure and personal risk factors for hearing loss.

  13. Association of remote dexterity and remote lifting for maintenance in fuel reprocessing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streiff, G.; Auchapt, P.; Vertut, J.

    1984-01-01

    The MA23M is an articulated bilateral servomanipulator with theoretically unlimited distance between master and slave stations. The last developments being carried on enable its good utilization in the large cells that will exist in the next reprocessing plants. Recent developments concerning computer aided operations like automatic TV tracking of the effector and manipulative assistance of MA23 and transporter enable realistic application in the large cells of the future reprocessing plants. In another hand manipulator containment, transfer and maintenance, in a glove box have been demonstrated. Concerning the in-cell process equipment to be maintained, extensive testing has shown that the association with a hoist is an excellent trade off in power and dexterity enabling solution of practically all expected or unexpected operations. According to the in-cell machinery and to the difficulty of the operation, one or two dextrous arms can be associated with one hoist. Dismantling of machines or dismantling of the whole facility will be possible by developing special tooling handled by the dextrous manipulator or, if too heavy, oriented by the manipulator but suspended to the hoist

  14. Wind power and bird kills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynolds, M.

    1998-01-01

    The accidental killing of birds by wind generators, and design improvements in the towers that support the turbines that might cut down on the bird killings were discussed. The first problem for the industry began in the late 1980s when the California Energy Commission reported as many as 160 birds (the majority being raptors, including the protected golden eagle) killed in one year in the vicinity of wind power plants. The key factor identified was the design of the towers as birds of prey are attracted to lattice towers as a place to hunt from. Tubular towers do not provide a place for the birds to perch, therefore they reduce the potential for bird strikes. Bird strikes also have been reported in Spain and the siting of the towers have been considered as the principal cause of the bird strikes. In view of these incidents, the wind power industry is developing standards for studying the potential of bird strikes and is continuing to study bird behaviour leading to collisions, the impact of topography, cumulative impacts and new techniques to reduce bird strikes. Despite the reported incidents, the risk of bird strikes by wind turbines, compared to other threats to birds such as pollution, oil spills, and other threats from fossil and nuclear fuels, is considered to be negligible. With continuing efforts to minimize incidents by proper design and siting, wind power can continue to grow as an environmentally sound and efficient source of energy

  15. Industry-driven sector roadmaps 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    Industri-driven sector roadmaps 2020: European Technology Platforms in wind and CCS. A new corporate trend on innovation in Europe, supported by The European Commission.......Industri-driven sector roadmaps 2020: European Technology Platforms in wind and CCS. A new corporate trend on innovation in Europe, supported by The European Commission....

  16. Increasing the competitiveness of wind energy. New technologies for advanced wind predictability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The performance of thermal and nuclear power plants is assessed routinely and precisely, whereas the performance assessment of wind turbines is lagging far behind. This increases operational costs, reduces energy capture, and makes wind energy less competitive. The paper presents a technology and system with improved 24-h power forecasting, as well as condition monitoring of the rotor blades. The system can be employed by any wind power plant and offers potentials to increase the competitiveness of the power industry. (orig.)

  17. Increasing the competitiveness of wind energy. New technologies for advanced wind predictability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolotti, Fabio [SSB Wind Systems GmbH und Co. KG, Salzbergen (Germany). Research and Technology

    2013-10-01

    The performance of thermal and nuclear power plants is assessed routinely and precisely, whereas the performance assessment of wind turbines is lagging far behind. This increases operational costs, reduces energy capture, and makes wind energy less competitive. The paper presents a technology and system with improved 24-h power forecasting, as well as condition monitoring of the rotor blades. The system can be employed by any wind power plant and offers potentials to increase the competitiveness of the power industry. (orig.)

  18. The wind power has a fair wind; L'energie eolienne dans le vent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After a presentation of the state of the art concerning the world energy consumption, regulation and the renewable energies situation in the french market, this document details the wind power: this energy origin, the operating and the implementation, the wind energy cost, the environmental effects and impacts, the compatibility with the agriculture, the wind power industry and market and the long-dated evolution perspectives. (A.L.B.)

  19. Cross sectional survey on association between alcohol, betel- nut, cigarette consumption and health promoting behavior of industrial workers in Ghaziabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Dimple; Marya, Charu Mohan; Menon, Ipseeta; Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Dhingra, Chandan; Anand, Richa

    2015-01-01

    The work force in industries are at risk of developing unduly high rates of health and behaviour related problems including abuse of alcohol, betel nut and cigarette (alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption). This study describes the relationships between alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption and health promoting behaviour among industrial workers. A cross sectional survey was conducted on workers in various industries of Ghaziabad city with concerned authority permission. A sample size of 732 workers was calculated based on pilot study. Through Simple random sampling 732 workers in 20 to 50 years age group with informed consent were interviewed through structured, pretested, validated questionnaire in vernacular language by one calibrated investigator. Data on socio demography, alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption pattern and health behaviour were collected. The association between health promoting behaviour and alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption was analysed by Logistic regression and Chi-square test through SPSS 16 at pconsumption in study population was 88%. The prevalence of individual alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption were 82%, 68% and 79% respectively. Combined alcohol, betel nut and cigarette prevalence in study population was 58%. Alcohol and cigarette users were significantly higher (p<0.001) in 30 to 40 years age group with lower level of education having poor attitude towards health promoting behaviour, poor oral hygiene practices and rare indulgence in regular physical exercise. This study stimulate further research on exploring methods to prevent initiation of health risk behaviour and promote healthy behaviour with cessation help for the current alcohol, betel nut and cigarette users.

  20. Selling wind: Lessons in green niche marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Gregory Edward

    Concern about global warming, energy independence, and threats to oil supply have increased attention on wind and other forms of renewable energy. Yet after more than twenty years, the wind industry remains dependent on government interventions. This research examined the potential of renewable energy credits (RECs) to help wind energy become profitable. Messages used to promote wind and solar energy RECs were compared with those for sustainable building materials. Findings confirm a still immature approach to marketing and sales. None of those interviewed either recognized the value of or had taken action to ensure customer retention nor recognized the role socially conscious and active consumers might play in promoting and helping develop the industry. Recommended actions include continuing research on effective marketing strategies and development of a coordinated industry message.