WorldWideScience

Sample records for wind erosion potential

  1. Wind erosion potential after land application of biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    PI, H.; Sharratt, B. S.; Schillinger, W. F.; Bary, A.; Cogger, C.

    2017-12-01

    The world population is currently 7.6 billion and, along with continued population growth, comes the challenge of disposing of wastewater and sewage sludge (biosolids). Applying biosolids to agricultural land to replace synthetic fertilizers represents a relatively safe method to recycle or sustainably use biosolids. While land application of biosolids is recognized as a sustainable management practice for enhancing soil health, no studies have determined the effects of biosolids on soil wind erosion. Wind erosion potential of a silt loam was assessed using a portable wind tunnel after applying synthetic and biosolid fertilizer to conventional and conservation tillage practices during the summer fallow phase of a winter wheat-summer fallow rotation in 2015 and 2016 in east-central Washington. Little difference in soil loss was observed between biosolid and synthetic fertilizer treatments, but this result appeared to be dependent on susceptibility of the soil to erosion. Regression analysis between soil loss from fertilizer or tillage treatments indicated that soil loss was lower from biosolid versus synthetic fertilizer and conservation versus conventional tillage at high erosion rates. This suggests that biosolids may reduce wind erosion under highly erodible conditions. Meanwhile, heavy metal concentrations in the windblown sediment were similar for the biosolid and synthetic fertilizer treatments whereas metal loss in windblown sediment was 10% lower from biosolid than synthetic fertilizer. Our results indicate that land application of biosolids did not accelerate the loss of metals or nutrients from soils during high winds. KeywordsLand application of biosolids; wind erosion; wind tunnel; sustainable agriculture

  2. Potential threat of southern Moravia soils by wind erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dufková

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion is caused by meteorological factors such as wind, precipitation and evaporation that influence the soil humidity. Erosive-climatological factor expresses wind and humidity conditions of particular landscape. This is an index of the influence of average soil surface humidity and average wind velocity on average soil erodibility by wind. On the basis of average wind velocity and Konček’s humidity index, the values of the erosive-climatological factor for three chosen areas of Czech republic (Telč-Kostelní Myslová, Znojmo-Kuchařovice and Brno-Tuřany, where the pro-cesses of wind erosion could exist, were evaluated. Thus, the change of the factor’s value during the period of 1961 – 2000 was studied. The linear trend for the region of Brno and Znojmo (dry areas shows increasing threat of soils by wind erosion, the contrary situation is at the humid area (Telč. The results prove the influence of soil humidity on the erosive-climatological factor and hereby the influence on wind erosion spreadout.

  3. Wind erosion potential of a winter wheat–summer fallow rotation after land application of biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    While land application of biosolids is recognized as a sustainable management practice for enhancing soil health, no studies have determined the effects of biosolids on soil wind erosion. Wind erosion potential of a silt loam was assessed using a portable wind tunnel after applying synthetic and bio...

  4. Wind erosion potential influenced by tillage in an irrigated potato-sweet corn rotation in the Columbia Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion is a concern within the Columbia Basin of the Inland Pacific Northwest (PNW) United States due to the sandy texture of soils and small amount of residue retained on the soil surface after harvest of vegetable crops like potato. This study assessed potential wind erosion of an irrigated ...

  5. A universal meteorological method to identify potential risk of wind erosion on heavy-textured soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Středová Hana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The climate of Central Europe, mainly winter seasons with no snow cover at lower altitudes and a spring drought as well, might cause erosion events on heavy-textured soils. The aim of this paper is to define a universal method to identify the potential risk of wind erosion on heavy-textured soils. The categorization of potential wind erosion risk due to meteorological conditions is based on: (i an evaluation of the number of freeze-thaw episodes forming bare soil surfaces during the cold period of year; and (ii, an evaluation of the number of days with wet soil surfaces during the cold period of year. In the period 2001–2012 (from November to March, episodes with temperature changes from positive to negative and vice versa (thaw-freeze and freeze-thaw cycles and the effects of wet soil surfaces in connection with aggregate disintegration, are identified. The data are spatially interpolated by GIS tools for areas in the Czech Republic with heavy-textured soils. Blending critical categories is used to locate potential risks. The level of risk is divided into six classes. Those areas identified as potentially most vulnerable are the same localities where the highest number of erosive episodes on heavy-textured soils was documented.

  6. Development and validation of a method to estimate the potential wind erosion risk in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Roger; Deumlich, Detlef; Völker, Lidia

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of the Cross Compliance (CC) regulations for soil protection resulted in the demand for the classification of the the wind erosion risk on agricultural areas in Germany nationwide. A spatial highly resolved method was needed based on uniform data sets and validation principles, which provides a fair and equivalent procedure for all affected farmers. A GIS-procedure was developed, which derives the site specific wind erosion risk from the main influencing factors: soil texture, wind velocity, wind direction and landscape structure following the German standard DIN 19706. The procedure enables different approaches in the Federal States and comparable classification results. Here, we present the approach of the Federal State of Brandenburg. In the first step a complete soil data map was composed in a grid size of 10 x 10 m. Data were taken from 1.) the Soil quality Appraisal (scale 1:10.000), 2.) the Medium-scale Soil Mapping (MMK, 1:25.000), 3.) extrapolating the MMK, 4.) new Soil quality Appraisal (new areas after coal-mining). Based on the texture and carbon content the wind erosion susceptibility was divided in 6 classes. This map was combined with data of the annual average wind velocity resulting in an increase of the risk classes for wind velocities > 5 ms-1 and a decrease for virtual shadows behind the landscape elements for eight directions. The relative frequency of wind from each direction was used as a weighting factor and multiplied with the numerical values of the shadowed cells. Depending on the distance to the landscape element the shadowing effect was combined with the risk classes. The results show that the wind erosion risk is obviously reduced by integrating landscape structures into the risk assessment. After the renewed classification for the entire Federal State, about 60% of the area in the highest, and 40% in the medium risk classes changed into lower classes. The area of the highest potential risk class decreased from 40% to

  7. Wind-Driven Erosion and Exposure Potential at Mars 2020 Rover Candidate-Landing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Banks, Maria; Urso, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Aeolian processes have likely been the predominant geomorphic agent for most of Mars’ history and have the potential to produce relatively young exposure ages for geologic units. Thus, identifying local evidence for aeolian erosion is highly relevant to the selection of landing sites for future missions, such as the Mars 2020 Rover mission that aims to explore astrobiologically relevant ancient environments. Here we investigate wind-driven activity at eight Mars 2020 candidate-landing sites to constrain erosion potential at these locations. To demonstrate our methods, we found that contemporary dune-derived abrasion rates were in agreement with rover-derived exhumation rates at Gale crater and could be employed elsewhere. The Holden crater candidate site was interpreted to have low contemporary erosion rates, based on the presence of a thick sand coverage of static ripples. Active ripples at the Eberswalde and southwest Melas sites may account for local erosion and the dearth of small craters. Moderate-flux regional dunes near Mawrth Vallis were deemed unrepresentative of the candidate site, which is interpreted to currently be experiencing low levels of erosion. The Nili Fossae site displayed the most unambiguous evidence for local sand transport and erosion, likely yielding relatively young exposure ages. The downselected Jezero crater and northeast Syrtis sites had high-flux neighboring dunes and exhibited substantial evidence for sediment pathways across their ellipses. Both sites had relatively high estimated abrasion rates, which would yield young exposure ages. The downselected Columbia Hills site lacked evidence for sand movement, and contemporary local erosion rates are estimated to be relatively low. PMID:29568719

  8. Wind-Driven Erosion and Exposure Potential at Mars 2020 Rover Candidate-Landing Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Banks, Maria; Urso, Anna

    2018-02-01

    Aeolian processes have likely been the predominant geomorphic agent for most of Mars' history and have the potential to produce relatively young exposure ages for geologic units. Thus, identifying local evidence for aeolian erosion is highly relevant to the selection of landing sites for future missions, such as the Mars 2020 Rover mission that aims to explore astrobiologically relevant ancient environments. Here we investigate wind-driven activity at eight Mars 2020 candidate-landing sites to constrain erosion potential at these locations. To demonstrate our methods, we found that contemporary dune-derived abrasion rates were in agreement with rover-derived exhumation rates at Gale crater and could be employed elsewhere. The Holden crater candidate site was interpreted to have low contemporary erosion rates, based on the presence of a thick sand coverage of static ripples. Active ripples at the Eberswalde and southwest Melas sites may account for local erosion and the dearth of small craters. Moderate-flux regional dunes near Mawrth Vallis were deemed unrepresentative of the candidate site, which is interpreted to currently be experiencing low levels of erosion. The Nili Fossae site displayed the most unambiguous evidence for local sand transport and erosion, likely yielding relatively young exposure ages. The downselected Jezero crater and northeast Syrtis sites had high-flux neighboring dunes and exhibited substantial evidence for sediment pathways across their ellipses. Both sites had relatively high estimated abrasion rates, which would yield young exposure ages. The downselected Columbia Hills site lacked evidence for sand movement, and contemporary local erosion rates are estimated to be relatively low.

  9. Wind-Driven Erosion and Exposure Potential at Mars 2020 Rover Candidate-Landing Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Banks, Maria; Urso, Anna

    2018-02-01

    Aeolian processes have likely been the predominant geomorphic agent for most of Mars' history and have the potential to produce relatively young exposure ages for geologic units. Thus, identifying local evidence for aeolian erosion is highly relevant to the selection of landing sites for future missions, such as the Mars 2020 Rover mission that aims to explore astrobiologically relevant ancient environments. Here we investigate wind-driven activity at eight Mars 2020 candidate-landing sites to constrain erosion potential at these locations. To demonstrate our methods, we found that contemporary dune-derived abrasion rates were in agreement with rover-derived exhumation rates at Gale crater and could be employed elsewhere. The Holden crater candidate site was interpreted to have low contemporary erosion rates, based on the presence of a thick sand coverage of static ripples. Active ripples at the Eberswalde and southwest Melas sites may account for local erosion and the dearth of small craters. Moderate-flux regional dunes near Mawrth Vallis were deemed unrepresentative of the candidate site, which is interpreted to currently be experiencing low levels of erosion. The Nili Fossae site displayed the most unambiguous evidence for local sand transport and erosion, likely yielding relatively young exposure ages. The downselected Jezero crater and northeast Syrtis sites had high-flux neighboring dunes and exhibited substantial evidence for sediment pathways across their ellipses. Both sites had relatively high estimated abrasion rates, which would yield young exposure ages. The downselected Columbia Hills site lacked evidence for sand movement, and contemporary local erosion rates are estimated to be relatively low.

  10. Remote sensing of land use/cover changes and its effect on wind erosion potential in southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrooz Rezaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion is a complex process influenced by different factors. Most of these factors are stable over time, but land use/cover and land management practices are changing gradually. Therefore, this research investigates the impact of changing land use/cover and land management on wind erosion potential in southern Iran. We used remote sensing data (Landsat ETM+ and Landsat 8 imagery of 2004 and 2013 for land use/cover mapping and employed the Iran Research Institute of Forest and Rangeland (IRIFR method to estimate changes in wind erosion potential. For an optimal mapping, the performance of different classification algorithms and input layers was tested. The amount of changes in wind erosion and land use/cover were quantified using cross-tabulation between the two years. To discriminate land use/cover related to wind erosion, the best results were obtained by combining the original spectral bands with synthetic bands and using Maximum Likelihood classification algorithm (Kappa Coefficient of 0.8 and 0.9 for Landsat ETM+ and Landsat 8, respectively. The IRIFR modelling results indicate that the wind erosion potential has increased over the last decade. The areas with a very high sediment yield potential have increased, whereas the areas with a low, medium, and high sediment yield potential decreased. The area with a very low sediment yield potential have remained constant. When comparing the change in erosion potential with land use/cover change, it is evident that soil erosion potential has increased mostly in accordance with the increase of the area of agricultural practices. The conversion of rangeland to agricultural land was a major land-use change which lead to more agricultural practices and associated soil loss. Moreover, results indicate an increase in sandification in the study area which is also a clear evidence of increasing in soil erosion.

  11. Wind Erosion Caused by Land Use Changes Significantly Reduces Ecosystem Carbon Storage and Carbon Sequestration Potentials in Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.; Chi, Y. G.; Wang, J.; Liu, L.

    2017-12-01

    Wind erosion exerts a fundamental influence on the biotic and abiotic processes associated with ecosystem carbon (C) cycle. However, how wind erosion under different land use scenarios will affect ecosystem C balance and its capacity for future C sequestration are poorly quantified. Here, we established an experiment in a temperate steppe in Inner Mongolia, and simulated different intensity of land uses: control, 50% of aboveground vegetation removal (50R), 100% vegetation removal (100R) and tillage (TI). We monitored lateral and vertical carbon flux components and soil characteristics from 2013 to 2016. Our study reveals three key findings relating to the driving factors, the magnitude and consequence of wind erosion on ecosystem C balance: (1) Frequency of heavy wind exerts a fundamental control over the severity of soil erosion, and its interaction with precipitation and vegetation characteristics explained 69% variation in erosion intensity. (2) With increases in land use intensity, the lateral C flux induced by wind erosion increased rapidly, equivalent to 33%, 86%, 111% and 183% of the net ecosystem exchange of the control site under control, 50R, 100R and TI sites, respectively. (3) After three years' treatment, erosion induced decrease in fine fractions led to 31%, 43%, 85% of permanent loss of C sequestration potential in the surface 5cm soil for 50R, 100R and TI sites. Overall, our study demonstrates that lateral C flux associated with wind erosion is too large to be ignored. The loss of C-enriched fine particles not only reduces current ecosystem C content, but also results in irreversible loss of future soil C sequestration potential. The dynamic soil characteristics need be considered when projecting future ecosystem C balance in aeolian landscape. We also propose that to maintain the sustainability of grassland ecosystems, land managers should focus on implementing appropriate land use rather than rely on subsequent managements on degraded soils.

  12. Contributions of solar-wind induced potential sputtering to the lunar surface erosion rate and it's exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnussirat, S. T.; Barghouty, A. F.; Edmunson, J. E.; Sabra, M. S.; Rickman, D. L.

    2018-04-01

    Sputtering of lunar regolith by solar-wind protons and heavy ions with kinetic energies of about 1 keV/amu is an important erosive process that affects the lunar surface and exosphere. It plays an important role in changing the chemical composition and thickness of the surface layer, and in introducing material into the exosphere. Kinetic sputtering is well modeled and understood, but understanding of mechanisms of potential sputtering has lagged behind. In this study we differentiate the contributions of potential sputtering from the standard (kinetic) sputtering in changing the chemical composition and erosion rate of the lunar surface. Also we study the contribution of potential sputtering in developing the lunar exosphere. Our results show that potential sputtering enhances the total characteristic sputtering erosion rate by about 44%, and reduces sputtering time scales by the same amount. Potential sputtering also introduces more material into the lunar exosphere.

  13. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  14. Testing compost as an anti wind erosion agent in a wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential of compost as an anti wind erosion agent was studied in a wind tunnel on a sandy soil susceptible to wind erosion. Soil treated with a compost-water mixture, which forms a crust on the soil surface after drying, was exposed to a series of increasing wind speeds. Two composts were

  15. Soil cover and wind erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryrear, D.W.

    Wind erosion on agricultural lands can be reduced if the soil surface is protected with crop residues. In evaluating the influence of residues on wind erosion, previous research has expressed residues of various crops as an equivalent of flat, small grain. This becomes difficult as the density of the residue changes with weathering, or as crops other than the major cultivated crops are grown. Soil losses due to wind erosion were determined by covering various percentages of the soil surface with simulated flat residues (wood dowels 3.1 to 25.4 mm in diameter). Covering 20% of the soil surface reduced soil losses 57%, and a 50% cover reduced soil losses 95%. The expression SLR = 1.81 e/sup x/ where x = /sup -0.072% SC/ describes the relationship between soil loss ratio (SLR) and percent soil cover (% SC) with a correlation coefficient of -0.94 (soil cover limits 8 to 80%). The cover can be any nonerodible material such as large clods, gravel, cotton gin trash, or any diameter stick between 3.1 and 25.4 mm. Percent soil cover is easily measured in the field or can be estimated with a minimum of training and experience.

  16. Wind erosion modelling in a Sahelian environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faye-Visser, S.M.; Sterk, G.; Karssenberg, D.

    2005-01-01

    In the Sahel field observations of wind-blown mass transport often show considerable spatial variation related to the spatial variation of the wind erosion controlling parameters, e.g. soil crust and vegetation cover. A model, used to predict spatial variation in wind erosion and deposition is a

  17. Scaling up from field to region for wind erosion prediction using a field-scale wind erosion model and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobeck, T.M.; Parker, N.C.; Haskell, S.; Guoding, K.

    2000-01-01

    Factors that affect wind erosion such as surface vegetative and other cover, soil properties and surface roughness usually change spatially and temporally at the field-scale to produce important field-scale variations in wind erosion. Accurate estimation of wind erosion when scaling up from fields to regions, while maintaining meaningful field-scale process details, remains a challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using a field-scale wind erosion model with a geographic information system (GIS) to scale up to regional levels and to quantify the differences in wind erosion estimates produced by different scales of soil mapping used as a data layer in the model. A GIS was used in combination with the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ), a field-scale wind erosion model, to estimate wind erosion for two 50 km2 areas. Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery from 1993 with 30 m resolution was used as a base map. The GIS database layers included land use, soils, and other features such as roads. The major land use was agricultural fields. Data on 1993 crop management for selected fields of each crop type were collected from local government agency offices and used to 'train' the computer to classify land areas by crop and type of irrigation (agroecosystem) using commercially available software. The land area of the agricultural land uses was overestimated by 6.5% in one region (Lubbock County, TX, USA) and underestimated by about 21% in an adjacent region (Terry County, TX, USA). The total estimated wind erosion potential for Terry County was about four times that estimated for adjacent Lubbock County. The difference in potential erosion among the counties was attributed to regional differences in surface soil texture. In a comparison of different soil map scales in Terry County, the generalised soil map had over 20% more of the land area and over 15% greater erosion potential in loamy sand soils than did the detailed soil map. As

  18. Beryllium-7 measurements of wind erosion on sloping fields in the wind-water erosion crisscross region on the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaqiong; Yang, Mingyi; Deng, Xinxin; Liu, Zhang; Zhang, Fengbao; Zhou, Weiying

    2018-02-15

    Soil erosion is complex in the wind-water erosion crisscross region of the Chinese Loess Plateau, as interleaving of wind and water erosion occurs on both temporal and spatial scales. It is difficult to distinguish wind erosion from the total erosion in previous studies due to the untraceable of aeolian particles and the limitation of feasible methods and techniques. This study used beryllium-7 measurements to study wind erosion in the wind-water erosion crisscross region on the Chinese Loess Plateau arms to delineate wind erosion distribution, to analyze its implication to erosive winds and surface microrelief, and to determine correlations between erosion rates and slope gradients. Results obtained using beryllium-7 measurements based on observation plots were verified with saltating particle collection method, and were also verified on a field scale. Results indicated that the effective resultant erosion wind was from northward, which was proved by the eight-directional distributed saltating particles. The microrelief of the ground surface contributed to the formation of high or low erosion centers. Wind erosion rates increased with a linear (R 2 ≥0.95) or exponential (R 2 ≥0.83) fitting increase in the slope gradients as reported in previous studies. Compared to wind erosion on field scale, both the plots and fields exhibited similar distribution patterns in wind erosion isolines. We also determined that the wind erosion rate for two fields estimated, based on equations developed from plot scale was acceptable. This study validates the feasibility of beryllium-7 measurements for soil-wind erosion field experiments and the potential to expand this approach to real field conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The prevention of wind erosion in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaslavsky, D.

    1977-01-01

    The wind erosion is a problem over more than 80 000 hectares in the Netherlands. The damage in wind erodible areas is on the average at least 150 Dfl. per hectare per year. A lot of damages very probably pass unobserved or unreported.

  20. Early-season wind erosion influenced by soil-incorporated green manure in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management strategies are sought to minimize wind erosion of irrigated agricultural soils along the Columbia River of the Inland Pacific Northwest, particularly during the early season (March-April) when high winds coincide with sowing of vegetable crops. Early-season wind erosion potential from soi...

  1. Determination of wind erosion intensity on heavy clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kozlovsky Dufková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion, common problem of light-textured soils, was determined on heavy clay soils in the foothills of Bílé Karpaty Mountains, Czech Republic. Soil erodibility by wind was determined from the Map of potential erodibility of soil by wind and from the calculation of potential and real soil loss by wind. All the determinations show underestimation of soil erodibility by wind on heavy clay soils, because methods that are used for this are based above all on the assessment of clay particles content and the presumption the more clay particles soil contains, the less vulnerable to wind erosion is. The potential erodibility of soil by wind is 0,09 t . ha−1 per year. The determined value does not exceed the tolerable soil loss limit 10 t . ha−1 per year for deep soils. The real average erodibility of soil by wind has the highest value 1,47 g . m−2 on November 30th, 2008. Other soil losses that do not exceed the tolerable soil loss limit 1,4 g . m−2, were determined on March 18th and 28th, 2008. Big difficulties come with the assessment of the erodibility of heavy clay soils in the areas, where soil erosion ve­ri­fia­bly exists, but it is not assessable by objective calculating methods. Evident necessity of new know­ledge concerning the determination of wind erosion intensity follows from the results.

  2. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering Enhancements of Lunar Regolith Erosion: The Contribution of the Heavy Multicharged (Minority) Solar Wind Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    We report preliminary results for H+, Ar+1, Ar+6 and Ar+9 ion sputtering of JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, obtain ed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility using quadrupole ma ss spectrometry. The multi-charged Ar ions were used as proxies for i ntermediate mass solar wind multicharged ions. Prior to the Ar beam e xposures, the sample was exposed to high fluence H+ irradiation to si mulate H-loading due to the dominant solar wind constituent. A x80 en hancement of oxygen sputtering by Ar+ over same velocity H+ was measu red and an additional x2 increase for Ar+9 over same velocity Ar+ was demonstrated, giving clear evidence of the importance of potential s puttering by multicharged ions. This enhancement was observed to pers ist to the maximum fluences investigated (approx 10(exp 16)/sq cm). As discussed in a companion abstract by N. Barghouty, such persistent s puttering enhancement has significant implications on weathering and aging of lunar regolith. In addition, XPS measurements showed strong evidence of Fe reduction for those target areas that had been exposed to high fluence Ar+ and Ar+8 beams. Preferential oxidation of the Fe -reduced beam-exposed regions during transfer to the XPS system led t o enhanced O concentrations in those regions as well. On the basis of these very promising preliminary results, a NASA-LASER project on mo re extensive measurements was recently selected for funding. The prop osal expands the collaboration with NASA-MSFC for the simulation effort, and adds a new collaboration with NASA-GSFC for lunar mission-rele vant measurements.

  3. On the geoethical implications of wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Károly, Tatárvári

    2016-04-01

    Human activities exerts an ever growing impact on our environment, and this is undeniably the responsibility of mankind. In spite of this fact there is almost no process in our environment that can be described exactly with complete exactness, and the working of which is known in full extent. Wind erosion is such a process. Although water erosion is mentioned ever more often in scientific circles as a from of erosion, its effect is restrained to a certain region, although it may cause perceptibly damage of a greater extent in short time. Wind erosion, apart from the fact that it may have global impact, may play an important role in the warming of our climate according to recent studies. First of all, wind erosion may cause damage far from its origin in human health, nutrition, or in the environment in general. Today several surveys have proved, that erosion caused by wind significantly contributes to the air pollution of cities, the fine dust carried as drift by the wind may cause severe environmental damage in accumulation zones. Microbes, toxic material may attach themselves to the dust carried this way and carried on and by the wings of the wind they may cause health issues in humans animals and plants as well. In spite of these facts there are almost no measures against wind erosion employed in arable land, although our ever doughtier climate and changes would make these necessary. Reduction of organic matter content presents a great problem in a large part of cultivated land, so the risk of the production of high quality food raises questions of more and more ethical nature. Who is responsible? The fact, that the chemicals used in a growing extent by agriculture may reach many people causing considerable damage to the environment also raises serious ethical questions. More and more periods with extreme weather conditions are experienced in Hungary and Europe as the effect of climate change. Drought periods are longer and more frequent as the intensity of

  4. Modelling of environmental and climatic problems: Wind and water erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslan, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Magnitude of wind and water erosion mainly depend on wind velocity, rainfall rate, slope and soil characteristics. The main purpose of this lecture is to define the role of small, meso and large scale phenomena (local and synoptic fluctuations) on water and wind erosion. These lecture notes present some results on wind speed simulation and seasonal fluctuations of water deficit for the selected station in different erosion risque and transition regions of Turkey. (author)

  5. Wind and water erosion control on semiarid lands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddoway, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Commercial crop production on semiarid lands is difficult because insufficient water is often present to manage the system effectively. Erosion control presents the major management problem. The factors contributing to wind erosion and their interaction have been quantified into a wind erosion equation. The control of wind erosion through agronomic alteration of the various factors is discussed. The quantification and control of water erosion is also discussed with respect to the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Radioisotopes tracers have been used in conjunction with these erosion equations to measure soil losses. (author)

  6. Soil deflation analyses from wind erosion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Lackóová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are various methods to assess soil erodibility for wind erosion. This paper focuses on aggregate analysis by a laser particle sizer ANALYSETTE 22 (FRITSCH GmbH, made to determine the size distribution of soil particles detached by wind (deflated particles. Ten soil samples, trapped along the same length of the erosion surface (150–155 m but at different wind speeds, were analysed. The soil was sampled from a flat, smooth area without vegetation cover or soil crust, not affected by the impact of windbreaks or other barriers, from a depth of maximum 2.5 cm. Prior to analysis the samples were prepared according to the relevant specifications. An experiment was also conducted using a device that enables characterisation of the vertical movement of the deflated material. The trapped samples showed no differences in particle size and the proportions of size fractions at different hourly average wind speeds. It was observed that most of particles travelling in saltation mode (size 50–500 μm – 58–70% – moved vertically up to 26 cm above the soil surface. At greater heights, particles moving in suspension mode (floating in the air; size < 100 μm accounted for up to 90% of the samples. This result suggests that the boundary between the two modes of the vertical movement of deflated soil particles lies at about 25 cm above the soil surface.

  7. Soil tillage and windbreak effects on millet and cowpea: I. Wind speed, evaporation, and wind erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzhaf, J.; Leihner, D.E.; Buerkert, A. (Univ. of Hohenheim, Stuttgart (Germany)); Serafini, P.G. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville (United States))

    Deforestation, overgrazing, and declining soil regeneration periods have resulted in increased wind erosion problems in dry areas of the West African Sahel, but little is known about the bio-physical factors involved. This research was conducted to determine the effects of ridging and four different windbreak spacings on wind erosion, potential evaporation, and soil water reserves. A field trial was conducted from 1985 to 1987 on 12 ha of a Psammentic Paleustalf in Southern Niger. Millet, Pennisetum glaucum (L.), and cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp., were seeded in strips on flat and ridged soil. Windbreaks of savannah vegetation were spaced at 6, 20, 40, and 90 m. The effects of ridging on wind speed, evaporation, and wind erosion were small and mostly non-significant. However, average wind speed at 0.3 m above ground in the center of cowpea and millet strips was significantly reduced from 2.8 to 2.1 m s[sup [minus]1] as windbreak distances narrowed from 90 to 6 m. As a consequence, potential evaporation declined by 15% and the amount of windblown soil particles by 50% in ridged and by 70% in flat treatments. Despite reduced potential evaporation, average subsoil water reserves were 14 mm smaller in the 6- than in the 20-m windbreak spacing indicating excessive water extraction by the windbreak vegetation. Thus, establishing windbreaks with natural savannah vegetation may require a careful consideration of the agronomic benefits and costs to competing crops. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Soil tillage and windbreak effects on millet and cowpea: I. Wind speed, evaporation, and wind erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzhaf, J.; Leihner, D.E.; Buerkert, A.; Serafini, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    Deforestation, overgrazing, and declining soil regeneration periods have resulted in increased wind erosion problems in dry areas of the West African Sahel, but little is known about the bio-physical factors involved. This research was conducted to determine the effects of ridging and four different windbreak spacings on wind erosion, potential evaporation, and soil water reserves. A field trial was conducted from 1985 to 1987 on 12 ha of a Psammentic Paleustalf in Southern Niger. Millet, Pennisetum glaucum (L.), and cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp., were seeded in strips on flat and ridged soil. Windbreaks of savannah vegetation were spaced at 6, 20, 40, and 90 m. The effects of ridging on wind speed, evaporation, and wind erosion were small and mostly non-significant. However, average wind speed at 0.3 m above ground in the center of cowpea and millet strips was significantly reduced from 2.8 to 2.1 m s -1 as windbreak distances narrowed from 90 to 6 m. As a consequence, potential evaporation declined by 15% and the amount of windblown soil particles by 50% in ridged and by 70% in flat treatments. Despite reduced potential evaporation, average subsoil water reserves were 14 mm smaller in the 6- than in the 20-m windbreak spacing indicating excessive water extraction by the windbreak vegetation. Thus, establishing windbreaks with natural savannah vegetation may require a careful consideration of the agronomic benefits and costs to competing crops. 21 refs., 5 figs

  9. Development of an Integrated Water and Wind Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, D. C.; Ascough, J. C.; Wagner, L. E.; Geter, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Prediction technologies for soil erosion by the forces of wind or water have largely been developed independently from one another, especially within the United States. Much of this has been due to the initial creation of equations and models which were empirical in nature (i.e., Universal Soil Loss Equation, Wind Erosion Equation) and based upon separate water erosion or wind erosion plot and field measurements. Additionally, institutional organizations in place typically divided research efforts and funding to unique wind or water erosion research and modeling projects. However, during the past 20 years computer technologies and erosion modeling have progressed to the point where it is now possible to merge physical process-based computer simulation models into an integrated water and wind erosion prediction system. In a physically- based model, many of the processes which must be simulated for wind and water erosion computations are the same, e.g., climate, water balance, runoff, plant growth, etc. Model components which specifically deal with the wind or water detachment, transport and deposition processes are those that must differ, as well as any necessary parameterization of input variables (e.g., adjusted soil erodibilities, critical shear stresses, etc.) for those components. This presentation describes current efforts towards development of a combined wind and water erosion model, based in part upon technologies present in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) and the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) models. Initial efforts during the past two years have resulted in modular modeling components that allow for prediction of infiltration, surface runoff, and water erosion at a hillslope scale within an Object Modeling System. Additional components currently in development include wind detachment at a single field point, continuous water balance, and unified plant growth. Challenges in this project are many, and include adequate field

  10. Comparative rates of wind versus water erosion from a small semiarid watershed in southern Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both wind erosion and water erosion can be serious land degradation processes in semi-arid dry-lands. However, the relative erosion rates of wind and water erosion have rarely been studied simultaneously and are poorly quantified. In this study, wind erosion and water erosion rates were simultaneous...

  11. Wind erosion control of soils using polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Movahedan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion of soils is one of the most important problems in environment and agriculture which could affects several fields. Agricultural lands, water reservoires, irrigation canals, drains and etc. may be affected by wind erosion and suspended particles. As a result wind erosion control needs attention in arid and semi-arid regions. In recent years, some polymeric materials have been used for improvement of structural stability, increasing aggregate stability and soil stabilization, though kind of polymer, quantity of polymer, field efficiency and durability and environmental impacts are some important parameters which should be taken into consideration. In this study, a Polyvinil Acetate-based polymer was used to treat different soils. Then polymer-added soil samples were investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel to verify the effecte of polymer on wind erosion control of the soils and the results were compared with water treated soil samples. The results of wind tunnel experiments with a maximum 26 m/s wind velocity showed that there was a significat difference between the erosion of polymer treated and water treated soil samples. Application of 25g/m2 polymer to Aeolian sands reduced the erosion of Aeolian sands samples to zero related to water treated samples. For silty and calyey soils treated by polymer, the wind erosion reduced minimum 90% in relation to water treated samples.

  12. Ice-Release and Erosion Resistant Materials for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Brinn, Cameron; Cook, Alex; Pascual-Marquez, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Icing conditions may cause wind turbine generators to partially lose productivity or to be completely shut down to avoid structural damage. At present, commercially available technologies to mitigate this problem consist of expensive, energy hungry heating elements, which costs roughly 70,000 euro per medium size turbine. Conventional passive ice protection coating systems heavily rely on delicate surface structures and expensive materials to create water repellent superhydrophobic / low surface energy surfaces, which have been proven to be ineffective against ice accumulation. The lack of performance among conventional ice protection materials stems from a flaw in the approach to the problem: failure to recognize that water in its liquid form (WATER) and water in its solid form (ICE) are two different things. Something that works for WATER does not automatically work for ICE. Another reason is that many superhydrophobic materials are often reliant upon often fragile micro-structured surfaces to achieve their intended effects. This paper discusses a fundamentally different approach to the creation of a robust, low cost, durable, and multifunctional materials for ice release and erosion resistance. This National Science Foundation sponsored ice-release coating technology holds promise for protecting wind turbine blades and towers, thus potentially increasing reliability for power generation under icing conditions. Because of the vulnerability of wind turbine blades to ice buildup and erosion damages, wind farm facilities stand to reap considerable benefits.

  13. Integrated spatial assessment of wind erosion risk in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Négyesi, Gábor; Laborczi, Annamária; Kovács, Tamás; László, Elemér; Bihari, Zita

    2016-11-01

    Wind erosion susceptibility of Hungarian soils was mapped on the national level integrating three factors of the complex phenomenon of deflation (physical soil features, wind characteristics, and land use and land cover). Results of wind tunnel experiments on erodibility of representative soil samples were used for the parametrization of a countrywide map of soil texture compiled for the upper 5 cm layer of soil, which resulted in a map representing threshold wind velocity exceedance. Average wind velocity was spatially estimated with 0.5' resolution using the Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenised Data Basis (MISH) method elaborated for the spatial interpolation of surface meteorological elements. The probability of threshold wind velocity exceedance was determined based on values predicted by the soil texture map at the grid locations. Ratio values were further interpolated to a finer 1 ha resolution using sand and silt content of the uppermost (0-5 cm) layer of soil as spatial co-variables. Land cover was also taken into account, excluding areas that are not relevant to wind erosion (forests, water bodies, settlements, etc.), to spatially assess the risk of wind erosion. According to the resulting map of wind erosion susceptibility, about 10 % of the total area of Hungary can be identified as susceptible to wind erosion. The map gives more detailed insight into the spatial distribution of wind-affected areas in Hungary compared to previous studies.

  14. Integrated spatial assessment of wind erosion risk in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pásztor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion susceptibility of Hungarian soils was mapped on the national level integrating three factors of the complex phenomenon of deflation (physical soil features, wind characteristics, and land use and land cover. Results of wind tunnel experiments on erodibility of representative soil samples were used for the parametrization of a countrywide map of soil texture compiled for the upper 5 cm layer of soil, which resulted in a map representing threshold wind velocity exceedance. Average wind velocity was spatially estimated with 0.5′ resolution using the Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenised Data Basis (MISH method elaborated for the spatial interpolation of surface meteorological elements. The probability of threshold wind velocity exceedance was determined based on values predicted by the soil texture map at the grid locations. Ratio values were further interpolated to a finer 1 ha resolution using sand and silt content of the uppermost (0–5 cm layer of soil as spatial co-variables. Land cover was also taken into account, excluding areas that are not relevant to wind erosion (forests, water bodies, settlements, etc., to spatially assess the risk of wind erosion. According to the resulting map of wind erosion susceptibility, about 10 % of the total area of Hungary can be identified as susceptible to wind erosion. The map gives more detailed insight into the spatial distribution of wind-affected areas in Hungary compared to previous studies.

  15. Wind Erosion in SA – An Economic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, Adam; Bright, Melissa; Forward, Giles

    2005-01-01

    Wind erosion has long been seen as a significant environmental issue within South Australia. But is it really an economic issue? This study suggests that even though it is acknowledged that wind erosion has an environmental cost, it is not economic to simply try and fix all wind erosion prone areas in South Australia. Land managers and therefore government policy needs to be selective about the areas they treat, and the strategies used, in order for there to be an economic benefit of ameliora...

  16. Ecological site-based assessments of wind and water erosion: informing accelerated soil erosion management in rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Duniway, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated soil erosion occurs when anthropogenic processes modify soil, vegetation or climatic conditions causing erosion rates at a location to exceed their natural variability. Identifying where and when accelerated erosion occurs is a critical first step toward its effective management. Here we explore how erosion assessments structured in the context of ecological sites (a land classification based on soils, landscape setting and ecological potential) and their vegetation states (plant assemblages that may change due to management) can inform systems for reducing accelerated soil erosion in rangelands. We evaluated aeolian horizontal sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA, using monitoring data and rangeland-specific wind and water erosion models. Across the ecological sites, plots in shrub-encroached and shrub-dominated vegetation states were consistently susceptible to aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion. Both processes were found to be highly variable for grassland and grass-succulent states across the ecological sites at the plot scale (0.25 Ha). We identify vegetation thresholds that define cover levels below which rapid (exponential) increases in aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion occur across the ecological sites and vegetation states. Aeolian sediment flux and fluvial erosion in the study area can be effectively controlled when bare ground cover is 100 cm in length is less than ~35%. Land use and management activities that alter cover levels such that they cross thresholds, and/or drive vegetation state changes, may increase the susceptibility of areas to erosion. Land use impacts that are constrained within the range of natural variability should not result in accelerated soil erosion. Evaluating land condition against the erosion thresholds identified here will enable identification of areas susceptible to accelerated soil erosion and the development of

  17. Ecological site‐based assessments of wind and water erosion: informing accelerated soil erosion management in rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P; Herrick, Jeffrey E; Duniway, Michael C

    Accelerated soil erosion occurs when anthropogenic processes modify soil, vegetation, or climatic conditions causing erosion rates at a location to exceed their natural variability. Identifying where and when accelerated erosion occurs is a critical first step toward its effective management. Here we explored how erosion assessments structured in the context of ecological sites (a land classification based on soils, landscape setting, and ecological potential) and their vegetation states (plant assemblages that may change due to management) can inform systems for reducing accelerated soil erosion in rangelands. We evaluated aeolian horizontal sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA, using monitoring data and rangeland-specific wind and water erosion models. Across the ecological sites, plots in shrub-encroached and shrub-dominated vegetation states were consistently susceptible to aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion. Both processes were found to be highly variable for grassland and grass–succulent states across the ecological sites at the plot scale (0.25 ha). We identified vegetation thresholds that define cover levels below which rapid (exponential) increases in aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion occur across the ecological sites and vegetation states. Aeolian sediment flux and fluvial erosion in the study area could be effectively controlled when bare ground cover was 100 cm in length was less than ∼35%. Land use and management activities that alter cover levels such that they cross thresholds, and/or drive vegetation state changes, may increase the susceptibility of areas to erosion. Land use impacts that are constrained within the range of natural variability should not result in accelerated soil erosion. Evaluating land condition against the erosion thresholds identified here will enable identification of areas susceptible to accelerated soil erosion and the

  18. A Multidirectional Wind Erosion Model for Western Saxony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Simon; Meusburger, Katrin; de Figueiredo, Tomás; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion can trigger a non-visible loss of fine soil up to 40 t ha-1 per single event and is as such a major soil threat and environmental concern in areas susceptible to wind erosion. Western Saxony was assessed to be among the most susceptible landscapes not only within Germany but even within Europe (Borelli et al., 2015; Borelli et al., 2014). Moreover, wind erosion events in eastern Germany cause very severe off-site effects with impacts on road traffic. So far the wind erosion model that is normally applied in Germany is based on the norm DIN standard 19706. The DIN standard 19706 was revised by new controlling factors and fuzzy logic to consider the multi-directionality of wind and make it more realistic to wind erosion processes. The new factors are based on different datasets like (i) wind and temperature data (1hr resolution) for 9 gauging stations and interpolated long-term wind speed (1981-2000, 200m resolution) provided by the German Weather Service, (ii) soil erodibility extracted from the digital soil map 1:50,000, (iii) landscape components from different data sources (ATKIS, OpenStreetMap and others), and (iv) a DEM (20m resolution) for local orographic modeling. For a risky sub-region, local wind speeds and directions were modelled based on the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Programs (WAsP) orography-model to assess road bodies for priority actions. Major improvements of the proposed model are the consideration of changing wind directions and the implementation of factors on soil cover and field length. An estimation of the long-term spatiotemporal variability under changing climate is possible with the model conception. The revised model assesses 3.6% of western Saxonies agricultural fields under very high risk to wind erosion. Larger fields (greater than 116 ha) are connected to a higher frequency (51.7%) of very high risk. Only a small proportion (5.2%) of the high risk class was found in small fields (smaller than 21 ha). Fields under

  19. 7 CFR 610.13 - Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion... Erosion Prediction Equations § 610.13 Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion. (a) The equation for predicting soil loss due to wind in the Wind Erosion Equation (WEQ) is E = f(IKCLV). (For...

  20. Emission factors for wind erosion of exposed aggregates at surface coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowherd, C.

    1982-06-01

    The information presented in this paper is directed to those interested in inventorying dust emissions generated by wind erosion of exposed aggregates at surface coal mines. A testing program is described which entailed the use of a portable wind tunnel and an isokinetic sampling system to measure windblown dust emissions from coal and overburden materials at three western mine sites. Test measurements consisted of particle mass emission rates and size distributions for various control wind speeds and times after the initiation of wind erosion. The results indicate that natural surface crusts are very effective in mitigating suspended dust emissions and that a given surface has a finite potential for wind erosion subsequent to mechanical disturbance. Test data are used to develop a predictive emission factor equation which relates emission rate (per unit surface area) to the frequency of disturbance and the erosion potential corresponding to the fastest mile of wind for the period between disturbances. This equation can be used directly for flat surfaces or it can be coupled with an analysis of wind flow patterns around elevated storage piles to develop dust emission estimates for overall pile erosion.

  1. Building Chinese wind data for Wind Erosion Prediction System using surrogate US data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion is a global problem, especially in arid and semiarid regions of the world, which leads to land degradation and atmosphere pollution. The process-based Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), developed by the USDA, is capable of simulating the windblown soil loss with changing weather and...

  2. Mechanics of Interrill Erosion with Wind-Driven Rain (WDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article provides an evaluation analysis for the performance of the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for Wind-Driven Rain (WDR) events. The interrill delivery rates (Di) were collected in the wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility of the International Cen...

  3. Mechanics of interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vector physics of wind-driven rain (WDR) differs from that of wind-free rain, and the interrill soil detachment equations in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model were not originally developed to deal with this phenomenon. This article provides an evaluation of the performance of the...

  4. Effects of tailing dam profiles on relative wind erosion rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, P.S.; Scott, W.D.; Summers, K.J.

    Erosion from mine treatment and associated residue areas can pose a significant environmental problem for surrounding locations from dust and other transported materials. The shape of such residue areas can influence windfield behavior by causing significant wind speed increases. Residue areas are often unprotected so that increasing the speed of wind passing over these areas will cause extra erosion. Values of wind speed-up predicted by an empirical model for wind flow over hills of low slope were compared with measured values over approach slopes to a tailings dam. Hunt's model used in this study relates wind speed from a point on the hill to that observed if there was no hill. Measured values are in agreement with those predicted by the model. Shear stress values calculated from the wind flow model are then used to determine the friction velocity which, in turn, predict the relative rates of erosion. This prediction is based on the cubic relation between the friction velocity and erosion rate observed by Bagnold. These calculations are repeated for the various possible hill shapes allowed by the plant layout and the need to integrate long term spoil heaps with existing topography. A strategy for minimizing erosion of mine tailings through shape selection can then form part of the environmental considerations associated with tailings dams.

  5. The erosive potential of candy sprays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. Material and methods The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy

  6. Effect of changes in some climatic factors on wind erosion risks – the case study of South Moravia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podhrázská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of wind erosion is determined by climatic factors (wind direction and wind speed, precipitation, temperature, humidity, presence of negative temperatures, soil and geological factors (geological composition of the area, the size and shape of soil particles, soil moisture, soil structure, mechanical stability of soil, vegetation factors (vegetation cover, crop residues, geomorphological factors (shape and distribution of the slopes, the incidence planes and leeward sites and anthropogenic factors (length and orientation of land, farming, irrigation. Potential exposure of the wind erosion can be expressed through indexes of soil susceptibility to wind erosion in conjunction with the effects of climatic factors. In connection with the fluctuating values of climatic factors induced by climate changes, differences can be expected to occur also in the size of areas threatened by wind erosion. One of the areas, most endangered by wind erosion in the Czech Republic, is South Moravia. In this region there was performed the regionalization of localities, endangered by wind erosion. This paper presents results of analysis the erosion risks according to climatic and soil characteristics statistically processed for the period from 1901–1950. These are then compared with areas endangered by wind erosion that were established based on the updated set of climatic data and its statistical processing from the period of years 1961–2000. The results are processed into map outputs by using GIS.

  7. Influence of climate conditions on the intensity and spreading of wind erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dufková

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of climate conditions on the intensity and spreading of wind erosion was considered in the area of South Moravia. For this purpose, 16 meteorological stations were selected on the basis of accessibility of required data, their adequate representativeness, homogeneity, and position of the stations. It was necessary to make the database of climatological factors (such as wind velocity, precipitation and air temperature of the period of 1961–2003 for the analyses of climatological data. The climatological data was then evaluated for the periods of 1961–2003, 1961–1990, 1991–2000, and 1971–2000. Clima- tic erosion factor, which explains potential erodibility of soil by wind, was determined through the analyses of factors influencing the wind erosion. The assessment of influence of expected climate change on the intensity and spreading of wind erosion consists in the selection of suitable climatological model and climate change scenarios on the basis of ability to model the three climatological factors (wind velocity, precipitation and air temperature. Climate change scenarios were then applied on the data of the selected climatological stations and the assessment of changes in data sets and the comparative analysis of the outputs of the scenarios with measured data from the normal period of 1961–1990 were done. The climatic erosion factor was also determined from the altered data of the scenarios.

  8. The Methods of Locating Areas Exposed to Wind Erosion in the South Moravia Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podhrázská

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the development of wind erosion are determined by the soil and climatic conditions as well as by the presence or absence of wind barriers. It is because of its climatic and soil conditions that the territory of the South Moravia Region has been affected by erosion for centuries. Combined with the atmospheric conditions, the dry and warm climate enables the development of aeolian processes both in light, drying soils and – under certain climatic conditions – in heavy, clay-loam soils. Soil erosion exposure maps have been prepared in order to identify the territories which are potentially exposed to wind erosion in terms of the soil and climatic conditions. Six exposure categories have been applied to the soils. However, the impact of permanent vegetation barriers – line elements – must be considered in order to identify the most exposed areas. Protective forest belts were planted in the 1950s to counter the effects of wind erosion and they are included in the database of the Institute for Economic Forest Management. The network of these wind barriers and the heath condition of the individual elements are often unsatisfactory because of poor maintenance. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the spatial function of the network of protective forest belts using the map of the potential exposure of soil in the Region of South Moravia. The method used to evaluate the spatial function of the windbreaks presented in the study using GIS instruments.

  9. Using albedo to reform wind erosion modelling, mapping and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P.

    2016-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emission models are used to assess the impacts of dust on radiative forcing in the atmosphere, cloud formation, nutrient fertilisation and human health. The models are underpinned by a two-dimensional geometric property (lateral cover; L) used to characterise the three-dimensional aerodynamic roughness (sheltered area or wakes) of the Earth's surface and calibrate the momentum it extracts from the wind. We reveal a fundamental weakness in L and demonstrate that values are an order of magnitude too small and significant aerodynamic interactions between roughness elements and their sheltered areas have been omitted, particularly under sparse surface roughness. We describe a solution which develops published work to establish a relation between sheltered area and the proportion of shadow over a given area; the inverse of direct beam directional hemispherical reflectance (black sky albedo; BSA). We show direct relations between shadow and wind tunnel measurements and thereby provide direct calibrations of key aerodynamic properties. Estimation of the aerodynamic parameters from albedo enables wind erosion assessments over areas, across platforms from the field to airborne and readily available satellite data. Our new approach demonstrated redundancy in existing wind erosion models and thereby reduced model complexity and improved fidelity. We found that the use of albedo enabled an adequate description of aerodynamic sheltering to characterise fluid dynamics and predict sediment transport without the use of a drag partition scheme (Rt) or threshold friction velocity (u∗t). We applied the calibrations to produce global maps of aerodynamic properties which showed very similar spatial patterns to each other and confirmed the redundancy in the traditional parameters of wind erosion modelling. We evaluated temporal patterns of predicted horizontal mass flux at locations across Australia which revealed variation between land cover types that would not

  10. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 2000) and (maximum monthly)...

  11. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 1990) and (maximum monthly)...

  12. Determination of wind erosion next to shelterbelts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dufková

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of shelterbelts on the erodibility of soil by wind was studied at three chosen shelterbelts of Southern Moravia, Czech Republic – near the shelterbelts in the cadastral areas of Dolní Dunajovice, Micmanice and Suchá Loz. Ambulatory measurements of wind velocity as so as soil sampling for soil humidity analyses, non-erodible and clay particles analyses were done during the year of 2006. Subsequently, real erodibility of soil by wind was determined at these three areas. Results of the measurements and calculations verify positive effect of shelterbelts consisted in wind velocity decreasing (at about 78% in average, soil humidity increasing (at about 102% in average and soil resistance increasing (at about 70% in average at the leeward side of the shelterbelts.

  13. The erosive potential of candy sprays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambon, D L; Brand, H S; Nieuw Amerongen, A V

    2009-05-23

    To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy volunteers after administration of a single dose of candy spray. Candy sprays have an extremely low pH (1.9-2.3) and a neutralisable acidity varying between 0.8-1.6 ml of 0.25M NaOH. In vivo, candy sprays induced a short-term 3.0 to 5.8-fold increase in salivary flow rate with a concomitant drop in salivary pH to values between 4.4 and 5.8. All candy sprays tested have an erosive potential. This information is of use for clinicians counselling juvenile patients with dental erosion.

  14. 75 FR 75961 - Notice of Implementation of the Wind Erosion Prediction System for Soil Erodibility System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Wind Erosion Prediction System for Soil Erodibility System Calculations for the Natural Resources... Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) for soil erodibility system calculations scheduled for implementation for... Erosion Equation (WEQ) where applicable. DATES: Effective Date: This is effective December 7, 2010...

  15. An index guiding temporal planting policies for wind erosion reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.X.; Zheng, D.W.; Stigter, C.J.; He, W.Q.; Tuo, D.B.; Zhao, P.

    2006-01-01

    Vegetation cover has spatial as well as temporal characteristics, but the latter are often neglected. Temporal cover characteristics were explored to recommend planting policies for returning arable land into land better protected from serious wind erosion during late autumn, winter, and

  16. Enhancing wind erosion monitoring and assessment for US rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion is a major resource concern for rangeland managers because it can impact soil health, ecosystem structure and function, hydrologic processes, agricultural production and air quality. Despite its significance, little is known about which landscapes are eroding, by how much, and when. T...

  17. Crater Mound Formation by Wind Erosion on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, L. J.; Kite, E. S.; Michaels, T. I.

    2018-01-01

    Most of Mars' ancient sedimentary rocks by volume are in wind-eroded sedimentary mounds within impact craters and canyons, but the connections between mound form and wind erosion are unclear. We perform mesoscale simulations of different crater and mound morphologies to understand the formation of sedimentary mounds. As crater depth increases, slope winds produce increased erosion near the base of the crater wall, forming mounds. Peak erosion rates occur when the crater depth is ˜2 km. Mound evolution depends on the size of the host crater. In smaller craters mounds preferentially erode at the top, becoming more squat, while in larger craters mounds become steeper sided. This agrees with observations where smaller craters tend to have proportionally shorter mounds and larger craters have mounds encircled by moats. If a large-scale sedimentary layer blankets a crater, then as the layer recedes across the crater it will erode more toward the edges of the crater, resulting in a crescent-shaped moat. When a 160 km diameter mound-hosting crater is subject to a prevailing wind, the surface wind stress is stronger on the leeward side than on the windward side. This results in the center of the mound appearing to "march upwind" over time and forming a "bat-wing" shape, as is observed for Mount Sharp in Gale crater.

  18. A history of wind erosion prediction models in the United States Department of Agriculture: The Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) was officially inaugurated in 1985 by United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) scientists in response to customer requests, particularly those coming from the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS), for im...

  19. Meteorological conditions during extreme wind erosion events on heavy soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislava Mužíková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion in the Czech Republic conditions poses relatively a lot of danger, especially for the most fertile areas, where agricultural land is more vulnerable due to the large pieces of land and inappropriate crop rotation. This process causes damage to agriculture by loss of topsoil, fertilizers, seeds and crop damage as well as sedimentation in water recipients and on roads. It also has negative impacts on human health (airborne dust. Wind erosion is especially affected by climatic elements (wind, temperature, precipitation and evaporation etc. and soil characteristics (soil type, content of erodible particles, soil moisture. Wind erosion affects mainly light and medium heavy soil. South Moravia is an example of the territories to which this rule does not apply. Although soils in the Carpathian flysch subsoil are mainly heavy, erosion has been causing damage here for many decades. Quite strong dust storms are not rare, especially at the end of winter and in early spring when the soil is not covered by vegetation.Notable cases of dust storms in the area were recorded in local chronicles, and then written in the summary publication by dr. Švehlík. Interest of this publication was focused on the most destructive cases of dust storms in Bílé Karpaty foothills. The aim was to study meteorological conditions during the period before and during the occurrence of dust storms in the area in detail and to find the relationship between weather and the intensity of wind erosion. The data of wind speed and direction, temperature, precipitation and snow were evaluated. In all cases the average daily air temperature and ground air temperature was over the freezing point or closely under it. The temperature generally increased before the dust storm occurrence and it often happened from negative to positive temperature and the soil probably defrosted. Snow cover was very small or there was no snow cover at all. In the course of April wind erosion

  20. VT Act 174 Wind Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The statewide wind potential layer used in the Act 174 effort represents three combined wind resource layers: Potential Residential and Small and...

  1. Dust emission and soil loss due to anthropogenic activities by wind erosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katra, Itzhak; Swet, Nitzan; Tanner, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Wind erosion is major process of soil loss and air pollution by dust emission of clays, nutrients, and microorganisms. Many soils throughout the world are currently or potentially associated with dust emissions, especially in dryland zones. The research focuses on wind erosion in semi-arid soils (Northern Negev, Israel) that are subjected to increased human activities of urban development and agriculture. A boundary-layer wind tunnel has been used to study dust emission and soil loss by simulation and quantification of high-resolution wind processes. Field experiments were conducted in various surface types of dry loess soils. The experimental plots represent soils with long-term and short term influences of land uses such as agriculture (conventional and organic practices), grazing, and natural preserves. The wind tunnel was operated under various wind velocities that are above the threshold velocity of aeolian erosion. Total soil sediment and particulate matter (PM) fluxes were calculated. Topsoil samples from the experimental plots were analysed in the laboratory for physical and chemical characteristics including aggregation, organic matter, and high-resolution particle size distribution. The results showed variations in dust emission in response to surface types and winds to provide quantitative estimates of soil loss over time. Substantial loss of particulate matter that is management strategies as well as for PM loading to the atmosphere and air pollution.

  2. Evaluation of chemical stabilizers and windscreens for wind erosion control of uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1984-08-01

    Potential wind erosion of uranium mill tailings is a concern for the surface disposal of tailings at uranium mills. Wind-blown tailings may subsequently be redeposited on areas outside the impoundment. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating techniques for fugitive dust control at uranium mill tailings piles. Laboratory tests, including wind tunnel studies, were conducted to evaluate the relative effectiveness of 43 chemical stabilizers. Seventeen of the more promising stabilizers were applied to test plots on a uranium tailings pile at the American Nuclear Corporation-Gas Hills Project mill site in central Wyoming. The durabilities of these materials under actual site conditions were evaluated over time. In addition, field testing of commercially available windscreens was conducted. Test panels were constructed of eight different materials at the Wyoming test site to compare their durability. A second test site was established near PNL to evaluate the effectiveness of windscreens at reducing wind velocity, and thereby reduce the potential for wind erosion of mill tailings. Results of the laboratory land field tests of the chemical stabilizers and windscreens are presented, along with costs versus effectiveness of these techniques for control of wind erosion at mill tailings piles. 12 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  3. WIND EROSION INTENSITY DETERMINATION USING SOIL PARTICLE CATCHER DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Lackóová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To analyze wind erosion events in the real terrain conditions, we proposed to construct a prototype of soil particle catcher devices to trap soil particles. With these devices we are able to measure the intensity of wind erosion at six different heights above the soil surface in one location or at three different heights in two places. It is possible to use them for six different places at the same time as well. We performed field measurements to determine the amount of soil particles transported by the wind between 26th – 31st March 2012. Each measuring took 60 minutes. After this time the soil particle catchers were emptied and further measurements carried out. At the beginning we selected two places for measurement (soil HPJ 16 and 37 at two heights, one above the other. Then we used two measuring systems 40 m apart at two sites (D2 and D4 and the soil captured at two heights (0, 1. The maximum weight of soil particles trapped in measuring system D2 at height (0 was 1242.7 g at a wind speed of 9.6 ms-1. At measurement height (1 the maximum weight was 72.7 g trapped at the same average hourly rate, but during different measurement events. The measuring system at D4 trapped the highest amount of soil at a wind speed of 8.9 ms-1 (1141.7 g at height (0 and at a speed of 9.3 ms-1 (22.3 g at height (1. During the measurements with the two basic measuring systems D4 and D2, we measured the wind erosion intensity together with soil particle catchers D1 and D3. D3 was placed between devices D4 and D2, D1 was 20 m ahead D2. Soil particle catchers were placed on the soil surface at height position (0. We measured increasing soil erosion downwind on four locations spaced at 20 m. The results show that with there is an increasing quantity of particles collected as the erosive surface length increases, due to the so-called snowball effect. We analyzed selected trapped soil samples in order to determine the size of the soil particles and their proportion

  4. The potential of wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge Madsen, P.; Lundsager, P.

    1992-09-01

    Papers presented at the European wind energy conference on the potential of wind farms are presented. The aim of the conference was to bring into focus the problems, experiences and potential of the application of wind power in wind power farms as a contribution to the European and global energy supply. It was considered that the interchange of experience among representatives of science, utilities, industry, environment and energy planning, together with those who represent financial and insurance interests, would create a better understanding of all aspects of wind power for its future successful development. The subjects covered concern surveys of national planning and policies regarding wind energy utilization and national and global development of wind turbine arrays. The performance of some individual wind farms is described. Papers also deal with utility and project planning, wind prediction and certification, wind loads and fatigues, wakes, noise and control. (AB)

  5. The potential of wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge Madsen, P.; Lundsager, P.

    1992-09-01

    Papers presented at the European wind energy conference on the potential of wind farms are presented. The aim of the conference was to bring into focus the problems, experiences and potential of the application of wind power in wind power farms as a contribution to the European and global energy supply. It was considered that the interchange of experience among representatives of science, utilities, industry, environment and energy planning, together with those who represent financial and insurance interests, would create a better understanding of all aspects of wind power for its future successful development. The subjects covered concern surveys of national planning and policies regarding wind energy utilization and national and global development of wind turbine arrays. The performance of some individual wind farms is described. Papers also deal with utility and project planning, wind prediction and certification, wind loads and fatigus, wakes, noise and control. (AB)

  6. Wind energy potential in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, S.

    1995-01-01

    Though located in the tropics, India is endowed with substantial wind resources because of its unique geographical location which gets fully exposed to both the south-west and north-east monsoon winds. The westerly winds of the south-west monsoons provide bulk of the wind potential. Areas with mean annual wind speed exceeding 18 k mph and areas with mean annual power density greater than 140 W/m 2 have been identified using the wind data collected by the wind monitoring project funded by the Ministry of Non-conventional Energy Sources (MNES). Seasonal variations in wind speed at selected locations are discussed as also the frequency distribution of hourly wind speed. Annual capacity factors for 250 kW wind electric generators have been calculated for several typical locations. A good linear correlation has been found between mean annual wind speed and mean annual capacity factor. A method is described for assessing wind potential over an extended region where adequate data is available. It is shown that the combined wind energy potential over five selected areas of limited extent in Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu alone amounts to 22,000 MW under the assumption of 20 per cent land availability for installing wind farms. For a higher percentage of land availability, the potential will be correspondingly higher. (author). 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  7. [Impact of wind-water alternate erosion on the characteristics of sediment particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Deng-Feng; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Ma, Xin-Xin; Zheng, Shi-Qing

    2014-02-01

    Wind and water are the two dominant erosion agents that caused soil and water losses in the wind-water alternate erosion region on the Loess Plateau. It is meaningful to study the impact of wind-water alternate erosion on the characteristics of soil particles for understanding the response of soil quality and environment to erosion. Through wind tunnel combined rainfall simulation, this paper studied the characteristics of the erosive sediment particles under the effect of wind-water alternate erosion. The results showed that the particles of 0-1 cm soil were coarsened by wind erosion at the wind speeds of 11 and 14 m x s(-1) compared with no wind erosion. Soil fine particles ( 0.05 mm) increased by 16.8%-20.8%. The physical property of surface soil was changed by the wind erosion, which, in turn, caused an increase in finer particles content in the sediment. Compared with no wind erosion, fine particles (water-wind alternate erosion increased by 2.7%-18.9% , and coarse particles (> 0.05 mm) decreased by 3.7%-9.3%. However, the changing trend of erosive sediment particles after the wind erosion at wind speeds of 11 and 14 m x s(-1) was different along with the rainfall intensity and duration. The erosive sediment particles at the rainfall intensities of 60, 80, 100 mm x h(-1) changed to greater extents than at the 150 mm x h(-1) rainfall intensity with longer than 15 min runoff flowing.

  8. Techniques for simultaneous quantification of wind and water erosion in semi-arid regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.; Sterk, G.; Ribolzi, O.

    2004-01-01

    Wind and water erosion are usually studied as two separate processes. However, in semi-arid zones both processes contribute significantly to soil degradation. Whereas for water erosion the direction of sediment transport is controlled by topography, in wind erosion the direction of transport is

  9. Potentials of wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezrukikh, P.P.; Bezrukikh, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    The ecological advantages of the wind power facilities (WPF) are considered. The possibilities of small WPF, generating the capacity from 40 W up to 10 kW, are discussed. The basic technical data on the national and foreign small WPF are presented. The combined wind power systems are considered. Special attention is paid to the most perspective wind-diesel systems, which provide for all possible versions of the electro-power supply. Useful recommendations and information on the wind power engineering are given for those, who decided to build up a wind facility [ru

  10. Soil erosion rates caused by wind and saltating sand stresses in a wind tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1993-02-01

    Wind erosion tests were performed in a wind tunnel in support of the development of long-term protective barriers to cap stabilized waste sites at the Hanford Site. Controlled wind and saltating sand erosive stresses were applied to physical models of barrier surface layers to simulate worst-case eolian erosive stresses. The goal of these tests was to provide information useful to the design and evaluation of the surface layer composition of an arid-region waste site barrier concept that incorporates a deep fine-soil reservoir. A surface layer composition is needed that will form an armor resistant to eolian erosion during periods of extreme dry climatic conditions, especially when such conditions result in the elimination or reduction of vegetation by water deprivation or wildfire. Because of the life span required of Hanford waste barriers, it is important that additional work follow these wind tunnel studies. A modeling effort is planned to aid the interpretation of test results with respect to the suitability of pea gravel to protect the finite-soil reservoir during long periods of climatic stress. It is additionally recommended that wind tunnel tests be continued and field data be obtained at prototype or actual barrier sites. Results wig contribute to barrier design efforts and provide confidence in the design of long-term waste site caps for and regions

  11. Soil erosion rates caused by wind and saltating sand stresses in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1993-02-01

    Wind erosion tests were performed in a wind tunnel in support of the development of long-term protective barriers to cap stabilized waste sites at the Hanford Site. Controlled wind and saltating sand erosive stresses were applied to physical models of barrier surface layers to simulate worst-case eolian erosive stresses. The goal of these tests was to provide information useful to the design and evaluation of the surface layer composition of an arid-region waste site barrier concept that incorporates a deep fine-soil reservoir. A surface layer composition is needed that will form an armor resistant to eolian erosion during periods of extreme dry climatic conditions, especially when such conditions result in the elimination or reduction of vegetation by water deprivation or wildfire. Because of the life span required of Hanford waste barriers, it is important that additional work follow these wind tunnel studies. A modeling effort is planned to aid the interpretation of test results with respect to the suitability of pea gravel to protect the finite-soil reservoir during long periods of climatic stress. It is additionally recommended that wind tunnel tests be continued and field data be obtained at prototype or actual barrier sites. Results wig contribute to barrier design efforts and provide confidence in the design of long-term waste site caps for and regions.

  12. Wind erosion in the Sahelian zone of Niger : processes, models, and control techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.

    1997-01-01

    In the Sahelian zone of Niger, severe wind erosion occurs mainly in the first half of the rainy season (May - July), when violent winds preceding thunderstorms result in intense sediment transport. Quantification of this wind erosion is difficult due to a high degree of temporal and spatial

  13. Estimation of wind erosion from construction of a railway in arid northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-art wind erosion simulation model, the Wind Erosion Prediction System and the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s AP-42 emission factors formula, were combined together to evaluate wind-blown dust emissions from various construction units from a railway construction projec...

  14. Multi-scale wind erosion monitoring and assessment for US rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion is a major resource concern for rangeland managers. Although wind erosion is a naturally occurring process in many drylands, land use activities, and land management in particular, can accelerate wind-driven soil loss – impacting ecosystem dynamics and agricultural production, air quali...

  15. Wind erosion research at an uranium mill tailings site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehmel, G A

    1977-07-01

    A uranium mill tailings pile at Grants, New Mexico, was selected for wind erosion research since the configuration provides flat area containing fine sand and made up of larger particles. The wind erosion experiment is discussed. Experimental equipment consists of meteorological instrumentation to automatically activate air samplers as a function of wind speed increments and direction, particle cascade impactors to measure airborne respirable concentrations as a function of particle size, inertial impaction devices to measure nonrespirable fluxes of airborne particles, a virtual particle cascade impactor to measure airborne concentrations of toxic trace elements, and soil depth gauges to measure changes in surface soil elevations as a function of time. Both radioactive particles as well as toxic trace element concentrations are measured. Radioactive particles are measured with both particle cascade impactors as well as high-volume air samplers. In contrast, toxic trace element airborne concentrations are measured only with a two-stage virtual particle cascade impactor. Fluxes of nonrespirable airborne particles are measured with inertial impaction devices. At particle cascade impactor sites, a rotating cyclone preseparator collects nonrespirable particles. In addition at all sites, fluxes of nonrespirable particles are measured using an open cavity inertial impaction device. (JGB)

  16. Wind Tunnel Experiments: Influence of Erosion and Deposition on Wind-Packing of New Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Sommer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind sometimes creates a hard, wind-packed layer at the surface of a snowpack. The formation of such wind crusts was observed during wind tunnel experiments with combined SnowMicroPen and Microsoft Kinect sensors. The former provides the hardness of new and wind-packed snow and the latter spatial snow depth data in the test section. Previous experiments had shown that saltation is necessary but not sufficient for wind-packing. The combination of hardness and snow depth data now allows to study the case with saltation in more detail. The Kinect data requires complex processing but with the appropriate corrections, snow depth changes can be measured with an accuracy of about 1 mm. The Kinect is therefore well suited to quantify erosion and deposition. We found that no hardening occurred during erosion and that a wind crust may or may not form when snow is deposited. Deposition is more efficient at hardening snow in wind-exposed than in wind-sheltered areas. The snow hardness increased more on the windward side of artificial obstacles placed in the wind tunnel. Similarly, the snow was harder in positions with a low Sx parameter. Sx describes how wind-sheltered (high Sx or wind-exposed (low Sx a position is and was calculated based on the Kinect data. The correlation between Sx and snow hardness was −0.63. We also found a negative correlation of −0.4 between the snow hardness and the deposition rate. Slowly deposited snow is harder than a rapidly growing accumulation. Sx and the deposition rate together explain about half of the observed variability of snow hardness.

  17. An Evaluation of the Wind Erosion Module in DUSTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, William J.; Allwine, K Jerry; Fritz, Brad G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.

    2008-03-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a dust transport model (DUSTRAN), which calculates atmospheric dust concentrations that result from both natural and human activity. DUSTRAN is a comprehensive dispersion modeling system, consisting of a dust-emissions module, a diagnostic meteorological model, and dispersion models that are integrated seamlessly into GIS software. DUSTRAN functions as a console application and allows the user to interactively create a release scenario and run the underlying models. We have recently had the opportunity to compare dust concentrations calculated by DUSTRAN with observations of wind erosion made on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. In this paper we describe both DUSTRAN’s algorithm for predicting the source strength of windblown dust and the comparison of simulated dust concentrations with data. The comparisons use observations of PM10 concentrations for three separate dust events on the Hanford Site in 2001. The dust measurements were made as part of an effort to monitor site recovery following a large range fire that occurred on the Hanford Site in 2000. The comparisons have provided both encouragement as to the practical value of the wind erosion module in DUSTRAN and examples of occasions when the simulations and observations diverge. In general, the maximum dust concentrations from the simulations and the observations for each dust event agreed closely. Because of the lack of soil moisture information, the model was run in a “dry” mode. However, some discrepancies between the observations and the model suggest that accounting for soil moisture should be done where possible. For low dust concentrations, DUSTRAN tends to overestimate PM10 levels. This may be a weakness in the simple form of the dust flux parameterization. It could also be a reflection of deviations of the threshold friction velocity from our nominal value of 20 cm s-1. Overall, however, we have

  18. New Insights into the Geography and Modelling of Wind Erosion in the European Agricultural Land. Application of a Spatially Explicit Indicator of Land Susceptibility to Wind Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Borrelli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The current state of the art in erosion research does not provide answers about the “where” and “when” of wind erosion in European agricultural lands. Questions about the implications for the agricultural productivity remain unanswered. Tackling this research gap, the study provides a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial patterns of land susceptibility to wind erosion in European agricultural lands. The Index of Land Susceptibility to Wind Erosion (ILSWE was applied in a GIS environment. A harmonized input dataset ranked following a fuzzy logic technique was employed. Within the 36 European countries under investigation, moderate (17.3 million ha and high levels (8.8 million ha of land susceptibility to wind erosion were predicted. This corresponds to 8.0% and 4.1% of total agricultural land, respectively.

  19. Accelerated rain erosion of wind turbine blade coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong

    During operation, the fast-moving blades of wind turbines are exposed to continuous impacts with rain droplets, hail, insects, or solid particles. This can lead to erosion of the blades, whereby the electrical efficiency is compromised and expensive repairs may be required. One possible solution...... to this problem is elastic blade coatings, which are able to absorb the impact energy without crack formation. The purpose of the work presented in this thesis has been to design and construct a laboratory experimentation device, which allows an accelerated and reliable evaluation of existing or novel blade...

  20. In-transit wind erosion losses of coal and method of control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimerick, K.H.; Laflin, G.P.

    1979-08-01

    Wind tunnel tests show the effects of wind velocity and particle size on the amount of coal lost while in transit. Different coals were evaluated to determine the variables associated with wind erosion. The erosion losses can be substantially reduced by using a binder, or crusting agent, to consolidate the surfaces of the coal into a solid mass which resists erosion. This not only reduces economic loss but minimizes pollution.

  1. Spatial and temporal variations of wind erosion climatic erosivity in the farming-pastoral zone of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Shuping; Yang, Ruixin; Yan, Yechao; Yang, Zhengwei; Wang, Dandan

    2018-03-01

    Wind erosion climatic erosivity is an important parameter to assess the possible effects of climatic conditions on wind erosion. In this paper, the wind erosion climatic factor (C-factor), which was used to quantify the wind erosion climatic erosivity, was calculated for the period 1960-2014 based on monthly meteorological data collected from 101 stations in the farming-pastoral zone of Northern China. The Mann-Kendall (M-K) test, trend analysis, and geostatistical analysis methods were used to explore the spatial and temporal characteristics of the wind erosion climatic erosivity in this region. The result suggests that the annual C-factor, with a maximum of 76.05 in 1969 and a minimum of 26.57 in 2007, has a significant decreasing trend over the past 55 years. Strong seasonality in the C-factor was found, with the highest value in spring, which accounts for a significant proportion of the annual C-factor (41.46%). However, the coefficient of variation of the seasonal C-factor reaches a maximum in winter and a minimum in spring. The mean annual C-factor varies substantially across the region. Areas with high values of the mean annual C-factor (C ≥ 100) are located in Ulanqab and Dingxi, while areas with low values (C ≤ 10) lie in Lanzhou, Linxia, Dingxi, Xining, and Chengde. Spatial analysis on the trend of the C-factor reveals that 81% of the stations show statistically significant decreases at a 90% confidence level. An examination of the concentration ratio of the C-factor shows that the wind erosion climatic erosivity is concentrated in spring, especially in April, which makes this period particularly important for implementing soil conservation measures.

  2. Wind erosion reduces soil organic carbon sequestration falsely indicating ineffective management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Baldock, Jeffrey A.

    2016-09-01

    Improved management of agricultural land has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to reduce atmospheric CO2 via soil carbon sequestration. However, SOC stocks are reduced by soil erosion which is commonly omitted from calculations of crop production, C cycling, C sequestration and C accounting. We used fields from the wind eroded dryland cropping region of Western Australia to demonstrate the global implications for C sequestration and C accounting of omitting soil erosion. For the fields we previously estimated mean net (1950s-1990) soil erosion of 1.2 ± 1.0 t ha-1 y-1. The mean net (1990-2013) soil erosion increased by nearly four times to 4.4 ± 2.1 t ha-1 y-1. Conservation agriculture has evidently not reduced wind erosion in this region. The mean net (1990-2013) SOC erosion was up to 0.2 t C ha-1 y-1 across all sampled fields and similar to measured sequestration rates in the region (up to 0.5 t C ha-1 y-1; 10 years) for many management practices recommended for building SOC stocks. The minimum detectable change (MDC; 10 years) of SOC without erosion was up to 0.2 t C ha-1 y-1 whilst the MDC of SOC with erosion was up to 0.4 t C ha-1 y-1. These results illustrate the generally applicable outcome: (i) if SOC erosion is equal to (or greater than) the increase in SOC due to management practices, the change will not be detectable (or a loss will be evident); (ii) without including soil erosion in SOC sequestration calculations, the monitoring of SOC stocks will lead to, at best the inability to detect change and, at worst the false impression that management practices have failed to store SOC. Furthermore, continued omission of soil erosion in crop production, C accounting and C sequestration will most likely undermine confidence in policy designed to encourage adoption of C farming and the attendant benefits for soil stewardship and food security.

  3. Manufacturing issues which affect coating erosion performance in wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, E.; Sánchez, F.; Domenech, L.; Olivares, A.; Young, T. M.; O'Carroll, A.; Chinesta, F.

    2017-10-01

    Erosion damage, caused by repeated rain droplet impact on the leading edges of wind turbine blades, is a major cause for cost concern. Resin Infusion (RI) is used in wind energy blades where low weight and high mechanical performance materials are demanded. The surface coating plays a crucial role in the manufacturing and performance response. The Leading Edge coating is usually moulded, painted or sprayed onto the blade surface so adequate adhesion in the layers' characterization through the thickness is required for mechanical performance and durability reasons. In the current work, an investigation has been directed into the resulting rain erosion durability of the coating was undertaken through a combination of mass loss testing measurements with manufacturing processing parameter variations. The adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock wave caused by the collapsing water droplet on impact. The stress waves are transmitted to the substrate, so microestructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation. Standard industrial systems are based on a multilayer system, with a high number of interfaces that tend to accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations and their potential stress reduction on the interface. In this research, the input parameters for the appropriate definition of the Cohesive Zone Modelling (CZM) of the coating-substrate interface are outlined by means of Pull off testing and Peeling testing results. It allowed one to optimize manufacturing and coating process for blades into a knowledge-based guidance for leading edge coating material development. It was achieved by investigating the erosion degradation process using both numerical and laboratory techniques (Pull off, Peeling and Rain Erosion Testing in a whirling arm rain erosion test facility).

  4. [Sediment-yielding process and its mechanisms of slope erosion in wind-water erosion crisscross region of Loess Plateau, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Deng-Feng; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Zheng, Shi-Qing; Li, Qiang

    2012-12-01

    Due to the coupling effects of wind and water erosions in the wind-water erosion crisscross region of Loess Plateau, the slope erosion in the region was quite serious, and the erosion process was quite complicated. By using wind tunnel combined with simulated rainfall, this paper studied the sediment-yielding process and its mechanisms of slope erosion under the effects of wind-water alternate erosion, and quantitatively analyzed the efffects of wind erosion on water erosion and the relationships between wind and water erosions. There was an obvious positive interaction between wind and water erosions. Wind erosion promoted the development of microtopography, and altered the quantitative relationship between the sediment-yielding under water erosion and the variation of rainfall intensity. At the rainfall intensity of 60 and 80 mm x h(-1), the sediment-yielding without wind erosion decreased with the duration of rainfall and tended to be stable, but the sediment-yielding with wind erosion decreased to a certain valley value first, and then showed an increasing trend. At the rainfall intensity of 60, 80, and 100 mm x h(-1), the sediment-yielding with the wind erosion at speeds of 11 and 14 m x s(-1) increased by 7.3%-27.9% and 23.2%-39.0%, respectively, as compared with the sediment-yielding without wind erosion. At the rainfall intensity of 120 and 150 mm x h(-1) and in the rainfall duration of 15 minutes, the sediment-yielding with and without wind erosion presented a decreasing trend, but, with the increase of rainfall duration, the sediment-yielding with wind erosion showed a trend of decreasing first and increasing then, as compared with the sediment-yielding without wind erosion. The mechanisms of wind-water alternate erosion were complicated, reflecting in the mutual relation and mutual promotion of wind erosion and water erosion in the aspects of temporal-spatial distribution, energy supply, and action mode of erosion forces.

  5. Wind erosion on heavy-textured soils: calculation and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kozlovsky Dufková

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The equation that expresses the influence of factors affecting soil aggregates breakdown, and thus wind erosion, originated from the results of laboratory simulations of soil aggregates breakdown due to low temperatures treatment, field measurements of air temperature and soil moisture, and statistical evaluation of gained outcomes. All the analyses, whether field or laboratory, were realized on three different soils from three different localities of the Bílé Karpaty Mountains foothills – Ostrožská Nová Ves, Blatnice pod Svatým Antonínkem, and Suchá Loz. The statistically significant factors, influencing the soil aggregates breakdown, were determined using multiple regression analysis and stepwise regression. Soil moisture content at time of freezing was the most significant factor affecting soil aggregates breakdown, content of soil particles < 0.01 mm was the least significant one. Based on the results of laboratory and field research there was created a map of heavy-textured soils that are vulnerable to wind erosion.

  6. First quantification of severe wind erosion in yardang fields using cosmogenic 10Be within the western Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, A.; Heermance, R.; Kapp, P. A.; Mc-Callister, A.

    2010-12-01

    occupation as a reference datum for erosion (0.25-1.4 mm/yr). The combination of strong winds, hyper-aridity, vast exposure of young (Plio-Quaternary) and friable lacustrine strata, and active tectonic deformation has produced a situation where wind, and not water, is the dominant agent of erosion and sediment transport. Our results identify the Qaidam basin as a major locus of wind erosion, as well as a major potential source area for the Loess Plateau deposits located downwind of the Qaidam basin. Improved constraints on factors controlling rates of yardang formation on Earth and how they vary as a function of lithology and wind conditions, may even lead to a better understanding of environmental conditions and yardang formation on other planetary bodies like Mars.

  7. Wind tunnel experiments on the effects of tillage ridge features on wind erosion horizontal fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the well-known soil factors which control wind erosion on flat, unridged surfaces, two specific processes affect the susceptibility of tillage ridged surfaces to wind erosion: ridge-induced roughness and ridge- trapping efficiency. In order to parameterize horizontal soil fluxes produced by wind over tillage ridges, eight-ridge configurations composed of sandy soil and exhibiting ridge heights to ridge spacing (RH/RS ratios ranging from 0.18 to 0.38 were experimented in a wind tunnel. These experiments are used to develop a parameterization of the horizontal fluxes over tillage ridged surfaces based only on the geometric characteristics of the ridges. Indeed, the key parameters controlling the horizontal flux, namely the friction velocity, threshold friction velocity and the adjustment coefficient, are derived through specific expressions, from ridge heights (RH and ridge spacing (RS. This parameterization was evaluated by comparing the results of the simulations to an additional experimental data set and to the data set obtained by Hagen and Armbrust (1992. In both cases, predicted and measured values are found to be in a satisfying agreement. This parameterization was used to evaluate the efficiency of ridges in reducing wind erosion. The results show that ridged surfaces, when compared to a loose, unridged soil surface, lead to an important reduction in the horizontal fluxes (exceeding 60%. Moreover, the effect of ridges in trapping particles contributes for more than 90% in the flux reduction while the ridge roughness effect is weak and decreases when the wind velocity increases.

  8. Wind tunnel experiments on the effects of tillage ridge features on wind erosion horizontal fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kardous

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the well-known soil factors which control wind erosion on flat, unridged surfaces, two specific processes affect the susceptibility of tillage ridged surfaces to wind erosion: ridge-induced roughness and ridge- trapping efficiency.

    In order to parameterize horizontal soil fluxes produced by wind over tillage ridges, eight-ridge configurations composed of sandy soil and exhibiting ridge heights to ridge spacing (RH/RS ratios ranging from 0.18 to 0.38 were experimented in a wind tunnel. These experiments are used to develop a parameterization of the horizontal fluxes over tillage ridged surfaces based only on the geometric characteristics of the ridges. Indeed, the key parameters controlling the horizontal flux, namely the friction velocity, threshold friction velocity and the adjustment coefficient, are derived through specific expressions, from ridge heights (RH and ridge spacing (RS. This parameterization was evaluated by comparing the results of the simulations to an additional experimental data set and to the data set obtained by Hagen and Armbrust (1992. In both cases, predicted and measured values are found to be in a satisfying agreement.

    This parameterization was used to evaluate the efficiency of ridges in reducing wind erosion. The results show that ridged surfaces, when compared to a loose, unridged soil surface, lead to an important reduction in the horizontal fluxes (exceeding 60%. Moreover, the effect of ridges in trapping particles contributes for more than 90% in the flux reduction while the ridge roughness effect is weak and decreases when the wind velocity increases.

  9. Wind erosion in semiarid landscapes: Predictive models and remote sensing methods for the influence of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, H. Brad

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: to develop and test predictive relations for the quantitative influence of vegetation canopy structure on wind erosion of semiarid rangeland soils, and to develop remote sensing methods for measuring the canopy structural parameters that determine sheltering against wind erosion. The influence of canopy structure on wind erosion will be investigated by means of wind-tunnel and field experiments using structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments using model roughness elements to simulate plant canopies. The canopy structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments as important in determining vegetative sheltering against wind erosion will then be measured at a number of naturally vegetated field sites and compared with estimates of these variables derived from analysis of remotely sensed data.

  10. The Reduction of Partitioned Wind and Water Erosion by Conservation Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil loss due to wind and water erosion degrades the soil and results in environmental problems downstream and downwind of the source field. Wind and water erosion may both occur to varying extents particularly in semi-arid environments. Soil conservation strategies require information about the p...

  11. Wind Erosion Processes and Control Techniques in the Sahelian Zone of Niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Stroosnijder, L.; Raats, P.A.C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind Erosion Processes and Control Techniques in the Sahelian Zone of Niger G. Sterk, L. Stroosnijder, and P.A.C. Raats Abstract The objective of this paper is to present the main results and conclusions from three years of field research on wind erosion processes and control techniques in the

  12. Farmers' perceptions of erosion by wind and water in northern Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.; Leenders, J.K.; Leeuwis, M.

    2003-01-01

    Wind and water erosion are widespread phenomena throughout the Sahel, especially in the early rainy season, when high-intensity rainstorms are often preceded by severe windstorms. This paper describes the results of a survey on the farmers' perceptions of wind and water erosion processes and control

  13. Wind erosion control with scattered vegetation in the Sahelian zone of Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Sahelian zone ofAfricais the region that is globally most subjected to land degradation, with wind erosion being the most important soil degradation process. By using control measures, the negative effects of wind erosion can be reduced. At present, adoption of

  14. Using state-and-transition models to evaluate impacts of land cover change on wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion of rangeland soils is a global problem exacerbated by land cover change. Despite efforts to quantify the impacts of land cover change on wind erosion, assessment uncertainty remains large. We address this uncertainty by evaluating the application of ecological sites and state-and-transi...

  15. Effect of vegetation cover and transitions on regional wind erosion in drylands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, I.F.

    2012-01-01

    Wind erosion is a critical environmental problem that threatens mainly the arid and semi-arid regions of our planet. Usually this problem is associated with desertification, poverty and other environmental and socioeconomic problems. Wind erosion causes the loss of fertile topsoil, and has a

  16. Estimating the offsite household damages from wind erosion in the western United States. Staff report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, S.; Lee, L.K.

    1989-06-01

    Wind erosion contributes significantly to particulate air pollution in some regions of the Western United States. As a result, wind erosion imposes damages on households in the form of increased interior and exterior cleaning, reduced recreational opportunities, and impaired health. Costs are difficult to estimate because of limited data availability. However, damages appear to be much larger offsite than onsite.

  17. Assessment of future scenarios for wind erosion sensitivity changes based on ALADIN and REMO regional climate model simulation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezősi Gábor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The changes in rate and pattern of wind erosion sensitivity due to climate change were investigated for 2021–2050 and 2071–2100 compared to the reference period (1961–1990 in Hungary. The sensitivities of the main influencing factors (soil texture, vegetation cover and climate factor were evaluated by fuzzy method and a combined wind erosion sensitivity map was compiled. The climate factor, as the driving factor of the changes, was assessed based on observed data for the reference period, while REMO and ALADIN regional climate model simulation data for the future periods. The changes in wind erosion sensitivity were evaluated on potentially affected agricultural land use types, and hot spot areas were allocated. Based on the results, 5–6% of the total agricultural areas were high sensitive areas in the reference period. In the 21st century slight or moderate changes of wind erosion sensitivity can be expected, and mostly ‘pastures’, ‘complex cultivation patterns’, and ‘land principally occupied by agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation’ are affected. The applied combination of multi-indicator approach and fuzzy analysis provides novelty in the field of land sensitivity assessment. The method is suitable for regional scale analysis of wind erosion sensitivity changes and supports regional planning by allocating priority areas where changes in agro-technics or land use have to be considered.

  18. Research of wind erosion intensity in the region of Subotica-Horgos sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velizar Velasevic; Ljubomir Letic

    1991-01-01

    Wind is an important erosional process in the areas of steppe-savanna climate in Europe as typified by the Bojvodina plain in Yugoslavia. Cultivated and forested plots on the Subotica-Horgos Sands were used to study aeolian erosion processes. Wind erosion on the cultivated plot was 3-29 times greater than that occurring on a plot planted to forest trees. That erosion...

  19. Determination of Soil Endangerment by Wind Erosion with Consideration of Legislative Changes in Acceptable Soil Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streďanský Jozef

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Value tightening of acceptable soil loss by wind erosion in amendment to the Act No. 220/2004 on Protection and Use of Agricultural Land in the Slovak Republic from 1st of April 2013 is necessary to reconsider wind erosion intensity in agricultural territories. The paper presents results of wind erosion intensity calculation by using Wind Erosion Equation (WEQ that is recommended by Act No. 220/2004. As observed we choose cadastral area Moèenok territory and had determined and compared changes in levels of soil endangerment of arable land by wind and spatial delamination of wind erosion in specific territory of Moèenok. According to WEQ calculation, we determined that soil loss from 3778.85 ha arable land is 1220.52 ha, which is highly endangerment by wind erosion. By defining levels of soil erosion endangerment (LSEE, we found out that area in 3rd class of endangerment rose from 1.48% to 43.37% after changing acceptable soil from 40 to 15 t ha-1 year-1. Results enable us to specify priority areas where to implement erosion control measures in according to sustainable use and protection of arable land in model area.

  20. Glyphosate and AMPA contents in sediments produced by wind erosion of agricultural soils in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Virginia; Aimar, Silvia; De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Buschiazzo, Daniel; Mendez, Mariano; Costa, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    Wind erosion of soils is an important event in arid and semiarid regions of Argentina. The magnitude of wind erosion occurring under different management practices is relatively well known in this region but less information is available on the quality of the eroded material. Considering that the intensification of agriculture may increase the concentrations of substances in the eroded material, producing potential negative effects on the environment, we analyzed the amount of glyphosate and AMPA in sediments produced by wind erosion of agricultural soils of Argentina. Wind eroded materials were collected by means of BSNE samplers in two loess sites of the semiarid region of Argentina: Chaco and La Pampa. Samples were collected from 1 ha square fields at 13.5, 50 and 150 cm height. Results showed that at higher heights the concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA were mostly higher. The glyphosate concentration was more variable and higher in Chaco (0.66 to 313 µg kg-1) than in La Pampa (4.17 to 114 µg kg-1). These results may be due to the higher use of herbicides in Chaco, where the predominant crops are soybeans and corn, produced under no-tillage. Under these conditions the use of glyphosate for weeds control is a common practice. Conversely, AMPA concentrations were higher in La Pampa (13.1 to 101.3 µg kg-1) than in Chaco (1.3 to 83 µg kg-1). These preliminary results show high concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA in wind eroded materials of agricultural soils of Argentina. More research is needed to confirm these high concentrations in other conditions in order to detect the temporal and spatial distribution patterns of the herbicide.

  1. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Raindrop and flow interactions for interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erpul, G.; Gabriels, D.; Darell Norton, L.; Dennis, C.; Huang, C.H.; Visser, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Wind-driven rain (WDR) experiments were conducted to evaluate the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project model with a two-dimensional experimental set-up in a wind tunnel. Synchronized wind and rain simulations were applied to soil surfaces on windward and leeward slopes of 7,

  3. [Influences of land using patterns on the anti-wind erosion of meadow grassland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yao-Zhi; Wang-Xu; Yang, Gui-Xia; Xin, Xiao-Ping

    2008-05-01

    In order to analyse the effects of the human disturbances to the ability of anti-wind erosion of the Hulunbuir meadow grassland, the methods of vegetation investigation and the wind tunnel experiment were made to research the changes of vegetation and the abilities of anti-wind erosion of meadow grassland under different using patterns of meadow grassland. The results indicate that, under different grazing intensities of meadow grassland, the critical wind velocity of soil erosion (v) changes with the vegetation cover according to the relation of second power function. Along with the grazing intensities increasing and the vegetation cover reducing, the velocity of soil erosion rapidly increased on the condition of similar wind velocity which is speedier than the critical wind velocity of soil erosion. When the meadow grassland is mildly grazed which the vegetation cover maintains 63%, the velocity of soil erosion is small even there is gale that the wind velocity reach 25 m/s. When the vegetation cover of meadow grassland reduced to less than 35%, the velocity of soil erosion rapidly increased with the vegetation cover's reducing on the condition of the wind velocity is among 20-25 m/s. And owing to the no-tillage cropland of meadow grassland is completely far from the protection of the vegetation, the soil wind erosion quantity achieves 682.1 kg/hm2 in a minute when the wind velocity is 25 m/s, which approaches the average formation quantity of soil (1 000 kg/hm2) in a year.

  4. A New Instrument for Testing Wind Erosion by Soil Surface Shape Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-xing Hai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion, a primary cause of soil degeneration, is a problem in arid and semiarid areas throughout the world. Many methods are available to study soil erosion, but there is no an effective method for making quantitative measurements in the field. To solve this problem, we have developed a new instrument that can measure the change in the shape of the soil surface, allowing quick quantification of wind erosion. In this paper, the construction and principle of the new instrument are described. Field experiments are carried out using the instrument, and the data are analyzed. The erosion depth is found to vary by 11% compared to the average for measurement areas ranging from 30×30 cm2 to 10×10 cm2. The results show that the instrument is convenient and reliable for quantitatively measuring wind erosion in the field.

  5. Wind born(e) landscapes: the role of wind erosion in agricultural land management and nature development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Wind has played an important role in the geological development of the north-western Europe. Various aeolian deposits such as inland dunes, river dunes, cover sands, drift sands and coastal dunes, form the base of large areas in our present landscape. The role of wind erosion in today's north-west

  6. Sand Drift Potential by Wind in Shileh Plain of Sistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Poormand

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wind erosion is one of the most important factors in desert environments. Prevailing winds can shift sand dunes and affect their accumulation and morphology. Also, wind regime determines the direction of sand dune mobility in different ways. Therefore, the wind regime, frequency, direction and velocity are supposed to be the most important factors to form the morphology of sand dunes. Wind energy and changes in different directions (wind regime have large impacts on the morphology, maintenance and transformation of wind features. Having a global knowledge of the magnitude of aeolian processes, we can assess the powerful impact of sand dune mobility on residential areas and infrastructures. The most important factors including the frequency, magnitude and directional mobility of aeolian processes have a very important effect on the entrainment and form of sand dunes. Materials and Methods: To understand and identify the wind erosion regions, wind regime is a useful way since there is a strong correlation between wind regimes and sand dune morphology and structure. Sand rose and wind rose are assumed to be easy, fast and most accurate methods for the identification of wind erosion. Wind regimes processes have been studied by many researchers who believed that investigating wind regimes and sand dune mobility gives a measure of drift potential. Drift potential is a measure of the sand-moving capability by wind; derived from reduction of surface-wind data through a weighting equation. To predict drift potential, wind velocity and direction data from meteorological synoptic stations were used. Regarding the estimation of sand transport rate by wind, many formulas exist such as Bagnold, Kawamura, and Lattau. Also, many software applications have been suggested. However, among these formulas, Fryberger’s is the best and has been widely used since 1979. Results and Discussion: The aim of this study was to analyze wind velocities and

  7. Long term erosion resistance of unprotected radon suppression earth covers to wind stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bander, T.J.

    1980-10-01

    Estimates of the amount of soil cover lost due to wind erosion are obtained using three different models. One model developed by W. S. Chepil employs a wind erosion equation which is based on wind tunnel and agricultural field measurements. The second model is based on an analytical solution of the saltation process obtained by P. R. Owen and agrees well with the data of Bagnold and Zingg. The third model was developed by Gillette and is based on a modification of the horizontal flux equation used by Bagnold and Chepil. Basic differences between the models are examined and a comparison of the soil movement predicted by each is presented. The usefulness of these wind erosion models as guidance in designing long term erosion-resistant covers for tailings piles is considered.

  8. Leading edge erosion of coated wind turbine blades: Review of coating life models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, H.M.; Gelinck, E.R.M.; Rentrop, A.; van der Heide, Emile

    2015-01-01

    Erosion of the leading edge of wind turbine blades by droplet impingement wear, reduces blade aerodynamic efficiency and power output. Eventually, it compromises the integrity of blade surfaces. Elastomeric coatings are currently used for erosion resistance, yet the life of such coatings cannot be

  9. Estimation of wind erosion from construction of a railway in arid Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benli Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A state-of-the-art wind erosion simulation model, the Wind Erosion Prediction System and the United States Environmental Protection Agency's AP 42 emission factors formula, were combined together to evaluate wind-blown dust emissions from various construction units from a railway construction project in the dry Gobi land in Northwest China. The influence of the climatic factors: temperature, precipitation, wind speed and direction, soil condition, protective measures, and construction disturbance were taken into account. Driven by daily and sub-daily climate data and using specific detailed management files, the process-based WEPS model was able to express the beginning, active, and ending phases of construction, as well as the degree of disturbance for the entire scope of a construction project. The Lanzhou-Xinjiang High-speed Railway was selected as a representative study because of the diversities of different climates, soil, and working schedule conditions that could be analyzed. Wind erosion from different working units included the building of roadbeds, bridges, plants, temporary houses, earth spoil and barrow pit areas, and vehicle transportation were calculated. The total wind erosion emissions, 7406 t, for the first construction area of section LXS-15 with a 14.877 km length was obtained for quantitative analysis. The method used is applicable for evaluating wind erosion from other complex surface disturbance projects.

  10. A history of wind erosion prediction models in the United States Department of Agriculture Prior to the Wind Erosion Prediction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Great Plains experienced an influx of settlers in the late 1850s to 1900. Periodic drought was hard on both settlers and the soil and caused severe wind erosion. The period known as the Dirty Thirties, 1931 to 1939, produced many severe windstorms, and the resulting dusty sky over Washington, D....

  11. PM2.5 and PM10 Emission from agricultural soils by wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil tillage and wind erosion are a major source of particulate matter less than 2.5 and 10 µm (PM2.5 and PM10) emission from cultivated soil. Fifteen cultivated soils collected from 5 states were tested as crushed (<2.0 mm) and uncrushed (natural aggregation) at 8, 10, and 13 m s-1 wind velocity in...

  12. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Modelling nutrient losses by wind and water erosion in northern Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the semi-arid environment of northern Burkina Faso the processes of wind and water erosion occur almost simultaneously and may cause severe soil degradation. Especially in the early rainy season when soils are bare and unprotected, violent winds preceding intense rainfall events result in intense

  14. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  15. In Search of the Wind Energy Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide advancement of wind energy is putting high demands on a number of underlying technologies such as wind turbine aerodynamics, structural dynamics, gearbox design, electrical grid connections, and so on. As wind is the only fuel for wind power plants, naturally, wind......-meteorology and wind-climatology are essential for any utilization of wind energy. This is what we are concerned about here with a view on what has happened in wind energy potential assessments in the last 25 years where the utilization of wind turbines in national power supply has accelerated and what......., The New Worldwide Microscale Wind Resource Assessment Data on IRENA's Global Atlas (The EUDP Global Wind Atlas, 2015)], and finally, the perspective for the current work with the New European Wind Atlas [E. L. Petersen et al., Energy Bull. 17, 34–39 (2014); Environ. Res. Lett. 8(1), 011005 (2013...

  16. Potential health impact of wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-05-01

    In response to public health concerns about wind turbines, a study was conducted to review the scientific evidence on the potential health effects of wind turbines. Several research questions were examined, including scientific evidence on the potential health impacts of wind turbines; the relationship between wind turbine noise and health; the relationship between low frequency sound, infrasound and health; assessment of exposure to wind turbines; wind turbine health and safety hazards and Ontario wind turbine setbacks; community consultation prior to wind farm construction and data gaps and research needs. The study showed that although some people living near wind turbines reported symptoms such as dizziness, headaches, and sleep disturbance, the scientific evidence available to date does not demonstrate a direct causal link between wind turbine noise and adverse health effects. The sound level from wind turbines at common residential setbacks is not sufficient to cause hearing impairment or other direct health effects, although some people may find it annoying. 41 refs., 1 appendix.

  17. Potential health impact of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    In response to public health concerns about wind turbines, a study was conducted to review the scientific evidence on the potential health effects of wind turbines. Several research questions were examined, including scientific evidence on the potential health impacts of wind turbines; the relationship between wind turbine noise and health; the relationship between low frequency sound, infrasound and health; assessment of exposure to wind turbines; wind turbine health and safety hazards and Ontario wind turbine setbacks; community consultation prior to wind farm construction and data gaps and research needs. The study showed that although some people living near wind turbines reported symptoms such as dizziness, headaches, and sleep disturbance, the scientific evidence available to date does not demonstrate a direct causal link between wind turbine noise and adverse health effects. The sound level from wind turbines at common residential setbacks is not sufficient to cause hearing impairment or other direct health effects, although some people may find it annoying. 41 refs., 1 appendix.

  18. U.S.V.I. Relative Erosion Potential - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 2000) and (maximum monthly)...

  19. U.S.V.I. Relative Erosion Potential - 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 1990) and (maximum monthly)...

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of agricultural mulches for reducing post-wildfire wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, P. R.; Jennewein, J.; Sharratt, B. S.; Lewis, S. A.; Brown, R. E.

    2017-08-01

    Post-wildfire soil erosion can be caused by water or aeolian processes, yet most erosion research has focused on predominantly water-driven erosion. This study investigates the effectiveness of three agricultural mulches, with and without a tackifier, on aeolian sediment transport processes. A wind tunnel was used to simulate post-wildfire wind erosion at three wind speeds (6, 11 and 18 m s-1). Shallow trays containing soil collected after a wildfire were treated with chopped rice, wheat or chopped wheat mulch; mulch treatments were also compounded with liquid treatments, tackifier to water ratios of 1:6, 1:3 and water. The mulch treatments were generally easily moved at all wind speeds with cover reductions greater than 90% at the highest wind speed. As expected, sediment loss was greatest for the bare soil treatment, ranging from 6.5 g m-2 at the lowest wind speed which increases to 6258 g m-2 at the highest wind speed. Adding wheat or chopped wheat mulch significantly reduced sediment loss by an order or magnitude (698 and 298 g m-2, respectively) at the highest wind speed. Adding chopped rice straw reduced sediment loss by a half to 3573 g m-2 at the highest wind speed, but the effect was not significant due to mobilization of the mulch. The most effective sediment loss mitigation was achieved with liquid tackifier treatments when applied to bare soil and when compounded with various mulch treatments, particularly at the highest wind speed. These results may aid management decisions when mitigating aeolian sediment transport after wildfires.

  1. Using Cesium-137 technique to study the characteristics of different aspect of soil erosion in the Wind-water Erosion Crisscross Region on Loess Plateau of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Mian E-mail: hnli-mian@163.com; Li Zhanbin; Liu Puling; Yao Wenyi

    2005-01-01

    The most serious soil erosion on Loess Plateau exists in the Wind-water Erosion Crisscross Region. In the past 20 years, the types and intensity of soil erosion and its temporal and spatial distribution were studied, but studies on the difference of soil erosion between slope aspects and slope positions in this area have no report. However, it is very important to analyze and evaluate quantitatively the characteristics of different aspects and positions of soil loss for the prevention and treatment of soil erosion in this area. The spatial pattern of net soil loss on 4 downslope transects in four aspects (east, west, south and north) on a typical Mao (round loess mound) in Liudaogou catchment in Wind-water Erosion Crisscross Region was measured in 2000 using the resident cesium-137 deficit technique. The purposes of this investigation were undertaken to determine whether or not {sup 137}Cs measurement would give a useful indication of the extent of soil loss and their characteristics from cultivated hillsides in different slope aspect and slope position in the study area. The results showed that the difference of soil erosion in different aspect was significant and the erosion rate was in this order: north>east>south>west. Compared with other areas, the difference of erosion rate between north hillside and south hillside was on the contrary, and the possible explanations could be the effect of wind erosion. Also, the percentage of wind erosion was estimated to be at least larger than 18% of total soil loss by comparing the difference of erosion amount in south hillside and north hillside. The erosion rates on different slope positions in all aspects were also different, the highest net soil loss occurred in the lower slope position, and the upper and middle slope positions were slight. The general trend of net soil loss on sloping surface was to increase in fluctuation with increasing downslope distance.

  2. Wind power potential and integration in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbetuyi, A.F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy penetration into power networks is increasing very rapidly all over the world. The great concern about global warming and continued apprehensions about nuclear power around the world should drive most countries in Africa into strong demand for wind generation because of its advantages which include the absence of harmful emissions, very clean and almost infinite availability of wind that is converted into electricity. This paper shows the power available in the wind. It also gives an overview of the wind power potential and integration in some selected Africa countries like Egypt, Morocco, South Africa and Nigeria and the challenges of wind power integration in Africa’s continent are also discussed. The Northern part of Africa is known to be Africa’s Wind pioneers having installed and connected the Wind Energy Converters (WEC to the grid. About 97% of the continent’s total wind installations are located in Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. Research work should commence on the identified sites with high wind speeds in those selected Africa countries, so that those potential sites can be connected to the grid. This is because the ability of a site to sufficiently accommodate wind generation not only depends on wind speeds but on its ability to interconnect to the existing grid. If these wind energy potentials are tapped and connected to the grid, the erratic and epileptic power supply facing most countries in Africa will be reduced; thereby reducing rural-urban migration and more jobs will be created.

  3. Erosion potential of snow cover in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Středová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amount of water derived from snow and melting rate can be collectively described as the erosion potential of water accumulated in the snow. The erosion potential of snow was calculated for thirty cold periods i.e. 1st November to 30th April (1980/1981 to 2009/2010 based on climatilogical data of fifty stations of Czech hydrometerological station from different climatic conditions according to Climatic region of Estimated Pedological Ecological Unit. Snow erosive potential statistically significantly depends on altitude (r = 0.726**, α = 0.01 and also on climatic region (r = 0.790**, α = 0.01. Mapping expression was based on average values of thirty-year period. Range of snow erosive potential in the map responces to quantile values, quintile values respectively (Q0.2, Q0.4, Q0.6, Q0.8. A map of erosion potential of snow cover for arable land deals with an assumption of arable land incidence. It was determined by excluding forests, built area, land with a slope of 12 ° and areas with an altitude of 700 m.

  4. Wind Erosion Induced Soil Degradation in Northern China: Status, Measures and Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongling Guo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil degradation is one of the most serious ecological problems in the world. In arid and semi-arid northern China, soil degradation predominantly arises from wind erosion. Trends in soil degradation caused by wind erosion in northern China frequently change with human activities and climatic change. To decrease soil loss by wind erosion and enhance local ecosystems, the Chinese government has been encouraging residents to reduce wind-induced soil degradation through a series of national policies and several ecological projects, such as the Natural Forest Protection Program, the National Action Program to Combat Desertification, the “Three Norths” Shelter Forest System, the Beijing-Tianjin Sand Source Control Engineering Project, and the Grain for Green Project. All these were implemented a number of decades ago, and have thus created many land management practices and control techniques across different landscapes. These measures include conservation tillage, windbreak networks, checkerboard barriers, the Non-Watering and Tube-Protecting Planting Technique, afforestation, grassland enclosures, etc. As a result, the aeolian degradation of land has been controlled in many regions of arid and semiarid northern China. However, the challenge of mitigating and further reversing soil degradation caused by wind erosion still remains.

  5. Survey of wind power potential for wind-based electricity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    2006-12-31

    Dec 31, 2006 ... ABSTRACT. The potential for wind-generated electricity is examined using 22 months wind data collected from a prospective site located in the southern highlands of Tanzania. While the data for the year 2001 was from March to December that of 2002 was for all the twelve months of the year.

  6. Implications of climate change on wind erosion of agricultural lands in the Columbia plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Sharratt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change may impact soil health and productivity as a result of accelerated or decelerated rates of erosion. Previous studies suggest a greater risk of wind erosion on arid and semi-arid lands due to loss of biomass under a future warmer climate. There have been no studies conducted to assess the impact of climate change on wind erosion in the Columbia Plateau of the Pacific Northwest United States where wind erosion of agricultural lands can cause exceedance of national air quality standards. The Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS was used to assess wind erosion and PM10 (particulate matter ≤10 µm in aerodynamic diameter emissions under a future climate projected by downscaling 18 Global Climate Models (GCM for a conservative emissions pathway. Wind erosion simulations were conducted at Lacrosse and Lind, WA and Moro, OR on a winter wheat-summer fallow (WW-SF rotation and at Lind on an additional winter wheat-camelina-summer fallow (WW-Cam-SF rotation. Each rotation was subject to conservation or conventional tillage practices for a baseline (1970–1999 and mid-21st century climate (2035–2064. A significant increase in temperature and nominal increases in precipitation were projected by an ensemble of climate models for the Columbia Plateau by the mid-21st century. Soil and PM10 losses were 25–84% lower for a mid-21st century climate, due in part to greater biomass production associated with CO2 fertilization and warmer temperatures. The reduction in soil and PM10 loss is projected to be more apparent for conservation tillage practices in the future. Soil and PM10 losses were greater from a WW-Cam-SF rotation than WW-SF rotation when conservation tillage practices were employed during the fallow phase of the rotations. Despite accounting for differences in the length of each rotation, annual soil and PM10 losses remained higher for the WW-Cam-SF rotation than the WW-SF rotation. Soil and PM10 losses were more variable across

  7. Literature review of models for estimating soil erosion and deposition from wind stresses on uranium-mill-tailings covers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon-suppression cover applied to uranium-mill tailings. The mechanics of wind erosion, as well as of soil deposition, are discussed in this report. Several wind erosion models are reviewed to determine if they can be used to estimate the erosion of soil from a mill-tailings cover. One model, developed by W.S. Chepil, contains the most-important factors that describe variables that influence wind erosion. Particular features of other models are also discussed, as well as the application of Chepil's model to a particular tailings pile. For this particular tailings pile, the estimated erosion was almost one inch per year for an unprotected tailings soil surface. Wide variability in the deposition velocity and lack of adequate deposition models preclude reliable estimates of the rate at which airborne particles are deposited.

  8. Literature review of models for estimating soil erosion and deposition from wind stresses on uranium-mill-tailings covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon-suppression cover applied to uranium-mill tailings. The mechanics of wind erosion, as well as of soil deposition, are discussed in this report. Several wind erosion models are reviewed to determine if they can be used to estimate the erosion of soil from a mill-tailings cover. One model, developed by W.S. Chepil, contains the most-important factors that describe variables that influence wind erosion. Particular features of other models are also discussed, as well as the application of Chepil's model to a particular tailings pile. For this particular tailings pile, the estimated erosion was almost one inch per year for an unprotected tailings soil surface. Wide variability in the deposition velocity and lack of adequate deposition models preclude reliable estimates of the rate at which airborne particles are deposited

  9. A case for wind enhanced tectonics: Plio-Quaternary sedimentation, erosion, and structural evolution controlled by wind within the Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heermance, R. V.; Kapp, P. A.; Pullen, A.; Garzione, C. N.

    2012-12-01

    The interplay between tectonics and localized erosion through fluvial and/or glacial processes has been widely documented. Wind erosion, however, has gone largely un-recognized as a potentially important process in this concept. We document an acceleration in shortening in response to wind deflation above actively deforming fault propagation anticlines since ~3.0 Ma in the Qaidam Basin, China. Evidence for this comes from a 1750 m measured section along the southwestern flank of an intra-basin anticline (38.33°N, 93.46°E) and regional cross-sections. Magnetostratigraphy provides age control for prominent stratigraphic and isotopic changes within the section. A positive shift of ~6‰ in the δ18O values of lake carbonates occurs at 1090 m (3.1 Ma), interpreted to be the result of increased aridity at that time. An intraformational angular unconformity, associated with anticline growth, appears at 1172 m (3.0 Ma) and records the initiation of growth strata deposition. At 1235 m (2.6 Ma), a marked lithofacies change to sub-aerial, evaporitic conditions is observed, and is associated with a 3-fold reduction in sedimentation rate. Paleo-yardangs, which are wind-eroded landforms preserved in the stratigraphic record, appear at 1260 m (2.4 Ma). These observations indicate that regional aridification at 3.1 Ma was followed closely by or coincident with fold growth. Facies changes to more evaporitic strata and erosion of the basin floor (based on paleo-yardangs) trailed initial climate and tectonic changes by 500,000-700,000 years. Although the on-lap relationship of post-growth strata implies that syn-tectonic strata may have pinched-out along the flanks of the anticline, our new analysis indicates that at least 1172 m of pre-growth strata must have been eroded from the core of the anticline since 3.0 Ma at a time-averaged rate of ~0.4 mm/year, comparable to fluvial and glacial erosion rates within active tectonic settings. The lack of an integrated fluvial channel

  10. Investigation of gas particle flow in an erosion wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.; Beacher, B.

    1983-04-01

    Trajectories of small particles approaching the test specimen in an erosion tunnel are analytically determined. The two-dimensional equations of motion are solved for a spherical particle under the sole influence of aerodynamic drag. The two-dimensional gradients of gas properties in the flow field are determined by a numerical solution of the equations describing a compressible inviscid fluid. At one inlet condition, the trajectories are computed for coal ash particles of various sizes approaching test specimens at several orientations. Trends are identified in the approaching characteristics that may be related to the observed erosion. The results indicate that, for ash particles with diameters less than 10 ..mu..m, significant numbers are deflected away from the specimen. These particles would otherwise impact with the specimen if they had to resist the turning effect of the flow field.

  11. A methodology for testing the erosive potential of sports drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, S M; Hughes, J A; Newcombe, R G; Addy, M; West, N X

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and test a methodology in situ, which simulated the consumption of sports drinks. A secondary aim was to assess the acceptability of the method to sedentary participants. To select the sports drink for the study in situ, five commercially available sports drinks were examined for erosive potential in vitro. The study in situ was a single centre, 2-period, 2-treatment crossover study to compare the erosive effect of a commercially available sports drink (Test), with that of mineral water (Control), over 10 day periods on 10 healthy volunteers. Subjects wore upper removable appliances containing two human enamel specimens from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The regimen of intake of the drinks was 350 ml in 10, 5-min rest, 650 ml in 25, 5-min rest, 500 ml in 10 and 5-min rest. Measurements of enamel loss were made on samples after 5 and 10 days by profilometry. The in situ study showed a statistically significant difference in erosive potential between the test and control beverages. No specimen exposed to the control beverage displayed appreciable erosion. Erosion occurred with the test drink, but to a variable degree between subjects. The subjects unanimously found the drinking regimen unpleasant. The sports drink caused significantly more erosion in situ than water and as seen in other studies, there was marked variation in susceptibility to erosion between subjects. The new drinking regimen was designed to simulate pre, during and post-exercise intake. Although all the sedentary subjects participating in this study reported that they found the volume of fluids consumed over a short period of time excessive it is unlikely that this would prove problematic in the exercise environment.

  12. Nutrient dynamics - wind and water erosion at the village scale in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.; Sterk, G.

    2007-01-01

    The loss of nutrients by wind erosion is generally attributed to losses by suspension, since suspension selectively removes the finest particles. However, because the main mass of sediment is moved by saltation during an event, the main mass of nutrients is also moved by saltation. Nutrient losses

  13. Crop production and economic loss due to wind erosion in hot arid ecosystem of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Priyabrata; Moharana, P. C.; Kumar, Mahesh; Soni, M. L.; Pandey, C. B.; Chaudhari, S. K.; Sikka, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    Wind erosion is a severe land degradation process in hot arid western India and affects the agricultural production system. It affects crop yield directly by damaging the crops through abrasion, burial, dust deposition etc. and indirectly by reducing soil fertility. In this study, an attempt was made to quantify the indirect impact of wind erosion process on crop production loss and associated economic loss in hot arid ecosystem of India. It has been observed that soil loss due to wind erosion varies from minimum 1.3 t ha-1 to maximum 83.3 t ha-1 as per the severity. Yield loss due to wind erosion was found maximum for groundnut (Arachis hypogea) (5-331 kg ha-1 yr-1), whereas minimum for moth bean (Vigna aconitifolia) (1-93 kg ha-1 yr-1). For pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum), which covers a major portion of arable lands in western Rajasthan, the yield loss was found 3-195 kg ha-1 yr-1. Economic loss was found higher for groundnut and clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) than rest crops, which are about

  14. Consistency of wind erosion assessments across land use and land cover types: A critical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent decades, large areas of rangeland have been converted to cropland or vice versa in the western United States and elsewhere in the world, driven largely by increased crop prices, loss of access to irrigation water, and agricultural expansion / contraction. Wind erosion and dust emissions ar...

  15. Fire and grazing effects on wind erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeire, Lance T; Wester, David B; Mitchell, Robert B; Fuhlendorf, Samuel D

    2005-01-01

    Selective grazing of burned patches can be intense if animal distribution is not controlled and may compound the independent effects of fire and grazing on soil characteristics. Our objectives were to quantify the effects of patch burning and grazing on wind erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature in sand sagebrush (Artemisia filifolia Torr.) mixed prairie. We selected 24, 4-ha plots near Woodward, OK. Four plots were burned during autumn (mid-November) and four during spring (mid-April), and four served as nonburned controls for each of two years. Cattle were given unrestricted access (April-September) to burned patches (erosion, soil water content, and soil temperature were measured monthly. Wind erosion varied by burn, year, and sampling height. Wind erosion was about 2 to 48 times greater on autumn-burned plots than nonburned plots during the dormant period (December-April). Growing-season (April-August) erosion was greatest during spring. Erosion of spring-burned sites was double that of nonburned sites both years. Growing-season erosion from autumn-burned sites was similar to nonburned sites except for one year with a dry April-May. Soil water content was unaffected by patch burn treatments. Soils of burned plots were 1 to 3 degrees C warmer than those of nonburned plots, based on mid-day measurements. Lower water holding and deep percolation capacity of sandy soils probably moderated effects on soil water content and soil temperature. Despite poor growing conditions following fire and heavy selective grazing of burned patches, no blowouts or drifts were observed.

  16. Accelerated rain erosion of wind turbine blade coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shizhong; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Bernad Jr., Pablo L.

    2014-01-01

    Under drift udsættes de hurtigt roterende vinger på vindmøller for gentagne kollisioner med regndråber, hagl, insekter eller partikler. Det kan føre til erosion af vingerne, hvilket går udover den elektriske effektivitet, og dyre reparationer kan blive nødvendige. En mulig løsning på dette problem er elastiske vingecoatings, der er i stand til at absorbere kollisionsenergien uden at revner eller andre skader dannes. Formålet med arbejdet, der præsenteres i denne afhandling, har været at desig...

  17. Wind erosion model of a multiple sized particles bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descamps, I.; Pons, A.; Harion, J.-L. [IMP-CNRS UPR 8521, Perpignan (France)

    2006-07-01

    A model has been developed in order to predict more accurately fugitive dust emissions by aeolian erosion on industrial sites. This model takes into account the time evolution of the bed surface features during erosion by a turbulent flow. It consists of four parts corresponding to aerodynamic entrainment and is based on the interaction between particle take-off and wall turbulence. A take-off criterion compares the lift force exerted by the flow on the particle with the sum of the weight and adhesive force. Bed pavement and saltation are also taken into account. Bed pavement is induced by the non-erodible particles. On steel plants stockpiles, ores and coals have granulometric spectra going a few microns to a few centimetres in diameter. In fact, the non-erodible particles, that cannot take-off because of their inertia, form obstacles in the finer particle take-off and lead to a time decrease in emitted mass flux. The new model has been tested for the case of a bimodal size distribution by comparison with relevant experimental data. The results demonstrate that the mode allows predicting the mass flux time decrease due to non-erodible particles. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  18. The Wind Energy Potential of Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Bjornsson, Halldór; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Jónasson, Kristján; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2014-05-01

    While Iceland has an abundant wind energy resource, its use for electrical power production has so far been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated primarily from hydro- and geothermal sources, and adding wind energy has so far not been considered practical or even necessary. However, wind energy is becoming a more viable option, as opportunities for new hydro- or geothermal power installations become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland, a wind atlas has been developed as part of the joint Nordic project 'Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing' (IceWind). Downscaling simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to determine the large-scale wind energy potential of Iceland. Local wind speed distributions are represented by Weibull statistics. The shape parameter across Iceland varies between 1.2 and 3.6, with the lowest values indicative of near-exponential distributions at sheltered locations, and the highest values indicative of normal distributions at exposed locations in winter. Compared with summer, average power density in winter is increased throughout Iceland by a factor of 2.0 - 5.5. In any season, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 - 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 - 1500 W m-2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations of 500 - 1000 m above mean sea level, power density is independent of the distance to the coast. In addition to seasonal and spatial variability, differences in average wind speed and power density also exist for different wind directions. Along the coast in winter, power density of onshore winds is higher by 100 - 700 W m-2 than that of offshore winds. The regions with the highest average wind speeds are impractical for wind farms, due to the distances from road

  19. The erosive potential of jawbreakers, a type of hard candy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Gambon, D.L.; van Dop, L.F.; van Liere, L.E.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives:  To explore the consumption pattern of a specific type of acidic solid candy, the so-called jawbreakers, by primary school children and determine the erosive potential of this type of candy in vivo. Methods:  A questionnaire about jawbreaker consumption was distributed among 10-12

  20. Environmental risks associated to wind erosion in a metal mining area from SE Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Fernandez, G.; Romero Diaz, A.

    2009-07-01

    Soils and mining wastes from the Mediterranean mining area placed in the Sierra Minera Mountains are highly enriched in heavy metals such as lead and zinc, but also other metals such as cadmium and arsenic. Wind erosion in this area could be considered extremely high and hazards associated to this eroded sediments seems to be high because the huge amount of metals present in this wastes. Therefore, combination of high erosion rates and high metal concentration in this mining waste, make those environmental risks can be considered high for the surrounding ecosystems, but also for public health of the nearby villages and towns. In order, to study these wind erosion processes over these mining materials, some experiments for the evaluation of the transportation of soil particles were carried out. Erosion rates in this realm is particularly important during spring months, when increased activity of the eastern winds brings intense soil dragging, with strong effects on the metals dispersion, including the massive removal of sediments. (Author) 16 refs.

  1. Responses of wind erosion to climate-induced vegetation changes on the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Seth M.; Belnap, Jayne; Okin, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    Projected increases in aridity throughout the southwestern United States due to anthropogenic climate change will likely cause reductions in perennial vegetation cover, which leaves soil surfaces exposed to erosion. Accelerated rates of dust emission from wind erosion have large implications for ecosystems and human well-being, yet there is poor understanding of the sources and magnitude of dust emission in a hotter and drier climate. Here we use a two-stage approach to compare the susceptibility of grasslands and three different shrublands to wind erosion on the Colorado Plateau and demonstrate how climate can indirectly moderate the magnitude of aeolian sediment flux through different responses of dominant plants in these communities. First, using results from 20 y of vegetation monitoring, we found perennial grass cover in grasslands declined with increasing mean annual temperature in the previous year, whereas shrub cover in shrublands either showed no change or declined as temperature increased, depending on the species. Second, we used these vegetation monitoring results and measurements of soil stability as inputs into a field-validated wind erosion model and found that declines in perennial vegetation cover coupled with disturbance to biological soil crust resulted in an exponential increase in modeled aeolian sediment flux. Thus the effects of increased temperature on perennial plant cover and the correlation of declining plant cover with increased aeolian flux strongly suggest that sustained drought conditions across the southwest will accelerate the likelihood of dust production in the future on disturbed soil surfaces.

  2. Effects of stubble and mulching on soil erosion by wind in semi-arid China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Peifei; Yin, Guanghua; Gu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Soil erosion is a growing challenge for agricultural production in Northern China. To explore the effect of variation in stubble height and mulching biomass on soil erosion caused by wind, we conducted a field experiment using a quadratic rotation combination design. Results showed that the quantity of straw mulch was the dominant factor affecting soil erosion, and stubble height was of secondary importance. The soil water content in stubble and straw mulching treatments was higher than in a control treatment at 0-20 cm soil, and the tendency in the amount of soil water content was opposite to the amount of wind erosion (r = -0.882, n = 10, p mulch treatments at the 15-20 cm depth was higher than the change from 0-5 cm to 5-10 cm. Combined, the influence of a stubble height of 34 cm and mulch quantity of 4260 kg·ha-1 lowered the amount of erosion to 0.42 t·ha-1, and increased the corn yield to 11900 kg·ha-1. We determined that those were the most appropriate levels of stubble height and straw mulch for crop fields in the semi-arid regions of Northern China.

  3. Effects of stubble and mulching on soil erosion by wind in semi-arid China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Peifei; Yin, Guanghua; Gu, Jian

    2016-07-18

    Soil erosion is a growing challenge for agricultural production in Northern China. To explore the effect of variation in stubble height and mulching biomass on soil erosion caused by wind, we conducted a field experiment using a quadratic rotation combination design. Results showed that the quantity of straw mulch was the dominant factor affecting soil erosion, and stubble height was of secondary importance. The soil water content in stubble and straw mulching treatments was higher than in a control treatment at 0-20 cm soil, and the tendency in the amount of soil water content was opposite to the amount of wind erosion (r = -0.882, n = 10, p soil water content observed in the stubble and mulch treatments at the 15-20 cm depth was higher than the change from 0-5 cm to 5-10 cm. Combined, the influence of a stubble height of 34 cm and mulch quantity of 4260 kg·ha(-1) lowered the amount of erosion to 0.42 t·ha(-1), and increased the corn yield to 11900 kg·ha(-1). We determined that those were the most appropriate levels of stubble height and straw mulch for crop fields in the semi-arid regions of Northern China.

  4. The Wind Energy Potential of Kurdistan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefi, Farzad; Moshtagh, Jamal; Moradi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In the current work by using statistical methods and available software, the wind energy assessment of prone regions for installation of wind turbines in, Qorveh, has been investigated. Information was obtained from weather stations of Baneh, Bijar, Zarina, Saqez, Sanandaj, Qorveh, and Marivan. The monthly average and maximum of wind speed were investigated between the years 2000-2010 and the related curves were drawn. The Golobad curve (direction and percentage of dominant wind and calm wind as monthly rate) between the years 1997-2000 was analyzed and drawn with plot software. The ten-minute speed (at 10, 30, and 60 m height) and direction (at 37.5 and 10 m height) wind data were collected from weather stations of Iranian new energy organization. The wind speed distribution during one year was evaluated by using Weibull probability density function (two-parametrical), and the Weibull curve histograms were drawn by MATLAB software. According to the average wind speed of stations and technical specifications of the types of turbines, the suitable wind turbine for the station was selected. Finally, the Divandareh and Qorveh sites with favorable potential were considered for installation of wind turbines and construction of wind farms.

  5. The Wind Energy Potential of Kurdistan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefi, Farzad; Moshtagh, Jamal; Moradi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In the current work by using statistical methods and available software, the wind energy assessment of prone regions for installation of wind turbines in, Qorveh, has been investigated. Information was obtained from weather stations of Baneh, Bijar, Zarina, Saqez, Sanandaj, Qorveh, and Marivan. The monthly average and maximum of wind speed were investigated between the years 2000–2010 and the related curves were drawn. The Golobad curve (direction and percentage of dominant wind and calm wind as monthly rate) between the years 1997–2000 was analyzed and drawn with plot software. The ten-minute speed (at 10, 30, and 60 m height) and direction (at 37.5 and 10 m height) wind data were collected from weather stations of Iranian new energy organization. The wind speed distribution during one year was evaluated by using Weibull probability density function (two-parametrical), and the Weibull curve histograms were drawn by MATLAB software. According to the average wind speed of stations and technical specifications of the types of turbines, the suitable wind turbine for the station was selected. Finally, the Divandareh and Qorveh sites with favorable potential were considered for installation of wind turbines and construction of wind farms. PMID:27355042

  6. Incidencia potencial de la erosión eólica sobre la degradación del suelo y la calidad del aire en distintas regiones de la Argentina Potential effects of wind erosion on soil degradation and air quality in different regions of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Buschiazzo

    2009-12-01

    ía relativamente más a la calidad del aire que a la del suelo. La magnitud de este proceso estaría regida, principalmente, por el área disponible para la erosión. En suelos sometidos a manejos agrícolas, frecuentemente desnudos y de bajo grado de evolución como los Ustipsammentes y Haplustoles, la erosión eólica tendría efectos intermedios, afectando tanto a la calidad del suelo como a la del aire. Finalmente, en suelos relativamente más evolucionados y sometidos a manejos agrícolas como los Hapludoles, la erosión afectaría en mayor medida a la calidad del suelo, siendo la emisión de partículas finas de relativa menor importancia.Wind erosion can impact soil and air quality. The magnitude of these effects depends on the soil type and management conditions, and is associated with the transport conditions of soil particles: saltation and rolling affect soil quality to a greater extent while suspension tends to increase the emission of fine particles to the atmosphere. The objective of this research was to determine the magnitude of both type of movements in soils of Argentina, in order to predict potential effects on soil or air quality. This study was carried out in four provinces of Argentina: Chaco (CHA, San Luis (SLU, La Pampa (LPA and Río Negro (PAT. In each case, wind erosion was measured in the 1 ha-square fields by means of BSNE samplers. Results indicated that the total amount of transported material, the so-called mass flux (FM as well as the absolute amount of eroded soil (Q were higher in sites with less developed soils of SLU (Ustipsamment and LPA (Haplustoll and lower in sites with a better developed soil of CHA (Hapludoll or with less developed soil but with permanent soil cover with natural grasses of PAT (Haplargid. Saltation and rolling were the main transport forms in SLU, LPA and CHA and suspension in PAT. Though low (10%, the plant coverage existing in this last site was enough to increase the height of the wind profile and to favor the transport

  7. The acidic and erosive potential of five sports drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jeremy; Loyn, Theresa; McAndrew, Robert

    2005-12-01

    Sports drinks are becoming increasingly popular as we are all being encouraged to adopt a healthier lifestyle with regular exercise. However, many of these products are based on acidic fruits and may contribute to erosion. The aim of this study was to screen a number of these products for their potential to cause enamel erosion in vitro. The erosive potential of a number of readily available sports drinks was assessed in the laboratory by measuring their pH, neutralisable acidity and their ability to erode enamel. These were compared to a positive control, orange juice and a negative control, water. The pH of the sports drinks ranged from 3.16-3.70 with their neutralisable acidity ranging from 9.74-13.44 mls of 0.1M NaOH. The amount of enamel removed following 1-hour immersion in the sports drinks ranged from 1.18-5.36 microns. In comparison, the orange juice control had a pH of 3.68, a neutralisable acidity of 19.68 mls of 0.1 M NaOH and removed 3.24 microns of enamel. Many of the sports drinks tested were found to be erosive. This information will be of use to clinicians when counselling patients with tooth surface loss who use fruit based sports drinks regularly.

  8. Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Mark Z; Archer, Cristina L

    2012-09-25

    Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical energy, which returns to the atmosphere as heat to regenerate some potential and kinetic energy. As the number of wind turbines increases over large geographic regions, power extraction first increases linearly, but then converges to a saturation potential not identified previously from physical principles or turbine properties. These saturation potentials are >250 terawatts (TW) at 100 m globally, approximately 80 TW at 100 m over land plus coastal ocean outside Antarctica, and approximately 380 TW at 10 km in the jet streams. Thus, there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining half (approximately 5.75 TW) or several times the world's all-purpose power from wind in a 2030 clean-energy economy.

  9. Near-surface meteorological conditions associated with active resuspension of dust by wind erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The meteorological conditions associated with extreme winds in the lee of the Colorado Rocky Mountains were studied from the viewpoint of dust resuspension and dispersion. Wind, dispersion, temperature, and dew point conditions occurring near the surface were discussed in detail for a selected event. Near-surface wind speeds were compared to observations made at a standard sampling height. These field data were developed to aid in validation and interpretation of wind tunnel observations and application of dispersion models to wind erosion resuspension. Three conclusions can immediately be drawn from this investigation. First, wind storms in nature are quite gusty, with gusts exceeding the mean speed by 50 percent or more. However, wind direction variations are small by comparison. Thus, wind tunnel studies should be able to simulate the large along-flow turbulence, while keeping cross-flow turbulence to a moderate level. This also has an application to the puff modeling of high winds. Puff models normally assume that the along-flow dispersion coefficient is equal to the cross-flow value. This study suggests that the along-flow coefficient should be much larger than its cross-flow counterpart. Another conclusion involves the usual assumption of Pasquill-Gifford stability class D. In the event studied here, the atmosphere was well mixed with near-neutral thermal stability, yet the horizontal dispersion stability class varied from G to A. Thus, an assumption of Class D horizontal dispersion during high winds would not have been valid during this case. A final conclusion involves the widely applied assumption of a logarithmic wind speed profile during high wind events. This study has indicated that such an assumption is appropriate.

  10. Keeping up with coal technology. Minimizing frozen-coal, wind-erosion problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    A freeze-conditioning agent is described which reduces the strength of the ice which forms on coal. The product has MSHA approval for use in U.S. underground mines. Coal losses from wind erosion during transit can be reduced by use of chemical crusting agents or car covers, or by the addition of several inches of large lumps of coal on top of the smaller particles.

  11. The erosive potential of jawbreakers, a type of hard candy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, H S; Gambon, D L; Van Dop, L F; Van Liere, L E; Veerman, E C I

    2010-11-01

    To explore the consumption pattern of a specific type of acidic solid candy, the so-called jawbreakers, by primary school children and determine the erosive potential of this type of candy in vivo. A questionnaire about jawbreaker consumption was distributed among 10-12 year-old-children (n = 302). Subsequently, 19 healthy volunteers tested four different jawbreakers in vivo. Whole saliva was collected 5 min before, 3 min during and 11 min after consumption. Salivary flow rate and pH were determined. Two-thirds of the children reported a history of jawbreaker consumption, 18% during the last week. More than half of the children estimated their average time for consumption of one jawbreaker to be more than 15 min. In vivo, the jawbreakers induced 8.6-13.9-fold increase in salivary flow rate. Sucking on sour, jumbo and strawberry jawbreakers induced a drop in salivary pH to values below pH 5.5. During consumption of fireball jawbreakers, the intra-oral pH hardly changed. Jawbreakers are frequently used by children, who keep this candy in their mouth for a long time. Jawbreakers differ considerable in erosive potential, with sour and jumbo jawbreakers > strawberry jawbreaker > fireball jawbreaker. This information is of use for dental hygienists counselling juvenile patients with dental erosion. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. [Vegetation above-ground biomass and its affecting factors in water/wind erosion crisscross region on Loess Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-guo; Fan, Jun; Wang, Quan-jiu; Wang, Li

    2011-03-01

    Field investigations were conducted in Liudaogou small watershed in late September 2009 to study the differences of vegetation above-ground biomass, soil moisture content, and soil nutrient contents under different land use patterns, aimed to approach the vegetation above-ground biomass level and related affecting factors in typical small watershed in water/wind erosion crisscross region on Loess Plateau. The above-ground dry biomass of the main vegetations in Liudaogou was 177-2207 g x m(-2), and that in corn field, millet field, abandoned farmland, artificial grassland, natural grassland, and shrub land was 2097-2207, 518-775, 248-578, 280-545, 177-396, and 372-680 g x m(-2), respectively. The mean soil moisture content in 0-100 layer was the highest (14.2%) in farmlands and the lowest (10.9%) in shrub land. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture content was the greatest (26. 7% ) in abandoned farmland, indicating the strong spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture in this kind of farmland. The mean soil water storage was in the order of farmland > artificial grassland > natural grassland > shrub land. Soil dry layer was observed in alfalfa and caragana lands. There was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.639, P water storage, and also, a very significant positive correlation between above-ground fresh biomass and vegetation height. The above-ground biomass of the higher vegetations could potentially better control the wind and water erosion in the water/wind erosion crisscross region. Vegetation above-ground biomass was highly correlated with soil moisture and nutrient contents, but had no significant correlations with elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, and soil bulk density.

  13. Climatological changing effects on wind, precipitation and erosion: Large, meso and small scale analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslan, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The Fourier transformation analysis for monthly average values of meteorological parameters has been considered, and amplitudes, phase angles have been calculated by using ground measurements in Turkey. The first order harmonics of meteorological parameters show large scale effects, while higher order harmonics show the effects of small scale fluctuations. The variations of first through sixth order harmonic amplitudes and phases provide a useful means of understanding the large and local scale effects on meteorological parameters. The phase angle can be used to determine the time of year the maximum or minimum of a given harmonic occurs. The analysis helps us to distinguish different pressure, relative humidity, temperature, precipitation and wind speed regimes and transition regions. Local and large scale phenomenon and some unusual seasonal patterns are also defined near Keban Dam and the irrigation area. Analysis of precipitation based on long term data shows that semi-annual fluctuations are predominant in the study area. Similarly, pressure variations are mostly influenced by semi-annual fluctuations. Temperature and humidity variations are mostly influenced by meso and micro scale fluctuations. Many large and meso scale climate change simulations for the 21st century are based on concentration of green house gases. A better understanding of these effects on soil erosion is necessary to determine social, economic and other impacts of erosion. The second part of this study covers the time series analysis of precipitation, rainfall erosivity and wind erosion at the Marmara Region. Rainfall and runoff erosivity factors are defined by considering the results of field measurements at 10 stations. Climatological changing effects on rainfall erosion have been determined by monitoring meteorological variables. In the previous studies, Fournier Index is defined to estimate the rainfall erosivity for the study area. The Fournier Index or in other words a climatic index

  14. Separation of dry and wet periods from regular weather station data for the analysis of wind erosion risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeini, Mohammadali Saremi; Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    ), climate (e.g. air temperature, solar radiation, evaporation) and soil (e.g. infiltration rate, adhesion). The purpose of this study is to overcome the lack of soil moisture data for wind erosion risk assessment by developing a method to estimate the soil wetness based on easy available weather data......Soil moisture is one of the most important dynamic factors determining soil erodibility, because it affects the stability of soil aggregates and threshold velocities for particle detachment by wind. Soil moisture should, therefore, be included in wind erosion risk assessments. However, despite its...... importance, soil moisture content is often ignored in the analysis of wind data for wind erosion studies. The main reason most probably being the lack of soil moisture sensors in conventional climate stations. Soil moisture at a given point in time is determined by rain (e.g. rainfall amount, duration...

  15. Sonic anemometry and sediment traps to evaluate the effectiveness of windbreaks in preventing wind erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro López

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present work analyzes the effectiveness of windbreaks against wind erosion through the study of streamline patterns and turbulent flow by means of sonic anemometry and sediment traps. To this end, windbreaks composed of plastic meshes (7.5 m long and 0.7 m tall were used. Windbreaks are a good means to reduce wind erosion, as they produce a positive effect on the characteristics of air currents that are related to wind erosion processes. Due to their ease of installation and dismantling, plastic meshes are widely used in areas where they are not required permanently. In our study, the use of a mesh of 13 × 30 threads cm−2 and 39 % porosity resulted in an average reduction of 85 % in face velocity at a height of 0.4 m and a distance of 1 m from the windbreak. The turbulence intensity i increased behind the windbreak because the reduction of mean of air speed on the leeside caused by the flow of air through the windbreak. Fluctuation levels, however, remained stable. The mean values of turbulence kinetic energy k decreased by 65 % to 86 % at a distance of 1 m from the windbreak and at a height of 0.4 m. The windbreak reduces erosion and sediment transportation 2 m downwind (2.9 times the windbreak height. Nevertheless, sediment transportation was not reduced at a height of 1.0 m and the effect of the windbreak was not observed at a distance of 6 m downwind (8.6 m times the windbreak height.

  16. Offshore wind energy potential in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Lixuan; Möller, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates available offshore wind energy resources in China’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ) with the aid of a Geographical Information System (GIS), which allows the influence of technical, spatial and economic constraints on offshore wind resources being reflected in a continuous...... of each spatial constraint as well as various scenarios of spatial constraints on marginal production costs of offshore wind energy. Furthermore, the impacts of differing Feed-in-tariff (FIT) standards on the economic potential are calculated. It confirms that economic potential of offshore wind energy...... and economic costs. However, the influence of tropical cyclone risks on these regions and detailed assessments at regional or local scale are worth of further discussions. Nevertheless, the models and results provide a foundation for a more comprehensive regional planning framework that would address...

  17. A Maine romance. [Solar heating, wind power and cliff erosion control at a Maine site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.A.

    1979-09-01

    The construction of a house on the coast of Maine included terracing of the bluff for erosion control, installation of water solar collectors for space and water heating, and construction of a wind turbine for electric power generation. A total of 4,027 ft/sup 2/ of house area is heated by a system of 10 collectors and 4,000 gal water storage. Insulation values are R-19 in the walls, R-40 in the ceiling, R-26 in the floors, and R-14 in the basement. South-facing windows provide additional heat gain. The wind turbine and generator system supplies alternating current to the house and also heats auxiliary water storage when necessary. The house, collectors, and wind turbine are designed to supply 85% of the heating load.

  18. Significance of frost action and surface soil characteristics to wind erosion at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, N.

    1978-09-01

    This study of the potential links between soil freezing and wind erosion was conducted at Rocky Flats during 4 winters. Most of the study has involved the conditions leading to the growth of segregation ice in the surface soil and the ground heave which that produces. This occurs about 15 times in the average winter at Rocky Flats, always on a diurnal cycle. Such frost action is preferentially distributed in time and space and cannot be estimated from air temperatures alone. November and March are the months of most frequent frost heave, and then only in the days following precipitation or snowmelt. The most marked frost effects are found on exposed interfluve and hillcrest situations, where there are patches of bare soil. Almost no effects are found on the valley floors. Soil disturbance by segregation ice leads to a marked decrease in soil bulk density, and presumably in soil strength though this change has not been quantitatively defined. However, this does not lead to wind erosion of the soil at the study site because that surface is more influenced by the vegetation cover than by the soil characteristics.

  19. Soil drying and wind erosion as affected by different types of shelterbelts planted in the desert region of western Rajasthan, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, J.P.; Rao, G.G.S.N.; Gupta, G.N.; Rao, B.V.R.

    1983-03-01

    Studies on the effects of 8-year-old shelterbelt plantations indicate a general reduction in wind velocity, wind erosion and evaporative loss of moisture from fields protected with Prosopis juliflora, Cassia siamea and Acacia tortilis. Cassia siamea shelterbelts are the most effective in checking wind erosion and delaying drying of the soil. (Refs. 13).

  20. Soil wind erosion in ecological olive trees in the Tabernas desert (southeastern Spain): a wind tunnel experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Carlos; Lozano, Francisco Javier; Gallardo, Pedro; Giménez, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Wind erosion is a key component of the soil degradation processes. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of material loss from wind on soil properties for different soil types and changes in soil properties in olive groves when they are tilled. The study area is located in the north of the Tabernas Desert, in the province of Almería, southeastern Spain. It is one of the driest areas in Europe, with a semiarid thermo-Mediterranean type of climate. We used a new wind tunnel model over three different soil types (olive-cropped Calcisol, Cambisol and Luvisol) and studied micro-plot losses and deposits detected by an integrated laser scanner. We also studied the image processing possibilities for examining the particles attached to collector plates located at the end of the tunnel to determine their characteristics and whether they were applicable to the setup. Samples collected in the traps at the end of the tunnel were analyzed. We paid special attention to the influence of organic carbon, carbonate and clay contents because of their special impact on soil crusting and the wind-erodible fraction. A principal components analysis (PCA) was carried out to find any relations on generated dust properties and the intensity and behavior of those relationships. Component 1 separated data with high N and OC contents from samples high in fine silt, CO3= and available K content. Component 2 separated data with high coarse silt and clay contents from data with high fine sand content. Component 3 was an indicator of available P2O5 content. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to analyze the effect of soil type and sampling height on different properties of trapped dust. Calculations based on tunnel data showed overestimation of erosion in soil types and calculation of the fraction of soil erodible by wind done by other authors for Spanish soils. As the highest loss was found in Cambisols, mainly due to the effect on soil crusting and the wind

  1. A Terrestrial Wind Erosion Analog for Mound and Moat Morphology of Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M. A.; Netoff, D. I.

    2016-12-01

    A striking feature of Gale crater is the 5.5 km high, layered mound called Mount Sharp- the major exploration target for the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity. Within the 154 km diameter crater, low plains (e.g. Aeolis Palus) resemble a moat surrounding Mount Sharp. Current studies debate whether sedimentary layers completely filled the crater, as well as how the units were sculpted to their current morphology. Areas of southern Utah are favorable for terrestrial comparisons to Mars due to the exceptional exposure and lack of vegetation in the desert climate. Here, water is key in shaping large geomorphic features, but wind is also an effective sculptor of the landscape. In Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, a distinctive weathering pit with a central mound and moat occurs in bleached eolian facies of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone. This pit is 60 m wide by 20 m deep and was informally dubbed "inselberg pit", although it has recently gained notoriety under the name of "cosmic navel" or "cosmic ashtray". Inside the pit, loose dune sand shifts periodically and seasonally across the pit floor and up against the walls. Eolian abrasion features of cm to m scales include: grooves, flutes, and erosional-shaped fingers or stalks topped with concretions. Strong regional and local winds are funneled to amplify their velocity and produce a venturi effect that sculpts the pit via wind abrasion, creating an internal mound and moat morphology. Although the Navajo pit is significantly smaller than Gale crater on Mars by several orders of magnitude, both show comparable mound and moat morphologies accompanied by erosional wind features. In Gale crater, evidence for wind erosion includes yardangs, dunes, and wind streaks. The natural Navajo analogy suggests that strong, dynamic, focused winds on Mars could be capable of carving deeply into sedimentary layers over long periods of time to generate Mount Sharp, surrounded by low, eroded plains within Gale crater.

  2. Simulated effects of crop rotations and residue management on wind erosion in Wuchuan, west-central Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Erda; Harman, Wyatte L; Williams, Jimmy R; Xu, Cheng

    2002-01-01

    For decades, wind erosion has triggered dust and sand storms, buffeting Beijing and areas of northwestern China to the point of being hazardous to human health while rapidly eroding crop and livestock productivity. The EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) field-scale simulation model was used to assess long-term effects of improved crop rotations and crop residue management practices on wind erosion in Wuchuan County in Inner Mongolia. Simulation results indicate that preserving crop stalks until land is prepared by zone tillage for the next year's crop in lieu of using them as a source of heating fuel or livestock fodder significantly reduces wind erosion by 60%. At the same time, grain and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) yields were maintained or improved. Significant reductions in erosion, 35 to 46%, also resulted from delaying stalk removal until late January through late April. Yearly wind erosion was concentrated in April and May, the windiest months. Additionally, the use of alternative crop rotations resulted in differences in wind erosion, largely due to a difference in residue stature and quality and differences in biomass produced. As a result, altering current crop rotation systems by expanding corn (Zea mays L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and millet [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] and reducing potato and pea (Pisum sativum L.) production significantly reduced simulated wind erosion, thus diminishing the severity of dust and sand storms in northwestern China. Saving and protecting topsoil over time will sustain land productivity and have long-term implications for improving conditions of rural poverty in the region.

  3. Ion sputtering of minerals and glasses: a first step to the simulation of solar wind erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, K.; Sassmannshausen, U.; Kuelzer, H.; Herr, W. (Koeln Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernchemie)

    1982-09-01

    Selected rockforming minerals (plagioclase, augite, olivine, ilmenite, silicate and metal phases of the meteorite 'Brenham') as well as silicate and phosphate glasses were irradiated with heavy ions (/sup 4/He/sup +/, /sup 14/N/sup +/, /sup 20/Ne/sup +/, /sup 40/Ar/sup +/, /sup 56/Fe/sup +/, Xe/sup +/sub(nat)) in the energy range of 50 to 130 keV in order to study ion-induced sputtering. Sputtering yields were measured independently by means of multiple beam interferometry and particle track autoradiography. The theory of sputtering by Sigmund, modified by Smith, was used to convert experimental heavy ion sputtering yields to H/sup +/- and He/sup +/-sputtering yields of the same target. Taking into account solar wind irradiation conditions at the lunar surface, an estimate of lunar erosion rates due to solar wind sputtering is given for the targets studied.

  4. Erosive potential of soft drinks on human enamel: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Lin Wang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: All tested soft drinks were found to be erosive. Soft drinks with high calcium contents have significantly lower erosive potential. Low pH value and high citrate content may cause more surface enamel loss. As the erosive time increased, the titratable acidity to pH 7 may be a predictor of the erosive potential for acidic soft drinks. The erosive potential of the soft drinks may be predicted based on the types of acid content, pH value, titratable acidity, and ion concentration.

  5. The wind energy potential in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, P

    2005-01-01

    The wind energy are increasing its contribution to large scale electricity generation in many countries.The high technical maturity reached by modern wind turbines returns it viable and competitive in many regions, specially in those where a suitable legal framework stimulates the generation from renewable sources of energy.As this regard, the objective of this report is to demonstrate that, far from being limited to provide energy to remote, dispersed or geographically isolated sites not served by conventional networks, the wind energy has fully potential to supply a pretty relevant part of the electrical consumption of the great urban centers located in those zones of the country favored with this resource.For it, two preliminary estimations has done: the total 'windy' surface area in geographic proximity of the high voltage lines and electrical substations of the Argentine System of Interconnection (SADI) able 'to be seeded' with wind turbines, and the total electrical energy feasible of being generated from them.The paper supposes the exclusion of important non apt areas by virtue of strictly geographic, economic or environmental considerations.Even so, the result of the final calculation is extraordinarily high and promissory: if only 4% of the total surface of the contiguous land areas (in a maximum radius of 62 km) to the high voltage transmission system (in which the annual mean wind speed surpasses the 5.55 m/s) would be filled with power wind turbines, the annual average energy produced by them would be equivalent to 89% of the estimated national electrical consumption for year 2013.The usable wind potential in favorable technical conditions for commercial generation rounds this way around 40,000 MW, that would report an annual average energy of 100,000 GWh, occupying an area near 5000 km 2 .The total wind energy potential is (of course) considerably greater. Anyway, given the random nature of the wind and the consequent characteristics of not firm power

  6. Evaluation of the erosive potential of soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; de Andrade Moreira Machado, Maria Aparecida; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2007-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the capability of different soft drinks (Coca-Cola(R)-C, Coca-Cola Light(R)-CL, Guaraná(R)-G, Pepsi Twist(R)-P and Sprite Light(R)-SL) to erode dental enamel, relating the percentage of superficial microhardness change (%SMHC) to concentrations of fluoride and phosphate, buffering capacity and pH of these drinks. The soft drinks were evaluated in respect to concentration of phosphate and fluoride spectrophotometrically using Fiske, Subarrow method and by specific electrode (Orion 9609), respectively. The pH and the buffering capacity were determined by glass electrode and by estimating of the volume of NaOH necessary to change the pH of the drink in one unit, respectively. One hundred specimens of bovine enamel were randomly assigned to 5 groups of 20 each. They were exposed to 4 cycles of demineralisation in the beverage and remineralisation in artificial saliva. The softening of enamel was evaluated by %SMHC. The mean %SMHC was: C=77.27%, CL= 72.45%, SL=78.43%, G=66.65% and P=67.95%. Comparing the %SMHC promoted by 5 soft drinks, SL = C > CL > P = G (P.05). The five soft drinks caused surface softening of enamel (erosion). In respect to the chemical variables tested, despite not statistically significant, the pH seems to have more influence on the erosive potential of these drinks. (Eur J Dent 2007;1:10-13).

  7. Potential for monitoring soil erosion features and soil erosion modeling components from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langran, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil erosion and its effects on soil productivity are essential in agricultural decision making and planning from the field scale to the national level. Erosion models have been primarily developed for designing erosion control systems, predicting sediment yield for reservoir design, predicting sediment transport, and simulating water quality. New models proposed are more comprehensive in that the necessary components (hydrology, erosion-sedimentation, nutrient cycling, tillage, etc.) are linked in a model appropriate for studying the erosion-productivity problem. Recent developments in remote sensing systems, such as Landsat Thematic Mapper, Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), etc., can contribute significantly to the future development and operational use of these models.

  8. Variability of Some soil physical and chemical properties along a transect under wind erosion processes in Segzi district, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ghiesari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arid and semiarid environment is the main climatic condition in central Iran, as well as 80 million km 2 of Iran (> 50% is affected by wind erosion. During the last decades, the area affected by wind erosion and desertification processes has increased as a result of human activity, climate change and recent drought (Karimzadeh, 2001. Thus, it is crucial to control wind erosion in the arid regions of Iran as the most serious environmental problem. In this regard, the information on the rate of soil erosion is needed for developing management practices and making strategic decisions.. Soil erosion rate has increased as a result of improper gypsum and clay mining operations In the Segzi region of Isfahan,. coarsening of the soil texture (as a result of the loss of fine textured materials, depletion of soil organic matter and degeneration of vegetation are wind erosion damages occurred widely. The objective of this study was to estimate wind erosion rates with 137Cs technique, and also to determine changes in soil physical and chemical properties by wind erosion process, along the wind erosion transect across the Segzi district, east of Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in arid region of east of Isfahan Province. sixteen sites were selected along a northeast- southwest transect with 42 km length. Eighty soil samples were taken from 0-30 cm in 5 cm layer depth sections. Some physical and chemical properties were measured and a reference site with lowest rate of soil erosion and sedimentation was also studied. 137-Cs technique was used for determination of erosional and depositional sites. Analysis of variance was used to compare physical and chemical properties sites to reference site. Results and Discussion: The results showed that sites of 1 to 8, 10 and 12-16 were identified as erosional sites and two sites of 9 and 11 were recognized as depositional sites. Soil organic matter and total nitrogen contents were

  9. Application of remote sensing to estimating soil erosion potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris-Jones, D. R.; Kiefer, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of remote sensing data sources and interpretation techniques has been tested in a 6136 hectare watershed with agricultural, forest and urban land cover to determine the relative utility of alternative aerial photographic data sources for gathering the desired land use/land cover data. The principal photographic data sources are high altitude 9 x 9 inch color infrared photos at 1:120,000 and 1:60,000 and multi-date medium altitude color and color infrared photos at 1:60,000. Principal data for estimating soil erosion potential include precipitation, soil, slope, crop, crop practice, and land use/land cover data derived from topographic maps, soil maps, and remote sensing. A computer-based geographic information system organized on a one-hectare grid cell basis is used to store and quantify the information collected using different data sources and interpretation techniques. Research results are compared with traditional Universal Soil Loss Equation field survey methods.

  10. Remote sensing as a tool for estimating soil erosion potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris-Jones, D. R.; Morgan, K. M.; Kiefer, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Universal Soil Loss Equation is a frequently used methodology for estimating soil erosion potential. The Universal Soil Loss Equation requires a variety of types of geographic information (e.g. topographic slope, soil erodibility, land use, crop type, and soil conservation practice) in order to function. This information is traditionally gathered from topographic maps, soil surveys, field surveys, and interviews with farmers. Remote sensing data sources and interpretation techniques provide an alternative method for collecting information regarding land use, crop type, and soil conservation practice. Airphoto interpretation techniques and medium altitude, multi-date color and color infrared positive transparencies (70mm) were utilized in this study to determine their effectiveness for gathering the desired land use/land cover data. Successful results were obtained within the test site, a 6136 hectare watershed in Dane County, Wisconsin.

  11. Experimental study on influence of vegetation coverage on runoff in wind-water erosion crisscross region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhua; Zhang, Ronggang; Sun, Juan

    2018-02-01

    Using artificial rainfall simulation method, 23 simulation experiments were carried out in water-wind erosion crisscross region in order to analyze the influence of vegetation coverage on runoff and sediment yield. The experimental plots are standard plots with a length of 20m, width of 5m and slope of 15 degrees. The simulation experiments were conducted in different vegetation coverage experimental plots based on three different rainfall intensities. According to the experimental observation data, the influence of vegetation coverage on runoff and infiltration was analyzed. Vegetation coverage has a significant impact on runoff, and the higher the vegetation coverage is, the smaller the runoff is. Under the condition of 0.6mm/min rainfall intensity, the runoff volume from the experimental plot with 18% vegetation coverage was 1.2 times of the runoff from the experimental with 30% vegetation coverage. What’s more, the difference of runoff is more obvious in higher rainfall intensity. If the rainfall intensity reaches 1.32mm/min, the runoff from the experimental plot with 11% vegetation coverage is about 2 times as large as the runoff from the experimental plot with 53%vegetation coverage. Under the condition of small rainfall intensity, the starting time of runoff in the experimental plot with higher vegetation coverage is later than that in the experimental plot with low vegetation coverage. However, under the condition of heavy rainfall intensity, there is no obvious difference in the beginning time of runoff. In addition, the higher the vegetation coverage is, the deeper the rainfall infiltration depth is.The results can provide reference for ecological construction carried out in wind erosion crisscross region with serious soil erosion.

  12. Wind erosion as an environmental transport pathway of glyphosate and AMPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Célia P. M.; Goossens, Dirk; Rezaei, Mahrooz; Riksen, Michel; Mol, Hans G. J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    health risk assessment studies. Moreover, glyphosate applications during dry periods in regions susceptible to wind erosion should be avoided.

  13. Wind Characteristics and Wind Energy Potential in the Golf of Tunis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmouni, A.W.; Ben Salah, M.; Kerkeni, C.; Askri, F.; Ben Nasrallah, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of wind resource in the Golf of Tunis. Experimental measurement of wind speed and wind direction, are conducted. The statistic treatment of results permitted us to evaluate the most characteristics of wind energy in the studied site. The obtained results can be used to perform wind power designs and confirm that the Golf of Tunis has promising wind energy potential

  14. Modelling topographic potential for erosion and deposition using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helena Mitasova; Louis R. Iverson

    1996-01-01

    Modelling of erosion and deposition in complex terrain within a geographical information system (GIS) requires a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM), reliable estimation of topographic parameters, and formulation of erosion models adequate for digital representation of spatially distributed parameters. Regularized spline with tension was integrated within a...

  15. Buffer erosion: An overview of concepts and potential safety consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, Michael J.; Arthur, Randy; Bennett, David; Savage, David; Saellfors, Goeran; Wennerstroem, Haakan

    2010-11-01

    In its safety analysis SR-Can, SKB reported preliminary results and conclusions on the mechanisms of bentonite colloid formation and stability, with a rough estimate of the consequences of loss of bentonite buffer by erosion. With the review of SR-Can the authorities (SKI and SSI) commented that erosion of the buffer had the greatest safety significance, that the understanding of the mechanisms of buffer erosion was inadequate, and that more work would be required to arrive at robust estimates of the extent and impacts of buffer erosion. After the SR-Can report, SKB started a two-year research project on buffer erosion. The results from this two-year project have been reported in several SKB technical reports. SSM started this project to build up its own competence in the related scientific areas by a preliminary evaluation of SKB's research results

  16. Dust records in the Pleistocene sediments of Fraser Island: palaeoclimatic reconstruction of wind erosion over the last 600 ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longmore, M.E. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). Dept of Geography; McTainsh, G.H. [Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). Fac of Environmental Sciences

    1997-12-31

    Full text: Pleistocene lake sediments from a relic perched freshwater lake on Fraser Island have been found to date back to ca.600 ka using U/Th analysis of the organics. This sequence is one of the three longest terrestrial records of environmental change in Australia and the contained evidence of vegetation, fire and lake level changes (Longmore and Heijnis, 1996) and is an invaluable contribution to palaeoclimatic reconstruction. A younger sequence, dated by conventional radiocarbon analysis, has 6.5 m of continuous organic sedimentation from ca. 30 ka to the present. The last 8.5 ka has been analysed in detail, showing a mid-Holocene `dry` period (Longmore, 1996). Continental aeolian dust from extreme wind erosional events has been measured in modern atmospheres (McTainsh, 1989; Knight et al., 1995) and deep sea cores (Hesse, 1994), but the terrestrial record of wind erosion during the Pleistocene is sparse. We will report on a pilot project to determine the presence of aeolian dust from extreme wind erosional events in the past in the sediments of Fraser Island lakes. Due to the highly weathered, well-sorted, siliceous nature of the dune sands forming the Island and the highly organic nature of the lake sediments (80-95% LOI), these are some of the few terrestrial sequences that permit separation of aeolian dust from local catchment materials. In the future, oxygen isotope and XRD analysis of the extracted dust will allow the most likely source of the entrained material to be determined and thus provide further evidence as to the wind regime during the last 600ka and 30ka respectively. The separation of dust from these terrestrial sequences is a major achievement and potentially may make a significant contribution to global palaeoclimatic models. Paper no. 78. 5 refs.

  17. Global potential for wind-generated electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi; McElroy, Michael B; Kiviluoma, Juha

    2009-07-07

    The potential of wind power as a global source of electricity is assessed by using winds derived through assimilation of data from a variety of meteorological sources. The analysis indicates that a network of land-based 2.5-megawatt (MW) turbines restricted to nonforested, ice-free, nonurban areas operating at as little as 20% of their rated capacity could supply >40 times current worldwide consumption of electricity, >5 times total global use of energy in all forms. Resources in the contiguous United States, specifically in the central plain states, could accommodate as much as 16 times total current demand for electricity in the United States. Estimates are given also for quantities of electricity that could be obtained by using a network of 3.6-MW turbines deployed in ocean waters with depths <200 m within 50 nautical miles (92.6 km) of closest coastlines.

  18. I Got Them Dust Bowl Blues: Wind Erosion in the Music of the Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    This paper deals with the role of wind erosion and blowing dust on the music of the Dust Bowl region, a portion of the southern Great Plains of the United States. A defining characteristic of the region is dust storms, and in the 1930s, severe dust storms created dramatic images that came to symbolize all of the economic, social and environmental hardships suffered by the people during the 1930s. The music of the time, by Woody Guthrie and others, suggested that the region was being destroyed, never to recover. The region was resilient, however, and in recent decades, dust has been depicted in songs either as an adversity to be endured or simply as a normal part of life in the area. It may be that blowing dust has become a defining characteristic of the region because of a somewhat warped sense of pride in living in an often-difficult environment.

  19. Estimation of wind characteristics at potential wind energy conversion sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    A practical method has been developed and applied to the problem of determining wind characteristics at candidate wind energy conversion sites where there are no available historical data. The method uses a mass consistent wind flow model (called COMPLEX) to interpolate between stations where wind data are available. The COMPLEX model incorporates the effects of terrain features and airflow. The key to the practical application of COMPLEX to the derivation of wind statistics is the model's linearity. This allows the input data sets to be resolved into orthogonal components along the set of eigenvectors of the covariance matrix. The solution for each eigenvector is determined with COMPLEX; the hourly interpolated winds are then formed from linear combinations of these solutions. The procedure requires: acquisition and merger of wind data from three to five stations, application of COMPLEX to each of the seven to 11 (depending on the number of stations for which wind data are available) eigenvectors, reconstruction of the hourly interpolated winds at the site from the eigenvector solutions, and finally, estimating the wind characteristics from the simulated hourly values. The report describes the methodology and the underlying theory. Possible improvements to the procedure are also discussed.

  20. Drawing a representative sample from the NCSS soil database: Building blocks for the national wind erosion network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing national wind erosion models for the continental United States requires a comprehensive spatial representation of continuous soil particle size distributions (PSD) for model input. While the current coverage of soil survey is nearly complete, the most detailed particle size classes have c...

  1. A large source of dust missing in particulate matter emission inventories? Wind erosion of post-fire landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; S. H. Chung; B. K. Lamb

    2017-01-01

    Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire contributes substantial particulate matter (PM) in the form of dust to the atmosphere, but the magnitude of this dust source is largely unknown. It is important to accurately quantify dust emissions because they can impact human health, degrade visibility, exacerbate dust-on-snow issues (including snowmelt timing, snow chemistry...

  2. Analysis of Wind Energy Potential and Vibrations Caused by Wind Turbine on Its Basement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaláb, Z.; Hanslian, David; Stolárik, M.; Pinka, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (2014), s. 151-159 ISSN 1335-1788 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : wind turbine * wind energy potential * wind map * wind map * experimental measurement * vibration velocity Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.329, year: 2014 http://actamont.tuke.sk/pdf/2014/n3/6kalab.pdf

  3. Characterizing soil erosion potential using electrical resistivity imaging : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The erosion rate, or erodibility, of soil depends on many soil characteristics including: plasticity, : water content, grain size, percent clay, compaction, and shear strength. Many of these characteristics also : influence soil in situ bulk electric...

  4. Characterizing soil erosion potential using electrical resistivity imaging : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The erosion rate, or erodibility, of soil depends on many soil characteristics : including: plasticity, water content, grain size, percent clay, compaction, and shear : strength. Many of these characteristics also influence soil in situ bulk electric...

  5. Influence of beverage composition on the results of erosive potential measurement by different measurement techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, D. H. J.; Vieira, A. M.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of beverage composition on the measurement of erosive potential is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether beverage composition influences the measurement of erosive potential and to evaluate the influence of exposure in small and large volumes. Eleven beverages were

  6. Influence of beverage composition on the results of erosive potential measurement by different measurement techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, D.H.; Vieira, A.M.; Ruben, J.L.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of beverage composition on the measurement of erosive potential is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether beverage composition influences the measurement of erosive potential and to evaluate the influence of exposure in small and large volumes. Eleven beverages were

  7. Sand transport by wind, erosion and deposition and the origin of aeolian bedforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran Vinent, Orencio

    2014-05-01

    Aeolian processes involve the wind action on a sedimentary substrate, namely erosion, sand transport and deposition. They are responsible for the emergence of aeolian dunes and ripples. Here, we discuss the physics of aeolian sediment transport from a physical point of view. Relevant time and length scales associated to turbulent wind fluctuations are summarized using aerodynamic theory. At the microscopic scale, the main forces acting on the grains are detailed. Sand transport is then studied using two phase numerical simulations based on a discrete element method for particles coupled to a continuum Reynolds averaged description of hydrodynamics. We then introduce the concepts - e.g. saturated flux, saturation length - and the relevant framework for the development of a continuum (macroscopic) quantitative description of transport at the core of our current understanding of aeolian dunes formation. At smaller scales, aeolian ripples arise from the interaction of sediment transport and topography. At larger scales, the nonlinear nature of the interaction between dunes leads to the formation of dune fields.

  8. Wind tunnel tests of biodegradable fugitive dust suppressants being considered to reduce soil erosion by wind at radioactive waste construction sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Dennis, G.W.; Bushaw, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed of three fugitive dust control agents derived from potato and sugar beet products. These materials are being considered for use as dust suppressants to reduce the potential for transport of radioactive materials by wind from radioactive waste construction and remediation sites. Soil and dust control agent type, solution concentrations, application quantities, aging (or drying) conditions, surface disturbance, and wind and saltating sand eolian erosive stresses were selected and controlled to simulate application and exposure of excavated soil surfaces in the field. A description of the tests, results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented in this report. The results of this study indicate that all three dust control agents can protect exposed soil surfaces from extreme eolian stresses. It is also clear that the interaction and performance of each agent with various soil types may differ dramatically. Thus, soils similar to that received from ML should be best protected by high concentration (∼2.5%) solutions of potato starch at low water application levels (∼1 to 2 L/m 2 ). Because the effectiveness of PS on this soil type is degraded after a moderate amount of simulated rainfall, other options or additives should be considered if surfaces are to be protected for long intervals or during periods of intermittent rainfall and hot, windy conditions. On the other hand, XDCA should be considered when excavating sandy soils. It should be noted, however, that because the Hanford soil test results are based on a small number of tests, it would be prudent to perform additional tests prior to selecting a fugitive dust control agent for use at the Hanford Site. While fermented potato waste was not the best fixative used on either soil, it did perform reasonably well on both soil types (better than XDCA on Idaho soil and better than PS on Hanford soil)

  9. Wind tunnel tests of biodegradable fugitive dust suppressants being considered to reduce soil erosion by wind at radioactive waste construction sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Dennis, G.W.; Bushaw, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed of three fugitive dust control agents derived from potato and sugar beet products. These materials are being considered for use as dust suppressants to reduce the potential for transport of radioactive materials by wind from radioactive waste construction and remediation sites. Soil and dust control agent type, solution concentrations, application quantities, aging (or drying) conditions, surface disturbance, and wind and saltating sand eolian erosive stresses were selected and controlled to simulate application and exposure of excavated soil surfaces in the field. A description of the tests, results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented in this report. The results of this study indicate that all three dust control agents can protect exposed soil surfaces from extreme eolian stresses. It is also clear that the interaction and performance of each agent with various soil types may differ dramatically. Thus, soils similar to that received from ML should be best protected by high concentration ({approximately}2.5%) solutions of potato starch at low water application levels ({approximately}1 to 2 L/m{sup 2}). Because the effectiveness of PS on this soil type is degraded after a moderate amount of simulated rainfall, other options or additives should be considered if surfaces are to be protected for long intervals or during periods of intermittent rainfall and hot, windy conditions. On the other hand, XDCA should be considered when excavating sandy soils. It should be noted, however, that because the Hanford soil test results are based on a small number of tests, it would be prudent to perform additional tests prior to selecting a fugitive dust control agent for use at the Hanford Site. While fermented potato waste was not the best fixative used on either soil, it did perform reasonably well on both soil types (better than XDCA on Idaho soil and better than PS on Hanford soil).

  10. The Wind Energy Potential of Kurdistan, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Arefi, Farzad; Moshtagh, Jamal; Moradi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In the current work by using statistical methods and available software, the wind energy assessment of prone regions for installation of wind turbines in, Qorveh, has been investigated. Information was obtained from weather stations of Baneh, Bijar, Zarina, Saqez, Sanandaj, Qorveh, and Marivan. The monthly average and maximum of wind speed were investigated between the years 2000?2010 and the related curves were drawn. The Golobad curve (direction and percentage of dominant wind and calm wind...

  11. Food acid content and erosive potential of sugar-free confections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, P; Walker, G D; Yuan, Y; Reynolds, C; Stacey, M A; Reynolds, E C

    2017-06-01

    Dental erosion is an increasingly prevalent problem associated with frequent consumption of acidic foods and beverages. The aim of this study was to measure the food acid content and the erosive potential of a variety of sugar-free confections. Thirty sugar-free confections were selected and extracts analysed to determine pH, titratable acidity, chemical composition and apparent degree of saturation with respect to apatite. The effect of the sugar-free confections in artificial saliva on human enamel was determined in an in vitro dental erosion assay using change in surface microhardness. The change in surface microhardness was used to categorize the confections as high, moderate or low erosive potential. Seventeen of the 30 sugar-free confections were found to contain high concentrations of food acids, exhibit low pH and high titratable acidity and have high erosive potential. Significant correlations were found between the dental erosive potential (change in enamel surface microhardness) and pH and titratable acidity of the confections. Ten of these high erosive potential confections displayed dental messages on the packaging suggesting they were safe for teeth. Many sugar-free confections, even some with 'Toothfriendly' messages on the product label, contain high contents of food acids and have erosive potential. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Potential for erosion corrosion of SRS high level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    SRS high-level radioactive waste tanks will not experience erosion corrosion to any significant degree during slurry pump operations. Erosion corrosion in carbon steel structures at reported pump discharge velocities is dominated by electrochemical (corrosion) processes. Interruption of those processes, as by the addition of corrosion inhibitors, sharply reduces the rate of metal loss from erosion corrosion. The well-inhibited SRS waste tanks have a near-zero general corrosion rate, and therefore will be essentially immune to erosion corrosion. The experimental data on carbon steel erosion corrosion most relevant to SRS operations was obtained at the Hanford Site on simulated Purex waste. A metal loss rate of 2.4 mils per year was measured at a temperature of 102 C and a slurry velocity comparable to calculated SRS slurry velocities on ground specimens of the same carbon steel used in SRS waste tanks. Based on these data and the much lower expected temperatures, the metal loss rate of SRS tanks under waste removal and processing conditions should be insignificant, i.e. less than 1 mil per year

  13. Erosive potential of soft drinks on human enamel: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Lin; Chang, Chia-Chieh; Chi, Chih-Wen; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Chuang, Yueh-Chiao; Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Huang, Guay-Fen; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2014-11-01

    Most soft drinks are acidic in nature. Regular consumption of these drinks may result in dental erosion. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the erosive potential of different soft drinks in Taiwan by a novel multiple erosive method. Four commercially available soft drinks in Taiwan were selected for this study. The properties of each product were analyzed to measure their pH, titratable acidity, and ion contents. The erosive potential of the soft drinks was measured based on the amount of loss of human enamel surface following its exposure to the soft drinks tested for different periods (20 minutes, 60 minutes, and 180 minutes). The enamel loss was measured using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The pH values of the soft drinks were below the critical pH value (5.5) for enamel demineralization, and ranged from 2.42 to 3.46. The drink with ingredients of citric acid and ascorbic acid had the highest titratable acidity (33.96 mmol OH(-)/L to pH 5.5 and 71.9 mmol OH(-)/L to pH 7). Exposure to all the soft drinks resulted in loss of human enamel surface (7.28-34.07 μm for 180-minute exposure). The beverage with the highest calcium content had the lowest erosive potential. All tested soft drinks were found to be erosive. Soft drinks with high calcium contents have significantly lower erosive potential. Low pH value and high citrate content may cause more surface enamel loss. As the erosive time increased, the titratable acidity to pH 7 may be a predictor of the erosive potential for acidic soft drinks. The erosive potential of the soft drinks may be predicted based on the types of acid content, pH value, titratable acidity, and ion concentration. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Wind potential assessment of Quebec Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilinca, A.; Chaumel, J.-L.; Retiveau, J.-L.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the development of a comprehensive wind atlas of the Province of Quebec. This study differs from previous studies by 1) use of a standard classification index to categorize the wind resource, 2) extensive review of surface and upper air data available for the Province to define the wind resource, and 3) integration of available wind data with the topography of the Province. The wind resource in the Province of Quebec is classified using the scheme proposed by Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The Battelle-PNL classification is a numerical one which includes rankings from Wind Power Class 1 (lowest) to Wind Power Class 7 (highest). Associated with each numerical classification is a range of wind power and associated mean wind speed at 10 m and 50 m above ground level. For this study, a classification for 30 m above ground level was interpolated and used. A significant amount of wind data was gathered for the Province. These data were obtained from Atmospheric Environment Service (AES), Canada, from wind project developers, and from climatological summaries of surface and upper air data. A total of 35 primary data sites were selected in the Province. Although a number of wind data sites in the Province were identified and used in the analysis, large areas of the Province lacked any specific wind information. The Province was divided into grid blocks having dimensions of 1/4 o latitude by 1/3 o longitude. Each grid block is assigned a numerical Wind Power Class value ranging from 1 to 7. This value is based on the integration of the available wind data and the topography within the square. The majority of the Province was classified as 1 or 2. Coastal locations and topographic features in the interior of the Province typically have Wind Power Class 3 or higher. (author)

  15. Ducted wind turbines : A potential energy shaper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dighe, V.V.

    2016-01-01

    In order to harvest wind resources more efficiently and to the greatest extent possible, unconventional wind turbine designs have been proposed, but never gained any acceptance in the marketplace. A team of researchers from TU Delft plans to revisit the concept of ducted wind turbines, which have

  16. Development potential of wind energy in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet Akova

    2011-07-01

    energy potential, as part of the renewable energy sources of Turkey, are highly important and each of these two sources has the technical potential to cover the electric production in 2008. The recent increase in the number of wind energy power stations can be related to the preparation of Turkish Wind Atlas, the preparation of legal arrangements to support private sector entrepreneurs and the rise in oil prices. Wind energy power stations are active in Marmara, Aegean region and the Mediterreanean region witnessing more constant and strong winds and are anticipated to be founded in other geographical regions as well in the future.

  17. Natural potential of erosion in the periurbane area of São Carlos - SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio G. Pedro

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The population growth in urban areas is speeding up the opening of new land parceling, which due to the emergencial characteristics has been done without proper land use planning. This intensive and non-ordered antropic occupation of the urban perimeter is inducing serious erosion problems. To minimize environmental impacts of new antropic occupations is necessary to obtain information of the physical environment properties, mainly related to erosion risk factors. The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE developed in the USA has been widely used for the American land use planning and allows determining areas with higher erosion risk in urban areas. The soil and climate (rain parameters joined to the topography, indicate the Natural Erosion Potential of the USLE, when the antropic influence is not taken into consideration. It was done a Natural Erosion Potential map of the urban perimeter of São Carlos city (Brazil, in the scale of 1:10,000 using IDRISI 32 GIS, aiming to indicate the higher risk areas to erosion. The map of Natural Erosion Potential (PNE allowed identifying that the lowest values of PNE occurred at the Northeast, of the studied region, where the land could be used for urban expansion. By the other hand it was found that at Southwest and Southeast the values of PNE, were high, indicating them to be areas not favorable to urban expansion due to higher erosion risk.

  18. Biochar erosion: A potential threat to its suitability for carbon sequestration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, W.; Heckrath, G.; Greenwood, P.; Kuhn, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    Biochar is often considered to be a ';soft' geo-engineering option, with the potential to encourage soils to sequester more carbon (C) from the atmospheric C pool, and so increase both medium- and long-term soil C stocks. Similar to soil organic carbon (SOC), biochar has a lower bulk density than typical agricultural soils. Therefore, the question about its preferential mobilization and redistribution in the landscape has been raised in recent years. This is especially relevant on soils, which are regularly cultivated and are vulnerable to soil erosion themselves. However, so far few studies about the erodibility and fate of biochar in the landscape exist and the answer to this question is still unknown. Since the efficacy of biochar for sequestering carbon and improving soil quality depends on its amount and residential time in the upper soil matrix, it is important to further our knowledge about mobilization and transport behaviour of biochar. Moreover, such knowledge could have profound economic implications for farmers committed to its use, as a high net annual loss of biochar by erosion could exceed any net annual economic gain. The overall objective of this study was, therefore, to investigate the erodibility of biochar, when erosion events occur directly or soon after its application. The estimation of the financial value of the eroded biochar and its cost-effectiveness were scaled up from plot to field scale. In this investigation, the biochar was applied to the soil surface of three plots on a recently cultivated sandy field near Viborg in northern Jutland, Denmark at concentrations equivalent to 1.5-2.0 kg m-2. After application, the biochar was manually incorporated into the till-zone (20cm). Three consecutive erosion events (each lasted for 30 min. with rainfall intensity of approx. 90 mm h-1) were conducted on both biochar and reference plots. The erosion events were generated by the 2.2 m-2 Portable Wind and Rainfall Simulator. The preliminary results

  19. Erosion of wind turbine blade coatings - Design and analysis of jet-based laboratory equipment for performance evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Nørkjær, Sten

    2015-01-01

    of up to 22 coating samples that is based on water jet slugs. Our objective is to study the effect of the parameters involved in the rain erosion process and to correlate our experimental results with data obtained with the complex and expensive whirling arm rig, which has become the industry standard...... method of test for rain erosion. Our results showed that water slug velocity and impact frequency are the most influential parameters in the coating erosion rate. Coating defects, often present on the specimens tested, appeared to play an important role in the erosion mechanism. Two particular...... and the potential significance of the presence of a thin water film on the coated surfaces. Our results endorse the complex nature of the rain erosion phenomenon, which is the result of the simultaneous combination of complex mechanisms and as such, it is difficult to reproduce at the laboratory scale....

  20. Effect of land use land cover change on soil erosion potential in an agricultural watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arabinda; Tiwari, Kamlesh N; Bhadoria, P B S

    2011-02-01

    Universal soil loss equation (USLE) was used in conjunction with a geographic information system to determine the influence of land use and land cover change (LUCC) on soil erosion potential of a reservoir catchment during the period 1989 to 2004. Results showed that the mean soil erosion potential of the watershed was increased slightly from 12.11 t ha(-1) year(-1) in the year 1989 to 13.21 t ha(-1) year(-1) in the year 2004. Spatial analysis revealed that the disappearance of forest patches from relatively flat areas, increased in wasteland in steep slope, and intensification of cultivation practice in relatively more erosion-prone soil were the main factors contributing toward the increased soil erosion potential of the watershed during the study period. Results indicated that transition of other land use land cover (LUC) categories to cropland was the most detrimental to watershed in terms of soil loss while forest acted as the most effective barrier to soil loss. A p value of 0.5503 obtained for two-tailed paired t test between the mean erosion potential of microwatersheds in 1989 and 2004 also indicated towards a moderate change in soil erosion potential of the watershed over the studied period. This study revealed that the spatial location of LUC parcels with respect to terrain and associated soil properties should be an important consideration in soil erosion assessment process.

  1. Survey of wind power potential for wind-based electricity at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential for wind-generated electricity is examined using 22 months wind data collected from a prospective site located in the southern highlands of Tanzania. While the data for the year 2001 was from March to December that of 2002 was for all the twelve months of the year. Characteristics of monthly and annual wind ...

  2. Retrospection of recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in the Luanhe River Source Area of North China using Cesium-137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhifan [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai St., Beijing 100875 (China) and College of Environment and Planning, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China)], E-mail: chenzhf0604@163.com; Zhao Ye [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai St., Beijing 100875 (China)], E-mail: zhaoye@bnu.edu.cn; Qiao Jiejuan [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai St., Beijing 100875 (China); Zhang Qing [National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Protection, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhu Yuen [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, 19 Xin Jie Kou Wai St., Beijing 100875 (China); Xu Cuihua [National Institute for Radiological Protection, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Protection, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The Luanhe River Source Area belongs to typical semi-arid, agro-pastoral ecotone of North China. It is very important for the prevention and treatment of soil erosion in North China to analyze and evaluate quantitatively the recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in this area. Based on long field observations, soil samples from different depths in a representative wind-deposited soil profile in the Luanhe River Source Area were collected. Then the {sup 137}Cs activity of soil samples from different depths in the soil profile was determined using a GEM series HPGe (high-purity germanium) coaxial detector system (ADCAM-100), and their soil properties, such as the soil particle fraction and so on, were analyzed. According to the detected {sup 137}Cs activity of different depths, a continuous time sequence of the wind-deposited soil profile in the study area was established. Furthermore, through assumption on a soil relative wind erosion intensity index (SWEI), recent 30-year changes in the process of soil wind erosion in the Luanhe River Source Area were retrospected . The analysis results revealed that weaker soil wind erosion occurred in the study area from the 1970s to the early 1980s and from the late 1980s to the mid to late 1990s. Conversely, intense periods of soil wind erosion occurred in the mid-1980s and from the late 1990s to 2002.

  3. Regional tendencies of potential wind power over Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radics, K.; Peline, C. N.; Bartholy, J.

    2009-04-01

    Since environmental processes may be affected by global warming and changes of extreme climate events, conversion of renewable energy sources has been considered a key issue for some decades. Globally, wind energy has become a mainstream energy source. The wind power capacity has grown significantly in Hungary as well. By the end of 2007, the cumulative installed wind capacity was 65 MW, but the wind share of electricity demand was only 0.35 %. Identification of optimal wind farm development sites relies on detailed local wind climate knowledge. Hungary had not been the subject of extensive wind resource analysis in the last century. However, several studies were carried out investigating on surface and upper-air wind records spanning several decades. In response to the need for a new statistical analysis a research started on clarifying the possible changes of wind characteristics in the country. The study is based on 34-year-long (1975-2008) wind data sets of 36 Hungarian synoptic meteorological stations. Mean and extreme wind climate characteristics were analysed. Spatial and temporal distributions of potential wind power were estimated. Finally, using a mesoscale wind model detailed wind resource map of Hungary was simulated.

  4. Evaluation of global onshore wind energy potential and generation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J; Clarke, Leon

    2012-07-17

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance, land suitability factors, cost assumptions, and explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of the world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region and with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global economic wind potential under central assumptions, that is, intermediate between optimistic and pessimistic, is estimated to be approximately 119.5 petawatt hours per year (13.6 TW) at less than 9 cents/kWh. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly wind speed (varying by -70% to +450% at less than 9 cents/kWh), land suitability (by -55% to +25%), turbine density (by -60% to +80%), and cost and financing options (by -20% to +200%), many of which have important policy implications. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  5. The Wind Energy Potential of Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Petersen, Guðrún Nína; Björnsson, Halldór

    2014-01-01

    of 500 e1000 m above mean sea level, power density is independent of the distance to the coast. In addition to seasonal and spatial variability, differences in average wind speed and power density also exist for different wind directions. Along the coast in winter, power density of onshore winds......, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 and 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 and 1500 W m_2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations...... is higher by 100 e700 W m_2 than that of offshore winds. Based on these results, 14 test sites were selected for more detailed analyses using the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license...

  6. A large source of dust missing in Particulate Matter emission inventories? Wind erosion of post-fire landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Wagenbrenner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire contributes substantial particulate matter (PM in the form of dust to the atmosphere, but the magnitude of this dust source is largely unknown. It is important to accurately quantify dust emissions because they can impact human health, degrade visibility, exacerbate dust-on-snow issues (including snowmelt timing, snow chemistry, and avalanche danger, and affect ecological and biogeochemical cycles, precipitation regimes, and the Earth’s radiation budget. We used a novel modeling approach in which local-scale winds were used to drive a high-resolution dust emission model parameterized for burned soils to provide a first estimate of post-fire PM emissions. The dust emission model was parameterized with dust flux measurements from a 2010 fire scar. Here we present a case study to demonstrate the ability of the modeling framework to capture the onset and dynamics of a post-fire dust event and then use the modeling framework to estimate PM emissions from burn scars left by wildfires in U.S. western sagebrush landscapes during 2012. Modeled emissions from 1.2 million ha of burned soil totaled 32.1 Tg (11.7–352 Tg of dust as PM10 and 12.8 Tg (4.68–141 Tg as PM2.5. Despite the relatively large uncertainties in these estimates and a number of underlying assumptions, these first estimates of annual post-fire dust emissions suggest that post-fire PM emissions could substantially increase current annual PM estimates in the U.S. National Emissions Inventory during high fire activity years. Given the potential for post-fire scars to be a large source of PM, further on-site PM flux measurements are needed to improve emission parameterizations and constrain these first estimates.

  7. Assessment of wind erosion threat for soils in cadastral area of Hajske

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchova, Z.; Stredanska, A.

    2008-01-01

    This contribution illustrates the application of methods of erosion threat assessment in lan adaptation projects. Calculations of the soil erosion index of particular soil blocks are demonstrated for the cadastral area of Hajske. Two methods for assessment of erosion threat have been applied. First the assessment based on the ecological soil-quality units (ESQU) has been performed. Next, the Pasak method for a detailed analysis of the soil erosion threat was applied. Both of the mentioned approaches are recommended for the land adaption projects. Based on the results, the soil blocks have been ranked by their soil erosion threat. (authors)

  8. Potential market of wind farm in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pengfei Shi [Hydropower Planning General Inst., Beijing (China)

    1996-12-31

    Wind energy resources are abundant in China, in southeast coast area along with the rapid economic growth, electricity demand has been sharply increased, due to complex terrain detailed assessments are in urgent need. Advanced methodology and computer model should be developed. In this paper the existing wind farms, installed capacity, manufacturers share and projects in the near future are presented. For further development of wind farm in large scale, different ways of local manufacturing wind turbine generators (WTG) are going on. Current policy and barriers are analyzed. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Ion and sulfate-isotope ratios in arid soils subject to wind erosion in the southwestern USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, W.H.; Peterjohn, W.T.

    Our objective was to evaluate the potential for arid-land soil dusts to contribute significantly to the content of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and other ions in precipitation. Soil samples collected at 102 locations throughout southwestern USA deserts were extracted with distilled water and analyzed for major ionic constituents and the stable isotope ratios (/sup 34/S//sup 32/S) in soluble sulfate. Most samples were dominated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and HCO/sub 3//sup -/, and were undersaturated with respect to gypsum. Only a weak correlation was found between Ca/sup 2 +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ in samples from upland sites. Median delta /sup 34/S of soil SO/sub 4/ was +6.2 per thousand compared to +3.9 per thousand reported for precipitation. However, the median ratios for Ca/SO/sub 4/ (12.00) and Mg/SO/sub 4/ (1.84) in soil extracts were much larger than the same ratios in precipitation, suggesting that wind erosion of undisturbed desert soils is not a major source of the SO/sub 4/ in precipitation. Calcite aerosols from desert soils may act to neutralize acid rain in the western USA.

  10. The potential wind power resource in Australia: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Willow; Gunturu, Udaya Bhaskar; Schlosser, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Australia's wind resource is considered to be very good, and the utilization of this renewable energy resource is increasing rapidly: wind power installed capacity increased by 35% from 2006 to 2011 and is predicted to account for over 12% of Australia's electricity generation in 2030. Due to this growth in the utilization of the wind resource and the increasing importance of wind power in Australia's energy mix, this study sets out to analyze and interpret the nature of Australia's wind resources using robust metrics of the abundance, variability and intermittency of wind power density, and analyzes the variation of these characteristics with current and potential wind turbine hub heights. We also assess the extent to which wind intermittency, on hourly or greater timescales, can potentially be mitigated by the aggregation of geographically dispersed wind farms, and in so doing, lessen the severe impact on wind power economic viability of long lulls in wind and power generated. Our results suggest that over much of Australia, areas that have high wind intermittency coincide with large expanses in which the aggregation of turbine output does not mitigate variability. These areas are also geographically remote, some are disconnected from the east coast's electricity grid and large population centers, which are factors that could decrease the potential economic viability of wind farms in these locations. However, on the eastern seaboard, even though the wind resource is weaker, it is less variable, much closer to large population centers, and there exists more potential to mitigate it's intermittency through aggregation. This study forms a necessary precursor to the analysis of the impact of large-scale circulations and oscillations on the wind resource at the mesoscale.

  11. The potential wind power resource in Australia: a new perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willow Hallgren

    Full Text Available Australia's wind resource is considered to be very good, and the utilization of this renewable energy resource is increasing rapidly: wind power installed capacity increased by 35% from 2006 to 2011 and is predicted to account for over 12% of Australia's electricity generation in 2030. Due to this growth in the utilization of the wind resource and the increasing importance of wind power in Australia's energy mix, this study sets out to analyze and interpret the nature of Australia's wind resources using robust metrics of the abundance, variability and intermittency of wind power density, and analyzes the variation of these characteristics with current and potential wind turbine hub heights. We also assess the extent to which wind intermittency, on hourly or greater timescales, can potentially be mitigated by the aggregation of geographically dispersed wind farms, and in so doing, lessen the severe impact on wind power economic viability of long lulls in wind and power generated. Our results suggest that over much of Australia, areas that have high wind intermittency coincide with large expanses in which the aggregation of turbine output does not mitigate variability. These areas are also geographically remote, some are disconnected from the east coast's electricity grid and large population centers, which are factors that could decrease the potential economic viability of wind farms in these locations. However, on the eastern seaboard, even though the wind resource is weaker, it is less variable, much closer to large population centers, and there exists more potential to mitigate it's intermittency through aggregation. This study forms a necessary precursor to the analysis of the impact of large-scale circulations and oscillations on the wind resource at the mesoscale.

  12. The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia: A New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Willow; Gunturu, Udaya Bhaskar; Schlosser, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Australia’s wind resource is considered to be very good, and the utilization of this renewable energy resource is increasing rapidly: wind power installed capacity increased by 35% from 2006 to 2011 and is predicted to account for over 12% of Australia’s electricity generation in 2030. Due to this growth in the utilization of the wind resource and the increasing importance of wind power in Australia’s energy mix, this study sets out to analyze and interpret the nature of Australia’s wind resources using robust metrics of the abundance, variability and intermittency of wind power density, and analyzes the variation of these characteristics with current and potential wind turbine hub heights. We also assess the extent to which wind intermittency, on hourly or greater timescales, can potentially be mitigated by the aggregation of geographically dispersed wind farms, and in so doing, lessen the severe impact on wind power economic viability of long lulls in wind and power generated. Our results suggest that over much of Australia, areas that have high wind intermittency coincide with large expanses in which the aggregation of turbine output does not mitigate variability. These areas are also geographically remote, some are disconnected from the east coast’s electricity grid and large population centers, which are factors that could decrease the potential economic viability of wind farms in these locations. However, on the eastern seaboard, even though the wind resource is weaker, it is less variable, much closer to large population centers, and there exists more potential to mitigate it’s intermittency through aggregation. This study forms a necessary precursor to the analysis of the impact of large-scale circulations and oscillations on the wind resource at the mesoscale. PMID:24988222

  13. Modelling streambank erosion potential using maximum entropy in a central Appalachian watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pitchford

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We used maximum entropy to model streambank erosion potential (SEP in a central Appalachian watershed to help prioritize sites for management. Model development included measuring erosion rates, application of a quantitative approach to locate Target Eroding Areas (TEAs, and creation of maps of boundary conditions. We successfully constructed a probability distribution of TEAs using the program Maxent. All model evaluation procedures indicated that the model was an excellent predictor, and that the major environmental variables controlling these processes were streambank slope, soil characteristics, bank position, and underlying geology. A classification scheme with low, moderate, and high levels of SEP derived from logistic model output was able to differentiate sites with low erosion potential from sites with moderate and high erosion potential. A major application of this type of modelling framework is to address uncertainty in stream restoration planning, ultimately helping to bridge the gap between restoration science and practice.

  14. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating–Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Cortés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP. The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER. The materials, specifically the coating–laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, pull-off testing, peeling–adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case

  15. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating-Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Enrique; Sánchez, Fernando; O'Carroll, Anthony; Madramany, Borja; Hardiman, Mark; Young, Trevor M

    2017-09-28

    Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating) applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP). The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER). The materials, specifically the coating-laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), pull-off testing, peeling-adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case study compares two

  16. Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, R.G.; Hanson, J.P.

    1985-12-01

    Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur

  17. Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, R.G.; Hanson, J.P.

    1985-12-01

    Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur.

  18. Erosion Potential of Tooth Whitening Regimens as Evaluated with Polarized Light Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambert, Patrick; Qian, Fang; Kwon, So Ran

    2015-11-01

    Tooth whitening is a widely utilized esthetic treatment in dentistry. With increased access to over-the-counter (OTC) systems concerns have been raised as to potential adverse effects associated with overuse of whitening materials. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate enamel erosion due to different whitening regimens when used in excess of recommended guidelines. Extracted human teeth (n = 66) were randomly divided into 11 groups (n = 6/group). Specimens were exposed to OTC products: Crest Whitestrips and 5-minute natural white and a do-it-yourself (DIY) strawberry whitening recipe. Within each regimen, groups were further divided per exposure time: specimens receiving the recommended product dosage; 5 times the recommended dosage; and 10 times the recommended dosage. Negative and positive controls were treated with grade 3 water and 1.0% citric acid, respectively. Specimens were nail-varnished to limit application to a 1 × 4 mm window. Following treatment, specimens were sectioned and erosion (drop in μm) measured using polarized light microscopy. Two-sample t-test was used to detect difference in amount of enamel erosion between negative and positive groups, while one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was used to detect difference between set of treatment groups and negative control groups or among all experimental groups. There was significant difference in mean amount of enamel erosion (p erosion for positive control group was significantly greater than that for negative control group (23.50 vs 2.65 μm). There was significant effect for type of treatments on enamel erosion [F(9,50) = 25.19; p 0.05 for all instances), except for Natural White_10 times treatment group (p erosion. Enamel erosion due to the overuse of whitening products varies for different modalities and products. Therefore, caution is advised when using certain over-the-counter products beyond recommended guidelines, as there is potential for enamel

  19. Practical method for estimating wind characteristics at potential wind-energy-conversion sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endlich, R. M.; Ludwig, F. L.; Bhumralkar, C. M.; Estoque, M. A.

    1980-08-01

    Terrain features and variations in the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer produce local variations in wind, and these variations are not depicted well by standard weather reports. A method is developed to compute local winds for use in estimating the wind energy available at any potential site for a wind turbine. The method uses the terrain heights for an area surrounding the site and a series of wind and pressure reports from the nearest four or five national Weather Service stations. An initial estimate of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer is made, then these winds are adjusted to satisfy the continuity equation. In this manner the flow is made to reflect the influences of the terrain and the shape of the boundary-layer top. This report describes in detail the methodology and results, and provides descriptions of the computer programs, instructions for using them, and complete program listings.

  20. [Estimation of the effect derived from wind erosion of soil and dust emission in Tianjin suburbs on the central district based on WEPS model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Han, Ting-Ting; Li, Tao; Ji, Ya-Qin; Bai, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Bin

    2012-07-01

    Due to the lack of a prediction model for current wind erosion in China and the slow development for such models, this study aims to predict the wind erosion of soil and the dust emission and develop a prediction model for wind erosion in Tianjin by investigating the structure, parameter systems and the relationships among the parameter systems of the prediction models for wind erosion in typical areas, using the U.S. wind erosion prediction system (WEPS) as reference. Based on the remote sensing technique and the test data, a parameter system was established for the prediction model of wind erosion and dust emission, and a model was developed that was suitable for the prediction of wind erosion and dust emission in Tianjin. Tianjin was divided into 11 080 blocks with a resolution of 1 x 1 km2, among which 7 778 dust emitting blocks were selected. The parameters of the blocks were localized, including longitude, latitude, elevation and direction, etc.. The database files of blocks were localized, including wind file, climate file, soil file and management file. The weps. run file was edited. Based on Microsoft Visualstudio 2008, secondary development was done using C + + language, and the dust fluxes of 7 778 blocks were estimated, including creep and saltation fluxes, suspension fluxes and PM10 fluxes. Based on the parameters of wind tunnel experiments in Inner Mongolia, the soil measurement data and climate data in suburbs of Tianjin, the wind erosion module, wind erosion fluxes, dust emission release modulus and dust release fluxes were calculated for the four seasons and the whole year in suburbs of Tianjin. In 2009, the total creep and saltation fluxes, suspension fluxes and PM10 fluxes in the suburbs of Tianjin were 2.54 x 10(6) t, 1.25 x 10(7) t and 9.04 x 10(5) t, respectively, among which, the parts pointing to the central district were 5.61 x 10(5) t, 2.89 x 10(6) t and 2.03 x 10(5) t, respectively.

  1. A modeling study of aeolian erosion enhanced by surface wind confluences over Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using erosion and air quality models, a study on the effect of PM10 episodes in Mexico City is presented. The important contribution of Aeolian erosion on urban air quality, its genesis, morphology, location and regional implications such as the role played by surface confluences, the dry Lake of T...

  2. Investigation of wind characteristics and assessment of wind energy potential for Waterloo region, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Meishen; Li Xianguo

    2005-01-01

    Wind energy becomes more and more attractive as one of the clean renewable energy resources. Knowledge of the wind characteristics is of great importance in the exploitation of wind energy resources for a site. It is essential in designing or selecting a wind energy conversion system for any application. This study examines the wind characteristics for the Waterloo region in Canada based on a data source measured at an elevation 10 m above the ground level over a 5-year period (1999-2003) with the emphasis on the suitability for wind energy technology applications. Characteristics such as annual, seasonal, monthly and diurnal wind speed variations and wind direction variations are examined. Wind speed data reveal that the windy months in Waterloo are from November to April, defined as the Cold Season in this study, with February being the windiest month. It is helpful that the high heating demand in the Cold Season coincides with the windy season. Analysis shows that the day time is the windy time, with 2 p.m. in the afternoon being the windiest moment. Moreover, a model derived from the maximum entropy principle (MEP) is applied to determine the diurnal, monthly, seasonal and yearly wind speed frequency distributions, and the corresponding Lagrangian parameters are determined. Based on these wind speed distributions, this study quantifies the available wind energy potential to provide practical information for the application of wind energy in this area. The yearly average wind power density is 105 W/m 2 . The day and night time wind power density in the Cold Season is 180 and 111 W/m 2 , respectively

  3. Oceanographic Factors and Erosion of the Outer Banks During Hurricane Isabel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keen, T. R; Rowley, C; Dykes, J

    2006-01-01

    .... The computed wind, wave, current, and water level fields are used to drive a three- dimensional numerical sedimentation model that calculates nearshore sediment transport and erosion potential...

  4. GIS Assessment of Wind Energy Potential in California and Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, R. K.; Snow, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    Energy efficiency coupled with renewable energy technologies can provide most of the U.S. carbon emissions reductions needed to contain atmospheric carbon concentrations at 450-500 parts per million, considered by many to be a tipping point in mitigating climate change. Among the leaders in the alternative energy sector is wind power, which is now one of the largest sources of new power generation in the U.S. creating jobs and revenue for rural communities while powering our economy with an emissions-free source of energy. In 2006, wind turbines capable of generating more than 2,400 megawatts of electricity were installed in the U.S. and by 2007 this number had risen to 3,000 megawatts. The U.S. generated 31 billion kilowatt-hours of wind power in 2007, which is enough electricity to power the equivalent of nearly 3 million average homes. It is estimated that generating the same amount of electricity would require burning 16 million tons of coal or 50 million barrels of oil. This study examines the wind power potential of sites near populated areas in Florida and California to determine the practicability of installing wind turbines at these locations. A GIS was developed in order to conduct a spatial analysis of these sites based on mean annual wind speed measured in meters per second and wind power density ratings measured in watts per square meter. The analysis indicates that coastal areas of Cocoa Beach, Key West, Hollywood, and West Palm Beach, respectively, possess the greatest potential for wind energy in Florida with mean annual wind speeds of 4.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 171 w/m2 peaking at Cocoa Beach followed by wind speeds of 4.64 m/s and wind power ratings of 115 w/m2 at Key West. California wind energy potential is even greater than that of Florida with Fairfield exhibiting mean annual wind speeds of 5.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 327 w/m2 followed by the Mojave and Palmdale areas with mean annual wind speeds of

  5. Wind Power Potential at Abandoned Mines in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    jang, M.; Choi, Y.; Park, H.; Go, W.

    2013-12-01

    This study performed an assessment of wind power potential at abandoned mines in the Kangwon province by analyzing gross energy production, greenhouse gas emission reduction and economic effects estimated from a 600 kW wind turbine. Wind resources maps collected from the renewable energy data center in Korea Institute of Energy Research(KIER) were used to determine the average wind speed, temperature and atmospheric pressure at hub height(50 m) for each abandoned mine. RETScreen software developed by Natural Resources Canada(NRC) was utilized for the energy, emission and financial analyses of wind power systems. Based on the results from 5 representative mining sites, we could know that the average wind speed at hub height is the most critical factor for assessing the wind power potential. Finally, 47 abandoned mines that have the average wind speed faster than 6.5 m/s were analyzed, and top 10 mines were suggested as relatively favorable sites with high wind power potential in the Kangwon province.

  6. The effects of saliva on the erosive potential of three different wines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Tjoe Fat, G.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2009-01-01

    Background:  The erosive potential of wine on teeth may be modified by the buffering capacity of saliva. This potential effect was studied for three different wines in vitro and in vivo. Methods:  The buffering capacity was studied in vitro by stepwise addition of small volumes of a dry white wine,

  7. Erosive potential of calcium-modified acidic candies in irradiated dry mouth patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensdottir, Thorbjörg; Buchwald, Christian; Nauntofte, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients who have received irradiation therapy on the head and neck area are known to suffer from reduced saliva flow and may therefore use acidic candies to relieve symptoms of dry mouth. However, such acidic candies have erosive potential even among healthy individuals. Therefore......, the aim of the present study was to determine if calcium-modified acidic candies have reduced erosive potential in irradiated cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nineteen cancer patients (26 to 70 years) ipsilaterally irradiated on the head and neck area sucked control and calcium-modified acidic...... candies, while their whole saliva was collected into a closed system. The erosive potential of both candies was evaluated from saliva degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite and by dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HAp) directly in candy-stimulated saliva. The results were compared to normative...

  8. Shelter effect on a row of coal piles to prevent wind erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, A.R.; Viergas, D.X.

    1988-08-01

    The shelter effect of porous wind breakers over a row of coal piles was studied in a wind tunnel. Two sets of tests are described, one performed in two dimensional configuration in which the shelter effect of several barriers with different heights and porosities is evaluated. The effect of wind direction is considered using a tridimensional model. Wall shear stress measurements performed with a hot film sensor allowed the characterization of the transport properties of fine particles of coal. By integration of the local wind properties the rates of pollutant emission were determined leading to the conclusion of an effective shelter action of the porous wind breakers.

  9. Exploring the potential of wind energy for a coastal state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, C.-D.; Yang, M.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Adequate recognition of the wind energy potential of coastal states may have far-reaching effects on the development of the energy systems of these countries. This study evaluates wind energy resources in Taiwan with the aid of a geographic information system (GIS), which allows local potentials and restrictions such as climate conditions, land uses, and ecological environments to be considered. The findings unveiled in this study suggest a significant role for offshore wind energy resources, which may constitute between 94% and 98% of overall wind resources in Taiwan. Total power yield from wind energy could reach between 150 and 165 TWh, which would have, respectively, accounted for between 62% and 68% of Taiwan's total power generation of 243 TWh in 2007. Based on the Taiwan's current emission factor of electricity, wind energy has the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions by between 94 and 102 million ton per year in Taiwan, which is, respectively, equivalent to 28% and 31% of the national net equivalent CO 2 emissions released in 2002. However, the challenge of managing the variability of wind power has to be addressed before the considerable contribution of wind energy to domestic energy supply and CO 2 reduction can be realized.

  10. Empirical models for predicting wind potential for wind energy applications in rural locations of Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odo, F.C. [National Centre for Energy Research and Development, University of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria); Akubue, G.U.; Offiah, S.U.; Ugwuoke, P.E. [National Centre for Energy Research and Development, University of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we use the correlation between the average wind speed and ambient temperature to develop models for predicting wind potentials for two Nigerian locations. Assuming that the troposphere is a typical heterogeneous mixture of ideal gases, we find that for the studied locations, wind speed clearly correlates with ambient temperature in a simple polynomial of 3rd degree. The coefficient of determination and root-mean-square error of the models are 0.81; 0.0024 and 0.56; 0.0041, respectively, for Enugu (6.40N; 7.50E) and Owerri (5.50N; 7.00E). These results suggest that the temperature-based model can be used, with acceptable accuracy, in predicting wind potentials needed for preliminary design assessment of wind energy conversion devices for the locations and others with similar meteorological conditions.

  11. Is splash erosion potential species specific? Measuring of splash erosion potential under forest in different succession stages along a biodiversity gradient in the humid subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, C.; Kühn, P.; Scholten, T.

    2009-04-01

    is 2.5 times higher than in open field despite the fact that only 60 percent of open field rainfall reaches the ground. The results also indicate that sand loss is a function of the age of the specific forest stand and the variability of sand loss under different species with respect to space and time. These and future results will help managing afforestation projects in giving implications which of the species (resp. species compositions) may reduce most effectively potential splash erosion. References: Brandt, C. J. (1989): The size distribution of throughfall drops under vegetation canopies. Catena 16, p. 507-524. Calder, I. R. (2001): Canopy processes: implications for transpiration, interception and splash induced erosion, ultimately for forest management and water resources. Plant Ecology 153, p. 203-214. Ellison, W. D. (1947): Soil Erosion Studies - Part II. Soil Detachment Hazard by Raindrop Splash. Agricultural Engineering 28, p. 197-201. Foot, K.; Morgan, R. P. C. (2005): The role of leaf inclination, leaf orientation and plant canopy architecture in soil particle detachment by raindrops. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 30, p. 1509-1520. Nanko, K.; Hotta, N. & Suzuki, M. (2006): Evaluating the influence of canopy species and meteorological factors on throughfall drop size distribution. Journal of Hydrology 329, p. 422-431. Vis, M. (1986): Interception, drop size distributions and rainfall kinetic energy in four colombian forest ecosystems. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 11, p. 591-603.

  12. Wind energy potential assessment of Cameroon's coastal regions for the installation of an onshore wind farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreyndip, Nkongho Ayuketang; Joseph, Ebobenow; David, Afungchui

    2016-11-01

    For the future installation of a wind farm in Cameroon, the wind energy potentials of three of Cameroon's coastal cities (Kribi, Douala and Limbe) are assessed using NASA average monthly wind data for 31 years (1983-2013) and compared through Weibull statistics. The Weibull parameters are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood, the mean power densities, the maximum energy carrying wind speeds and the most probable wind speeds are also calculated and compared over these three cities. Finally, the cumulative wind speed distributions over the wet and dry seasons are also analyzed. The results show that the shape and scale parameters for Kribi, Douala and Limbe are 2.9 and 2.8, 3.9 and 1.8 and 3.08 and 2.58, respectively. The mean power densities through Weibull analysis for Kribi, Douala and Limbe are 33.7 W/m2, 8.0 W/m2 and 25.42 W/m2, respectively. Kribi's most probable wind speed and maximum energy carrying wind speed was found to be 2.42 m/s and 3.35 m/s, 2.27 m/s and 3.03 m/s for Limbe and 1.67 m/s and 2.0 m/s for Douala, respectively. Analysis of the wind speed and hence power distribution over the wet and dry seasons shows that in the wet season, August is the windiest month for Douala and Limbe while September is the windiest month for Kribi while in the dry season, March is the windiest month for Douala and Limbe while February is the windiest month for Kribi. In terms of mean power density, most probable wind speed and wind speed carrying maximum energy, Kribi shows to be the best site for the installation of a wind farm. Generally, the wind speeds at all three locations seem quite low, average wind speeds of all the three studied locations fall below 4.0m/s which is far below the cut-in wind speed of many modern wind turbines. However we recommend the use of low cut-in speed wind turbines like the Savonius for stand alone low energy needs.

  13. Wind, rain and soil erosion rates on bare and plant covered agriculture plots at the experimental station of El Teularet -Sierra de Enguera, Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, A.; Azorin-Molina, C.; Iserloh, Th.

    2012-04-01

    Soil erosion is being scientifically researched for more tan one century, but there is some knowledge lacks that should be researched. Within the factors of the soil erosion wind and rain were studied, but little is know about the impact of the combination of both. Soil erosion by wind was mainly studied on drylands and agriculture land (Sterk and Spaan, 1997; Bielders et al., 2002; Rajot et al., 2003; Zobeck et al., 2003). Soil erosion by water was studied in many ecosystems but it is especially active on agriculture land (Cerdà et al., 2009) and under Mediterranean climatic conditions (Cerdà et al., 2010). The importance of wind on soil erosion is base in the fact that rainstorms occurs with wind, adding a driving component to the falling raindrops. The influence of wind on raindrops is clear, but there is not measurements and there is no information of this influence under field conditions with natural rainfall events.This paper aims to determine the interaction between wind and rain as factors of the soil losses under Mediterranean climatic conditions and different agriculture managements and land uses. Since 2003, the El Teularet-Serra de Enguera Soil Erosion Experimental Station located in Eastern Spain is measuring the soil losses in plots under different land uses and land managements. The station is devoted to study the soil water erosion processes under rain-fed agriculture fields and the rangelands by means of simulated rainfall experiments and plots of different sizes. The soil erosion measure ments are done by means of 13 plots, each of them composed of 5 subplots of 1, 2, 4, 16 and 48 m2 under different land uses and managements. Two plots are covered by two different types of shrubs: Quercus coccifera and Ulex parviflorus, respectively. Three plots reproduce the use of herbicides, one is ploughed, and three plots follow conservation practices (oats and beans with no-tillage, with tillage, and with a vege- tation cover of weeds). Other plots are

  14. Solar and wind exergy potentials for Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Vázquez-Martín, Sandra; Zorzano, María-Paz

    2016-01-01

    The energy requirements of the planetary exploration spacecrafts constrain the lifetime of the missions, their mobility and capabilities, and the number of instruments onboard. They are limiting factors in planetary exploration. Several missions to the surface of Mars have proven the feasibility and success of solar panels as energy source. The analysis of the exergy efficiency of the solar radiation has been carried out successfully on Earth, however, to date, there is not an extensive research regarding the thermodynamic exergy efficiency of in-situ renewable energy sources on Mars. In this paper, we analyse the obtainable energy (exergy) from solar radiation under Martian conditions. For this analysis we have used the surface environmental variables on Mars measured in-situ by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station onboard the Curiosity rover and from satellite by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer instrument onboard the Mars Global Surveyor satellite mission. We evaluate the exergy efficiency from solar radiation on a global spatial scale using orbital data for a Martian year; and in a one single location in Mars (the Gale crater) but with an appreciable temporal resolution (1 h). Also, we analyse the wind energy as an alternative source of energy for Mars exploration and compare the results with those obtained on Earth. We study the viability of solar and wind energy station for the future exploration of Mars, showing that a small square solar cell of 0.30 m length could maintain a meteorological station on Mars. We conclude that the low density of the atmosphere of Mars is responsible of the low thermal exergy efficiency of solar panels. It also makes the use of wind energy uneffective. Finally, we provide insights for the development of new solar cells on Mars. - Highlights: • We analyse the exergy of solar radiation under Martian environment • Real data from in-situ instruments is used to determine the maximum efficiency of radiation • Wind

  15. Assessment of Global Wind Energy Resource Utilization Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, M.; He, B.; Guan, Y.; Zhang, H.; Song, S.

    2017-09-01

    Development of wind energy resource (WER) is a key to deal with climate change and energy structure adjustment. A crucial issue is to obtain the distribution and variability of WER, and mine the suitable location to exploit it. In this paper, a multicriteria evaluation (MCE) model is constructed by integrating resource richness and stability, utilization value and trend of resource, natural environment with weights. The global resource richness is assessed through wind power density (WPD) and multi-level wind speed. The utilizable value of resource is assessed by the frequency of effective wind. The resource stability is assessed by the coefficient of variation of WPD and the frequency of prevailing wind direction. Regression slope of long time series WPD is used to assess the trend of WER. All of the resource evaluation indicators are derived from the atmospheric reanalysis data ERA-Interim with spatial resolution 0.125°. The natural environment factors mainly refer to slope and land-use suitability, which are derived from multi-resolution terrain elevation data 2010 (GMTED 2010) and GlobalCover2009. Besides, the global WER utilization potential map is produced, which shows most high potential regions are located in north of Africa. Additionally, by verifying that 22.22 % and 48.8 9% operational wind farms fall on medium-high and high potential regions respectively, the result can provide a basis for the macroscopic siting of wind farm.

  16. Patterns in consumption of potentially erosive beverages among adolescent school children in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Boutkabout, C.; Levie, D.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of intake and patterns in consumption of potentially erosive beverages in school children in the Netherlands. METHODS: A cross-sectional, single centre study was performed among 502 school children in Rotterdam, in age varying between 12 and 19 years. Data on

  17. In vitro analysis of the cariogenic and erosive potential of paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated in vitro the cariogenic and erosive potential of antitussive liquid oral medications for paediatric use. Fifteen paediatric liquid antitussives were sampled. The endogenous pH was evaluated by potentiometry, titratable acidity was measured according to the method adopted by the Association of Official Analytical ...

  18. Application of a modeling approach to designate soil and soil organic carbon loss to wind erosion on long-term monitoring sites (BDF) in Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerger, Rainer; Funk, Roger; Cordsen, Eckhard; Fohrer, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) loss is a serious problem in maize monoculture areas of Northern Germany. Sites of the soil monitoring network (SMN) "Boden-Dauerbeobachtung" show long-term soil and SOC losses, which cannot be explained by conventional SOC balances nor by other non-Aeolian causes. Using a process-based model, the main objective was to determine whether these losses can be explained by wind erosion. In the long-term context of 10 years, wind erosion was not measured directly but often observed. A suitable estimation approach linked high-quality soil/farming monitoring data with wind erosion modeling results. The model SWEEP, validated for German sandy soils, was selected using 10-minute wind speed data. Two similar local SMN study sites were compared, however, site A was characterized by high SOC loss and often affected by wind erosion, while the reference site B was not. At site A soil mass and SOC stock decreased by 49.4 and 2.44 kg m-2 from 1999 to 2009. Using SWEEP, a total soil loss of 48.9 kg m-2 resulted for 16 erosion events (max. single event 12.6 kg m-2). A share of 78% was transported by suspension with a SOC enrichment ratio (ER) of 2.96 (saltation ER 0.98), comparable to the literature. At the reference site measured and modeled topsoil losses were minimal. The good agreement between monitoring and modeling results suggested that wind erosion caused significant long-term soil and SOC losses. The approach uses results of prior studies and is applicable to similar well-studied sites without other noteworthy SOC losses.

  19. The National Wind Erosion Research Network: Building a standardized long-term data resource for aeolian research, modeling and land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Van Zee, Justin W; Courtright, Ericha M; Hugenholtz, Ted M; Zobeck, Ted M; Okin, Gregory S.; Barchyn, Thomas E; Billings, Benjamin J; Boyd, Robert A.; Clingan, Scott D; Cooper, Brad F; Duniway, Michael C.; Derner, Justin D.; Fox, Fred A; Havstad, Kris M.; Heilman, Philip; LaPlante, Valerie; Ludwig, Noel A; Metz, Loretta J; Nearing, Mark A; Norfleet, M Lee; Pierson, Frederick B; Sanderson, Matt A; Sharrat, Brenton S; Steiner, Jean L; Tatarko, John; Tedela, Negussie H; Todelo, David; Unnasch, Robert S; Van Pelt, R Scott; Wagner, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the United States Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for a long-term research program to meet critical challenges in wind erosion research and management in the United States. The Network has three aims: (1) provide data to support understanding of basic aeolian processes across land use types, land cover types, and management practices, (2) support development and application of models to assess wind erosion and dust emission and their impacts on human and environmental systems, and (3) encourage collaboration among the aeolian research community and resource managers for the transfer of wind erosion technologies. The Network currently consists of thirteen intensively instrumented sites providing measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions, and soil and vegetation properties that influence wind erosion. Network sites are located across rangelands, croplands, and deserts of the western US. In support of Network activities, http://winderosionnetwork.org was developed as a portal for information about the Network, providing site descriptions, measurement protocols, and data visualization tools to facilitate collaboration with scientists and managers interested in the Network and accessing Network products. The Network provides a mechanism for engaging national and international partners in a wind erosion research program that addresses the need for improved understanding and prediction of aeolian processes across complex and diverse land use types and management practices.

  20. Potentiality of wind power generation along the Bangladesh coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Md. Akramuzzaman; Chowdhury, K. M. Azam; Sen, Sukanta; Islam, Mohammad Masudul

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays Bangladesh is facing the problem with electricity as the production is less comparing to the demand. A significant amount of electricity is consumed in urban areas especially by industries whereas in rural or coastal areas most of the people are not having it. Around 40 millions of people living in the 724 km long coast in Bangladesh. Moreover, it is surprising that throughout the year there is sufficient wind blow in coastal areas by which we can produce a massive amount of electricity. However, day by day the utilization of wind energy is increasing in the world which reduces costs of renewable energy technology, improves efficiency. It would be a good alternative solution instead of dependency on natural gas. Wind energy is mainly potential in coastal and offshore areas with strong wind regimes. Wind energy is vital for ensuring a green energy for the future. The agricultural land of Bangladesh needs the supply of water at right time for better yielding. The installation of windmills will be very much convenient for operating the water supply pumps. This research highlights the possibility of wind energy and describes the necessary steps to implement and develop wind energy sector in Bangladesh by using other's successful ideas. Supportive policies, rules, and decree can be applied to make government, non-government organization, and donor organizations work together to develop wind energy sector in Bangladesh.

  1. Wind reduction patterns around isolated biomass for wind erosion control in a desertified area of Central Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasr Al-amin, N.K.; Stigter, C.J.; El-Tayeb Mohammed, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of sparse vegetation, feature common in arid zone, to reduce wind force (velocity) and hence protect the surface and regions downwind from drifting sand and their consequences. Respectively 4 (with heights h of 4, 3.2, 2 and 1.66 m), 2 (with h of

  2. Decadal predictability of regional scale wind speed and wind energy potentials over Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Moemken

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Decadal predictions on timescales from one year to one decade are gaining importance since this time frame falls within the planning horizon of politics, economy and society. The present study examines the decadal predictability of regional wind speed and wind energy potentials in three generations of the MiKlip (‘Mittelfristige Klimaprognosen’ decadal prediction system. The system is based on the global Max-Planck-Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM, and the three generations differ primarily in the ocean initialisation. Ensembles of uninitialised historical and yearly initialised hindcast experiments are used to assess the forecast skill for 10 m wind speeds and wind energy output (Eout over Central Europe with lead times from one year to one decade. With this aim, a statistical-dynamical downscaling (SDD approach is used for the regionalisation. Its added value is evaluated by comparison of skill scores for MPI-ESM large-scale wind speeds and SDD-simulated regional wind speeds. All three MPI-ESM ensemble generations show some forecast skill for annual mean wind speed and Eout over Central Europe on yearly and multi-yearly time scales. This forecast skill is mostly limited to the first years after initialisation. Differences between the three ensemble generations are generally small. The regionalisation preserves and sometimes increases the forecast skills of the global runs but results depend on lead time and ensemble generation. Moreover, regionalisation often improves the ensemble spread. Seasonal Eout skills are generally lower than for annual means. Skill scores are lowest during summer and persist longest in autumn. A large-scale westerly weather type with strong pressure gradients over Central Europe is identified as potential source of the skill for wind energy potentials, showing a similar forecast skill and a high correlation with Eout anomalies. These results are promising towards the establishment of a decadal prediction

  3. Offshore Wind Potential in South India from Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Bingöl, Ferhat; Badger, Merete

    The offshore wind energy potential for pre-feasibility in South India in the area from 77° to 80° Eastern longitude and 7° to 10° Northern latitude is observed from a total of 164 ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) satellite images during the years 2002 to 2011. All satellite scenes......-year mean and a general description of the winds and climate with monsoons in India is presented....

  4. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Amol; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Khangura, Jagmeet

    2011-09-15

    We assess developable on-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-heights and under two sensitivity scenarios – one with no farmland included, the other with all farmland included. Under the “no farmland included” case, the total wind potential in India ranges from 748 GW at 80m hub-height to 976 GW at 120m hub-height. Under the “all farmland included” case, the potential with a minimum capacity factor of 20 percent ranges from 984 GW to 1,549 GW. High quality wind energy sites, at 80m hub-height with a minimum capacity factor of 25 percent, have a potential between 253 GW (no farmland included) and 306 GW (all farmland included). Our estimates are more than 15 times the current official estimate of wind energy potential in India (estimated at 50m hub height) and are about one tenth of the official estimate of the wind energy potential in the US.

  5. Wave and offshore wind potential for the island of Tenerife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veigas, M.; Iglesias, G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The island aims to reduce its carbon footprint by developing renewable energy. • The substantial wave and offshore wind resources around the island are examined. • One area is appropriate for installing a hybrid wave–offshore wind farm. - Abstract: The island of Tenerife, a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in the Atlantic Ocean, aims to be energy self-sufficient in order to reduce its carbon footprint. To accomplish this goal it should develop the renewable sources, in particular wave and offshore wind energy. The objectives of this work are twofold; (i) to characterize the wave and offshore wind power distribution around the island and (ii) to determine which offshore area is best suited for their exploitation, taking into account the resource and other conditioning factors such as the bathymetry, distance to the coastline and ports, and offshore zoning. To carry out this research, hindcast wave and wind data obtained with numerical models are used alongside observations from meteorological stations. One area, in the vicinity of Puerto de la Cruz, is identified as having great potential for installing a hybrid floating wave–wind farm. Both resources are characterized for the area selected: the wave resource in terms of wave directions, significant wave heights and energy periods; the offshore wind resource in terms of directions and speeds in addition to the seasonality for the both resources. It is found that most of the wave resource is provided by N and NNW waves with significant wave heights between 1.5 m and 3.0 m and energy periods between 10 s and 14 s. It follows that the Wave Energy Converters deployed in the area should have maximum efficiency in those ranges. As for the offshore wind resource, most of the energy corresponds to NNE and NE winds with speeds between 9 and 14 m s −1 , which should be taken into account when selecting the offshore wind turbines

  6. Iron supplementation reduces the erosive potential of a cola drink on enamel and dentin in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Melissa Thiemi; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2012-01-01

    Iron has been suggested to reduce the erosive potential of cola drinks in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of ferrous sulfate supplementation on the inhibition of the erosion caused by a cola drink. Ten adult volunteers participated in a crossover protocol conducted in two phases of 5 days, separated by a washout period of 7 days. In each phase, they wore palatal devices containing two human enamel and two human dentin blocks. The volunteers immersed the devices for 5 min in 150 mL of cola drink (Coca-ColaTM, pH 2.6), containing ferrous sulfate (10 mmol/L) or not (control), 4 times per day. The effect of ferrous sulfate on the inhibition of erosion was evaluated by profilometry (wear). Data were analyzed by paired t tests (pcola drinks with ferrous sulfate can be a good alternative for the reduction of their erosive potential. Additional studies should be done to test if lower ferrous sulfate concentrations can also have a protective effect as well as the combination of ferrous sulfate with other ions.

  7. Evaluation of the Erosive Potential of Selected Isotonic Drinks: In Vitro Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowska, Aneta; Szymański, Witold; Kołodziejczyk, Łukasz; Bołtacz-Rzepkowska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Isotonic drinks are an important component of the diet of athletes. Sports drinks cause the body to maintain proper hydration and supplement minerals which are lost in sweat during excessive exercising. Aside from the benefits of isotonic drinks, it is important to be aware of the harmful effects of citric acid within the products, which could cause enamel erosion. The aim of the study was to evaluate the erosive potential of sports drinks using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM). The studies measured the change of surface roughness of the dental enamel after etching using Isostar, Powerade and Gatorade drinks, and Fortuna orange juice. Measurements were repeated after 1, 2 and 3 h of exposure to the selected liquid. The evaluation of calcium compound contents was carried out using the complexonometric method. The surface roughness measurements of dental enamel showed that the lowest values of the parameters Ra and Rz were obtained for Isostar and orange juice. The research of the calcium content in the selected beverages showed the highest value in Isostar (320.0 mg/L) and the lowest in Powerade (40.0 mg/L) and Gatorade (21.0 mg/L). Our study confirms that Isostar is the safest sports drink, among the analyzed beverages, for athletes, because it causes the least erosive changes in dental enamel. It is recommended to supplement beverages to reduce their potential for erosion using calcium compounds.

  8. Erosion rates as a potential bottom-up control of forest structural characteristics in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milodowski, David T; Mudd, Simon M; Mitchard, Edward T A

    2015-01-01

    The physical characteristics of landscapes place fundamental constraints on vegetation growth and ecosystem function. In actively eroding landscapes, many of these characteristics are controlled by long-term erosion rates: increased erosion rates generate steeper topography and reduce the depth and extent of weathering, limiting moisture storage capacity and impacting nutrient availability. Despite the potentially important bottom-up control that erosion rates place on substrate characteristics, the relationship between the two is largely unexplored. We investigate spatial variations in aboveground biomass (AGB) across a structurally diverse mixed coniferous/deciduous forest with an order of magnitude erosion-rate gradient in the Northern Californian Sierra Nevada, USA, using high resolution LiDAR data and field plots. Mean basin slope, a proxy for erosion rate, accounts for 32% of variance in AGB within our field area (P erosion rate as a potentially important, but hitherto unappreciated, control on AGB and forest structure.

  9. Potential contribution of wind farms to damp oscillations in weak grids with high wind penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, R.D. [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Laboratorio de Electronica Industrial, Control e Instrumentacion (LEICI), Facultad de Ingenieria, P.O. Box 91, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Mantz, R.J. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICpba) (Argentina); Battaiotto, P.E. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-08-15

    In Argentinean Patagonia, there exists a growing interest in understanding local problems associated with the increasing of wind energy penetration in the grid. Recent papers show that some of these power quality problems can be reduced by the proper control of the wind farms. In this way, this work deals with the impact and potential contribution of wind generation on the damping of the electromechanical oscillations called inter- and intra-area oscillations. For gaining qualitative insights and understandings on this complex subject, a test system that allows to isolate the oscillations modes is considered. The analysis shows that new control concepts for wind farm can efficiently contribute to the power system damping. (author)

  10. Interactive effects of moss-dominated crusts and Artemisia ordosica on wind erosion and soil moisture in Mu Us sandland, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Bu, Chongfeng; Mu, Xingmin; Shao, Hongbo; Zhang, Kankan

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the effects of biological soil crusts (BSCs) on soil moisture and wind erosion and study the necessity and feasibility of disturbance of BSCs in the Mu Us sandland, the effects of four treatments, including moss-dominated crusts alone, Artemisia ordosica alone, bare sand, and Artemisia ordosica combined with moss-dominated crusts, on rainwater infiltration, soil moisture, and annual wind erosion were observed. The major results are as follows. (1) The development of moss-dominated crusts exacerbated soil moisture consumption and had negative effects on soil moisture in the Mu Us sandland. (2) Moss-dominated crusts significantly increased soil resistance to wind erosion, and when combined with Artemisia ordosica, this effect became more significant. The contribution of moss-dominated crusts under Artemisia ordosica was significantly lower than that of moss-dominated crusts alone in sites where vegetative coverage > 50%. (3) Finally, an appropriate disturbance of moss-dominated crusts in the rainy season in sites with high vegetative coverage improved soil water environment and vegetation succession, but disturbance in sites with little or no vegetative cover should be prohibited to avoid the exacerbation of wind erosion.

  11. Interactive Effects of Moss-Dominated Crusts and Artemisia ordosica on Wind Erosion and Soil Moisture in Mu Us Sandland, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Bu, Chongfeng; Mu, Xingmin; Shao, Hongbo; Zhang, Kankan

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the effects of biological soil crusts (BSCs) on soil moisture and wind erosion and study the necessity and feasibility of disturbance of BSCs in the Mu Us sandland, the effects of four treatments, including moss-dominated crusts alone, Artemisia ordosica alone, bare sand, and Artemisia ordosica combined with moss-dominated crusts, on rainwater infiltration, soil moisture, and annual wind erosion were observed. The major results are as follows. (1) The development of moss-dominated crusts exacerbated soil moisture consumption and had negative effects on soil moisture in the Mu Us sandland. (2) Moss-dominated crusts significantly increased soil resistance to wind erosion, and when combined with Artemisia ordosica, this effect became more significant. The contribution of moss-dominated crusts under Artemisia ordosica was significantly lower than that of moss-dominated crusts alone in sites where vegetative coverage > 50%. (3) Finally, an appropriate disturbance of moss-dominated crusts in the rainy season in sites with high vegetative coverage improved soil water environment and vegetation succession, but disturbance in sites with little or no vegetative cover should be prohibited to avoid the exacerbation of wind erosion. PMID:24982973

  12. Interactive Effects of Moss-Dominated Crusts and Artemisia ordosica on Wind Erosion and Soil Moisture in Mu Us Sandland, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the effects of biological soil crusts (BSCs on soil moisture and wind erosion and study the necessity and feasibility of disturbance of BSCs in the Mu Us sandland, the effects of four treatments, including moss-dominated crusts alone, Artemisia ordosica alone, bare sand, and Artemisia ordosica combined with moss-dominated crusts, on rainwater infiltration, soil moisture, and annual wind erosion were observed. The major results are as follows. (1 The development of moss-dominated crusts exacerbated soil moisture consumption and had negative effects on soil moisture in the Mu Us sandland. (2 Moss-dominated crusts significantly increased soil resistance to wind erosion, and when combined with Artemisia ordosica, this effect became more significant. The contribution of moss-dominated crusts under Artemisia ordosica was significantly lower than that of moss-dominated crusts alone in sites where vegetative coverage > 50%. (3 Finally, an appropriate disturbance of moss-dominated crusts in the rainy season in sites with high vegetative coverage improved soil water environment and vegetation succession, but disturbance in sites with little or no vegetative cover should be prohibited to avoid the exacerbation of wind erosion.

  13. In vitro evaluation of the erosive potential of viscosity-modified soft acidic drinks on enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut-Yetkiner, Arzu; Wiegand, Annette; Ronay, Valerie; Attin, Rengin; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of viscosity-modified soft acidic drinks on enamel erosion. A total of 108 bovine enamel samples (∅ = 3 mm) were embedded in acrylic resin and allocated into six groups (n = 18). Soft acidic drinks (orange juice, Coca-Cola, Sprite) were used both in their regular forms and at a kinetic viscositiy of 5 mm(2)/s, which was adjusted by adding hydroxypropyl cellulose. All solutions were pumped over the enamel surface from a reservoir with a drop rate of 3 ml/min. Each specimen was eroded for 10 min at 20 °C. Erosion of enamel surfaces was measured using profilometry. Data were analyzed using independent t tests and one-way ANOVAs (p viscosity-modified drinks (Coca-Cola, 4.90 ± 0.34 μm; Sprite, 4.46 ± 0.39 μm; orange juice, 1.10 ± 0.22 μm). For both regular and viscosity-modified forms, Coca-Cola and Sprite caused higher enamel loss than orange juice. Increasing the viscosity of acidic soft drinks to 5 mm(2)/s reduced enamel erosion by 12.6-18.7 %. The erosive potential of soft acidic drinks is not only dependent on various chemical properties but also on the viscosity of the acidic solution and can be reduced by viscosity modification.

  14. Rain erosion of wind turbine blade coatings using discrete water jets: Effects of water cushioning, substrate geometry, impact distance, and coating properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Bernad, Pablo L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and reliable rain erosion screening of blade coatings for wind turbines is a strong need in the coatings industry. One possibility in this direction is the use of discrete water jets, where so-called jet slugs are impacted on a coating surface. Previous investigations have mapped the influe......Rapid and reliable rain erosion screening of blade coatings for wind turbines is a strong need in the coatings industry. One possibility in this direction is the use of discrete water jets, where so-called jet slugs are impacted on a coating surface. Previous investigations have mapped......, impact, hardness, and abrasion experiments, were also conducted. The ranking of abrasion resistance of the blade coatings was in agreement with the ranking of rain erosion resistance measured in the whirling arm rig (an industrial standard).Results of this work, with more pertinent parameters explored...

  15. Potential Coir Fibre Composite for Small Wind Turbine Blade Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakri Bakri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers have been developed as reinforcement of composite to shift synthetic fibers. One of potential natural fibers developed is coir fiber. This paper aims to describe potential coir fiber as reinforcement of composite for small wind turbine blade application. The research shows that mechanical properties ( tensile, impact, shear, flexural and compression strengths of coir fiber composite have really similar to wood properties for small wind turbine blade material, but inferior to glass fiber composite properties. The effect of weathering was also evaluated to coir fiber composite in this paper.

  16. Resource assessment and removal analysis for corn stover and wheat straw in the Eastern and Midwestern United States - rainfall and wind-induced soil erosion methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.G. [Enersol Resources, Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2002-05-01

    The focus of this study was to develop a methodology to estimate 'hectare-weighted', county-level, corn stover and spring and winter wheat straw removable residue quantities in the USA for 1995-1997 in 37 states (north-south line from North Dakota to Texas and all states east) such that tolerable rainfall and wind soil loss limits were not exceeded.The methodology developed and employed in this study was based on the revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) and the wind erosion equation (WEQ), which were used to predict individual county-level corn or wheat yields required at harvest to insure that the amount of soil loss would not exceed the tolerable soil loss limit. These yields were then compared to actual county-level corn or wheat yields to determine the quantity of removable residue. Results of this study indicate an annual average of over 42 and 8 million metric tons of corn stover and straw (spring and winter wheat), respectively (46.2 and 8.8 million tons) were potentially available for removal between 1995 and 1997 in these 37 states. (Author)

  17. Geophysical potential for wind energy over the open oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possner, Anna; Caldeira, Ken

    2017-10-24

    Wind turbines continuously remove kinetic energy from the lower troposphere, thereby reducing the wind speed near hub height. The rate of electricity generation in large wind farms containing multiple wind arrays is, therefore, constrained by the rate of kinetic energy replenishment from the atmosphere above. In recent years, a growing body of research argues that the rate of generated power is limited to around 1.5 W m -2 within large wind farms. However, in this study, we show that considerably higher power generation rates may be sustainable over some open ocean areas. In particular, the North Atlantic is identified as a region where the downward transport of kinetic energy may sustain extraction rates of 6 W m -2 and above over large areas in the annual mean. Furthermore, our results indicate that the surface heat flux from the oceans to the atmosphere may play an important role in creating regions where sustained high rates of downward transport of kinetic energy and thus, high rates of kinetic energy extraction may be geophysical possible. While no commercial-scale deep water wind farms yet exist, our results suggest that such technologies, if they became technically and economically feasible, could potentially provide civilization-scale power.

  18. Decadal predictability of regional scale wind speed and wind energy potentials over Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moemken, Julia; Reyers, Mark; Buldmann, Benjamin; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-04-01

    Regional climate predictions on timescales from one year to one decade are gaining importance since this time frame falls within the planning horizon of politics, economy, and society. In this context, decadal predictions are of particular interest for the development of renewable energies such as wind energy. The present study examines the decadal predictability of regional scale wind speed and wind energy potentials in the framework of the MiKlip consortium ("Mittelfristige Klimaprognosen"; www.fona-miklip.de). This consortium aims to develop a model system based on the Max-Planck-Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) that can provide skilful decadal predictions on regional and global scales. Three generations of the decadal prediction system, which differ primarily in their ocean initialisation, are analysed here. Ensembles of uninitialised historical and yearly initialised hindcast experiments are used to assess different skill scores for 10m wind speeds and wind energy output (Eout) over Central Europe, with special focus given to Germany. With this aim, a statistical-dynamical downscaling (SDD) approach is used for the regionalisation of the global datasets. Its added value is evaluated by comparison of skill scores for MPI-ESM large-scale wind speeds and SDD simulated regional wind speeds. All three MPI-ESM ensemble generations show some forecast skill for annual mean wind speed and Eout over Central Europe on yearly and multi-yearly time scales. The forecast skill is mostly limited to the first years after initialisation. Differences between the three ensemble generations are generally small. The regionalisation preserves and sometimes increases the forecast skill of the global runs but results depend on lead time and ensemble generation. Moreover, regionalisation often improves the ensemble spread. Seasonal Eout skills are generally lower than for annual means. Skill scores are lowest during summer, and persist longest in autumn. A large-scale westerly

  19. Effect of erosion on the solar wind stand-off distance at Mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavin, J.A.; Holzer, R.E.

    1979-05-01

    Recent studies have provided quantitative measurements of the effect of dayside magnetic reconnection on the position of the earth's forward magnetopause. By scaling these terrestrial observations to Mercury, it is predicted that the mean solar wind stand-off distance for average solar wind dynamic pressure conditions will be 0.2--0.7 R/sub m/ inward from its 'ground state' position. Furthermore, it is expected that the magnetopause will be eroded and/or compressed to within 0.2R/sub m/ of Mercury's surface a significant portion of the time. Empirical formulae derived for the earth's magnetosphere are used to determine both solar wind stand-off distances and solar wind dynamic pressures for the two Mariner 10 encounters with Mercury's magnetosphere. It is found that for the first encounter when the interplanetary magnetic field was often southward and substorm signatures are observed inside the magnetosphere, the mean stand-off distance inferred from the boundary crossings is 1.5R/sub m/(for P/sub s/w=6.0 x 10/sup 8/dynes/cm/sup 2/). At the time of the final encounter, the Mariner 10 magnetometer observed no significant southward component in the IMF and no substorm activity was evident. For this encounter, the mean inferred stand-off distance is 1.9R/sub m/ consistent with the expected effects of magnetic flux transfer within a terrestrial-type magnetosphere. A dipole moment of 6 +- 2 x 10/sup 22/ G-cm/sup 3/ is calculated from the observed bow shock and magnetopause positions. Finally, the importance of magnetic flux transfer in the solar wind-magnetospher-atmosphere-surface interaction at Mercury is briefly discussed.

  20. Onshore wind energy potential over Iberia: present and future projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochinha, Carlos A.; Santos, João A.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    Onshore grid-connected wind power generation has been explored for more than three decades in the Iberian Peninsula. Further, increasing attention has been devoted to renewable energy sources in a climate change context. While advantages of wind energy are widely recognized, its distribution is not spatially homogeneous and not uniform throughout the year. Hence, understanding these spatial-temporal distributions is critical in power system planning. The present study aims at assessing the potential power output estimated from 10 m wind components simulated by a regional climate model (CCLM), driven by ERA40 reanalysis. Datasets are available on a grid with a high spatial resolution (approximately 20 km) and over a 40-yr period (1961-2000). Furthermore, several target sites, located in areas with high installed wind generation capacity, are selected for local-to-regional scale assessments. The results show that potential wind power is higher over northern Iberia, mostly in Cantabria and Galicia, while Andalucía and Cataluña record the lowest values. With respect to the intra-annual variability, summer is by far the season with the lowest potential energy outputs. Furthermore, the inter-annual variability reveals an overall downward long-term trend over the 40-yr period, particularly in the winter time series. A CCLM transient experiment, forced by the SRES A1B emission scenario, is also discussed for a future period (2041-2070), after a model validation/calibration process (bias corrections). Significant changes in the wind power potential are projected for the future throughout Iberia, but their magnitude largely depends on the locations. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER- 019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  1. Estimation of wind power potential of the Gulf of Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monzikova, Anna K.; Kudryavtsev, V.N.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of wind power potential of the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland and its seasonal variations are presented. Measurements taken from meteorological stations around the coastline are used as the input data. Calculations are based on the similarity theory for the atmospheric planetar...

  2. Electric potential of the moon in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.; Fenner, M. A.; Hills, H. K.

    1973-01-01

    Acceleration and detection of the lunar thermal ionosphere in the presence of the lunar electric field yields a value of at least +10 V for the lunar electric potential for solar zenith angles between approximately 20 and 45 deg and in the magnetosheath or solar wind. An enhanced positive ion flux is observed with the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment when a preacceleration voltage attains certain values. This enhancement is greater when the moon is in the solar wind as opposed to the magnetosheath.

  3. NWTC Helps Chart the World's Wind Resource Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provide the wind industry, policymakers, and other stakeholders with applied wind resource data, information, maps, and technical assistance. These tools, which emphasize wind resources at ever-increasing heights, help stakeholders evaluate the wind resource and development potential for a specific area.

  4. Parametrization of the increase of the aeolian erosion threshold wind friction velocity due to soil moisture for arid and semi-arid areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fécan

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale simulation of the soil-derived dust emission in semi-arid regions needs to account for the influence of the soil moisture on the wind erosion threshold. Soil water retention consists of molecular adsorption on the soil grain surface and capillary forces between the grain. Interparticle capillary forces (characterized by the moisture tension are the main factor responsible for the increase of the wind erosion threshold observed when the soil moisture increases. When the soil moisture content is close to but smaller than the maximum amount of adsorbed water, w' (depending on the soil texture, these capillary forces are considered as not strong enough to significantly increase the erosion threshold. An expression of the moisture tension as a function of soil moisture and w' is derived from retention curves. From this expression, a parametrization of the ratio of the wet to dry erosion thresholds has been developed as a function of soil moisture and soil texture. The coefficients of this parametrization have been determined by using experimental data from the literature. An empirical relationship between w' and soil clay content has been established. The erosion threshold ratios simulated for different soil textures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (Aerosols and particles · Hydrology (soil moisture

  5. Parametrization of the increase of the aeolian erosion threshold wind friction velocity due to soil moisture for arid and semi-arid areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecan, F.; Marticorena, B.; Bergametti, G. [Paris-7 Univ. (France). Lab. Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques

    1999-01-01

    Large-scale simulation of the soil-derived dust emission in semiarid regions needs to account for the influence of the soil moisture on the wind erosion threshold. Soil water retention consists of molecular adsorption on the soil grain surface and capillary forces between the grain. Interparticle capillary forces (characterized by the moisture tension) are the main factor responsible for the increase of the wind erosion threshold observed when the soil moisture increases. When the soil moisture content is close to but smaller than the maximum amount of adsorbed water, w` (depending on the soil texture), these capillary forces are considered as not strong enough to significantly increase the erosion threshold. An expression of the moisture tension as a function of soil moisture and w` is derived from retention curves. From this expression, a parametrization of the ratio of the wet to dry erosion thresholds has been developed as a function of soil moisture and soil texture. The coefficients of this parametrization have been determined by using experimental data from the literature. An empirical relationship between w` and soil clay content has been established. The erosion threshold ratios simulated for different soil textures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.) 24 refs.

  6. Parametrization of the increase of the aeolian erosion threshold wind friction velocity due to soil moisture for arid and semi-arid areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fécan

    Full Text Available Large-scale simulation of the soil-derived dust emission in semi-arid regions needs to account for the influence of the soil moisture on the wind erosion threshold. Soil water retention consists of molecular adsorption on the soil grain surface and capillary forces between the grain. Interparticle capillary forces (characterized by the moisture tension are the main factor responsible for the increase of the wind erosion threshold observed when the soil moisture increases. When the soil moisture content is close to but smaller than the maximum amount of adsorbed water, w' (depending on the soil texture, these capillary forces are considered as not strong enough to significantly increase the erosion threshold. An expression of the moisture tension as a function of soil moisture and w' is derived from retention curves. From this expression, a parametrization of the ratio of the wet to dry erosion thresholds has been developed as a function of soil moisture and soil texture. The coefficients of this parametrization have been determined by using experimental data from the literature. An empirical relationship between w' and soil clay content has been established. The erosion threshold ratios simulated for different soil textures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (Aerosols and particles · Hydrology (soil moisture

  7. Potential for Development of Solar and Wind Resource in Bhutan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.

    2009-09-01

    With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced maps and data of the wind and solar resources in Bhutan. The solar resource data show that Bhutan has an adequate resource for flat-plate collectors, with annual average values of global horizontal solar radiation ranging from 4.0 to 5.5 kWh/m2-day (4.0 to 5.5 peak sun hours per day). The information provided in this report may be of use to energy planners in Bhutan involved in developing energy policy or planning wind and solar projects, and to energy analysts around the world interested in gaining an understanding of Bhutan's wind and solar energy potential.

  8. Energy potential and early operational experience for large wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, W. H.; Thomas, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Projections for the total potential output of large wind turbines in the U.S. are reviewed. NASA has developed nine large windpowered generators, of 100 kW, 200 kW, 2 MW, and 2.5 MW capacities, with rotors 100-300 ft in diameter, and all with horizontal axes. Approximately 214,000 sq miles of the U.S. have been determined as having substantial wind regimes and terrain suitable for large wind turbine siting. This translates into 340,000 Mod 2 (2.5 MW) wind turbines producing 4.9 quads of electricity annually, equivalent to saving 2.5 billion barrels of oil/yr. The cost of electricity is seen as the critical factor in utility acceptance of large wind turbines, and the Mod 2 machines are noted to achieve the 2-4 cents/kWh (1977 dollars) COE which is necessary. Problems such as pollution, including visual, auditory, EM, and land use difficulties are considered, and solutions are indicated.

  9. Path Analysis Identifies Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κB Ligand, Osteoprotegerin, and Sclerostin as Potential Mediators of the Tophus-bone Erosion Relationship in Gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhana, Ashika; Aati, Opetaia; Gamble, Gregory D; Callon, Karen E; Doyle, Anthony J; Roger, Mark; McQueen, Fiona M; Horne, Anne; Reid, Ian R; Cornish, Jillian; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    To determine the relationship between tophus, erosion and bone remodeling factors in gout. Computed tomography bone erosion and circulating bone factors were measured in adults with tophaceous gout. Multiple regression modeling and path analysis were used to determine predictors of erosion. Tophus number, Māori or Pacific ethnicity, creatinine, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and sclerostin were independently associated with erosion. Path analysis showed a direct effect of tophus number on erosion, partially mediated through OPG, RANKL, and sclerostin. Tophus number is strongly associated with bone erosion in gout. Circulating RANKL, OPG, and sclerostin are potential mediators of tophus-related erosion.

  10. Wind energy potential in Chile: Assessment of a small scale wind farm for residential clients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becerra, Miguel; Morán, José; Jerez, Alejandro; Cepeda, Francisco; Valenzuela, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An assessment of a small scale wind farm was carried out. • Two Chilean locations were selected, which are geographically dissimilar. • The software tool selected for the project’s evaluation was HOMER. • All the project’s financial evaluations were negative. • Government policy tools and their applications were discussed. - Abstract: This work presents a techno-financial evaluation of two Chilean locations with promising wind potential: Laguna Verde placed in the central region of the country, and Porvenir in the southern region. A small scale wind farm was studied, considering a nominal electrical production capacity of 90 kW. This facility is comprised of three wind turbine models, all available in the national market. Currently, the tariff method used in Chile is the net billing scheme, where the energy bought and sold to the grid has different prices. The study is based on 300 hypothetical residential households. The software tool used to perform the assessment was the Hybrid Optimization of Multiple Energy Resources (HOMER). For all the scenarios the results showed a Net Present Cost (NPC), instead of a financial profit from the proposed projects. A sensitivity analysis was also carried out. From the group of variables studied, the NPC exhibited itself as more sensitive to the price of buying energy from the grid and to the annual average wind speed. Finally, a few government policies and their applications are discussed.

  11. Changes in wind erosion over a 25-year restoration chronosequence on the south edge of the Tengger Desert, China: implications for preventing desertification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quanlin; Fehmi, Jeffrey S; Zhang, Dekui; Fan, Baoli; Chen, Fang

    2017-08-23

    Wind erosion is a primary cause of desertification as well as being a serious ecological problem in arid and semi-arid areas across the world. To determine mechanisms for restoring desertified lands, an unrestored shifting sand dune and three formerly shifting sand dunes (desertified lands) that had been enclosed and afforested for 5, 15, and 25 years were selected for evaluation on the south edge of the Tengger Desert, China. Based on sampling heights between 0.2 and 3 m, the critical threshold average wind speed was 6.5 m s -1 at 2 m where the sand transport rate was reduced from 285.9 kg m -2  h -1 on the unrestored dunes to 9.1 and 1.8 kg m -2  h -1 on the sites afforested and enclosed for 5 and 15 years, respectively. The percentage of wind eroded area was reduced from 99.9% on the unrestored dune to 94.5, 9.0, and 0.5% on the sites afforested and enclosed for 5, 15, and 25 years, respectively. Wind erosion was effectively reduced after 15 years. Although there were different driving factors for wind erosion mitigation on the different restoration stages, an increase in the vegetation cover, surface roughness, soil shear strength, soil clay content, organic matter, and reduction in the near-surface wind speed were the primary variables associated with the restoration chronosequence. We conclude that reducing the wind speed and developing a biological crust through vegetation restoration were the critical components for restoration of desertified land.

  12. Potential impacts of climate change on soil erosion vulnerability across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Segura; G. Sun; S. McNulty; Y. Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Rainfall runoff erosivity (R) is one key climate factor that controls water erosion. Quantifying the effects of climate change-induced erosivity change is important for identifying critical regions prone to soil erosion under a changing environment. In this study we first evaluate the changes of R from 1970 to 2090 across the United States under nine climate conditions...

  13. Assessment of Jet Erosion for Potential Post-Retrieval K-Basin Settled Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-09-29

    Packaged K-Basin sludge will be transported to the T Plant on the Hanford Site where it will be interim stored. The sludge will be retrieved from the storage containers and processed for disposal. A sample of high uranium content canister sludge, designated 96-13, "self-cemented" during laboratory storage. This sample was uncharacteristically strong compared to expected K-Basin material. The purpose for this work is to evaluate the potential retrieval of such sludge after storage at the T Plant via jet erosion. The specific objectives of this report are to determine the modes of erosion and the methods used to measure/assess the erodibility parameters of sludge and identify those parameters applicable to jet erosion. The erodibility parameters of sample 96-13 are characterized to the extent possible. These objectives have been met based on literature review, past experience at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and observation of sample 96-13 video during hot-cell activities.

  14. Measurement campaign for wind power potential in west Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rønnow Jakobsen, Kasper

    2013-04-01

    Experiences and results from a wind resource exploring campaign 2003- in west Greenland. Like many other countries, Greenland is trying to reduce its dependency of fossil fuel by implementing renewable energy. The main challenge is that the people live on the coast in scattered settlements, without power infrastructure. Based on this a wind power potential project was established in 2002, funded by the Greenlandic government and the Technical University of Denmark. We present results and experiences of the campaign. 1 Field campaign There were only a few climate stations in or close to settlements and due to their positioning and instrumentation, they were not usable for wind resource estimation. To establish met stations in Arctic areas with complex topography, there are some challenges to face; mast positioning in complex terrain, severe weather conditions, instrumentation, data handling, installation and maintenance budget. The terrain in the ice free and populated part, mainly consists of mountains of different heights and shapes, separated by deep fjords going from the ice cap to the sea. With a generally low wind resource the focus was on the most exposed positions close to the settlements. Data from the nearest existing climate stations was studied for background estimations of predominant wind directions and extreme wind speeds, and based on that the first 10m masts were erected in 2003. 2 Instruments The first installations used standard NRG systems with low cost NRG instruments. For most of the sites this low cost setup did a good job, but there were some problems with the first design, including instrument and boom strains. In subsequent years, the systems were updated several times to be able to operate in the extreme conditions. Different types of instruments, data logger and boom systems were tested to get better data quality and reliability. Today 11 stations with heights ranging from 10-50m are installed and equipped according to the IEC standard

  15. A systematic approach to evaluate erosion potential at environmental restoration sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veenis, S.J.; Mays, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for investigation and remediation of solid waste management units (SWMUs) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and area of concerns (AOCs) under the direction of the Department of Energy. During the investigation and remediation phases, information may be gathered that indicates that conditions may be present at the site which may effect surface water quality. Depending on the constituent found, its concentration, and erosion/sediment transport potential, it may be necessary to implement temporary or permanent mitigative measures

  16. The electric potential of the moon in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.; Fenner, M. A.; Hills, H. K.

    1973-01-01

    Acceleration and detection of the lunar thermal ionosphere in the presence of the lunar electric field yields a value of approximately +10 V for the lunar electric potential for solar zenith angles between 20 and 45 deg and in the magnetosheath or solar wind. The ion number density of the thermal ionosphere observed is compatible with a surface neutral number density of about 100,000 atoms/cu cm.

  17. Cost reduction potentials of offshore wind power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobohm, Jens; Krampe, Leonard; Peter, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind power is a major hope for the German energy turnaround. However, it will only be possible to tap its cost reduction potentials if industry, the political leadership and the administrative authorities join forces to create the necessary preconditions. An important requirement for this capital-intensive technology are stable legal and political framework conditions. A recent study on the future shows what needs to be done.

  18. Measurements of erosion potential using Gust chamber in Yolo Bypass near Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Paul A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2018-04-27

     coring equipment used. The available results suggest that Toe Drain soil is highly erodible (low critical shear stress and high erosion rate once initiated) despite being difficult to sample. As a collector of runoff, it also has the potential to accumulate soils eroded from adjacent areas, subsequent to storm events, as flows subside. This deposited material will typically be more erodible than the material that it lands on. The deposition and resuspension of material was not simulated in the testing described here because the applied shear stress increases monotonically during testing.The spatial distribution of mean grain size, loss on ignition, and percent fines of Yolo Bypass soils are also presented. Sediment sampling for this effort was performed by DWR; the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed the sample analysis. These data should thus be considered provisional, but the remainder of the data presented here, and this report, have been through the formal U.S. Geological Survey review process.A separate effort has been made by others to develop numerical model results defining the spatially  varying, time-dependent hydrodynamics in the Yolo Bypass. These model results are being used to quantify shear stress on the soil surface, which together with the Gust chamber results shown here, are used for the DWR Yolo Bypass D-MCM mercury transport model to compute erosion rates for each time step.

  19. Potential fragility levels for erosion and landslides in soils of Ibague municipality (Tolima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Leal Villamil

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the methodology of potential soil fragility, described by Alarcón and Gayoso (1999, the evaluation and spatial distribution of the potential fragility for erosion and  landslides, was carried out in the soils of the municipality of Ibagué. Edaphic variables were taken from units of soils according to two systems of classification: Comité de Cafeteros de Colombia (1973 and IGAC (2004. Environmental variables of precipitation and altimetry were obtained from the hydrographic basin ordination and management plan of the Coello and Torare rivers (CORTOLIMA, 2006 and the forestry planning project for the Department of Tolima (Universidad del Tolima and CORTOLIMA, 2007. According to the numerical information organized in maps and the mathematical models established for the nomograms of the base methodology, the rates of potential fragility of the two phenomena of soil degradation were determined. The results show that with the soil classification system IGAC, the municipality of Ibagué is more sensitive to phenomena of landslides rather than to erosion, opposed to what is shown in the system of the Comité de Cafeteros de Colombia. Both systems coincide in stating that the zones with higher propensity to these phenomena are located mainly near the Combeima Canyon, in the mountainous area near the municipality of Cajamarca, as well as the hills and mountains that surround the urban area

  20. Resource assessment and removal analysis for corn stover and wheat straw in the United States : rainfall and wind-induced soil erosion methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.G. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Walsh, M.; Graham, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oakridge, TN (United States); Sheehan, J.J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents a newly developed methodology to estimate the quantities of crop residues that can be removed while maintaining rain or wind erosion at less than or equal to the tolerable soil-loss level. Several factors directly influence the removal of agricultural residues for bioenergy and bioproduct use such as grain yield, crop rotation, field management practices within a rotation, climate, and physical characteristics of the soil. The authors analyzed six corn and wheat rotations in the 10 largest corn-producing states, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. An evaluation for conventional, mulch-reduced, and no-till field operations was performed of residue removal rates for each rotation. The results showed that potential removable maximum quantities vary from almost 5.5 million dry metric tons per year for a continuous corn rotation using conventional till in Kansas, to in excess of 97 million dry metric tons per year for a corn-wheat rotation using no-till in Illinois. 9 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. In vitro evaluation of the erosive potential of orange juice modified by food additives in enamel and dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramucci, Taís; Hara, Anderson T; Zero, Domenick T; Ferreira, Stella S; Aoki, Idalina V; Sobral, Maria Angela P

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the erosive potential of orange juice modified by food additives in enamel and dentine. Calcium lactate pentahydrate (CLP), xanthan gum (XG), sodium linear polyphosphate (LPP), sodium pyrophosphate tetrabasic (PP), sodium tripolyphosphate (STP) and some of their combinations were added to an orange juice. Pure orange juice and a calcium-modified juice were used as negative (C-) and positive (C+) controls, respectively. In phase 1, 15 modified orange juices were tested for erosive potential using pH-stat analysis. In phase 2, the additives alone and the combination with good results in phase 1 and in previous studies (CLP+LPP) were tested in an erosion-remineralization cycling model. In phase 3, the erosion and remineralization episodes were studied independently. Enamel was analysed by surface microhardness (SMH) and profilometry, whilst dentine by profilometry. In phase 1, reduction of the erosive potential was observed for all additives and their combinations, except XG alone. In phase 2, no detectable enamel loss was observed when CLP, LPP and CLP+LPP were added to the juice. XG, STP and PP had enamel loss similar to C- (p>0.05). Amongst additives, the combination CLP+LPP showed the highest SMH values followed by CLP (p0.05). For dentine, only CLP+LPP lead to surface loss values lower than C- (peffect was enhanced by their combination. For dentine, only the combination CLP+LPP reduced erosion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Successful Small Wind Future: There Is Great Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2017-05-02

    Suzanne Tegen made this presentation at the 2017 Small Wind Conference in Bloomington, Minnesota. It provides an overview of DOE-sponsored small wind products, testing, and support; an example of a Regional Resource Center defending distributed wind; the recently published Distributed Wind Taxonomy; the dWind model and recent results; and other recent DOE and NREL publications related to small and distributed wind.

  3. Estimating potential soil erosion for environmental services in a sugarcane growing area using multisource remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulianga, B.; Bégué, A.; Simoes, M.; Clouvel, P.; Todoroff, P.

    2013-10-01

    Characterization of landscapes is crucial in modelling potential soil erosion to ascertain environmental services that are provided by the main land use in the ecosystem. Remote sensing techniques have proved successful in characterization of landscapes. In this study area of a rain-fed Kibos-Miwani sugar zone of Kenya, we used Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data extracted from satellite imagery to characterize the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the vegetation conditions, and to model potential soil erosion. Data used included Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 250 m NDVI acquired in the period 2000 to 2013; 30 m Landsat5 time series images acquired between November 2010 and June 2011; a 30 m digital elevation model (DEM); and ground observations (land cover and soil characteristics). Temporal NDVI was extracted directly from MODIS 250 m images to study the changes in seasonal vegetation conditions with time, and spatial NDVI was extracted by analysing Landsat5 images at the field scale. NDVI extracted from Landsat images for a specific date, represented vegetation conditions for that simulation period. To compute potential soil erosion, we used Landsat 5 NDVI, the slope, aspect, curvature and soil physical properties as input data sets in the spatially explicit Fuzzy-based dynamic soil erosion model (FuDSEM). Land cover data collected revealed that sugarcane was the main land use, occupying 76% of the land cover. Results were consistent with crop management practices, illustrating a spatially heterogeneous land scape with varied vegetation conditions throughout the year. Out of simulations, we noted a homogeneous low erosion risk in areas with natural land cover with a global mean of 0.42. Medium to intense erosion risk in cropped areas was evident, with erosion risk varying from one pixel to the other. Simulation results suggest that crop management practices (planting and harvesting processes) are the drivers of erosion

  4. Wind speed and wind energy potentials in EURO-CORDEX ensemble simulations: evaluation, bias-correction and future changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moemken, Julia; Reyers, Mark; Feldmann, Hendrik; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2017-04-01

    The EURO-CORDEX initiative aims at dynamically downscaling the CMIP5 global climate projections to provide an ensemble of high-resolution regional climate change scenarios for Europe. We analyse a multi-model ensemble of recent EURO-CORDEX simulations at 12km resolution focussing on wind speed and wind energy potentials. The analysis is based on 3-hourly 10m wind speeds from 9 different GCM-RCM-chains. For validation, the historical 10m wind speeds are compared to ERA-Interim driven evaluation runs for the same RCMs. This comparison uncovered some substantial biases for wind speeds, which result both from the choice of GCM and RCM. Since these biases may influence the climate change signal, the 10m wind speeds from the historical and the scenario runs are bias corrected. With this aim, a probability mapping is carried out to adjust the simulated wind speeds to the evaluation runs. In a next step, the corrected 10m wind speeds are extrapolated to the average hub height of a wind turbine (here 100m). For this purpose, different approximations for the power law exponent and their influence on the wind speed distribution in 100m were investigated. Finally, gridded wind energy output (Eout) is calculated for two operational wind turbines by taking the specific characteristics of the turbines into account. With this methodology, future changes of wind characteristics relevant for the wind energy production are estimated, including mean changes in annual and seasonal wind energy production, changes in variability and extreme events like long-lasting calm periods.

  5. The effect of dilution on the erosive potential of maltodextrin-containing sports drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gomes VIDAL

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The increasing consumption of maltodextrin-containing sports drinks, usually acidic, during physical activity may cause dental erosion. Objective To evaluate the effect of dilution on the erosive potential of maltodextrin-containing sports drinks. Methodology Five samples of five maltodextrin-containing sports drinks [Sports Nutrition (SN, Body Action (BA, New Millen (NM, Athletica Nutrition (AN, Integral Medica (IM] were diluted with distilled water in three different proportions: as recommended by manufacturer (rec, with 20% more powder (20+ and with 20% less powder (20- than recommended. Their pH and titratable acidity (volume of 1N NaOH necessary to raise pH to 5.5 were determined. Result The pH and titratable acidity differed among the products, and pH values differed among the dilutions. All sports drinks showed pH below the critical pH for dental enamel demineralization. There was a significant negative correlation between pH and titratable acidity (p <0.01; r = -0.795. Conclusion Changes in the dilution of maltodextrin-containing sports drinks affected their pH, but not their titratable acidity.

  6. Dust Plume Modeling at Fort Bliss: Move-Out Operations, Combat Training and Wind Erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-09-29

    The potential for air-quality impacts from heavy mechanized vehicles operating in the training ranges and on the unpaved main supply routes at Fort Bliss was investigated. This report details efforts by the staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Fort Bliss Directorate of Environment in this investigation. Dust emission and dispersion from typical activities, including move outs and combat training, occurring on the installation were simulated using the atmospheric modeling system DUSTRAN. Major assumptions associated with designing specific modeling scenarios are summarized, and results from the simulations are presented.

  7. Model for the accumulation of solar wind radiation damage effects in lunar dust grains, based on recent results concerning implantation and erosion effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, J.; Bibring, J.P.; Cowsik, G.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.

    1983-02-15

    In this paper we present our most recent results on ion implantation and erosion effects, intended to reproduce the superficial amorphous layers of radiation damage observed with a high voltage electron microscope on ..mu..m-sized grains extracted from the lunar regolith and which result from the exposure of the grains to the solar wind. We next outline theoretical computations which yield the thickness distribution of such amorphous layers as a function of the exposure time of the grains at the surface of the moon, the He/H ratio, and the speed distribution in the solar wind. From this model, the position of the peak in the solar wind speed distribution is the major parameter controlling the thickness of the amorphous layer.

  8. Energy sector and wind energy potential in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogulata, R.T.

    2003-01-01

    Turkey has very limited indigenous energy resources and has to import around 65% of primary energy to meet her needs. It is a large importer of primary energy despite having ample renewable energy sources. Turkey's vibrant economy has led to increased energy demand in recent years. This situation is expected to continue in the near future because its economy is dependent mainly on imported oil, natural gas and electricity. This paper presents the prevailing and the expected energy situation and energy demand. Wind energy potential in Turkey is also discussed. (author)

  9. Rio Grande Erosion Potential Demonstration - Report for the National Border Technology Program; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JEPSEN, RICHARD A.; ROBERTS, JESSE D.; LANGFORD, RICHARD; GAILANI, JOSEPH

    2001-01-01

    This demonstration project is a collaboration among DOE, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP), the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC), and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). Sandia deployed and demonstrated a field measurement technology that enables the determination of erosion and transport potential of sediments in the Rio Grande. The technology deployed was the Mobile High Shear Stress Flume. This unique device was developed by Sandia's Carlsbad Programs for the USACE and has been used extensively in collaborative efforts on near shore and river systems throughout the United States. Since surface water quantity and quality along with human health is an important part of the National Border Technology Program, technologies that aid in characterizing, managing, and protecting this valuable resource from possible contamination sources is imperative

  10. Effects of Long-term Conservation Tillage on Soil Nutrients in Sloping Fields in Regions Characterized by Water and Wind Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chunjian; Cao, Xue; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Weiyu; Feng, Yongzhong; Qiao, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Conservation tillage is commonly used in regions affected by water and wind erosion. To understand the effects of conservation tillage on soil nutrients and yield, a long-term experiment was set up in a region affected by water and wind erosion on the Loess Plateau. The treatments used were traditional tillage (CK), no tillage (NT), straw mulching (SM), plastic-film mulching (PM), ridging and plastic-film mulching (RPM) and intercropping (In). Our results demonstrate that the available nutrients in soils subjected to non-traditional tillage treatments decreased during the first several years and then remained stable over the last several years of the experiment. The soil organic matter and total nitrogen content increased gradually over 6 years in all treatments except CK. The nutrient content of soils subjected to conservative tillage methods, such as NT and SM, were significantly higher than those in soils under the CK treatment. Straw mulching and film mulching effectively reduced an observed decrease in soybean yield. Over the final 6 years of the experiment, soybean yields followed the trend RPM > PM > SM > NT > CK > In. This trend has implications for controlling soil erosion and preventing non-point source pollution in sloping fields by sacrificing some food production.

  11. Effects of Long-term Conservation Tillage on Soil Nutrients in Sloping Fields in Regions Characterized by Water and Wind Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chunjian; Cao, Xue; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Weiyu; Feng, Yongzhong; Qiao, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Conservation tillage is commonly used in regions affected by water and wind erosion. To understand the effects of conservation tillage on soil nutrients and yield, a long-term experiment was set up in a region affected by water and wind erosion on the Loess Plateau. The treatments used were traditional tillage (CK), no tillage (NT), straw mulching (SM), plastic-film mulching (PM), ridging and plastic-film mulching (RPM) and intercropping (In). Our results demonstrate that the available nutrients in soils subjected to non-traditional tillage treatments decreased during the first several years and then remained stable over the last several years of the experiment. The soil organic matter and total nitrogen content increased gradually over 6 years in all treatments except CK. The nutrient content of soils subjected to conservative tillage methods, such as NT and SM, were significantly higher than those in soils under the CK treatment. Straw mulching and film mulching effectively reduced an observed decrease in soybean yield. Over the final 6 years of the experiment, soybean yields followed the trend RPM > PM > SM > NT > CK > In. This trend has implications for controlling soil erosion and preventing non-point source pollution in sloping fields by sacrificing some food production.

  12. China: an emerging offshore wind development hotspot. With a new assessment of China's offshore wind potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinvang, Rasmus; Enslow, Rachel; Beaumont, Hubert

    2010-08-15

    This study provides new and more detailed estimates of the offshore wind energy resources in China, with particular focus on Southern China. The study points out that the offshore wind industry is ramping up in China with at least 11.9GW in the development pipeline per April 2010. The study estimates the offshore wind potential of China (excluding Taiwan) to 11,580TWh/year. The study proves estimates and wind energy resource maps per province. Fujian, Zhejiang and Hainan stand out with the highest offshore wind speeds in China while Guangdong also shows significant potential, with annual wind speed averages of 6.5-10.2m/s and an energy density range of 12-36GWh/km2. Even though current offshore wind development is mainly taking place in Fujian and Jiangsu, this study shows that the potential is likely even greater in other provinces. The study was developed by the Chinese Wind Energy Association (CWEA) and Sun Yat-sen University, and commissioned by WWF as part of a project funded by the Norwegian Agency of development Coopeartion (Norad). Methodology and constraints: The wind resource analysis improves upon previous studies in estimating the wind energy generation potential for offshore wind power in China, with available meteorological data adjusted for influence of typhoons. The study models how much energy offshore wind can produce along China's coast up to 100km from the shore by calculating the energy output of theoretical wind farms by applying the power curve of a 3MW turbine at a 100m hub height. In addition the study further expands by giving special consideration to the deep-sea offshore potential at +50m water depths. The study focuses particularly on the coastline from Shandong down to Hainan. The final results provide good indication of the offshore wind resource in China when comparing one area to the other. The report can therefore be used as a preliminary tool to identifying most interesting provinces and locations for offshore wind

  13. Measurement of soil water erosion in Africa: the potential support provided by nuclear techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabit, Lionel

    2010-05-01

    Conservation of soil and water resources has become a major agronomic and environmental concern. Degradation phenomena, such as erosion, desertification and salinization affect 65% of soils worldwide. Soil degradation is currently affecting 1.9 billion hectares and is increasing at a rate of 5 to 7 million hectares each year. Almost 50% of 133 million ha degraded soils by overexploitation are located in Africa. The degradation of arable lands affects especially arid areas with poor vegetation cover and tropical areas with high intensity rainfall. Water erosion is by far the most common type of land degradation in Africa. Accelerated erosion decreases soil productivity, increases sedimentation and is related to environmental pollution problems in agro-ecosystems. To control soil erosion there is a need to assess the impact of major land use and the effectiveness of specific soil conservation technologies using various approaches. Effective erosion control starts with the knowledge of soil erosion rates and mechanisms. In Africa, various research projects on water erosion have been implemented involving different conventional techniques such as remote sensing, morphometric investigation, sediment transport models and sediment loading measurements, runoff plots and rainfall erosivity measurements. However, only limited quantitative data on erosion and sedimentation magnitude under African agroenvironmental condition are available. Traditional monitoring and modeling techniques for soil water erosion require many parameters and years of measurements of (inter-annual and mid-term) climatic variability and cropping practices. Conventional erosion and sedimentation methods are limited to provide mid-term trends in soil erosion, however fallout radionuclides (FRN) - e.g. 137-Cs, 210-Pb and 7-Be - have proven to be very powerful tools to trace soil erosion and sedimentation within the landscape from plot to basin scale. FRN techniques allow the estimation of short and

  14. Thermal erosion of cratonic lithosphere as a potential trigger for mass-extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilet, S.; Müntener, O.; Jean, G.; Schoene, B.; Schaltegger, U.

    2016-12-01

    The temporal coincidence between LIPs and mass extinctions has led many to pose a causal relationship between the two. However, there is still no consensus on a mechanistic model that explains how magmatism leads to the turnover of terrestrial and marine plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we present a synthesis of stratigraphic constraints on the Triassic-Jurassic and Pliensbachian-Toarcian boundaries combined with geochronological data demonstrating that these biotic crises are both associated with rapid change from an initial cool period to greenhouse conditions. As current hypothesis for LIPs seems unable to produce these successive climatic changes, we evaluate an alternative suggesting that the initial cooling could be due to gas release during the initial thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere due to emplacement of the CAMP and Karoo-Ferrar volcanic provinces. Karoo and CAMP areas were underlain by thick lithosphere (>200 km) prior to continental break up. Even in presence of abnormal potential mantle temperature, the presence of thick lithosphere excludes significant melting of the asthenospheric mantle without initial stage of thermal erosion of the cratonic lithosphere. Various studies on Kaapvaal craton have shown that sulfide minerals are enclosed in the basal part of the cratonic lithosphere. We argue that initial gas emission was dominated by sulfur liberated from sulfide-bearing cratonic lithosphere causing global cooling and eustatic regression, which was followed by warming/transgression associated with the progressive increase of CO2 in the atmosphere associated to LIPs emission. We suggest that the nature of the underlying lithosphere during large LIP eruption exerts an important control on the consequences at the Earth's surface. This model offers an explanation for why LIPs erupted through oceanic lithosphere are not associated with climatic and biotic crises comparable to LIPs emitted through cratonic lithosphere.

  15. Wind energy potential assessment of Cameroon’s coastal regions for the installation of an onshore wind farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkongho Ayuketang Arreyndip

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For the future installation of a wind farm in Cameroon, the wind energy potentials of three of Cameroon’s coastal cities (Kribi, Douala and Limbe are assessed using NASA average monthly wind data for 31 years (1983–2013 and compared through Weibull statistics. The Weibull parameters are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood, the mean power densities, the maximum energy carrying wind speeds and the most probable wind speeds are also calculated and compared over these three cities. Finally, the cumulative wind speed distributions over the wet and dry seasons are also analyzed. The results show that the shape and scale parameters for Kribi, Douala and Limbe are 2.9 and 2.8, 3.9 and 1.8 and 3.08 and 2.58, respectively. The mean power densities through Weibull analysis for Kribi, Douala and Limbe are 33.7 W/m2, 8.0 W/m2 and 25.42 W/m2, respectively. Kribi’s most probable wind speed and maximum energy carrying wind speed was found to be 2.42 m/s and 3.35 m/s, 2.27 m/s and 3.03 m/s for Limbe and 1.67 m/s and 2.0 m/s for Douala, respectively. Analysis of the wind speed and hence power distribution over the wet and dry seasons shows that in the wet season, August is the windiest month for Douala and Limbe while September is the windiest month for Kribi while in the dry season, March is the windiest month for Douala and Limbe while February is the windiest month for Kribi. In terms of mean power density, most probable wind speed and wind speed carrying maximum energy, Kribi shows to be the best site for the installation of a wind farm. Generally, the wind speeds at all three locations seem quite low, average wind speeds of all the three studied locations fall below 4.0m/s which is far below the cut-in wind speed of many modern wind turbines. However we recommend the use of low cut-in speed wind turbines like the Savonius for stand alone low energy needs

  16. Estimating the wind energy potential over the coastal stations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The suitability of two coastal stations in Nigeria for wind energy generation is presented in this study. To estimate the wind speeds at the desired height 70 m for standard wind turbine, two methods; namely power law relationship and diabatic evaluation have been considered. It was found that the diabatic evaluation method ...

  17. Wind characteristics and energy potentialities of some selected sites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wind regime as observed in three meteorological stations in the north Cameroon are presented in form of velocity duration curves as well as in form of velocity frequency curves. Monthly average wind speed distributions were determined for each station. Based on the analysed data, the utilisation of wind for power ...

  18. Assessment of wind energy potential for eletricity generation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wind speed data from a site called Setchet is used to illustrate that the available wind energy can be harvested to generate electricity that can supplement the shortfall of electricity. The windy season, which is from July to November, coincides with the dry season. The annual average wind speed is 8.3 m/s, a value that is ...

  19. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Distributed Wind in Colorado, Minnesota, and New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Kevin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sigrin, Benjamin O. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lantz, Eric J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mooney, Meghan E. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-03

    This work seeks to identify current and future spatial distributions of economic potential for behind-the-meter distributed wind, serving primarily rural or suburban homes, farms, and manufacturing facilities in Colorado, Minnesota, and New York. These states were identified by technical experts based on their current favorability for distributed wind deployment. We use NREL's Distributed Wind Market Demand Model (dWind) (Lantz et al. 2017; Sigrin et al. 2016) to identify and rank counties in each of the states by their overall and per capita potential. From this baseline assessment, we also explore how and where improvements in cost, performance, and other market sensitivities affect distributed wind potential.

  20. Analysis of potential for jet-impingement erosion from leaking steam generator tubes during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Diercks, D. R.; Shack, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes analytical evaluation of crack-opening areas and leak rates of superheated steam through flaws in steam generator tubes and erosion of neighboring tubes due to jet impingement of superheated steam with entrained particles from core debris created during severe accidents. An analytical model for calculating crack-opening area as a function of time and temperature was validated with tests on tubes with machined flaws. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used to calculate the jet velocity impinging on neighboring tubes as a function of tube spacing and crack-opening area. Erosion tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-velocity erosion rig at the University of Cincinnati, using micrometer-sized nickel particles mixed in with high-temperature gas from a burner. The erosion results, together with analytical models, were used to estimate the erosive effects of superheated steam with entrained aerosols from the core during severe accidents

  1. Potential of Offshore Wind Energy and Extreme Wind Speed Forecasting on the West Coast of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Chang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is of great importance and urgency for Taiwan to develop offshore wind power. However, relevant data on offshore wind energy resources are limited. This study imported wind speeds measured by a tidal station and a buoy into the software WAsP to estimate the high-altitude wind speeds in the two areas. A light detection and ranging (Lidar system was set up near the tidal station and buoy. High-altitude wind speeds measured by the Lidar system were compared with the WAsP-estimated values, and it was discovered that the two data sets were consistent. Then, long-term wind speed data observed by buoys and tidal stations at various locations were imported into WAsP to forecast wind speeds at heights of 55–200 m on the west coast of Taiwan. The software WAsP Engineering was used to analyze the extreme wind speeds in the same areas. The results show that wind speeds at 100 m are approximately 9.32–11.24 m/s, which means that the coastal areas of west Taiwan are rich in wind energy resources. When a long-term 10-min average wind speed is used, the extreme wind speed on the west coast is estimated to be between 36.4 and 55.3 m/s.

  2. Developement and introduction of measures for protecting coal from wind erosion during transportation. Razrabotka, vnedrenie mer i sredstv zashchity uglei ot vetrovoi ehrozii pri transportirovanii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, V.M.; Radovitskii, I.V.; Sazhin, O.B.; Yakubovich, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    Ways are discussed of reducing coal losses during transportation, totalling around 10 million tons per annum (about 50% due to wind erosion). The paper reviews coal protection in USA, FRG, Japan, Czechoslovakia and German Democratic Republic, protective covers, characteristics of water-in-oil emulsions (60% water phase) and their application, results of industrial scale tests, development and principal application of devices for creating protective covering of coal in open trucks, new protective materials for prevention of coal losses (water soluble latex, waste from oil refineries, etc.). Basic physical properties of oil refinery waste are given. Tests proved that this kind of cover can reliably prevent small coal from flying away at railway speeds of 110-120 km/h. The paper describes prevention of coal losses during storage (effect of oxygen, atmospheric precipitation and wind) by special emulsion covers, devices for preparing and depositing protective covering (water saturated steam) and automation of protective covering devices. 5 references.

  3. Wind Power Potentials in Cameroon and Nigeria: Lessons from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Abubakar Mas’ud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy has seen a tremendous growth for electricity generation worldwide and reached 456 GW by the end of June 2016. According to the World Wind Energy Association, global wind power will reach 500 GW by the end of 2016. Africa is a continent that possesses huge under-utilized wind potentials. Some African countries, e.g., Morocco, Egypt, Tunisia and South Africa, have already adopted wind as an alternative power generation source in their energy mix. Among these countries, South Africa has invested heavily in wind energy with operational wind farms supplying up to 26,000 GWh annually to the national grid. However, two African countries, i.e., Cameroon and Nigeria, have vast potentials, but currently are lagging behind in wind energy development. For Nigeria, there is slow implementation of renewable energy policy, with no visible operational wind farms; while Cameroon does not have any policy plan for wind power. These issues are severely hindering both direct foreign and local investments into the electricity sector. Cameroon and Nigeria have huge wind energy potentials with similar climatic conditions and can benefit greatly from the huge success recorded in South Africa in terms of policy implementation, research, development and technical considerations. Therefore, this paper reviews the wind energy potentials, policies and future renewable energy road-maps in Cameroon and Nigeria and identifies their strength and weakness, as well as providing necessary actions for future improvement that South Africa has already adopted.

  4. Impacts of Biochar on Physical Properties and Erosion Potential of a Mudstone Slopeland Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei-Hsin; Liou, Ruei-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Food demand and soil sustainability have become urgent issues recently because of the global climate changes. This study aims to evaluate the application of a biochar produced by rice hull, on changes of physiochemical characteristics and erosion potential of a degraded slopeland soil. Rice hull biochar pyrolized at 400°C was incorporated into the soil at rates of 2.5%, 5%, and 10% (w/w) and was incubated for 168 d in this study. The results indicated that biochar application reduced the Bd by 12% to 25% and the PR by 57% to 92% after incubation, compared with the control. Besides, porosity and aggregate size increased by 16% to 22% and by 0.59 to 0.94 mm, respectively. The results presented that available water contents significantly increased in the amended soils by 18% to 89% because of the obvious increase of micropores. The water conductivity of the biochar-amended soils was only found in 10% biochar treatment, which might result from significant increase of macropores and reduction of soil strength (Bd and PR). During a simulated rainfall event, soil loss contents significantly decreased by 35% to 90% in the biochar-amended soils. In conclusion, biochar application could availably raise soil quality and physical properties for tilth increasing in the degraded mudstone soil. PMID:25548787

  5. Impacts of Biochar on Physical Properties and Erosion Potential of a Mudstone Slopeland Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Yei Hseu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Food demand and soil sustainability have become urgent issues recently because of the global climate changes. This study aims to evaluate the application of a biochar produced by rice hull, on changes of physiochemical characteristics and erosion potential of a degraded slopeland soil. Rice hull biochar pyrolized at 400°C was incorporated into the soil at rates of 2.5%, 5%, and 10% (w/w and was incubated for 168 d in this study. The results indicated that biochar application reduced the Bd by 12% to 25% and the PR by 57% to 92% after incubation, compared with the control. Besides, porosity and aggregate size increased by 16% to 22% and by 0.59 to 0.94 mm, respectively. The results presented that available water contents significantly increased in the amended soils by 18% to 89% because of the obvious increase of micropores. The water conductivity of the biochar-amended soils was only found in 10% biochar treatment, which might result from significant increase of macropores and reduction of soil strength (Bd and PR. During a simulated rainfall event, soil loss contents significantly decreased by 35% to 90% in the biochar-amended soils. In conclusion, biochar application could availably raise soil quality and physical properties for tilth increasing in the degraded mudstone soil.

  6. A geographic information system to predict soil erosion potential in rural transportation construction project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-30

    Topographic surface modeling using a Geographic Information System (GIS) can be useful for the prediction of soil erosion resulting from highway construction projects. The assumption is that terrain, along with other parameters, will influence the po...

  7. Change of precipitation characteristics in the water-wind erosion crisscross region on the Loess Plateau, China, from 1958 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingkai; Li, Zengyao; Zhu, Qingke

    2017-08-14

    Precipitation plays an important and crucial role in processes in the water-wind erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau than in other parts of the region. We analyzed precipitation data and standardized precipitation index (SPI) at 14 representative synoptic stations from 1958 to 2015 used trend-free prewhitening, linear trend estimation, Spearman's rho test, the Mann-Kendall trend test, the Mann-Kendall abrupt change test and rescaled range analysis. The following conclusions were drawn. First, the analysis of monthly precipitation at all stations suggested that precipitation during the rainy season (July, August, September), especially rain in July and August, exhibited a general decreasing trend, while both increasing and decreasing trends were observed in other months. Moreover, the annual precipitation of all stations continued to exhibit decreasing trends except Wuzhai. Erosive rainfall frequency in the rainy season and the annual scale was weakly reduced but erosive force of single rainfall has been enhanced. Second, the SPI exhibited different increasing degrees in winter, while decreasing trends were observed in other seasons. Additionally, the annual-scale SPI at most stations exhibited a stable and sustained downward trend. Therefore, this region is currently associated with a drought trend, and the drought degree will likely continue to increase.

  8. Wind diesel systems - design assessment and future potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infield, D.G.; Scotney, A.; Lundsager, P.

    1992-01-01

    Diesels are the obvious form. of back-up electricity generation in small to medium sized wind systems. High wind penetrations pose significant technical problems for the system designer, ranging from component sizing to control specification and dynamic stability. A key role is seen for proven...... system models for assessing both dynamic characteristics and overall performance and economics. An introduction is provided to the Wind Diesel Engineering Design Toolkit currently under development (for implementation on PC) by a consortium of leading wind diesel experts, representing six European...

  9. Solar wind and cosmic ray irradiation of grains and ices - application to erosion and synthesis of organic compounds in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocard, F.; Benit, J.; Meunier, J. P.; Bibring, R.; Vassent, B.

    1984-01-01

    Solar wind and cosmic and cosmic ray irradiation of grains induces physical and chemical effects including their erosion and the synthesis of molecular compounds within the implanted layers. The experiments performed with H2O ice implanted by keV ions are presented. The ion implantation is intended to simulate the irradiation of comets, ring grains, and satellites of outer planets, either by the primitive solar particles or by contemporary solar wind (SW) or solar cosmic rays (SCR) fluxes. The detection of molecules was obtained through in-situ infrared spectroscopy. A model is proposed for the formation of organic matter within icy solar system bodies which is in agreement with experimental results of erosion rates. The organic molecules, frozen-in within the icy mantles of the grains present in the protosolar nebula, would originate from their primitive irradiation. Such an irradiation would have taken place during an early stage of the proto-sun, when both the SW and SCR particles were more intense by orders of magnitude.

  10. Offshore wind potential evaluation and remote sensing imagery; Evaluation du potentiel eolien offshore et imagerie satellitale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichaux, N.

    2003-12-15

    Offshore wind energy may help to contribute to the respect of the Kyoto objectives by Europe. It is a key issue to struggle against global change. To sit the future offshore wind parks, it is necessary to accurately evaluate the spatial repartition of the wind potential. We demonstrate that the offshore wind potential shall be represented by maps of wind statistics. As remote sensing is a tool for measuring space physical phenomena, we evaluate its potentialities for mapping wind statistics. Space-borne scatterometers enables the obtention of wind statistics, but far from our areas of interest and at low spatial resolution. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) enables the computation of high resolution wind maps over our areas of interest, but are unsuitable to compute wind statistics. We define the mathematical framework of a statistical method. That method enables to take advantage of both scatterometer and SAR to compute maps of wind statistics at high spatial resolution over the areas of interest. It enables remote sensing to be used operationally to map the offshore wind potential. (author)

  11. Prediction of wind power potential by wind speed probability distribution in a hilly terrain near Bh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Siraj; Diwakar, Nilesh

    2010-09-15

    Daily wind speed data in metre per second and its direction of flow in degree were recorded from of the India Meteorological Department for a site near the Bhopal Airport for the period of eleven years. The influence of roughness of the terrain, obstacles and topography in terms of contour for the area were also taken into consideration. These data were analysed using WAsP programme and regional wind climate of the area was determined. It is seen from the analysis of the wind speed data and keeping the topographical variation of terrain, exploitable wind speed is experienced at 50 m.

  12. Empirical Study Of Wind Energy Potential In Calabar Cross River State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uquetan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper focuses on wind energy potentials in Calabar a coastal city. The wind speed data were collected from Margaret Ekpo International Airport Calabar NIMET. The Objective of this study is to examine whether the wind energy in Calabar can generate sufficient energy to supplement electricity generation for the Calabar region. The primary data obtained is monthly mean in the form of wind speed for a period of 5year 2008 - 2012. These was used to estimate the available wind energy potential in calabar. The results show that the annual wind is 1.3 ms indicating Calabar as a low wind speed region. The wind power density value of 3.11Wm2 indicates that Calabar wind can only be used for small stand-alone wind power systems such as battery charging and for powering street light and water pumps fig 1 2 3 amp 4. The weibull probability distribution scale parameters k are higher in values and variability than the shape parameter c for the monthly distribution. Calabar wind cannot be used to generate electricity because the wind speed data at 10m height doesnt exceed 2.5ms due to the standard cut in speed.

  13. Mapping soil erosion hotspots and assessing the potential impacts of land management practices in the highlands of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamene, Lulseged; Adimassu, Zenebe; Ellison, James; Yaekob, Tesfaye; Woldearegay, Kifle; Mekonnen, Kindu; Thorne, Peter; Le, Quang Bao

    2017-09-01

    An enormous effort is underway in Ethiopia to address soil erosion and restore overall land productivity. Modelling and participatory approaches can be used to delineate erosion hotspots, plan site- and context-specific interventions and assess their impacts. In this study, we employed a modelling interface developed based on the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation adjusted by the sediment delivery ratio to map the spatial distribution of net soil loss and identify priority areas of intervention. Using the modelling interface, we also simulated the potential impacts of different soil and water conservation measures in reducing net soil loss. Model predictions showed that net soil loss in the study area ranges between 0.4 and 88 t ha- 1 yr- 1 with an average of 12 t ha- 1 yr- 1. The dominant soil erosion hotspots were associated with steep slopes, gullies, communal grazing and cultivated areas. The average soil loss observed in this study is higher than the tolerable soil loss rate estimated for the highland of Ethiopia. The scenario analysis results showed that targeting hotspot areas where soil loss exceeds 10 t ha- 1 yr- 1 could reduce net soil loss to the tolerable limit (< 2 t ha- 1 yr- 1). The spatial distribution of soil loss and the sediment yield reduction potential of different options provided essential information to guide prioritization and targeting. In addition, the results can help promoting awareness within the local community of the severity of the soil erosion problem and the potential of management interventions. Future work should include cost-benefit and tradeoff analyses of the various management options for achieving a given level of erosion reduction.

  14. A laboratory investigation of consumer addition of UHT milk to lessen the erosive potential of fizzy drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, J; Chadwick, R G

    2009-02-14

    Much recent attention has been given to the erosive potential of carbonated beverages. Some have shown that the risks of developing erosion, if such drinks are consumed once daily and four times daily, are respectively 2.2 and 5.13 times greater than if they are not consumed at all. The addition of ultra-heat treated (UHT) milk to such beverages has been identified by a survey as common practice in Pakistan. It is known that the addition of calcium to orange juice and acidic candies reduces the capacity of these dietary items to produce dental erosion by the law of mass action. While potentially helpful, such a practice at manufacture may affect adversely product stability and flavour, thus compromising market share. As a result an alternative approach is for the consumer to carry out such modification. The addition of milk is one such potential means.Objective To assess the capacity of six brands of carbonated drinks to bring about dental erosion and determine if consumer modification by the addition of milk affected this. In vitro study. For each drink in both manufactured and consumer modified (25 ml of drink with 6.25 ml UHT milk) states, the pH and titratable acidity were measured. These assessments were also made for distilled water dilution of the manufactured drinks in the ratio of 1 part drink to 0.25 parts water. In addition, the effects of a 60 min exposure to the drinks in manufactured and consumer modified states, upon the surface microhardness and profile of human molar buccal tooth substance were determined. The addition of milk significantly increased the mean pH (p Milk addition significantly lessened (p milk to carbonated beverages reduced overall their capacity to bring about dental erosion.

  15. Evaluation Of Wind Energy Potential In Zaria Metropolis | Olatunji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meteorological data were acquired from the Nigerian College of Aviation Technology Zaria. The station is located at Longitude 07o 41' E, Latitude 11o08' N and elevation of 686 m above sea level. Diurnal wind speeds and directions were recorded with Wind Vane and Anemometer from 1995 through 2004. The readings ...

  16. Wind energy potential in the site of Batna in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksas, M. [Batna Univ. (Algeria). Dept. of Physics

    2010-07-01

    Algeria has launched a national program that promotes the use of renewable energy sources in the frame of its sustainable energy development plan for 2020. The first target is to increase electricity production by renewable energies to 10-12 per cent of the total production by 2015. Wind energy is the fastest growing source of renewable energy in the world, with an average growth rate of 30 per cent. New technological developments in wind energy design have contributed to this significant growth. Hybrid wind and solar systems are also possible economical alternative for isolated and remote areas. The objective of this study was to establish an accurate assessment of the wind energy resource in the region of Batna in the North East of Algeria. Hourly measured long term wind speed data of Batna during the period of 1999-2008 were statistically analyzed. The probability density distributions were then derived from long term wind speed data and the distributional parameters were identified. Annual mean values of wind speed and power were also calculated. The frequency distribution of daily totals of wind speed data were counted. The mean annual value of Weibull shape parameter k was 1.61 while the annual value of the scale parameter c was 4.91 m/s. 19 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  17. Assessment of wind energy potential for electricity generation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fossil fuel for energy production has been estimated to contribute about 80. % of the total gses responsible for the green house effect of the atmosphere. Renewable energy sources such as wind, if thoroughly investigated, could be used to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels for electricity generation. Although wind ...

  18. Protection from erosion following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud; William J. Elliot

    2006-01-01

    Erosion in the first year after a wildfire can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than the erosion from undisturbed forests. To mitigate potential postfire erosion, various erosion control treatments are applied on highly erodible areas with downstream resources in need of protection. Because postfire erosion rates generally decline by an order of magnitude for...

  19. Analysis of the potential for hydrogen production in the province of Cordoba, Argentina, from wind resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, C.R.; Santa Cruz, R.; Aisa, S. [Universidad Empresarial Siglo 21, Monsenor Pablo Cabrera s/n calle, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Riso, M.; Jimenez Yob, G.; Ottogalli, R. [Subsecretaria de Infraestructuras y Programas, Ministerio de Obras y Servicios Publicos del Gobierno de la Provincia de Cordoba, Av. Poeta Lugones 12, 2do. Piso, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Jeandrevin, G. [Instituto Universitario Aeronautico, Avenida Fuerza Aerea km 6 1/2, 5022 Cordoba (Argentina); Leiva, E.P.M. [INFIQC, Unidad de Matematica y Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Haya de la Torre s/n, 5010 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The potential for hydrogen production from wind resources in the province of Cordoba, second consumer of fossil fuels for transportation in Argentina, is analyzed. Three aspects of the problem are considered: the evaluation of the hydrogen resource from wind power, the analysis of the production costs via electrolysis and the annual requirements of wind energy to generate hydrogen to fuel the vehicular transport of the province. Different scenarios were considered, including pure hydrogen as well as the so-called CNG plus, where hydrogen is mixed with compressed natural gas in a 20% V/V dilution of the former. The potential for hydrogen production from wind resources is analyzed for each department of the province, excluding those regions not suited for wind farms. The analysis takes into account the efficiency of the electrolyzer and the capacity factor of the wind power system. It is concluded that the automotive transportation could be supplied by hydrogen stemming from wind resources via electrolysis. (author)

  20. Seawater pumped storage systems and offshore wind parks in islands with low onshore wind potential. A fundamental case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsaprakakis, Dimitris Al.; Christakis, Dimitris G.

    2014-01-01

    The scope of this article is to investigate the effects of introducing a WP-PSS (Wind Powered Pumped Storage System) in isolated electricity systems assuming unfavourable conditions such as low onshore wind potential and low PSS head height. These disadvantages can be compensated with the installation of offshore wind parks, larger reservoirs and double penstocks to allow simultaneous water fall and pumping using pipes of the greatest diameter that are currently commercially available. With the above modifications, the energy efficiency of the WP-PSS improves while the installation costs rise. A new operation algorithm for the WP-PSS is created to fully utilize the capacity of the double penstock and ultimately maximise wind energy penetration. A case study for a WP-PSS on the island of Rhodes is presented in this paper. Despite unfavourable conditions, the WP-PSS model leads to the following results: • Annual wind energy penetration exceeds 50% of the annual electricity consumption. • The WP-PSS exhibits attractive financial induces without including any subsidies. The WP-PSS presented in this paper proved to be technically and economically feasible and revealed that WP-PSSs are a guaranteed choice for large scale penetration of R.E.S. in electrical systems. - Highlights: • Offshore wind parks (WPs) and seawater PSS can guarantee power production in autonomous systems. • The examined system is proved technically and economically feasible under unfavourable conditions. • A new operational algorithm is developed to maximise the wind energy penetration. • The annual wind energy penetration exceeds 50%. The economic indexes are acceptable. • The WP-PSS is a guaranteed choice for wind energy penetration maximisation

  1. Effect of iron supplementation on the erosive potential of carbonated or decarbonated beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Thiemi Kato

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, the effect of iron (previously exposed with enamel powder or added directly to the beverage on the erosive potential of carbonated or decarbonated beverage. Four sets of experiments were done. For groups E1 and E3, a solution containing 30 mmol/L FeSO4 was added to bovine enamel powder (particles between 75-106 mm before exposure to the carbonated or decarbonated beverage (Sprite Zero®, respectively. For groups E2 and E4, 15 mmol/L FeSO4 was added directly to the carbonated or decarbonated beverage, respectively. Control groups were included for comparison. In controls C1 and C3, the experiments E1 and E3 were repeated, but the iron solution was replaced by deionized water. For controls C2 and C4, the carbonated and decarbonated beverage, respectively, was used, without addition of iron. After addition of the beverage to the powdered enamel (40 mg enamel powder/400 mL of final volume, the sample was vortexed for 30 s and immediately centrifuged for 30 s (11,000 rpm. The supernatant was removed after 1 min 40 s. This procedure was repeated in quintuplicate and the phosphate released was analyzed spectrophotometrically. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test (p<0.05. E2 presented the best results with a significant inhibition (around 36% of phosphate released. For E3 and E4 a non-significant inhibition (around 4 and 12%, respectively, was observed. For E1 an increase in phosphate loss was detected. Thus, the protective effect of iron seems to be better when this ion is directly added to the carbonated beverage.

  2. Offshore wind power experiences, potential and key issues for deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemming, J.; Morthorst, P.E.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2009-01-15

    Wind power has been growing at spectacular rates. Today it is the largest non-hydro renewable power technology. Worldwide there is 74 GW of installed capacity which is 1.7% of power generation capacity and in 2006 it accounted for 0.82% of electricity production. However, offshore wind still only counts for a very small amount and development has only taken place in North European counties round the North Sea and the Baltic Sea over the last 15 years. Offshore wind is still some 50% more expensive than onshore wind, but more wind resources and lesser visual impacts from larger turbines are expected to compensate for the higher installation costs in the long term. Most offshore wind farms are installed in British, Swedish and Danish waters, and present-day costs of installing wind energy in the UK are between 1,200 to 1,600 GBP/kW (1,781 to 2,375 Euro/kW) offshore, while in Sweden investment costs were 1,800 Euro/kW, and in Denmark 1,200 to 1,700 Euro/kW, though investment costs for a new wind farm are expected be in the range of 2.0 to 2.2 mill. Euro/MW for a near-shore shallow depth facility. Future developments in offshore wind technology concerning aerodynamics, structural dynamics, structural design, machine elements, electrical design and grid integration could drive investment costs from present-day range of 1.9 to 2.2 mill. Euro/MW down to 1.35 - 1.54 mill.Euro/MW in 2050, which accounts for a reduction of costs of approx. 35%. In order to sum up progress and identify future research needs, the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind agreement Task 11 should arrange a new meeting concerning long term research needs for reviewing 'the long term strategy for 2000 to 2020' from 2001, to come up with suggestions / recommendations on how to define and proceed with, the necessary research activities of the IEA Wind Agreement and governments involved on key wind issues related to offshore technologies. (au)

  3. Scientific case studies in land-use driven soil erosion in the central United States: Why soil potential and risk concepts should be included in the principles of soil health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. Turner

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent improvements in overall soil health gained through conservation agriculture, which has become a global priority in agricultural systems, soil and water-related externalities (e.g., wind and water erosion continue to persist or worsen. Using an inductive, systems approach, we tested the hypothesis that such externalities persist due to expansion of cultivation onto areas unsuitable for sustained production. To test this hypothesis, a variety of data sources and analyses were used to uncover the land and water resource dynamics underlying noteworthy cases of soil erosion (either wind or water and hydrological effects (e.g., flooding, shifting hydrographs throughout the central United States. Given the evidence, we failed to reject the hypothesis that cultivation expansion is contributing to increased soil and water externalities, since significant increases in cultivation on soils with severe erosion limitations were observed everywhere the externalities were documented. We discuss the case study results in terms of land use incentives (e.g., policy, economic, and biophysical, developing concepts of soil security, and ways to utilize case studies such as those presented to better communicate the value of soil and water resource conservation. Incorporating the tenets of soil potential and soil risk into soil health evaluations and cultivation decision-making is needed to better match the soil resource with land use and help avoid more extreme soil and water-related externalities.

  4. Geoprocessing techniques to evaluate the spatial distribution of natural rain erosion potential in the Hydrographic Basin of Cachoeira Dourada Reservoir – Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Pereira CABRAL

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural potential erosion were defined from their main natural conditioners in the region of hydrographic basin of Cachoeira Dourada (between Goiás and Minas Gerais states −Brazil, with geoprocessing techniques and the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE. Upon the decision for natural erosion potential, a matrix with values of erosivity (R, erodibility (K, declivity, and ramp length (LS was elaborated, where classes of low, medium, high, very high, and extremely high natural erosion potential (NEP were established. Spatial distribution for the factors R, K, LS, and PNE was defined. The highest average R index for the rainy series was 8173.50 MJ ha mm-1 h-1 year-1. The period with data from 30 years (1973 – 2002 showed that the reservoir basin displayed areas susceptible to rill and interill erosion (69.16% of the total. There is a predominance of low erosion potential among the classes, which can be explained due to the soil predominant classes as well as to the low declivity. Areas with medium to extremely high erosion potential require the adoption of measures to avoid start and development of more severe erosion processes (ravines and gullies.

  5. A comprehensive measure of the energy resource: Wind power potential (WPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jie; Chowdhury, Souma; Messac, Achille

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A more comprehensive metric is developed to accurately assess the quality of wind resources at a site. • WPP exploits the joint distribution of wind speed and direction, and yields more credible estimates. • WPP investigates the effect of wind distribution on the optimal net power generation of a farm. • The results show that WPD and WPP follow different trends. - Abstract: Currently, the quality of available wind energy at a site is assessed using wind power density (WPD). This paper proposes to use a more comprehensive metric: the wind power potential (WPP). While the former accounts for only wind speed information, the latter exploits the joint distribution of wind speed and wind direction and yields more credible estimates. The WPP investigates the effect of wind velocity distribution on the optimal net power generation of a farm. A joint distribution of wind speed and direction is used to characterize the stochastic variation of wind conditions. Two joint distribution methods are adopted in this paper: bivariate normal distribution and anisotropic lognormal method. The net power generation for a particular farmland size and installed capacity is maximized for different distributions of wind speed and wind direction, using the Unrestricted Wind Farm Layout Optimization (UWFLO) framework. A response surface is constructed to represent the computed maximum wind farm capacity factor as a function of the parameters of the wind distribution. Two different response surface methods are adopted in this paper: (i) the adaptive hybrid functions (AHF), and (ii) the quadratic response surface method (QRSM). Toward this end, for any farm site, we can (i) estimate the parameters of the joint distribution using recorded wind data (for bivariate normal or anisotropic lognormal distributions) and (ii) predict the maximum capacity factor for a specified farm size and capacity using this response surface. The WPP metric is illustrated using recorded wind

  6. A decision support system for assessing offshore wind energy potential in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillings, Ch.; Wanderer, T.; Cameron, L.; Wal, van der J.T.; Jacquemin, J.; Veum, K.

    2012-01-01

    Offshore wind energy (OWE) in the North Sea has the potential to meet large share of Europe’s future electricity demand. To deploy offshore wind parks in a rational way, the overall OWE potential has to be realistically determined. This has to be done on an international, cross-border level and by

  7. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  8. Making full use of wind power potential in North America -- possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaud, Christian

    2010-09-15

    The anticipated increase in electrical load in North America up to the year 2050 will be at least 50%. Wind potential in North America is enormous, well in excess of the expected requirements. However, the amount of wind capacity, which can be directly connected to a grid is limited to 20% of the installed capacity because of technical constraints. Technologies to enable full wind potential to be harnessed still need to be developed; they will consist in storing wind energy in hydroelectric reservoirs or generating hydrogen. However, the resulting cost of electricity will be somewhat higher than present.

  9. Erosive potential of cola and orange fruit juice on tooth colored ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immersion regime was followed according to Von Fraunhofer and Rogers. The pre and post immersion surface roughness values were recorded using a profilometer. Results: Both tested materials showed statistically-significant surface erosion (P < 0.01) when exposed to cola and orange fruit juice than the control group ...

  10. Soil Erosion. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    Soil erosion is the detachment and movement of topsoil or soil material from the upper part of the soil profile. It may occur in the form of rill, gully, sheet, or wind erosion. Agents of erosion may be water, wind, glacial ice, agricultural implements, machinery, and animals. Soil conservation measures require a thorough understanding of the…

  11. Solar and wind potentialities in Mauritania. Presentation of pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adell, A.; Fagel, L.

    1996-01-01

    The programs of rural hydraulics based upon the use of renewable energies, either solar or wind, have gained in importance in Africa during the last decade; particularly in Mauritania, a Sahelian country, which is extending widely beyond the western edge of Sahara. This country has been hardly affected by the prolonged droughts which have recently struck this region. Water is a major problem here. Important projects appeared concerning the pumping of water with the help of solar photovoltaic systems and wind mechanical pumps; other processes are being studied: pumping with aero-generators, sea water desalinating... Today Mauritania is at the top of countries of the subregion concerning the number of installations of wind mechanical pumps. The meteorological conditions are in fact favourable to such realizations. A technical and economic comparative study of the results of functioning obtained on the field with a photovoltaic pumping installation and a wind pumping installation, is presented: better technical performances and greater reliability for the photovoltaic pump, lower cost and technological mastery for the wind pump. (author). 9 refs., 8 figs

  12. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) county-level alkaline emission estimates for unpaved roads. Dust Devils and wind erosion, 1985 (for microcomputers). Data file

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masser, C.C.; Barnard, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The two floppy diskettes contain the data summary tables included in Appendices A, B, and C of the report Development of County-Level Wind Erosion and Unpaved Road Alkaline Emission Estimates for the 1985 NAPAP Emissions Inventory. The data tables are formatted in LOTUS 1-2-3 version 2.01 format (although they were written using Microsoft EXCEL Version 2.1). Each of the files represent one of the Appendices. It should be noted that in the report, only counties that had non-zero Dust Devil emissions were included in Appendix C. The corresponding file provides information for all counties in the continental U.S. even though most counties have Dust Devil emissions equal to zero.

  13. Estimation of wind characteristics at potential wind energy conversion sites. Volume 1. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, S. M.; Chen, P. C.

    1978-03-01

    To achieve the DOE goal of placing the most economically viable wind energy conversion system at a site, it becomes necessary to determine the accuracy of the climatology development technique, and to determine the extent of its applicability to sites of differing geographic settings and data station locations. To achieve this goal, the Climatology Development Methodology was applied to eight candidate wind energy sites of differing site geographic settings and data station locations. The performance of the methodology was evaluated by examining the accuracy of the hub-height wind climatologies generated for each type of site and station geographic setting. The validity of the site wind climatology for a given setting helped establish the accuracy of the Climatology Development Methodology and the extent of its applicability. The Climatology Development Methodology developed in this study is presented and the techniques of the methodology discussed. Also presented are the eight candidate site hub-height wind climatologies generated, and a description of each site's geographic setting and data station proximity. The report concludes with an evaluation of the Climatology Development Methodology and a discussion of the study's conclusions and recommendations.

  14. Methodology for the determination of wind characteristics and assessment of wind energy potential in Túquerres - Nariño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Eraso Checa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The world is living a steady increase in the electric power demand, an alternative power generation different to conventional is the renewable energy. With the appearance of the Law 1715, Colombia has an incentives policy for the integration of new projects in renewable energies. Because of that, is important to develop studies with real data in the field of the potential of renewable energy resources which can be implemented. This article presents the analysis of the wind generation potential of Túquerres Savanna, located in the department of Nariño. The potential was obtained from the measurement of the wind speed, during the period between the months of June and December of the year 2015. The data were analyzed statistically according to a measure of central tendency, frequency distribution and Weibull distribution for the normalization of scattered data; finally, the power density was calculated according to a horizontal axis wind turbine and the electrical generation potential of the area was simulated. The average wind speeds are 4,4 m/s and the power density founded is 3,47 W/m2.

  15. Meteorological wind energy potential in the Alps using ERA40 and wind measurement sites in the Tyrolean Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draxl, Caroline; Mayr, Georg J.

    2011-01-01

    The peculiarities of meteorological wind potential in alpine settings compared to flatland and offshore sites are studied. Four data sources are used: Global reanalysis ERA40 from ECMWF, long-term stations in the Tyrolean Alps, spatially dense measurements near the best site and Doppler sodar wind...... profiles. Due to the decrease of density with height, alpine sites suffer from a nearly linear decrease of harvestable power with altitude, which is more than offset by the increase of wind speed at altitudes above 1.5 km MSL. ERA40 data show higher potential on the northern than on the southern side...... of the Alps. The best locations are not isolated peaks but ridges within wide orographic channels. The best potential sites in the Tyrolean part of the Alps have median wind speeds of up to 7.1 m s−1 and extractable potentials between 2900 and 1600 kWh per year and per square meter of rotor area. The profile...

  16. Modelling landscape-scale erosion potential related to vehicle disturbances along the U.S.-Mexico border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Miguel; Webb, Robert H.; Norman, Laura M.; Psillas, Jennifer L.; Rosenberg, Abigail S.; Carmichael, Shinji; Petrakis, Roy E.; Sparks, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Decades of intensive off-road vehicle use for border security, immigration, smuggling, recreation, and military training along the USA–Mexico border have prompted concerns about long-term human impacts on sensitive desert ecosystems. To help managers identify areas susceptible to soil erosion from anthropogenic activities, we developed a series of erosion potential models based on factors from the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). To better express the vulnerability of soils to human disturbances, we refined two factors whose categorical and spatial representations limit the application of the USLE for non-agricultural landscapes: the C-factor (vegetation cover) and the P-factor (support practice/management). A soil compaction index (P-factor) was calculated as the difference in saturated hydrologic conductivity (Ks) between disturbed and undisturbed soils, which was then scaled up to maps of vehicle disturbances digitized from aerial photography. The C-factor was improved using a satellite-based vegetation index, which was better correlated with estimated ground cover (r2 = 0·77) than data derived from land cover (r2 = 0·06). We identified 9,780 km of unauthorized off-road tracks in the 2,800-km2 study area. Maps of these disturbances, when integrated with soil compaction data using the USLE, provided landscape-scale information on areas vulnerable to erosion from both natural processes and human activities and are detailed enough for adaptive management and restoration planning. The models revealed erosion potential hotspots adjacent to the border and within areas managed as critical habitat for the threatened flat-tailed horned lizard and endangered Sonoran pronghorn.

  17. Remote sensing for wind power potential: a prospector's handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, J.E.; Maule, P.A.; Bodvarsson, G.; Rosenfeld, C.L.; Woolley, S.G.; McClenahan, M.R.

    1983-02-01

    Remote sensing can aid in identifying and locating indicators of wind power potential from the terrestrial, marine, and atmospheric environments (i.e.: wind-deformed trees, white caps, and areas of thermal flux). It is not considered as a tool for determining wind power potential. A wide variety of remotely sensed evidence is described in terms of the scale at which evidence of wind power can be identified, and the appropriate remote sensors for finding such evidence. Remote sensing can be used for regional area prospecting using small-scale imagery. The information from such small-scale imagery is most often qualitative, and if it is transitory, examination of a number of images to verify presistence of the feature may be required. However, this evidence will allow rapid screening of a large area. Medium-scale imagery provides a better picture of the evidence obtained from small-scale imagery. At this level it is best to use existing imagery. Criteria relating to land use, accessibility, and proximity of candidate sites to nearby transmission lines can also be effectively evaluated from medium-scale imagery. Large-scale imagery provides the most quantitative evidence of the strength of wind. Wind-deformed trees can be identified at a large number of sites using only a few hours in locally chartered aircraft. A handheld 35mm camera can adequately document any evidence of wind. Three case studies that employ remote sensing prospecting techniques are described. Based on remotely sensed evidence, the wind power potential in three geographically and climatically diverse areas of the United States is estimated, and the estimates are compared to actual wind data in those regions. In addition, the cost of each survey is discussed. The results indicate that remote sensing for wind power potential is a quick, cost effective, and fairly reliable method for screening large areas for wind power potential.

  18. Plutonium in Soils from Northeast China and Its Potential Application for Evaluation of Soil Erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2013-01-01

    Surface and soil core samples from northeast China were analyzed for Pu isotopes. The measured 240Pu/239Pu atomic ratios and 239 1 240Pu/137Cs activity ratios revealed that the global fallout is the dominant source of Pu and 137Cs at these sites. Migration behavior of Pu varying with land type....... While only half inventory of Pu was obtained in another soil core and no sub-surface maximum value occurred. Erosion of topsoil in the site should be the most possible reason for the significantly lower Pu inventory, which is also supported by the reported 137Cs profiles. These results demonstrated...... that Pu could be applied as an ideal substitute of 137Cs for soil erosion study in the future....

  19. Calculation of transient potential rise on the wind turbine struck by lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoqing, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    A circuit model is proposed in this paper for calculating the transient potential rise on the wind turbine struck by lightning. The model integrates the blade, sliding contact site, and tower and grounding system of the wind turbine into an equivalent circuit. The lightning current path from the attachment point to the ground can be fully described by the equivalent circuit. The transient potential responses are obtained in the different positions on the wind turbine by solving the circuit equations. In order to check the validity of the model, the laboratory measurement is made with a reduced-scale wind turbine. The measured potential waveform is compared with the calculated one and a better agreement is shown between them. The practical applicability of the model is also examined by a numerical example of a 2 MW Chinese-built wind turbine.

  20. Measurement program to characterize the wind at a potential WECS site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verholek, M.G.

    1978-03-01

    An onsite meteorological measurement program to characterize the wind at a potential wind turbine installation site is described. The basic informational requirements have been postulated, the analysis described, and an appropriate measurement program has been devised. This phase of siting measurements provides the information for the final installation decision process--which WECS to put at which site.

  1. Evaluation of wind energy potential in the south-south geopolitical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... Templine RJ (1974) The damens turbine: a performance prediction model using steamtables. Sandia National. Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. Youm I; Sarr J; Sall M; Ndiaye A; Kane MM (2012). Analysis of Wind Data and Wind Energy Potential along the Northern Coast of Senegal. Rev.

  2. Patchiness in wind erosion-deposition patterns in response to a recent state change reversal in the Chihuahuan Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifts from shrub-dominated states to grasslands are believed to be irreversible as a result of positive feedbacks between woody plants and soil properties. In the Chihuahuan Desert, mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) expansion into black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda) grasslands is maintained by wind redis...

  3. Why is China’s wind power generation not living up to its potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenteler, Joern; Tang, Tian; Chan, Gabriel; Diaz Anadon, Laura

    2018-04-01

    Following a decade of unprecedented investment, China now has the world’s largest installed base of wind power capacity. Yet, despite siting most wind farms in the wind-rich Northern and Western provinces, electricity generation from Chinese wind farms has not reached the performance benchmarks of the United States and many other advanced economies. This has resulted in lower environmental, economic, and health benefits than anticipated. We develop a framework to explain the performance of the Chinese and US wind sectors, accounting for a comprehensive set of driving factors. We apply this framework to a novel dataset of virtually all wind farms installed in China and the United States through the end of 2013. We first estimate the wind sector’s technical potential using a methodology that produces consistent estimates for both countries. We compare this potential to actual performance and find that Chinese wind farms generated electricity at 37%–45% of their annual technical potential during 2006–2013 compared to 54%–61% in the United States. Our findings underscore that the larger gap between actual performance and technical potential in China compared to the United States is significantly driven by delays in grid connection (14% of the gap) and curtailment due to constraints in grid management (10% of the gap), two challenges of China’s wind power expansion covered extensively in the literature. However, our findings show that China’s underperformance is also driven by suboptimal turbine model selection (31% of the gap), wind farm siting (23% of the gap), and turbine hub heights (6% of the gap)—factors that have received less attention in the literature and, crucially, are locked-in for the lifetime of wind farms. This suggests that besides addressing grid connection delays and curtailment, China will also need policy measures to address turbine siting and technology choices to achieve its national goals and increase utilization up to US levels.

  4. Genesis Solar Wind Science Canister Components Curated as Potential Solar Wind Collectors and Reference Contamination Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind for 27 months at Earth-Sun L1 on both passive and active collectors carried inside of a Science Canister, which was cleaned and assembled in an ISO Class 4 cleanroom prior to launch. The primary passive collectors, 271 individual hexagons and 30 half-hexagons of semiconductor materials, are described in. Since the hard landing reduced the 301 passive collectors to many thousand smaller fragments, characterization and posting in the online catalog remains a work in progress, with about 19% of the total area characterized to date. Other passive collectors, surfaces of opportunity, have been added to the online catalog. For species needing to be concentrated for precise measurement (e.g. oxygen and nitrogen isotopes) an energy-independent parabolic ion mirror focused ions onto a 6.2 cm diameter target. The target materials, as recovered after landing, are described in. The online catalog of these solar wind collectors, a work in progress, can be found at: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/gencatalog/index.cfm This paper describes the next step, the cataloging of pieces of the Science Canister, which were surfaces exposed to the solar wind or component materials adjacent to solar wind collectors which may have contributed contamination.

  5. Modelling soil erosion potential in the transboundary (Kenya & Tanzania) catchment of river Umba using remotely sensed data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedam, N.; Mutisya, B.; Kairo, J.; Resink-Ndungu, Jane Njeri; Kervyn, M.

    2017-01-01

    Soil erosion is one of the leading forms of soil degradation. Estimating soil erosion from field measurements is expensive hence the extent of soil erosion in many tropical watersheds is unknown. Erosion is a complex process; some of the eroded materials are deposited within the watershed while the

  6. Erosive potential of saliva stimulating tablets with and without fluoride in irradiated head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajer, Christel; Buchwald, Christian; Nauntofte, Birgitte; Specht, Lena; Bardow, Allan; Jensdottir, Thorbjoerg

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients irradiated in the head and neck region often suffer from severe dry mouth and use acidic saliva stimulating products, which may cause erosion of teeth. Purpose: To determine saliva stimulating effects and erosive potential (EP) of acidic saliva stimulating tablets (Xerodent TM ) with and without fluoride in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. Materials and method: Nineteen irradiated patients (median age 57 years) sucked Xerodent TM tablets with and without fluoride. Saliva collections were divided into three 10-min sessions in the sequence: unstimulated whole saliva, Xerodent TM stimulated saliva without fluoride, and with fluoride. Saliva pH was determined without loss of CO 2 and in combination with inorganic measures used to calculate the degree of saturation of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and fluorapatite (FAp). EP was determined directly in all saliva samples by monitored dissolution of HAp crystals. Results: Saliva flow rates increased significantly (15-fold) when sucking both tablets (p TM with and without fluoride were evaluated as non-erosive, however, for additional caries protection the fluoride variant is preferable.

  7. Potential for increased wind-generated electricity utilization using heat pumps in urban areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, Michael; Modi, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Large-scale wind power and increased electric heat pumps were evaluated. • A deterministic model of wind power and electricity demand was developed. • Sub-models for space heating and domestic hot water demand were developed. • Increased use of heat pumps can improve the viability of large-scale wind power. • Larger wind power capacity can meet a target utilization rate with more heat pumps. - Abstract: The U.S. has substantial wind power potential, but given wind’s intermittent availability and misalignment with electricity demand profiles, large-scale deployment of wind turbines could result in high electricity costs due to energy storage requirements or low utilization rates. While fuel switching and heat pumps have been proposed as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy reduction strategies at the building scale, this paper shows that heat pump adoption could have additional system-wide benefits by increasing the utilization of wind-generated electricity. A model was developed to evaluate the effects of coupling large-scale wind power installations in New York State with increased use of electric heat pumps to meet a portion of space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) demands in New York City. The analysis showed significant increases in wind-generated electricity utilization with increased use of heat pumps, allowing for higher installed capacity of wind power. One scenario indicates that 78.5% annual wind-generated electricity utilization can be achieved with 3 GW of installed wind power capacity generated electricity equal to 20% of existing NYC annual electricity demand; if 20% of space heating and DHW demands are provided by heat pumps, the 78.5% utilization rate can be achieved with an increase of total wind power capacity to 5 GW. Therefore, this integrated supply–demand approach could provide additional system-wide emissions reductions

  8. Assessment of offshore wind power potential in the Aegean and Ionian Seas based on high-resolution hindcast model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takvor Soukissian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study long-term wind data obtained from high-resolution hindcast simulations is used to analytically assess offshore wind power potential in the Aegean and Ionian Seas and provide wind climate and wind power potential characteristics at selected locations, where offshore wind farms are at the concept/planning phase. After ensuring the good model performance through detailed validation against buoy measurements, offshore wind speed and wind direction at 10 m above sea level are statistically analyzed on the annual and seasonal time scale. The spatial distribution of the mean wind speed and wind direction are provided in the appropriate time scales, along with the mean annual and the inter-annual variability; these statistical quantities are useful in the offshore wind energy sector as regards the preliminary identification of favorable sites for exploitation of offshore wind energy. Moreover, the offshore wind power potential and its variability are also estimated at 80 m height above sea level. The obtained results reveal that there are specific areas in the central and the eastern Aegean Sea that combine intense annual winds with low variability; the annual offshore wind power potential in these areas reach values close to 900 W/m2, suggesting that a detailed assessment of offshore wind energy would be worth noticing and could lead in attractive investments. Furthermore, as a rough estimate of the availability factor, the equiprobable contours of the event [4 m/s ≤ wind speed ≤ 25 m/s] are also estimated and presented. The selected lower and upper bounds of wind speed correspond to typical cut-in and cut-out wind speed thresholds, respectively, for commercial offshore wind turbines. Finally, for seven offshore wind farms that are at the concept/planning phase the main wind climate and wind power density characteristics are also provided.

  9. Offshore Wind Power Experiences, Potential and Key Issues for Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard; Morthorst, Poul Erik; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    , machine elements, electrical design and grid integration could drive investment costs from present-day range of 1.9 to 2.2 mill.€/MW down to 1.35 - 1.54 mill.€/MW in 2050, which accounts for a reduction of costs of approx. 35% . In order to sum up progress and identify future research needs...... were 1,800 €/kW, and in Denmark 1,200 to 1,700 €/kW, though investment costs for a new wind farm are expected be in the range of 2.0 to 2.2 mill. €/MW for a near-shore shallow depth facility. Future developments in offshore wind technology concerning aerodynamics, structural dynamics, structural design...

  10. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING WIND-ENERGY POTENTIAL IN LOW BUILT-UP URBAN ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LÁZÁR I.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available his study is concerned with the examination of roughness factor affecting wind potential in low built-up urban areas (e.g. subdivision, light industrial area. The test interval is the transition between summer and winter, as a secondary wind maximum period. The ten-minute data-pairs empirical distribution was approached by several theoretical distributions where a fitting test research was also performed. Extrapolation to higher levels is possible by defining the Hellmann exponent. The wind speed in respective height and the specific wind power are derived from it. Knowing the daily progress of the Hellmann exponent value, more accurate estimation can be given of the wind potential calculated to different heights according to the measuring point. The results were compared to the surface cover of the surrounding area as well as to the literary alpha values.

  11. Evaluating Wind Power Potential in the Spanish Antarctic Base (BAE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arribas, L.M.; Garcia Barquero, C; Navarro, J.; Cuerva, A.; Cruz, I.; Roque, V.; Marti, I.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the work is to model wind field in the surroundings of the Spanish Antarctic Base (BAE in the following). The need of such a work comes from the necessity of an energy source able to supply the energy demand in the BAE during the Antarctic winter. When the BAE is in operation (in the Antarctic summer) the energy supply comes from a diesel engine. In the Antarctic winter the base is closed, but the demand of energy supply is growing up every year because of the increase in the number of technical and scientific machines that remain in the BAE taking different measurements. For this purpose the top of a closed hill called Pico Radio, not perturbed by close obstacles, has been chosen as the better site for the measurements. The measurement station is made up with a sonic anemometer and a small wind generator to supply the energy needed by the sensors head heating of the anemometer. This way, it will be also used as a proof for the suitability of a wind generator in the new chosen site, under those special climatic conditions.(Author) 3 refs

  12. Aspects of a potential impact of wind turbines on birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Fischer

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The electricity generated from renewable energy resources is an environmentally-preferred alternative to the conventionally produced electricity from fossil fuel and nuclear power plants. As the demand for a clean energy increases, the wind power generating stations are being constructed across Europe. However, concerns have been raised about the possible environmental impact of these turbines on birds. A research in this area has focused primarily on the mortality caused by birds striking turbine blades and associated wires. The disturbance to breeding, wintering or staging birds as a result of turbines has not been examined in detail. With respect to avian mortality at wind power generating stations, the greatest concern has been for raptors and migrating songbirds. The concern for raptors generally stems from the fact that many populations are small and thus even a few deaths can lead to declines. Songbirds are also considered at risk because they are known to fly into human-made structures (e.g. office towers, TV/microwave towers causing, on occasion, mass kills of thousands of individuals. While raptors and songbirds are generally at greatest risk of injury or death from turbines, the impact of such structures on all bird species should be considered on a site-by-site basis. Generally is possible to say that collisions with transmission and distribution lines, automobiles, trucks, tall building, residential house windows and lighted communication towers are more important for the avian mortality than the wind power generating stations.

  13. Extensive management of field margins enhances their potential for off-site soil erosion mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hamada E; Reineking, Björn

    2016-03-15

    Soil erosion is a widespread problem in agricultural landscapes, particularly in regions with strong rainfall events. Vegetated field margins can mitigate negative impacts of soil erosion off-site by trapping eroded material. Here we analyse how local management affects the trapping capacity of field margins in a monsoon region of South Korea, contrasting intensively and extensively managed field margins on both steep and shallow slopes. Prior to the beginning of monsoon season, we equipped a total of 12 sites representing three replicates for each of four different types of field margins ("intensive managed flat", "intensive managed steep", "extensive managed flat" and "extensive managed steep") with Astroturf mats. The mats (n = 15/site) were placed before, within and after the field margin. Sediment was collected after each rain event until the end of the monsoon season. The effect of management and slope on sediment trapping was analysed using linear mixed effects models, using as response variable either the sediment collected within the field margin or the difference in sediment collected after and before the field margin. There was no difference in the amount of sediment reaching the different field margin types. In contrast, extensively managed field margins showed a large reduction in collected sediment before and after the field margins. This effect was pronounced in steep field margins, and increased with the size of rainfall events. We conclude that a field margin management promoting a dense vegetation cover is a key to mitigating negative off-site effects of soil erosion in monsoon regions, particularly in field margins with steep slopes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Responses of wind erosion to disturbance in a desert scrub grassland: grass vs. bush cover, and a snapshot into recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddock, M.; Zobeck, T. M.; D'Odorico, P.; van Pelt, S.; Ravi, S.; Over, T. M.; Bhattachan, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mixture of grass and bush vegetation that typifies many desert scrublands is a distinctive feature of the northern Chihuahuan Desert, where it represents a change in land cover driven by shrub encroachment. In such environments, the redistribution of nutrients by aeolian transport has been recognized as an important biophysical process, with a role in sustaining shrub presence. Investigation of disturbances in these landscapes (e.g. fire and grazing) will enable better understanding of their dust emission behavior with changing climate, perturbance regime and management scenarios. Here we use a portable wind tunnel to investigate the impact of fire and animals on soil erodibilty and dust emissions from different vegetation types in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge, central New Mexico. Plots were selected that were a) predominantly creosote bush or b) predominantly grass covered. Dust emission was measured for these surfaces both before and after a prescribed burn was conducted. The grass plots were also clipped and artificially trampled to simulate grazing. PM10 concentrations and emission rates from the test surfaces are shown for initial blow-off experiments as the wind tunnel flow accelerates to a target velocity, plus the steady state emission flux produced under constant wind flow with an added abrader sand. An adjacent area burned 8 months previously also allowed investigation of the change in erodibility of the soil for a known time after fire. Our preliminary results indicate the extent that dust emission is changed by the introduced disturbances, and their differing effect on creosote bush and grass dominated covers.

  15. Worldwide wind/diesel hybrid power system study: Potential applications and technical issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, W. R.; Johnson, B. L., III

    1991-04-01

    The world market potential for wind/diesel hybrid technology is a function of the need for electric power, the availability of sufficient wind resource to support wind/diesel power, and the existence of buyers with the financial means to invest in the technology. This study includes data related to each of these three factors. This study does not address market penetration, which would require analysis of application specific wind/diesel economics. Buyer purchase criteria, which are vital to assessing market penetration, are discussed only generally. Countries were screened for a country-specific market analysis based on indicators of need and wind resource. Both developed countries and less developed countries (LDCs) were screened for wind/diesel market potential. Based on the results of the screening, ten countries showing high market potential were selected for more extensive market analyses. These analyses provide country-specific market data to guide wind/diesel technology developers in making design decisions that will lead to a competitive product. Section 4 presents the country-specific data developed for these analyses, including more extensive wind resource characterization, application-specific market opportunities, business conditions, and energy market characterizations. An attempt was made to identify the potential buyers with ability to pay for wind/diesel technology required to meet the application-specific market opportunities identified for each country. Additionally, the country-specific data are extended to corollary opportunities in countries not covered by the study. Section 2 gives recommendations for wind/diesel research based on the findings of the study.

  16. Worldwide wind/diesel hybrid power system study: Potential applications and technical issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, W.R.; Johnson, B.L. III (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

    1991-04-01

    The world market potential for wind/diesel hybrid technology is a function of the need for electric power, the availability of sufficient wind resource to support wind/diesel power, and the existence of buyers with the financial means to invest in the technology. This study includes data related to each of these three factors. This study does not address market penetration, which would require analysis of application specific wind/diesel economics. Buyer purchase criteria, which are vital to assessing market penetration, are discussed only generally. Countries were screened for a country-specific market analysis based on indicators of need and wind resource. Both developed countries and less developed countries'' (LDCs) were screened for wind/diesel market potential. Based on the results of the screening, ten countries showing high market potential were selected for more extensive market analyses. These analyses provide country-specific market data to guide wind/diesel technology developers in making design decisions that will lead to a competitive product. Section 4 presents the country-specific data developed for these analyses, including more extensive wind resource characterization, application-specific market opportunities, business conditions, and energy market characterizations. An attempt was made to identify the potential buyers with ability to pay for wind/diesel technology required to meet the application-specific market opportunities identified for each country. Additionally, the country-specific data are extended to corollary opportunities in countries not covered by the study. Section 2 gives recommendations for wind/diesel research based on the findings of the study. 86 refs.

  17. Projecting Wind Energy Potential Under Climate Change with Ensemble of Climate Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A.; Shashikanth, K.; Ghosh, S.; Mukherjee, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increasing global concern over energy sustainability and security, triggered by a number of issues, such as (though not limited to): fossil fuel depletion, energy resource geopolitics, economic efficiency versus population growth debate, environmental concerns and climate change. Wind energy is a renewable and sustainable form of energy in which wind turbines convert the kinetic energy of wind into electrical energy. Global warming and differential surface heating may significantly impact the wind velocity and hence the wind energy potential. Sustainable design of wind mills requires understanding the impacts of climate change on wind energy potential, which we evaluate here with multiple General Circulation Models (GCMs). GCMs simulate the climate variables globally considering the greenhouse emission scenarios provided as Representation Concentration path ways (RCPs). Here we use new generation climate model outputs obtained from Coupled model Intercomparison Project 5(CMIP5). We first compute the wind energy potential with reanalysis data (NCEP/ NCAR), at a spatial resolution of 2.50, where the gridded data is fitted to Weibull distribution and with the Weibull parameters, the wind energy densities are computed at different grids. The same methodology is then used, to CMIP5 outputs (resultant of U-wind and V-wind) of MRI, CMCC, BCC, CanESM, and INMCM4 for historical runs. This is performed separately for four seasons globally, MAM, JJA, SON and DJF. We observe the muti-model average of wind energy density for historic period has significant bias with respect to that of reanalysis product. Here we develop a quantile based superensemble approach where GCM quantiles corresponding to selected CDF values are regressed to reanalysis data. It is observed that this regression approach takes care of both, bias in GCMs and combination of GCMs. With superensemble, we observe that the historical wind energy density resembles quite well with

  18. Assessment of wind energy potential and optimal electricity generation in Borj-Cedria, Tunisia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmouni, A.W.; Kerkeni, C. [Laboratoire de Maitrise de l' Energie Eolienne et de Valorisation Energetique des Dechets, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, Hammam Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Ben Salah, M. [Laboratoire des Procedees Thermiques, Centre de Recherche et technologies de l' Energie, Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95 Hammam Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Askri, F.; Ben Nasrallah, S. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Systemes Thermiques et Energetiques, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, avenue Ibn El Jazzar 5019, Monastir (Tunisia)

    2011-01-15

    In the last century, several climate changes have been observed in regions all over the world. The main cause of these climatic changes is the rise of fossil fuel uses, which is due to the important demographic and industrial development. These negative effects have forced scientists to draw attention to renewable energy sources, which are the most suitable solution in the future. In this paper, wind energy potential was estimated using the wind speed data collected by two meteorological stations installed in the Centre of Research and Technologies of Energy (CRTEn) in the Borj-Cedria area. The data collected at 30, 20 and 10 m height during 2008 and 2009, have permitted us to estimate the seasonal mean wind speed, wind speed distribution and wind power density. The results have been used to estimate the net energy output of seven 1.5 MW wind turbines with taken account the air density correction and the power losses in wind farm. This comparative simulation shows difference in wind generators production and allows us to choose the best wind turbine adapted to the site conditions. (author)

  19. Evaluating wind energy potential in Gorgan–Iran using two methods of Weibull distribution function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Hashemi-Tilehnoee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, wind energy characteristics of the, a city in northeast of Iran, measured at 10m height in 2014. The Gorgan airport one hour recorded data extrapolated to 50m height. The data have been statistically analyzed hourly, daily, monthly, seasonally and annually to determine the wind power potential. Weibull distribution function has been used to determine the wind power density and then the potential energy. Standard deviation method and power density method are the methods used to calculate the scaling and shaping parameters of the Weibull distribution function. The annual mean wind power calculated by the standard deviation method and the power density method is 38.98w/m2 and 41.32w/m2, respectively. By comparing the results concluded that the power density method is a better method than the standard deviation method. In addition, Gorgan wind energy potentiality categorized into class 1. So is unsuitable to utilize large wind energy turbine. Article History: Received November 21, 2015; Received in revised form January 15, 2016; Accepted February 10, 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Babayani, D., Khaleghi, M., Tashakor, S., and Hashemi-Tilehnoee.,M. (2016 Evaluating wind energy potential in Gorgan–Iran using two methods of Weibull distribution function. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(1, 43-48. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.1.43-48 

  20. Potential for Jobs and Economic Development from Offshore Wind in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-11-02

    In California's future scenarios, energy demand increases with population growth and productivity. Decision-makers will have to make choices about which energy resources to utilize, and offshore wind offers one option for carbon-free electricity with the potential for increased local jobs. This presentation discusses results from an NREL report, Floating Offshore Wind in California: Gross Potential for Jobs and Economic Impacts from Two Future Scenarios. Presenter Suzanne Tegen describes the Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model and its results for two offshore wind scenarios in California. She discusses different assumptions and how they affect the scenarios.

  1. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  2. Plutonium in soils from northeast China and its potential application for evaluation of soil erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming

    2013-12-16

    Surface and soil core samples from northeast China were analyzed for Pu isotopes. The measured (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratios and (239 + 240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratios revealed that the global fallout is the dominant source of Pu and (137)Cs at these sites. Migration behavior of Pu varying with land type and human activities resulted in different distribution of Pu in surface soils. A sub-surface maximum followed by exponential decline of (239 + 240)Pu concentrations was observed in an undisturbed soil core, with a total (239 + 240)Pu inventory of 86.9 Bq/m(2) and more than 85% accumulated in 0 ~ 20 cm layers. While only half inventory of Pu was obtained in another soil core and no sub-surface maximum value occurred. Erosion of topsoil in the site should be the most possible reason for the significantly lower Pu inventory, which is also supported by the reported (137)Cs profiles. These results demonstrated that Pu could be applied as an ideal substitute of (137)Cs for soil erosion study in the future.

  3. Assessment of the Joint Development Potential of Wave and Wind Energy in the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The South China Sea is a major shipping hub between the West Pacific and Indian Oceans. In this region, the demand for energy is enormous, both for residents’ daily lives and for economic development. Wave energy and wind energy are two major clean and low-cost ocean sources of renewable energy. The reasonable development and utilization of these energy sources can provide a stable energy supply for coastal cities and remote islands of China. Before wave energy and wind energy development, however, we must assess the potential of each of these sources. Based on high-resolution and high-accuracy wave field data and wind field data obtained by ERA-Interim reanalysis for the recent 38-year period from 1979–2016, the joint development potential of wave energy and wind energy was assessed in detail for offshore and nearshore areas in the South China Sea. Based on potential installed capacity, the results revealed three promising areas for the joint development of nearshore wave energy and wind energy, including the Taiwan Strait, Luzon Strait and the sea southeast of the Indo-China Peninsula. For these three dominant areas (key stations, the directionality of wave energy and wind energy propagation were good in various seasons; the dominant wave conditions and the dominant wind conditions were the same, which is advantageous for the joint development of wave and wind energy. Existing well-known wave energy converters (WECs are not suitable for wave energy development in the areas of interest. Therefore, we must consider the distributions of wave conditions and develop more suitable WECs for these areas. The economic and environmental benefits of the joint development of wave and wind energy are high in these promising areas. The results described in this paper can provide references for the joint development of wave and wind energy in the South China Sea.

  4. Potential climatic impacts and reliability of large-scale offshore wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chien; Prinn, Ronald G

    2011-01-01

    The vast availability of wind power has fueled substantial interest in this renewable energy source as a potential near-zero greenhouse gas emission technology for meeting future world energy needs while addressing the climate change issue. However, in order to provide even a fraction of the estimated future energy needs, a large-scale deployment of wind turbines (several million) is required. The consequent environmental impacts, and the inherent reliability of such a large-scale usage of intermittent wind power would have to be carefully assessed, in addition to the need to lower the high current unit wind power costs. Our previous study (Wang and Prinn 2010 Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10 2053) using a three-dimensional climate model suggested that a large deployment of wind turbines over land to meet about 10% of predicted world energy needs in 2100 could lead to a significant temperature increase in the lower atmosphere over the installed regions. A global-scale perturbation to the general circulation patterns as well as to the cloud and precipitation distribution was also predicted. In the later study reported here, we conducted a set of six additional model simulations using an improved climate model to further address the potential environmental and intermittency issues of large-scale deployment of offshore wind turbines for differing installation areas and spatial densities. In contrast to the previous land installation results, the offshore wind turbine installations are found to cause a surface cooling over the installed offshore regions. This cooling is due principally to the enhanced latent heat flux from the sea surface to lower atmosphere, driven by an increase in turbulent mixing caused by the wind turbines which was not entirely offset by the concurrent reduction of mean wind kinetic energy. We found that the perturbation of the large-scale deployment of offshore wind turbines to the global climate is relatively small compared to the case of land

  5. Potential of CO2 lasers (10.6 µm associated with fluorides in inhibiting human enamel erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayanne Monteiro RAMOS-OLIVEIRA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study aimed to investigate the potential of CO2 lasers associated with different fluoride agents in inhibiting enamel erosion. Human enamel samples were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 12: G1-eroded enamel; G2-APF gel; G3-AmF/NaF gel; G4-AmF/SnF2 solution; G5-CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 µm+APF gel; G6-CO2 laser+AmF/NaF gel; G7-CO2laser+AmF/SnF2solution; G8-CO2 laser; and G9-sound enamel. The CO2 laser parameters were: 0.45 J/cm2; 6 μs; and 128 Hz. After surface treatment, the samples (except from G9 were immersed in 1% citric acid (pH 4.0, 3 min. Surface microhardness was measured at baseline and after surface softening. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (p < 0.05. G2 (407.6 ± 37.3 presented the highest mean SMH after softening, followed by G3 (407.5 ± 29.8 and G5 (399.7 ± 32.9. Within the fluoride-treated groups, G4 (309.0 ± 24.4 had a significantly lower mean SMH than G3 and G2, which were statistically similar to each other. AmF/NaF and APF application showed potential to protect and control erosion progression in dental enamel, and CO2 laser irradiation at 0.45J/cm2 did not influence its efficacy. CO2 laser irradiation alone under the same conditions could also significantly decrease enamel erosive mineral loss, although at lower levels.

  6. A high-resolution assessment of wind and wave energy potentials in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Langodan, Sabique

    2016-08-24

    This study presents an assessment of the potential for harvesting wind and wave energy from the Red Sea based on an 18-year high-resolution regional atmospheric reanalysis recently generated using the Advanced Weather Research Forecasting model. This model was initialized with ERA-Interim global data and the Red Sea reanalysis was generated using a cyclic three-dimensional variational approach assimilating available data in the region. The wave hindcast was generated using WAVEWATCH III on a 5 km resolution grid, forced by the Red Sea reanalysis surface winds. The wind and wave products were validated against data from buoys, scatterometers and altimeters. Our analysis suggests that the distribution of wind and wave energy in the Red Sea is inhomogeneous and is concentrated in specific areas, characterized by various meteorological conditions including weather fronts, mesoscale vortices, land and sea breezes and mountain jets. A detailed analysis of wind and wave energy variation was performed at three hotspots representing the northern, central and southern parts of the Red Sea. Although there are potential sites for harvesting wind energy from the Red Sea, there are no potential sites for harvesting wave energy because wave energy in the Red Sea is not strong enough for currently available wave energy converters. Wave energy should not be completely ignored, however, at least from the perspective of hybrid wind-wave projects. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Subannual spatiotemporal patterns of potential erosion hotspots on full island scale (Mauritius, Indian Ocean): Foci for agrodiversity and ecosystem buffer regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijsdijk, K. F.; Seijmonsbergen, A. C.; Kamminga, T.; Koon, A.; Assenjee, A.; Goolaup, P.

    2009-04-01

    Economic and agricultural growth on Mauritius has resulted in severe environmental pressure during the last decades. Forest fragmentation (>98%), agricultural intervention, prolonged bare soil periods and changing soil properties in combination with a short rainy cyclone season has led to an increase in surface erosion processes and loss of soil fertility. The sensitivity to soil erosion depends on spatial differences in surface conditions. To reveal hot spots of erosion, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) model was applied for the whole of Mauritius (scale 1:50 000) through ArcGIS algorithms. Although RUSLE is not designed to calculate monthly potential erosion we demonstrate it may indicate realistic spatiotemporal patterns. Subannual soil loss values in 2005 and averaged for a 30 yrs period between 1978-2008, were reclassified into six potential soil erosion categories, from very low to extremely high. In 2005 peaks in potential erosion values in February and March (>1.5t ha-1 month-1) coincide with the cyclone season and very low potential soil loss values from October through December (<0.05t ha-1 month-1) relate to the dry season, which confirms the influence of the R-factor. The calculated values and patterns of potential soil erosion hot spots compare realistically with available soil loss data for various land cover units. Hotspots that would otherwise masked by the annual mean of the annual based RUSLE equation. The outcome provide essential subannual spatiotemporal information to identify areas with increased vulnerability to soil erosion that should prioritized for taking effective measures against future soil loss. In a monocrop setting subannual RUSLE analyses can provide regional and temporal foci to base agrodiversity strategies upon. Further it helps to identify vulnerable spots in buffer zones of threatened ecosystems.

  8. Evaluation of Erosion Potential of Estuarine Sediments in NY/NJ Harbor (Impact of In-Situ Stabilization on the Remediation of Soft Sediments - A preamble to Erosion Testing and Evaluation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The primary objective of the project are to perform a review of existing in-situ techniques of sediment erosion potential evaluation in contaminated "superfund" sites in the United States and those from Europe and Japan and the applicability of soft ...

  9. Floating Offshore Wind in Hawaii: Potential for Jobs and Economic Impacts from Three Future Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Tony; Keyser, David; Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-04-18

    Construction of the first offshore wind power plant in the United States began in 2015, off the coast of Rhode Island, using fixed platform structures that are appropriate for shallow seafloors, like those located off the East Coast and mid-Atlantic. However, floating platforms, which have yet to be deployed commercially, will likely need to be anchored to the deeper seafloor if deployed in Hawaiian waters. To analyze the employment and economic potential for floating offshore wind off Hawaii's coasts, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to analyze two hypothetical deployment scenarios for Hawaii: 400 MW of offshore wind by 2050 and 800 MW of offshore wind by 2050. The results of this analysis can be used to better understand the general scale of economic opportunities that could result from offshore wind development.

  10. Assessing Potential Wind Energy Resources in Saudi Arabia with a Skew-t Distribution

    KAUST Repository

    Tagle, Felipe

    2017-03-13

    Facing increasing domestic energy consumption from population growth and industrialization, Saudi Arabia is aiming to reduce its reliance on fossil fuels and to broaden its energy mix by expanding investment in renewable energy sources, including wind energy. A preliminary task in the development of wind energy infrastructure is the assessment of wind energy potential, a key aspect of which is the characterization of its spatio-temporal behavior. In this study we examine the impact of internal climate variability on seasonal wind power density fluctuations using 30 simulations from the Large Ensemble Project (LENS) developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Furthermore, a spatio-temporal model for daily wind speed is proposed with neighbor-based cross-temporal dependence, and a multivariate skew-t distribution to capture the spatial patterns of higher order moments. The model can be used to generate synthetic time series over the entire spatial domain that adequately reproduces the internal variability of the LENS dataset.

  11. Potential of wind power projects under the Clean Development Mechanism in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Pallav; Michaelowa, Axel

    2007-07-30

    So far, the cumulative installed capacity of wind power projects in India is far below their gross potential (tax benefits, long term financing schemes etc., for more than 10 years etc. One of the major barriers is the high costs of investments in these systems. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol provides industrialized countries with an incentive to invest in emission reduction projects in developing countries to achieve a reduction in CO2 emissions at lowest cost that also promotes sustainable development in the host country. Wind power projects could be of interest under the CDM because they directly displace greenhouse gas emissions while contributing to sustainable rural development, if developed correctly. Our estimates indicate that there is a vast theoretical potential of CO2 mitigation by the use of wind energy in India. The annual potential Certified Emissions Reductions (CERs) of wind power projects in India could theoretically reach 86 million. Under more realistic assumptions about diffusion of wind power projects based on past experiences with the government-run programmes, annual CER volumes by 2012 could reach 41 to 67 million and 78 to 83 million by 2020. The projections based on the past diffusion trend indicate that in India, even with highly favorable assumptions, the dissemination of wind power projects is not likely to reach its maximum estimated potential in another 15 years. CDM could help to achieve the maximum utilization potential more rapidly as compared to the current diffusion trend if supportive policies are introduced.

  12. Generalized Extreme Value Distribution Models for the Assessment of Seasonal Wind Energy Potential of Debuncha, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkongho Ayuketang Arreyndip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of generalized extreme value family of distributions (Weibull, Gumbel, and Frechet is employed for the first time to assess the wind energy potential of Debuncha, South-West Cameroon, and to study the variation of energy over the seasons on this site. The 29-year (1983–2013 average daily wind speed data over Debuncha due to missing values in the years 1992 and 1994 is gotten from NASA satellite data through the RETScreen software tool provided by CANMET Canada. The data is partitioned into min-monthly, mean-monthly, and max-monthly data and fitted using maximum likelihood method to the two-parameter Weibull, Gumbel, and Frechet distributions for the purpose of determining the best fit to be used for assessing the wind energy potential on this site. The respective shape and scale parameters are estimated. By making use of the P values of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic (K-S and the standard error (s.e analysis, the results show that the Frechet distribution best fits the min-monthly, mean-monthly, and max-monthly data compared to the Weibull and Gumbel distributions. Wind speed distributions and wind power densities of both the wet and dry seasons are compared. The results show that the wind power density of the wet season was higher than in the dry season. The wind speeds at this site seem quite low; maximum wind speeds are listed as between 3.1 and 4.2 m/s, which is below the cut-in wind speed of many modern turbines (6–10 m/s. However, we recommend the installation of low cut-in wind turbines like the Savonius or Aircon (10 KW for stand-alone low energy need.

  13. Investigating the potential and feasibility of an offshore wind farm in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, Joerg; Antonini, Alessandro; Govoni, Laura; Gottardi, Guido; Archetti, Renata; Supino, Enrico; Berretta, Claudia; Casadei, Carlo; Ozzi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • First feasibility study for an offshore wind farm in the Northern Adriatic Sea. • Field wind and wave data collected at the site. • Site-specific design of transition piece and foundation. • Economical and technical feasibility applied to four different scenarios. - Abstract: The use of offshore wind power is becoming increasingly important towards a sustainable growth worldwide. In Italy, as well as in other countries where wind energy is provided only by onshore plants, the interest in the deployment of offshore wind resources is rapidly growing, despite relatively modest average wind speeds, compared to typical wind conditions in the North Sea. Research efforts have, so far, addressed the exploration of the most promising locations, based on wind characteristics; however, more extended evidence of technical and economic feasibility is now needed to raise awareness in the decision makers and secure to this source of renewable energy a proper role in the future energy policies. Within such a context, the paper presents the first feasibility study for the development of an offshore wind farm off the coast of Rimini, in the Northern Adriatic Sea. The study is based on an anemometric campaign started at the site in 2008 to provide a statistical assessment of the wind characteristics and the related wind energy potential, and on a 10-year wave measurement record next to the area, together with a thorough analysis of the site geological and environmental characteristics. Environmental data are interpreted with a proper consideration of the extreme events distribution and relevant results are used to select the most appropriate commercially available wind turbine and to design the site-specific support structure. A comprehensive evaluation of the investment costs and revenues is then carried out with reference to two wind farm layouts (a first smaller, constituted of 15 elements, and another one, featuring up to 60 elements) and in relation to two

  14. Potential risks at an industrial site: A wind tunnel study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaňour, Zbyněk; Jurčáková, Klára; Brych, Karel; Dittrt, František; Dittrich, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 3 (2010), s. 185-190 ISSN 0957-5820 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC 113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : atmospheric turbulence * flow visualization * wind tunnel modeling Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.453, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B8JGG-4Y7P8YF-1&_user=640952&_coverDate=05%2F31%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1433050901&_rerunOrigin= google &_acct=C000034318&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=640952&md5=b036d2c5d747eadc03ff5697ea45e6a2

  15. Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Farms on North Sea Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jeffrey R.; Merckelbach, Lucas; Callies, Ulrich; Clark, Suzanna; Gaslikova, Lidia; Baschek, Burkard

    2016-01-01

    Advances in offshore wind farm (OWF) technology have recently led to their construction in coastal waters that are deep enough to be seasonally stratified. As tidal currents move past the OWF foundation structures they generate a turbulent wake that will contribute to a mixing of the stratified water column. In this study we show that the mixing generated in this way may have a significant impact on the large-scale stratification of the German Bight region of the North Sea. This region is chosen as the focus of this study since the planning of OWFs is particularly widespread. Using a combination of idealised modelling and in situ measurements, we provide order-of-magnitude estimates of two important time scales that are key to understanding the impacts of OWFs: (i) a mixing time scale, describing how long a complete mixing of the stratification takes, and (ii) an advective time scale, quantifying for how long a water parcel is expected to undergo enhanced wind farm mixing. The results are especially sensitive to both the drag coefficient and type of foundation structure, as well as the evolution of the pycnocline under enhanced mixing conditions—both of which are not well known. With these limitations in mind, the results show that OWFs could impact the large-scale stratification, but only when they occupy extensive shelf regions. They are expected to have very little impact on large-scale stratification at the current capacity in the North Sea, but the impact could be significant in future large-scale development scenarios. PMID:27513754

  16. Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Farms on North Sea Stratification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Carpenter

    Full Text Available Advances in offshore wind farm (OWF technology have recently led to their construction in coastal waters that are deep enough to be seasonally stratified. As tidal currents move past the OWF foundation structures they generate a turbulent wake that will contribute to a mixing of the stratified water column. In this study we show that the mixing generated in this way may have a significant impact on the large-scale stratification of the German Bight region of the North Sea. This region is chosen as the focus of this study since the planning of OWFs is particularly widespread. Using a combination of idealised modelling and in situ measurements, we provide order-of-magnitude estimates of two important time scales that are key to understanding the impacts of OWFs: (i a mixing time scale, describing how long a complete mixing of the stratification takes, and (ii an advective time scale, quantifying for how long a water parcel is expected to undergo enhanced wind farm mixing. The results are especially sensitive to both the drag coefficient and type of foundation structure, as well as the evolution of the pycnocline under enhanced mixing conditions-both of which are not well known. With these limitations in mind, the results show that OWFs could impact the large-scale stratification, but only when they occupy extensive shelf regions. They are expected to have very little impact on large-scale stratification at the current capacity in the North Sea, but the impact could be significant in future large-scale development scenarios.

  17. Predicción de la erosión eólica potencial con el modelo EWEQ en dos suelos loesicos: efectos de las condiciones climáticas Wind erosion prediction with the EWEQ model in two loess soils: effects of climatic condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Beatriz Aimar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La erosión eólica potencial del suelo (EEP es un dato básico utilizado en varios modelos de predicción para calcular la erosión eólica de suelos agrícolas. El objetivo de este estudio fue cuantificar la EEP de un Haplustol y un Ustipsammente de la Región Semiárida Pampeana (RSP y compararla con las predicciones del modelo Ecuación de Erosión Eólica en Español (EWEQ, realizadas con diferentes factores climáticos (C. Se efectuaron mediciones de EEP a campo durante un año en ambos suelos, mantenidos sin cobertura y con mínima rugosidad. Los resultados indicaron que la EEP medida a campo fue mayor en el Ustipsammente (270 Mg ha-1 año-1 que en el Haplustol (40 Mg ha-1 año -1 , con una reducción en el espesor del horizonte de 21,3 y 3,1 mm, respectivamente. La erosión del Ustipsammente fue dos veces mayor en primavera-verano que en otoño-invierno. Este efecto no se observó en el Haplustol, debido a su menor desecamiento y mayores contenidos de humedad luego de las lluvias. La erosión del Haplustol, por desecarse más lentamente luego de una lluvia, fue más condicionada por las precipitaciones que la del Ustipsammente. Un 40% de la erosión de ambos suelos fue definida por la duración de las tormentas. Las tasas de erosión (EEP por unidad de tiempo, Qt se correlacionaron positivamente con la velocidad promedio del viento (V, ajustando a una función polinómica en ambos suelos. A la misma V, Qt fue siempre mayor en el Ustipsammente. La EEP calculada con la EWEQ, utilizando el factor C correspondiente al año de muestreo (30,3, fue la más semejante a la erosión medida a campo, aunque el modelo la subestimó en un 43% en el Haplustol y en un 18% en el Ustipsammente. La EWEQ deberá ofrecer al usuario distintos factores C para poder predecir EEP en escenarios climáticos variables.The potential wind erosion of a soil (EEP is a basic data for predicting wind erosion of agricultural soils in most wind erosion prediction models

  18. Wind Energy Potential Assessment for Electric Pumps of Agriculture in Broujerd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jalalvand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to restrain the potential of wind energy, the first step is to determine the wind energy potential. In this study the wind data was used from the three-hour frequency recording of 10-year period (2002-2011. To predict the occurrence probability of each wind speed, the two-parameter Weibull function was used. The goodness of fit test by Chi-Square test showed that the wind speed distribution is not represented by the typical two- parameter Weibull function for all the months. Weibull probability density function has a good fit for eleven months, but for the 9th month of the year (September, it is not fitted. Thus, four-parameter Weibull probability function has been developed to analyze the wind speed frequency distribution in that region for the mentioned months. The electrical energy consumption of agricultural water wells in the region was also calculated for the desired periods of the year. Energy demand and energy supply were matched. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 18.0.0, MATLAB 7.13.0.564 and WIDOGRAPHER 3.0.2. The results show that in Broujerd, to exploit the wind energy at all times of the year, it is necessary to have at least 39 turbines of 2300 kW with 99 meters tower. If the desired turbines are used, there will be extra energy and also, agriculture will be continued towards sustainable development.

  19. Potential impacts of climate change on rainfall erosivity and water availability in China in the next 100 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Steven G. McNulty; Jennifer Moore; Corey Bunch; Jian Ni

    2002-01-01

    Soil erosion and water shortages threaten China’s social and economic development in the 21st century. This paper examines how projected climate change could affect soil erosion and water availability across China. We used both historical climate data (1961-1980) and the UKMO Hadley3 climate scenario (1960-2099) to drive regional hydrology and soil erosivity models....

  20. Analysis of winter weather conditions and their potential impact on wind farm operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovskaia, E.; Treinish, L. A.; Praino, A.

    2009-12-01

    Severe weather conditions have two primary impacts on wind farm operations. The first relates to understanding potential damage to the turbines themselves and what actions are required to mitigate the effects. The second is recognizing what conditions may lead to a full or partial shutdown of the wind farm with sufficient lead time to determine the likely inability to meet energy generation committments. Ideally, wind forecasting suitable for wind farm operations should be of sufficient fidelity to resolve features within the boundary layer that lead to either damaging conditions or useful power generation. Given the complexity of the site-specific factors that effect the boundary layer at the scale of typical land-based wind farm locations such as topography, vegetation, land use, soil conditions, etc., which may vary with turbine design and layout within the farm, enabling reliable forecasts of too little or too much wind is challenging. A potential solution should involve continuous updates of alert triggering criteria through analysis of local wind patterns and probabilistic risk assessment for each location. To evaluate this idea, we utilize our operational mesoscale prediction system, dubbed “Deep Thunder”, developed at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center. In particular, we analyze winter-time near-surface winds in upstate New York, where four similar winds farms are located. Each of these farms were built at roughly the same time and utilize similar turbines. Given the relative uncertainty associated with numerical weather prediction at this scale, and the difference in risk assessment due to the two primary impacts of severe weather, probabilistic forecasts are a prerequisite. Hence, we have employed ensembles of weather scenarios, which are based on the NCAR WRF-ARW modelling system. The set of ensemble members was composed with variations in the choices of physics and parameterization schemes, and source of background fields for initial

  1. Renewable Energy Potential of Greenland with emphasis on wind resource assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kasper Rønnow

    of Profitable (required returns of investment), more can economically be saved by replacing outdated equipment. The renewable energy potential for both solar and wind was relatively high, with solar radiation above 1000 kWh=m2=year and mean wind speeds of 6.1 m/s at 10 MAG. For a 50 kWp PV installation the 25...... a dedicated wind monitoring system usable in the Arctic environment and to test it at different types of sites. The instrument test showed that even the highest quality of equipment failed in harsh climate. An extended test was planned, but due to delays, the test result is not ready yet. Based...

  2. Economically Feasible Potentials for Wind Power in China and the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, X.; McElroy, M. B.; Chris, N. P.; Tchou, J.

    2011-12-01

    The present study is intended to explore the economic feasible potentials for wind energy in China and the U.S. subject to their policy systems for renewable energy. These two countries were chosen as subject locales for three reasons: first, they are the two largest countries responsible for energy consumption and CO2 emissions; second, these two countries have the largest installed capacities and the fastest annual growth of wind power in the world; third, China and the U.S. have adopted two distinct but representative incentive policies to accelerate exploitation of the renewable energy source from wind. Investments in large-scale wind farms in China gain privileges from the concession policy established under China's Renewable Energy Law. The electricity generated from wind can be sold at a guaranteed price for a concession period (typically the first ten operational years of a wind farm) to ensure the profitability of the wind farm development. The effectiveness of this policy has been evidenced by the swift growth of total installed capacities for wind power over the past five years in China. A spatial financial model was developed to evaluate the bus-bar prices of wind-generated electricity in China following this wind concession policy. The results indicated that wind could accommodate all of the demand for electricity projected for 2030 assuming a guaranteed bus-bar price of 7.6 U.S. Cents per kWh over the concession period. It is noteworthy that the prices of wind-generated electricity could be as cheap as conventional power generation in the years following the concession period. The power market in the U.S. is more deregulated and electricity is normally traded in a bidding process an hour to a day ahead of real time. Accordingly, the market-oriented policy instrument of PTC subsidies was instituted in the U.S. to ensure the competitiveness of wind power compared to the conventional power generation in the regional power markets. The spatial financial

  3. Wind-Electric Power Potential Assessment for Three Locations in East Java-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Musyafa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports our effort to asses wind energy potentials for three locations in East Java. We used wind speed data over a period of almost 3 years, i.e. in period of June 2006 – August 2008. Data were taken from direct measurement in locations in East Java Province, i.e. Sampang (Madura, Juanda (Surabaya, and Sawahan (Nganjuk. The short-term of wind speed mean in monthly signifies to wind-speed value ”which parallels to the wind turbine power curve value” were used to estimate the annual energy output for a 1 MW installed capacity wind farm on the each site 100 of 10kW rated wind turbines were used in the analysis. The short term of wind speed mean at Surabaya and Nganjuk were 2.34, 3.03 and 1.97 m/s at 2 m Above Ground Level (AGL, respectively. In both locations, wind speeds were observed during the day time between 04.00 and 18.00 and relatively smaller ones between 19.00 and 03.00 period. Meanwhile, in Sampang (Madura the higher wind speeds were observed between 20.00 and 06.00, and relatively smaller between 07.00 and 19.00 period. The 1 MW windfarm at Sampang, Surabaya and Nganjuk can produce 1.284; 1.199 and 1.008 MWh of electricity yearly, taking into consideration of the temperature adjustment coefficien of about 6 %. The plant capacity factor at Sampang, Surabaya and Nganjuk were found to be 30.02 %, 30.00 % and 30.01 % respectively. Additionally, it is noticed that these site can contribute to the avoidance of 0.904; 0.846 and 0.709 tons/year of CO2 equivalent Green House Gases (GHG from entering into the local atmosphere, thus creating a clean and healthy athmosphere for local inhabitants.

  4. Wind power potential outside the Norwegian coast (offshore); Vindkraftpotensialet utenfor norskekysten (offshore)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstad, Knut; Tallhaug, Lars

    2008-07-01

    Norway has a long coastline with good wind conditions, but is different from many other European countries because a big part of the maritime zone close to the coast is very deep (the Norwegian trench). Thus it is only possible to utilize a small part of the offshore field for wind power with today's technology. Developing wind power offshore is today only extended to the areas with shallow water with depth between 5 and 20 meters. The solution for the deeper areas is not commercially available as of yet, but more and more participants, a Norwegian firm (Owec) among others, are working on solutions that will make it possible to establish wind turbines with a solid base as deep as 100 meters (technology based on experiences from the oil industry). A considerable wind power potential in the shallow water areas outside the Norwegian coast has been proven. Meanwhile the potential is strongly dependent on the demand that the generating station must have a minimum distance from the shore. In areas with depths shallower than 20 meters, the potential is estimated from about 6000 to about 30 000 MW, dependent on if the minimum distance from shore is 10 to 1 km. If the maximum depth is extended to 50 m, the potential is about 13 000 to 55 000 MW. Also an approximation is made on how big the wind power potential can be if the maximum depth is extended to 100 m. The potential for wind power will then improve substantially and will be in the area from 40 000 to 140 000 MW. For depths that deep, it may also be pertinent to increase the demand for minimum distance from the shore to 20 km. The potential outside the 20 km limit will be about 12 000 MW. The investigation considers that the development shall not take place in the protected zones or too close to shore. Specific adverse effects of environmental and other specific effects will however not be evaluated. For instance it is not clear what significance the visual impacts and coast scenery will be and what restrictions

  5. Identifying the Areas Benefitting from the Prevention of Wind Erosion by the Key Ecological Function Area for the Protection of Desertification in Hunshandake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on the spatial flow of ecosystem services can help to identify the spatial relationships between service-providing areas (SPAs and service-benefitting areas (SBAs. In this study, we used the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model to stimulate the flow paths of the wind erosion prevented by ecosystems in Hunshandake, China. By interpolating these paths, the SBAs were identified, and their benefits in terms of land cover, population, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP were determined. The results indicated that the flow paths mostly extended to the eastern part of the study area, and the estimated cover of the SBAs was 39.21% of the total area of China. The grid cells through which many (≥10% of the trajectories passed were mainly located in the western part of north-eastern China and the eastern part of northern China. The benefitting population accounted for 74.51% of the total population of China, and the GDP was 67.11% of the total in 2010. Based on this research, we described a quantitative relationship between the SPAs and the SBAs and identified the actual beneficiaries. This work may provide scientific knowledge that can be used by decision makers to develop management strategies, such as ecological compensation to mitigate damage from sandstorms in the study area.

  6. Patches structure succession based on spatial point pattern features in semi-arid ecosystems of the water-wind erosion crisscross region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Min Hao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spatial point-pattern analysis can give insights to the underlying processes of patch succession and restoration. It is unclear whether inter-shrub competition determines patch succession. In this paper, we assessed the spatial patterns along patch succession using spatial statistics such as univariate and bivariate O-ring statistics, in the water-wind erosion crisscross region in semi-arid ecosystems of the Loess Plateau. Point pattern analysis results showed that there were no significant difference in three positions of the slope. The small and middle shrub patches were aggregatedly distributed in small spatial scale, meanwhile the large shrub patches were regularly distributed and dead shrub patches were randomly distributed. The small shrub patches were respectively aggregated to the middle and large patches at fine scales. Competition-induced regular distribution or negative relationship becomes obvious when analyzing the shift towards less aggregated perceptible effect of competition, a time component should always be included in spatial pattern-based inference of competition. Our results revealed that regular, clumped and random shrub patch patterns could occur, pending on size of shrub patches, and the shrub patches are distributed in different ways and they can present variant spatial point pattern features along patch size succession.

  7. Plant materials and amendments for controlling wind and water erosion on a fly ash disposal area: TVA Colbert Fossil Plant, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, J.J.; Behel, D.; Soileau, J.M.; Kelsoe, J.

    1996-12-31

    Fly ash disposal sites adjacent to fossil fueled generating plants are subject to wind and water erosion which increases the operation and maintenance costs. Gullies and unstable areas in the disposal sites require expensive leveling and filling practices. Test evaluated both warm- and cool-season cover crops established by either sod or seed. Amendments to the ash consisted of composted poultry litter (CPL), soil, soil+CPL, fertilizer and beneficial soil microbes including mycorrhizal fungi. Turf sods (419 Bermuda, Emerald zoysia, and Raleigh St. Augustine) were compared in greenhouse and field studies. Six legumes and 12 grass species were tested in the greenhouse as seeded cover crops using similar amendments and raw poultry litter (PL). Legumes grew better with CPL and Boil amendments and grasses grew better on PL and soil amendments possibly due to differences in N requirements and N supply. Cool season crops generally grew faster than warm season species in the greenhouse tests. Amendments should be mixed with the FA to ameliorate the effects of boron and salt toxicity and to increase the water holding capacity. Bermuda sod grew faster than either St, Augustine or Emerald zoysia, but requires more water. A microbial amendment increased dry matter yields of bermuda sod 2 to 3 times after 40 to 60 days over unamended controls. Microbial amendments may be justified on an economic and sustainable basis. A field study is assessing the environmental and cultural requirements to grow a cover crop on an annual basis.

  8. The Potential of hybrid solar-wind electricity generation in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibiru, Ayirewura Vitus

    2013-07-01

    In this work the potential of harnessing electricity from solar and wind sources in Ghana is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively. In this regard solar, wind and other relevant data were collected (over a period of one year) from various parts of Ghana. Detailed assessment of the capacity or potential of power production from hybrid solar-wind sources is done with the use of empirical mathematical formulae and the PRO VITUS model incorporated in the 'ENERGY X' software. The various characteristics of wind, solar and available energy resources for the five locations over a one year period have been studied too. The annual mean wind speed at a height of 10 m above ground level for five locations namely Accra, Kumasi, Takoradi, Sunyani and Tamale are 2.38 ms -1 ± 0.05, 2.39 ms -1 ± 0.05, 2.38 ms -1 ± 0.06, 2.18 ms -1 ± 0.05 and 2.47 ± ms -1 respectively and their corresponding annual mean solar radiations are 228.71 Wm -2 ± 9.81, 187.69 Wm -2 ± 9.60, 236.58 Wm -2 ± 10.39, 200.99 Wm -2 ± 9.88 and 231.63 Wm -2 . Thus, the five sites hold potential for hybrid solar-wind energy exploitation. (au)

  9. Assessment of solar and wind energy potentials for three free economic and industrial zones of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Kasra; Mostafaeipour, Ali; Sabzpooshani, Majid

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the potential of renewable energy sources of solar and wind in three free economic and industrial zones of Chabahar, Kish and Salafchegan in Iran. Feasibility of harnessing solar energy was investigated by using key solar parameters like monthly mean global, beam and diffuse solar radiation as well as clearness index. It was found that all locations had great potentials for utilizing different solar energy systems. Additionally, the monthly, seasonal, semi-yearly and yearly optimum tilt angles of south-facing solar surfaces were determined. For all zones, adjusting the tilt angle twice a year or in other words, the semi-yearly tilt adjustment for two periods of warm (April–September) and cold (October–March) were highly recommended, since it offers almost the same level of annual solar energy gain (SEG) as those of monthly and seasonal adjustments. Weibull Distribution Function (WDF) was performed for analyzing the wind potentials at different heights. It was found that Chabahar was not suitable for wind energy development, but Kish and Salafchegan with yearly wind powers of 111.28 W/m 2 and 114.34 W/m 2 , respectively ranked in class 2 which are considered marginal for wind power development. Three different wind turbine models were proposed for Kish and Salafchegan. - Highlights: • Feasibility of solar and wind energy for three locations of Iran was investigated. • All locations were suitable for solar energy utilization. • The optimum tilt angles of solar surfaces were determined. • Chabahar was unsuitable, but Kish and Salafchegan were marginal for wind purpose

  10. Prescribed Burning and Erosion Potential in Mixed Hardwood Forests of Southern Illinois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurbir Singh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prescribed fire has several benefits for managing forest ecosystems including reduction of fuel loading and invasive species and enhanced regeneration of desirable tree species. Along with these benefits there are some limitations like nutrient and sediment loss which have not been studied extensively in mixed hardwood forests. The objective of our research was to quantify the amount of sediment movement occurring on a watershed scale due to prescribed fire in a southern Illinois mixed hardwood ecosystem. The research site was located at Trail of Tears State Forest in western Union county, IL, USA and included five watershed pairs. One watershed in each pair was randomly assigned the prescribed burn treatment and the other remained as control (i.e., unburned. The prescribed burn treatment significantly reduced the litter depth with 12.6%–31.5% litter remaining in the prescribed burn treatment watersheds. When data were combined across all watersheds, no significant differences were obtained between burn treatment and control watershed for total suspended solids and sediment concentrations or loads. The annual sediment losses varied from 1.41 to 90.54 kg·ha−1·year−1 in the four prescribed burn watersheds and 0.81 to 2.54 kg·ha−1·year−1 in the four control watersheds. Prescribed burn watershed 7 showed an average soil sediment loss of 4.2 mm, whereas control watershed 8 showed an average accumulation of sediments (9.9 mm, possibly due to steeper slopes. Prescribed burning did not cause a significant increase in soil erosion and sediment loss and can be considered acceptable in managing mixed hardwood forests of Ozark uplands and the Shawnee Hills physiographic regions of southern Illinois.

  11. Costs and potential of the harnessing of wind power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diekmann, J.

    1995-01-01

    A report on the past use of wind power in Germany is followed by chapters on the operation of wind power plants in economic, ecological, and socioeconomic terms. Against this background, future possibilities for using wind power in Germany are discussed on the basis of an assessment of the potential and of the determinants of potential exploitation.- In order to allow better understanding of how the IKARUS project deals with wind power plants, the assumptions considered in the model calculations are described in chapter 8 under methodical aspects. Most important herein is the way that the modelling ties in wind power plants into the overall system of energy supply. In addition, it is explained how wind power systems are described in the database. The objective of the IKARUS project is primarily a comprehensive view of the energy system; from the angle of individual lines of technology, certain unsharpnesses need to be taken into account. Consequently, both certain limits to the use of the tools and the future need for updating are pointed out. (orig./UA) [de

  12. Four essays on offshore wind power potential, development, regulatory framework, and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanju, Amardeep

    Offshore wind power is an energy resource whose potential in the US has been recognized only recently. There is now growing interest among the coastal states to harness the resource, particularly in states adjacent to the Mid-Atlantic Bight where the shallow continental shelf allows installation of wind turbines using the existing foundation technology. But the promise of bountiful clean energy from offshore wind could be delayed or forestalled due to policy and regulatory challenges. This dissertation is an effort to identify and address some of the important challenges. Focusing on Delaware as a case study it calculates the extent of the wind resource; considers one means to facilitate resource development---the establishment of statewide and regional public power authorities; analyzes possible regulatory frameworks to manage the resource in state-controlled waters; and assesses the use of distributed storage to manage intermittent output from wind turbines. In order to cover a diversity of topics, this research uses a multi-paper format with four essays forming the body of work. The first essay lays out an accessible methodology to calculate offshore wind resource potential using publicly available data, and uses this methodology to access wind resources off Delaware. The assessment suggests a wind resource approximately four times the average electrical load in Delaware. The second essay examines the potential role of a power authority, a quasi-public institution, in lowering the cost of capital, reducing financial risk of developing and operating a wind farm, and enhancing regional collaboration on resource development and management issues. The analysis suggests that a power authority can lower the cost of offshore wind power by as much as 1/3, thereby preserving the ability to pursue cost-competitive development even if the current federal incentives are removed. The third essay addresses the existing regulatory void in state-controlled waters of Delaware

  13. An assessment of the potential for business use of wind turbines on farms in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, A.G.M.; Graham, R.; Morgan, O.W.

    1998-01-01

    High wind speeds on farms in Scotland, coupled with on-site demands for electricity, suggest there is potential for installing single wind turbines on these farms to generate electricity. The benefit of avoided costs for on-site supplies will help to lower the effective generating costs of surplus electricity for sale. Using a sensitivity analysis to examine a range of parameter settings for financial costs, wind speeds, and farm grants, it is shown that a turbine can be viable on a farm. The key to viability is to have correct and accurate matching between turbine and farm business, there being a place for both large turbines and small turbines under separate circumstances. There are scenarios where a wind turbine is viable on half the farms in Scotland. (Author)

  14. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential effects of erosion and deposition on a radioactive waste repository. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The potential impact of future geologic processes on the integrity of a deep, high-level radioactive-waste repository is evaluated. The following study identifies the potential consequences of surface erosion and deposition on sub-surface repository containment characteristics and assesses the ability to measure and predict quantitatively the rates and corresponding extent of these processes in the long term. Numerous studies of the magnitudes and rates of surficial erosion and deposition that have been used to determine the minimum allowable depth for a geologic repository (300 m - NRC Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60.122, Draft 10) are cited in this report. Measurement and interpretation of potential rates and extent of surficial processes in these studies involved considerable uncertainty, and the implications of this uncertainty on presently proposed repository siting criteria are addressed herein. Important concepts that should be considered when developing siting criteria to protect against deleterious effects arising from future erosion or deposition are highlighted. Erosion agents that could affect deep repositories are distinguished in this report so that their individual and combined impacts may be examined. This approach is recommended when evaluating potential repository sites in diverse environments that are susceptible to different agents of erosion. In contrast, agents of sedimentation are not differentiated in this report because of their relatively minor impact on a deep repository

  15. A decision support system for assessing offshore wind energy potential in the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillings, Christoph; Wanderer, Thomas; Cameron, Lachlan; Tjalling van der Wal, Jan; Jacquemin, Jerome; Veum, Karina

    2012-01-01

    Offshore wind energy (OWE) in the North Sea has the potential to meet large share of Europe’s future electricity demand. To deploy offshore wind parks in a rational way, the overall OWE potential has to be realistically determined. This has to be done on an international, cross-border level and by taking into account the existing man-made and nature-related uses of the North Sea. As spatial conflicts will arise between existing uses and the new OWE uses, a Decision Support System (DSS) based on a Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed. Based on data of existing sea uses and calculation rules for spatial prioritisation analysis, the DSS helps in identifying areas that are (1) generally suitable for offshore wind power, (2) strictly excluded or (3) negotiable with respect to other existing sea uses. The combination of this conflict analysis together with cost assumptions for offshore wind farms and their expected electricity yield leads to identification of favourable areas for OWE deployment in the North Sea. This approach helps to reduce the conflict between offshore wind deployment and existing sea uses in the North Sea for future planning. The results can assist decision makers in developing transnational roadmaps for OWE. - Highlights: ► Decision Support System (DSS) to identify offshore wind energy (OWE) potential in the North Sea. ► Spatial analysis of existing sea use functions and offshore wind energy potential. ► Input parameters of DSS depend on the level of OWE spatial priority assumed by the user. ► DSS performs the required calculations and provides results in form of maps and statistics. ► DSS available after registration at (www.windspeed.eu).

  16. Austria's wind energy potential – A participatory modeling approach to assess socio-political and market acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höltinger, Stefan; Salak, Boris; Schauppenlehner, Thomas; Scherhaufer, Patrick; Schmidt, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Techno-economic assessments confirm the potential of wind energy to contribute to a low carbon bioeconomy. The increasing diffusion of wind energy, however, has turned wind energy acceptance into a significant barrier with respect to the deployment of wind turbines. This article assesses whether, and at what cost, Austrian renewable energy targets can be met under different expansion scenarios considering the socio-political and market acceptance of wind energy. Land-use scenarios have been defined in a participatory modeling approach with stakeholders from various interest groups. We calculated the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for all of the potential wind turbine sites, which we used to generate wind energy supply curves. The results show that wind energy production could be expanded to 20% of the final end energy demand in three out of four scenarios. However, more restrictive criteria increase LCOE by up to 20%. In contrast to common views that see local opposition against wind projects as the main barrier for wind power expansion, our participatory modeling approach indicates that even on the level of key stakeholders, the future possible contribution of wind energy to Austrian renewable energy targets reaches from almost no further expansion to very high shares of wind energy. - Highlights: • Including social barriers could reduce Austria’s wind potential from 92.78 to 3.89 TWh • Costs for attaining a 20% wind energy share vary by 20% between the scenarios • Socially acceptable wind area potential ranges from 0.1 to 3.9% of Austria’s total area • Excluding forest areas lowers the maximum wind energy potential by 45%

  17. 78 FR 59968 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Oregon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ...; MMAA104000] Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Oregon... BOEM by Principle Power, Inc. (Principle Power) to acquire an OCS commercial wind lease; (2) solicit... from Principle Power for a commercial wind lease on the OCS offshore Oregon. Principle [[Page 59969...

  18. 77 FR 47877 - Potential Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Maine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Maine; Request for Interest... Request for a Commercial OCS Wind Lease, Request for Interest, and Request for Public Comment SUMMARY: The... (Statoil NA) to acquire an OCS wind lease; (2) solicit public input regarding the proposal, its potential...

  19. Offshore Wind Resource, Cost, and Economic Potential in the State of Maine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, Walter D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-12

    This report provides information for decision-makers about floating offshore wind technologies in the state of Maine. It summarizes research efforts performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory between 2015 and 2017 to analyze the resource potential, cost of offshore wind, and economic potential of offshore wind from four primary reports: Musial et al. (2016); Beiter et al. (2016, 2017); and Mone et al. (unpublished). From Musial et al. (2016), Maine's technical offshore wind resource potential ranked seventh in the nation overall with more than 411 terawatt-hours/year of offshore resource generating potential. Although 90% of this wind resource is greater than 9.0-meters-per-second average velocity, most of the resource is over deep water, where floating wind technology is needed. Levelized cost of energy and levelized avoided cost of energy were computed to estimate the unsubsidized 'economic potential' for Maine in the year 2027 (Beiter et al. 2016, 2017). The studies found that Maine may have 65 gigawatts of economic potential by 2027, the highest of any U.S. state. Bottom-line costs for the Aqua Ventus project, which is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Demonstration project, were released from a proprietary report written by NREL in 2016 for the University of Maine (Mone et al. unpublished). The report findings were that economies of scale and new technology advancements lowered the cost from $300/megawatt-hour (MWh) for the two-turbine 12-megawatt (MW) Aqua Ventus 1 project, to $126/MWh for the commercial-scale, 498-MW Aqua Ventus-2 project. Further cost reductions to $77/MWh were found when new technology advancements were applied for the 1,000-MW Aqua Ventus-3 project in 2030. No new analysis was conducted for this report.

  20. Eolian erosion of the Martian surface. I - Erosion rate similitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, J. D.; White, B. R.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A similitude parameter is derived which is based on theoretical considerations of erosion due to sand in saltation. This parameter has been used to correlate wind tunnel experiments of particle flow over model craters. The characteristics of the flow field in the vicinity and downstream of a crater are discussed and it is shown that erosion is initiated in areas lying under a pair of trailing vortices. The erosion rate parameter is used to calculate erosion rates on Mars, reported in Part 2, to be published later.

  1. Potential of wind power projects under the Clean Development Mechanism in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaelowa Axel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far, the cumulative installed capacity of wind power projects in India is far below their gross potential (≤ 15% despite very high level of policy support, tax benefits, long term financing schemes etc., for more than 10 years etc. One of the major barriers is the high costs of investments in these systems. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM of the Kyoto Protocol provides industrialized countries with an incentive to invest in emission reduction projects in developing countries to achieve a reduction in CO2 emissions at lowest cost that also promotes sustainable development in the host country. Wind power projects could be of interest under the CDM because they directly displace greenhouse gas emissions while contributing to sustainable rural development, if developed correctly. Results Our estimates indicate that there is a vast theoretical potential of CO2 mitigation by the use of wind energy in India. The annual potential Certified Emissions Reductions (CERs of wind power projects in India could theoretically reach 86 million. Under more realistic assumptions about diffusion of wind power projects based on past experiences with the government-run programmes, annual CER volumes by 2012 could reach 41 to 67 million and 78 to 83 million by 2020. Conclusion The projections based on the past diffusion trend indicate that in India, even with highly favorable assumptions, the dissemination of wind power projects is not likely to reach its maximum estimated potential in another 15 years. CDM could help to achieve the maximum utilization potential more rapidly as compared to the current diffusion trend if supportive policies are introduced.

  2. An assessment of wind energy potential in Iberia under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Santos, João A.; Rochinha, Carlos; Reyers, Mark; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2015-04-01

    Wind energy potential in Iberia is assessed for recent-past (1961-2000) and future (2041-2070) climates. For recent-past, a COSMO-CLM simulation driven by ERA-40 is used. COSMO-CLM simulations driven by ECHAM5 following the A1B scenario are used for future projections. A 2 MW rated power wind turbine is selected. Mean potentials, inter-annual variability and irregularity are discussed on annual/seasonal scales and on a grid resolution of 20 km. For detailed regional assessments eight target sites are considered. For recent-past conditions, the highest daily mean potentials are found in winter over northern and eastern Iberia, particularly on high-elevation or coastal regions. In northwestern Iberia, daily potentials frequently reach maximum wind energy output (50 MWh day-1), particularly in winter. Southern Andalucía reveals high potentials throughout the year, whereas the Ebro valley and central-western coast show high potentials in summer. The irregularity in annual potentials is moderate (2 MWh day-1). The northward displacement of North Atlantic westerly winds (autumn-spring) and the strengthening of easterly flows (summer) are key drivers of future projections. Santos, J.A.; Rochinha, C.; Liberato, M.L.R.; Reyers, M.; Pinto, J.G. (2015) Projected changes in wind energy potentials over Iberia. Renewable Energy, 75, 1: 68-80. doi: 10.1016/j.renene.2014.09.026 Acknowledgements: This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  3. Floating Offshore Wind in Oregon: Potential for Jobs and Economic Impacts from Two Future Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Tony [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Speer, Bethany [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Construction of the first offshore wind power plant in the United States began in 2015, off the coast of Rhode Island, using fixed platform structures that are appropriate for shallow seafloors, like those located off of the East Coast and mid-Atlantic. However, floating platforms, which have yet to be deployed commercially, will likely need to anchor to the deeper seafloor if deployed off of the West Coast. To analyze the employment and economic potential for floating offshore wind along the West Coast, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to analyze two hypothetical, large-scale deployment scenarios for Oregon: 5,500 megawatts (MW) of offshore wind deployment in Oregon by 2050 (Scenario A), and 2,900 MW of offshore wind by 2050 (Scenario B). These levels of deployment could power approximately 1,600,000 homes (Scenario A) or 870,000 homes (Scenario B). Offshore wind would contribute to economic development in Oregon in the near future, and more substantially in the long term, especially if equipment and labor are sourced from within the state. According to the analysis, over the 2020-2050 period, Oregon floating offshore wind facilities could support 65,000-97,000 job-years and add $6.8 billion-$9.9 billion to the state GDP (Scenario A).

  4. Significance of frost action and surface soil characteristics to wind erosion at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Second progress report, October 1, 1975--May 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, N.; Morin, P.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes information on soil frost effects collected on Rocky Flats during the 1975-1976 winter. On a broad scale, work on soil textures at and just below the ground surface corroborates the conclusion reached earlier that the general frost susceptibility of the Rocky Flats soils is quite well keyed to topography. This is incorporated into a mapping procedure for potential soil frost activity which is applied to the northwestern part of the Rocky Flats area. On a site scale, instrumental records of weather conditions and soil responses have been maintained from October, 1975, to May, 1976, at the Lindsay Ranch study site, northwest of the Rocky Flats Plant. During that period, 33 needle ice events have been observed and recorded and are described in this report. A preliminary examination of wind data for the same period suggests that the soil in areas of natural vegetation on the site are not exposed to wind action. If, however, they were exposed, winds capable of eroding them are common.

  5. Wind Energy Potential at Badin and Pasni Costal Line of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Sarwar Kaloi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Unfortunately, Pakistan is facing an acute energy crisis since the past decade due to the increasing population growth and is heavily dependent on imports of fossil fuels. The shortage of the electricity is 14-18 hours in rural areas and 8-10 hours in urban areas. This situation has been significantly affecting the residential, industrial and commercial sectors in the country. At this time, it is immense challenges for the government to keep the power supply provision continue in the future for the country. In this situation, it has been the increased research to explore renewable energy resources in the country to fulfill the deficit scenario in the state. The renewable energy sector has not penetrated in the energy mix, currently in the upcoming markets. This paper highlights the steps taken by the country in the past and is taking steps at the present time to get rid of from the existing energy crisis when most urban areas are suffering from power outages for 12 hours on regular basis. Until 2009, no single grid interconnected wind established, but now the circumstances are changing significantly and wind farms are contributing to the national grid is the reality now. The initiation of the three wind farms interconnection network and many others in the pipeline are going to be operational soon. The federal policy on wind energy system has recently changed. Surprisingly, the continuing schemes of the wind farm are getting slow. This paper reviews developments in the wind energy sector in the country and lists some suggestions that can contribute to improving the penetration of wind energy in the national energy sector. Keywords: Wind energy, evolution of wind resource, Wind sites of Pakistan Article History: Received Dec 16th 2016; Received in revised form May 15th 2017; Accepted June 18th 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Kaloi,G.S., Wang, J., Baloch, M.H and Tahir, S. (2017 Wind Energy Potential at Badin and Pasni Costal Line

  6. A simple method to downscale daily wind statistics to hourly wind data

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zhongling

    2013-01-01

    Wind is the principal driver in the wind erosion models. The hourly wind speed data were generally required for precisely wind erosion modeling. In this study, a simple method to generate hourly wind speed data from daily wind statistics (daily average and maximum wind speeds together or daily average wind speed only) was established. A typical windy location with 3285 days (9 years) measured hourly wind speed data were used to validate the downscaling method. The results showed that the over...

  7. Preliminary assessment of the potential for using cesium-137 technique to estimate rates of soil erosion on cultivated land in La Victoria I, Camaguey province of cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigido, F.O.; Gandarilla Benitez, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a growing awareness that erosion on cultivated land in Cuba is a potential hazard to long term productivity, there is still only limited information on the rates involved, particularly long term values. The potential for using the radionuclide Caesium-137 as an environmental tracer to indicate sources of soil erosion on cultivated soils in La Victoria catchment is introduced. Use of Caesium-137 measurements to estimate rates of erosion and deposition is founded on comparison of the Caesium-137 inventories at individual sampling points with a reference inventory representing the local Caesium fallout input and thus the inventory to be expected at the site experiencing neither erosion nor deposition. Two models for converting Caesium-137 measurements to estimates of soil redistribution rates on studied site have been used, the Proportional Model and Mass Balance Model. Using the first one net soil erosion was calculated to be 17.6 t. Ha 1 - .year 1 - . Estimates of soil loss using a Mass Balance Model (Simplified Model 1 and Model 2) were found to be 30.2 and 30.6 t. Ha 1 - .year 1 - ,respectively. Preliminary results suggest that Caesium-137 technique may be of considerable value in assembling data on the rates and spatial distribution of soil loss and a reliable tool for developing of soil conservation program

  8. A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Battiest

    2012-11-30

    The project, A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation, is funded under a solicitation issued by the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program. Funding provided by the grant allowed the Navajo Nation to measure wind potential at two sites, one located within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation and the other off-reservation during the project period (September 5, 2005 - September 30, 2009). The recipient for the grant award is the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA). The grant allowed the Navajo Nation and NTUA manage the wind feasibility from initial site selection through the decision-making process to commit to a site for wind generation development. The grant activities help to develop human capacity at NTUA and help NTUA to engage in renewable energy generation activities, including not only wind but also solar and biomass. The final report also includes information about development activities regarding the sited included in the grant-funded feasibility study.

  9. Summary of: an in vitro investigation of the erosive potential of smoothies: commentary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent health promotion campaigns have encouraged the public to consume at least five portions of fruit and vegetables per day. Many see consuming fruit smoothies as a way of achieving this. Objective To ascertain the potential or otherwise for fruit smoothies to bring about dental

  10. Wind and Solar Energy Potential Assessment for Development of Renewables Energies Applications in Bucaramanga, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez, G.; Osma, G.; Vergara, P.; Rey, J.

    2014-06-01

    Currently, the trend of micro-grids and small-scale renewable generation systems implementation in urban environments requires to have historical and detailed information about the energy potential resource in site. In Colombia, this information is limited and do not favor the design of these applications; for this reason, must be made detailed studies of the energy potential in their cities. In this paper is presented the wind and solar energy resource assessment for the city of Bucaramanga, based on the monitoring on four strategic points during the years 2010, 2011 and 2012. According to the analysis, is evidenced a significant solar resource throughout the year ascending on average to 1 734 kWh/m2, equivalent to 4.8 kWh/m2/day. Also, from a wind statistical study based on the Weibull probability distribution and Wind Power Density (WPD) was established the wind potential as Class 1 according to the scale of the Department of Energy of the United States (DOE), since the average speed is near 1.4 m/s. Due this, it is technically unfeasible the using of micro-turbines in the city, even so their potential for natural ventilation of building was analyzed. Finally, is presented a methodology to analyze solar harvesting by sectors in the city, according to the solar motion and shadowing caused by existing structures.

  11. Wind and Solar Energy Potential Assessment for Development of Renewables Energies Applications in Bucaramanga, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez, G; Osma, G; Vergara, P; Rey, J

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the trend of micro-grids and small-scale renewable generation systems implementation in urban environments requires to have historical and detailed information about the energy potential resource in site. In Colombia, this information is limited and do not favor the design of these applications; for this reason, must be made detailed studies of the energy potential in their cities. In this paper is presented the wind and solar energy resource assessment for the city of Bucaramanga, based on the monitoring on four strategic points during the years 2010, 2011 and 2012. According to the analysis, is evidenced a significant solar resource throughout the year ascending on average to 1 734 kWh/m 2 , equivalent to 4.8 kWh/m 2 /day. Also, from a wind statistical study based on the Weibull probability distribution and Wind Power Density (WPD) was established the wind potential as Class 1 according to the scale of the Department of Energy of the United States (DOE), since the average speed is near 1.4 m/s. Due this, it is technically unfeasible the using of micro-turbines in the city, even so their potential for natural ventilation of building was analyzed. Finally, is presented a methodology to analyze solar harvesting by sectors in the city, according to the solar motion and shadowing caused by existing structures

  12. Exploring China’s offshore wind energy potential in a comprehensive perspectives of technical, environmental and economic constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Lixuan; Möller, Bernd

    Adequate recognition of offshore wind energy potential may have far-reaching influence on the development of future energy strategies. This study aims to investigate available offshore wind energy resource in China’s exclusive economic zones (EEZs) with the aid of a Geographical Information System...... (GIS), which allows the influence of technical, spatial and economic constraints on raw offshore wind potential being reflected in a continuous space. Firstly, based on ocean wind speed data gained from satellite QuikSCAT, raw potential are identified. Those findings are then used along...

  13. Potential climatic impacts and reliability of very large-scale wind farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Meeting future world energy needs while addressing climate change requires large-scale deployment of low or zero greenhouse gas (GHG emission technologies such as wind energy. The widespread availability of wind power has fueled substantial interest in this renewable energy source as one of the needed technologies. For very large-scale utilization of this resource, there are however potential environmental impacts, and also problems arising from its inherent intermittency, in addition to the present need to lower unit costs. To explore some of these issues, we use a three-dimensional climate model to simulate the potential climate effects associated with installation of wind-powered generators over vast areas of land or coastal ocean. Using wind turbines to meet 10% or more of global energy demand in 2100, could cause surface warming exceeding 1 °C over land installations. In contrast, surface cooling exceeding 1 °C is computed over ocean installations, but the validity of simulating the impacts of wind turbines by simply increasing the ocean surface drag needs further study. Significant warming or cooling remote from both the land and ocean installations, and alterations of the global distributions of rainfall and clouds also occur. These results are influenced by the competing effects of increases in roughness and decreases in wind speed on near-surface turbulent heat fluxes, the differing nature of land and ocean surface friction, and the dimensions of the installations parallel and perpendicular to the prevailing winds. These results are also dependent on the accuracy of the model used, and the realism of the methods applied to simulate wind turbines. Additional theory and new field observations will be required for their ultimate validation. Intermittency of wind power on daily, monthly and longer time scales as computed in these simulations and inferred from meteorological observations, poses a demand for one or more options to ensure

  14. Optimal Sizing of wind power systems in three high wind potential zones in Kuwait for remote housing electrification

    OpenAIRE

    Hajiah, Ali; Sebzali, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a technical study for wind power systems in three sites in Kuwait namely Al-Wafra, Um-Omara and Al-Taweel. Hourly wind speed data for three years are used in order to optimally sizing the wind power systems. Firstly, the Wiebull, function is used to model the wind speed data for each sites. After that a numerical method is used to optimize the energy sources in the power system (wind turbine and battery) using MATLAB. After that the MATLAB is used to analyze the performanc...

  15. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: Contribution of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Harris, P. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Hijiazi, H.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Sputtering of lunar regolith by protons as well as solar-wind heavy ions is considered. From preliminary measurements of H+, Ar+1, Ar+6 and Ar+9 ion sputtering of JSC-1A AGGL lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, and TRIM simulations of kinetic sputtering yields, the relative contributions of kinetic and potential sputtering contributions are estimated. An 80-fold enhancement of oxygen sputtering by Ar+ over same-velocity H+, and an additional x2 increase for Ar+9 over same-velocity Ar+ was measured. This enhancement persisted to the maximum fluences investigated is approximately 1016/cm (exp2). Modeling studies including the enhanced oxygen ejection by potential sputtering due to the minority heavy ion multicharged ion solar wind component, and the kinetic sputtering contribution of all solar wind constituents, as determined from TRIM sputtering simulations, indicate an overall 35% reduction of near-surface oxygen abundance. XPS analyses of simulant samples exposed to singly and multicharged Ar ions show the characteristic signature of reduced (metallic) Fe, consistent with the preferential ejection of oxygen atoms that can occur in potential sputtering of some metal oxides.

  16. Review of remote-sensor potential for wind-energy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooke, W.H.

    1981-03-01

    This report evaluates a number of remote-sensing systems such as radars, lidars, and acoustic echo sounders which are potential alternatives to the cup- and propeller anemometers routinely used in wind energy siting. The high costs and demanding operational requirements of these sensors currently preclude their use in the early stages of a multi-phase wind energy siting strategy such as that recently articulated by Hiester and Pennell (1981). Instead, these systems can be used most effectively in the lattermost stages of the siting process - what Hiester and Pennell (1981) refer to as the site development phase, necessary only for the siting of large wind-energy conversion systems (WECS) or WECS clusters. Even for this particular application only four techniques appear to be operational now; that is, if used properly, these techniques should provide the data sets currently considered adequate for wind-energy siting purposes. They are, in rough order of increasing expense and operating demands: optical transverse wind sensors; acoustic Doppler sounders; time-of-flight and continuous wave (CW) Doppler lidar; and frequency-modulated, continuous wave (FM-CW) Doppler radar.

  17. Floating Offshore Wind in California: Gross Potential for Jobs and Economic Impacts from Two Future Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speer, Bethany [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Construction of the first offshore wind farm in the United States began in 2015, using fixed platform structures that are appropriate for shallow seafloors, like those located off of the East Coast and mid-Atlantic. However, floating platforms, which have yet to be deployed commercially, will likely need to anchor to the deeper seafloor if deployed off of the West Coast. To analyze the employment and economic potential for floating offshore wind along the West Coast, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) has commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to analyze two hypothetical, large-scale deployment scenarios for California: 16 GW of offshore wind by 2050 (Scenario A) and 10 GW of offshore wind by 2050 (Scenario B). The results of this analysis can be used to better understand the general scales of economic opportunities that could result from offshore wind development. Results show total state gross domestic product (GDP) impacts of $16.2 billion in Scenario B or $39.7 billion in Scenario A for construction; and $3.5 billion in Scenario B or $7.9 billion in Scenario A for the operations phases.

  18. The potential of wave and offshore wind energy in around the coastline of Malaysia that face the South China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, E.P.; Zainal, Z.A.; Aswatha Narayana, P.A.; Seetharamu, K.N.

    2006-01-01

    The world wide estimated wave resource is more than 2 TW. Offshore wind speeds are generally higher than wind speeds over land, hence higher available energy resource. The estimated offshore wind potential in European waters alone is in excess of 2500 TWh/annum. Offshore area also provides larger area for deploying wind energy devices. In recent year efforts to promote these two types of renewable and green energy sources have been intensify. Using the data obtained from the Malaysia Meteorological Service (MMS) analysis was conducted for the potential of wave energy and wind energy along the coastline of Malaysia facing the South China Sea. Maps of wave power potential were produced. The mean vector wind speed and direction were tabulated

  19. Potencial de erosão da bacia do Rio Uberaba Potential of erosion in Uberaba River watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato F. do Valle Júnior

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo identificar qualitativamente as áreas suscetíveis à erosão laminar na bacia do Rio Uberaba, localizada em Uberaba -MG, apoiado no modelo matemático da Equação Universal de Perda de Solo (EUPS. Foram utilizadas cartas de: solos, uso e ocupação das terras, redes de drenagem, declividade e dados pluviográficos, utilizando-se de um Sistema de Informação Geográfica (SIG -IDRISI. A espacialização do potencial de erosão só foi possível a partir da estimativa da tolerância às perdas laminares para cada tipo de solo da bacia, e da profundidade dos solos, por entender que as perdas são mais significativas em solos mais rasos do que em solos muito profundos. Na análise dos resultados, verificou-se que 37% da área total da bacia do Rio Uberaba (905,24 km² sofrem perdas de solos acima do limite de tolerância, sendo 12% em solos profundos e 25% em muito profundos, e a espacialização deste evento favorece a adoção de ações efetivas quanto à conservação dos solos da bacia.This work aimed to identify qualitatively the areas susceptive to laminar erosion in Uberaba river watershed, located in Uberaba-MG, Brazil, based on the mathematical model of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE. The following maps had been used: soil, land use, drainage net, slope and rainfall data, using a Geographic Information System (GIS - IDRISI to analyze and manage the data that are linked to the location. The spatiality of the potential of erosion was possible from the estimative of the tolerance to laminar losses for each kind of soil in the watershed and soil depth, to understand that the losses are more significant in flatter soil than in very deep ones. In the analysis of the results, it was verified that 37% of the total area of the watershed of the Uberaba river (905,24 km² showed losses above the tolerance limit, being 12% in deep soil and 25% in very deeply ones, and the spatiality of this event, regards to

  20. The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. L. Foster

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several research projects undertaken by the authors and others over the last 14 years have used fallout and geogenic radionuclides for understanding erosion processes and sediment yield dynamics in South Africa over the last 100–200 years as European settlers colonised the interior plains and plateaux of the country and imported new livestock and farming techniques to the region. These projects have used two fallout radionuclides (210Pb and 137Cs to date sediments accumulating in reservoirs, farm dams, wetlands, alluvial fans and floodouts and have used other fallout nuclides (7Be and long-lived geogenic radionuclides (e.g. 40K, 235U as part of a composite fingerprint exploring contemporary sediment sources and changes to sources through time. While successful in many parts of the world, applying these techniques in Southern Africa has posed a number of challenges often not encountered elsewhere. Here we explore some of the benefits and challenges in using gamma-emitting radionuclides, especially 137Cs, in these landscapes. Benefits include the potential for discriminating gully sidewall from topsoil sources, which has helped to identify contemporary gully systems as sediment conduits, rather than sources, and for providing a time-synchronous marker horizon in a range of sedimentary environments that has helped to develop robust chronologies. Challenges include the spatial variability in soil cover on steep rocky hillslopes, which is likely to challenge assumptions about the uniformity of initial fallout nuclide distribution, the paucity of stable (non-eroding sites in order to estimate atmospheric fallout inventories, and the limited success of 210Pb dating in some rapidly accumulating high altitude catchments where sediments often comprise significant amounts of sand and gravel. Despite these challenges we present evidence suggesting that the use of gamma-emitting radionuclides can make a significant contribution to our understanding of

  1. [Seasonal characteristics of soil respiration and affecting factors under typical vegetations in the water-wind erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui-Hui; Fan, Jun; Qi, Li-Bin; Hao, Ming-De

    2010-12-01

    By the soil respiration system, the characteristics of soil respiration were investigated to explore the correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature, soil water and soil nutrient under different land use patterns in the water-wind erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau. The results indicated that the seasonal changing characteristics of soil respiration were distinguished significantly among different vegetations, and soil water content and temperature were the main influencing factors. Soil respiration seasonal changing ranges, such as bare land, crop land, Medicago sativa land, Caragana korshinskii land, abandoned wild grass land, Stipa bungeana land, wild grass land, degraded Medicago sativa land, sloping Medicago sativa land, sloping abandoned wild grass land, sloping crop land and terraced crop land, were 0.32-0.82, 0.41-2.83, 0.74-2.81, 0.76-3.07, 0.67-2.79, 0.51-2.12, 0.56-2.05, 0.59-1.66, 0.42-2.09, 0.31-1.86, 0.32-1.93 and 0.41-3.17 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1). Comparing seasonal changing magnitudes of soil respiration, crop land was the biggest (167% - 203%), abandoned wild grass land (117% -154%), Caragana korshinskii land (134%), Stipa bungeana land (129%), Medicago sativa land (119%-120%) and bare land (94%) followed crop land. The smallest was degraded Medicago sativa land (92%). Bare land and degraded Medicago sativa land had small seasonal variation during the study period. Monthly average values of soil carbon flux (soil respiration) of Medicago sativa land and Caragana korshinskii land were maximal, but the maximum values under crop land were observed in July and August. Besides Q10 of crop land was also maximal, which reached 1.86. There were significant correlations between soil respiration and soil organic matter and available K. Moreover, soil respiration was affected by soil organic matter and total nitrogen in July and August when the water and heat condition were plentiful, but soil ammonium nitrogen had negative impact

  2. Modeling the erosion risk potential induced by terraces and their condition in a highly dynamic watershed close to the Three-Gorges-Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbrodt, S.; Behrens, T.; Imbery, S.; Scholten, T.

    2010-03-01

    Globally, the Three-Gorges Ecosystem is currently one of the most anthropogenic influenced regions. Due to the Three-Gorges Dam large areas in the upper catchment of the Yangtze and its major tributaries become inundated. Consequently, high land-use dynamic with resettlements, construction of infrastructure, and new land reclamation for smallholder agriculture and cash crops characterize this area. Therefore, ecological impacts are expected in an unforeseeable dimension. Soil loss is one of the major threats and its control an enormous challenge. Even existing erosion control measures like dry-stone walling bench terraces have to be adapted to this new situation in order to keep their effectiveness. In the highly dynamic watershed of the Xiangxi, a first class tributary to the Yangtze, this study aims to assess and predict the spatial and temporal varying dam-caused soil erosion risk potential. Using a multi-level and multi-scale approach this study seeks to develop an integrative data-based methodology for soil erosion assessment by means of GIS-based erosion modeling using relevant digital terrain data, field investigations and remote sensing. The different scales considered cover the Xiangxi watershed (3.100 km²), the highly dynamic backwater area (500 km²), and two micro-scale study sites (3 km² and 88 km²) subject to flooding and high land-use dynamic. Central features of the Xiangxi watershed are steep slopes artificially fractured by terraces. A preliminary erosion survey has shown a strong connection of the frequency and intensity of erosion and the quality of terrace-maintenance. Terraces with wall disorders and technically poor constructed design show higher soil loss and runoff than well-maintained terraces. Their condition is regarded as a driving erosion factor. Therefore, a conceptual Terrace-Condition-Erosion model (TerraCE) was developed in order to assess to what extent soil erosion depends on the quality of terraces. Central aspects are the

  3. Quantification Of Erosion Rates Of Agriculturally Used Soils By Artificial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinand

    2010-05-01

    0.0.1 1. Introduction to soil erosion measurement by radionuclides Soil erosion by water, wind and tillage affects both agriculture and the natural environment. Studying this phenomenon would be one of the advancements in science. Soil erosion occurs worldwide and since the last two decades it has been a main topic of discussion all over the world. The use of environmental radionuclides such as 90Sr, 137Cs to study medium term soil erosion (40 yrs) started in the early 1990's. Using these new techniques better knowledge about erosion can be gained and this knowledge can be implemented for erosion risk management. The erosion and sedimentation study by using man-made and natural radioisotopes is a key technique, which has developed over the past 30 years. Fallout 137Cs and Cosmogenic 7Be are radionuclides that have been used to provide independent measurements of soil-erosion and sediment-deposition rates and patterns [1] [2] [3] [4]. Erosion measurements using radionuclides 137Cs, 7Be Caesium-137 from atmospheric nuclear-weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s (Fig.1) is a unique tracer of erosion and sedimentation, since there are no natural sources of 137Cs. Unique events such as the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 caused regional dispersal of 137Cs that affects the total global deposition budget. This yearly pattern of fallout can be used to develop a chronology of deposition horizons in lakes, reservoirs, and floodplains. 137Cs can be easily measured by gamma spectroscopy. Using 137Cs is a fast and cheap method to study erosion-deposition processes compared to the traditional methods like silt bags. PIC Figure 1: Global 137Cs fallout (Modified from SAAS Bulletin 353, Part E, DDR, 1986) When 137Cs, 7Be reach the soil surface by wet and dry deposition, they are quickly and strongly adsorbed by ion exchange and are essentially non exchangeable in most environments. Each radionuclide is distributed differently in the soil because of differences in half-lives (30 yrs

  4. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution of the Heavy Highly Charged (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface helps determine the composition of the lunar exosphere and contributes to surface weathering. To date, only the effects of the two dominant solar wind constituents, H+ and He+, have been considered. The heavier, less abundant solar wind constituents have much larger sputtering yields because they have greater mass (kinetic sputtering) and they are highly charged (potential sputtering) Their contribution to total sputtering can therefore be orders of magnitude larger than their relative abundances would suggest

  5. A pan-European quantitative assessment of soil loss by wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Pasqualle; Lugato, Emanuele; Panagos, Panos

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion by wind is a serious environmental problem often low perceived but resulting in severe soil degradation forms. On the long-term a considerable part of topsoil - rich in nutrient and organic matters - could be removed compromising the agricultural productivity and inducing an increased use of fertilizers. Field scale studies and observations proven that wind erosion is a serious problem in many European sites. The state-of-the-art suggests a scenario where wind erosion locally affects the temperate climate areas of the northern European countries, as well as the semi-arid areas of the Mediterranean region. However, observations, field measurements and modelling assessments are extremely limited and unequally distributed across Europe. It implies a lack of knowledge about where and when wind erosion occurs, limiting policy actions aimed at mitigating land degradation. To gain a better understanding about soil degradation process, the Soil Resource Assessment working group of the Joint Research Centre carried out the first pan-European assessments of wind-erodible fraction of soil (EF) (Geoderma, 232, 471-478, 2014) and land susceptibility to wind erosion (Land Degradation & Development, DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2318). Today's challenge is to integrate the insights archived by these pan-European assessments, local experiments and field-scale models into a new generation of regional-scale wind erosion models. A GIS version of the Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ) was developed with the aim to i) move a step forward into the aforementioned challenges, and ii) evaluate the soil loss potential due to wind erosion in the agricoltural land of the EU. The model scheme was designed to describe daily soil loss potential, combining spatiotemporal conditions of soil erodibility, crust factor, soil moisture content, vegetation coverage and wind erosivity at 1 km2 resolution. The average soil loss predicted by GIS-RWEQ in the EU arable land ranges from 0 to 39.9 Mg ha-1 yr

  6. Assessment of wind energy potential and cost estimation of wind-generated electricity at hilltops surrounding the city of Maroua in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaoga, Dieudonné Kidmo; Bogno, Bachirou; Aillerie, Michel; Raidandi, Danwe; Yamigno, Serge Doka; Hamandjoda, Oumarou; Tibi, Beda

    2016-07-01

    In this work, 28 years of wind data, measured at 10m above ground level (AGL), from Maroua meteorological station is utilized to assess the potential of wind energy at exposed ridges tops of mountains surrounding the city of Maroua. The aim of this study is to estimate the cost of wind-generated electricity using six types of wind turbines (50 to 2000 kW). The Weibull distribution function is employed to estimate Weibull shape and scale parameters using the energy pattern factor method. The considered wind shear model to extrapolate Weibull parameters and wind profiles is the empirical power law correlation. The results show that hilltops in the range of 150-350m AGL in increments of 50, fall under Class 3 or greater of the international system of wind classification and are deemed suitable to outstanding for wind turbine applications. A performance of the selected wind turbines is examined as well as the costs of wind-generated electricity at the considered hilltops. The results establish that the lowest costs per kWh are obtained using YDF-1500-87 (1500 kW) turbine while the highest costs are delivered by P-25-100 (90 kW). The lowest costs (US) per kWh of electricity generated are found to vary between a minimum of 0.0294 at hilltops 350m AGL and a maximum of 0.0366 at hilltops 150m AGL, with corresponding energy outputs that are 6,125 and 4,932 MWh, respectively. Additionally, the matching capacity factors values are 38.05% at hilltops 150m AGL and 47.26% at hilltops 350m AGL. Furthermore, YDF-1500-87 followed by Enercon E82-2000 (2000 kW) wind turbines provide the lowest cost of wind generated electricity and are recommended for use for large communities. Medium wind turbine P-15-50 (50 kW), despite showing the best coefficients factors (39.29% and 48.85% at hilltops 150 and 350m AGL, in that order), generates electricity at an average higher cost/kWh of US0.0547 and 0.0440 at hilltops 150 and 350m AGL, respectively. P-15-50 is deemed a more advantageous option

  7. Erosive gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, S.H.; Conrad, C.; Kjoergaad, J.

    1982-01-01

    Erosive gastritis is a well-defined radiologic and endoscopic entity. It is one of the common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, yet it is seldom diagnosed and often confused with a number of other diseases. This communication re-emphasizes the characteristic endoscopic and radiologic features of erosive gastritis and its differential diagnosis. Two representative cases are reported. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of wind energy potential in the south-south geopolitical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South geopolitical zone of Nigeria using 10 year wind data obtained at a height of 10m as a possible location for energy generation from wind. The obtained ... Keywords: Mean wind speed, Wind power density, Wind energy, Renewable energy ...

  9. Predicting and mapping potential Whooping Crane stopover habitat to guide site selection for wind energy projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaire, J Amy; Kreakie, Betty J; Keitt, Timothy; Minor, Emily

    2014-04-01

    Migratory stopover habitats are often not part of planning for conservation or new development projects. We identified potential stopover habitats within an avian migratory flyway and demonstrated how this information can guide the site-selection process for new development. We used the random forests modeling approach to map the distribution of predicted stopover habitat for the Whooping Crane (Grus americana), an endangered species whose migratory flyway overlaps with an area where wind energy development is expected to become increasingly important. We then used this information to identify areas for potential wind power development in a U.S. state within the flyway (Nebraska) that minimize conflicts between Whooping Crane stopover habitat and the development of clean, renewable energy sources. Up to 54% of our study area was predicted to be unsuitable as Whooping Crane stopover habitat and could be considered relatively low risk for conflicts between Whooping Cranes and wind energy development. We suggest that this type of analysis be incorporated into the habitat conservation planning process in areas where incidental take permits are being considered for Whooping Cranes or other species of concern. Field surveys should always be conducted prior to construction to verify model predictions and understand baseline conditions. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Potencial erosivo e características das chuvas de Encruzilhada do Sul, RS Erosivity potential and characteristics of rainfalls at Encruzihada do Sul, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio L. F. Eltz

    2011-04-01

    the smallest erosive potential (14%. In the average, the advanced, intermediary and delayed patterns present 48, 26 and 26% of the number of erosive rainfalls per year, respectively, correponding to 51, 27 and 22%, respectively, of the annual volume of erosive rainfalls and 55, 27 and 18% of the average annual erosivity. For Encruzilhada do Sul, the mean annual rainfall erosivity index is 5534.3 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 ("R" Factor of USLE, with a return period of 2.3 years, and occurrence probability of 40.6%. It has been verified that the rainfall erosive potential (EI30 does not present significant correlation to the rainfall coefficient.

  11. Potential scour for marine current turbines based on experience of offshore wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Lam, W. H.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    The oceans have tremendous untapped natural resources. These sources are capable to make significant contribution to our future energy demands. Marine current energy offers sustainable and renewable alternative to conventional sources. Survival problems of Marine Current Turbines (MCTs) need to be addressed due to the harsh marine environment. The analogous researches in wind turbine have been conducted. Some of the results and knowledge are transferable to marine current energy industry. There still exist some gaps in the state of knowledge. Scour around marine structures have been well recognised as an engineering issue as scour is likely to cause structural instability. This paper aims to review different types of foundation of MCTs and potential scour and scour protection around these foundations based on the experience of offshore wind turbine farm.

  12. An assessment of wind energy potential as a power generation source in the capital of Iran, Tehran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyhani, A.; Ghasemi-Varnamkhasti, M.; Khanali, M.; Abbaszadeh, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the statistical data of eleven years' wind speed measurements of the capital of Iran, Tehran, are used to find out the wind energy potential. Also, other wind characteristics with the help of two methods of meteorological and Weibull are assessed to evaluate of which at a height of 10 m above ground level and in open area. For this purpose, a long term data source, consisting of eleven years (1995-2005) of three-hour period measured mean wind data, was adopted and analyzed. Based on these data, it was indicated that the numerical values of the shape and scale parameters for Tehran varied over a wide range. The yearly values of k (dimensionless Weibull shape parameter), ranged from 1.91 to 2.26 with a mean value of 2.02, while those of c (Weibull scale parameter), were in the range of 4.38-5.1 with a mean value of 4.81. Corresponding values for monthly data of whole year were found to be within the range 1.72-2.68 and 4.09-5.67, respectively related to k and c Weibull parameters. Results revealed that the highest and the lowest wind power potential are in April and August, respectively. It was also concluded that the site studied is not suitable for electric wind application in a large-scale. It was found that the wind potential of the region can be adequate for non-grid connected electrical and mechanical applications, such as wind generators for local consumption, battery charging, and water pumping. In wind direction evaluation, it was found that the most probable wind direction for the eleven-year period is on 180 deg, i.e. west winds. (author)

  13. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Avian Interactions at Four Proposed Wind Energy Facilities on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-08-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) is investigating whether to install wind turbines to provide a supplemental source of electricity at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) near Lompoc, California. As part of that investigation, VAFB sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide a preliminary characterization of the potential risk to wildlife resources (mainly birds and bats) from wind turbine installations. With wind power development expanding throughout North America and Europe, concerns have surfaced over the number of bird fatalities associated with wind turbines. Guidelines developed for the wind industry by the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) recommend assessing potential impacts to birds, bats, and other potentially sensitive resources before construction. The primary purpose of an assessment is to identify potential conflicts with sensitive resources, to assist developers with identifying their permitting needs, and to develop strategies to avoid impacts or to mitigate their effects. This report provides a preliminary (Phase I) biological assessment of potential impacts to birds and bats that might result from construction and operation of the proposed wind energy facilities on VAFB.

  14. Social, technological, and research responses to potential erosion and sediment disasters in the western United States, with examples from California

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice

    1985-01-01

    Examples from California are used to illustrate typical responses to erosion and debris flow disasters in the United States. Political institutions leave virtually all responsibility for disaster prevention to the lowest levels of government or to individuals. Three circumstances in which disasters occur are discussed: urbanized debris cones, urbanized unstable...

  15. "Social, technological, and research responses to potential erosion and sediment disasters in the western United States, with examples from California"

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice

    1985-01-01

    Synopsis - Examples from California are used to illustrate typical responses to erosion and debris flow disasters the United States. Political institutions leave virtually all responsibility for disaster prevention to the lowest levels of government or to individuals. Three circumstances in which disasters occur are discussed: urbanized debris cones, urbanized unstable...

  16. Estimated Production Potential Types of Wind Turbines Connected to the Network Using Random Numbers Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Saeid Nahi; Seyed Mohammad Hossein Nabavi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, power systems, energy generation by wind has been very important. Noting that the production of electrical energy by wind turbines on site to several factors (such as wind speed and profile site for the turbines, especially off the wind input speed, wind rated speed and wind output speed disconnect) is dependent. On the other hand, several different types of turbines in the market there. Therefore, selecting a turbine that its capacity could also answer the need...

  17. 6 years of wind data for Marsabit, Kenya average over 14 m/s at 100 m hub height; An analysis of the wind energy potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamau, J.N.; Kinyua, R. [Department of Physics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Nairobi (Kenya); Gathua, J.K. [Department of Physics, Kenyatta University, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2010-06-15

    The wind energy potential for generation of electricity and for domestic water pumping has been investigated for Marsabit, Kenya. Marsabit (37 58'N, 2 19'E) lies in Eastern province approximately 560 km from Nairobi. Wind data from the Kenya Meteorological department for the period 2001-2006 has been used to study the Diurnal, monthly and inter-annual variability using empirical methods including the Power law and Weibull statistics. Average wind speeds greater than11 m/s at a height of 10 m are prevalent in this area. The available power density at a height of 100 m is between 1776 W/m{sup 2} and 2202 W/m{sup 2} which is in the wind class range of 7 and 8. The maximum extractable power density at 100 m varied between 1417 W/m{sup 2} and 1757 W/m{sup 2}. Values of Weibull parameters k (dimensionless) and c (m/s) ranged between 2.5-3.05 and 11.86-12.97 respectively. Wind Rose analysis revealed no marked variation in wind direction and frequency throughout the year (mean direction between 150 and 160 degrees with highest standard deviation of 33.5 degrees). From the analysis, the site was found suitable for grid connected power generation and also for other stand-alone generators that can be used for water pumping and battery charging. (author)

  18. EnviroAtlas - Annual average potential wind energy resource by 12-digit HUC for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the annual average potential wind energy resource in kilowatt hours per square kilometer per day for each 12-digit Hydrologic Unit...

  19. New perspectives on the soil erosion-soil quality relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennock, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    The redistribution of soil has a profound impact on its quality (defined as its ability to function within its ecosystem and within adjacent ecosystems) and ultimately on its productivity for crop growth. The application of 137 Cs-redistribution techniques to the study of erosion has yielded major new insights into the soil erosion-soil quality relationship. In highly mechanized agricultural systems, tillage erosion can be the dominant cause of soil redistribution; in other agroecosystems, wind and water erosion dominate. Each causal factor results in characteristic landscape-scale patterns of redistribution. In landscapes dominated by tillage redistribution, highest losses occur in shoulder positions (those with convex downslope curvatures); in water-erosion-dominated landscapes, highest losses occur where slope gradient and length are at a maximum. Major impacts occur through the loss of organically-enriched surface material and through the incorporation of possibly yield-limiting subsoils into the rooting zone of the soil column. The potential impact of surface soil losses and concomitant subsoil incorporation on productivity may be assessed by examining the pedological nature of the affected soils and their position in the landscape. The development of sound conservation policies requires that the soil erosion-quality relationship be rigorously examined in the full range of pedogenic environments, and future applications of the 137 Cs technique hold considerable promise for providing this comprehensive global database. (author)

  20. Environmental impacts of micro-wind turbines and their potential to contribute to UK climate change targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greening, Benjamin; Azapagic, Adisa

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates the life cycle environmental sustainability of micro-wind turbines in the UK in comparison with grid electricity and solar PV (photovoltaics). The results suggests that per kWh electricity generated, the majority of environmental impacts from the wind turbines are lower than from grid electricity, ranging from 26% lower terrestrial toxicity to 92% lower global warming. However, depletion of abiotic elements, fresh-water and human toxicities are 82%, 74% and 53% higher than for grid electricity, respectively. The wind turbines are more environmentally sustainable than solar PV for seven out of 11 impacts, ranging from 7.5% lower eutrophication to 85% lower ozone layer depletion. However, depletion of fossil resources, fresh-water, human and terrestrial toxicities are higher for the wind turbine than for the PV, ranging from 5% for the former to 87% for the latter. UK-wide deployment of micro-wind turbines would save between 0.6 and 1% of GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions on 2009 levels. Therefore, the potential of micro-wind turbines to contribute towards UK's climate change targets is limited. - Highlights: • Life cycle environmental impacts of micro-wind turbines estimated for UK conditions. • The majority impacts are lower for micro-wind turbines than for grid electricity and solar PV. • Some impacts from micro-wind are higher, notably fresh-water and human toxicity. • At the national level, wind turbines would save only 0.6% GHG emissions on 2009 levels. • The potential of micro-wind turbines to contribute to UK's climate change targets is limited

  1. Compressor Impeller Erosion Resistant Surface Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, Michael

    2000-01-01

    ...). Coatings based on tungsten carbide tantalum carbide. titanium carbide all with a cobalt matrix were evaluated for high velocity particle erosion in conventional wear test studies as well as wind tunnel testing...

  2. A study of wind energy potential: remedy for fluctuation of electric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result is good enough, since the minimum wind speed required to turn the turbine of a wind machine is 3.0ms-1. Comparative analysis using the Wind Speed Scale at 10m heights shows that this value of wind speed can be categorized as moderate especially when compared with other towns in Nigeria. This implies ...

  3. Remote sensing and GIS based study of potential erosion and degradation areas on the island Fogo (Cape Verde Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olehowski, Claas; Naumann, Simone; Siegmund, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    The Island of Fogo (Cape Verde) is affected by processes of erosion and degradation, caused mainly by a high population growth and global change. With its small scaled climatic, floristic and geo-ecological differentiation, the island of Fogo is an optimal research space for understanding semiarid island ecosystems in the marginal tropics and their behaviour to erosion and degradation processes. For that reason, a change detection analysis over the past two decades is generated, showing the level and direction of land cover and land use change. Two satellite images from 1984 and 2007 will classified by a Maximum Likelihood approach. In a further step, an image of 1974 will be also integrated in this change detection analysis, enlarging the study over the last three decades.

  4. Physical basis and potential estimation techniques for soil erosion parameters in the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, W.P.; Simon, Andrew

    1984-01-01

    Simulation of upland-soil erosion by the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System currently requires the user to estimate two rainfall detachment parameters and three hydraulic detachmment paramenters. One rainfall detachment parameter can be estimated from rainfall simulator tests. A reformulation of the rainfall detachment equation allows the second parameter to be computed directly. The three hydraulic detachment parameters consist of one exponent and two coefficients. The initial value of the exponent is generally set equal to 1.5. The two coefficients are functions of the soil 's resistance to erosion and one of the two also accounts for sediment delivery processes not simulated in the model. Initial estimates of these parameters can be derived from other modeling studies or from published empirical relations. (USGS)

  5. Potential of neuro-fuzzy methodology to estimate noise level of wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Vlastimir; Petković, Dalibor; Por, Lip Yee; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Zamani, Mazdak; Ćojbašić, Žarko; Motamedi, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines noise effect became large problem because of increasing of wind farms numbers since renewable energy becomes the most influential energy sources. However, wind turbine noise generation and propagation is not understandable in all aspects. Mechanical noise of wind turbines can be ignored since aerodynamic noise of wind turbine blades is the main source of the noise generation. Numerical simulations of the noise effects of the wind turbine can be very challenging task. Therefore in this article soft computing method is used to evaluate noise level of wind turbines. The main goal of the study is to estimate wind turbine noise in regard of wind speed at different heights and for different sound frequency. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used to estimate the wind turbine noise levels.

  6. Potential pathogenetic role of Th17, Th0, and Th2 cells in erosive and reticular oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinni, M-P; Lombardelli, L; Logiodice, F; Tesi, D; Kullolli, O; Biagiotti, R; Giudizi, Mg; Romagnani, S; Maggi, E; Ficarra, G

    2014-03-01

    The role of Th17 cells and associated cytokines was investigated in oral lichen planus. 14 consecutive patients with oral lichen planus were investigated. For biological studies, tissues were taken from reticular or erosive lesions and from normal oral mucosa (controls) of the same patient. mRNA expression for IL-17F, IL-17A, MCP-1, IL-13, IL-2, IL-10, IL-1β, RANTES, IL-4, IL-12B, IL-8, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-18, TGF-β1, IL-23R, IL-7, IL-15, IL-6, MIG, IP-10, LTB, VEGF, IL-5, IL-27, IL-23A, GAPDH, PPIB, Foxp3, GATA3, and RORC was measured using the QuantiGene 2.0. Results showed that Th17-type and Th0-type molecules' mRNAs, when compared with results obtained from tissue controls, were increased in biopsies of erosive lesions, whereas Th2-type molecules' mRNAs were increased in reticular lesions. When the CD4+ T-cell clones, derived from oral lichen planus tissues and tissue controls, were analyzed, a higher prevalence of Th17 (confirmed by an increased CD161 expression) and Th0 CD4+ T clones was found in erosive lesions, whereas a prevalence of Th2 clones was observed in reticular lesions. Our data suggest that Th17, Th0, and Th2 cells, respectively, may have a role in the pathogenesis of erosive and reticular oral lichen planus. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Potential of the space-borne Doppler wind lidar measurements in a limited-area model for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šavli, Matic; Žagar, Nedjeljka

    2017-04-01

    Mesoscale models for numerical weather prediction (NWP) in Europe have reached the horizontal resolution close to 1 km. A large resolution increase in the last decade has not been accompanied by a sufficient increase in a number of observations to initialize the models. In particular, there is a large need for the direct wind observations as well as for humidity data in order to improve mesoscale analyses. The ADM-Aeolus mission of the European Space Agency, scheduled for launch in 2017, will contribute the global wind profiles from the Doppler wind lidar measurements of the horizontal line-of-sight (HLOS) winds. A number of studies addressed the potential impact of the ADM-Aeolus wind profiles in the global ECMWF model and showed significant benefits of the new data in the tropics where the analysis uncertainties are currently largest. Our study is the first effort to evaluate the potential of the ADM-Aeolus HLOS wind profiles in a limited-area NWP model for Europe. We present a special observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework involving the limited-area NWP Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation system nested into the 50-member ensemble prediction system of ECMWF. The results are presented from a number of OSSE experiments that compare the information content of the HLOS winds with the two wind components and temperature observations with respect to dynamics and the flow-dependent background-error covariances. The results show that the ADM-Aeolus HLOS winds are on average more beneficial for the assimilation than any of the two components. We demonstrate how the application of the HLOS wind profiles in the ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation can improve the analysis of the baroclinic development in the northern Atlantic that leads to severe weather events over Europe.

  8. Comparison of wind tunnel and field experiments to measure potential deposition of fenpropimorph following volatilisation from treated crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassink, Jan; Platz, Klaus; Stadler, Reinhold; Zangmeister, Werner; Fent, Gunnar; Möndel, Martin; Kubiak, Roland

    2007-02-01

    The potential for short-range transport via air, i.e. volatilisation from the area of application and subsequent deposition on adjacent non-target areas, was investigated for the fungicide fenpropimorph in a wind tunnel system and under outdoor conditions in a higher-tier field study. Fenpropimorph 750 g L(-1) EC was applied post-emergence to cereal along with a reference standard lindane EC. Stainless steel containers of water were placed at different distances downwind of the application area to trap volatile residues during a study period of 24 h following application. Meteorological conditions in the wind tunnel as well as on the field were constantly monitored during the study period. The wind tunnel system was a partly standardised system on a semi-field scale, i.e. wind direction and wind speed (2 m s(-1)) were constant, but temperature and humidity varied according to the conditions outside. In the field experiment, the average wind speed over the 24 h study period was 3 m s(-1) and no rainfall occurred. Three different measuring lines were installed on the non-target area beside the treated field to cover potential variations in the wind direction. However, no significant differences were observed since the wind direction was generally constant. Fenpropimorph was detected in minor amounts of 0.01-0.05% of the applied material in the wind tunnel experiment. Even at a distance of 1 m beside the treated field, no significant deposition occurred (0.04% of applied material after 24 h). In the field, less than 0.1% of the applied fenpropimorph was detected at 0 m directly beside the treated field. At 5 m distance the deposition values were below 0.04%, and at 20 m distance about 0.01%. In general, the amounts of deposited fenpropimorph detected in the partly standardised wind tunnel system and the higher-tier field study were in good agreement.

  9. The influence of cover crops and tillage on actual and potential soil erosion in an olive grove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Blanca; Bienes, Ramón; García-Díaz, Andrés; Panagopoulos, Thomas; José Marqués, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The study was carried out in an olive grove in central Spain (South of Madrid; Tagus River Basin). In this semi-arid zone, the annual mean temperature is 13.8 ºC and the annual precipitation is 395 mm. Olive groves are planted in an erosion prone area due to steep slopes up to 15%. Soil is classified as Typic Haploxerept with clay loam texture. The land studied was formerly a vineyard, but it was replaced by the studied olive grove in 2004. It covers approximately 3 ha and olive trees are planted every 6 x 7 metres. They were usually managed by tillage to decrease weed competition. This conventional practice results in a wide surface of bare soil prone to erosion processes. In the long term soil degradation may lead to increase the desertification risk in the area. Storms have important consequences in this shallow and vulnerable soil, as more than 90 Mg ha-1 have been measured after one day with 40 mm of rainfall. In order to avoid this situation, cover crops between the olive trees were planted three years ago: sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and purple false brome (Brachypodium distachyon), and they were compared with annual spontaneous vegetation after a minimum tillage treatment (ASV). The results regarding erosion control were positive. We observed (Oct. 2012/Sept. 2013) annual soil loss up to 11 Mg ha-1 in ASV, but this figure was reduced in the sown covers, being 8 Mg ha-1 in sainfoin treatment, 3,7 Mg ha-1 in barley treatment, and only 1,5 Mg ha-1 in false brome treatment. Those results are used to predict the risk of erosion in long term. Moreover, soil organic carbon (SOC) increased with treatments, this is significant as it reduces soil erodibility. The increases were found both in topsoil (up to 5 cm) and more in depth, in the root zone (from 5 to 10 cm depth). From higher to lower SOC values we found the false brome (1.05%), barley (0.92%), ASV (0.79%) and sainfoin (0.71%) regarding topsoil. In the root zone (5-10 cm depth

  10. Evaluation of wind potential for an optimum choice of wind turbine generator on the sites of Lomé, Accra, and Cotonou located in the gulf of Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akim Adekunlé SALAMI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the characterization and assessment of wind energy potential in annual and monthly levels of the sites of Lomé, Accra and Cotonou located in the Gulf of Guinea, and the optimal characteristics of wind turbines to be installed on these sites. Studies of characterization and the wind potential of these sites from the wind speed data collected over a period of thirteen years at a height of 10 meters above the ground, show an annual average speed of 3.52 m/s for Lomé, 3.99 m/s for Cotonou and 4.16 m/s for Accra. These studies also showed that a monthly average speed exceeding 4 m/s was observed on the sites of Cotonou and Accra during the months of February, March, April, July, August and September and during the months of July, August and September on the site of Lomé. After a series of simulation conducted using the software named PotEol that we have developed in Scilab, we have retained that the wind turbines rated speeds of ~8 to 9 m/s at the sites of Lomé and Cotonou and ~ 9 to 10 m/s on the site of Accra would be the most appropriate speeds for optimal exploitation of electric energy from wind farms at a height of 50 m above the ground. Article History: Received May 26th 2016; Received in revised form August 24th 2016; Accepted August 30th 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Salami, A.A., Ajavon, A.S.A , Kodjo, M.K. and Bédja, K. (2016 Evaluation of Wind Potential for an Optimum Choice of Wind Turbine Generator on the Sites of Lomé, Accra, and Cotonou Located in the Gulf of Guinea. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(3, 211-223. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.3.211-223

  11. Assessing the vegetation canopy influences on wind flow using wind ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effectiveness of vegetation in reducing wind ... Wind erosion; roughness length; shear velocity ratio; shear stress ratio; roughness density; wind tunnel. J. Earth .... flow direction induced by its kinematic viscosity. An increase in shear stress causes a proportional increase in the height-dependent change in wind velocity.

  12. Evaluation of the RWEQ and SWEEP in simulating soil and PM10 loss from a portable wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion threatens sustainable agriculture and environmental quality in the Columbia Plateau region of the US Pacific Northwest. Wind erosion models such as Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) and the Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ) have been developed as tools for identifying practices t...

  13. A spatially explicit assessment of the wind energy potential in response to an increased distance between wind turbines and settlements in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masurowski, Frank; Drechsler, Martin; Frank, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Setting a minimum distance between wind turbines and settlements is an important policy to mitigate the conflict between renewable energy production and the well-being of residents. We present a novel approach to assess the impact of varying minimum distances on the wind energy potential of a region, state or country. We show that this impact can be predicted from the spatial structure of the settlements. Applying this approach to Germany, we identify those regions where the energy potential very sensitively reacts to a change in the minimum distance. In relative terms the reduction of the energy potential is maximal in the north-west and the south-east of Germany. In absolute terms it is maximal in the north. This information helps deciding in which regions the minimum distance may be increased without large losses in the energy potential. - Highlights: • Distance between wind turbines and settlements is an important policy criterion. • We predict the impact of varying the distance on the regional energy potential. • The impact can be explained from the settlement structure. • The impact varies by region and German Federal state.

  14. Development of county-level wind-erosion and unpaved-road alkaline emission estimates for the 1985 NAPAP (National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program) emissions inventory. Documentation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The report details the methods used and the result of the conversion of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's (NAPAP's) alkaline-material emissions information for wind erosion, unpaved roads, and dust devils from their current spatial resolution to county-level resolution. Additionally, methods for converting the county-level data to NAPAP's Modelers Inventory grid system are proposed. NAPAP is developing a nationwide emissions inventory of substances contributing to acid precipitation. Also of interest are substances that can neutralize acids in precipitation. Information from NAPAP's natural sources task group on the emissions of alkaline materials (calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium) is available, but the spatial resolution is not currently in a form that lends itself to use by either the National Emissions Data System or modelers using the NAPAP Resolved Modelers Inventory grid system.

  15. The erosive potential of commercially available mouthrinses on enamel as measured by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, I A; Edgar, W M; Higham, S M

    2003-07-01

    Longitudinal in vitro. Previously extracted, caries free, human premolars were selected and prepared by gentle pumicing and coating in an acid-resistant nail-varnish save for an exposed enamel window on the buccal surface. Each was assigned to one of eight groups (six per group, 10 in positive control); positive control (citric acid, pH 2.7, F(-) 0 ppm), negative control (pH 7.0, F(-) 0 ppm) Listerine (pH 3.87, F(-) 0.021 ppm), Tesco Value (pH 6.05, F(-) 289.00 ppm), Tesco Total Care (pH 6.20, F(-) 313.84 ppm), Sainsbury's (pH 6.15, F(-) 365.75 ppm), Sensodyne (pH 6.12, F(-) 285.30 ppm) and Corsodyl (pH 5.65, F(-) 0 ppm). The titratable acid values (TAV) for each rinse were established using volume (ml) of 0.1 M NaOH to achieve pH 7. Fluoride values were obtained by ion selective electrode. The solutions were kept at 37 degrees C and gently agitated. Teeth were removed at hourly intervals for 15 h, air-dried and subjected to Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) examination by a blinded examiner and DeltaQ values recorded. At the conclusion of the study each of the positive control teeth and one from each other group were sectioned through the eroded lesion, ground and polished to 100 micrometers and subjected to transverse microradiography and DeltaZ recorded for validation. TAVs were: Listerine 2.45 L > Sainsbury's 0.35 ml >Tesco Total Care 0.14 ml > Tesco Value 0.08 ml > Corsodyl 0.10 ml >Sensodyne 0.9 ml. DeltaQ increased over time for the positive control, (0 h 0.2, 10 h 95.2, 15 h 152.3). Negative controls remained stable. The increase in DeltaQ for each rinse after 15 h was Listerine (9.3(+/-7.2)), Corsodyl (1.5(+/-1.2)), Tesco Value (1.8(+/-1.2)), Tesco Total Care (1.4(+/-1.1)), Sainsbury's (3.4(+/-2.2)), Sensodyne (0.9(+/-1.6)). TMR confirmed the presence/absence of erosive lesions. QLF effectively monitored erosion in the positive controls and lack of erosion in the NC. Only one mouthrinse (Listerine) caused any erosion compared to the negative

  16. The variability of runoff and soil erosion in the Brazilian Cerrado biome due to the potential land use and climate changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre Ayach Anache, Jamil; Wendland, Edson; Malacarne Pinheiro Rosalem, Lívia; Srivastava, Anurag; Flanagan, Dennis

    2017-04-01

    Changes in land use and climate can influence runoff and soil loss, threatening soil and water conservation in the Cerrado biome in Brazil. Due to the lack of long term observed data for runoff and soil erosion in Brazil, the adoption of a process-based model was necessary, representing the variability of both variables in a continuous simulation approach. Thus, we aimed to calibrate WEPP (Water Erosion Prediction Project) model for different land uses (undisturbed Cerrado, fallow, pasture, and sugarcane) under subtropical conditions inside the Cerrado biome; predict runoff and soil erosion for these different land uses; and simulate runoff and soil erosion considering climate change scenarios. We performed the model calibration using a 4-year dataset of observed runoff and soil loss in four different land uses (undisturbed Cerrado, fallow, pasture, and sugarcane). The WEPP model components (climate, topography, soil, and management) were calibrated according to field data. However, soil and management were optimized according to each land use using a parameter estimation tool. The observations were conducted between 2012 and 2015 in experimental plots (5 m width, 20 m length, 9% slope gradient, 3 replicates per treatment). The simulations were done using the calibrated WEPP model components, but changing the 4-year observed climate file by a 100-year dataset created with CLIGEN (weather generator) based on regional climate statistics. Afterwards, using MarkSim DSSAT Weather File Generator, runoff and soil loss were simulated using future climate scenarios for 2030, 2060, and 2090. To analyze the data, we used non-parametric statistics as data do not follow normal distribution. The results show that WEPP model had an acceptable performance for the considered conditions. In addition, both land use and climate can influence on runoff and soil loss rates. Potential climate changes which consider the increase of rainfall intensities and depths in the studied region may

  17. Wind-generated Electricity in China: Decreasing Potential, Inter-annual Variability and Association with Changing Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Peter; Chen, Xinyu; McElroy, Michael B

    2017-11-24

    China hosts the world's largest market for wind-generated electricity. The financial return and carbon reduction benefits from wind power are sensitive to changing wind resources. Wind data derived from an assimilated meteorological database are used here to estimate what the wind generated electricity in China would have been on an hourly basis over the period 1979 to 2015 at a geographical resolution of approximately 50 km × 50 km. The analysis indicates a secular decrease in generating potential over this interval, with the largest declines observed for western Inner Mongolia (15 ± 7%) and the northern part of Gansu (17 ± 8%), two leading wind investment areas. The decrease is associated with long-term warming in the vicinity of the Siberian High (SH), correlated also with the observed secular increase in global average surface temperatures. The long-term trend is modulated by variability relating to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the Arctic Oscillation (AO). A linear regression model incorporating indices for the PDO and AO, as well as the declining trend, can account for the interannual variability of wind power, suggesting that advances in long-term forecasting could be exploited to markedly improve management of future energy systems.

  18. Potential of onshore wind energy. Study to the determination of the nationwide potential of space and potential of performance of the wind energy utilization at land; Potenzial der Windenergie an Land. Studie zur Ermittlung des bundesweiten Flaechen- und Leistungspotenzials der Windenergienutzung an Land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetkehus, Insa; Salecker, Hanno; Adlunger, Kirsten

    2013-06-15

    Within the study under consideration, the potential of onshore wind energy was determined. The principally available potential of space for the wind turbine technology is 49,400 km{sup 2}. This corresponds to 13.8 % of the land area of the Federal Republic of Germany. This also corresponds to a potential of about 1,190 gigawatts of installed power with a yield of 2,900 TWh per year. The realizable potential for wind energy on land is significantly lower. The future expansion of the onshore wind energy requires an exploration of low-conflict and cost-effective locations.

  19. Mechanics of aeolian processes: Soil erosion and dust production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabadi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aeolian (wind) processes occur as a result of atmosphere/land-surface system interactions. A thorough understanding of these processes and their physical/mechanical characterization on a global scale is essential to monitoring global change and, hence, is imperative to the fundamental goal of the Earth observing system (Eos) program. Soil erosion and dust production by wind are of consequence mainly in arid and semi arid regions which cover 36 percent of the Earth's land surface. Some recent models of dust production due to wind erosion of agricultural soils and the mechanics of wind erosion in deserts are reviewed and the difficulties of modeling the aeolian transport are discussed.

  20. Erosive potential of commonly used beverages, medicated syrup, and their effects on dental enamel with and without restoration: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Krishna; Bhaskar, Vijay; Ganesh, Mahadevan; Venkataraghavan, Karthik; Choudhary, Prashant; Shah, Shalin; Krishnan, Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates erosive potential of commonly used beverages, medicated syrup, and their effects on dental enamel with and without restoration in vitro. Test medias used in this study included carbonated beverage, noncarbonated beverage, high-energy sports drink medicated cough syrup, distilled water as the control. A total of 110 previously extracted human premolar teeth were selected for the study. Teeth were randomly divided into two groups. Test specimens were randomly distributed to five beverages groups and comprised 12 specimens per group. Surface roughness (profilometer) readings were performed at baseline and again, following immersion for 14 days (24 h/day). Microleakage was evaluated. The results obtained were analyzed for statistical significance using SPSS-PC package using the multiple factor ANOVA at a significance level of P syrup (P = 0.000), and distilled water (P = 0.000). High-energy sports drink showed highest surface roughness value and microleakage score among all test media and thus greater erosive potential to enamel while medicated syrup showed least surface roughness value and microleakage among all test media.

  1. To Analyse the Erosive Potential of Commercially Available Drinks on Dental Enamel and Various Tooth Coloured Restorative Materials – An In-vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Ritu; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sandhu, Sanam; Sharma, Sunila; Kaur, Rajwinder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the enormous change in life style pattern of a common man through the past few decades, there has been proportional variation in the amount and frequency of consumption of drinks. An increased consumption of these drinks will concurrently increase enamel surface roughness by demineralization, resulting in hypersensitivity and elevated caries risk. Aim The present study was designed to evaluate the erosive potential of commercially available drinks on tooth enamel and various tooth coloured restorative materials. Materials and Methods Extracted human teeth were taken and divided into four groups i.e. tooth enamel, glass ionomer cement, composite and compomer. Four commercially available drinks were chosen these were Coca -Cola, Nimbooz, Frooti and Yakult. The pH of each drink was measured. Each group was immersed in various experimental drinks for a period of 14 days. The erosive potential of each drink was measured by calculating the change in average surface roughness of these groups after the immersion protocol in various drinks. The data analysis was done by One Way Anova, Post-Hoc Bonferroni, and paired t –test. Results Group II-GIC showed highest values for mean of change in average surface roughness and the values were statistically significant (pdrinks. PMID:27437343

  2. Erosion Potential of a Burn Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Interim Summary of One Year of Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etyemezian, V.; Shafer, D.; Miller, J.; Kavouras, I.; Campbell, S.; DuBois, D.; King, J.; Nikolich, G.; Zitzer, S.

    2010-05-18

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in deserts in the Southwest U.S. is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. This increase in fires has implications for management of Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site office (NNSA/NSO) has responsibility. A series of studies has been initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn over to understand technical and perceived risk they might pose to site workers and public receptors in communities around the NTS, TTR, and NTTR; and to develop recommendations for stabilization and restoration after a fire. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob fire, a lightning-caused fire approximately 12 kilometers north of Hiko, Nevada, that burned approximately 200 ha between August 6-8, 2008, and is representative of a transition zone on the NTS between the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, where the largest number of Soil Sub-Project CAUs/CASs are located.

  3. River delta shoreline reworking and erosion in the Mediterranean and Black Seas: the potential roles of fluvial sediment starvation and other factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manon Besset

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean basin (including the Black Sea is characterized by a plethora of deltas that have developed in a wave-influenced setting. Many of these deltas are sourced in sediments by river catchments that have been variably dammed. The vulnerability status of a selection of ten deltas subject to different levels of reduction in fluvial sediment supply following damming was analysed by quantifying changes in delta protrusion area and protrusion angle over the last 30 years. The rationale for choosing these two metrics, which do not require tricky calculations of longshore bedload transport volumes and river ‘influence’, is that as sediment supply wanes, increasing relative efficiency of waves leads to longshore redistribution of reworked sediments and progressive ‘flattening’ of the delta protrusion. The results show that eight of the ten deltas (Nile, Rhône, Ebro, Ceyhan, Arno, Ombrone, Moulouya, Medjerda are in erosion, whereas two (Danube, Po show stability, but the statistical relationship between change in delta protrusion area and sediment flux reduction is poor, thus suggesting that the role of dams in causing delta shoreline erosion may have been over-estimated. But this poor relationship could also be due to a long temporal lag between dam construction and bedload removal and transport to the coast downstream of dams, and, where the delta protrusion is being eroded, to bedload trapping by shoreline engineering structures and by elongating delta-flank spits. Other potential influential factors in shoreline change include subsidence, sea-level rise, storminess, exceptional river floods, and managed sediment releases downstream of dams. A longer observation period and high-resolution sediment-budget studies will be necessary to determine more definitively to which extent continued trapping of sediment behind dams will impact overall delta stability in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Mitigation of delta erosion is likely to

  4. Erhversbetinget erosion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Gjørup, Hans; Nyvad, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Baggrund – I forbindelse med dental erosion er en grundig udredning af patienten vigtig, således at årsagen til erosionernes opståen findes, og der kan iværksættes adækvat forebyggende indsats. En sådan udredning er ikke mindst vigtig, når arbejdsmiljøet mistænkes. Patienttilfælde – En 30-årig...... arbejdsskade, men ikke anerkendt, da erosioner ikke er optaget på Arbejdsskadestyrelsens liste over erhvervssygdomme. En systematisk registrering af lignende tilfælde kunne imidlertid på sigt ændre retspraksis for fremtidige patienter med arbejdsbetinget erosion....

  5. Climate change impacts on the power generation potential of a European mid-century wind farms scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, Isabelle; Vautard, Robert; Noël, Thomas; Jerez, Sonia; Thais, Françoise; Van Meijgaard, Erik; Prein, Andreas; Déqué, Michel; Kotlarski, Sven; Maule, Cathrine Fox; Nikulin, Grigory; Teichmann, Claas

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy resource is subject to changes in climate. To investigate the impacts of climate change on future European wind power generation potential, we analyze a multi-model ensemble of the most recent EURO-CORDEX regional climate simulations at the 12 km grid resolution. We developed a mid-century wind power plant scenario to focus the impact assessment on relevant locations for future wind power industry. We found that, under two greenhouse gas concentration scenarios, changes in the annual energy yield of the future European wind farms fleet as a whole will remain within ±5% across the 21st century. At country to local scales, wind farm yields will undergo changes up to 15% in magnitude, according to the large majority of models, but smaller than 5% in magnitude for most regions and models. The southern fleets such as the Iberian and Italian fleets are likely to be the most affected. With regard to variability, changes are essentially small or poorly significant from subdaily to interannual time scales. (letter)

  6. Modeling erosion from forest roads with WEPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. McFero Grace

    2007-01-01

    Forest roads can be major sources of soil erosion from forest watersheds. Sediments from forest roads are a concern due to their potential delivery to stream systems resulting in degradation of water quality. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) was used to predict erosion from forest road components under different management practices. WEPP estimates are...

  7. Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, James M.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-07-15

    Proposed development of domestic energy resources, including wind energy, is expected to impact the sagebrush steppe ecosystem in the western United States. The greater sage-grouse relies on habitats within this ecosystem for survival, yet very little is known about how wind energy development may affect sage-grouse. The purpose of this report is to inform organizations of the impacts wind energy development could have on greater sage-grouse populations and identify information needed to fill gaps in knowledge.

  8. POTENSI HUTAN TANAMAN MAHONI (Swietenia macrophylla King DALAM PENGENDALIAN LIMPASAN DAN EROSI (Potential of Swietenia macrophylla King Forest Plantation for Run Off and Erosion Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashudi Mashudi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian dilaksanakan pada hutan tanaman mahoni (Swietenia macrophylla King. umur 2, 5 dan 9 tahun yang berlokasi di Resort Polisi Hutan (RPH Getas, Bagian Kesatuan Pemangkuan Hutan (BKPH Monggot, Kesatuan Pemangkuan Hutan (KPH Gundih, Jawa Tengah. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui kondisi komunitas vegetasi tegakan mahoni pada beberapa fase umur dan potensinya dalam pengendalian limpasan dan erosi. Masing-masing umur tanaman dibangun 2 petak ukur pengamatan limpasan dan erosi dengan ukuran 22,1 m x 4 m per petak ukur. Sebagai kontrol dibangun 2 petak ukur dengan ukuran yang sama pada lahan terbuka (tanpa tanaman. Pengamatan vegetasi juga dilakukan di dalam petak ukur pengamatan erosi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pengendalian erosi dan limpasan permukaan tegakan mahoni lebih banyak dikendalikan oleh keberadaan seresah dan tumbuhan bawah. Tingkat erosi yang terjadi pada tegakan mahoni umur 2, 5 dan 9 tahun menurun, yaitu masing-masing menjadi 49,4, 15,3 dan 8,7 % dibandingkan dengan control (lahan tanpa tanaman. Besar limpasan air permukaan pada tegakan mahoni umur 2, 5 dan 9 tahun yang dicerminkan oleh nilai koefisien erosi masing-masing sebesar 0,24 (4 % terhadap kontrol, 0,19 (24 % terhadap kontrol dan 0,14 (44 % terhadap kontrol. Kegiatan seleksi pada kegiatan pemuliaan akan menghasilkan benih unggul yang akan meningkatkan produksi kayu (biomasa dan menurunkan laju limpasan dan erosi.   ABSTRACT The research was conducted on mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King. plantations at 2, 5 and 9 years old located in RPH Getas, BKPH Monggot, KPH Gundih, Central Java. This study was carried out to determine the condition of vegetation communities of mahogany stand on several phases of age and its potential in controlling runoff and erosion. Two observation plots including runoff and erosion were set up by the size of 22.1 m x 4 m per plot. Two plots of the same size were also set up on open land (without plants as a control

  9. Verification and implementation of microburst day potential index (MDPI) and wind INDEX (WINDEX) forecasting tools at Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Mark

    1996-01-01

    This report details the research, development, utility, verification and transition on wet microburst forecasting and detection the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) did in support of ground and launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS). The unforecasted wind event on 16 August 1994 of 33.5 ms-1 (65 knots) at the Shuttle Landing Facility raised the issue of wet microburst detection and forecasting. The AMU researched and analyzed the downburst wind event and determined it was a wet microburst event. A program was developed for operational use on the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) weather system to analyze, compute and display Theta(epsilon) profiles, the microburst day potential index (MDPI), and wind index (WINDEX) maximum wind gust value. Key microburst nowcasting signatures using the WSR-88D data were highlighted. Verification of the data sets indicated that the MDPI has good potential in alerting the duty forecaster to the potential of wet microburst and the WINDEX values computed from the hourly surface data do have potential in showing a trend for the maximum gust potential. WINDEX should help in filling in the temporal hole between the MDPI on the last Cape Canaveral rawinsonde and the nowcasting radar data tools.

  10. Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

  11. Commonalities in WEPP and WEPS and efforts towards a single erosion process model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.; Flanagan, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been developing process-based erosion models to predict water erosion and wind erosion. During much of that time, the development efforts of the Water Erosion Prediction Project

  12. Technical information on the assessment of the potential impact of wind turbines on radio communication, radar and seismoacoustic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    Wind turbines can negatively impact radio, telecommunications, radar, or seismoacoustic systems when located within a certain distance. Early consultation with stakeholders is needed to ensure that installations do not interfere with existing systems. This document was prepared on behalf of the Radio Advisory Board to facilitate effective cohabitation between wind energy and existing systems through the early and effective sharing of information. Wind project proponents must develop a map showing the location of the proposed wind farm and all turbines as well as to determine potential impacts on radio, radar, or telecommunications systems in the area. Wind project proponents should then contact the applicable authority to determine if further investigation is warranted. Proponents and authorities must then undertake the necessary studies and measures to resolve the issues. This study focused on the development of a series of analytical methodologies and thresholds for identifying where and when potential inferences may occur. Negative impacts included shadowing; mirror-type reflections; and scattering. Impacts on radar systems, and seismoacoustic systems were considered. Consultation zone calculations were presented. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  13. Potential Offshore Wind Energy Areas in California: An Assessment of Locations, Technology, and Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, Walter [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beiter, Philipp [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report summarizes a study of possible offshore wind energy locations, technologies, and levelized cost of energy in the state of California between 2015 and 2030. The study was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), the federal agency responsible for regulating renewable energy development on the Outer Continental Shelf. It is based on reference wind energy areas where representative technology and performance characteristics were evaluated. These reference areas were identified as sites that were suitable to represent offshore wind cost and technology based on physical site conditions, wind resource quality, known existing site use, and proximity to necessary infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to assist energy policy decision-making by state utilities, independent system operators, state government officials and policymakers, BOEM, and its key stakeholders. The report is not intended to serve as a prescreening exercise for possible future offshore wind development.

  14. Assessment of the present and future offshore wind power potential: a case study in a target territory of the Baltic Sea near the Latvian coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizuma, Lita; Avotniece, Zanita; Rupainis, Sergejs; Teilans, Artis

    2013-01-01

    Offshore wind energy development promises to be a significant domestic renewable energy source in Latvia. The reliable prediction of present and future wind resources at offshore sites is crucial for planning and selecting the location for wind farms. The overall goal of this paper is the assessment of offshore wind power potential in a target territory of the Baltic Sea near the Latvian coast as well as the identification of a trend in the future wind energy potential for the study territory. The regional climate model CLM and High Resolution Limited Area Model (Hirlam) simulations were used to obtain the wind climatology data for the study area. The results indicated that offshore wind energy is promising for expanding the national electricity generation and will continue to be a stable resource for electricity generation in the region over the 21st century.

  15. A potential archive of Pleistocene uplift and erosion in the eastern Nete basin, Campine area, north-eastern Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerten, Koen; Leterme, Bertrand

    2013-04-01

    From a geodynamic point of view, the Campine area is situated on the crossroads between distinctive tectonic settings: the subsiding North Sea basin and Roer Valley Graben in the north, and the uplifting Brabant Massif and Ardennes in the south. In general, this has led to overall Cenozoic subsidence of the area and sedimentation of unconsolidated marine sands. However, the morphology of the present-day Nete basin, which is situated in the central and eastern part of the Campine area, is a clear example of an erosional feature and shows evidence of up to 30 m of Quaternary erosion. However, the drivers, timing and rate of landscape development in the Nete basin are poorly constrained. Here, we present and describe geological and geomorphological remnants testifying to past landscape development in the Nete basin, that will help understanding the Quaternary geodynamic evolution (uplift) of the Campine area. The Nete basin is located in northern Belgium and is drained by two small rivers, the Kleine Nete and Grote Nete, that merge into the larger Nete river several km before entering the Lower Scheldt basin. The Nete basin can clearly be identified on topographical maps as a depression, ca. 40 km x 40 km, with valley floors ranging between 10-20 m above sea level (a.s.l.). It is bounded in the north, east and south by erosion resistant geological formations at altitudes between 30 m (north) and 60 m (south). The major direction of drainage is from ENE to WSW and the basin thus opens towards the west. The start of basin development is situated after deposition of Rhine sediments (~ 1 Ma) which form the erosion resistant eastern watershed with the Meuse basin at an altitude of ~ 50 m a.s.l. on top of the Campine Plateau. GIS-based landscape analysis of the topography and the contour map of the Quaternary base confirm the observation that the lowering of the relief from the Campine Plateau down to the floodplain of the Kleine Nete and Grote Nete shows a stepwise

  16. The Major Cause of Observed Erosion Surge on the Beaches North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surges in coastal erosion north of Dar es Salaam city have been documented from 1977 to the early 1980s and around 1997/98. Analysis of the wind data shows that the documented increase in coastal erosion coincided with increased wind speeds. Extreme winds in excess of 10-11 m s-1 were experienced during ...

  17. Potential of wind turbines to elicit seizures under various meteorological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Andrew R D; Webb, Ann R; Wilkins, Arnold J

    2010-07-01

    To determine the potential risk of epileptic seizures from wind turbine shadow flicker under various meteorologic conditions. We extend a previous model to include attenuation of sunlight by the atmosphere using the libradtran radiative transfer code. Under conditions in which observers look toward the horizon with their eyes open we find that there is risk when the observer is closer than 1.2 times the total turbine height when on land, and 2.8 times the total turbine height in marine environments, the risk limited by the size of the image of the sun's disc on the retina. When looking at the ground, where the shadow of the blade is cast, observers are at risk only when at a distance turbines rotate at a rate below that at which the flicker is likely to present a risk, although there is a risk from smaller turbines that interrupt sunlight more than three times per second. For the scenarios considered, we find the risk is negligible at a distance more than about nine times the maximum height reached by the turbine blade, a distance similar to that in guidance from the United Kingdom planning authorities.

  18. Review of the reef effects of offshore wind farm structures and potential for enhancement and mitigation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-01-09

    The purpose of this report is to review the likely reef effects of offshore wind farm (OWF) structures focussing on two aspects of their physical presence: firstly, the likely reef effects on fish, shellfish and other marine biota and secondly, the potential to enhance the reef effect for commercially significant species.Turbine towers and their associated scour protection constitute surfaces readily colonised by a typical and broadly predictable assemblage of organisms, reflecting zonation patterns observed in adjacent intertidal and sub-tidal rocky shore communities. The physical impact and biological impact of OWFs will be proportional to the level (area/extent) of scour protection utilised and this will need to be assessed on a site specific basis. At sites where it is unnecessary or unworkable to exclude all fishing gears, some commercial species will probably benefit from the presence of turbine structures and their associated reefs as a result of the provision of enhanced habitat opportunities. Exploration of the potential for mussel culture appears to be one of the most straightforward economic opportunities which could be progressed within existing OWFs - although, development of appropriate technology for culture in water depths at OWFs will require some further investigation. The opportunities presented by seaweed culture in the UK have yet to be recognised and an appropriate strategic direction provided for the sector. At the present time there appears to be very little potential for fin fish culture within OWFs, as shallow water depths and current conditions are not ideal for cage culture of salmon or cod, and current market conditions and labour costs mean that culture of sea bass in UK waters could not compete favourably with Mediterranean mariculture. Evidence from a variety of sources indicates that one enhancement effect which requires further investigation, as it is potentially a valuable opportunity for restoration and management of commercially

  19. Vertical axis wind rotors: Status and potential. [energy conversion efficiency and aerodynamic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, W.

    1973-01-01

    The design and application of a vertical axis wind rotor is reported that operates as a two stage turbine wherein the wind impinging on the concave side is circulated through the center of the rotor to the back of the convex side, thus decreasing what might otherwise be a high negative pressure region. Successful applications of this wind rotor to water pumps, ship propulsion, and building ventilators are reported. Also shown is the feasibility of using the energy in ocean waves to drive the rotor. An analysis of the impact of rotor aspect ratio on rotor acceleration shows that the amount of venting between rotor vanes has a very significant effect on rotor speed for a given wind speed.

  20. INFLUENCE OF THE CHANGING LOCAL CLIMATE ON WIND POTENTIALS OF MOUNT KOPAONIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Živković

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining all acceptable locations is one of the main tasks for siting wind turbines. The economic factors are usually very limiting. Very thorough analyses are needed in order to ensure the project finalization. Nevertheless, even after all the steps are made, some problems may occur. One of them is the real status of the winds in the so-called climatology period. This paper focuses on the influences of the changing winds after the preliminary estimations are done. The estimations are obtained using the WAsP simulation software. The results are compared in terms of quality and quantity of the wind data and capacity factor. Finally, an economic analysis is done.

  1. Potential of MgB2 superconductors in direct drive generators for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Liu, Dong; Magnusson, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Topologies of superconducting direct drive wind turbine generators are based on a combination of superconducting wires wound into field coils, copper armature windings, steel laminates to shape the magnetic flux density and finally structural materials as support. But what is the most optimal......-Pin concept nacelle. A series of topologies are investigate by adding more iron components to the generator, such as rotor back iron, field winding pole, magnetic teeth and armature back iron. This method is used to investigate 6 topologies and to determine the optimal cost of the different topologies...... by using the current cost of 4 €/m for the MgB2 wire from Columbus Superconductors and also a possible future cost of 1 €/m if a superconducting offshore wind power capacity of 10 GW has been introduced by 2030 as suggested in a roadmap. The obtained topologies are compared to what is expected from...

  2. Offshore wind energy in Mediterranean and other european seas: Technology and potential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudiosi, G.

    1997-01-01

    In the last six years (1990-1996) the world wide capacity of grid connected offshore wind plants, at the prototypical stage, has reached 12 MW at energy costs some what higher than fifty per cent of similar on shore plants. Additional offshore installations are close to the construction and proposed for some hundreds MW in north european seas. The technology of the offshore wind turbines is evolving parallely to that of the onshore ones

  3. Decadal predictability of wind energy potentials over Germany in the Earth System Model of the Max-Planck-Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moemken, Julia; Reyers, Mark; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2015-04-01

    Regional climate predictions on timescales from one year to one decade are gaining importance since this time frame falls within the planning horizon of politics, economy, and society. In this context, decadal predictions are of particular interest for the development of renewable energies such as wind energy. The present study examines the decadal predictability of wind energy potentials in the framework of the ongoing MiKlip consortium (www.fona-miklip.de). This consortium aims to develop a model system based on the Max-Planck-Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM), that can provide skillful decadal predictions on regional and global scales. Three generations of the decadal prediction system of the MPI-ESM are analysed here with respect to wind energy potentials on the regional and local scale. Ensembles of uninitialized historical and yearly initialized hindcast experiments are used to assess the forecast skill for wind energy output (Eout) over Central Europe, with special focus given to Germany. With this aim, a statistical-dynamical downscaling (SDD) approach is used for the regionalisation of the global datasets. All three MPI-ESM ensemble generations, which are based on different hindcast initialisations, show some forecast skill for wind energy potentials on yearly and multi-yearly time scales over Germany, Poland, Czech Republic and Benelux. In general, the predictive skill for the two latest MPI-ESM generations (baseline1 and prototype) is higher than for the first generation (baseline0). The predictability varies with different leading-time periods and declines with increasing time since initialisation. Regarding seasonal means, skill scores are lowest during winter, and persist longest for autumn in all three generations. In the summer months, differences between the three generations are more pronounced than for the other seasons. In general, forecast skill for wind energy potential is found for all three MPI-ESM ensemble generations. This skill is

  4. Renewable Energy Potential by the Application of a Building Integrated Photovoltaic and Wind Turbine System in Global Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewook Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally, maintaining equilibrium between energy supply and demand is critical in urban areas facing increasing energy consumption and high-speed economic development. As an alternative, the large-scale application of renewable energy, such as solar and wind power, might be a long-term solution in an urban context. This study assessed the overall utilization potential of a building-integrated photovoltaic and wind turbine (BIPvWt system, which can be applied to a building skin in global urban areas. The first step of this study was to reorganize the large volume of global annual climate data. The data were analyzed by computational fluid dynamic analysis and an energy simulation applicable to the BIPvWt system, which can generate a Pmax 300 Wp/module with a 15% conversion efficiency from a photovoltaic (PV system and a 0.149 power coefficient/module from wind turbines in categorized urban contexts and office buildings in specific cities; it was constructed to evaluate and optimize the ratio that can cover the current energy consumption. A diagram of the distribution of the solar and wind energy potential and design guidelines for a building skin were developed. The perspective of balancing the increasing energy consumption using renewable energy in urban areas can be visualized positively in the near future.

  5. Coupling of phenological information and simulated vegetation index time series: Limitations and potentials for the assessment and monitoring of soil erosion risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring of agricultural used soils at frequent intervals is needed to get a sufficient understanding of soil erosion processes. This is crucial to support decision making and refining soil policies especially in the context of climate change. Along with rainfall erosivity, soil coverage by vegeta...

  6. Green Water Credits – exploring its potential to enhance ecosystem services by reducing soil erosion in the Upper Tana basin, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, J.H.; Droogers, P.; Hunink, J.; Mwaniki, B.; Muchena, F.; Gicheru, P.; Bindraban, P.; Onduru, D.; Cleveringa, R.; Bouma, J.

    2014-01-01

    Food production, water availability and energy production are important ecosystem services of the Upper Tana basin (Kenya) and they decline due to upstream erosion affecting downstream water users. The effect of 11 soil conservation measures on soil erosion and the three ecosystem services was

  7. Results, advantages, cost effectivity and installation potential of cooperation wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenbach, J.; De Vries, J.

    1990-01-01

    September 1987 a cooperation of small electricity consumers installed the first cooperative wind turbine in Delft, Netherlands. At present there are 25 such cooperatives with more than 4000 members. In February 1990 14 cooperative wind turbines were in operation with a total capacity of 1,030 kWh. An extension to 23 wind turbines with a total capacity of circa 1.8 MW and a total investment of 3.8 million Dutch guilders is expected for 1990. In 1989 1.1 million kWh has been generated, and in 1990 a production of more than 2 million kWh is expected. The most important advantages of cooperative exploitation of wind turbines are the positive public opinion, extensive possibilities to install the wind turbines, the free choice of location, and cost effectivity. At the present level of investment subsidies and kWh compensations the installed capacity can increase to a maximum of 10 MW in 1995. If a national regulation for cooperative exploitation will be implemented, the kWh compensations increase to DFl 0.17-0.20 and the investment subsidies gradually decrease to zero, the total capacity can mount to 40 MW in 1995 and 125 MW in the year 2000. 1 fig., 3 tabs., 3 refs

  8. How to mitigate impacts of wind farms on bats? A review of potential conservation measures in the European context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peste, Filipa; Paula, Anabela; Silva, Luís P. da; Bernardino, Joana; Pereira, Pedro; Mascarenhas, Miguel; Costa, Hugo; Vieira, José; Bastos, Carlos; Fonseca, Carlos; Pereira, Maria João Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Wind energy is growing worldwide as a source of power generation. Bat assemblages may be negatively affected by wind farms due to the fatality of a significant number of individuals after colliding with the moving turbines or experiencing barotrauma. The implementation of wind farms should follow standard procedures to prevent such negative impacts: avoid, reduce and offset, in what is known as the mitigation hierarchy. According to this approach avoiding impacts is the priority, followed by the minimisation of the identified impacts, and finally, when residual negative impacts still remain, those must be offset or at least compensated. This paper presents a review on conservation measures for bats and presents some guidelines within the compensation scenario, focusing on negative impacts that remain after avoidance and minimisation measures. The conservation strategies presented aim at the improvement of the ecological conditions for the bat assemblage as a whole. While developed under the European context, the proposed measures are potentially applicable elsewhere, taking into consideration the specificity of each region in terms of bat assemblages present, landscape features and policy context regarding nature and biodiversity conservation and management. An analysis of potential opportunities and constraints arising from the implementation of offset/compensation programmes and gaps in the current knowledge is also considered. - Highlights: • Wind energy impacts bat populations in ways not yet fully understood. • As the use of windfarms is growing worldwide greater impacts on bat populations are also expected. • Mitigation hierarchy provides a way to reduce impacts from new wind farm facilities. • Compensation measures may be used to reduce the residual effects on bat populations. • Identify bats ecological needs and compensate according to the existing surroundings

  9. How to mitigate impacts of wind farms on bats? A review of potential conservation measures in the European context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peste, Filipa, E-mail: filipapeste@gmail.com [Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) (Portugal); Department of Biology, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Paula, Anabela [Bioinsight - Ambiente e Biodiversidade, Lda. Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, Luís P. da [Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) (Portugal); Department of Biology, University of Aveiro (Portugal); MARE and CEF, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra (Portugal); Bernardino, Joana; Pereira, Pedro [Bio3 - Estudos e Projectos em Biologia e Recursos Naturais, Lda. Almada (Portugal); Mascarenhas, Miguel [Bioinsight - Ambiente e Biodiversidade, Lda. Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Hugo [Bio3 - Estudos e Projectos em Biologia e Recur