WorldWideScience

Sample records for wimp capture process

  1. Thermalization time scales for WIMP capture by the Sun in effective theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmark, A., E-mail: axel.widmark@fysik.su.se [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-05-01

    I study the process of dark matter capture by the Sun, under the assumption of a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), in the framework of non-relativistic effective field theory. Hypothetically, WIMPs from the galactic halo can scatter against atomic nuclei in the solar interior, settle to thermal equilibrium with the solar core and annihilate to produce an observable flux of neutrinos. In particular, I examine the thermalization process using Monte-Carlo integration of WIMP trajectories. I consider WIMPs in a mass range of 10–1000 GeV and WIMP-nucleon interaction operators with different dependence on spin and transferred momentum. I find that the density profiles of captured WIMPs are in accordance with a thermal profile described by the Sun's gravitational potential and core temperature. Depending on the operator that governs the interaction, the majority of the thermalization time is spent in either the solar interior or exterior. If normalizing the WIMP-nuclei interaction strength to a specific capture rate, I find that the thermalization time differs at most by 3 orders of magnitude between operators. In most cases of interest, the thermalization time is many orders of magnitude shorter than the age of the solar system.

  2. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-10-30

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  3. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  4. Impacts of WIMP dark matter upon stellar evolution: main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Pat; Edsjo, Joakim

    2008-01-01

    The presence of large amounts of WIMP dark matter in stellar cores has been shown to have significant effects upon models of stellar evolution. We present a series of detailed grids of WIMP-influenced stellar models for main sequence stars, computed using the DarkStars code. We describe the changes in stellar structure and main sequence evolution which occur for masses ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 solar masses and metallicities from Z = 0.0003-0.02, as a function of the rate of energy injection by WIMPs. We then go on to show what rates of energy injection can be obtained using realistic orbital parameters for stars near supermassive black holes, including detailed considerations of dark matter halo velocity and density profiles. Capture and annihilation rates are strongly boosted when stars follow elliptical rather than circular orbits, causing WIMP annihilation to provide up to 100 times the energy of hydrogen fusion in stars at the Galactic centre.

  5. The WIMP Paradigm: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The WIMP paradigm is the glue that joins together much of the high energy and cosmic frontiers. It postulates that most of the matter in the Universe is made of weakly-interacting massive particles, with implications for a broad range of experiments and observations. I will review the WIMP paradigm's underlying motivations, its current status in view of rapid experimental progress on several fronts, and recent theoretical variations on the WIMP paradigm theme.

  6. Constraints on WIMP masses and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, K.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that cosmology, experiments and unitarity considerations limit the mass and coupling g' of a generic, heavy WIMP from the above as well as from the below. There are absolute lower limits of 4x10 -5 g and 6x10 -5 g for the couplings of Diracn and Majorana WIMPs, respectively. In U(1)' models cosmology implies an upper limit of about 1 TeV on the Z' and on the WIMP masses, but only in the absence of Z-Z' mixing. (orig.)

  7. WIMP-nucleus scattering in chiral effective theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Graesser, Michael L.; Ovanesyan, Grigory

    2012-10-01

    We discuss long-distance QCD corrections to the WIMP-nucleon(s) interactions in the framework of chiral effective theory. For scalar-mediated WIMP-quark interactions, we calculate all the next-to-leading-order corrections to the WIMP-nucleus elastic cross-section, including two-nucleon amplitudes and recoil-energy dependent shifts to the single-nucleon scalar form factors. As a consequence, the scalar-mediated WIMP-nucleus cross-section cannot be parameterized in terms of just two quantities, namely the neutron and proton scalar form factors at zero momentum transfer, but additional parameters appear, depending on the short-distance WIMP-quark interaction. Moreover, multiplicative factorization of the cross-section into particle, nuclear and astro-particle parts is violated. In practice, while the new effects are of the natural size expected by chiral power counting, they become very important in those regions of parameter space where the leading order WIMP-nucleus amplitude is suppressed, including the so-called "isospin-violating dark matter" regime. In these regions of parameter space we find order-of-magnitude corrections to the total scattering rates and qualitative changes to the shape of recoil spectra.

  8. Neutrinos from WIMP annihilations obtained using a full three-flavor Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blennow, Mattias; Ohlsson, Tommy; Edsjö, Joakim

    2008-01-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are one of the main candidates for making up the dark matter in the Universe. If these particles make up the dark matter, then they can be captured by the Sun or the Earth, sink to the respective cores, annihilate, and produce neutrinos. Thus, these neutrinos can be a striking dark matter signature at neutrino telescopes looking towards the Sun and/or the Earth. Here, we improve previous analyses on computing the neutrino yields from WIMP annihilations in several respects. We include neutrino oscillations in a full three-flavor framework as well as all effects from neutrino interactions on the way through the Sun (absorption, energy loss, and regeneration from tau decays). In addition, we study the effects of non-zero values of the mixing angle θ 13 as well as the normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies. Our study is performed in an event-based setting which makes these results very useful both for theoretical analyses and for building a neutrino telescope Monte Carlo code. All our results for the neutrino yields, as well as our Monte Carlo code, are publicly available. We find that the yield of muon-type neutrinos from WIMP annihilations in the Sun is enhanced or suppressed, depending on the dominant WIMP annihilation channel. This effect is due to an effective flavor mixing caused by neutrino oscillations. For WIMP annihilations inside the Earth, the distance from source to detector is too small to allow for any significant amount of oscillations at the neutrino energies relevant for neutrino telescopes

  9. Planck-scale effects on WIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiane M Boucenna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists a widely known conjecture that gravitational effects violate global symmetries. We study the effect of global-symmetry violating higher-dimension operators induced by Planck-scale physics on the properties of WIMP dark matter. Using an effective description, we show that the lifetime of the WIMP dark matter candidate can satisfy cosmological bounds under reasonable assumptions regarding the strength of the dimension-five operators. On the other hand, the indirect WIMP dark matter detection signal is significantly enhanced due to new decay channels.

  10. Understanding WIMP-baryon interactions with direct detection: a roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Peter, Annika H.G.

    2014-01-01

    We study prospects of dark-matter direct-detection searches for probing non-relativistic effective theory for WIMP-baryon scattering. We simulate a large set of noisy recoil-energy spectra for different scattering scenarios (beyond the standard momentum-independent contact interaction), for Generation 2 and futuristic experiments. We analyze these simulations and quantify the probability of successfully identifying the operator governing the scattering, if a WIMP signal is observed. We find that the success rate depends on a combination of factors: the WIMP mass, the mediator mass, the type of interaction, and the experimental energy window. For example, for a 20 GeV WIMP, Generation 2 is only likely to identify the right operator if the interaction is Coulomb-like, and is unlikely to do so in any other case. For a WIMP with a mass of 200 GeV or higher, success is almost guaranteed. We also find that, regardless of the scattering model and the WIMP parameters, a single Generation 2 experiment is unlikely to successfully discern the momentum dependence of the underlying operator on its own, but prospects improve drastically when experiments with different target materials and energy windows are analyzed jointly. Furthermore, we examine the quality of parameter estimation and degeneracies in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the effective theory. We find in particular that the resulting WIMP mass estimates can be severely biased if data are analyzed assuming the standard (momentum-independent) operator while the actual operator has momentum-dependence. Finally, we evaluate the ultimate reach of direct detection, finding that the prospects for successful operator selection prior to reaching the irreducible backgrounds are excellent, if the signal is just below the current limits, but slim if Generation 2 does not report WIMP detection

  11. Optimizing EDELWEISS detectors for low-mass WIMP searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Q.; Armengaud, E.; Augier, C.; Benoît, A.; Bergé, L.; Billard, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Camus, P.; Cazes, A.; Chapellier, M.; Charlieux, F.; de Jésus, M.; Dumoulin, L.; Eitel, K.; Foerster, N.; Gascon, J.; Giuliani, A.; Gros, M.; Hehn, L.; Jin, Y.; Juillard, A.; Kleifges, M.; Kozlov, V.; Kraus, H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Le-Sueur, H.; Maisonobe, R.; Marnieros, S.; Navick, X.-F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Pari, P.; Paul, B.; Poda, D.; Queguiner, E.; Rozov, S.; Sanglard, V.; Scorza, S.; Siebenborn, B.; Vagneron, L.; Weber, M.; Yakushev, E.; EDELWEISS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The physics potential of EDELWEISS detectors for the search of low-mass weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) is studied. Using a data-driven background model, projected exclusion limits are computed using frequentist and multivariate analysis approaches, namely, profile likelihood and boosted decision tree. Both current and achievable experimental performances are considered. The optimal strategy for detector optimization depends critically on whether the emphasis is put on WIMP masses below or above ˜5 GeV /c2 . The projected sensitivity for the next phase of the EDELWEISS-III experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory (LSM) for low-mass WIMP search is presented. By 2018 an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section of σSI=7 ×10-42 cm2 is expected for a WIMP mass in the range 2 - 5 GeV /c2 . The requirements for a future hundred-kilogram-scale experiment designed to reach the bounds imposed by the coherent scattering of solar neutrinos are also described. By improving the ionization resolution down to 50 eVe e , we show that such an experiment installed in an even lower background environment (e.g., at SNOLAB) together with an exposure of 1 000 kg .yr , should allow us to observe about 80 B 8 neutrino events after discrimination.

  12. Supersymmetry with Radiatively-Driven Naturalness: Implications for WIMP and Axion Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Jung Bae

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available By insisting on naturalness in both the electroweak and quantum chromodynamics (QCD sectors of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM, the portrait for dark matter production is seriously modified from the usual weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP miracle picture. In supersymmetry (SUSY models with radiatively-driven naturalness (radiative natural SUSY or radiative natural SUSY (RNS which include a Dine–Fischler–Srednicki–Zhitnitsky (DFSZ-like solution to the strong charge-conjugation-parity (CP and SUSY \\(\\mu\\ problems, dark matter is expected to be an admixture of both axions and higgsino-like WIMPs. The WIMP/axion abundance calculation requires simultaneous solution of a set of coupled Boltzmann equations which describe quasi-stable axinos and saxions. In most of parameter space, axions make up the dominant contribution of dark matter although regions of WIMP dominance also occur. We show the allowed range of Peccei-Quinn (PQ scale \\(f_a\\ and compare to the values expected to be probed by the axion dark matter search experiment (ADMX axion detector in the near future. We also show WIMP detection rates, which are suppressed from usual expectations, because now WIMPs comprise only a fraction of the total dark matter. Nonetheless, ton-scale noble liquid detectors should be able to probe the entirety of RNS parameter space. Indirect WIMP detection rates are less propitious since they are reduced by the square of the depleted WIMP abundance.

  13. Wimps and stellar structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouquet, A.; Salati, P.

    1988-01-01

    We present the results of an analytic approximation to compute the effects of WIMPs on stellar structures in a self-consistent way. We examine in particular the case of the Sun and of horizontal branch stars

  14. Dark Matter: Looking for WIMPs in the Galactic Halo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerib, Daniel S.

    2006-01-01

    Overwhelming observational evidence indicates that most of the matter in the Universe consists of non-baryonic dark matter. One possibility is that the dark matter is Weakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) that were produced in the early Universe. These relics could comprise the Milky Way's dark halo and provide evidence for new particle physics, such as Supersymmetry. After reviewing some of the evidence for dark matter and the WIMP hypothesis, I will describe the strategy for searching for WIMPs, along with a survey of the current status and outlook. In particular, dark matter searches have begun to explore the region of parameter space where SUSY particles could provide dark matter candidates. I will also mention some of the recent theoretical work on dark matter candidates which is being done in anticipation of the turn-on of the LHC and as part of the active R and D on the ILC. Finally, a vigorous detector development program promises significant advances in WIMP sensitivity in the coming years

  15. Generalized spin-dependent WIMP-nucleus interactions and the DAMA modulation effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun; Yoon, Jong-Hyun, E-mail: scopel@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: koreasds@naver.com, E-mail: pledge200@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    Guided by non-relativistic Effective Field Theory (EFT) we classify the most general spin-dependent interactions between a fermionic Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) and nuclei, and within this class of models we discuss the viability of an interpretation of the DAMA modulation result in terms of a signal from WIMP elastic scatterings using a halo-independent approach. We find that, although several relativistic EFT's can lead to a spin-dependent cross section, in some cases with an explicit, non-negligible dependence on the WIMP incoming velocity, three main scenarios can be singled out in the non-relativistic limit which approximately encompass them all, and that only differ by their dependence on the transferred momentum. For two of them compatibility between DAMA and other constraints is possible for a WIMP mass below 30 GeV, but only for a WIMP velocity distribution in the halo of our Galaxy which departs from a Maxwellian. This is achieved by combining a suppression of the WIMP effective coupling to neutrons (to evade constraints from xenon and germanium detectors) to an explicit quadratic or quartic dependence of the cross section on the transferred momentum (that leads to a relative enhancement of the expected rate off sodium in DAMA compared to that off fluorine in droplet detectors and bubble chambers). For larger WIMP masses the same scenarios are excluded by scatterings off iodine in COUPP.

  16. Constraints on low-mass WIMPs from the EDELWEISS-III dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armengaud, E.; De Boissière, T. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, 91191 France (France); Arnaud, Q.; Augier, C.; Benoît, A.; Billard, J.; Cazes, A.; Charlieux, F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon-UCBL, IN2P3-CNRS, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, Villeurbanne Cedex, 69622 France (France); Benoît, A.; Bres, G.; Camus, P. [Institut Néel, CNRS/UJF, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP 166, Grenoble, 38042 France (France); Bergé, L.; Broniatowski, A.; Chapellier, M.; Dumoulin, L. [CSNSM, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay, 91405 France (France); Bergmann, T. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institut für Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Postfach 3640, Karlsruhe, 76021 Germany (Germany); Blümer, J. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Gaedestr. 1, Karlsruhe, 76128 Germany (Germany); Brudanin, V.; Filosofov, D. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Eitel, K., E-mail: eric.armengaud@cea.fr [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, Karlsruhe, 76021 Germany (Germany); and others

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a search for elastic scattering from galactic dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in the 4–30 GeV/ c {sup 2} mass range. We make use of a 582 kg-day fiducial exposure from an array of 800 g Germanium bolometers equipped with a set of interleaved electrodes with full surface coverage. We searched specifically for ∼ 2.5–20 keV nuclear recoils inside the detector fiducial volume. As an illustration the number of observed events in the search for 5 (resp. 20) GeV/ c {sup 2} WIMPs are 9 (resp. 4), compared to an expected background of 6.1 (resp. 1.4). A 90% CL limit of 4.3 × 10{sup −40} cm{sup 2} (resp. 9.4 × 10{sup −44} cm{sup 2}) is set on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross-section for 5 (resp. 20) GeV/ c {sup 2} WIMPs. This result represents a 41-fold improvement with respect to the previous EDELWEISS-II low-mass WIMP search for 7 GeV/ c {sup 2} WIMPs. The derived constraint is in tension with hints of WIMP signals from some recent experiments, thus confirming results obtained with different detection techniques.

  17. First low WIMP mass results in EDELWEISS III experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorza, Silvia [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: EDELWEISS-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The EDELWEISS-III collaboration is operating an experiment for the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) dark matter in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory. It consists of twenty-four advanced high purity germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. The current EDELWEISS-III program, including improvements of the background, data-acquisition and the configuration is detailed. Sources of background along with the rejection techniques are discussed. Detector performances and a first low WIMP mass analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign are presented as well.

  18. Power corrections to the universal heavy WIMP-nucleon cross section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Hill, Richard J.; Solon, Mikhail P.; Wijangco, Alexander M.

    2018-06-01

    WIMP-nucleon scattering is analyzed at order $1/M$ in Heavy WIMP Effective Theory. The $1/M$ power corrections, where $M\\gg m_W$ is the WIMP mass, distinguish between different underlying UV models with the same universal limit and their impact on direct detection rates can be enhanced relative to naive expectations due to generic amplitude-level cancellations at leading order. The necessary one- and two-loop matching calculations onto the low-energy effective theory for WIMP interactions with Standard Model quarks and gluons are performed for the case of an electroweak SU(2) triplet WIMP, considering both the cases of elementary fermions and composite scalars. The low-velocity WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section is evaluated and compared with current experimental limits and projected future sensitivities. Our results provide the most robust prediction for electroweak triplet Majorana fermion dark matter direct detection rates; for this case, a cancellation between two sources of power corrections yields a small total $1/M$ correction, and a total cross section close to the universal limit for $M \\gtrsim {\\rm few} \\times 100\\,{\\rm GeV}$. For the SU(2) composite scalar, the $1/M$ corrections introduce dependence on underlying strong dynamics. Using a leading chiral logarithm evaluation, the total $1/M$ correction has a larger magnitude and uncertainty than in the fermionic case, with a sign that further suppresses the total cross section. These examples provide definite targets for future direct detection experiments and motivate large scale detectors capable of probing to the neutrino floor in the TeV mass regime.

  19. Power corrections to the universal heavy WIMP-nucleon cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Hill, Richard J.; Solon, Mikhail P.; Wijangco, Alexander M.

    2018-06-01

    WIMP-nucleon scattering is analyzed at order 1 / M in Heavy WIMP Effective Theory. The 1 / M power corrections, where M ≫mW is the WIMP mass, distinguish between different underlying UV models with the same universal limit and their impact on direct detection rates can be enhanced relative to naive expectations due to generic amplitude-level cancellations at leading order. The necessary one- and two-loop matching calculations onto the low-energy effective theory for WIMP interactions with Standard Model quarks and gluons are performed for the case of an electroweak SU(2) triplet WIMP, considering both the cases of elementary fermions and composite scalars. The low-velocity WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section is evaluated and compared with current experimental limits and projected future sensitivities. Our results provide the most robust prediction for electroweak triplet Majorana fermion dark matter direct detection rates; for this case, a cancellation between two sources of power corrections yields a small total 1 / M correction, and a total cross section close to the universal limit for M ≳ few × 100GeV. For the SU(2) composite scalar, the 1 / M corrections introduce dependence on underlying strong dynamics. Using a leading chiral logarithm evaluation, the total 1 / M correction has a larger magnitude and uncertainty than in the fermionic case, with a sign that further suppresses the total cross section. These examples provide definite targets for future direct detection experiments and motivate large scale detectors capable of probing to the neutrino floor in the TeV mass regime.

  20. Projected WIMP Sensitivity of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) Dark Matter Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerib, D.S.; et al.

    2018-02-16

    LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) is a next generation dark matter direct detection experiment that will operate 4850 feet underground at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota, USA. Using a two-phase xenon detector with an active mass of 7 tonnes, LZ will search primarily for low-energy interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), which are hypothesized to make up the dark matter in our galactic halo. In this paper, the projected WIMP sensitivity of LZ is presented based on the latest background estimates and simulations of the detector. For a 1000 live day run using a 5.6 tonne fiducial mass, LZ is projected to exclude at 90% confidence level spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections above $1.6 \\times 10^{-48}$ cm$^{2}$ for a 40 $\\mathrm{GeV}/c^{2}$ mass WIMP. Additionally, a $5\\sigma$ discovery potential is projected reaching cross sections below the existing and projected exclusion limits of similar experiments that are currently operating. For spin-dependent WIMP-neutron(-proton) scattering, a sensitivity of $2.7 \\times 10^{-43}$ cm$^{2}$ ($8.1 \\times 10^{-42}$ cm$^{2}$) for a 40 $\\mathrm{GeV}/c^{2}$ mass WIMP is expected. With construction well underway, LZ is on track for underground installation at SURF in 2019 and will start collecting data in 2020.

  1. To catch a WIMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, Donald.

    1995-01-01

    In the rush to account for the missing ''dark matter'' in the universe, many teams of cosmologists are setting up experiments to prove the existence of a hypothetical form of matter called weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPS. The innovative research ideas developed by these teams are described and compared briefly. (UK)

  2. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-06-24

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  3. The WIMP Forest: Indirect Detection of a Chiral Square

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Jackson, C.B.; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Tait, Tim M.P.; Vallinotto, Alberto

    2009-04-01

    The spectrum of photons arising from WIMP annihilation carries a detailed imprint of the structure of the dark sector. In particular, loop-level annihilations into a photon and another boson can in principle lead to a series of lines (a WIMP forest) at energies up to the WIMP mass. A specific model which illustrates this feature nicely is a theory of two universal extra dimensions compactified on a chiral square. Aside from the continuum emission, which is a generic prediction of most dark matter candidates, we find a 'forest' of prominent annihilation lines that, after convolution with the angular resolution of current experiments, leads to a distinctive (2-bump plus continuum) spectrum, which may be visible in the near future with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (formerly known as GLAST).

  4. Proceedings of the 4th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Axel; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas [eds.

    2008-08-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Physical foundations for WIMPs, axions, and WISPS, signals from astrophysical sources, direct searches for dark matter WIMPs, new theoretical developments, new experimental approaches. (HSI)

  5. Proceedings of the 4th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Axel; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-08-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Physical foundations for WIMPs, axions, and WISPS, signals from astrophysical sources, direct searches for dark matter WIMPs, new theoretical developments, new experimental approaches. (HSI)

  6. Accurate calculations of the WIMP halo around the Sun and prospects for its gamma-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivertsson, Sofia; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2010-01-01

    Galactic weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) may scatter off solar nuclei to orbits gravitationally bound to the Sun. Once bound, the WIMPs continue to lose energy by repeated scatters in the Sun, eventually leading to complete entrapment in the solar interior. While the density of the bound population is highest at the center of the Sun, the only observable signature of WIMP annihilations inside the Sun is neutrinos. It has been previously suggested that although the density of WIMPs just outside the Sun is lower than deep inside, gamma rays from WIMP annihilation just outside the surface of the Sun, in the so-called WIMP halo around the Sun, may be more easily detected. We here revisit this problem using detailed Monte Carlo simulations and detailed composition and structure information about the Sun to estimate the size of the gamma-ray flux. Compared to earlier simpler estimates, we find that the gamma-ray flux from WIMP annihilations in the solar WIMP halo would be negligible; no current or planned detectors would be able to detect this flux.

  7. Joint Rome Workshop "Challenges in the Dark Sector: Alternatives to the WIMP paradigm”

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Identifying what Dark Matter (DM) is, as well as its nature and properties, remains a major challenge for both theoretical and experimental astroparticle physics communities. In the past decades, WIMP DM has been the most hunted candidate, with the result that nowadays WIMPS are cornered by large amounts of experimental data from Direct Detection, Indirect Detection, and Collider Experiments. If no WIMP signal is detected in the next few years, the possibility that this very appealing theoretical idea is not what Nature has chosen will become even more compelling and will boost theoretical studies and experimental searches for non-WIMP alternatives for DM. The aim of this 3-day meeting is to convene experts on alternatives to the WIMP paradigm to stimulate informal discussions on different possibilities (dark photons, axion-like particles, Majorons, self-interacting dark sectors, just to mention a few). We plan to have only three or four talks each day, and plenty of time to discuss implications of these DM s...

  8. 6th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2010). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudis, Laura; Schumann, Marc (eds.)

    2010-11-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Axions, WIMPs, WISPs, and neutrinos in the universe, laboratory experimental searching for WISPs, astrophysical experimental searching for WISPs, direct and indirect detection of WIMPs, new ideas and developments, visions, large laboratories. (HSI)

  9. 6th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2010). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudis, Laura; Schumann, Marc

    2010-11-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Axions, WIMPs, WISPs, and neutrinos in the universe, laboratory experimental searching for WISPs, astrophysical experimental searching for WISPs, direct and indirect detection of WIMPs, new ideas and developments, visions, large laboratories. (HSI)

  10. Gravitationally induced particle production and its impact on the WIMP abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Baranov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A large set of independent astronomical observations have provided a strong evidence for nonbaryonic dark matter in the Universe. One of the most investigated candidates is an unknown long-lived Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP which was in thermal equilibrium with the primeval plasma. Here we investigate the WIMP abundance based on the relativistic kinetic treatment for gravitationally induced particle production recently proposed in the literature (Lima and Baranov, 2014 [16]. The new evolution equation is deduced and solved both numerically and through a semi-analytical approach. The predictions of the WIMP observables are discussed and compared with the ones obtained in the standard approach.

  11. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavoto, G.; Cirillo, E.N.M.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  12. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavoto, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Cirillo, E.N.M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento SBAI, Rome (Italy); Cocina, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Ferretti, J. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  13. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoto, G; Cirillo, E N M; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs ([Formula: see text] GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  14. Limits on Spin-Dependent WIMP-Nucleon Cross Section Obtained from the Complete LUX Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Chiller, A. A.; Chiller, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Dobson, J. E. Y.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Faham, C. H.; Fallon, S. R.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Gehman, V. M.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lee, C.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Reichhart, L.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Stephenson, S.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.; LUX Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present experimental constraints on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon elastic cross sections from the total 129.5 kg yr exposure acquired by the Large Underground Xenon experiment (LUX), operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota (USA). A profile likelihood ratio analysis allows 90% C.L. upper limits to be set on the WIMP-neutron (WIMP-proton) cross section of σn=1.6 ×10-41 cm2 (σp=5 ×10-40 cm2 ) at 35 GeV c-2 , almost a sixfold improvement over the previous LUX spin-dependent results. The spin-dependent WIMP-neutron limit is the most sensitive constraint to date.

  15. Boffins go underground searching for Wimps

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In a bid to identify the prime suspect for Dark Matter known as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or Wimps, British scientists have installed detectors 1100m down a salt mine at Boulby on the North Yorkshire moors (1/2 page).

  16. Simultaneous Generation of WIMP Miracle-like Densities of Baryons and Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, John

    2012-01-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Production of unstable scalars carrying baryon number at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  17. Halo-independent determination of the unmodulated WIMP signal in DAMA: the isotropic case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East #201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States); Scopel, Stefano, E-mail: paolo.gondolo@utah.edu, E-mail: scopel@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-01

    We present a halo-independent determination of the unmodulated signal corresponding to the DAMA modulation if interpreted as due to dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). First we show how a modulated signal gives information on the WIMP velocity distribution function in the Galactic rest frame from which the unmodulated signal descends. Then we describe a mathematically-sound profile likelihood analysis in which the likelihood is profiled over a continuum of nuisance parameters (namely, the WIMP velocity distribution). As a first application of the method, which is very general and valid for any class of velocity distributions, we restrict the analysis to velocity distributions that are isotropic in the Galactic frame. In this way we obtain halo-independent maximum-likelihood estimates and confidence intervals for the DAMA unmodulated signal. We find that the estimated unmodulated signal is in line with expectations for a WIMP-induced modulation and is compatible with the DAMA background+signal rate. Specifically, for the isotropic case we find that the modulated amplitude ranges between a few percent and about 25% of the unmodulated amplitude, depending on the WIMP mass.

  18. Simultaneous generation of WIMP miracle-like densities of baryons and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, John

    2011-01-01

    The observed density of dark matter is of the magnitude expected for a thermal relic weakly-interacting massive particle (WIMP). In addition, the observed baryon density is within an order of magnitude of the dark matter density. This suggests that the baryon density is physically related to a typical thermal relic WIMP dark matter density. We present a model which simultaneously generates thermal relic WIMP-like densities for both baryons and dark matter by modifying a large initial baryon asymmetry. Dark matter is due to O(100) GeV gauge singlet scalars produced in the annihilation of the O(TeV) colored scalars which are responsible for the final thermal WIMP-like baryon asymmetry. The requirement of no baryon washout implies that there are two gauge singlet scalars. The low-temperature transfer of the asymmetry to conventional baryons can be understood if the long-lived O(TeV) colored scalars have large hypercharge, |Y|>4/3. Production of such scalars at the LHC would be a clear signature of the model.

  19. Model-independent determination of the WIMP mass from direct dark matter detection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, Manuel; Shan, Chung-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are one of the leading candidates for dark matter. We develop a model-independent method for determining the mass m χ of the WIMP by using data (i.e. measured recoil energies) of direct detection experiments. Our method is independent of the as yet unknown WIMP density near the Earth, of the form of the WIMP velocity distribution, as well as of the WIMP–nucleus cross section. However, it requires positive signals from at least two detectors with different target nuclei. In a background-free environment, m χ ∼50 GeV could in principle be determined with an error of ∼35% with only 2 × 50 events; in practice, upper and lower limits on the recoil energy of signal events, imposed to reduce backgrounds, can increase the error. The method also loses precision if m χ significantly exceeds the mass of the heaviest target nucleus used

  20. Halo-independent analysis of direct detection data for light WIMPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Gondolo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We present a halo-independent analysis of direct detection data on ''light WIMPs'', i.e. weakly interacting massive particles with mass close to or below 10 GeV/c 2 . We include new results from silicon CDMS detectors (bounds and excess events), the latest CoGeNT acceptances, and recent measurements of low sodium quenching factors in NaI crystals. We focus on light WIMPs with spin-independent isospin-conserving and isospin-violating interactions with nucleons. For these dark matter candidates we find that a low quenching factor would make the DAMA modulation incompatible with a reasonable escape velocity for the dark matter halo, and that the tension among experimental data tightens in both the isospin-conserving and isospin-violating scenarios. We also find that a new although milder tension appears between the CoGeNT and DAMA annual modulations on one side and the silicon excess events on the other, in that it seems difficult to interpret them as the modulated and unmodulated aspects of the same WIMP dark matter signal

  1. Neutrino astronomy and search for WIMPs with MACRO

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, P

    2000-01-01

    Upward-going muons, induced primarily by atmospheric neutrinos, are used to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origin. No evidence has been found looking at the event direction and flux limits are obtained on candidate sources. A space-time correlation between gamma ray bursts and upward-going muons has been also investigated. Furthermore the search for a neutrino signal from the Earth and the Sun induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) has been updated. The number of events from the Sun and from the Earth is compatible with the background from atmospheric neutrinos. Therefore flux limits for different search cones have been estimated. Here we concentrate on neutralinos as WIMP candidates and limits depending on the neutralino mass are given and compared with the prediction of supersymmetric models. (11 refs).

  2. Exclusion limits on the WIMP nucleon elastic scattering cross-section from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golwala, Sunil Ramanlal [UC, Berkeley

    2000-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that a large fraction of the matter in the universe is nonluminous, nonbaryonic, and “cold” — nonrelativistic at the time matter began to dominate the energy density of the universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are an excellent candidate for nonbaryonic, cold dark matter. Minimal supersymmetry provides a natural WIMP candidate in the form of the lightest superpartner, with a typical mass Mδ ~ 100 GeV c-2 . WIMPs are expected to have collapsed into a roughly isothermal, spherical halo within which the visible portion of our galaxy resides. They would scatter off nuclei via the weak interaction, potentially allowingtheir direct detection. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) employs Ge and Si detectors to search for WIMPs via their elastic-scatteringinteractions with nuclei while discriminatingagainst interactions of background particles. The former yield nuclear recoils while the latter produce electron recoils. The ionization yield (the ratio of ionization production to recoil energy in a semiconductor) of a particle interaction differs greatly for nuclear and electron recoils. CDMS detectors measure phonon and electron-hole-pair production to determine recoil energy and ionization yield for each event and thereby discriminate nuclear recoils from electron recoils. This dissertation reports new limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic-scattering cross section that exclude unexplored parameter space above 10 GeV c-2 WIMP mass and, at > 75% CL, the entire 3σ allowed region for the WIMP signal reported by the DAMA experiment. The experimental apparatus, detector performance, and data analysis are fully described.

  3. Science plumbs new depths in hunt for Wimps

    CERN Multimedia

    Benfield, C

    2003-01-01

    Lord Sainsbury has officially opened a laboratory in the salt mine at Boulby near Whitby. The lab is searching for WIMPs and was recently awarded 3.1 millions pounds by PPARC to upgrade the facility (1 page).

  4. Improved EDELWEISS-III sensitivity for low-mass WIMPs using a profile likelihood approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehn, L. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Armengaud, E.; Boissiere, T. de; Gros, M.; Navick, X.F.; Nones, C.; Paul, B. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Arnaud, Q. [Univ Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Lyon (France); Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Augier, C.; Billard, J.; Cazes, A.; Charlieux, F.; Jesus, M. de; Gascon, J.; Juillard, A.; Queguiner, E.; Sanglard, V.; Vagneron, L. [Univ Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Lyon (France); Benoit, A.; Camus, P. [Institut Neel, CNRS/UJF, Grenoble (France); Berge, L.; Chapellier, M.; Dumoulin, L.; Giuliani, A.; Le-Sueur, H.; Marnieros, S.; Olivieri, E.; Poda, D. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Bluemer, J. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Broniatowski, A. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Eitel, K.; Kozlov, V.; Siebenborn, B. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Foerster, N.; Heuermann, G.; Scorza, S. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Jin, Y. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS, Route de Nozay, Marcoussis (France); Kefelian, C. [Univ Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Lyon (France); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kleifges, M.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Weber, M. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Kudryavtsev, V.A. [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Pari, P. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Piro, M.C. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Rozov, S.; Yakushev, E. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Schmidt, B. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-15

    We report on a dark matter search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) in the mass range m{sub χ} element of [4, 30] GeV/c{sup 2} with the EDELWEISS-III experiment. A 2D profile likelihood analysis is performed on data from eight selected detectors with the lowest energy thresholds leading to a combined fiducial exposure of 496 kg-days. External backgrounds from γ- and β-radiation, recoils from {sup 206}Pb and neutrons as well as detector intrinsic backgrounds were modelled from data outside the region of interest and constrained in the analysis. The basic data selection and most of the background models are the same as those used in a previously published analysis based on boosted decision trees (BDT) [1]. For the likelihood approach applied in the analysis presented here, a larger signal efficiency and a subtraction of the expected background lead to a higher sensitivity, especially for the lowest WIMP masses probed. No statistically significant signal was found and upper limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section can be set with a hypothesis test based on the profile likelihood test statistics. The 90 % C.L. exclusion limit set for WIMPs with m{sub χ} = 4 GeV/c{sup 2} is 1.6 x 10{sup -39} cm{sup 2}, which is an improvement of a factor of seven with respect to the BDT-based analysis. For WIMP masses above 15 GeV/c{sup 2} the exclusion limits found with both analyses are in good agreement. (orig.)

  5. Beyond WIMP: From Theory to Detection of Sub-GeV Dark Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The existence of dark matter has been well established with overwhelming evidence, but its particle identity is still unknown. For more than three decades, significant theoretical and experimental efforts have been directed towards the search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), often overlooking other possibilities. The lack of an unambiguous positive WIMP signal, at both indirect- and direct-detection experiments and at the LHC, stresses the need to expand dark matter research into additional theoretical scenarios and, more importantly, to develop new experimental capabilities that go beyond the limitations of WIMP detection. In this talk I will discuss new theoretical ideas and experimental avenues for searching for light, sub-GeV dark matter. Some emphasis will be given to direct detection experiments, where several new strategies to directly detect dark matter particles with MeV to GeV mass, far below standard direct detection capabilities, are developed.

  6. Cosmological radio emission induced by WIMP Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornengo, N.; Regis, M.; Lineros, R.; Taoso, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the radio synchrotron emission induced by WIMP dark matter annihilations and decays in extragalactic halos. We compute intensity, angular correlation, and source counts and discuss the impact on the expected signals of dark matter clustering, as well as of other astrophysical uncertainties as magnetic fields and spatial diffusion. Bounds on dark matter microscopic properties are then derived, and, depending on the specific set of assumptions, they are competitive with constraints from other indirect dark matter searches. At GHz frequencies, dark matter sources can become a significant fraction of the total number of sources with brightness below the microJansky level. We show that, at this level of fluxes (which are within the reach of the next-generation radio surveys), properties of the faint edge of differential source counts, as well as angular correlation data, can become an important probe for WIMPs

  7. Cosmological radio emission induced by WIMP Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornengo, N.; Regis, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Università di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Lineros, R.; Taoso, M., E-mail: fornengo@to.infn.it, E-mail: rlineros@ific.uv.es, E-mail: regis@to.infn.it, E-mail: mtaoso@phas.ubc.ca [IFIC, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Ed. Institutos, Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the radio synchrotron emission induced by WIMP dark matter annihilations and decays in extragalactic halos. We compute intensity, angular correlation, and source counts and discuss the impact on the expected signals of dark matter clustering, as well as of other astrophysical uncertainties as magnetic fields and spatial diffusion. Bounds on dark matter microscopic properties are then derived, and, depending on the specific set of assumptions, they are competitive with constraints from other indirect dark matter searches. At GHz frequencies, dark matter sources can become a significant fraction of the total number of sources with brightness below the microJansky level. We show that, at this level of fluxes (which are within the reach of the next-generation radio surveys), properties of the faint edge of differential source counts, as well as angular correlation data, can become an important probe for WIMPs.

  8. NEWSdm: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search with directional measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Crescenzo A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Dark Matter searches are nowadays one of the most exciting research topics. Several experimental efforts are concentrated on the development, construction, and operation of detectors looking for the scattering of target nuclei with Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs. The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a challenging strategy to extend dark matter searches beyond the neutrino floor and provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Current directional experiments are based on the use of gas TPC whose sensitivity is strongly limited by the small achievable detector mass. We present an innovative directional experiment based on the use of a solid target made by newly developed nuclear emulsions and read-out systems reaching a position resolution of the order of 10 nm.

  9. NEWSdm: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search with directional measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Crescenzo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Direct Dark Matter searches are nowadays one of the most exciting research topics. Several experimental efforts are concentrated on the development, construction, and operation of detectors looking for the scattering of target nuclei with Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs). The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a challenging strategy to extend dark matter searches beyond the neutrino floor and provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Current directional experiments are based on the use of gas TPC whose sensitivity is strongly limited by the small achievable detector mass. We present an innovative directional experiment based on the use of a solid target made by newly developed nuclear emulsions and read-out systems reaching a position resolution of the order of 10 nm.

  10. Detector Simulation and WIMP Search Analysis for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kevin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological measurements on the scales of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the universe indicate that 85% of the matter in the universe is composed of dark matter, made up of non-baryonic particles that interact with cross-sections on the weak scale or lower. Hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, represent a potential solution to the dark matter problem, and naturally arise in certain Standard Model extensions. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) collaboration aims to detect the scattering of WIMP particles from nuclei in terrestrial detectors. Germanium and silicon particle detectors are deployed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These detectors are instrumented with phonon and ionization sensors, which allows for discrimination against electromagnetic backgrounds, which strike the detector at rates orders of magnitude higher than the expected WIMP signal. This dissertation presents the development of numerical models of the physics of the CDMS detectors, implemented in a computational package collectively known as the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC). After substantial validation of the models against data, the DMC is used to investigate potential backgrounds to the next iteration of the CDMS experiment, known as SuperCDMS. Finally, an investigation of using the DMC in a reverse Monte Carlo analysis of WIMP search data is presented.

  11. TREX-DM: a low-background Micromegas-based TPC for low-mass WIMP detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguaz, F.J.; Garza, J.G.; Castel, J.F.; Cebrian, S.; Dafni, T.; Garcia, J.A.; Irastorza, I.G.; Lagraba, A.; Luzon, G.; Peiro, A. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Aznar, F. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Universidad de Zaragoza, Centro Universitario de la Defensa, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    If Dark Matter is made of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below ∝20 GeV, the corresponding nuclear recoils in mainstream WIMP experiments are of energies too close, or below, the experimental threshold. Gas Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) can be operated with a variety of target elements, offer good tracking capabilities and, on account of the amplification in gas, very low thresholds are achievable. Recent advances in electronics and in novel radiopure TPC readouts, especially micro-mesh gas structure (Micromegas), are improving the scalability and low-background prospects of gaseous TPCs. Here we present TREX-DM, a prototype to test the concept of a Micromegas-based TPC to search for low-mass WIMPs. The detector is designed to host an active mass of ∝0.300 kg of Ar at 10 bar, or alternatively ∝0.160 kg of Ne at 10 bar, with an energy threshold below 0.4 keVee, and is fully built with radiopure materials. We will describe the detector in detail, the results from the commissioning phase on surface, as well as a preliminary background model. The anticipated sensitivity of this technique may go beyond current experimental limits for WIMPs of masses of 2-8 GeV. (orig.)

  12. The DarkStars code: a publicly available dark stellar evolution package

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Pat; Fairbairn, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    We announce the public release of the 'dark' stellar evolution code DarkStars. The code simultaneously solves the equations of WIMP capture and annihilation in a star with those of stellar evolution assuming approximate hydrostatic equilibrium. DarkStars includes the most extensive WIMP microphysics of any dark evolution code to date. The code employs detailed treatments of the capture process from a range of WIMP velocity distributions, as well as composite WIMP distribution and conductive energy transport schemes based on the WIMP mean-free path in the star. We give a brief description of the input physics and practical usage of the code, as well as examples of its application to dark stars at the Galactic centre.

  13. ZEPLIN-II limits on WIMP-nucelon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alner, G. J.; Bungau, C.; Camanzi, B.; Durkin, T.; Edwards, B.; Lewin, J. D.; Luescher, R.; Preece, R. M.; Smith, N. J. T.; Smith, P. F.; Sumner, T. J.; Thorne, C.; Araujo, H. M.; Bewick, A.; Davidge, D.; Dawson, J.; Howard, A. S.; Jones, W. G.; Joshi, M.; Lebedenko, V. N.

    2009-01-01

    ZEPLIN II is a two-phase xenon detector designed to detect dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Following the first 31-day underground run in Boulby Mine, UK, the collaboration published dark matter limits in January 2007; the first such limits using two-phase xenon technology. We outline the key detector design, performance and results here.

  14. Limits on the Spin-Dependent WIMP-Nucleon Cross Sections from the First Science Run of the ZEPLIN-III Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedenko, V. N.; Bewick, A.; Currie, A.; Davidge, D.; Dawson, J.; Horn, M.; Howard, A. S.; Jones, W. G.; Joshi, M.; Liubarsky, I.; Lyons, K.; Quenby, J. J.; Sumner, T. J.; Thorne, C.; Walker, R. J.; Araujo, H. M.; Edwards, B.; Barnes, E. J.; Ghag, C.; Murphy, A. StJ.

    2009-01-01

    We present new experimental constraints on the WIMP-nucleon spin-dependent elastic cross sections using data from the first science run of ZEPLIN-III, a two-phase xenon experiment searching for galactic dark matter weakly interacting massive particles based at the Boulby mine. Analysis of ∼450 kg·days fiducial exposure allow us to place a 90%-confidence upper limit on the pure WIMP-neutron cross section of σ n =1.9x10 -2 pb at 55 GeV/c 2 WIMP mass. Recent calculations of the nuclear spin structure based on the Bonn charge-dependent nucleon-nucleon potential were used for the odd-neutron isotopes 129 Xe and 131 Xe. These indicate that the sensitivity of xenon targets to the spin-dependent WIMP-proton interaction could be much lower than implied by previous calculations, whereas the WIMP-neutron sensitivity is impaired only by a factor of ∼2.

  15. A Bio-Inspired Model-Based Approach for Context-Aware Post-WIMP Tele-Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor López-Jaquero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tele-rehabilitation is one of the main domains where Information and Communication Technologies (ICT have been proven useful to move healthcare from care centers to patients’ home. Moreover, patients, especially those carrying out a physical therapy, cannot use a traditional Window, Icon, Menu, Pointer (WIMP system, but they need to interact in a natural way, that is, there is a need to move from WIMP systems to Post-WIMP ones. Moreover, tele-rehabilitation systems should be developed following the context-aware approach, so that they are able to adapt to the patients’ context to provide them with usable and effective therapies. In this work a model-based approach is presented to assist stakeholders in the development of context-aware Post-WIMP tele-rehabilitation systems. It entails three different models: (i a task model for designing the rehabilitation tasks; (ii a context model to facilitate the adaptation of these tasks to the context; and (iii a bio-inspired presentation model to specify thoroughly how such tasks should be performed by the patients. Our proposal overcomes one of the limitations of the model-based approach for the development of context-aware systems supporting the specification of non-functional requirements. Finally, a case study is used to illustrate how this proposal can be put into practice to design a real world rehabilitation task.

  16. No WIMP mini-spikes in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, M.; Bertone, G.; Volonteri, M.; Weniger, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of black holes inevitably affects the distribution of dark and baryonic matter in their vicinity, leading to an enhancement of the dark matter density, called spike, and if dark matter is made of WIMPs, to a strong enhancement of the dark matter annihilation rate. Spikes at the center

  17. Exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, D.; Baudis, L.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Castle, J.P.; Chang, C.L.; Clarke, R.M.; Saab, T.; Akerib, D.S.; Bolozdynya, A.; Driscoll, D.; Kamat, S.; Perera, T.A.; Schnee, R.W.; Wang, G.; Armel-Funkhouser, M.S.; Golwala, S.R.; Hellmig, J.; Mandic, V.; Meunier, P.

    2002-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) employs low-temperature Ge and Si detectors to search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their elastic-scattering interactions with nuclei while discriminating against interactions of background particles. For recoil energies above 10 keV, events due to background photons are rejected with >99.9% efficiency, and surface events are rejected with >95% efficiency. The estimate of the background due to neutrons is based primarily on the observation of multiple-scatter events that should all be neutrons. Data selection is determined primarily by examining calibration data and vetoed events. Resulting efficiencies should be accurate to ∼10%. Results of CDMS data from 1998 and 1999 with a relaxed fiducial-volume cut (resulting in 15.8 kg days exposure on Ge) are consistent with an earlier analysis with a more restrictive fiducial-volume cut. Twenty-three WIMP candidate events are observed, but these events are consistent with a background from neutrons in all ways tested. Resulting limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic-scattering cross section exclude unexplored parameter space for WIMPs with masses between 10-70 GeV/c 2 . These limits border, but do not exclude, parameter space allowed by supersymmetry models and accelerator constraints. Results are compatible with some regions reported as allowed at 3σ by the annual-modulation measurement of the DAMA Collaboration. However, under the assumptions of standard WIMP interactions and a standard halo, the results are incompatible with the DAMA most likely value at >99.9% confidence level (C.L.), and are incompatible with the model-independent annual-modulation signal of DAMA at 99.99% C.L. in the asymptotic limit

  18. WIMP-nucleon cross-section results from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, D.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Araujo, H.M., E-mail: h.araujo@imperial.ac.uk [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Barnes, E.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Belov, V.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bewick, A. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Burenkov, A.A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chepel, V. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Currie, A. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); DeViveiros, L. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Edwards, B. [Particle Physics Department, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Horn, M.; Jones, W.G. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Kalmus, G.E. [Particle Physics Department, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Kobyakin, A.S.; Kovalenko, A.G. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lebedenko, V.N. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Lindote, A. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Particle Physics Department, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Lopes, M.I. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); and others

    2012-03-13

    We report experimental upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. A raw fiducial exposure of 1344 kg Dot-Operator days was accrued over 319 days of continuous operation between June 2010 and May 2011. A total of eight events was observed in the signal acceptance region in the nuclear recoil energy range 7-29 keV, which is compatible with background expectations. This allows the exclusion of the scalar cross-section above 4.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} pb near 50 GeV/c{sup 2} WIMP mass with 90% confidence. Combined with data from the first run, this result improves to 3.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} pb. The corresponding WIMP-neutron spin-dependent cross-section limit is 8.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} pb. The ZEPLIN programme reaches thus its conclusion at Boulby, having deployed and exploited successfully three liquid xenon experiments of increasing reach.

  19. WIMP-nucleon cross-section results from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, D.Yu.; Araújo, H.M.; Barnes, E.J.; Belov, V.A.; Bewick, A.; Burenkov, A.A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A.; DeViveiros, L.; Edwards, B.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Jones, W.G.; Kalmus, G.E.; Kobyakin, A.S.; Kovalenko, A.G.; Lebedenko, V.N.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. A raw fiducial exposure of 1344 kg⋅days was accrued over 319 days of continuous operation between June 2010 and May 2011. A total of eight events was observed in the signal acceptance region in the nuclear recoil energy range 7-29 keV, which is compatible with background expectations. This allows the exclusion of the scalar cross-section above 4.8×10 -8 pb near 50 GeV/c 2 WIMP mass with 90% confidence. Combined with data from the first run, this result improves to 3.9×10 -8 pb. The corresponding WIMP-neutron spin-dependent cross-section limit is 8.0×10 -3 pb. The ZEPLIN programme reaches thus its conclusion at Boulby, having deployed and exploited successfully three liquid xenon experiments of increasing reach.

  20. The waning of the WIMP? A review of models, searches, and constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Dutra, Maíra; Ghosh, Pradipta; Lindner, Manfred; Mambrini, Yann; Pierre, Mathias; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2018-03-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are among the best-motivated dark matter candidates. No conclusive signal, despite an extensive search program that combines, often in a complementary way, direct, indirect, and collider probes, has been detected so far. This situation might change in near future due to the advent of one/multi-TON Direct Detection experiments. We thus, find it timely to provide a review of the WIMP paradigm with focus on a few models which can be probed at best by these facilities. Collider and Indirect Detection, nevertheless, will not be neglected when they represent a complementary probe.

  1. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter Using the First Five-Tower Run of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippini, Jeffrey Peter [UC, Berkeley

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades astronomers and physicists have accumulated a vast array of evidence that the bulk of the universe's matter is in some non-baryonic form that remains undetected by electromagnetic means. This \\dark matter" resides in diuse halos surrounding galaxies and other cosmic structures. Particle theorists have proposed a wide array of candidates for its nature. One particularly promising class of candidates are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs): quanta with masses of order 100 GeV/c2 and interactions characteristic of the weak nuclear force. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment seeks to directly detect the rare elastic interactions of galactic WIMPs with terrestrial nuclei. To this end, CDMS operates an array of crystalline Ge and Si particle detectors in Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. These crystals are operated at millikelvin temperatures and instrumented to measure the ionization and athermal phonons generated by each particle interaction. This combination provides a powerful two-fold discrimination against the interactions of particles generated by radioactive decay and cosmogenic showers. This dissertation describes the commissioning, analysis, and results of the rst WIMP-search data runs of the CDMS experiment with its full complement of 5 \\Towers" of detectors. These data represent a substantial increase in target mass and exposure over previous CDMS results. The results of this work place the most stringent limits yet set upon the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section for WIMP masses above 44 GeV/c2 , as well as setting competitive limits on spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions. This work also outlines the larger context of this and other probes of the WIMP theory of dark matter, as well as some current development eorts toward a larger cryogenic experiment.

  2. Direct detection of WIMPs: implications of a self-consistent truncated isothermal model of the Milky Way's dark matter halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Soumini; Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani; Cowsik, Ramanath

    2010-09-01

    Direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) candidates of Dark Matter (DM) is studied within the context of a self-consistent truncated isothermal model of the finite-size dark halo of the Galaxy. The halo model, based on the ``King model'' of the phase space distribution function of collisionless DM particles, takes into account the modifications of the phase-space structure of the halo due to the gravitational influence of the observed visible matter in a self-consistent manner. The parameters of the halo model are determined by a fit to a recently determined circular rotation curve of the Galaxy that extends up to ~ 60 kpc. Unlike in the Standard Halo Model (SHM) customarily used in the analysis of the results of WIMP direct detection experiments, the velocity distribution of the WIMPs in our model is non-Maxwellian with a cut-off at a maximum velocity that is self-consistently determined by the model itself. For our halo model that provides the best fit to the rotation curve data, the 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section from the recent results of the CDMS-II experiment, for example, is ~ 5.3 × 10-8 pb at a WIMP mass of ~ 71 GeV. We also find, using the original 2-bin annual modulation amplitude data on the nuclear recoil event rate seen in the DAMA experiment, that there exists a range of small WIMP masses, typically ~ 2-16 GeV, within which DAMA collaboration's claimed annual modulation signal purportedly due to WIMPs is compatible with the null results of other experiments. These results, based as they are on a self-consistent model of the dark matter halo of the Galaxy, strengthen the possibility of low-mass (lsim10 GeV) WIMPs as a candidate for dark matter as indicated by several earlier studies performed within the context of the SHM. A more rigorous analysis using DAMA bins over smaller intervals should be able to better constrain the ``DAMA regions'' in the WIMP parameter space within the context of

  3. WIMP search and a Cherenkov detector prototype for ILC polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Christoph

    2011-10-15

    The planned International Linear Collider (ILC) will be an essential experiment to precisely determine the properties and structure of physics at the TeV scale. An important feature of the ILC is the possibility to use polarized electrons and positrons. In part 1 of this thesis, a model independent search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) at ILC is presented. The signal channel under study is direct WIMP pair production with associated Initial State Radiation (ISR), e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {chi}{chi}{gamma}, where the WIMPs leave the detector without any further interaction, and only the emitted photon is detected. From the energy spectrum of the detected photons the coupling structure, cross sections, masses and the quantum number of the dominant partial wave in the production process can be inferred. The analysis includes the dominant SM, as well as machine-induced backgrounds, and is performed using a full simulation of the ILD detector concept. For an integrated luminosity of L=500 fb{sup -1}, the signal cross sections can be measured to a precision of 3%, dominated by systematic uncertainties on the polarization measurement of the initial electrons and positrons. Masses can be measured to a precision of up to 2% by a comparison of the data photon spectrum to parametrized template spectra. In part 2 of this thesis, a Cherenkov detector prototype for Compton polarimetry at ILC is presented. For the polarization measurement a systematic uncertainty of {delta} P/P = 0.25% or better is envisioned. To achieve this goal, the Cherenkov detector has to be precisely aligned with the fan of Compton scattered electrons and its signal response needs to be highly linear. For the detector prototype data driven alignment strategies have been developed by comparing data recorded at the Elsa accelerator in Bonn, Germany, with detailed Geant4 simulations. With the use of multi-anode photomultipliers, data driven alignment strategies promise to provide the

  4. WIMP search and a Cherenkov detector prototype for ILC polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, Christoph

    2011-10-01

    The planned International Linear Collider (ILC) will be an essential experiment to precisely determine the properties and structure of physics at the TeV scale. An important feature of the ILC is the possibility to use polarized electrons and positrons. In part 1 of this thesis, a model independent search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) at ILC is presented. The signal channel under study is direct WIMP pair production with associated Initial State Radiation (ISR), e + e - → χχγ, where the WIMPs leave the detector without any further interaction, and only the emitted photon is detected. From the energy spectrum of the detected photons the coupling structure, cross sections, masses and the quantum number of the dominant partial wave in the production process can be inferred. The analysis includes the dominant SM, as well as machine-induced backgrounds, and is performed using a full simulation of the ILD detector concept. For an integrated luminosity of L=500 fb -1 , the signal cross sections can be measured to a precision of 3%, dominated by systematic uncertainties on the polarization measurement of the initial electrons and positrons. Masses can be measured to a precision of up to 2% by a comparison of the data photon spectrum to parametrized template spectra. In part 2 of this thesis, a Cherenkov detector prototype for Compton polarimetry at ILC is presented. For the polarization measurement a systematic uncertainty of δ P/P = 0.25% or better is envisioned. To achieve this goal, the Cherenkov detector has to be precisely aligned with the fan of Compton scattered electrons and its signal response needs to be highly linear. For the detector prototype data driven alignment strategies have been developed by comparing data recorded at the Elsa accelerator in Bonn, Germany, with detailed Geant4 simulations. With the use of multi-anode photomultipliers, data driven alignment strategies promise to provide the required precision. At ILC, these

  5. WIMP dark matter candidates and searches—current status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Leszek; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Trojanowski, Sebastian

    2018-06-01

    We review several current aspects of dark matter theory and experiment. We overview the present experimental status, which includes current bounds and recent claims and hints of a possible signal in a wide range of experiments: direct detection in underground laboratories, gamma-ray, cosmic ray, x-ray, neutrino telescopes, and the LHC. We briefly review several possible particle candidates for a weakly interactive massive particle (WIMP) and dark matter that have recently been considered in the literature. We pay particular attention to the lightest neutralino of supersymmetry as it remains the best motivated candidate for dark matter and also shows excellent detection prospects. Finally we briefly review some alternative scenarios that can considerably alter properties and prospects for the detection of dark matter obtained within the standard thermal WIMP paradigm.

  6. WIMP dark matter candidates and searches-current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Leszek; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Trojanowski, Sebastian

    2018-06-01

    We review several current aspects of dark matter theory and experiment. We overview the present experimental status, which includes current bounds and recent claims and hints of a possible signal in a wide range of experiments: direct detection in underground laboratories, gamma-ray, cosmic ray, x-ray, neutrino telescopes, and the LHC. We briefly review several possible particle candidates for a weakly interactive massive particle (WIMP) and dark matter that have recently been considered in the literature. We pay particular attention to the lightest neutralino of supersymmetry as it remains the best motivated candidate for dark matter and also shows excellent detection prospects. Finally we briefly review some alternative scenarios that can considerably alter properties and prospects for the detection of dark matter obtained within the standard thermal WIMP paradigm.

  7. 5th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2009). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Lindner, Axel; Redondo, Javier [eds.

    2010-06-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Direct searches for dark matter, indirect searches for WIMPS, photon generation and laser polarization experiments, direct axion signals, theoretic WISP developments. (HSI)

  8. 5th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2009). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Lindner, Axel; Redondo, Javier

    2010-06-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Direct searches for dark matter, indirect searches for WIMPS, photon generation and laser polarization experiments, direct axion signals, theoretic WISP developments. (HSI)

  9. A precision search for WIMPs with charged cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Annika; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    AMS-02 has reached the sensitivity to probe canonical thermal WIMPs by their annihilation into antiprotons. Due to the high precision of the data, uncertainties in the astrophysical background have become the most limiting factor for indirect dark matter detection. In this work we systematically quantify and—where possible—reduce uncertainties in the antiproton background. We constrain the propagation of charged cosmic rays through the combination of antiproton, B/C and positron data. Cross section uncertainties are determined from a wide collection of accelerator data and are—for the first time ever—fully taken into account. This allows us to robustly constrain even subdominant dark matter signals through their spectral properties. For a standard NFW dark matter profile we are able to exclude thermal WIMPs with masses up to 570 GeV which annihilate into bottom quarks. While we confirm a reported excess compatible with dark matter of mass around 80 GeV, its local (global) significance only reaches 2.2 σ (1.1 σ) in our analysis.

  10. The Fraternal WIMP Miracle

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    We identify and analyze thermal dark matter candidates in the fraternal twin Higgs model and its generalizations. The relic abundance of fraternal twin dark matter is set by twin weak interactions, with a scale tightly tied to the weak scale of the Standard Model by naturalness considerations. As such, the dark matter candidates benefit from a "fraternal WIMP miracle," reproducing the observed dark matter abundance for dark matter masses between 50 and 150 GeV. However, the couplings dominantly responsible for dark matter annihilation do not lead to interactions with the visible sector. The direct detection rate is instead set via fermionic Higgs portal interactions, which are likewise constrained by naturalness considerations but parametrically weaker than those leading to dark matter annihilation. The predicted direct detection cross section is close to current LUX bounds and presents an opportunity for the next generation of direct detection experiments.

  11. Calculated WIMP signals at the ANDES laboratory: comparison with northern and southern located dark matter detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitarese, O.; Fushimi, K. J.; Mosquera, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are possible components of the Universe’s dark matter (DM). The detection of WIMPs is signaled by the recoil of the atomic nuclei which form a detector. CoGeNT at the Soudan Underground Laboratory (SUL) and DAMA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) have reported data on annual modulation of signals attributed to WIMPs. Both experiments are located in laboratories in the Northern Hemisphere. DM detectors are planned to operate (or already operate) in laboratories in the Southern Hemisphere, including SABRE at Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory (SUPL) in Australia, and DM-ICE in Antarctica. In this work we have analyzed the dependence of diurnal and annual modulation of signals, pertaining to the detection of WIMP, on the coordinates of the laboratory, for experiments which may be performed in the planned new Agua Negra Deep Experimental Site (ANDES) underground facility, to be built in San Juan, Argentina. We made predictions for NaI and Ge-type detectors placed in ANDES, to compare with DAMA, CoGeNT, SABRE and DM-ICE arrays, and found that the diurnal modulation of the signals, at the ANDES site, is amplified at its maximum value, both for NaI (Ge)-type detectors, while the annual modulation remains unaffected by the change in coordinates from north to south.

  12. Calculated WIMP signals at the ANDES laboratory: comparison with northern and southern located dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, O; Mosquera, M E; Fushimi, K J

    2016-01-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are possible components of the Universe’s dark matter (DM). The detection of WIMPs is signaled by the recoil of the atomic nuclei which form a detector. CoGeNT at the Soudan Underground Laboratory (SUL) and DAMA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) have reported data on annual modulation of signals attributed to WIMPs. Both experiments are located in laboratories in the Northern Hemisphere. DM detectors are planned to operate (or already operate) in laboratories in the Southern Hemisphere, including SABRE at Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory (SUPL) in Australia, and DM-ICE in Antarctica. In this work we have analyzed the dependence of diurnal and annual modulation of signals, pertaining to the detection of WIMP, on the coordinates of the laboratory, for experiments which may be performed in the planned new Agua Negra Deep Experimental Site (ANDES) underground facility, to be built in San Juan, Argentina. We made predictions for NaI and Ge-type detectors placed in ANDES, to compare with DAMA, CoGeNT, SABRE and DM-ICE arrays, and found that the diurnal modulation of the signals, at the ANDES site, is amplified at its maximum value, both for NaI (Ge)-type detectors, while the annual modulation remains unaffected by the change in coordinates from north to south. (paper)

  13. Large-scale nuclear structure calculations for spin-dependent WIMP scattering with chiral effective field theory currents

    OpenAIRE

    Klos, P.; Menéndez, J.; Gazit, D.; Schwenk, A.

    2013-01-01

    We perform state-of-the-art large-scale shell-model calculations of the structure factors for elastic spin-dependent WIMP scattering off 129,131Xe, 127I, 73Ge, 19F, 23Na, 27Al, and 29Si. This comprehensive survey covers the non-zero-spin nuclei relevant to direct dark matter detection. We include a pedagogical presentation of the formalism necessary to describe elastic and inelastic WIMP-nucleus scattering. The valence spaces and nuclear interactions employed have been previously used in nucl...

  14. Final results of the EDELWEISS-II WIMP search using a 4-kg array of cryogenic germanium detectors with interleaved electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armengaud, E.; Augier, C.; Benoit, A.; Berge, L.; Bluemer, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Brudanin, V.; Censier, B.; Chardin, G.; Chapellier, M.; Charlieux, F.; Coulter, P.; Cox, G.A.; Defay, X.; De Jesus, M.; Dolgorouki, Y.; Domange, J.; Dumoulin, L.

    2011-01-01

    The EDELWEISS-II Collaboration has completed a direct search for WIMP dark matter with an array of ten 400-g cryogenic germanium detectors in operation at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane. The combined use of thermal phonon sensors and charge collection electrodes with an interleaved geometry enables the efficient rejection of γ-induced radioactivity as well as near-surface interactions. A total effective exposure of 384 kg d has been achieved, mostly coming from fourteen months of continuous operation. Five nuclear recoil candidates are observed above 20 keV, while the estimated background is 3.0 events. The result is interpreted in terms of limits on the cross-section of spin-independent interactions of WIMPs and nucleons. A cross-section of 4.4x10 -8 pb is excluded at 90%CL for a WIMP mass of 85 GeV. New constraints are also set on models where the WIMP-nucleon scattering is inelastic.

  15. An intermediate framework between WIMP, FIMP, and EWIP dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle), FIMP (Feebly interacting Massive Particle) and EWIP (Extremely Weakly Interacting Particle) dark matter are different theoretical frameworks that have been postulated to explain the dark matter. In this paper we examine an intermediate scenario that combines features from these three frameworks. It consists of a weakly interacting particle — à la WIMP — that does not reach thermal equilibrium in the early Universe — à la FIMP — and whose relic density is determined by the reheating temperature of the Universe — à la EWIP. As an example, an explicit realization of this framework, based on the singlet scalar model of dark matter, is analyzed in detail. In particular, the relic density is studied as a function of the parameters of the model, and the new viable region within this intermediate scenario is determined. Finally, it is shown that this alternative framework of dark matter allows for arbitrarily heavy dark matter particles and that it suggests a connection between dark matter and inflation

  16. System and process for capture of H.sub.2S from gaseous process streams and process for regeneration of the capture agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldenbrant, David J; Koech, Phillip K; Rainbolt, James E; Bearden, Mark D; Zheng, Feng

    2014-02-18

    A system and process are disclosed for selective removal and recovery of H.sub.2S from a gaseous volume, e.g., from natural gas. Anhydrous organic, sorbents chemically capture H.sub.2S gas to form hydrosulfide salts. Regeneration of the capture solvent involves addition of an anti-solvent that releases the captured H.sub.2S gas from the capture sorbent. The capture sorbent and anti-solvent are reactivated for reuse, e.g., by simple distillation.

  17. Ultra-cold WIMPs relics of non-standard pre-BBN cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gelmini, Graciela B

    2008-01-01

    We point out that in scenarios in which the Universe evolves in a non-standard manner during and after the kinetic decoupling of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), these relics can be much colder than in standard cosmological scenarios (i.e. can be ultra-cold), possibly leading to the formation of smaller first objects in hierarchical structure formation scenarios.

  18. Looking for the WIMP next door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jared A.; Gori, Stefania; Shelton, Jessie

    2018-02-01

    We comprehensively study experimental constraints and prospects for a class of minimal hidden sector dark matter (DM) models, highlighting how the cosmological history of these models informs the experimental signals. We study simple `secluded' models, where the DM freezes out into unstable dark mediator states, and consider the minimal cosmic history of this dark sector, where coupling of the dark mediator to the SM was sufficient to keep the two sectors in thermal equilibrium at early times. In the well-motivated case where the dark mediators couple to the Standard Model (SM) via renormalizable interactions, the requirement of thermal equilibrium provides a minimal, UV-insensitive, and predictive cosmology for hidden sector dark matter. We call DM that freezes out of a dark radiation bath in thermal equilibrium with the SM a WIMP next door, and demonstrate that the parameter space for such WIMPs next door is sharply defined, bounded, and in large part potentially accessible. This parameter space, and the corresponding signals, depend on the leading interaction between the SM and the dark mediator; we establish it for both Higgs and vector portal interactions. In particular, there is a cosmological lower bound on the portal coupling strength necessary to thermalize the two sectors in the early universe. We determine this thermalization floor as a function of equilibration temperature for the first time. We demonstrate that direct detection experiments are currently probing this cosmological lower bound in some regions of parameter space, while indirect detection signals and terrestrial searches for the mediator cut further into the viable parameter space. We present regions of interest for both direct detection and dark mediator searches, including motivated parameter space for the direct detection of sub-GeV DM.

  19. Novel process concept for cryogenic CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinier, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is generally considered as one of the necessary methods to mitigate anthropogenic CO2 emissions to combat climate change. The costs of CCS can for a large extent be attributed to the capture process. Several post-combustion CO2 capture processes have been developed,

  20. Alignment in double capture processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Benhenni, M.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.

    1993-01-01

    The electron spectra emitted when a double capture occurs in N 7+ +He and Ne 8+ +He systems at 10 qkeV collisional energy, allow us to determine the angular distributions of the 3 ell 3 ell ' lines through a special spectra fitting procedure which includes interferences between neighbouring states. It is found that the doubly excited states populated in double capture processes are generally aligned

  1. GENIUS and the Genius TF: A New Observatory for WIMP Dark Matter and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.; Majorovits, B.

    2001-01-01

    The GENIUS proposal is described and some of it's physics potential is outlined. Also in the light of the contradictive results from the DAMA and CDMS experiments the Genius TF, a new experimental setup is proposed. The Genius TF could probe the DAMA evidence region using the WIMP nucleus recoil signal and WIMP annual modulation signature simultaneously. Besides that it can prove the long term feasibility of the detector technique to be implemented into the GENIUS setup and will in this sense...

  2. Carbon capture by hybrid separation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Benthum, R.J.; van Kemenade, H.P.; Brouwers, J.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Even though there is an increasing development of carbon capture technology over the last decade, large-scale implementation is still far from common practice, mainly caused by the energy intensiveness of carbon capture processes and the lack of regulation. In absence of strict regulation, less

  3. Alignment in double capture processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Benhenni, M.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A. (IRSAMC, URA CNRS 770, Univ. Paul Sabatier, 118 rte de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France))

    1993-06-05

    The electron spectra emitted when a double capture occurs in N[sup 7+]+He and Ne[sup 8+]+He systems at 10 qkeV collisional energy, allow us to determine the angular distributions of the 3[ell]3[ell] [prime] lines through a special spectra fitting procedure which includes interferences between neighbouring states. It is found that the doubly excited states populated in double capture processes are generally aligned.

  4. Novel process concept for cryogenic CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Tuinier, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is generally considered as one of the necessary methods to mitigate anthropogenic CO2 emissions to combat climate change. The costs of CCS can for a large extent be attributed to the capture process. Several post-combustion CO2 capture processes have been developed, such as scrubbing, membrane processes and pressure swing adsorption. Amine scrubbing is currently the state of the art technology, in which CO2 is being removed by contacting the flue gas with a so...

  5. Consequences of DM/antiDM Oscillations for Asymmetric WIMP Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cirelli, Marco; Servant, Geraldine; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2012-01-01

    Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, a scenario usually dubbed Asymmetric Dark Matter (aDM), we study the effect of oscillations between dark matter and its antiparticle on the re-equilibration of the initial asymmetry before freeze-out, which enable efficient annihilations to recouple. We calculate the evolution of the DM relic abundance and show how oscillations re-open the parameter space of aDM models, in particular in the direction of allowing large (WIMP-scale) DM masses. A typical wimp with a mass at the EW scale (\\sim 100 GeV - 1 TeV) presenting a primordial asymmetry of the same order as the baryon asymmetry naturally gets the correct relic abundance if the DM-number-violating Delta(DM) = 2 mass term is in the \\sim meV range. The re-establishment of annihilations implies that constraints from the accumulation of aDM in astrophysical bodies are evaded. On the other hand, the ordinary bounds from BBN, CMB and indirect detection signals on annihilating DM have to be consi...

  6. The Diurnal Variation of the Wimp Detection Event Rates in Directional Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D

    2009-01-01

    The recent WMAP data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Modern particle theories naturally provide viable cold dark matter candidates with masses in the GeV-TeV region. Supersymmetry provides the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), theories in extra dimensions supply the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) etc. The nature of dark matter can only be unraveled only by its direct detection in the laboratory. All such candidates will be called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). In any case the direct dark matter search, which amounts to detecting the recoiling nucleus, following its collision with WIMP, is central to particle physics and cosmology. In this work we briefly review the theoretical elements relevant to the direct dark matter detection experiments, paying particular attention to directional experiments. i.e experiments in which, not only the energy but the direction of the recoiling nucleus is ob...

  7. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Huajie [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  8. Choices of capture chromatography technology in antibody manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLeo, Michael; Ley, Arthur; Nixon, Andrew E; Chen, Jie

    2017-11-15

    The capture process employed in monoclonal antibody downstream purification is not only the most critically impacted process by increased antibody titer resulting from optimized mammalian cell culture expression systems, but also the most important purification step in determining overall process throughput, product quality, and economics. Advances in separation technology for capturing antibodies from complex feedstocks have been one focus of downstream purification process innovation for past 10 years. In this study, we evaluated new generation chromatography resins used in the antibody capture process including Protein A, cation exchange, and mixed mode chromatography to address the benefits and unique challenges posed by each chromatography approach. Our results demonstrate the benefit of improved binding capacity of new generation Protein A resins, address the concern of high concentration surge caused aggregation when using new generation cation exchange resins with over 100mg/mL binding capacity, and highlight the potential of multimodal cation exchange resins for capture process design. The new landscape of capture chromatography technologies provides options to achieve overall downstream purification outcome with high product quality and process efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct detection of dark matter with the EDELWEISS-III experiment: signals induced by charge trapping, data analysis and characterization of cryogenic detector sensitivity to low-mass WIMPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    The EDELWEISS-III experiment is dedicated to direct dark matter searches aiming at detecting WIMPS. These massive particles should account for more than 80% of the mass of the Universe and be detectable through their elastic scattering on nuclei constituting the absorber of a detector. As the expected WIMP event rate is extremely low ( 20 GeV). Finally, a study dedicated to the optimization of solid cryogenic detectors to low mass WIMP searches is presented. This study is performed on simulated data using a statistical test based on a profiled likelihood ratio that allows for statistical background subtraction and spectral shape discrimination. This study combined with results from Run308, has lead the EDELWEISS experiment to favor low mass WIMP searches ( [fr

  10. Exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section from the first run of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search in the Soudan Underground Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerib, D.S.; Bailey, C.N.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Driscoll, D.D.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Kamat, S.; Perera, T.A.; Schnee, R.W.; Wang, G.; Armel-Funkhouser, M.S.; Daal, M.; Filippini, J.; Lu, A.; Mandic, V.; Meunier, P.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Issac, M.C. Perillo; Rau, W.; Seitz, D.N.; Serfass, B.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) employs low-temperature Ge and Si detectors to seek weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their elastic-scattering interactions with nuclei. Simultaneous measurements of both ionization and phonon energy provide discrimination against interactions of background particles. For recoil energies above 10 keV, events due to background photons are rejected with >99.99% efficiency. Electromagnetic events very near the detector surface can mimic nuclear recoils because of reduced charge collection, but these surface events are rejected with >96% efficiency by using additional information from the phonon pulse shape. Efficient use of active and passive shielding, combined with the 2090 m.w.e. overburden at the experimental site in the Soudan mine, makes the background from neutrons negligible for this first exposure. All cuts are determined in a blind manner from in situ calibrations with external radioactive sources without any prior knowledge of the event distribution in the signal region. Resulting efficiencies are known to ∼10%. A single event with a recoil of 64 keV passes all of the cuts and is consistent with the expected misidentification rate of surface electron recoils. Under the assumptions for a standard dark matter halo, these data exclude previously unexplored parameter space for both spin-independent and spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering. The resulting limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic-scattering cross section has a minimum of 4x10 -43 cm 2 at a WIMP mass of 60 GeVc -2 . The minimum of the limit for the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron elastic-scattering cross section is 2x10 -37 cm 2 at a WIMP mass of 50 GeVc -2

  11. Limits on light WIMPs with a 1 kg-scale germanium detector at 160 eVee physics threshold at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Hau-Bin; Yue, Qian; Kang, Ke-Jun; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Li, Yuan-Jing; Tsz-King Wong, Henry; Aǧartioǧlu, M.; An, Hai-Peng; Chang, Jian-Ping; Chen, Jing-Han; Chen, Yun-Hua; Deng, Zhi; Du, Qiang; Gong, Hui; He, Li; Hu, Jin-Wei; Hu, Qing-Dong; Huang, Han-Xiong; Jia, Li-Ping; Jiang, Hao; Li, Hong; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Jin; Li, Xia; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yu-Lan; Lin, Fong-Kay; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, Shu-Kui; Liu, Zhong-Zhi; Ma, Hao; Ma, Jing-Lu; Pan, Hui; Ren, Jie; Ruan, Xi-Chao; Sevda, B.; Sharma, Vivek; Shen, Man-Bin; Singh, Lakhwinder; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Tang, Chang-Jian; Tang, Wei-You; Tian, Yang; Wang, Ji-Min; Wang, Li; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yi; Wu, Shi-Yong; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Xing, Hao-Yang; Xu, Yin; Xue, Tao; Yang, Song-Wei; Yi, Nan; Yu, Chun-Xu; Yu, Hai-Jun; Yue, Jian-Feng; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Zeng, Ming; Zeng, Zhi; Zhang, Yun-Hua; Zhao, Ming-Gang; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Ji-Fang; Zhou, Zu-Ying; Zhu, Jing-Jun; Zhu, Zhong-Hua; CDEX Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    We report results of a search for light weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter from the CDEX-1 experiment at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL). Constraints on WIMP-nucleon spin-independent (SI) and spin-dependent (SD) couplings are derived with a physics threshold of 160 eVee, from an exposure of 737.1 kg-days. The SI and SD limits extend the lower reach of light WIMPs to 2 GeV and improve over our earlier bounds at WIMP mass less than 6 GeV. Supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFA0402200, 2017YFA0402201), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175099, 11275107, 11475117, 11475099, 11475092, 11675088), the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2010CB833006). We thank the support of grants from the Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program (20121088494, 20151080354) and the Academia Sinica Investigator Award 2011-15, contracts 103-2112-M-001-024 and 104-2112-M-001-038-MY3 from the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan.

  12. Multiple-predators-based capture process on complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, Rajput Ramiz; Pu Cunlai; Li Jie; Chen Rongbin; Xu Zhongqi

    2017-01-01

    The predator/prey (capture) problem is a prototype of many network-related applications. We study the capture process on complex networks by considering multiple predators from multiple sources. In our model, some lions start from multiple sources simultaneously to capture the lamb by biased random walks, which are controlled with a free parameter α . We derive the distribution of the lamb’s lifetime and the expected lifetime 〈 T 〉. Through simulation, we find that the expected lifetime drops substantially with the increasing number of lions. Moreover, we study how the underlying topological structure affects the capture process, and obtain that locating on small-degree nodes is better than on large-degree nodes to prolong the lifetime of the lamb. The dense or homogeneous network structures are against the survival of the lamb. We also discuss how to improve the capture efficiency in our model. (paper)

  13. Readout technologies for directional WIMP Dark Matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battat, J.B.R.; Irastorza, I.G.; Aleksandrov, A.; Asada, T.; Baracchini, E.; Billard, J.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Buonaura, A.; Burdge, K.; Cebrián, S.

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a compelling but technologically challenging strategy to provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Most directional detectors aim to reconstruct the dark-matter-induced nuclear recoil tracks, either in gas or solid targets. The main challenge with directional detection is the need for high spatial resolution over large volumes, which puts strong requirements on the readout technologies. In this paper we review the various detector readout technologies used by directional detectors. In particular, we summarize the challenges, advantages and drawbacks of each approach, and discuss future prospects for these technologies.

  14. Processes involved in pion capture in hydrogen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.

    1983-03-01

    A systematic analysis is presented of the possible elementary processes determining the fate of negative pions stopped in hydrogen-containing samples. Using a phenomenological description in comparison with the available experimental information on pion capture in hydrogen, it is shown that the formation and decay of pπ - atoms in compounds Zsub(m)Hsub(n) are determined mainly by the processes of Auger capture in a molecular orbit ZHπ - , transition from molecular to atomic orbit, transfer of pions to atoms Z in collisions pπ - +Z, and nuclear capture in collisions pπ - +H. The recent assumption of a considerable role of the processes of radiative atomic capture in bound hydrogen atoms, nuclear capture of pions by protons from the molecular state ZHπ - , or 'inner' transfer of the pion via tunnelling through the bond Z-H is not supported by the theory and contradicts the experimental data

  15. Modeling of phonon- and Coulomb-mediated capture processes in quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes modeling of carrier relaxation processes in self-assembled quantum-dot-structures, with particular emphasis on carrier capture processes in quantum dots. Relaxation by emission of lontitudinal optical (LO) phonons is very efficient in bulk semiconductors and nanostructures...... of higher dimensionality. Here, we investigate carrier capture processes into quantum dots, mediated by emission of one and two LO phonons. In these investigations is is assumed that the dot is empty initially. In the Case of single-phonon capture we also investigate the influence of the presence...... of a charge in the quantum-dot state to which the capture takes place. In general, capture rates are of the same order as capture rates into an empty dot state, but in some cases the dot-size interval for which the capture process is energetically allowed, is considerably reduced.The above calculations...

  16. Capturing Creativity in Collaborative Design Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J. U.; Onarheim, Balder

    2015-01-01

    process and present the process in a visual overview with the use of a visual language of symbols. The framework, entitled C3, Capturing Creativity in Context, is presented and subsequently evaluated based on a pilot study utilizing C3. Here it was found that the framework was particularly useful...

  17. WIMP search in the mono-photon channel at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habermehl, Moritz [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a planned electron-positron collider with √(s) tunable from 250 to 500 GeV, with a possible upgrade to 1 TeV. Besides precision measurements of the Higgs boson its physics goals comprise searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, e.g. searches for Dark Matter. This collider search assumes the production of WIMPs in pairs. They are not visible in the detector but the energy carried away can be observed via an additional (''tag'') particle. Photon emission from the initial state leads to the almost model independent signature: e{sup +}e{sup -} → χχγ. As this analysis tests couplings between WIMPs and leptons it is complementary to analogues searches at the LHC. A precise study is facilitated by the clean environment of lepton colliders with small systematics of electroweak backgrounds. While the conceptual feasibility and the sensitivity reach of the ILC have been shown in the past, this talk focusses on the consequences for the detector design. The requirements for the central detector as well as for the instrumentation of the forward region are discussed in the context of the ILD detector concept.

  18. Beyond WIMPs: the Quark (Anti Nugget Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitnitsky Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We review a testable dark matter (DM model outside of the standard WIMP paradigm. The model is unique in a sense that the observed ratio Ωdark ≃ Ωvisible for visible and dark matter densities finds its natural explanation as a result of their common QCD origin when both types of matter (DM and visible are formed during the QCD phase transition and both are proportional to single dimensional parameter of the system, Λqcd. We argue that the charge separation effect also inevitably occurs during the same QCD phase transition in the presence of the CP odd axion field a(x. It leads to preferential formation of one species of nuggets on the scales of the visible Universe where the axion field a(x is coherent. A natural outcome of this preferential evolution is that only one type of the visible baryons (not anti- baryons remain in the system after the nuggets complete their formation. Unlike conventional WIMP dark matter candidates, the nuggets and anti-nuggets are strongly interacting but macroscopically large objects. The rare events of annihilation of the anti-nuggets with visible matter lead to a number of observable effects. We argue that the relative intensities for a number of measured excesses of emission from the centre of galaxy (covering more than 11 orders of magnitude are determined by standard and well established physics. At the same time the absolute intensity of emission is determined by a single new fundamental parameter of the theory, the axion mass, 10−6eV ≲ ma ≲ 10−3eV. Finally, we comment on implications of these studies for the axion search experiments, including microwave cavity and the Orpheus experiments.

  19. The use of twin-screen-based WIMPS in spacecraft control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klim, R. D.

    1990-10-01

    The ergonomic problems of designing a sophisticated Windows Icons Mouse Pop-up (WIMP) based twin screen workstation are outlined. These same problems will be encountered by future spacecraft controllers. The design of a modern, advanced workstation for use on a distributed multicontrol center in a multisatellite control system is outlined. The system uses access control mechanisms to ensure that only authorized personnel can undertake certain operations on the workstation. Rules governing the use of windowing features, screen attributes, icons, keyboard and mouse in spacecraft control are discussed.

  20. Chemical processes in neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    Research into the radiation chemical effects of neutron capture therapy are described. In the use of neutron capture therapy for the treatment of brain tumours, compounds containing an activatable nuclide are selectively concentrated within tumour tissue and irradiated with neutrons. Target compounds for use in therapy must accumulate selectively in high concentrations in the tumour and must be non toxic to the patient. The most suitable of these are the boron hydrides. Radiation dosages, resulting from neutron capture in normal tissue constituents are tabulated. As part of the program to study the radiation-induced chemical processes undergone by boron target compounds, the radiolytic degredation of boron hydride and phenyl boric acid system was investigated. No direct dependence between the yield of the transient radiolytic species and the concentration of the B-compound was observed. (author)

  1. CO₂ Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toy, Lora [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gupta, Raghubir [Research Triangle Inst. International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Because the fleet of coal-fired power plants is of such importance to the nation's energy production while also being the single largest emitter of CO₂, the development of retrofit, post-combustion CO₂ capture technologies for existing and new, upcoming coal power plants will allow coal to remain a major component of the U.S. energy mix while mitigating global warming. Post-combustion carbon capture technologies are an attractive option for coal-fired power plants as they do not require modification of major power-plant infrastructures, such as fuel processing, boiler, and steam-turbine subsystems. In this project, the overall objective was to develop an advanced, hollow-fiber, polymeric membrane process that could be cost-effectively retrofitted into current pulverized coal-fired power plants to capture at least 90% of the CO₂ from plant flue gas with 95% captured CO₂ purity. The approach for this project tackled the technology development on three different fronts in parallel: membrane materials R&D, hollow-fiber membrane module development, and process development and engineering. The project team consisted of RTI (prime) and two industrial partners, Arkema, Inc. and Generon IGS, Inc. Two CO₂-selective membrane polymer platforms were targeted for development in this project. For the near term, a next-generation, high-flux polycarbonate membrane platform was spun into hollow-fiber membranes that were fabricated into both lab-scale and larger prototype (~2,200 ft²) membrane modules. For the long term, a new fluoropolymer membrane platform based on poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] chemistry was developed using a copolymer approach as improved capture membrane materials with superior chemical resistance to flue-gas contaminants (moisture, SO₂, NOx, etc.). Specific objectives were: - Development of new, highly chemically resistant, fluorinated polymers as membrane materials with minimum selectivity of 30 for CO₂ over N₂ and CO

  2. First 5 tower WIMP-search results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search with improved understanding of neutron backgrounds and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings-Yeomans, Raul [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Non-baryonic dark matter makes one quarter of the energy density of the Universe and is concentrated in the halos of galaxies, including the Milky Way. The Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) is a dark matter candidate with a scattering cross section with an atomic nucleus of the order of the weak interaction and a mass comparable to that of an atomic nucleus. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) experiment, using Ge and Si cryogenic particle detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, aims to directly detect nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions. This thesis presents the first 5 tower WIMP-search results from CDMS-II, an estimate of the cosmogenic neutron backgrounds expected at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, and a proposal for a new measurement of high-energy neutrons underground to benchmark the Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the non-observation of WIMPs and using standard assumptions about the galactic halo [68], the 90% C.L. upper limit of the spin-independent WIMPnucleon cross section for the first 5 tower run is 6.6 × 10-44cm2 for a 60 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. A combined limit using all the data taken at Soudan results in an upper limit of 4.6×10-44cm2 at 90% C.L.for a 60 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. This new limit corresponds to a factor of ~3 improvement over any previous CDMS-II limit and a factor of ~2 above 60 GeV/c 2 better than any other WIMP search to date. This thesis presents an estimation, based on Monte Carlo simulations, of the nuclear recoils produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries (at the Soudan site) for a 5 tower Ge and Si configuration as well as for a 7 supertower array. The results of the Monte Carlo are that CDMS-II should expect 0.06 ± 0.02+0.18 -0.02 /kgyear unvetoed single nuclear recoils in Ge for the 5 tower configuration, and 0.05 ± 0.01+0.15 -0.02 /kg-year for the 7 supertower configuration. The systematic error is based on the available

  3. Gas permeation process for post combustion CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, Marc

    2017-01-01

    CO 2 Capture and Storage (CCS) is a promising solution to separate CO 2 from flue gas, to reduce the CO 2 emissions in the atmosphere, and hence to reduce global warming. In CCS, one important constraint is the high additional energy requirement of the different capture processes. That statement is partly explained by the low CO 2 fraction in the inlet flue gas and the high output targets in terms of CO 2 capture and purity (≥90%). Gas permeation across dense membrane can be used in post combustion CO 2 capture. Gas permeation in a dense membrane is ruled by a mass transfer mechanism and separation performance in a dense membrane are characterized by component's effective permeability and selectivity. One of the newest and encouraging type of membrane in terms of separation performance is the facilitated transport membrane. Each particular type of membrane is defined by a specific mass transfer law. The most important difference to the mass transfer behavior in a dense membrane is related to the facilitated transport mechanism and the solution diffusion mechanism and its restrictions and limitations. Permeation flux modelling across a dense membrane is required to perform a post combustion CO 2 capture process simulation. A CO 2 gas permeation separation process is composed of a two-steps membrane process, one drying step and a compression unit. Simulation on the energy requirement and surface area of the different membrane modules in the global system are useful to determine the benefits of using dense membranes in a post combustion CO 2 capture technology. (author)

  4. Development of low-background CsI(Tl) crystals for WIMP search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.S.; Bhang, H.; Hahn, I.S.; Hwang, M.J.; Kim, H.J.; Kim, S.C.; Kim, S.K.; Kim, S.Y.; Kim, T.Y.; Kim, Y.D.; Kwak, J.W.; Kwon, Y.J.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.I.; Lee, M.J.; Li, J.; Myung, S.S.; Park, H.; Zhu, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) is being carried out at the underground laboratory, Yangyang, Korea. Characteristics and internal background of CsI(Tl) crystal have been investigated. In our extensive R and D, we reduced internal background in the CsI(Tl) crystal. With the latest, we have achieved 5.50+/-0.10cpd (counts/keV/kg/day) at 10-15keV low-energy region. Further reduction of internal background is foreseen with the CsI powder lately produced

  5. Asymmetric WIMP Dark Matter in the presence of DM/anti-DM oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaharijas, G.

    2014-01-01

    The general class of 'Asymmetric Dark Matter (DM)' scenarios assumes the existence of a primordial particle/anti-particle asymmetry in the dark matter sector related to the asymmetry in the baryonic one, as a way to achieve the observed similarity between the baryonic and dark matter energy densities today. Focusing on this framework we study the effect of oscillations between dark matter and its anti-particle on the re-equilibration of the initial asymmetry. We calculate the evolution of the dark matter relic abundance and show how oscillations re-open the parameter space of asymmetric dark matter models, in particular in the direction of allowing large (WIMP-scale) DM masses. We found in particular that a typical WIMP with a mass at the EW scale (about 1 TeV) having a primordial asymmetry of the same order as the baryon asymmetry, naturally gets the correct relic abundance if the δm mass term is in the ∼ meV range. This turns out to be a natural value for fermionic DM arising from the higher dimensional operator H 2 DM 2 /Λ where H is the Higgs field and Λ ∼ M Pl . Finally, we constrain the parameter space in this framework by applying up-to-date bounds from indirect detection signals on annihilating DM

  6. Multiphonon capture processes in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Uskov, A.; Bischoff, Svend

    2001-01-01

    We investigate capture of carriers from states in the continuous part of the energy spectrum into the discrete states of self-assembled InAs/GaAs QDs via emission of one or two phonons. We are not aware of any other investigations of two-phonon mediated capture processes in QDs, but we show...

  7. Review of the neutron capture process in fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The importance of the neutron capture process and the status of the more important cross section data are reviewed. The capture in fertile and fissile nuclei is considered. For thermal reactors the thermal to epithermal capture ratio for 238 U and 232 Th remains a problem though some improvements were made with more recent measurements. The capture cross section of 238 U in the fast energy range remains quite uncertain and a long standing discrepancy for the calculated versus experimental central reaction rate ratio C28/F49 persists. Capture in structural materials, fission product nuclei and the higher actinides is also considered

  8. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter Using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets accumulated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Results from the original analysis of these data were published in 2009; two events were observed in the signal region with an expected leakage of 0.9 events. Further investigation revealed an issue with the ionization-pulse reconstruction algorithm leading to a software upgrade and a subsequent reanalysis of the data. As part of the reanalysis, I performed an advanced discrimination technique to better distinguish (potential) signal events from backgrounds using a 5-dimensional chi-square method. This dataanalysis technique combines the event information recorded for each WIMP-search event to derive a backgrounddiscrimination parameter capable of reducing the expected background to less than one event, while maintaining high efficiency for signal events. Furthermore, optimizing the cut positions of this 5-dimensional chi-square parameter for the 14 viable germanium detectors yields an improved expected sensitivity to WIMP interactions relative to previous CDMS results. This dissertation describes my improved (and optimized) discrimination technique and the results obtained from a blind application to the reanalyzed CDMS II WIMP-search data.

  9. System and process for capture of acid gasses at elevated pressure from gaseous process streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Linehan, John C.; Rainbolt, James E.; Bearden, Mark D.; Zheng, Feng

    2016-09-06

    A system, method, and material that enables the pressure-activated reversible chemical capture of acid gasses such as CO.sub.2 from gas volumes such as streams, flows or any other volume. Once the acid gas is chemically captured, the resulting product typically a zwitterionic salt, can be subjected to a reduced pressure whereupon the resulting product will release the captures acid gas and the capture material will be regenerated. The invention includes this process as well as the materials and systems for carrying out and enabling this process.

  10. Constraints on light WIMP candidates from the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arina, Chiara; Tytgat, Michel H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the measurements reported by direct detection experiments, most notably DAMA, CDMS-II, CoGeNT and Xenon10/100, we study further the constraints that might be set on some light dark matter candidates, M DM ∼ few GeV, using the Fermi-LAT data on the isotropic gamma-ray diffuse emission. In particular, we consider a Dirac fermion singlet interacting through a new Z' gauge boson, and a scalar singlet S interacting through the Higgs portal. Both candidates are WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), i.e. they have an annihilation cross-section in the pbarn range. Also they may both have a spin-independent elastic cross section on nucleons in the range required by direct detection experiments. Although being generic WIMP candidates, because they have different interactions with Standard Model particles, their phenomenology regarding the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray emission is quite distinct. In the case of the scalar singlet, the one-to-one correspondence between its annihilation cross-section and its spin-independent elastic scattering cross-section permits to express the constraints from the Fermi-LAT data in the direct detection exclusion plot, σ n 0 −M DM . Depending on the astrophysics, we argue that it is possible to exclude the singlet scalar dark matter candidate at 95% confidence level. The constraints on the Dirac singlet interacting through a Z' are comparatively weaker

  11. Further results on the WIMP annual modulation signature by DAMA/NaI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Cappella, F.

    2005-01-01

    The ≅ 100 kg highly radiopure NaI(Tl) set-up of the DAMA project (DAMA/NaI) has investigated the model- independent WIMP annual modulation signature over seven annual cycles for a total exposure of 107731 kg x day, obtaining a model-independent evidence for the presence of a dark matter particle component in the galactic halo at 6.3 σ C.L.. Some of the many possible corollary model-dependent quests for the candidate particle have been investigated with the total exposure as well

  12. Study of CO2 capture processes in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, J.M.

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO 2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post-combustion CO 2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture by methanol and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO 2 . These processes were evaluated using the process software Aspen PlusTM to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. With regard to post-combustion, an aqueous solution based on a mixture of amines (N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and triethylene tetramine (TETA)) was developed. Measurements of absorption were carried out between 298 and 333 K in a Lewis cell. CO 2 partial pressure at equilibrium, characteristic of the CO 2 solubility in the solvent, was determined up to 393 K. The solvent performances were compared with respect to more conventional solvents such as MDEA and monoethanolamine (MEA). For oxy-fuel combustion, a recovery process, based on a cryogenic separation of the components of the flue gas, was developed and applied to power plants. The study showed that O 2 purity acts on the CO 2 concentration in the flue gas and thus on the performances of the recovery process. The last option is natural gas reforming with CO 2 pre-combustion capture. Several configurations were assessed: air reforming and oxygen reforming, reforming pressure and dilution of the synthesis gas. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents. (author)

  13. A Process for Capturing the Art of Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Clark V., III; Sekeres, Carrie; Roumie, Yasmeen

    2016-01-01

    There is both an art and a science to systems engineering. The science of systems engineering is effectively captured in processes and procedures, but the art is much more elusive. We propose that there is six step process that can be applied to any systems engineering organization to create an environment from which the "art" of that organization can be captured, be allowed to evolve collaboratively and be shared with all members of the organization. This paper details this process as it was applied to NASA Launch Services Program (LSP) Integration Engineering Branch during a pilot program of Confluence, a Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) wiki tool.

  14. Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Gerald C [North Augusta, SC; Falta, Ronald W [Seneca, SC; Siddall, Alvin A [Aiken, SC

    2011-07-12

    A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

  15. Attentional Capture by Emotional Stimuli Is Modulated by Semantic Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang-Ming; Baddeley, Alan; Young, Andrew W.

    2008-01-01

    The attentional blink paradigm was used to examine whether emotional stimuli always capture attention. The processing requirement for emotional stimuli in a rapid sequential visual presentation stream was manipulated to investigate the circumstances under which emotional distractors capture attention, as reflected in an enhanced attentional blink…

  16. Neutron Induced Capture and Fission Processes on 238U

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear data on Uranium isotopes are of crucial interest for new generation of nuclear reactors. Processes of interest are the nuclear reactions induced by neutrons and in this work mainly the capture and the fission process on 238U will be analyzed in a wide energy interval. For slow and resonant neutrons the many levels Breit – Wigner formalism is necessary. In the case of fast and very fast neutrons up to 200 MeV the nuclear reaction mechanism implemented in Talys will be used. The present evaluations are necessary in order to obtain the field of neutrons in the design of nuclear reactors and they are compared with experimental data from literature obtained from capture and (n,xn processes.

  17. Membrane contactors for CO2 capture processes - critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogalska, Adrianna; Trojanowska, Anna; Garcia-Valls, Ricard

    2017-07-01

    The use of membrane contactor in industrial processes is wide, and lately it started to be used in CO2 capture process mainly for gas purification or to reduce the emission. Use of the membrane contactor provides high contact surface area so the size of the absorber unit significantly decreases, which is an important factor for commercialization. The research has been caried out regarding the use of novel materials for the membrane production and absorbent solution improvements. The present review reveals the progress in membrane contactor systems for CO2 capture processes concerning solution for ceramic membrane wetting, comparison study of different polymers used for fabrication and methods of enzyme immobilization for biocomposite membrane. Also information about variety of absorbent solutions is described.

  18. ACACIA Project - Development of a Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Process. Case of the DMXTM Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.; Briot, P.; Raynal, L.; Broutin, P.; Gimenez, M.; Soazic, M.; Cessat, P.; Saysset, S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the ACACIA project was to develop processes for post-combustion CO 2 capture at a lower cost and with a higher energetic efficiency than first generation processes using amines such as Monoethanolamine (MEA) which are now considered for the first Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) demonstrators. The partners involved in this project were: Rhodia (Solvay since then), Arkema, Lafarge, GDF SUEZ, Veolia Environnement, IFP Energies nouvelles, IRCE Lyon, LMOPS, LTIM, LSA Armines. To validate the relevance of the breakthrough processes studied in this project, techno-economic evaluations were carried out with comparison to the reference process using a 30 wt% MEA solvent. These evaluation studies involved all the industrial partners of the project, each partner bringing specific cases of CO 2 capture on their industrial facilities. From these studies, only the process using de-mixing solvent, DMX TM , developed by IFPEN appears as an alternative solution to the MEA process. (authors)

  19. Astrophysical neutron capture rates in s- and r-process nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.; Mohr, P.; Oberhummer, H.; Rauscher, T.; Mutti, P.; Corvi, F.; Sedyshev, P.V.; Popov, Yu.P.

    1997-01-01

    The astrophysical neutron capture rates of light and heavy nuclei are measured and calculated. The measurements are realized using the activation technique at the 3.75 MV Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator and by means of the time-of-flight method at the Geel electron linear accelerator (GELINA). The setup for the fast cyclic activation measurements made on 26 Mg and 48 Ca, as well as on Pt isotopes is described. The time-of-flight method is used for neutron capture measurements of the bottleneck isotopes 138 Ba and 208 Pb. The calculations are made using direct and compound nuclear capture models. The s-process nucleosynthesis path in the Os and Pt mass region is discussed in details. It is shown that for 19 '1 Os, 192 Ir and 193 Pt there is a competition between β-decay and neutron capture. The β-decay half-lives are dependent on temperature and electron density of the s-process environment. The abundance of s-only 192 Pt originates from the branching at 191 Os and 192 Ir. The isotopes 190 Pt and 198 Pt are not on the s-process path, therefore the seed abundance vanish during nucleosynthesis. Calculations are carried out using parametrized models in order to reproduce the s-process abundance in the mass region from Os up to Pt. The neutron density is adjusted to reproduce the solar abundance of the s-only isotope 9 2 Pt in the analysis of the present branching especially

  20. Results and status of the Edelweiss Wimp search experiment; Experience Edelweiss de recherche directe de Wimps: resultats et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, A.; Berge, L.; Blumer, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Censier, B.; Chabert, L.; Chambon, B.; Chapellier, M.; Chardin, G.; Charvin, P.; Jesus, M. de; Drain, D.; Di Stefano, P.; Dumoulin, L.; Eitel, K.; Fesquet, M.; Firucci, S.; Gascon, J.; Gerbier, G.; Gerlic, E.; Goldbach, C.; Goyot, M.; Gros, M.; Habermahl, F.; Horn, M.; Hadjout, J.P.; Herve, S.; Juillard, A.; Kikuchi, C.; Lesquen, A. de; Luca, M.; Mallet, J.; Marnieros, S.; Martineau, O.; Mosca, L.; Navick, X.F.; Nollez, G.; Pari, P.; Riccio, C.; Sanglard, V.; Stern, M.; Vagneron, L.; Villard, V

    2005-07-01

    In the Edelweiss experiment, nuclear recoils induced by elastic collisions with WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particle) from the galactic halo are identified in low-temperature Ge detectors where the ratio of the heat and ionization signals provide an event-by-event discrimination of nuclear recoils from the dominant background coming from {gamma}-rays interactions. The Edelweiss experiment is located in the Modane underground facility in order to cut the muon flux drastically. We present here the results obtained during the first part of the experiment named Edelweiss-I that ended in the beginning of 2004. Since october 2002, 3 optimized 320 grams detectors have been simultaneously operated at a regulated temperature of 0.017 K and about 50 kg*day were added to the previous published data. These data are still under analysis but preliminary results concerning the upper limit at 90% CL (confidence level) confirm the limit already published in 2002. The first run of Edelweiss-II is due to begin during summer 2005, we are expecting to gain 2 orders of magnitude in terms of detector sensitivity and reach 0.002 events/day*kg. (A.C.)

  1. Numerical prediction of CO2 capture process by a single droplet in alkaline spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Tsai, Ming-Hang; Hung, Chen-I

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • CO 2 capture by a single droplet is studied numerically. • Three different initial pH values of 10, 11, and 12 in the droplet are considered. • The initial pH value has a significant influence on the capture process. • The carbon capture rate is raised as the initial pH value rises. • The droplet with the initial pH value of 12 is feasible to perform CO 2 capture. - Abstract: Carbon dioxide captured by single droplets in sprays plays a fundamental role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This study focuses on CO 2 capture processes in single droplets in alkaline sprays using a numerical method. Three different initial pH values of 10, 11, and 12 in the droplet are considered. The capture behavior in the absence of chemical dissociation is also investigated for comparison. The predictions suggest that the chemical dissociation in the droplet substantially elongates the CO 2 capture process and the mass diffusion is the controlling mechanism of CO 2 capture process. For the chemical absorption, the final CO 2 capture amount by the droplet is mainly determined by HCO 3 - which is significantly influenced by the initial pH value. An increase in initial pH value raises the carbon capture amount by the droplet. The mean concentration of CO 3 2- is highly related to the variation of mean pH value, but its concentration is by far lower than those of H 2 O⋅CO 2 and HCO 3 - . Corresponding to the initial pH values of 10, 11, and 12, the times required for turning the basic droplet to the acidic one are in the orders of 10, 100, and 1000 ms. On account of larger carbon capture amount and shorter absorption period at a higher initial pH value, the carbon capture rate is lifted as the initial pH value rises, and CO 2 capture by droplets at the initial pH value of 12 is better than those at 10 and 11

  2. Modelling of tetrahydrofuran promoted gas hydrate systems for carbon dioxide capture processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    A thermodynamic study of a novel gas hydrate based CO2 capture process is presented.•Model predicts this process unsuitable for CO2 capture from power station flue gases. A thermodynamic modelling study of both fluid phase behaviour and hydrate phase behaviour is presented for the quaternary system...... of water, tetrahydrofuran, carbon dioxide and nitrogen. The applied model incorporates the Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state for the fluid phase description and the van der Waals-Platteeuw hydrate model for the solid (hydrate) phase. Six binary pairs are studied for their fluid phase behaviour...... accurate descriptions of both fluid- and hydrate phase equilibria in the studied system and its subsystems. The developed model is applied to simulate two simplified, gas hydrate-based processes for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gases. The first process, an unpromoted...

  3. CO2 capture using aqueous ammonia: kinetic study and process simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; van Well, Willy J.M.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    to 0.6. The results were compared with those found for 30 wt% mono-ethanolamine (MEA) solutions.The capture process was simulated successfully using the simulator Aspen Plus coupled with the extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic model available for the NH3–CO2–H2O system. For this purpose, a user model......Carbon dioxide capture using aqueous ammonia is a post-combustion technology that has shown a good potential. Therefore this process is studied by measuring the rate of absorption of carbon dioxide by aqueous ammonia and by performing process simulation. The rate of absorption of carbon dioxide...

  4. CPN/Tools: A Post-WIMP Interface for Editing and Simulating Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel; Mackay, Wendy E.

    2001-01-01

    traditional ideas about user interfaces, getting rid of pull-down menus, scrollbars, and even selection, while providing the same or greater functionality. It also uses the new and much faster CPN simulator and features incremental syntax checking of the nets. CPN/Tools requires an OpenGL graphics accelerator......CPN/Tools is a major redesign of the popular Design/CPN tool from the University of Aarhus CPN group. The new interface is based on advanced, post-WIMP interaction techniques, including bi-manual interaction, toolglasses and marking menus and a new metaphor for managing the workspace. It challenges...

  5. An Integrated, Low Temperature Process to Capture and Sequester Carbon Dioxide from Industrial Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Foremski, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Laboratory experiments show that it is possible to integrate (1) the chemistry of serpentine dissolution, (2) capture of CO2 gas from the combustion of natural gas and coal-fired power plants using aqueous amine-based solvents, (3) long-term CO2 sequestration via solid phase carbonate precipitation, and (4) capture solvent regeneration with acid recycling in a single, continuous process. In our process, magnesium is released from serpentine at 300°C via heat treatment with ammonium sulfate salts or at temperatures as low as 50°C via reaction with sulfuric acid. We have also demonstrated that various solid carbonate phases can be precipitated directly from aqueous amine-based (NH3, MEA, DMEA) CO2 capture solvent solutions at room temperature. Direct precipitation from the capture solvent enables regenerating CO2 capture solvent without the need for heat and without the need to compress the CO2 off gas. We propose that known low-temperature electrochemical methods can be integrated with this process to regenerate the aqueous amine capture solvent and recycle acid for dissolution of magnesium-bearing mineral feedstocks and magnesium release. Although the direct precipitation of magnesite at ambient conditions remains elusive, experimental results demonstrate that at temperatures ranging from 20°C to 60°C, either nesquehonite Mg(HCO3)(OH)●2H2O or a double salt with the formula [NH4]2Mg(CO3)2●4H2O or an amorphous magnesium carbonate precipitate directly from the capture solvent. These phases are less desirable for CO2 sequestration than magnesite because they potentially remove constituents (water, ammonia) from the reaction system, reducing the overall efficiency of the sequestration process. Accordingly, the integrated process can be accomplished with minimal energy consumption and loss of CO2 capture and acid solvents, and a net generation of 1 to 4 moles of H2O/6 moles of CO2 sequestered (depending on the solid carbonate precipitate and amount of produced H2

  6. Identifying WIMP dark matter from particle and astroparticle data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Bozorgnia, Nassim; Kim, Jong Soo; Liem, Sebastian; McCabe, Christopher; Otten, Sydney; Ruiz de Austri, Roberto

    2018-03-01

    One of the most promising strategies to identify the nature of dark matter consists in the search for new particles at accelerators and with so-called direct detection experiments. Working within the framework of simplified models, and making use of machine learning tools to speed up statistical inference, we address the question of what we can learn about dark matter from a detection at the LHC and a forthcoming direct detection experiment. We show that with a combination of accelerator and direct detection data, it is possible to identify newly discovered particles as dark matter, by reconstructing their relic density assuming they are weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) thermally produced in the early Universe, and demonstrating that it is consistent with the measured dark matter abundance. An inconsistency between these two quantities would instead point either towards additional physics in the dark sector, or towards a non-standard cosmology, with a thermal history substantially different from that of the standard cosmological model.

  7. arXiv Uncertainties in WIMP Dark Matter Scattering Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Olive, Keith A.

    We revisit the uncertainties in the calculation of spin-independent scattering matrix elements for the scattering of WIMP dark matter particles on nuclear matter. In addition to discussing the uncertainties due to limitations in our knowledge of the nucleonic matrix elements of the light quark scalar densities , we also discuss the importances of heavy quark scalar densities , and comment on uncertainties in quark mass ratios. We analyze estimates of the light-quark densities made over the past decade using lattice calculations and/or phenomenological inputs. We find an uncertainty in the combination that is larger than has been assumed in some phenomenological analyses, and a range of that is smaller but compatible with earlier estimates. We also analyze the importance of the {\\cal O}(\\alpha_s^3) calculations of the heavy-quark matrix elements that are now available, which provide an important refinement of the calculation of the spin-independent scattering cross section. We use for illustration a benchmar...

  8. Thermodynamic and Process Modelling of Gas Hydrate Systems in CO2 Capture Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen

    A novel gas separation technique based on gas hydrate formation (solid precipitation) is investigated by means of thermodynamic modeling and experimental investigations. This process has previously been proposed for application in post-combustion carbon dioxide capture from power station flue gases...... formation may be performed at pressures of approximately 20 MPa and temperatures below 280 K. Thermodynamic promoters are needed, to reduce the pressure requirement of the process, thereby making it competitive to existing capture technologies. A literature study is presented focusing mainly...... on thermodynamic gas hydrate promotion by hydrate formers stabilising the classical gas clathrate hydrate structures (sI, sII and sH) at low to moderate pressures. Much literature is available on this subject. Both experimental and theoretical studies presented in the literature have pointed out cyclopentane...

  9. An architectural framework for developing intelligent applications for the carbon dioxide capture process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, C.; Zhou, Q.; Chan, C.W. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reported on the development of automated application solutions for the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture process. An architectural framework was presented for developing intelligent systems for the process system. The chemical absorption process consists of dozens of components. It therefore generates more than a hundred different types of data. Developing automated support for these tasks is desirable because the monitoring, analysis and diagnosis of the data is very complex. The proposed framework interacts with an implemented domain ontology for the CO{sub 2} capture process, which consists of information derived from senior operators of the CO{sub 2} pilot plant at the International Test Centre for Carbon Dioxide Capture at University of Regina. The well-defined library within the framework reduces development time and cost. The framework also has built-in web-based software components for data monitoring, management, and analysis. These components provide support for generating automated solutions for the CO{sub 2} capture process. An automated monitoring system that was also developed based on the architectural framework.

  10. Detection of WIMPs in the Edelweiss experiment. Study of the radioactive background noise and measurements with bolometers; Recherche des wimp's du halo galactique dans l'experience edelweiss: etude du bas bruit radioactif et mesures a l'aide de bolometres a double detection ionisation/chaleur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miramonti, L. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DAPNIA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the detection of black matter in the form of WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particle). The characteristics of the interaction of WIMPs with matter are recalled. The very low number of expected events (<1 event/day.Kg) implies a radioactive background noise as weak as possible, furthermore the exponential decrease of the interacting rate with increasing energy calls for detectors with very low thresholds. Bolometers present advantages in WIMPs detection: i) very good resolution and very low thresholds, ii) very broad range of materials that can be used as absorber, the only requirements are: a crystal structure, to be a diamagnetic isolator and to have a convenient Debye temperature, iii) the possibility of detecting ionizing or non-ionizing particles, iv) the possibility of identifying the incident particle by measuring both temperature and another parameter such as ionization or scintillation, and v) the possibility of localizing the interaction inside the absorber by detecting ballistic phonons. The problematic of radioactive background noise is presented and the answers to the different sources (cosmic radiation,natural and artificial radioactivity) generating the background noise are examined. The materials used in the building of the detector and cryostat must be carefully chosen, they should be as little radioactive as possible. The test benches used to select materials for the Edelweiss experiment are described. The first measurements concerning the detectors Ge-4 and Ge-7 are presented. (A.C.)

  11. 7th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2011). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zioutas, Konstantin; Schumann, Marc

    2011-12-01

    The year 2011 was an exciting period to work on the ''dark side'' of the Universe. Several experimental claims of the direct detection of WIMP dark matter were challenged by the restrictive limits of several others. Dedicated experiments searching for axions, another well motivated dark matter candidate, and for axion-like particles continued to improve their limits and got an additional boost by puzzling astrophysical observations and new developments in theory. The LHC collected an unexpectedly large amount of data and started to produce results at an amazing speed. And finally, this year's Nobel price of physics was awarded to the observation of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, an effect which might be related to dark energy, whose nature remain among the biggest mysteries in physics. These exciting topics and many more important aspects of particle- and astroparticle physics were discussed between experimentalists and theorists at the 7th Patras Workshop on Axions, WIMPs, and WISPs. The workshop took place from June 27 - July 1, 2011, in the Royal Myconian and Myconian Imperial Resorts Hotels on the Greek island of Mykonos. As in the previous years, it was a very fruitful and lively meeting in an inspiring and open atmosphere, which allowed for many open and constructive discussions also on controversial topics. The scientific exchange, the beautiful scenery of the island, the venue itself, the food, an excursion to the ancient ruins of Delos, and finally an amazing conference dinner made this meeting really unique. The ''spirit'' of the workshop and its atmosphere cannot be brought to paper, but many of its scientific highlights are collected in these proceedings. We are looking forward to the 8th Patras Workshop, which will be held in Chicago (USA) July 18-22, 2012. It will be organized jointly by our US colleagues Andrei Afanasev (JLAB), Oliver Baker (Yale), and William Wester (FNAL).

  12. Bolometer's development for the detection of dark matter; Instrumentation autour de bolometres pour la recherche de matiere sombre WIMPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvon, D

    2000-06-01

    The author reviews his contributions to the use of bolometers (cryogenic detectors) for the detection of wimps (weakly interactive massive particles). Wimps are detected through their elastic scattering on the nuclei of the detector, a heat signal, luminescence or ionization can be simultaneously detected (at least 2 signals are necessary to discard photon interactions). Bolometers operate at low temperatures (< 50 mK) so they allow very low detection threshold and resolution (< keV) with a full energy conversion for recoiling nuclei. In Saclay the technology of bolometers based on simultaneous detection of heat and ionisation has been developed and improvements have been studied (NbSi thin films bolometers). The first results obtained in the framework of the Edelweiss collaboration are presented. Other developments based on infra-red bolometry (Planck surveyor and Archeops projects) are briefly described. In an appendix the operating principle of a bolometer is presented. (A.C.)

  13. The phenomenology of superWIMP dark matter scenariow with long-lived sleptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisig, Jan

    2013-08-15

    We study the phenomenology of a supersymmetric scenario where the next-to-lightest superparticle (NLSP) is the charged slepton and is long-lived due to a lightest superparticle (LSP) which is a super weakly interacting massive particle (superWIMP), like the gravitino. This has far-reaching consequences for the cosmological history of the universe on the one hand and for the signatures at colliders on the other hand. We do not assume any high-scale model for the mediation of SUSY breaking to the MSSM but work along the lines of simplified models and the phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). In a first part, we investigate the LHC sensitivity and its dependence on the superparticle spectrum with an emphasis on strong production and decay. We formulate appropriate simplified models that allow to conservatively approximate the signal efficiencies of arbitrary spectra from a small number of decisive parameters. We found that the application of simplified models is especially suitable in the considered scenario. Devising cuts that yield a large detection efficiency in the whole parameter space, we determine the discovery and exclusion potential of the LHC. We found that the prominent signature of long-lived sleptons allows to extract more robust constraints on the parameter space than for the widely studied case of a neutralino LSP scenario. In addition, we study the implications of the recent LHC results on the cosmological validity of a superWIMP Dark Matter scenario with a long-lived stau NLSP. Therefore, we work in a pMSSM framework and perform a Monte Carlo scan over the pMSSM parameter space highlighting the implications of a Higgs around 125 GeV and the nullsearches for heavy stable charged particles at the 7 and 8TeV LHC. Further, we consider bounds from MSSM Higgs searches, from flavor and precision observables as well as from the theoretical requirement of vacuum stability. In particular we work out the impact on the allowed range for the stau yield after freeze

  14. The phenomenology of superWIMP dark matter scenariow with long-lived sleptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisig, Jan

    2013-08-01

    We study the phenomenology of a supersymmetric scenario where the next-to-lightest superparticle (NLSP) is the charged slepton and is long-lived due to a lightest superparticle (LSP) which is a super weakly interacting massive particle (superWIMP), like the gravitino. This has far-reaching consequences for the cosmological history of the universe on the one hand and for the signatures at colliders on the other hand. We do not assume any high-scale model for the mediation of SUSY breaking to the MSSM but work along the lines of simplified models and the phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). In a first part, we investigate the LHC sensitivity and its dependence on the superparticle spectrum with an emphasis on strong production and decay. We formulate appropriate simplified models that allow to conservatively approximate the signal efficiencies of arbitrary spectra from a small number of decisive parameters. We found that the application of simplified models is especially suitable in the considered scenario. Devising cuts that yield a large detection efficiency in the whole parameter space, we determine the discovery and exclusion potential of the LHC. We found that the prominent signature of long-lived sleptons allows to extract more robust constraints on the parameter space than for the widely studied case of a neutralino LSP scenario. In addition, we study the implications of the recent LHC results on the cosmological validity of a superWIMP Dark Matter scenario with a long-lived stau NLSP. Therefore, we work in a pMSSM framework and perform a Monte Carlo scan over the pMSSM parameter space highlighting the implications of a Higgs around 125 GeV and the nullsearches for heavy stable charged particles at the 7 and 8TeV LHC. Further, we consider bounds from MSSM Higgs searches, from flavor and precision observables as well as from the theoretical requirement of vacuum stability. In particular we work out the impact on the allowed range for the stau yield after freeze

  15. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hancu, Dan; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    This report presents system and economicanalysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO₂ capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. Forcomparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO₂ for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO₂ as compared to $60.25/ton of CO₂ when MEA is used. The aminosilicone- based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO₂ decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higherthermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lowervapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lowerheat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages overconventional systems using MEA.

  16. THE INTERMEDIATE NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESS AND CARBON-ENHANCED METAL-POOR STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Melanie [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Landessternwarte, Königstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Stancliffe, Richard J. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lugaro, Maria [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Meyer, Bradley S., E-mail: mhampel@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the Galactic Halo display enrichments in heavy elements associated with either the s (slow) or the r (rapid) neutron-capture process (e.g., barium and europium, respectively), and in some cases they display evidence of both. The abundance patterns of these CEMP- s / r stars, which show both Ba and Eu enrichment, are particularly puzzling, since the s and the r processes require neutron densities that are more than ten orders of magnitude apart and, hence, are thought to occur in very different stellar sites with very different physical conditions. We investigate whether the abundance patterns of CEMP- s / r stars can arise from the nucleosynthesis of the intermediate neutron-capture process (the i process), which is characterized by neutron densities between those of the s and the r processes. Using nuclear network calculations, we study neutron capture nucleosynthesis at different constant neutron densities n ranging from 10{sup 7}–10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. With respect to the classical s process resulting from neutron densities on the lowest side of this range, neutron densities on the highest side result in abundance patterns, which show an increased production of heavy s -process and r -process elements, but similar abundances of the light s -process elements. Such high values of n may occur in the thermal pulses of asymptotic giant branch stars due to proton ingestion episodes. Comparison to the surface abundances of 20 CEMP- s / r stars shows that our modeled i -process abundances successfully reproduce observed abundance patterns, which could not be previously explained by s -process nucleosynthesis. Because the i -process models fit the abundances of CEMP- s / r stars so well, we propose that this class should be renamed as CEMP- i .

  17. Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-combustion CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shiguang; Shou, S.; Pyrzynski, Travis; Makkuni, Ajay; Meyer, Howard

    2013-12-31

    This report summarizes scientific/technical progress made for bench-scale membrane contactor technology for post-combustion CO2 capture from DOE Contract No. DE-FE-0004787. Budget Period 1 (BP1) membrane absorber, Budget Period 2 (BP2) membrane desorber and Budget Period 3 (BP3) integrated system and field testing studies have been completed successfully and met or exceeded the technical targets (≥ 90% CO2 removal and CO2 purity of 97% in one membrane stage). Significant breakthroughs are summarized below: BP1 research: The feasibility of utilizing the poly (ether ether ketone), PEEK, based hollow fiber contractor (HFC) in combination with chemical solvents to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO2 from simulated flue gases has been successfully established. Excellent progress has been made as we have achieved the BP1 goal: ≥ 1,000 membrane intrinsic CO2 permeance, ≥ 90% CO2 removal in one stage, ≤ 2 psi gas side pressure drop, and ≥ 1 (sec)-1 mass transfer coefficient. Initial test results also show that the CO2 capture performance, using activated Methyl Diethanol Amine (aMDEA) solvent, was not affected by flue gas contaminants O2 (~3%), NO2 (66 ppmv), and SO2 (145 ppmv). BP2 research: The feasibility of utilizing the PEEK HFC for CO2-loaded solvent regeneration has been successfully established High CO2 stripping flux, one order of magnitude higher than CO2 absorption flux, have been achieved. Refined economic evaluation based on BP1 membrane absorber and BP2 membrane desorber laboratory test data indicate that the CO2 capture costs are 36% lower than DOE’s benchmark amine absorption technology. BP3 research: A bench-scale system utilizing a membrane absorber and desorber was integrated into a continuous CO2 capture process using contactors containing 10 to 20 ft2 of membrane area. The integrated process operation was stable through a 100-hour laboratory test, utilizing a simulated flue gas stream. Greater than 90% CO2 capture combined with 97

  18. 7th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2011). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zioutas, Konstantin; Schumann, Marc (eds.)

    2011-12-15

    The year 2011 was an exciting period to work on the ''dark side'' of the Universe. Several experimental claims of the direct detection of WIMP dark matter were challenged by the restrictive limits of several others. Dedicated experiments searching for axions, another well motivated dark matter candidate, and for axion-like particles continued to improve their limits and got an additional boost by puzzling astrophysical observations and new developments in theory. The LHC collected an unexpectedly large amount of data and started to produce results at an amazing speed. And finally, this year's Nobel price of physics was awarded to the observation of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, an effect which might be related to dark energy, whose nature remain among the biggest mysteries in physics. These exciting topics and many more important aspects of particle- and astroparticle physics were discussed between experimentalists and theorists at the 7th Patras Workshop on Axions, WIMPs, and WISPs. The workshop took place from June 27 - July 1, 2011, in the Royal Myconian and Myconian Imperial Resorts Hotels on the Greek island of Mykonos. As in the previous years, it was a very fruitful and lively meeting in an inspiring and open atmosphere, which allowed for many open and constructive discussions also on controversial topics. The scientific exchange, the beautiful scenery of the island, the venue itself, the food, an excursion to the ancient ruins of Delos, and finally an amazing conference dinner made this meeting really unique. The ''spirit'' of the workshop and its atmosphere cannot be brought to paper, but many of its scientific highlights are collected in these proceedings. We are looking forward to the 8th Patras Workshop, which will be held in Chicago (USA) July 18-22, 2012. It will be organized jointly by our US colleagues Andrei Afanasev (JLAB), Oliver Baker (Yale), and William Wester (FNAL).

  19. Neutron Capture Reactions on Fe and Ni Isotopes for the Astrophysical s-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederer, C., E-mail: claudia.lederer@ed.ac.uk [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Giubrone, G. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Massimi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna, and Sezione INFN di Bologna, 40100 Bologna (Italy); Žugec, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, 70125 Bari (Italy); Domingo-Pardo, C. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Guerrero, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Gunsing, F. [Commissariat à l' Énergie Atomique (CEA) Saclay – Irfu, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Käppeler, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Nord, Institut für Kernphysik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tain, J.L. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Altstadt, S. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universität, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Andrzejewski, J. [Uniwersytet Łódzki, 90131 Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 – IPN, 91406 Orsay (France); Bécares, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bečvář, F. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2014-06-15

    Neutron capture cross sections in the keV neutron energy region are the key nuclear physics input to study the astrophysical slow neutron capture process. In the past years, a series of neutron capture cross section measurements has been performed at the neutron time-of-flight facility n{sub T}OF at CERN focussing on the Fe/Ni mass region. Recent results and future developments in the neutron time-of-flight technique are discussed.

  20. Capturing connectivity and causality in complex industrial processes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fan; Shah, Sirish L; Chen, Tongwen

    2014-01-01

    This brief reviews concepts of inter-relationship in modern industrial processes, biological and social systems. Specifically ideas of connectivity and causality within and between elements of a complex system are treated; these ideas are of great importance in analysing and influencing mechanisms, structural properties and their dynamic behaviour, especially for fault diagnosis and hazard analysis. Fault detection and isolation for industrial processes being concerned with root causes and fault propagation, the brief shows that, process connectivity and causality information can be captured in two ways: ·      from process knowledge: structural modeling based on first-principles structural models can be merged with adjacency/reachability matrices or topology models obtained from process flow-sheets described in standard formats; and ·      from process data: cross-correlation analysis, Granger causality and its extensions, frequency domain methods, information-theoretical methods, and Bayesian ne...

  1. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  2. Stellar neutron capture rates and the s process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Käppeler F.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutron reactions are responsible for the formation of the elements heavier than iron. The corresponding scenarios relate to helium burning in Red Giant stars (s process and to supernova explosions (r and p processes. The s process, which operates in or near the valley of β-stability, has produced about half of the elemental abundances between Fe and Bi. Accurate (n, γ cross sections are the essential input for s process studies, because they determine the abundances produced by that process. Following a brief summary of the neutron capture processes, the focus will be set on the s process in massive stars, where the role of reliable cross section information is particularly important. Eventually, the intriguing aspects of the origin of 60Fe will be addressed. Attempts to determine the stellar cross section of that isotope are pushing experimental possibilities to their limits and present a pertinent challenge for future facilities.

  3. CO2 capture from IGCC gas streams using the AC-ABC process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Anoop [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); McLaughlin, Elisabeth [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hornbostel, Marc [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krishnan, Gopala [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Jayaweera, Indira [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-02-16

    The objective of this project was to develop a novel, low-cost CO2 capture process from pre-combustion gas streams. The bench-scale work was conducted at the SRI International. A 0.15-MWe integrated pilot plant was constructed and operated for over 700 hours at the National Carbon Capture Center, Wilsonville, AL. The AC-ABC (ammonium carbonate-ammonium bicarbonate) process for capture of CO2 and H2S from the pre-combustion gas stream offers many advantages over Selexol-based technology. The process relies on the simple chemistry of the NH3-CO2-H2O-H2S system and on the ability of the aqueous ammoniated solution to absorb CO2 at near ambient temperatures and to release it as a high-purity, high-pressure gas at a moderately elevated regeneration temperature. It is estimated the increase in cost of electricity (COE) with the AC-ABC process will be ~ 30%, and the cost of CO2 captured is projected to be less than $27/metric ton of CO2 while meeting 90% CO2 capture goal. The Bechtel Pressure Swing Claus (BPSC) is a complementary technology offered by Bechtel Hydrocarbon Technology Solutions, Inc. BPSC is a high-pressure, sub-dew-point Claus process that allows for nearly complete removal of H2S from a gas stream. It operates at gasifier pressures and moderate temperatures and does not affect CO2 content. When coupled with AC-ABC, the combined technologies allow a nearly pure CO2 stream to be captured at high pressure, something which Selexol and other solvent-based technologies cannot achieve.

  4. An intelligent system for monitoring and diagnosis of the CO{sub 2} capture process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Chan, C.W.; Tontiwachwuthikul, P. [University of Regina, Regina, SK (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    2011-07-15

    Amine-based carbon dioxide capture has been widely considered as a feasible ideal technology for reducing large-scale CO{sub 2} emissions and mitigating global warming. The operation of amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is a complicated task, which involves monitoring over 100 process parameters and careful manipulation of numerous valves and pumps. The current research in the field of CO{sub 2} capture has emphasized the need for improving CO{sub 2} capture efficiency and enhancing plant performance. In the present study, artificial intelligence techniques were applied for developing a knowledge-based expert system that aims at effectively monitoring and controlling the CO{sub 2} capture process and thereby enhancing CO{sub 2} capture efficiency. In developing the system, the inferential modeling technique (IMT) was applied to analyze the domain knowledge and problem-solving techniques, and a knowledge base was developed on DeltaV Simulate. The expert system helps to enhance CO{sub 2} capture system performance and efficiency by reducing the time required for diagnosis and problem solving if abnormal conditions occur. The expert system can be used as a decision-support tool that helps inexperienced operators control the plant: it can be used also for training novice operators.

  5. Results and status of the Edelweiss Wimp search experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, A.; Berge, L.; Blumer, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Censier, B.; Chabert, L.; Chambon, B.; Chapellier, M.; Chardin, G.; Charvin, P.; Jesus, M. de; Drain, D.; Di Stefano, P.; Dumoulin, L.; Eitel, K.; Fesquet, M.; Firucci, S.; Gascon, J.; Gerbier, G.; Gerlic, E.; Goldbach, C.; Goyot, M.; Gros, M.; Habermahl, F.; Horn, M.; Hadjout, J.P.; Herve, S.; Juillard, A.; Kikuchi, C.; Lesquen, A. de; Luca, M.; Mallet, J.; Marnieros, S.; Martineau, O.; Mosca, L.; Navick, X.F.; Nollez, G.; Pari, P.; Riccio, C.; Sanglard, V.; Stern, M.; Vagneron, L.; Villard, V.

    2005-01-01

    In the Edelweiss experiment, nuclear recoils induced by elastic collisions with WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particle) from the galactic halo are identified in low-temperature Ge detectors where the ratio of the heat and ionization signals provide an event-by-event discrimination of nuclear recoils from the dominant background coming from γ-rays interactions. The Edelweiss experiment is located in the Modane underground facility in order to cut the muon flux drastically. We present here the results obtained during the first part of the experiment named Edelweiss-I that ended in the beginning of 2004. Since october 2002, 3 optimized 320 grams detectors have been simultaneously operated at a regulated temperature of 0.017 K and about 50 kg*day were added to the previous published data. These data are still under analysis but preliminary results concerning the upper limit at 90% CL (confidence level) confirm the limit already published in 2002. The first run of Edelweiss-II is due to begin during summer 2005, we are expecting to gain 2 orders of magnitude in terms of detector sensitivity and reach 0.002 events/day*kg. (A.C.)

  6. Membrane Process to Capture CO{sub 2} from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, Tim; Wei, Xiaotong; Firat, Bilgen; He, Jenny; Amo, Karl; Pande, Saurabh; Baker, Richard; Wijmans, Hans; Bhown, Abhoyjit

    2012-03-31

    This final report describes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) on development of an efficient membrane process to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from power plant flue gas (award number DE-NT0005312). The primary goal of this research program was to demonstrate, in a field test, the ability of a membrane process to capture up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in coal-fired flue gas, and to evaluate the potential of a full-scale version of the process to perform this separation with less than a 35% increase in the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Arizona Public Services (APS), who hosted a membrane field test at their Cholla coal-fired power plant, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and WorleyParsons (WP), who performed a comparative cost analysis of the proposed membrane CO{sub 2} capture process. The work conducted for this project included membrane and module development, slipstream testing of commercial-sized modules with natural gas and coal-fired flue gas, process design optimization, and a detailed systems and cost analysis of a membrane retrofit to a commercial power plant. The Polaris? membrane developed over a number of years by MTR represents a step-change improvement in CO{sub 2} permeance compared to previous commercial CO{sub 2}-selective membranes. During this project, membrane optimization work resulted in a further doubling of the CO{sub 2} permeance of Polaris membrane while maintaining the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. This is an important accomplishment because increased CO{sub 2} permeance directly impacts the membrane skid cost and footprint: a doubling of CO{sub 2} permeance halves the skid cost and footprint. In addition to providing high CO{sub 2} permeance, flue gas CO{sub 2} capture membranes must be stable in the presence of contaminants including SO{sub 2}. Laboratory tests showed no

  7. Property impacts on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) processes: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yuting; Nookuea, Worrada; Li, Hailong; Thorin, Eva; Yan, Jinyue

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Property impacts on CCS processes have been reviewed. • Properties were ranked and priority of properties in model development was analyzed. • Relevant properties in the design and operation of CCS processes have been identified. • The studied CCS processes include CO_2 capture, conditioning, transport and storage. - Abstract: The knowledge of thermodynamic and transport properties of CO_2-mixtures is important for designing and operating different processes in carbon capture and storage systems. A literature survey was conducted to review the impact of uncertainty in thermos-physical properties on the design and operation of components and processes involved in CO_2 capture, conditioning, transport and storage. According to the existing studies on property impacts, liquid phase viscosity and diffusivity as well as gas phase diffusivity significantly impact the process simulation and absorber design for chemical absorption. Moreover, the phase equilibrium is important for regenerating energy estimation. For CO_2 compression and pumping processes, thermos-physical properties have more obvious impacts on pumps than on compressors. Heat capacity, density, enthalpy and entropy are the most important properties in the pumping process, whereas the compression process is more sensitive to heat capacity and compressibility. In the condensation and liquefaction process, the impacts of density, enthalpy and entropy are low on heat exchangers. For the transport process, existing studies mainly focused on property impacts on the performance of pipeline steady flow processes. Among the properties, density and heat capacity are most important. In the storage process, density and viscosity have received the most attention in property impact studies and were regarded as the most important properties in terms of storage capacity and enhanced oil recovery rate. However, for physical absorption, physical adsorption and membrane separation, there has been a

  8. A Real-Time Image Acquisition And Processing System For A RISC-Based Microcomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, Adrian J.; Allinson, Nigel M.

    1989-03-01

    A low cost image acquisition and processing system has been developed for the Acorn Archimedes microcomputer. Using a Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) architecture, the ARM (Acorn Risc Machine) processor provides instruction speeds suitable for image processing applications. The associated improvement in data transfer rate has allowed real-time video image acquisition without the need for frame-store memory external to the microcomputer. The system is comprised of real-time video digitising hardware which interfaces directly to the Archimedes memory, and software to provide an integrated image acquisition and processing environment. The hardware can digitise a video signal at up to 640 samples per video line with programmable parameters such as sampling rate and gain. Software support includes a work environment for image capture and processing with pixel, neighbourhood and global operators. A friendly user interface is provided with the help of the Archimedes Operating System WIMP (Windows, Icons, Mouse and Pointer) Manager. Windows provide a convenient way of handling images on the screen and program control is directed mostly by pop-up menus.

  9. Modeling and optimization of CO2 capture processes by chemical absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neveux, Thibaut

    2013-01-01

    CO 2 capture processes by chemical absorption lead to a large energy penalty on efficiency of coal-fired power plants, establishing one of the main bottleneck to its industrial deployment. The objective of this thesis is the development and validation of a global methodology, allowing the precise evaluation of the potential of a given amine capture process. Characteristic phenomena of chemical absorption have been thoroughly studied and represented with state-of-the-art models. The e-UNIQUAC model has been used to describe vapor-liquid and chemical equilibria of electrolyte solutions and the model parameters have been identified for four solvents. A rate-based formulation has been adopted for the representation of chemically enhanced heat and mass transfer in columns. The absorption and stripping models have been successfully validated against experimental data from an industrial and a laboratory pilot plants. The influence of the numerous phenomena has been investigated in order to highlight the most limiting ones. A methodology has been proposed to evaluate the total energy penalty resulting from the implementation of a capture process on an advanced supercritical coal-fired power plant, including thermal and electric consumptions. Then, the simulation and process evaluation environments have been coupled with a non-linear optimization algorithm in order to find optimal operating and design parameters with respect to energetic and economic performances. This methodology has been applied to optimize five process flow schemes operating with an monoethanolamine aqueous solution at 30% by weight: the conventional flow scheme and four process modifications. The performance comparison showed that process modifications using a heat pump effect give the best gains. The use of technical-economic analysis as an evaluation criterion of a process performance, coupled with a optimization algorithm, has proved its capability to find values for the numerous operating and design

  10. Simulation of a bubbling fluidized bed process for capturing CO2 from flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jeong-Hoo; Yi, Chang-Keun; Jo, Sung-Ho; Ryu, Ho-Jung; Park, Young-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    We simulated a bubbling bed process capturing CO 2 from flue gas. It applied for a laboratory scale process to investigate effects of operating parameters on capture efficiency. The adsorber temperature had a stronger effect than the regenerator temperature. The effect of regenerator temperature was minor for high adsorber temperature. The effect of regenerator temperature decreased to level off for the temperature >250 .deg. C. The capture efficiency was rather dominated by the adsorption reaction than the regeneration reaction. The effect of gas velocity was as appreciable as that of adsorber temperature. The capture efficiency increased with the solids circulation rate since it was ruled by the molar ratio of K to CO 2 for solids circulation smaller than the minimum required one (G s, min ). However, it leveled off for solids circulation rate >G s, min . As the ratio of adsorber solids inventory to the total solids inventory (x w1 ) increased, the capture efficiency increased until x w1 =0.705, but decreased for x w1 >0.705 because the regeneration time decreased too small. It revealed that the regeneration reaction was faster than the adsorption reaction. Increase of total solids inventory is a good way to get further increase in capture efficiency

  11. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  12. Integration of the steam cycle and CO2 capture process in a decarbonization power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Gang; Hu, Yue; Tang, Baoqiang; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    A new integrated system with power generation and CO 2 capture to achieve higher techno-economic performance is proposed in this study. In the new system, three measures are adopted to recover the surplus energy from the CO 2 capture process. The three measures are as follows: (1) using a portion of low-pressure steam instead of high-pressure extracted steam by installing the steam ejector, (2) mixing a portion of flash-off water with the extracted steam to utilize the superheat degree of the extracted steam, and (3) recycling the low-temperature waste heat from the CO 2 capture process to heat the condensed water. As a result, the power output of the new integrated system is 107.61 MW higher than that of a decarbonization power plant without integration. The efficiency penalty of CO 2 capture is expected to decrease by 4.91%-points. The increase in investment produced by the new system is 3.25 M$, which is only 0.88% more than the total investment of a decarbonization power plant without integration. Lastly, the cost of electricity and CO 2 avoided is 15.14% and 33.1% lower than that of a decarbonization power generation without integration, respectively. The promising results obtained in this study provide a new approach for large-scale CO 2 removal with low energy penalty and economic cost. - Highlights: • Energy equilibrium in CO 2 capture process is deeply analyzed in this paper. • System integration is conducted in a coal-fired power plant with CO 2 capture. • The steam ejector is introduced to utilize the waste energy from CO 2 capture process. • Thermodynamic, exergy and techno-economic analyses are quantitatively conducted. • Energy-saving effects are found in the new system with minimal investment

  13. Interatomic Coulombic electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokhberg, K.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2010-01-01

    In a previous publication [K. Gokhberg and L. S. Cederbaum, J. Phys. B 42, 231001 (2009)] we presented the interatomic Coulombic electron capture process--an efficient electron capture mechanism by atoms and ions in the presence of an environment. In the present work we derive and discuss the mechanism in detail. We demonstrate thereby that this mechanism belongs to a family of interatomic electron capture processes driven by electron correlation. In these processes the excess energy released in the capture event is transferred to the environment and used to ionize (or to excite) it. This family includes the processes where the capture is into the lowest or into an excited unoccupied orbital of an atom or ion and proceeds in step with the ionization (or excitation) of the environment, as well as the process where an intermediate autoionizing excited resonance state is formed in the capturing center which subsequently deexcites to a stable state transferring its excess energy to the environment. Detailed derivation of the asymptotic cross sections of these processes is presented. The derived expressions make clear that the environment assisted capture processes can be important for many systems. Illustrative examples are presented for a number of model systems for which the data needed to construct the various capture cross sections are available in the literature.

  14. C2A2 Project - CO2 Capture by Advances Amines process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thybaud, Nathalie

    2014-06-01

    This publication presents the operation principles and the obtained results for a research demonstrator developed in Le Havre by EDF and Alstom for CO 2 capture by post-combustion. The implemented technology, developed by Alstom and DOX Chemical is named Advanced Amines Processes (AAP). This process comprises the use of solvent and a specific process scheme (the Advanced Flow Scheme or AFS). The smoke treatment chain of the installation is described, and the valorisation of combustion by-products and of smoke processing operations is indicated. The capacities of the installation are given. Systems aimed at increasing the solvent lifetime are described, and some operational parameters are indicated. Various aspects related to the demonstrator design, construction and operation are discussed. Results obtained during tests between October 2013 and March 2014 are given and discussed in terms of quantity of captured CO 2 , of energy performance, of solvent management and consumption, of emissions, of corrosion, of exploitation organisation, and of instrumentation verification and data quality

  15. Monitoring taconite process streams with thermal neutron capture-gamma ray analysis. Report of investigations/1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodbury, F.B.W.

    1980-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines is evaluating alternative technologies to treat oxidized taconites. Since process control is an essential element in the application of these process technologies, research was performed on a prototype monitoring system utilizing a californium-252 (252-Cf) neutron source and a thermal neutron capture-gamma ray spectra analysis method to measure the amount of iron and percent solids in process slurries. The prototype system was used to monitor the concentrate and tailing streams in a 900-lb/hr flotation pilot plant during continuous around-the-clock tests. The iron content of the process slurries was determined by measuring the total peak areas under the capture spectrum peaks at 7.626-7.632 MeV, the associated escape peaks at 7.136-7.122 and 6.626-6.612 MeV, and the iron doublets at 4.900 and 4.998 MeV. A potential method for determining the percent solids in process slurries using the 2.22 MeV hydrogen capture peak is discussed

  16. Standard services for the capture, processing, and distribution of packetized telemetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William H.

    1989-01-01

    Standard functional services for the capture, processing, and distribution of packetized data are discussed with particular reference to the future implementation of packet processing systems, such as those for the Space Station Freedom. The major functions are listed under the following major categories: input processing, packet processing, and output processing. A functional block diagram of a packet data processing facility is presented, showing the distribution of the various processing functions as well as the primary data flow through the facility.

  17. Pilot-Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, Marc [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to achieve the DOE’s goal to develop advanced CO2 capture and separation technologies that can realize at least 90% CO2 removal from flue gas steams produced at a pulverized coal (PC) power plant at a cost of less than $40/tonne of CO2 captured. The principal objective is to test a CO2 capture process that will reduce the parasitic plant load by using a CO2 capture sorbent that will require a reduced amount of steam. The process is based on advanced carbon sorbents having a low heat of adsorption, high CO2 adsorption capacity, and excellent selectivity. While the intent of this project was to produce design and performance data by testing the sorbent using a slipstream of coal-derived flue gas at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) under realistic conditions and continuous long-term operation, the project was terminated following completion of the detailing pilot plant design/engineering work on June 30, 2016.

  18. Search for WIMP dark matter produced in association with a Z boson with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Basalaev, Artem; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The search for weakly interacting dark matter particle (WIMP) candidates produced in association with a Z boson is presented. Events with large missing transverse momentum and consistent with the decay of a Z boson into oppositely charged electron or muon pairs were selected in analysis. Background estimates and corresponding systematic uncertainties are shown. The limits on the mass scale of the contact interaction as a function of the dark matter particle mass and the limits on the coupling and scalar particle mediator mass for 8 TeV proton-proton collisions data are presented. Prospects for analysis using 13 TeV proton-proton collisions data are discussed.

  19. Carbon dioxide capture processes: Simulation, design and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Lee, Jay Hyung; Gani, Rafiqul

    2012-01-01

    equilibrium and associated property models are used. Simulations are performed to investigate the sensitivity of the process variables to change in the design variables including process inputs and disturbances in the property model parameters. Results of the sensitivity analysis on the steady state...... performance of the process to the L/G ratio to the absorber, CO2 lean solvent loadings, and striper pressure are presented in this paper. Based on the sensitivity analysis process optimization problems have been defined and solved and, a preliminary control structure selection has been made.......Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas and its major source is combustion of fossil fuels for power generation. The objective of this study is to carry out the steady-state sensitivity analysis for chemical absorption of carbon dioxide capture from flue gas using monoethanolamine solvent. First...

  20. Alternative Layouts for the Carbon Capture with the Chilled Ammonia Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valenti, Gianluca; Bonalumi, Davide; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2013-01-01

    Many alternatives are being investigated for the carbon capture, but none appears to have been proved as the choice for full-scale applications. This work considers the Chilled Ammonia Process for coal-fired Ultra Super Critical power plants. Three layouts are simulated with Aspen Plus and the Ex......Many alternatives are being investigated for the carbon capture, but none appears to have been proved as the choice for full-scale applications. This work considers the Chilled Ammonia Process for coal-fired Ultra Super Critical power plants. Three layouts are simulated with Aspen Plus...... substantially the electric loss due to stream extraction from the turbine. The simulations show that the net electric efficiency drops from 45.5% to 33.5-34.5%, the SPECCA index is 3.8-4.3 MJth kgCO2–1 and the heat duties are 2.7-2.9 MJth kgCO2–1. The performances may improve greatly upon optimization...

  1. A low energy aqueous ammonia CO2 capture process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Blaker, Eirik Ask

    2014-01-01

    of the process. The present capture alternative is especially convenient for power plants but is also beneficial for the cement, steel and aluminum industry. Special attention is given to the ammonia slip prediction. The calculations substantiate that the slip above the absorber is 0.1 mol % after washing...

  2. Process simulation of CO2 capture with aqueous ammonia using the Extended UNIQUAC model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn; van Well, Willy J.M.

    2012-01-01

    of the process is necessary.In this work, the performance of the carbon dioxide capture process using aqueous ammonia has been analyzed by process simulation. The Extended UNIQUAC thermodynamic model available for the CO2–NH3–H2O system has been implemented in the commercial simulator Aspen Plus®1 by using...... dioxide at low temperature (2–10°C). The low temperature limits the vaporization of ammonia in the absorber and entails precipitation of ammonium carbonate compounds, thereby allowing high loadings of CO2. The process has thereby good perspectives. However, a scientific understanding and evaluation......The use of aqueous ammonia is a promising option to capture carbon dioxide from power plants thanks to the potential low heat requirement during the carbon dioxide desorption compared to monoethanolamine (MEA) based process. The patented Chilled Ammonia Process developed by Alstom absorbs carbon...

  3. A Survey on Sensor Coverage and Visual Data Capturing/Processing/Transmission in Wireless Visual Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence G. H. Yap

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Visual Sensor Networks (WVSNs where camera-equipped sensor nodes can capture, process and transmit image/video information have become an important new research area. As compared to the traditional wireless sensor networks (WSNs that can only transmit scalar information (e.g., temperature, the visual data in WVSNs enable much wider applications, such as visual security surveillance and visual wildlife monitoring. However, as compared to the scalar data in WSNs, visual data is much bigger and more complicated so intelligent schemes are required to capture/process/ transmit visual data in limited resources (hardware capability and bandwidth WVSNs. WVSNs introduce new multi-disciplinary research opportunities of topics that include visual sensor hardware, image and multimedia capture and processing, wireless communication and networking. In this paper, we survey existing research efforts on the visual sensor hardware, visual sensor coverage/deployment, and visual data capture/ processing/transmission issues in WVSNs. We conclude that WVSN research is still in an early age and there are still many open issues that have not been fully addressed. More new novel multi-disciplinary, cross-layered, distributed and collaborative solutions should be devised to tackle these challenging issues in WVSNs.

  4. Automated full matrix capture for industrial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Roy H.; Pierce, S. Gareth; Collison, Ian; Dutton, Ben; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Jackson, Joseph; Lardner, Timothy; MacLeod, Charles; Morozov, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    Full matrix capture (FMC) ultrasound can be used to generate a permanent re-focusable record of data describing the geometry of a part; a valuable asset for an inspection process. FMC is a desirable acquisition mode for automated scanning of complex geometries, as it allows compensation for surface shape in post processing and application of the total focusing method. However, automating the delivery of such FMC inspection remains a significant challenge for real industrial processes due to the high data overhead associated with the ultrasonic acquisition. The benefits of NDE delivery using six-axis industrial robots are well versed when considering complex inspection geometries, but such an approach brings additional challenges to scanning speed and positional accuracy when combined with FMC inspection. This study outlines steps taken to optimize the scanning speed and data management of a process to scan the diffusion bonded membrane of a titanium test plate. A system combining a KUKA robotic arm and a reconfigurable FMC phased array controller is presented. The speed and data implications of different scanning methods are compared, and the impacts on data visualization quality are discussed with reference to this study. For the 0.5 m2 sample considered, typical acquisitions of 18 TB/m2 were measured for a triple back wall FMC acquisition, illustrating the challenge of combining high data throughput with acceptable scanning speeds.

  5. Complementarity of WIMP Sensitivity with direct SUSY, Monojet and Dark Matter Searches in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Arbey, Alexandre; Mahmoudi, Farvah

    2014-01-01

    This letter presents new results on the combined sensitivity of the LHC and underground dark matter search experiments to the lightest neutralino as WIMP candidate in the minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. We show that monojet searches significantly extend the sensitivity to the neutralino mass in scenarios where scalar quarks are nearly degenerate in mass with it. The inclusion of the latest bound by the LUX experiment on the neutralino-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross section expands this sensitivity further, highlighting the remarkable complementarity of jets/$\\ell$s+MET and monojet at LHC and dark matter searches in probing models of new physics with a dark matter candidate. The qualitative results of our study remain valid after accounting for theoretical uncertainties.

  6. Neutron capture at the s-process branching points $^{171}$Tm and $^{204}$Tl

    CERN Multimedia

    Branching points in the s-process are very special isotopes for which there is a competition between the neutron capture and the subsequent b-decay chain producing the heavy elements beyond Fe. Typically, the knowledge on the associated capture cross sections is very poor due to the difficulty in obtaining enough material of these radioactive isotopes and to measure the cross section of a sample with an intrinsic activity; indeed only 2 out o the 21 ${s}$-process branching points have ever been measured by using the time-of-flight method. In this experiment we aim at measuring for the first time the capture cross sections of $^{171}$Tm and $^{204}$Tl, both of crucial importance for understanding the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in AGB stars. The combination of both (n,$\\gamma$) measurements on $^{171}$Tm and $^{204}$Tl will allow one to accurately constrain neutron density and the strength of the 13C(α,n) source in low mass AGB stars. Additionally, the cross section of $^{204}$Tl is also of cosmo-chrono...

  7. Increasing the carbon capture efficiency of the Ca/Cu looping process for power production with advanced process schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martini, M.; Martinez, I.; Romano, M.C.; Chiesa, P.; Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Ca-Cu process is a novel concept for hydrogen production with inherent CO2 capture that has received great attention in the last years as potential low-CO2 emission technology for power generation and hydrogen production from natural gas. The process is based on the reforming of natural gas in

  8. Search for WIMP dark matter produced in association with a Z boson with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00399337; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The search for weakly interacting dark matter particle (WIMP) candidates produced in association with a Z boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. Events with large missing transverse momentum and consistent with the decay of a Z boson into oppositely charged electron or muon pairs were selected in analysis. Background estimates and corresponding systematic uncertainties are shown. The limits on the mass scale of the contact interaction as a function of the dark matter particle mass and the limits on the coupling and scalar particle mediator mass for 8 TeV proton-proton collisions data are presented. Prospects for analysis using 13 TeV proton-proton collisions data are discussed.

  9. Incorporating IGCC and CaO sorption-enhanced process for power generation with CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Xiang, Wenguo; Wang, Dong; Xue, Zhipeng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CaO sorption-enhanced process is incorporated with IGCC for CO 2 capture. ► IGCC–CCS is simplified using CaO sorption-enhanced process. ► The electricity efficiency is around 31–33% and CO 2 capture efficiency exceeds 95%. ► Parameters such as sorption pressure influence the system performance. -- Abstract: Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is a power generation technology to convert solid fuels into electricity. IGCC with CCS is regarded as a promising option to mitigate CO 2 emission. In this paper, the CaO sorption-enhanced process is incorporated downstream with coal gasification to produce a hydrogen-rich stream for electricity production and CO 2 separation. A WGS-absorber substitutes the high- and low-temperature water–gas shift reactors and desulfurization units in conventional IGCC–CCS to produce a hydrogen-rich stream, which is sent onto a gas turbine. CaO is used as the sorbent to enhance hydrogen production and for CO 2 capture. Regeneration of CaO is completed via calcination in a regenerator vessel. The IGCC with CaO sorption-enhanced process is modeled and simulated using Aspen Plus software. Two commercial available gasification technologies, Shell and Texaco, are integrated with the sorption-enhanced process. The results showed IGCC with CaO sorption-enhanced process has a satisfactory system performance. Even though the net electricity efficiency is not as high as expected, just around 30–33%, the system has a high CO 2 capture efficiency ∼97% and low pollutant emissions. Moreover, compared with conventional IGCC–CCS, the schematic diagram of the IGCC–CCS process is simplified. Parameters that affect the plant performance are analyzed in the sensitive analysis, including WGS-absorber temperature, H 2 O/CO ratio, pressure, etc. Some challenges to the system are also discussed.

  10. Near-Ultraviolet Observations of CS 29497-030: New Constraints on Neutron-Capture Nucleosynthesis Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivans, Inese I.; Sneden, Christopher; Gallino, Roberto; Cowan, John J.; Preston, George W.

    2005-07-01

    Employing spectra obtained with the new Keck I HIRES near-UV-sensitive detector, we have performed a comprehensive chemical composition analysis of the binary blue metal-poor star CS 29497-030. Abundances for 29 elements and upper limits for an additional seven have been derived, concentrating on elements largely produced by means of neutron-capture nucleosynthesis. Included in our analysis are the two elements that define the termination point of the slow neutron-capture process, lead and bismuth. We determine an extremely high value of [Pb/Fe]=+3.65+/-0.07 (σ=0.13) from three features, supporting the single-feature result obtained in previous studies. We detect Bi for the first time in a metal-poor star. Our derived Bi/Pb ratio is in accord with those predicted from the most recent FRANEC calculations of the slow neutron-capture process in low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We find that the neutron-capture elemental abundances of CS 29497-030 are best explained by an AGB model that also includes very significant amounts of pre-enrichment of rapid neutron-capture process material in the protostellar cloud out of which the CS 29497-030 binary system formed. Mass transfer is consistent with the observed [Nb/Zr]~0. Thus, CS 29497-030 is both an r+s and ``extrinsic AGB'' star. Furthermore, we find that the mass of the AGB model can be further constrained by the abundance of the light odd-element Na. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  11. Environmental Performance of Hypothetical Canadian Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Processes Using Life-Cycle Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakkana Piewkhaow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of life-cycle assessment was applied in order to evaluate the environmental performance of a hypothetical Saskatchewan lignite-fueled Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC electricity generation, with and without pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2 capture from a full life-cycle perspective. The emphasis here is placed on environmental performance associated with air contaminants of the comparison between IGCC systems (with and without CO2 capture and a competing lignite pulverized coal-fired electricity generating station in order to reveal which technology offers the most positive environmental effects. Moreover, ambient air pollutant modeling was also conducted by using American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD air dispersion modeling to determine the ground-level concentration of pollutants emitted from four different electricity generating stations. This study assumes that all stations are located close to Estevan. The results showed a significant reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and acidification potential by applying both post-combustion and pre-combustion CO2 capture processes. The GHG emissions were found to have reduced by 27%–86%, and IGCC systems were found to compare favorably to pulverized coal systems. However, in other environmental impact categories, there are multiple environmental trade-offs depending on the capture technology used. In the case of post-combustion capture, it was observed that the environmental impact category of eutrophication potential, summer smog, and ozone depletion increased due to the application of the CO2 capture process and the surface mining coal operation. IGCC systems, on the other hand, showed the same tendency as the conventional coal-fired electricity generation systems, but to a lesser degree. This is because the IGCC system is a cleaner technology that produces lower pollutant emission levels than the electricity

  12. Review, modeling, Heat Integration, and improved schemes of Rectisol®-based processes for CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, Manuele; Martelli, Emanuele; Marechal, François; Consonni, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The paper evaluates the thermodynamic performances and the energy integration of alternative schemes of a methanol absorption based acid gas removal process designed for CO 2 Capture and Storage. More precisely, this work focuses the attention on the Rectisol ® process specifically designed for the selective removal of H 2 S and CO 2 from syngas produced by coal gasification. The study addresses the following issues: (i) perform a review of the Rectisol ® schemes proposed by engineers and researchers with the purpose of determining the best one for CO 2 capture and storage; (ii) calibrate the PC-SAFT equation of state for CH 3 OH–CO 2 –H 2 S–H 2 –CO mixtures at conditions relevant to the Rectisol ® process; (iii) evaluate the thermodynamic performances and optimize the energy integration of a “Reference” scheme derived from those available in the literature; (iv) identify and assess alternative Rectisol ® schemes with optimized performance for CO 2 Capture and Storage and Heat Integration with utilities. On the basis of the analysis of the Composite Curves of the integrated process, we propose some possible improvements at the level of the process configuration, like the introduction of mechanical vapor recompression and the development of a two stage regeneration arrangement. - Highlights: • Comprehensive review of the Rectisol ® process configurations and applications. • Calibration of PC-SAFT equation of state for Rectisol ® -relevant mixtures. • Detailed process simulation and optimized Heat Integration, and utility design. • Development of alternative Rectisol ® schemes optimized for CO 2 Capture

  13. Prospects for direct neutron capture measurements on s-process branching point isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, C.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Quesada, J.M. [Universidad de Sevilla, Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain); Domingo-Pardo, C. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Kaeppeler, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Palomo, F.R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Dept. de Ingenieria Electronica, Sevilla (Spain); Reifarth, R. [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The neutron capture cross sections of several unstable key isotopes acting as branching points in the s-process are crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis studies, but they are very challenging to measure directly due to the difficult production of sufficient sample material, the high activity of the resulting samples, and the actual (n, γ) measurement, where high neutron fluxes and effective background rejection capabilities are required. At present there are about 21 relevant s-process branching point isotopes whose cross section could not be measured yet over the neutron energy range of interest for astrophysics. However, the situation is changing with some very recent developments and upcoming technologies. This work introduces three techniques that will change the current paradigm in the field: the use of γ-ray imaging techniques in (n, γ) experiments, the production of moderated neutron beams using high-power lasers, and double capture experiments in Maxwellian neutron beams. (orig.)

  14. Carbon dioxide capture from power or process plant gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Mark D; Humble, Paul H

    2014-06-10

    The present invention are methods for removing preselected substances from a mixed flue gas stream characterized by cooling said mixed flue gas by direct contact with a quench liquid to condense at least one preselected substance and form a cooled flue gas without substantial ice formation on a heat exchanger. After cooling additional process methods utilizing a cryogenic approach and physical concentration and separation or pressurization and sorbent capture may be utilized to selectively remove these materials from the mixed flue gas resulting in a clean flue gas.

  15. Electron capture and excitation processes in H+-H collisions in dense quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimovski, D.; Markovska, N.; Janev, R. K.

    2016-10-01

    Electron capture and excitation processes in proton-hydrogen atom collisions taking place in dense quantum plasmas are studied by employing the two-centre atomic orbital close-coupling (TC-AOCC) method. The Debye-Hückel cosine (DHC) potential is used to describe the plasma screening effects on the Coulomb interaction between charged particles. The properties of a hydrogen atom with DHC potential are investigated as a function of the screening strength of the potential. It is found that the decrease in binding energy of nl levels with increasing screening strength is considerably faster than in the case of the Debye-Hückel (DH) screening potential, appropriate for description of charged particle interactions in weakly coupled classical plasmas. This results in a reduction in the number of bound states in the DHC potential with respect to that in the DH potential for the same plasma screening strength, and is reflected in the dynamics of excitation and electron capture processes for the two screened potentials. The TC-AOCC cross sections for total and state-selective electron capture and excitation cross sections with the DHC potential are calculated for a number of representative screening strengths in the 1-300 keV energy range and compared with those for the DH and pure Coulomb potential. The total capture cross sections for a selected number of screening strengths are compared with the available results from classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations.

  16. Scattered Data Processing Approach Based on Optical Facial Motion Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, animation reconstruction of facial expressions has become a popular research field in computer science and motion capture-based facial expression reconstruction is now emerging in this field. Based on the facial motion data obtained using a passive optical motion capture system, we propose a scattered data processing approach, which aims to solve the common problems of missing data and noise. To recover missing data, given the nonlinear relationships among neighbors with the current missing marker, we propose an improved version of a previous method, where we use the motion of three muscles rather than one to recover the missing data. To reduce the noise, we initially apply preprocessing to eliminate impulsive noise, before our proposed three-order quasi-uniform B-spline-based fitting method is used to reduce the remaining noise. Our experiments showed that the principles that underlie this method are simple and straightforward, and it delivered acceptable precision during reconstruction.

  17. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a PhaseChanging Absorbent: Techno-Economic Analysis Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miebach, Barbara [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); McDuffie, Dwayne [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Spiry, Irina [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Westendorf, Tiffany [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States)

    2017-01-27

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing CO2 capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2 capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. This report presents system and economic analysis for a process that uses a phase changing aminosilicone solvent to remove CO2 from pulverized coal (PC) power plant flue gas. The aminosilicone solvent is a pure 1,3-bis(3-aminopropyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane (GAP-0). Performance of the phase-changing aminosilicone technology is compared to that of a conventional carbon capture system using aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA). This analysis demonstrates that the aminosilicone process has significant advantages relative to an MEA-based system. The first-year CO2 removal cost for the phase-changing CO2 capture process is $52.1/tonne, compared to $66.4/tonne for the aqueous amine process. The phase-changing CO2 capture process is less costly than MEA because of advantageous solvent properties that include higher working capacity, lower corrosivity, lower vapor pressure, and lower heat capacity. The phase-changing aminosilicone process has approximately 32% lower equipment capital cost compared to that of the aqueous amine process. However, this solvent is susceptible to thermal degradation at CSTR desorber operating temperatures, which could add as much as $88/tonne to the CO2 capture cost associated with solvent makeup. Future work is focused on mitigating this critical risk by developing an advanced low-temperature desorber that can deliver comparable desorption performance and significantly reduced

  18. Thermal effects of CO2 capture by solid adsorbents: some approaches by IR image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benevides Ferreira, J.F.; Pradere, C.; Batsale, J.C.; Jolly, J.; Pavageau, B.; Le Bourdon, G.; Mascetti, J.; Servant, L.

    2013-01-01

    Thanks to infrared thermography, we have studied the mechanisms of CO 2 capture by solid adsorbents (CO 2 capture via gas adsorption on various types of porous substrates) to better understand the physico-chemical mechanisms that control CO 2 -surface interactions. In order to develop in the future an efficient process for post-combustion CO 2 capture, it is necessary to quantify the energy of adsorption of the gas on the adsorbent (exothermic process). The released heat (heat of adsorption) is a key parameter for the choice of materials and for the design of capture processes. Infrared thermography is used, at first approach, to detect the temperature fields on a thin-layer of adsorbent during CO 2 adsorption. An analytical heat transfer model was developed to evaluate the adsorption heat flux and to estimate, via an inverse technique, the heat of adsorption. The main originality of our method is to estimate heat losses directly from the heat generated during the adsorption process. Then, the estimated heat loss is taken for an a posteriori calculation of the adsorption heat flux. Finally, the heat of adsorption may be estimated. The interest in using infrared thermography is also its ability to quickly change the experimental setup, for example, to switch from the adsorbent thin-layer to the adsorbent bed configuration. We present the first results tempting to link the thin-layer data to the propagation speed of the thermal front in a milli-fluidics adsorption bed, also observed by IR thermography. (authors)

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of CO2 capture processes for power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Biyouki, Zeinab Amrollahi

    2014-01-01

    This thesis work presents an evaluation of various processes for reducing CO2 emissions from natural-gas-fired combined cycle (NGCC) power plants. The scope of the thesis is to focus mainly on post-combustion chemical absorption for NGCC. For the post-combustion capture plant, an important interface is the steam extraction from the steam turbine in order to supply the heat for solvent regeneration. The steam extraction imposes a power production penalty. The thesis includes analysis and compa...

  20. Effect of process parameters on power requirements of vacuum swing adsorption technology for CO2 capture from flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jun; Webley, Paul A.; Xiao, Penny

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of process and operating parameters - feed gas temperature, evacuation pressure and feed concentration - on the performance of carbon dioxide vacuum swing adsorption (CO 2 VSA) processes for CO 2 capture from gas, especially as it affects power consumption. To obtain reliable data on the VSA process, experimental work was conducted on a purposely built three bed CO 2 VSA pilot plant using commercial 13X zeolite. Both 6 step and 9 step cycles were used to determine the influences of temperature, evacuation pressure and feed concentration on process performance (recovery, purity, power and corresponding capture cost). A simple economic model for CO 2 capture was developed and employed herein. Through experiments and analysis, it is found that the feed gas temperature, evacuation pressure and feed concentration have significant effects on power consumption and CO 2 capture cost. Our data demonstrate that the CO 2 VSA process has good recovery (>70%), purity (>90%) and low power cost (4-10 kW/TPDc) when operating with 40 C feed gas provided relatively deep vacuum is used. Enhanced performance is obtained when higher feed gas concentration is fed to the plant, as expected. Our data indicates large potential for application of CO 2 VSA to CO 2 capture from flue gas. (author)

  1. Ionic-Liquid-Based CO2 Capture Systems: Structure, Interaction and Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shaojuan; Zhang, Xiangping; Bai, Lu; Zhang, Xiaochun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jianji; Bao, Di; Li, Mengdie; Liu, Xinyan; Zhang, Suojiang

    2017-07-26

    The inherent structure tunability, good affinity with CO 2 , and nonvolatility of ionic liquids (ILs) drive their exploration and exploitation in CO 2 separation field, and has attracted remarkable interest from both industries and academia. The aim of this Review is to give a detailed overview on the recent advances on IL-based materials, including pure ILs, IL-based solvents, and IL-based membranes for CO 2 capture and separation from the viewpoint of molecule to engineering. The effects of anions, cations and functional groups on CO 2 solubility and selectivity of ILs, as well as the studies on degradability of ILs are reviewed, and the recent developments on functionalized ILs, IL-based solvents, and IL-based membranes are also discussed. CO 2 separation mechanism with IL-based solvents and IL-based membranes are explained by combining molecular simulation and experimental characterization. Taking into consideration of the applications and industrialization, the recent achievements and developments on the transport properties of IL fluids and the process design of IL-based processes are highlighted. Finally, the future research challenges and perspectives of the commercialization of CO 2 capture and separation with IL-based materials are posed.

  2. Application of a Chilled Ammonia-based Process for CO2 Capture to Cement Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez-Calvo, José Francisco; Sutter, Daniel; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process (CAP) is considered one of the most promising alternatives to amine-based absorption processes for post-combustion carbon capture applied to power plants. This work provides an insight on the CAP adaptations required to meet the conditions found in the flue gas emitted in

  3. Thermal design of heat-exchangeable reactors using a dry-sorbent CO2 capture multi-step process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Hokyu; Yoo, Hoanju; Seo, Hwimin; Park, Yong-Ki; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2015-01-01

    The present study proposes a multi-stage CO 2 capture process that incorporates heat-exchangeable fluidized-bed reactors. For continuous multi-stage heat exchange, three dry regenerable sorbents: K 2 CO 3 , MgO, and CaO, were used to create a three-stage temperature-dependent reaction chain for CO 2 capture, corresponding to low (50–150 °C), middle (350–650 °C), and high (750–900 °C) temperature stages, respectively. Heat from carbonation in the high and middle temperature stages was used for regeneration for the middle and low temperature stages. The feasibility of this process is depending on the heat-transfer performance of the heat-exchangeable fluidized bed reactors as the focus of this study. The three-stage CO 2 capture process for a 60 Nm 3 /h CO 2 flow rate required a reactor area of 0.129 and 0.130 m 2 for heat exchange between the mid-temperature carbonation and low-temperature regeneration stages and between the high-temperature carbonation and mid-temperature regeneration stages, respectively. The reactor diameter was selected to provide dense fluidization conditions for each bed with respect to the desired flow rate. The flow characteristics and energy balance of the reactors were confirmed using computational fluid dynamics and thermodynamic analysis, respectively. - Highlights: • CO 2 capture process is proposed using a multi-stage process. • Reactor design is conducted considering heat exchangeable scheme. • Reactor surface is designed by heat transfer characteristics of fluidized bed

  4. Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Thomas [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Soukri, Mustapha [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Farmer, Justin [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Mobley, Paul [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Tanthana, Jak [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Dongxiang [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Xiaoxing [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Song, Chunshan [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-12-31

    It is increasingly clear that CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) must play a critical role in curbing worldwide CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Development of these technologies to cost-effectively remove CO2 from coal-fired power plants is very important to mitigating the impact these power plants have within the world’s power generation portfolio. Currently, conventional CO2 capture technologies, such as aqueous-monoethanolamine based solvent systems, are prohibitively expensive and if implemented could result in a 75 to 100% increase in the cost of electricity for consumers worldwide. Solid sorbent CO2 capture processes – such as RTI’s Advanced Solid Sorbent CO2, Capture Process – are promising alternatives to conventional, liquid solvents. Supported amine sorbents – of the nature RTI has developed – are particularly attractive due to their high CO2 loadings, low heat capacities, reduced corrosivity/volatility and the potential to reduce the regeneration energy needed to carry out CO2 capture. Previous work in this area has failed to adequately address various technology challenges such as sorbent stability and regenerability, sorbent scale-up, improved physical strength and attrition-resistance, proper heat management and temperature control, proper solids handling and circulation control, as well as the proper coupling of process engineering advancements that are tailored for a promising sorbent technology. The remaining challenges for these sorbent processes have provided the framework for the project team’s research and development and target for advancing the technology beyond lab- and bench-scale testing. Under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy, and part of NETL’s CO2 Capture Program, RTI has led an effort to address and mitigate the challenges associated with solid sorbent CO2 capture. The overall objective

  5. Angular scattering in electron capture and loss D- beam formation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggiola, M.J.; Hodges, R.V.; Huestis, D.L.; Peterson, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of high energy (> 150 keV) neutral beams for heating and fueling magnetic fusion devices depends on the ability to produce well-collimated negative ion beams. The double capture charge-exchange technique is a known, scalable method. In order to maximize the overall efficiency of the process and to achieve the desired beam characteristics, it is necessary to examine the optical qualities of the beams as well as the total efficiency of beam production. A combined modeling and experimental study of the angular scattering effects in negative ion formation and loss processes has therefore been undertaken

  6. Techno-economic study of CO2 capture process for cement plants. Paper no. IGEC-1-107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazmul Hassan, S.M.; Douglas, P.L.; Croiset, E.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is considered to be the major source of GHG responsible for global warming; man-made CO 2 contributes approximately 63.5% to all greenhouse gases. The cement industry is responsible for approximately 5% of global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions emitting nearly 900 kg of CO 2 for every 1000 kg of cement produced. Amine absorption processes, in particular the monoethanolamine (MEA) based process, is considered to be a viable technology for capturing CO 2 from low-pressure flue gas streams because of its fast reaction rate with CO 2 and low cost of raw materials compared to other amines. However, the MEA absorption process is associated with high capital and operating costs because a significant amount of energy is required for solvent regeneration and because of severe operating problems such as corrosion, solvent loss and solvent degradation. This research was motivated by the need to design, size and cost a CO 2 capture process from the cement industry. The MEA based absorption process was used as a potential technique to model CO 2 capture from cement plants. In this research four cases were considered all to reach a CO 2 purity of 98%: i) the plant operates at the highest capacity; ii) the plant operates at average load; iii) the plant operates at minimum operating capacity; and iv) switching to a lower carbon content fuel at average plant load. A comparison among the four cases were performed to determine the best operating conditions for capturing CO 2 from cement plants. A sensitivity analysis of the economics to the lean loading and percent recovery were carried out as well as the different absorber and striper tray combinations. (author)

  7. Advanced Amine Solvent Formulations and Process Integration for Near-Term CO2 Capture Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Kevin S.; Searcy, Katherine; Rochelle, Gary T.; Ziaii, Sepideh; Schubert, Craig

    2007-06-28

    This Phase I SBIR project investigated the economic and technical feasibility of advanced amine scrubbing systems for post-combustion CO2 capture at coal-fired power plants. Numerous combinations of advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were screened for energy requirements, and three cases were selected for detailed analysis: a monoethanolamine (MEA) base case and two “advanced” cases: an MEA/Piperazine (PZ) case, and a methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) / PZ case. The MEA/PZ and MDEA/PZ cases employed an advanced “double matrix” stripper configuration. The basis for calculations was a model plant with a gross capacity of 500 MWe. Results indicated that CO2 capture increased the base cost of electricity from 5 cents/kWh to 10.7 c/kWh for the MEA base case, 10.1 c/kWh for the MEA / PZ double matrix, and 9.7 c/kWh for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. The corresponding cost per metric tonne CO2 avoided was 67.20 $/tonne CO2, 60.19 $/tonne CO2, and 55.05 $/tonne CO2, respectively. Derated capacities, including base plant auxiliary load of 29 MWe, were 339 MWe for the base case, 356 MWe for the MEA/PZ double matrix, and 378 MWe for the MDEA / PZ double matrix. When compared to the base case, systems employing advanced solvent formulations and process configurations were estimated to reduce reboiler steam requirements by 20 to 44%, to reduce derating due to CO2 capture by 13 to 30%, and to reduce the cost of CO2 avoided by 10 to 18%. These results demonstrate the potential for significant improvements in the overall economics of CO2 capture via advanced solvent formulations and process configurations.

  8. Bench Scale Development and Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process for Post-Combustion CO₂ Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ravi [Innosepra Limited Liability Company, Middlesex, NJ (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A physical sorption process to produce dry CO₂ at high purity (>98%) and high recovery (>90%) from the flue gas taken before or after the FGD was demonstrated both in the lab and in the field (one ton per day scale). A CO₂ recovery of over 94% and a CO₂ purity of over 99% were obtained in the field tests. The process has a moisture, SOX, and Hg removal stage followed by a CO₂ adsorption stage. Evaluations based on field testing, process simulation and detailed engineering studies indicate that the process has the potential for more than 40% reduction in the capital and more than 40% reduction in parasitic power for CO₂ capture compared to MEA. The process has the potential to provide CO₂ at a cost (<$40/tonne) and quality (<1 ppm H₂O, <1 ppm SOX, <10 ppm O₂) suitable for EOR applications which can make CO₂ capture profitable even in the absence of climate legislation. The process is applicable to power plants without SOX, Hg and NOX removal equipment.

  9. Simulation of the capture process in the Fermilab Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1987-01-01

    A progress report on efforts to understand and improve adiabatic capture in the Fermilab Booster by experiment and simulation is presented. In particular, a new Rf voltage program for capture which ameliorates transverse space-charge effects is described and simulated

  10. Heat and work integration: Fundamental insights and applications to carbon dioxide capture processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Chao; Gundersen, Truls

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The problem definition of heat and work integration is introduced. • The fundamental insights of heat and work integration are presented. • The design methodology is illustrated with two small test examples. • Applications of to three carbon dioxide capture processes are presented. - Abstract: The integration of heat has achieved a notable success in the past decades. Pinch Analysis is a well-established methodology for heat integration. Work is an equally important thermodynamic parameter. The enthalpy of a process stream can be changed by the transfer of heat and/or work. Heat and work are actually interchangeable and can thus be integrated. For example, compression processes consume more work at higher temperatures, however, the compression heat may be upgraded and utilized; expansion processes produce more work at higher temperatures, however, more heat may be required. The classical heat integration problem is thus extended to a new research topic about the integration of both heat and work. The aim of this paper is to present the problem definition, fundamental thermodynamic insights and industrial applications of heat and work integration. The results from studies on the three carbon dioxide capture processes show that significant energy savings can be achieved by proper heat and work integration. In the oxy-combustion process, the work consumption for cryogenic air separation is reduced by 10.1%. In the post-combustion membrane separation process, the specific work consumption for carbon dioxide separation is reduced by 12.9%. In the membrane air separation process, the net work consumption (excluding heat consumption) is reduced by 90%.

  11. Prospects for SIMPLE 2000: a large-mass, low-background superheated droplet detector for WIMP searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collar, J.I.; Girard, T.A.; Miley, H.S.; Waysand, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Superheated Instrument for Massive Particle searches (SIMPLE 2000) will consist of an array of 8-16 large active mass (approx. 15 g) superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) to be installed in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt. Several factors make the use of SDDs an attractive approach for the detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), namely their intrinsic insensitivity to minimally ionizing particles, high fluorine content, low cost and operation at near ambient pressure and temperature. We comment here on the fabrication, calibration and already-competitive first limits from prototype SDDs for SIMPLE, as well as on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the programme, which aims at an exposure of > 25 kg day during 2000. The ability of modest-mass fluorine-rich detectors to investigate regions of neutralino parameter space beyond the reach of the most ambitious cryogenic projects is pointed out. (author)

  12. Prospects for SIMPLE 2000: a large-mass, low-background superheated droplet detector for WIMP searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collar, J I; Puibasset, J; Girard, T A; Limagne, D; Miley, H S; Waysand, G

    2000-01-01

    The Superheated Instrument for Massive Particle searches (SIMPLE 2000) will consist of an array of 8-16 large active mass (≅15 g) superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) to be installed in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt. Several factors make the use of SDDs an attractive approach for the detection of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), namely their intrinsic insensitivity to minimally ionizing particles, high fluorine content, low cost and operation at near ambient pressure and temperature. We comment here on the fabrication, calibration and already-competitive first limits from prototype SDDs for SIMPLE, as well as on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the programme, which aims at an exposure of > 25 kg day during 2000. The ability of modest-mass fluorine-rich detectors to investigate regions of neutralino parameter space beyond the reach of the most ambitious cryogenic projects is pointed out

  13. Simulation of the capture process in the Fermilab Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1987-09-01

    A progress report on efforts to understand and improve adiabatic capture in the Fermilab Booster by experiment and simulation is presented. In particular, a new RF voltage program for capture which ameliorates transverse space-charge effects is described and simulated. 7 refs., 4 figs

  14. Integration of Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction as Cell Harvest and Capture Operation in the Manufacturing Process of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Schmidt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Substantial improvements have been made to cell culturing processes (e.g., higher product titer in recent years by raising cell densities and optimizing cultivation time. However, this has been accompanied by an increase in product-related impurities and therefore greater challenges in subsequent clarification and capture operations. Considering the paradigm shift towards the design of continuously operating dedicated plants at smaller scales—with or without disposable technology—for treating smaller patient populations due to new indications or personalized medicine approaches, the rising need for new, innovative strategies for both clarification and capture technology becomes evident. Aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE is now considered to be a feasible unit operation, e.g., for the capture of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant proteins. However, most of the published work so far investigates the applicability of ATPE in antibody-manufacturing processes at the lab-scale and for the most part, only during the capture step. This work shows the integration of ATPE as a combined harvest and capture step into a downstream process. Additionally, a model is applied that allows early prediction of settler dimensions with high prediction accuracy. Finally, a reliable process development concept, which guides through the necessary steps, starting from the definition of the separation task to the final stages of integration and scale-up, is presented.

  15. First search for dark matter annihilations in the Earth with the IceCube detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B.J.; Abraham, K.; Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Holzapfel, K.; Huber, M.; Jurkovic, M.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Turcati, A.; Veenkamp, J.; Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bretz, H.P.; Franckowiak, A.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Spiering, C.; Stasik, A.; Stoessl, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Santen, J. van; Yanez, J.P.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O'Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C.; Ahlers, M.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Krueger, C.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Rossem, M. van; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Xu, D.L.; Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M.; Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eller, P.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Pankova, D.V.; Quinnan, M.; Tesic, G.; Weiss, M.J.; Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Pino Rosendo, E. del; Di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Foesig, C.C.; Koepke, L.; Krueckl, G.; Peiffer, P.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K.; Argueelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Moulai, M.; Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Glagla, M.; Glauch, T.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Kemp, J.; Konietz, R.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Penek, Oe.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schimp, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stahlberg, M.; Stettner, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Wallraff, M.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G.; Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Mandelartz, M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Tenholt, F.; Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Kopper, S.; Lauber, F.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Soldin, D.; BenZvi, S.; Cross, R.; Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Friedman, E.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G.W.; Besson, D.Z.; Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S.; Tatar, J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of the first IceCube search for dark matter annihilation in the center of the Earth. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), candidates for dark matter, can scatter off nuclei inside the Earth and fall below its escape velocity. Over time the captured WIMPs will be accumulated and may eventually self-annihilate. Among the annihilation products only neutrinos can escape from the center of the Earth. Large-scale neutrino telescopes, such as the cubic kilometer IceCube Neutrino Observatory located at the South Pole, can be used to search for such neutrino fluxes. Data from 327 days of detector livetime during 2011/2012 were analyzed. No excess beyond the expected background from atmospheric neutrinos was detected. The derived upper limits on the annihilation rate of WIMPs in the Earth and the resulting muon flux are an order of magnitude stronger than the limits of the last analysis performed with data from IceCube's predecessor AMANDA. The limits can be translated in terms of a spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section. For a WIMP mass of 50 GeV this analysis results in the most restrictive limits achieved with IceCube data. (orig.)

  16. First search for dark matter annihilations in the Earth with the IceCube detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide (Australia); Abraham, K.; Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Holzapfel, K.; Huber, M.; Jurkovic, M.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Turcati, A.; Veenkamp, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bretz, H.P.; Franckowiak, A.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Spiering, C.; Stasik, A.; Stoessl, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Santen, J. van; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O' Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Krueger, C.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Rossem, M. van; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Xu, D.L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Andeen, K. [Marquette University, Department of Physics, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Anderson, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eller, P.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Pankova, D.V.; Quinnan, M.; Tesic, G.; Weiss, M.J. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Pino Rosendo, E. del; Di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Foesig, C.C.; Koepke, L.; Krueckl, G.; Peiffer, P.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Argueelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Moulai, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Glagla, M.; Glauch, T.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Kemp, J.; Konietz, R.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Penek, Oe.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schimp, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stahlberg, M.; Stettner, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Wallraff, M.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebusch, C.H. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Mandelartz, M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Tenholt, F. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Kopper, S.; Lauber, F.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Soldin, D. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); BenZvi, S.; Cross, R. [University of Rochester, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, NY (United States); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Friedman, E.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G.W. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S.; Tatar, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2017-02-15

    We present the results of the first IceCube search for dark matter annihilation in the center of the Earth. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), candidates for dark matter, can scatter off nuclei inside the Earth and fall below its escape velocity. Over time the captured WIMPs will be accumulated and may eventually self-annihilate. Among the annihilation products only neutrinos can escape from the center of the Earth. Large-scale neutrino telescopes, such as the cubic kilometer IceCube Neutrino Observatory located at the South Pole, can be used to search for such neutrino fluxes. Data from 327 days of detector livetime during 2011/2012 were analyzed. No excess beyond the expected background from atmospheric neutrinos was detected. The derived upper limits on the annihilation rate of WIMPs in the Earth and the resulting muon flux are an order of magnitude stronger than the limits of the last analysis performed with data from IceCube's predecessor AMANDA. The limits can be translated in terms of a spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section. For a WIMP mass of 50 GeV this analysis results in the most restrictive limits achieved with IceCube data. (orig.)

  17. A Novel Strategy of Carbon Capture and Sequestration by rHLPD Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eric Riman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoethanolamine (MEA scrubbing is an energy intensive process for Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS due to the regeneration of amine in stripping towers at high temperature (100-120 ºC and the subsequent pressurization of CO2 for geologic sequestration. In this paper, we introduce a novel method, reactive hydrothermal liquid phase densification (rHLPD, which is able to solidify (densify monolithic materials without using high temperature kilns. Then we integrate MEA-based CCS processing and mineral carbonation by using rHLPD technology. This integration is designated as rHLPD-Carbon Sequestration (rHLPD-CS process. Our results show that the CO2 captured in the MEA-CO2 solution was sequestered by the mineral (wollastonite CaSiO3 carbonation at a low operating temperature (60 ºC and simultaneously monolithic materials with a compressive strength of ~121 MPa were formed. This suggests that the use of rHLPD-CS technology eliminates the energy consumed for CO2-MEA stripping and CO2 compression and also sequesters CO2 to form value-added products, which have a potential to be utilized as construction and infrastructure materials. In contrast to the high energy requirements and excessive greenhouse gas emissions from conventional Portland cement manufacturing, our calculations show that the integration of rHLPD and CS technologies provides a low energy alternative to production of traditional cementitious binding materials.

  18. Demonstration of Advanced CO2 Capture Process Improvements for Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, John [Southern Company Services, Inc., Wilsonville, AL (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This document summarizes the activities of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0026590, “Demonstration of Advanced CO2 Capture Process Improvements for Coal-Fired Flue Gas” during the performance period of October 1, 2015 through May 31, 2017. This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) was the prime contractor and co-funder of the project. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America (MHIA) and AECOM were project team members. The overall project objective was to improve costs, energy requirements, and performance of an existing amine-based CO2 capture process. This will occur via improvements in three areas: 1. Reboiler design – The first objective of the program was to demonstrate performance of an integrated stripper/reboiler (termed Built-in Reboiler, or BIR) to reduce footprint, capital costs, and integration issues of the current technology. 2. Particulate management – The second objective was to carry out a Particulate Matter Management (PMM) test. This has the potential to reduce operating costs and capital costs due to the reduced or eliminated need for mechanical filtration. 3. Solvent – The third objective was to carry out a new solvent test plan (referred to as NSL) to demonstrate a new solvent (termed New Solvent A), which is expected to reduce regeneration steam. The bulk price is also expected to be lower than KS-1, which is the current solvent used in this process. NSL testing would include baseline testing, optimization, long term testing, solvent reclamation testing, and final inspection. These combine to form the Advanced Carbon Capture (ACC) technology. Much of this work will be applicable to generic solvent processes, especially in regards to improved reboiler design, and focused to meet or exceed the DOE’s overall carbon capture performance goals of 90% CO2 capture rate with 95% CO2 purity at a cost of

  19. Utilization of Integrated Process Control, Data Capture, and Data Analysis in Construction of Accelerator Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnie Madre; Charles Reece; Joseph Ozelis; Valerie Bookwalter

    2003-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed a web-based system that integrates commercial database, data analysis, document archiving and retrieval, and user interface software, into a coherent knowledge management product (Pansophy). This product provides important tools for the successful pursuit of major projects such as accelerator system development and construction, by offering elements of process and procedure control, data capture and review, and data mining and analysis. After a period of initial development, Pansophy is now being used in Jefferson Lab's SNS superconducting linac construction effort, as a means for structuring and implementing the QA program, for process control and tracking, and for cryomodule test data capture and presentation/analysis. Development of Pansophy is continuing, in particular data queries and analysis functions that are the cornerstone of its utility

  20. The Universality of the Rapid Neutron-capture Process Revealed by a Possible Disrupted Dwarf Galaxy Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Andrew R.; Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2017-12-01

    The rapid neutron-capture or r-process is thought to produce the majority of the heavy elements (Z> 30) in extremely metal-poor stars. The same process is also responsible for a significant fraction of the heavy elements in the Sun. This universality of the r-process is one of its characteristic features, as well as one of the most important clues to its astrophysical origin. We report the discovery of an extremely metal-poor field giant with [{Sr},{Ba}/{{H}}]≈ -6.0 and [{Sr},{Ba}/{Fe}]≈ -3.0, the lowest abundances of strontium and barium relative to iron ever observed. Despite its low abundances, the star 2MASS J151113.24-213003.0 has [{Sr}/{Ba}]=-0.11+/- 0.14, therefore its neutron-capture abundances are consistent with the main solar r-process pattern that has [{Sr}/{Ba}]=-0.25. It has been suggested that extremely low neutron-capture abundances are a characteristic of dwarf galaxies, and we find that this star is on a highly eccentric orbit with an apocenter ≳100 kpc that lies in the disk of satellites in the halo of the Milky Way. We show that other extremely metal-poor stars with low [Sr, Ba/H] and [Sr, Ba/Fe] plus solar [Sr/Ba] tend to have orbits with large apocenters, consistent with a dwarf galaxy origin for this class of object. The nucleosynthesis event that produced the neutron-capture elements in 2MASS J151113.24-213003.0 must produce both strontium and barium together in the solar ratio. We exclude contributions from the s-process in intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch or fast-rotating massive metal-poor stars, pair-instability supernovae, the weak r-process, and neutron-star mergers. We argue that the event was a Pop III or extreme Pop II core-collapse supernova explosion. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  1. Improving Prediction Accuracy of a Rate-Based Model of an MEA-Based Carbon Capture Process for Large-Scale Commercial Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Luo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon capture and storage (CCS technology will play a critical role in reducing anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emission from fossil-fired power plants and other energy-intensive processes. However, the increment of energy cost caused by equipping a carbon capture process is the main barrier to its commercial deployment. To reduce the capital and operating costs of carbon capture, great efforts have been made to achieve optimal design and operation through process modeling, simulation, and optimization. Accurate models form an essential foundation for this purpose. This paper presents a study on developing a more accurate rate-based model in Aspen Plus® for the monoethanolamine (MEA-based carbon capture process by multistage model validations. The modeling framework for this process was established first. The steady-state process model was then developed and validated at three stages, which included a thermodynamic model, physical properties calculations, and a process model at the pilot plant scale, covering a wide range of pressures, temperatures, and CO2 loadings. The calculation correlations of liquid density and interfacial area were updated by coding Fortran subroutines in Aspen Plus®. The validation results show that the correlation combination for the thermodynamic model used in this study has higher accuracy than those of three other key publications and the model prediction of the process model has a good agreement with the pilot plant experimental data. A case study was carried out for carbon capture from a 250 MWe combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT power plant. Shorter packing height and lower specific duty were achieved using this accurate model.

  2. CO{sub 2} capture from oil refinery process heaters through oxyfuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.B. Wilkinson; J.C. Boden; T. Gilmartin; C. Ward; D.A. Cross; R.J. Allam; N.W.Ivens [BP, Sunbury-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    BP has a programme to develop technologies that could reduce greenhouse gas emissions, by the capture and storage of CO{sub 2} from existing industrial boilers and process heaters. One generic technology under development is oxyfuel combustion, with flue gas recycle. Previous studies, by three of the authors, have concluded that refinery steam boilers could be successfully converted to oxyfuel firing. Fired heaters, however, differ from boilers in several respects and so it was decided to study the feasibility of converting process heaters. Three heaters, located on BP s Grangemouth refinery, were chosen as examples, as they are typical of large numbers of heaters worldwide. In establishing the parameters of the study, it was decided that the heat fluxes to the process tubes should not be increased, compared to conventional air firing. For two of the heaters this was achieved by proposing a slightly higher recycle rate than for the boiler conversion studied earlier - the heater duty would be retained with no changes to the tubes. For the third heater, where the process duty uses only the radiant section, the CO{sub 2} capture cost and the firing rate could be reduced by lowering the recycle rate. Some air in leakage to these heaters was considered inevitable, despite measures to control it, and therefore plant to remove residual inerts from the CO{sub 2} product was designed. Cryogenic oxygen production was selected for two heaters, but for the smallest heater vacuum swing adsorption was more economic. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. CO2 Capture and Reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thambimuthu, K.; Gupta, M.; Davison, J.

    2003-01-01

    CO2 capture and storage including its utilization or reuse presents an opportunity to achieve deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil energy use. The development and deployment of this option could significantly assist in meeting a future goal of achieving stabilization of the presently rising atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases. CO2 capture from process streams is an established concept that has achieved industrial practice. Examples of current applications include the use of primarily, solvent based capture technologies for the recovery of pure CO2 streams for chemical synthesis, for utilization as a food additive, for use as a miscible agent in enhanced oil recovery operations and removal of CO2 as an undesired contaminant from gaseous process streams for the production of fuel gases such as hydrogen and methane. In these applications, the technologies deployed for CO2 capture have focused on gas separation from high purity, high pressure streams and in reducing (or oxygen deficient) environments, where the energy penalties and cost for capture are moderately low. However, application of the same capture technologies for large scale abatement of greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel use poses significant challenges in achieving (at comparably low energy penalty and cost) gas separation in large volume, dilute concentration and/or low pressure flue gas streams. This paper will focus on a review of existing commercial methods of CO2 capture and the technology stretch, process integration and energy system pathways needed for their large scale deployment in fossil fueled processes. The assessment of potential capture technologies for the latter purpose will also be based on published literature data that are both 'transparent' and 'systematic' in their evaluation of the overall cost and energy penalties of CO2 capture. In view of the of the fact that many of the existing commercial processes for CO2 capture have seen applications in

  4. Prospects for SIMPLE 2000 A large-mass, low-background Superheated Droplet Detector for WIMP searches

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I; Girard, T A; Limagne, D; Miley, H S; Waysand, G

    2000-01-01

    SIMPLE 2000 ({\\underline S}uperheated {\\underline I}nstrument for {\\underline M}assive {\\underline P}artic{\\underline {LE}} searches) will consist of an array of eight to sixteen large active mass ($\\sim15$ g) Superheated Droplet Detectors(SDDs) to be installed in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt. Several factors make of SDDs an attractive approach for the detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), namely their intrinsic insensitivity to minimum ionizing particles, high fluorine content, low cost and operation near ambient pressure and temperature. We comment here on the fabrication, calibration and already-competitive first limits from SIMPLE prototype SDDs, as well as on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the program, which aims at an exposure of $>$25 kg-day during the year 2000. The ability of modest-mass fluorine-rich detectors to explore regions of neutralino parameter space beyond the reach of the most ambitious cryogenic projects is pointed out.

  5. Stimulus-driven capture and contingent capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeuwes, J.; Olivers, C.N.L.; Belopolsky, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    Whether or not certain physical events can capture attention has been one of the most debated issues in the study of attention. This discussion is concerned with how goal-directed and stimulus-driven processes interact in perception and cognition. On one extreme of the spectrum is the idea that

  6. Environmental issues and process risks for operation of carbon capture plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajnert Radosław

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this publication is a presentation of environmental issues and process risks connected with operation an installation for carbon capture from waste gas. General technological assumptions, typical for demonstration plant for carbon capture from waste gas (DCCP with application of two different solutions – 30% water solution of monoethanoloamine (MEA and water solution with 30% AMP (2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol and 10% piperazine have been described. The concept of DCCP installation was made for Łaziska Power Plant in Łaziska Górne owned by TAURON Wytwarzanie S.A. Main hazardous substances, typical for such installation, which can be dangerous for human life and health or for the environment have been presented. Pollution emission to the air, noise emission, waste water and solid waste management have been described. The environmental impact of the released substances has been stated. Reference to emission standards specified in regulations for considered substances has been done. Principles of risk analysis have been presented and main hazards in carbon dioxide absorption node and regeneration node have been evaluated.

  7. Environmental issues and process risks for operation of carbon capture plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnert, Radosław; Nowak, Martyna; Telenga-Kopyczyńska, Jolanta

    2018-01-01

    The scope of this publication is a presentation of environmental issues and process risks connected with operation an installation for carbon capture from waste gas. General technological assumptions, typical for demonstration plant for carbon capture from waste gas (DCCP) with application of two different solutions - 30% water solution of monoethanoloamine (MEA) and water solution with 30% AMP (2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol) and 10% piperazine have been described. The concept of DCCP installation was made for Łaziska Power Plant in Łaziska Górne owned by TAURON Wytwarzanie S.A. Main hazardous substances, typical for such installation, which can be dangerous for human life and health or for the environment have been presented. Pollution emission to the air, noise emission, waste water and solid waste management have been described. The environmental impact of the released substances has been stated. Reference to emission standards specified in regulations for considered substances has been done. Principles of risk analysis have been presented and main hazards in carbon dioxide absorption node and regeneration node have been evaluated.

  8. A Novel Strategy for Carbon Capture and Sequestration by rHLPD Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qinghua; Gupta, Surojit; Tang, Ling; Quinn, Sean [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Atakan, Vahit [Solidia Technologies, Inc., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Riman, Richard E., E-mail: riman@rci.rutgers.edu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2016-01-22

    Monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing is an energy-intensive process for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) due to the regeneration of amine in stripping towers at high temperature (100–120°C) and the subsequent pressurization of CO{sub 2} for geological sequestration. In this paper, we introduce a novel method, reactive hydrothermal liquid phase densification (rHLPD), which is able to solidify (densify) monolithic materials without using high temperature kilns. Then, we integrate MEA-based CCS processing and mineral carbonation by using rHLPD technology. This integration is designated as rHLPD-carbon sequestration (rHLPD-CS) process. Our results show that the CO{sub 2} captured in the MEA-CO{sub 2} solution was sequestered by the mineral (wollastonite CaSiO{sub 3}) carbonation at a low operating temperature (60°C) and simultaneously monolithic materials with a compressive strength of ~121 MPa were formed. This suggests that the use of rHLPD-CS technology eliminates the energy consumed for CO{sub 2}-MEA stripping and CO{sub 2} compression and also sequesters CO{sub 2} to form value-added products, which have a potential to be utilized as construction and infrastructure materials. In contrast to the high energy requirements and excessive greenhouse gas emissions from conventional Portland cement manufacturing, our calculations show that the integration of rHLPD and CS technologies provides a low energy alternative to production of traditional cementitious-binding materials.

  9. Neutron capture in 122,123,124Te: A critical test for s-process studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, K.; Voss, F.; Kaeppeler, F.; Reffo, G.

    1991-11-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of 122,123,124,125,126 Te were measured in the energy range from 10 to 200 keV at the Karlsruhe Van de Graaff accelerator using gold as a standard. Neutrons were produced via the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction by bombarding metallic Li targets with a pulsed proton beam. Capture events were registered with the Karlsruhe 4π Barium Fluoride Detector. Several runs have been performed under different experimental conditions to study the systematic uncertainties in detail. The cross section ratios were determined with an overall uncertainty of ∝ 1%. This is an improvement by about a factor of five compared to the existing data. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections were calculated for thermal energies between kT=10 and 100 keV by normalizing the cross section shape up to 600 keV neutron energy reported in literature to the present data. These stellar cross sections were used in an s-process analysis. With the classical approach the abundances of the three s-only isotopes 122,123,124 Te could be reproduced within the experimental uncertainties of ∝ 1%. The accuracy of the present data allowed also to derive constraints for the existing stellar models with respect to the effective neutron density. Furthermore, the p-process abundances for the tellurium isotopes are discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. The neutron capture cross section of the ${s}$-process branch point isotope $^{63}$Ni

    CERN Multimedia

    Neutron capture nucleosynthesis in massive stars plays an important role in Galactic chemical evolution as well as for the analysis of abundance patterns in very old metal-poor halo stars. The so-called weak ${s}$-process component, which is responsible for most of the ${s}$ abundances between Fe and Sr, turned out to be very sensitive to the stellar neutron capture cross sections in this mass region and, in particular, of isotopes near the seed distribution around Fe. In this context, the unstable isotope $^{63}$Ni is of particular interest because it represents the first branching point in the reaction path of the ${s}$-process. We propose to measure this cross section at n_TOF from thermal energies up to 500 keV, covering the entire range of astrophysical interest. These data are needed to replace uncertain theoretical predicitons by first experimental information to understand the consequences of the $^{63}$Ni branching for the abundance pattern of the subsequent isotopes, especially for $^{63}$Cu and $^{...

  11. Recent development of capture of CO2

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez, Rosa Hilda

    2014-01-01

    "Recent Technologies in the capture of CO2" provides a comprehensive summary on the latest technologies available to minimize the emission of CO2 from large point sources like fossil-fuel power plants or industrial facilities. This ebook also covers various techniques that could be developed to reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere. The contents of this book include chapters on oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized beds, gas separation membrane used in post-combustion capture, minimizing energy consumption in CO2 capture processes through process integration, characterization and application of structured packing for CO2 capture, calcium looping technology for CO2 capture and many more. Recent Technologies in capture of CO2 is a valuable resource for graduate students, process engineers and administrative staff looking for real-case analysis of pilot plants. This eBook brings together the research results and professional experiences of the most renowned work groups in the CO2 capture field...

  12. Field Testing of Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayre, Aaron [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Frankman, Dave [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Baxter, Andrew [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Stitt, Kyler [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Baxter, Larry [Sustainable Energy Solutions, LLC; Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2017-07-17

    Sustainable Energy Solutions has been developing Cryogenic Carbon Capture™ (CCC) since 2008. In that time two processes have been developed, the External Cooling Loop and Compressed Flue Gas Cryogenic Carbon Capture processes (CCC ECL™ and CCC CFG™ respectively). The CCC ECL™ process has been scaled up to a 1TPD CO2 system. In this process the flue gas is cooled by an external refrigerant loop. SES has tested CCC ECL™ on real flue gas slip streams from subbituminous coal, bituminous coal, biomass, natural gas, shredded tires, and municipal waste fuels at field sites that include utility power stations, heating plants, cement kilns, and pilot-scale research reactors. The CO2 concentrations from these tests ranged from 5 to 22% on a dry basis. CO2 capture ranged from 95-99+% during these tests. Several other condensable species were also captured including NO2, SO2 and PMxx at 95+%. NO was also captured at a modest rate. The CCC CFG™ process has been scaled up to a .25 ton per day system. This system has been tested on real flue gas streams including subbituminous coal, bituminous coal and natural gas at field sites that include utility power stations, heating plants, and pilot-scale research reactors. CO2 concentrations for these tests ranged from 5 to 15% on a dry basis. CO2 capture ranged from 95-99+% during these tests. Several other condensable species were also captured including NO2, SO2 and PMxx at 95+%. NO was also captured at 90+%. Hg capture was also verified and the resulting effluent from CCC CFG™ was below a 1ppt concentration. This paper will focus on discussion of the capabilities of CCC, the results of field testing and the future steps surrounding the development of this technology.

  13. Electron-capture process and ion mobility spectra in plasma chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasek, F.W.; Spangler, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basic principles of plasma chromatography are introduced and ion mobility relationships presented. The relationships of plasma chromatography to electron-capture detector mechanisms are discussed, including electron energy considerations and electron-capture reactions. A number of experimental studies by plasma chromatography are described. (C.F.)

  14. The Ca-looping process for CO2 capture and energy storage: role of nanoparticle technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2018-02-01

    The calcium looping (CaL) process, based on the cyclic carbonation/calcination of CaO, has come into scene in the last years with a high potential to be used in large-scale technologies aimed at mitigating global warming. In the CaL process for CO2 capture, the CO2-loaded flue gas is used to fluidize a bed of CaO particles at temperatures around 650 °C. The carbonated particles are then circulated into a calciner reactor wherein the CaO solids are regenerated at temperatures near 950 °C under high CO2 concentration. Calcination at such harsh conditions causes a marked sintering and loss of reactivity of the regenerated CaO. This main drawback could be however compensated from the very low cost of natural CaO precursors such as limestone or dolomite. Another emerging application of the CaL process is thermochemical energy storage (TCES) in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants. Importantly, carbonation/calcination conditions to maximize the global CaL-CSP plant efficiency could differ radically from those used for CO2 capture. Thus, carbonation could be carried out at high temperatures under high CO2 partial pressure for maximum efficiency, whereas the solids could be calcined at relatively low temperatures in the absence of CO2 to promote calcination. Our work highlights the critical role of carbonation/calcination conditions on the performance of CaO derived from natural precursors. While conditions in the CaL process for CO2 capture lead to a severe CaO deactivation with the number of cycles, the same material may exhibit a high and stable conversion at optimum CaL-CSP conditions. Moreover, the type of CaL conditions influences critically the reaction kinetics, which plays a main role on the optimization of relevant operation parameters such as the residence time in the reactors. This paper is devoted to a brief review on the latest research activity in our group concerning these issues as well as the possible role of nanoparticle technology to enhance the

  15. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Buddle, Stanlee [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Caraher, Joel [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Chen, Wei [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Doherty, Mark [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Farnum, Rachel [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Giammattei, Mark [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Hancu, Dan [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Miebach, Barbara [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Perry, Robert [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Rubinsztajn, Gosia; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2017-05-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s goal for Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies is the development of technologies available for demonstration by 2025 that can capture 90% of emitted CO2 with at least 95% CO2 purity for less than $40/tonne of CO2 captured. In the first budget period of the project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance. In the second budget period of the project, individual bench-scale unit operations were tested to determine the performance of each of each unit. Solids production was demonstrated in dry simulated flue gas across a wide range of absorber operating conditions, with single stage CO2 conversion rates up to 75mol%. Desorber operation was demonstrated in batch mode, resulting in desorption performance consistent with the equilibrium isotherms for GAP-0/CO2 reaction. Important risks associated with gas humidity impact on solids consistency and desorber temperature impact on thermal degradation were explored, and adjustments to the bench-scale process were made to address those effects. Corrosion experiments were conducted to support selection of suitable materials of construction for the major

  16. p-process nucleosynthesis via proton-capture reactions in thermonuclear supernovae explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Anne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Model calculations within the framework of the so-called γ process show an underproduction of the p nucleus with the highest isotopic abundace 92Mo. This discrepancy can be narrowed by taking into account the alternative production site of a type Ia supernova explosion. Here, the nucleus 92Mo can be produced by a sequence of proton-capture reactions. The amount of 92Mo nuclei produced via this reaction chain is most sensitive to the reactions 90Zr(p,γ and 91Nb(p,γ. Both rates have to be investigated experimentally to study the impact of this nucleosynthesis aspect on the long-standing 92Mo-problem. We have already measured the proton-capture reaction on 90Zr using high-resolution in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy. In this contribution, we will present our preliminary results of the total cross sections as well as the partial cross sections. Furthermore, we plan to measure the 91Nb(p,γ reaction soon. Due to the radioactive target material, the 91Nb nuclei have to be produced prior to the experiment. The current status of this production will be presented in this contribution.

  17. Membrane Separation Processes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture: State of the Art and Critical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belaissaoui Bouchra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane processes have been initially seldom considered within a post-combustion carbon dioxide capture framework. More traditional processes, particularly gas-liquid absorption in chemical solvents, are often considered as the most appropriate solution for the first generation of technologies. In this paper, a critical state of the art of gas separation membranes for CO2 capture is proposed. In a first step, the key performances (selectivity, permeability of different membrane materials such as polymers, inorganic membranes, hybrid matrices and liquid membranes, including recently reported results, are reviewed. In a second step, the process design characteristics of a single stage membrane unit are studied. Purity and energy constraints are analysed as a function of operating conditions and membrane materials performances. The interest of multistage and hybrid systems, two domains which have not sufficiently investigated up to now, are finally discussed. The importance of technico-economical analyses is highlighted in order to better estimate the optimal role of membranes for CCS applications.

  18. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  19. Exploratory investigations of hypervelocity intact capture spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, P.; Griffiths, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability to capture hypervelocity projectiles intact opens a new technique available for hypervelocity research. A determination of the reactions taking place between the projectile and the capture medium during the process of intact capture is extremely important to an understanding of the intact capture phenomenon, to improving the capture technique, and to developing a theory describing the phenomenon. The intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles by underdense media generates spectra, characteristic of the material species of projectile and capture medium involved. Initial exploratory results into real-time characterization of hypervelocity intact capture techniques by spectroscopy include ultra-violet and visible spectra obtained by use of reflecting gratings, transmitting gratings, and prisms, and recorded by photographic and electronic means. Spectrometry proved to be a valuable real-time diagnostic tool for hypervelocity intact capture events, offering understanding of the interactions of the projectile and the capture medium during the initial period and providing information not obtainable by other characterizations. Preliminary results and analyses of spectra produced by the intact capture of hypervelocity aluminum spheres in polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), and polyurethane (PU) foams are presented. Included are tentative emission species identifications, as well as gray body temperatures produced in the intact capture process.

  20. An Integrated Open Approach to Capturing Systematic Knowledge for Manufacturing Process Innovation Based on Collective Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangfeng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Process innovation plays a vital role in the manufacture realization of increasingly complex new products, especially in the context of sustainable development and cleaner production. Knowledge-based innovation design can inspire designers’ creative thinking; however, the existing scattered knowledge has not yet been properly captured and organized according to Computer-Aided Process Innovation (CAPI. Therefore, this paper proposes an integrated approach to tackle this non-trivial issue. By analyzing the design process of CAPI and technical features of open innovation, a novel holistic paradigm of process innovation knowledge capture based on collective intelligence (PIKC-CI is constructed from the perspective of the knowledge life cycle. Then, a multi-source innovation knowledge fusion algorithm based on semantic elements reconfiguration is applied to form new public knowledge. To ensure the credibility and orderliness of innovation knowledge refinement, a collaborative editing strategy based on knowledge lock and knowledge–social trust degree is explored. Finally, a knowledge management system MPI-OKCS integrating the proposed techniques is implemented into the pre-built CAPI general platform, and a welding process innovation example is provided to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. It is expected that our work would lay the foundation for the future knowledge-inspired CAPI and smart process planning.

  1. Electron capture and transfer-ionization processes in {sup 4}He{sup 2+}+Ar collision at 12.5 keV amu{sup -1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Benhenni, M. [Laboratoire Collisions, Agregats, Reactivite, IRSAMC, UMR 5589 CNRS and Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France)

    1998-05-14

    Electron emission in the {sup 4}He{sup 2+}+Ar collisional system has been investigated at 35 deg. and 12.5 keV amu{sup -1} collision velocity, in coincidence with the recoil target ion charges. Direct single ionization is found to be negligible with respect to single-electron capture. Contributions of transfer-ionization processes are stressed in the production of Ar{sup 2+} to Ar{sup 4+} ions; those of direct ionization, double excitation of the target and double capture into autoionization states of helium are instead found to be much less probable. Among the two-electron processes which explain the formation of Ar{sup 2+} ions, the double capture into autoionizing states of helium remains unimportant with respect to a pure transfer ionization process (one captured electron plus one ionized electron). The measured predominant production of Ar{sup 3+} ions illustrates the role played by three-electron processes, mainly a two-electron transfer accompanied by a single-target ionization. Finally, the formation of Ar{sup 4+} ions is connected with more complex transfer ionization processes. A qualitative analysis of these results is made within the quasimolecular approach. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  2. Do two machine-learning based prognostic signatures for breast cancer capture the same biological processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drier, Yotam; Domany, Eytan

    2011-03-14

    The fact that there is very little if any overlap between the genes of different prognostic signatures for early-discovery breast cancer is well documented. The reasons for this apparent discrepancy have been explained by the limits of simple machine-learning identification and ranking techniques, and the biological relevance and meaning of the prognostic gene lists was questioned. Subsequently, proponents of the prognostic gene lists claimed that different lists do capture similar underlying biological processes and pathways. The present study places under scrutiny the validity of this claim, for two important gene lists that are at the focus of current large-scale validation efforts. We performed careful enrichment analysis, controlling the effects of multiple testing in a manner which takes into account the nested dependent structure of gene ontologies. In contradiction to several previous publications, we find that the only biological process or pathway for which statistically significant concordance can be claimed is cell proliferation, a process whose relevance and prognostic value was well known long before gene expression profiling. We found that the claims reported by others, of wider concordance between the biological processes captured by the two prognostic signatures studied, were found either to be lacking statistical rigor or were in fact based on addressing some other question.

  3. Do two machine-learning based prognostic signatures for breast cancer capture the same biological processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotam Drier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The fact that there is very little if any overlap between the genes of different prognostic signatures for early-discovery breast cancer is well documented. The reasons for this apparent discrepancy have been explained by the limits of simple machine-learning identification and ranking techniques, and the biological relevance and meaning of the prognostic gene lists was questioned. Subsequently, proponents of the prognostic gene lists claimed that different lists do capture similar underlying biological processes and pathways. The present study places under scrutiny the validity of this claim, for two important gene lists that are at the focus of current large-scale validation efforts. We performed careful enrichment analysis, controlling the effects of multiple testing in a manner which takes into account the nested dependent structure of gene ontologies. In contradiction to several previous publications, we find that the only biological process or pathway for which statistically significant concordance can be claimed is cell proliferation, a process whose relevance and prognostic value was well known long before gene expression profiling. We found that the claims reported by others, of wider concordance between the biological processes captured by the two prognostic signatures studied, were found either to be lacking statistical rigor or were in fact based on addressing some other question.

  4. Comparison between the mechanical and radiative electron-capture processes at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.D.; Miraglia, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The ground-state--ground-state mechanical and radiative electron-capture processes are studied at very high, but not relativistic, projectile velocities. Three-body calculations were carried out with use of the continuum distorted-wave theoretical method for both processes. Total cross sections and final-atom angular distributions were computed, and the importance of each mechanism examined. For total cross sections, the numerical results reaffirm that the radiative process is the predominant mechanism at very high projectile energies. For a given incident charge, the range of projectile energies in which the nonrelativistic radiative mechanism is the most important decreases as the target charge increases. It is found that the radiative mechanism produces a very sharp final-atom angular distribution in the forward direction. When both processes, the radiative and mechanical, give the same total cross section, the calculations show that the radiative differential cross section in the forward direction is almost 2 orders of magnitude larger than the mechanical one

  5. Two-step rapid sulfur capture. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The primary goal of this program was to test the technical and economic feasibility of a novel dry sorbent injection process called the Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process for several advanced coal utilization systems. The Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process consists of limestone activation in a high temperature auxiliary burner for short times followed by sorbent quenching in a lower temperature sulfur containing coal combustion gas. The Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process is based on the Non-Equilibrium Sulfur Capture process developed by the Energy Technology Office of Textron Defense Systems (ETO/TDS). Based on the Non-Equilibrium Sulfur Capture studies the range of conditions for optimum sorbent activation were thought to be: activation temperature > 2,200 K for activation times in the range of 10--30 ms. Therefore, the aim of the Two-Step process is to create a very active sorbent (under conditions similar to the bomb reactor) and complete the sulfur reaction under thermodynamically favorable conditions. A flow facility was designed and assembled to simulate the temperature, time, stoichiometry, and sulfur gas concentration prevalent in the advanced coal utilization systems such as gasifiers, fluidized bed combustors, mixed-metal oxide desulfurization systems, diesel engines, and gas turbines.

  6. Effect of Gas Recycling on the Performance of a Moving Bed Temperature-Swing (MBTSA Process for CO2 Capture in a Coal Fired Power Plant Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Mondino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of a continuous moving-bed temperature-swing adsorption (MBTSA process for post-combustion CO2 capture in a coal-fired power plant context has been developed. Process simulations have been done using single component isotherms and measured gas diffusion parameters of an activated carbon adsorbent. While a simple process configuration with no gas re-circulation gives quite low capture rate and CO2 purity, 86% and 65%, respectively, more advanced process configurations where some of the captured gas is recirculated to the incoming flue gas drastically increase both the capture rate and CO2 purity, the best configuration reaching capture rate of 86% and CO2 purity of 98%. Further improvements can be achieved by using adsorbents with higher CO2/N2 selectivity and/or higher temperature of the regeneration section.

  7. Thermodynamics of a post combustion hydrate-based carbon dioxide capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Attouche Sfaxi, I.

    2011-07-01

    Hydrates selectivity towards carbon dioxide is offering a promising route for carbon dioxide removal from flue gases. Hydrate-based CO 2 capture process could substitute amine facilities widely implemented in gas treatment plants but suffering from oxidative degradation problems and high energy demand. In the framework of this thesis, we focus on phase equilibria that are involved in such process. Experimental dissociation conditions for clathrate hydrates of carbon dioxide and nitrogen, in the presence of some promoting molecules (Tetrahydrofuran, Tetrabutyl ammonium bromide and Tetrabutyl ammonium Fluoride ) are reported in the experimental section of this work. The data generated in this work along with literature data are compared to the model predictions. The developed model is based on the Cubic Plus Association (CPA) equation of state (EoS) for fluid phases combined to the van der Waals and Platteeuw's theory for the hydrate phase. (author)

  8. AMUC: Associated Motion capture User Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Sally Jane; Lawson, Sian E M; Olivier, Patrick; Watson, Paul; Chan, Anita M-A; Dade-Robertson, Martyn; Dunphy, Paul; Green, Dave; Hiden, Hugo; Hook, Jonathan; Jackson, Daniel G

    2009-07-13

    The AMUC (Associated Motion capture User Categories) project consisted of building a prototype sketch retrieval client for exploring motion capture archives. High-dimensional datasets reflect the dynamic process of motion capture and comprise high-rate sampled data of a performer's joint angles; in response to multiple query criteria, these data can potentially yield different kinds of information. The AMUC prototype harnesses graphic input via an electronic tablet as a query mechanism, time and position signals obtained from the sketch being mapped to the properties of data streams stored in the motion capture repository. As well as proposing a pragmatic solution for exploring motion capture datasets, the project demonstrates the conceptual value of iterative prototyping in innovative interdisciplinary design. The AMUC team was composed of live performance practitioners and theorists conversant with a variety of movement techniques, bioengineers who recorded and processed motion data for integration into the retrieval tool, and computer scientists who designed and implemented the retrieval system and server architecture, scoped for Grid-based applications. Creative input on information system design and navigation, and digital image processing, underpinned implementation of the prototype, which has undergone preliminary trials with diverse users, allowing identification of rich potential development areas.

  9. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Stripping Process-Based Technology for CO₂ Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2015-09-30

    A novel Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) process has been developed by Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc., Nexant Inc., and Western Kentucky University in this bench-scale project. The GPS-based process presents a unique approach that uses a gas pressurized technology for CO₂ stripping at an elevated pressure to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over the MEA process. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental work, process simulation, and technical and economic analysis studies were applied. The project conducted individual unit lab-scale tests for major process components, including a first absorption column, a GPS column, a second absorption column, and a flasher. Computer simulations were carried out to study the GPS column behavior under different operating conditions, to optimize the column design and operation, and to optimize the GPS process for an existing and a new power plant. The vapor-liquid equilibrium data under high loading and high temperature for the selected amines were also measured. The thermal and oxidative stability of the selected solvents were also tested experimentally and presented. A bench-scale column-based unit capable of achieving at least 90% CO₂ capture from a nominal 500 SLPM coal-derived flue gas slipstream was designed and built. This integrated, continuous, skid-mounted GPS system was tested using real flue gas from a coal-fired boiler at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The technical challenges of the GPS technology in stability, corrosion, and foaming of selected solvents, and environmental, health and

  10. Process intensification characteristics of a microreactor absorber for enhanced CO_2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapathy, Harish; Steinmayer, Sascha; Shooshtari, Amir; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Ohadi, Michael M.; Alshehhi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Enhanced gas separation/CO_2 capture using aqueous DEA in micro-structured absorber. • 15 straight parallel channels with hydraulic diameter of 456 μm. • Achieved close to 100% absorption efficiency under certain operating conditions. • Mass transfer coefficients 1–3 orders of magnitude higher than conventional absorbers. • Substantial intensification of absorption process achievable using microreactors. - Abstract: Gas separation processes, including post-combustion carbon capture (PCCC) by chemical absorption using liquid solvents can be substantially enhanced using high performance micro-structured surfaces to enhance the surface area available for reaction. The present paper studies the hydrodynamics and mass transfer performance of gas–liquid absorption of CO_2 into aqueous diethanolamine in a micro-structured reactor. The system was designed to comprise 15 straight parallel channels in a cross flow inlet configuration. The hydraulic diameter of each channel was 456 μm. The performance of the reactor was studied with respect to the absorption efficiency, mass transfer coefficient, acid gas loading ratio, and pressure drop. A flow pattern map was developed using available regime transition criteria. Parametric studies varying the gas and liquid flow rates, as well as their respective concentrations at the reactor inlet, were conducted. The two-phase pressure drop was compared against the predictions of a piecewise model and a reasonably good agreement was obtained. Absorption efficiencies close to 100% were observed under certain operating conditions. The presently achieved values of liquid-side volumetric mass transfer coefficients were between 1–3 orders of magnitude higher than those reported for most conventional gas–liquid absorption systems, which can be attributed to the inherent high specific interfacial area provided through micro-structured surfaces. The results reported here indicate the substantial levels of process

  11. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancu, Dan [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wood, Benjamin [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Genovese, Sarah [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Westendorf, Tiffany [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Perry, Robert [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Spiry, Irina [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Farnum, Rachael [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wilson, Paul [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Chen, Wei [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); McDermott, John [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Doherty, Mark [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Rainka, Matt [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Miebach, Barbara [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2017-08-03

    GE Global Research has developed, over the last 8 years, a platform of cost effective CO2 capture technologies based on a non-aqueous aminosilicone solvent (GAP-1m). As demonstrated in a previous funded DOE project (DE-FE0007502), the GAP-1m solvent has increased CO2 working capacity, lower volatility and corrosivity than the benchmark aqueous amine technology. The current report describes the cooperative program between GE Global Research (GE GRC), and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to design, construct, and operate a pilot-scale process using GAP-1m solvent to demonstrate its performance at 0.5 MWe. (i) Performance of the GAP-1m solvent was demonstrated in a 0.5 MWe pilot with real flue gas for over 900 hrs. of operation using two alternative desorption designs: a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR), and a Steam Stripper Column (SSC). The CSTR is a one-stage separation unit with reduced space requirements, and capital cost. The alternative is a multi-stage separation column, with improved desorption efficiency. Testing the two desorber options allowed us to identify the most cost effective, and space efficient desorber solution. (ii) CSTR Campaign: The CSTR desorber unit was designed, fabricated and integrated with the pilot solvent test unit (PSTU), replacing the PSTU Steam Stripper Column at NCCC. Solvent management and waste water special procedures were implemented to accommodate operation of the non-aqueous solvent in the PSTU. Performance of the GAP-1m solvent with the CSTR was demonstrated for over 500 hrs. while varying temperature of the desorption (230 – 265 oF), solvent circulation rate (GAP-1m : CO2 (molar) = 1.5 – 4), and flue gas flow rates (0.2 – 0.5 MWe). Solvent carry-over in the CO2 product was minimized by maintaining water content below 5 wt.%, and desorption pressure at 7 psig. CO2 capture efficiency achieved was 95% at 0.25 MWe (GAP-1m : CO2 = 4 (molar

  12. Capture, transport and storage of CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boer, B.

    2008-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gas CO2 in industrial processes and electricity production can be reduced on a large scale. Available techniques include post-combustion, pre-combustion, the oxy-fuel process, CO2 fixation in industrial processes and CO2 mineralization. In the Netherlands, plans for CO2 capture are not developing rapidly (CCS - carbon capture and storage). [mk] [nl

  13. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, K.Y.

    2012-01-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of ∼ ±22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than ∼ 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance ∼ 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance ∼ 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  14. Asymptotic coulombic conditions in the electron capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corchs, S.E.; Maidagan, J.M.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    Several first order perturbative approximations of the transition amplitude for electronic capture are studied. Different models in which the long range Coulomb potential is represented by different internuclear dependent phases, in the initial and final wave functions, are analysed and compared. (Author). 8 refs., 2 figs

  15. Dynamic plasma screening effects on electron capture process in hydrogenic ion fully stripped ion collisions in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y.

    1997-01-01

    In dense plasmas, dynamic plasma screening effects are investigated on electron capture from hydrogenic ions by past fully stripped ions. The classical Bohr Lindhard model has been applied to obtain the electron capture probability. The interaction potential in dense plasmas is represented in terms of the longitudinal dielectric function. The classical straight-line trajectory approximation is applied to the motion of the projectile ion in order to visualize the electron capture probability as a function of the impact parameter, projectile energy, and plasma parameters. The electron capture probability including the dynamic plasma screening effect is always greater than that including the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is smaller than the electron thermal velocity, the dynamic polarization screening effect becomes the static plasma screening effect. When the projectile velocity is greater than the plasma electron thermal velocity, the interaction potential is almost unshielded. The difference between the dynamic and static plasma screening effects is more significant for low energy projectiles. It is found that the static screening formula obtained by the Debye Hueckel model overestimates the plasma screening effects on the electron capture processes in dense plasmas. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. Radiative proton-capture nuclear processes in metallic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, Setsuo

    2001-01-01

    Protons being the lightest nuclei, metallic hydrogen may exhibit the features of quantum liquids most relevant to enormous enhancement of nuclear reactions; thermonuclear and pycnonuclear rates and associated enhancement factors of radiative proton captures of high-Z nuclei as well as of deuterons are evaluated. Atomic states of high-Z impurities are determined in a way consistent with the equations of state and screening characteristics of the metallic hydrogen. Rates of pycnonuclear p-d reactions are prodigiously high at densities ≥20 g/cm 3 , pressures ≥1 Gbar, and temperatures ≥950 K near the conditions of solidification. It is also predicted that proton captures of nuclei such as C, N, O, and F may take place at considerable rates, owing to strong screening by K-shell electrons, if the densities ≥60-80 g/cm 3 , the pressures ≥7-12 Gbar, and the temperatures just above solidification. The possibilities and significance of pycnonuclear p-d fusion experiments are specifically remarked

  17. Nuclear muon capture

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, N C

    1977-01-01

    Our present knowledge of the nuclear muon capture reactions is surveyed. Starting from the formation of the muonic atom, various phenomena, having a bearing on the nuclear capture, are reviewed. The nuclear reactions are then studied from two angles-to learn about the basic muon+nucleon weak interaction process, and to obtain new insights on the nuclear dynamics. Future experimental prospects with the newer generation muon 'factories' are critically examined. Possible modification of the muon+nucleon weak interaction in complex nuclei remains the most important open problem in this field. (380 refs).

  18. Capturing dynamic processes of change in GROW mutual help groups for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Lizzie D; Bishop, Brian J; Sparrow, Neville

    2009-12-01

    The need for a model that can portray dynamic processes of change in mutual help groups for mental health (MHGMHs) is emphasized. A dynamic process model has the potential to capture a more comprehensive understanding of how MHGMHs may assist their members. An investigation into GROW, a mutual help organization for mental health, employed ethnographic, phenomenological and collaborative research methods. The study examined how GROW impacts on psychological well being. Study outcomes aligned with the social ecological paradigm (Maton in Understanding the self-help organization: frameworks and findings. Sage, Thousand Oaks 1994) indicating multifactorial processes of change at and across three levels of analysis: group level, GROW program/community level and individual level. Outcome themes related to life skills acquisition and a change in self-perception in terms of belonging within community and an increased sense of personal value. The GROW findings are used to assist development of a dynamic multi-dimensional process model to explain how MHGMHs may promote positive change.

  19. Negative meson capture in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The processes of deexcitation and capture of negative mesons and hadrons in atomic hydrogen are investigated. Only slow collisions in which the projectile-atom relative velocity is less than one atomic unit are considered, and the motion of the incident particle is treated classically. For each classical trajectory the probability of ionizing the hydrogen atom is determined, together with the energy spectrum of the emitted electron. Ionization probabilities are calculated using the time-dependent formulation of the perturbed stationary state method. Exact two-center electronic wave functions are used for both bound and continuum states. The total ionization cross section and electron energy spectrum have been calculated for negative muons, kaons and antiprotons at incident relative velocities between 0.04 and 1.0 atomic units. The electron energy spectrum has a sharp peak for electron kinetic energies on the order of 10 -3 Rydbergs. The ionization process thus favors the emission of very slow electrons. The cross section for ionization with capture of the incident particle was calculated for relative kinetic energies greater than 1.0 Rydberg. Since ionization was found to occur with the emission of electrons of nearly zero kinetic energy, the fraction of ionizing collisions which result in capture decreases very rapidly with projectile kinetic energy. The energy distributions of slowed down muons and hadrons were also computed. These distributions were used together with the capture cross section to determine the distribution of kinetic energies at which capture takes place. It was found that most captures occur for kinetic energies slightly less than 1.0 Rydbergs with relatively little capture at thermal energies. The captured particles therefore tend to go into very large and loosely found orbits with binding energies less than 0.1 Rydbergs

  20. Process design of a hydrogen production plant from natural gas with CO2 capture based on a novel Ca/Cu chemical loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez, I.; Romano, M.C.; Fernández, J.R.; Chiesa, P.; Murillo, R.; Abanades, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Process design of a H 2 production plant based on a novel Ca/Cu looping process is presented. • CuO reduction with syngas provides energy for CaCO 3 calcination. • The effect of operating conditions on plant performance indexes is analysed. • Carbon capture efficiencies of around 94% are obtained. • Around 6% points of equivalent H 2 efficiency improvement on conventional reforming. - Abstract: A detailed and comprehensive design of a H 2 production plant based on a novel Ca/Cu chemical looping process is presented in this work. This H 2 production process is based on the sorption-enhanced reforming concept using natural gas together with a CaO/CaCO 3 chemical loop. A second Cu/CuO loop is incorporated to supply energy for the calcination of the CaCO 3 via the reduction of CuO with a fuel gas. A comprehensive energy integration description of the different gas streams available in the plant is provided to allow a thermodynamic assessment of the process and to highlight its advantages and drawbacks. Hydrogen equivalent efficiencies of up to 77% are feasible with this novel Ca/Cu looping process, using an active reforming catalyst based on Pt, high oxidation temperatures and moderate gas velocities in the fixed bed system, which are around 6% points above the efficiency of a reference H 2 production plant based on conventional steam reforming including CO 2 capture with MDEA. Non-converted carbon compounds in the reforming stage are removed as CO 2 in the calcination stage of the Ca/Cu looping process, which will be compressed and sent for storage. Carbon capture efficiencies of around 94% can be obtained with this Ca/Cu looping process, which are significantly higher than those obtained in the reference plant that uses MDEA absorption (around 85%). Additional advantages, such as its compact design and the use of cheaper materials compared to other commercial processes for H 2 production with CO 2 capture, confirm the potential of the Ca

  1. Integration between a demo size post-combustion CO2 capture and full size power plant: an integral approach on energy penalty for different process options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miguel Mercader, F. de; Magneschi, G.; Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Stienstra, G.J.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2012-01-01

    CO2 capture based on post-combustion capture has the potential to significantly reduce the CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, this capture process reduces considerably the energy efficiency of the power plant. To reduce this energy penalty, this paper studies different

  2. The Ansel Adams zone system: HDR capture and range compression by chemical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, John J.

    2010-02-01

    We tend to think of digital imaging and the tools of PhotoshopTM as a new phenomenon in imaging. We are also familiar with multiple-exposure HDR techniques intended to capture a wider range of scene information, than conventional film photography. We know about tone-scale adjustments to make better pictures. We tend to think of everyday, consumer, silver-halide photography as a fixed window of scene capture with a limited, standard range of response. This description of photography is certainly true, between 1950 and 2000, for instant films and negatives processed at the drugstore. These systems had fixed dynamic range and fixed tone-scale response to light. All pixels in the film have the same response to light, so the same light exposure from different pixels was rendered as the same film density. Ansel Adams, along with Fred Archer, formulated the Zone System, staring in 1940. It was earlier than the trillions of consumer photos in the second half of the 20th century, yet it was much more sophisticated than today's digital techniques. This talk will describe the chemical mechanisms of the zone system in the parlance of digital image processing. It will describe the Zone System's chemical techniques for image synthesis. It also discusses dodging and burning techniques to fit the HDR scene into the LDR print. Although current HDR imaging shares some of the Zone System's achievements, it usually does not achieve all of them.

  3. From superWIMPs to decaying dark matter. Models, bounds and indirect searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weniger, Christoph

    2010-06-01

    Despite lots of observational and theoretical efforts, the particle nature of dark matter remains unknown. Beyond the paradigmatic WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), many theoretically well motivated models exist where dark matter interacts much more weakly than electroweak with Standard Model particles. In this case new phenomena occur, like the decay of dark matter or the interference with the standard cosmology of the early Universe. In this thesis we study some of these aspects of superweakly coupled dark matter in general, and in the special case of hidden U(1) X gauginos that kinetically mix with hypercharge. There, we will assume that the gauge group remains unbroken, similar to the Standard Model U(1) em . We study different kinds of cosmological bounds, including bounds from thermal overproduction, from primordial nucleosynthesis and from structure formation. Furthermore, we study the possible cosmic-ray signatures predicted by this scenario, with emphasis on the electron and positron channel in light of the recent observations by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. Moreover we study the cosmic-ray signatures of decaying dark matter independently of concrete particle-physics models. In particular we analyze in how far the rise in the positron fraction above 10 GeV, as observed by PAMELA, can be explained by dark matter decay. Lastly, we concentrate on related predictions for gamma-ray observations with the Fermi LAT, and propose to use the dipole-like anisotropy of the prompt gamma-ray dark matter signal to distinguish exotic dark matter contributions from the extragalactic gamma-ray background. (orig.)

  4. From superWIMPs to decaying dark matter. Models, bounds and indirect searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weniger, Christoph

    2010-06-15

    Despite lots of observational and theoretical efforts, the particle nature of dark matter remains unknown. Beyond the paradigmatic WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), many theoretically well motivated models exist where dark matter interacts much more weakly than electroweak with Standard Model particles. In this case new phenomena occur, like the decay of dark matter or the interference with the standard cosmology of the early Universe. In this thesis we study some of these aspects of superweakly coupled dark matter in general, and in the special case of hidden U(1){sub X} gauginos that kinetically mix with hypercharge. There, we will assume that the gauge group remains unbroken, similar to the Standard Model U(1){sub em}. We study different kinds of cosmological bounds, including bounds from thermal overproduction, from primordial nucleosynthesis and from structure formation. Furthermore, we study the possible cosmic-ray signatures predicted by this scenario, with emphasis on the electron and positron channel in light of the recent observations by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. Moreover we study the cosmic-ray signatures of decaying dark matter independently of concrete particle-physics models. In particular we analyze in how far the rise in the positron fraction above 10 GeV, as observed by PAMELA, can be explained by dark matter decay. Lastly, we concentrate on related predictions for gamma-ray observations with the Fermi LAT, and propose to use the dipole-like anisotropy of the prompt gamma-ray dark matter signal to distinguish exotic dark matter contributions from the extragalactic gamma-ray background. (orig.)

  5. Continuous desalting of refolded protein solution improves capturing in ion exchange chromatography: A seamless process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Nicole; Jungbauer, Alois

    2017-06-01

    Truly continuous biomanufacturing processes enable an uninterrupted feed stream throughout the whole production without the need for holding tanks. We have utilized microporous anion and cation exchangers into which only salts, but not proteins, can penetrate into the pores for desalting of protein solutions, while diafiltration or dilution is usually employed for feed adjustments. Anion exchange and cation exchange chromatography columns were connected in series to remove both anions and cations. To increase operation performance, a continuous process was developed comprised of four columns. Continuous mode was achieved by staggered cycle operation, where one set of columns, consisting of one anion exchange and one cation exchange column, was loaded during the regeneration of the second set. Refolding, desalting and subsequent ion exchange capturing with a scFv as the model protein was demonstrated. The refolding solution was successfully desalted resulting in a consistent conductivity below 0.5 mS/cm from initial values of 10 to 11 mS/cm. With continuous operation process time could be reduced by 39% while productivity was increased to 163% compared to batch operation. Desalting of the protein solution resulted in up to 7-fold higher binding capacities in the subsequent ion exchange capture step with conventional protein binding resins. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Carbon captured from the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith, D.

    2008-01-01

    This article presented an innovative way to achieve the efficient capture of atmospheric carbon. A team of scientists from the University of Calgary's Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy have shown that it is possible to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) using a simple machine that can capture the trace amount of CO 2 present in ambient air at any place on the planet. The thermodynamics of capturing the small concentrations of CO 2 from the air is only slightly more difficult than capturing much larger concentrations of CO 2 from power plants. The research is significant because it offers a way to capture CO 2 emissions from transportation sources such as vehicles and airplanes, which represent more than half of the greenhouse gases emitted on Earth. The energy efficient and cost effective air capture technology could complement other approaches for reducing emissions from the transportation sector, such as biofuels and electric vehicles. Air capture differs from carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology used at coal-fired power plants where CO 2 is captured and pipelined for permanent storage underground. Air capture can capture the CO 2 that is present in ambient air and store it wherever it is cheapest. The team at the University of Calgary showed that CO 2 could be captured directly from the air with less than 100 kWhrs of electricity per tonne of CO 2 . A custom-built tower was able to capture the equivalent of 20 tonnes per year of CO 2 on a single square meter of scrubbing material. The team devised a way to use a chemical process from the pulp and paper industry to cut the energy cost of air capture in half. Although the technology is only in its early stage, it appears that CO 2 could be captured from the air with an energy demand comparable to that needed for CO 2 capture from conventional power plants, but costs will be higher. The simple, reliable and scalable technology offers an opportunity to build a commercial-scale plant. 1 fig

  7. Proton capture by magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaussen, K.; Olsen, H.A.; Oeverboe, I.; Osland, P.

    1983-09-01

    In the Kazama-Yang approximation, the lowest monopole-proton bound states have binding energies of 938 MeV, 263 keV, 105 eV, and 0.04 eV. The cross section for radiative capture to these states is for velocities β = 10 -5 - 10 -3 found to be of the order of 10 -28 - 10 -26 cm 2 . For the state that has a binding energy of 263 keV, the capture length in water is 171 x (β/10 -4 )sup(0.48) m. Observation of photons from the capture process would indicate the presence of monopoles. (orig.)

  8. Mars Atmospheric Capture and Gas Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Gibson, Tracy; Devor, Robert; Captain, James

    2011-01-01

    The Mars atmospheric capture and gas separation project is selecting, developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Trace gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure C02 to processing elements. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and should be captured as welL To achieve these goals, highly efficient gas separation processes will be required. These gas separation techniques are also required across various areas within the ISRU project to support various consumable production processes. The development of innovative gas separation techniques will evaluate the current state-of-the-art for the gas separation required, with the objective to demonstrate and develop light-weight, low-power methods for gas separation. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from un-reacted carbon oxides (C02- CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, (3) carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction, and (4) helium from hydrogen or oxygen from a propellant scavenging process. Potential technologies for the separations include freezers, selective membranes, selective solvents, polymeric sorbents, zeolites, and new technologies. This paper and presentation will summarize the results of an extensive literature review and laboratory evaluations of candidate technologies for the capture and separation of C02 and other relevant gases.

  9. Radiative capture of nucleons at astrophysical energies with single-particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.T.; Bertulani, C.A.; Guimaraes, V.

    2010-01-01

    Radiative capture of nucleons at energies of astrophysical interest is one of the most important processes for nucleosynthesis. The nucleon capture can occur either by a compound nucleus reaction or by a direct process. The compound reaction cross sections are usually very small, especially for light nuclei. The direct capture proceeds either via the formation of a single-particle resonance or a non-resonant capture process. In this work we calculate radiative capture cross sections and astrophysical S-factors for nuclei in the mass region A<20 using single-particle states. We carefully discuss the parameter fitting procedure adopted in the simplified two-body treatment of the capture process. Then we produce a detailed list of cases for which the model works well. Useful quantities, such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients, are obtained and compared to published data.

  10. THE WEAK s-PROCESS IN MASSIVE STARS AND ITS DEPENDENCE ON THE NEUTRON CAPTURE CROSS SECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignatari, M.; Herwig, F.; Gallino, R.; Bisterzo, S.; Heil, M.; Wiescher, M.; Kaeppeler, F.

    2010-01-01

    The slow neutron capture process in massive stars (weak s process) produces most of the s-process isotopes between iron and strontium. Neutrons are provided by the 22 Ne(α,n) 25 Mg reaction, which is activated at the end of the convective He-burning core and in the subsequent convective C-burning shell. The s-process-rich material in the supernova ejecta carries the signature of these two phases. In the past years, new measurements of neutron capture cross sections of isotopes beyond iron significantly changed the predicted weak s-process distribution. The reason is that the variation of the Maxwellian-averaged cross sections (MACS) is propagated to heavier isotopes along the s path. In the light of these results, we present updated nucleosynthesis calculations for a 25 M sun star of Population I (solar metallicity) in convective He-burning core and convective C-burning shell conditions. In comparison with previous simulations based on the Bao et al. compilation, the new measurement of neutron capture cross sections leads to an increase of s-process yields from nickel up to selenium. The variation of the cross section of one isotope along the s-process path is propagated to heavier isotopes, where the propagation efficiency is higher for low cross sections. New 74 Ge, 75 As, and 78 Se MACS result in a higher production of germanium, arsenic, and selenium, thereby reducing the s-process yields of heavier elements by propagation. Results are reported for the He core and for the C shell. In shell C-burning, the s-process nucleosynthesis is more uncertain than in the He core, due to higher MACS uncertainties at higher temperatures. We also analyze the impact of using the new lower solar abundances for CNO isotopes on the s-process predictions, where CNO is the source of 22 Ne, and we show that beyond Zn this is affecting the s-process yields more than nuclear or stellar model uncertainties considered in this paper. In particular, using the new updated initial

  11. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Benjamin; Genovese, Sarah; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Farnum, Rachael; Sing, Surinder; Wilson, Paul; Buckley, Paul; Acharya, Harish; Chen, Wei; McDermott, John; Vipperia, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

    2013-12-31

    A bench-scale system was designed and built to test an aminosilicone-based solvent. A model was built of the bench-scale system and this model was scaled up to model the performance of a carbon capture unit, using aminosilicones, for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) for a pulverized coal (PC) boiler at 550 MW. System and economic analysis for the carbon capture unit demonstrates that the aminosilicone solvent has significant advantages relative to a monoethanol amine (MEA)-based system. The CCS energy penalty for MEA is 35.9% and the energy penalty for aminosilicone solvent is 30.4% using a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the energy penalty for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to 29%. The increase in cost of electricity (COE) over the non-capture case for MEA is ~109% and increase in COE for aminosilicone solvent is ~98 to 103% depending on the solvent cost at a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the increase in COE for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to ~95-100%.

  12. A survey of the Carbon Capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokrllova, J.; Cik, G.; Takacova, A.; Smolinska, M.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide, one of the most important representatives of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere continues to rise. Fossil fuels burned in thermal power plants currently represent 80% of total energy production around the world and are the largest point sources of CO 2 , accounting for approximately 40% of total CO 2 emissions. There are several options for reducing CO 2 emissions: reducing demand, improving production efficiency and carbon capture and storage (CCS, carbon capture and storage). Capture and storage of carbon dioxide is generally a three-step process: 1 st Capture and compression of combustion products, 2 nd transport (mostly pipeline) and 3 rd utilization (eg. production of urea, beverage industry, production of dry ice, etc.). Technologies for CO 2 capturing used in power plants burning fossil fuels can be divided into four groups, each of which requires a completely different approach to CO 2 capture.

  13. Asymmetric capture of Dirac dark matter by the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blennow, Mattias; Clementz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Current problems with the solar model may be alleviated if a significant amount of dark matter from the galactic halo is captured in the Sun. We discuss the capture process in the case where the dark matter is a Dirac fermion and the background halo consists of equal amounts of dark matter and anti-dark matter. By considering the case where dark matter and anti-dark matter have different cross sections on solar nuclei as well as the case where the capture process is considered to be a Poisson process, we find that a significant asymmetry between the captured dark particles and anti-particles is possible even for an annihilation cross section in the range expected for thermal relic dark matter. Since the captured number of particles are competitive with asymmetric dark matter models in a large range of parameter space, one may expect solar physics to be altered by the capture of Dirac dark matter. It is thus possible that solutions to the solar composition problem may be searched for in these type of models

  14. Asymmetric capture of Dirac dark matter by the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, Mattias; Clementz, Stefan [Department of Theoretical Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Albanova University Center,106 91, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-18

    Current problems with the solar model may be alleviated if a significant amount of dark matter from the galactic halo is captured in the Sun. We discuss the capture process in the case where the dark matter is a Dirac fermion and the background halo consists of equal amounts of dark matter and anti-dark matter. By considering the case where dark matter and anti-dark matter have different cross sections on solar nuclei as well as the case where the capture process is considered to be a Poisson process, we find that a significant asymmetry between the captured dark particles and anti-particles is possible even for an annihilation cross section in the range expected for thermal relic dark matter. Since the captured number of particles are competitive with asymmetric dark matter models in a large range of parameter space, one may expect solar physics to be altered by the capture of Dirac dark matter. It is thus possible that solutions to the solar composition problem may be searched for in these type of models.

  15. Asymmetric capture of Dirac dark matter by the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, Mattias; Clementz, Stefan, E-mail: emb@kth.se, E-mail: scl@kth.se [Department of Theoretical Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Albanova University Center, 106 91, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-01

    Current problems with the solar model may be alleviated if a significant amount of dark matter from the galactic halo is captured in the Sun. We discuss the capture process in the case where the dark matter is a Dirac fermion and the background halo consists of equal amounts of dark matter and anti-dark matter. By considering the case where dark matter and anti-dark matter have different cross sections on solar nuclei as well as the case where the capture process is considered to be a Poisson process, we find that a significant asymmetry between the captured dark particles and anti-particles is possible even for an annihilation cross section in the range expected for thermal relic dark matter. Since the captured number of particles are competitive with asymmetric dark matter models in a large range of parameter space, one may expect solar physics to be altered by the capture of Dirac dark matter. It is thus possible that solutions to the solar composition problem may be searched for in these type of models.

  16. Energetic neutrinos from heavy-neutralino annihilation in the Sun. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    1991-01-01

    Neutralinos may be captured in the sun and annihilated therein producing high-energy neutrinos. Present limits on the flux of such neutrinos from underground detectors such as IMB and Kamiokande 2 may be used to rule out certain supersymmetric dark matter candidates, while in many other supersymmetric models the rates are large enough that if neutralinos do reside in the galactic halo, observation of a neutrino signal may be possible in the near future. Neutralinos that are either nearly pure Higgsino or a Higgsino/gaugino combination are generally captured in the sun by coherent scattering off nuclei via exchange of the lightest Higgs boson. If the squark mass is not much greater than the neutralino mass, then capture of neutralinos that are primarily gaugino occurs predominantly by spin-dependent scattering off hydrogen in the sun. The neutrino signal from annihilation of WIMPs with masses in the range of 80 to 1000 GeV in the sun should generally be stronger than that from weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) annihilation in the earth, and detection rates for mixed-state neutralinos are generally higher than those for Higgsinos or gauginos.

  17. Measurement of the radiative capture cross section of the s-process branching points 204Tl and 171Tm at the n_TOF facility (CERN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Guerrero, C.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Calviño, F.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Dressler, R.; Heinitz, S.; Kivel, N.; Quesada, J. M.; Schumann, D.; Aberle, O.; Alcayne, V.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Barbagallo, M.; Bečvář, F.; Bellia, G.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brown, A.; Busso, M.; Caamaño, M.; Caballero-Ontanaya, L.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Cristallo, S.; Damone, L. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dietz, M.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Eleme, Z.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Furman, V.; Göbel, K.; Gawlik, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Gunsing, F.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kimura, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Kopatch, Y.; Krtička, M.; Kurtulgil, D.; Ladarescu, I.; Lederer-Woods, C.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S. J.; Macina, D.; Martínez, T.; Masi, A.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Maugeri, E. A.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Michalopoulou, V.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Musumarra, A.; Negret, A.; Nolte, R.; Ogállar, F.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Persanti, L.; Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Radeck, D.; Ramos, D.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rochman, D.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Simone, S.; Smith, A. G.; Sosnin, N. V.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Talip, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Ulrich, J.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.; Köster, U.

    2018-05-01

    The neutron capture cross section of some unstable nuclei is especially relevant for s-process nucleosynthesis studies. This magnitude is crucial to determine the local abundance pattern, which can yield valuable information of the s-process stellar environment. In this work we describe the neutron capture (n,γ) measurement on two of these nuclei of interest, 204Tl and 171Tm, from target production to the final measurement, performed successfully at the n_TOF facility at CERN in 2014 and 2015. Preliminary results on the ongoing experimental data analysis will also be shown. These results include the first ever experimental observation of capture resonances for these two nuclei.

  18. Capture cross sections on unstable nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Escher, J. E.; Scielzo, N.; Bedrossian, P.; Ilieva, R. S.; Humby, P.; Cooper, N.; Goddard, P. M.; Werner, V.; Tornow, W.; Rusev, G.; Kelley, J. H.; Pietralla, N.; Scheck, M.; Savran, D.; Löher, B.; Yates, S. W.; Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Tsoneva, N.; Goriely, S.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate neutron-capture cross sections on unstable nuclei near the line of beta stability are crucial for understanding the s-process nucleosynthesis. However, neutron-capture cross sections for short-lived radionuclides are difficult to measure due to the fact that the measurements require both highly radioactive samples and intense neutron sources. Essential ingredients for describing the γ decays following neutron capture are the γ-ray strength function and level densities. We will compare different indirect approaches for obtaining the most relevant observables that can constrain Hauser-Feshbach statistical-model calculations of capture cross sections. Specifically, we will consider photon scattering using monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams. Challenges that exist on the path to obtaining neutron-capture cross sections for reactions on isotopes near and far from stability will be discussed.

  19. Capture cross sections on unstable nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonchev A.P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate neutron-capture cross sections on unstable nuclei near the line of beta stability are crucial for understanding the s-process nucleosynthesis. However, neutron-capture cross sections for short-lived radionuclides are difficult to measure due to the fact that the measurements require both highly radioactive samples and intense neutron sources. Essential ingredients for describing the γ decays following neutron capture are the γ-ray strength function and level densities. We will compare different indirect approaches for obtaining the most relevant observables that can constrain Hauser-Feshbach statistical-model calculations of capture cross sections. Specifically, we will consider photon scattering using monoenergetic and 100% linearly polarized photon beams. Challenges that exist on the path to obtaining neutron-capture cross sections for reactions on isotopes near and far from stability will be discussed.

  20. Toward transformational carbon capture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States); Litynski, John T. [Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington DC (United States); Brickett, Lynn A. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States); Morreale, Bryan D. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This paper will briefly review the history and current state of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research and development and describe the technical barriers to carbon capture. it will argue forcefully for a new approach to R&D, which leverages both simulation and physical systems at the laboratory and pilot scales to more rapidly move the best technoogies forward, prune less advantageous approaches, and simultaneously develop materials and processes.

  1. Carbon Capture: A Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-21

    whereas laboratory-scale experiments typically seek to validate or obtain data for specific components of a system. Laboratory- and bench-scale processes...Plant,” Energy, vol. 35 (2010), pp. 841-850. E. Favre, R. Bounaceur, and D. Roizard, “ Biogas , Membranes and Carbon Dioxide Capture,” Journal of...pp. 1-49. 64 Favre, “ Biogas , Membranes.” Carbon Capture: A Technology Assessment Congressional Research Service 42 materials have pore sizes

  2. Neutron capture cross section of $^{90}$Zr Bottleneck in the s-process reaction flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliente, G; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Aerts, G; Abbondanno, U; Alvarez, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, Panayiotis; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Bečvář, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calviño, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapiço, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillman, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Durán, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Gonçalves, I; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Köhler, P; Kossionides, E; Krtička, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, J; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stéphan, C; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente, M, C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2008-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the Zr isotopes have important implications in nuclear astrophysics and for reactor design. The small cross section of the neutron magic nucleus 90Zr, which accounts for more than 50% of natural zirconium represents one of the key isotopes for the stellar s-process, because it acts as a bottleneck in the neutron capture chain between the Fe seed and the heavier isotopes. The same element, Zr, also is an important component of the structural materials used in traditional and advanced nuclear reactors. The (n,γ) cross section has been measured at CERN, using the n_TOF spallation neutron source. In total, 45 resonances could be resolved in the neutron energy range below 70 keV, 10 being observed for the first time thanks to the high resolution and low backgrounds at n_TOF. On average, the Γγ widths obtained in resonance analyses with the R-matrix code SAMMY were 15% smaller than reported previously. By these results, the accuracy of the Maxwellian averaged cross section f...

  3. Carbon captured from the air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, D. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    This article presented an innovative way to achieve the efficient capture of atmospheric carbon. A team of scientists from the University of Calgary's Institute for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economy have shown that it is possible to reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using a simple machine that can capture the trace amount of CO{sub 2} present in ambient air at any place on the planet. The thermodynamics of capturing the small concentrations of CO{sub 2} from the air is only slightly more difficult than capturing much larger concentrations of CO{sub 2} from power plants. The research is significant because it offers a way to capture CO{sub 2} emissions from transportation sources such as vehicles and airplanes, which represent more than half of the greenhouse gases emitted on Earth. The energy efficient and cost effective air capture technology could complement other approaches for reducing emissions from the transportation sector, such as biofuels and electric vehicles. Air capture differs from carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology used at coal-fired power plants where CO{sub 2} is captured and pipelined for permanent storage underground. Air capture can capture the CO{sub 2} that is present in ambient air and store it wherever it is cheapest. The team at the University of Calgary showed that CO{sub 2} could be captured directly from the air with less than 100 kWhrs of electricity per tonne of CO{sub 2}. A custom-built tower was able to capture the equivalent of 20 tonnes per year of CO{sub 2} on a single square meter of scrubbing material. The team devised a way to use a chemical process from the pulp and paper industry to cut the energy cost of air capture in half. Although the technology is only in its early stage, it appears that CO{sub 2} could be captured from the air with an energy demand comparable to that needed for CO{sub 2} capture from conventional power plants, but costs will be higher. The simple, reliable and scalable technology

  4. Search for double beta decay processes of {sup 124}Xe with XENON100 and XENON1T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieguth, Alexander [IKP, Westfaelische-Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Driven by the search for dark matter particles the XENON dark matter project recently installed its next stage multi-ton experiment XENON1T at the LNGS, which will probe the spin-indpendent-WIMP-Nucleon cross section down to 2.10{sup -47} cm{sup 2}. Besides its main purpose different particle physics topics can be addressed by the taken data. One example are the double beta decay processes of natural isotope {sup 124}Xe. This isotope is expected to decay via two-neutrino double electron capture (2νECEC) and due to its high Q-value of 2864 keV additionally through 2νβ{sup +}β{sup +}. Since these processes have not been detected so far, there is only a lower limit the respective half-life (e.g. > 4.7.10{sup 21} yr for 2νECEC). A detection of the 2νECEC is possible using XENON1T data by looking for its clear signature of secondary X-rays or Auger electrons and at least new lower half-life limits for all other decay channels can be obtained. While these processes are expected from standard model physics, a detection of a decay without neutrinos (e.g 0νECEC) would hint towards beyond the standard model physics and could derive conclusions on the neutrino mass. Until XENON1T is taking data, the search for all processes can be tested in the recorded data of its predecessor XENON100.

  5. Process and Material Design for Micro-Encapsulated Ionic Liquids in Post-Combustion CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Bo [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Brennecke, Joan F [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); McCready, Mark [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Stadtherr, Mark [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-11-18

    Aprotic Heterocyclic Anion (AHA) Ionic Liquids (ILs) have been identified as promising new solvents for post-combustion carbon capture due to their high CO2 uptake and the high tenability 1,2 of their binding energy with CO2. Some of these compounds change phase (solid to liquid) on absorption of CO2; these Phase Change ILs (PCILs)3 offer the additional advantage that part of the heat needed to desorb the CO2 from the absorbent is provided by the heat of fusion as the PCIL solidifies upon release of CO2. However, the relatively high viscosity of AHA ILs and the occurrence of a phase change in PCILs present challenges for conventional absorption equipment. To overcome these challenges we are pursuing the use of new technology to micro-encapsulate the AHA ILs and PCILs. Our partners at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have successfully demonstrated this technology in the application of post-combustion carbon capture with sodium and potassium carbonate solutions,4 and have recently shown the feasibility of micro-encapsulation of an AHA IL for carbon capture.5 The large effective surface area and high CO2 permeability of the micro-capsules is expected to offset the drawback of the high IL viscosity and to provide for a more efficient and cost-effective mass transfer operation involving AHA ILs and PCILs. These opportunities, however, present us with both process and materials design questions. For example, what is the target CO2 absorption strength (enthalpy of chemical absorption) for the tunable AHA IL? What is the target for micro-capsule diameter in order to obtain a high mass transfer rate and good fluidization performance? What are the appropriate temperatures and pressures for the absorber and stripper? In order to address these and other questions, we have developed a rate-based model of a post-combustion CO2 capture process using micro-encapsulated ILs. As a performance baseline

  6. Optimizing the Costs of Solid Sorbent-Based CO2 Capture Process Through Heat Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjostrom, Sharon [Ada-Es, Inc., Highlands Ranch, CO (United States)

    2016-03-18

    The focus of this project was the ADAsorb™ CO2 Capture Process, a temperature-swing adsorption process that incorporates a three-stage fluidized bed as the adsorber and a single-stage fluidized bed as the regenerator. ADAsorb™ system was designed, fabricated, and tested under DOE award DEFE0004343. Two amine-based sorbents were evaluated in conjunction with the ADAsorb™ process: “BN”, an ion-exchange resin; and “OJ”, a metal organic framework (MOF) sorbent. Two cross heat exchanger designs were evaluated for use between the adsorber and regenerator: moving bed and fluidized bed. The fluidized bed approach was rejected fairly early in the project because the additional electrical load to power blowers or fans to overcome the pressure drop required for fluidization was estimated to be nominally three times the electrical power that could be generated from the steam saved through the use of the cross heat exchanger. The Energy Research Center at Lehigh University built and utilized a process model of the ADAsorb™ capture process and integrated this model into an existing model of a supercritical PC power plant. The Lehigh models verified that, for the ADAsorb™ system, the largest contributor to parasitic power was lost electrical generation, which was primarily electric power which the host plant could not generate due to the extraction of low pressure (LP) steam for sorbent heating, followed by power for the CO2 compressor and the blower or fan power required to fluidize the adsorber and regenerator. Sorbent characteristics such as the impacts of moisture uptake, optimized adsorption and regeneration temperature, and sensitivity to changes in pressure were also included in the modeling study. Results indicate that sorbents which adsorb more than 1-2% moisture by weight are unlikely to be cost competitive unless they have an extremely high CO2 working capacity that well exceeds 15% by weight. Modeling also revealed

  7. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent: Topical Report EH&S Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Herwig, Mark; Giolando, Salvatore; Green, Dianne; Morall, Donna

    2016-05-11

    GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2 capture solvent (award number DEFE0013687). As part of this program, a technology EH&S assessment (Subtask 5.1) has been completed for a CO2 capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. The assessment focuses on two chemicals used in the process, the aminosilicone solvent, GAP-0, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA), the GAP-0 carbamate formed upon reaction of the GAP-0 with CO2, and two potential byproducts formed in the process, GAP-0/SOx salts and amine-terminated, urea-containing silicone (also referred to as “ureas” in this report). The EH&S assessment identifies and estimates the magnitude of the potential air and water emissions and solid waste generated by the process and reviews the toxicological profiles of the chemicals associated with the process. Details regarding regulatory requirements, engineering controls, and storage and handling procedures are also provided in the following sections.

  8. Application of a computer-aided framework for the design of CO2 capture and utilization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Woodley, John; Gani, Rafiqul

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and utilization is a vital element of carbon dioxide emission reduction to address global warming. An integrated, computer-aided framework has been developed to achieve this. This framework adopts a three-stage approach to sustainable process synthesis-design: (i) process...... synthesis, (ii) process design and (iii) innovative design. In the first stage, reaction path synthesis is used to determine the reactions and products that are considered in processing route selection and/or generation. Various scenarios are then considered for the superstructure optimization. The selected...... steps. Then, the superstructure optimization is performed on a network containing 13 likely products giving 30 feasible processing routes, considering different scenarios and objectives. Stages 2 and 3 have been applied to the optimal solution of the first scenario, which selects the production...

  9. The relationship between action-effect monitoring and attention capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Manjaly, Jaison A; Sunny, Meera Mary

    2015-02-01

    Many recent findings suggest that stimuli that are perceived to be the consequence of one's own actions are processed with priority. According to the preactivation account of intentional binding, predicted consequences are preactivated and hence receive a temporal advantage in processing. The implications of the preactivation account are important for theories of attention capture, as temporal advantage often translates to attention capture. Hence, action might modulate attention capture by feature singletons. Experiment 1 showed that a motion onset and color change captured attention only when it was preceded by an action. Experiment 2 showed that the capture occurs only with predictable, but not with unpredictable, consequences of action. Experiment 3 showed that even when half the display changed color at display transition, they were all prioritized. The results suggest that action modulates attentional control.

  10. Study of CO{sub 2} capture processes in power plants; Etude de procedes de captage du CO{sub 2} dans les centrales thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.M

    2007-12-15

    The aim of the present study is to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO{sub 2} from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture by methanol and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO{sub 2}. These processes were evaluated using the process software Aspen PlusTM to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. With regard to post-combustion, an aqueous solution based on a mixture of amines (N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and triethylene tetramine (TETA)) was developed. Measurements of absorption were carried out between 298 and 333 K in a Lewis cell. CO{sub 2} partial pressure at equilibrium, characteristic of the CO{sub 2} solubility in the solvent, was determined up to 393 K. The solvent performances were compared with respect to more conventional solvents such as MDEA and monoethanolamine (MEA). For oxy-fuel combustion, a recovery process, based on a cryogenic separation of the components of the flue gas, was developed and applied to power plants. The study showed that O{sub 2} purity acts on the CO{sub 2} concentration in the flue gas and thus on the performances of the recovery process. The last option is natural gas reforming with CO{sub 2} pre-combustion capture. Several configurations were assessed: air reforming and oxygen reforming, reforming pressure and dilution of the synthesis gas. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents. (author)

  11. CFD Simulations of a Regenerative Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture in Advanced Gasification Based Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arastoopour, Hamid [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Abbasian, Javad [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-07-31

    This project describes the work carried out to prepare a highly reactive and mechanically strong MgO based sorbents and to develop a Population Balance Equations (PBE) approach to describe the evolution of the particle porosity distribution that is linked with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to perform simulations of the CO2 capture and sorbent regeneration. A large number of MgO-based regenerable sorbents were prepared using low cost and abundant dolomite as the base material. Among various preparation parameters investigated the potassium/magnesium (K/Mg) ratio was identified as the key variable affecting the reactivity and CO2 capacity of the sorbent. The optimum K/Mg ratio is about 0.15. The sorbent formulation HD52-P2 was identified as the “best” sorbent formulation and a large batch (one kg) of the sorbent was prepared for the detailed study. The results of parametric study indicate the optimum carbonation and regeneration temperatures are 360° and 500°C, respectively. The results also indicate that steam has a beneficial effect on the rate of carbonation and regeneration of the sorbent and that the reactivity and capacity of the sorbent decreases in the cycling process (sorbent deactivation). The results indicate that to achieve a high CO2 removal efficiency, the bed of sorbent should be operated at a temperature range of 370-410°C which also favors production of hydrogen through the WGS reaction. To describe the carbonation reaction kinetics of the MgO, the Variable Diffusivity shrinking core Model (VDM) was developed in this project, which was shown to accurately fit the experimental data. An important advantage of this model is that the changes in the sorbent conversion with time can be expressed in an explicit manner, which will significantly reduce the CFD computation time. A Computational Fluid Dynamic/Population Balance Equations (CFD/PBE) model was developed that accounts for the particle (sorbent) porosity distribution and a new version of

  12. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  13. Thermophysical Properties and Phase Behavior of Fluids for Application in Carbon Capture and Storage Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusler, J P Martin

    2017-06-07

    Phase behavior and thermophysical properties of mixtures of carbon dioxide with various other substances are very important for the design and operation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) processes. The available empirical data are reviewed, together with some models for the calculation of these properties. The systems considered in detail are, first, mixtures of carbon dioxide, water, and salts; second, carbon dioxide-rich nonelectrolyte mixtures; and third, mixtures of carbon dioxide with water and amines. The empirical data and the plethora of available models permit the estimation of key fluid properties required in the design and operation of CCS processes. The engineering community would benefit from the further development, and delivery in convenient form, of a small number of these models sufficient to encompass the component slate and operating conditions of CCS processes.

  14. Capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvorný, David; Vokrouhlický, David; Deienno, Rogerio

    2014-01-01

    The irregular satellites of outer planets are thought to have been captured from heliocentric orbits. The exact nature of the capture process, however, remains uncertain. We examine the possibility that irregular satellites were captured from the planetesimal disk during the early solar system instability when encounters between the outer planets occurred. Nesvorný et al. already showed that the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune were plausibly captured during planetary encounters. Here we find that the current instability models present favorable conditions for capture of irregular satellites at Jupiter as well, mainly because Jupiter undergoes a phase of close encounters with an ice giant. We show that the orbital distribution of bodies captured during planetary encounters provides a good match to the observed distribution of irregular satellites at Jupiter. The capture efficiency for each particle in the original transplanetary disk is found to be (1.3-3.6) × 10 –8 . This is roughly enough to explain the observed population of jovian irregular moons. We also confirm Nesvorný et al.'s results for the irregular satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  15. Upscaling of enzyme enhanced CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne Berthold

    Fossil fuels are the backbone of the energy generation in the coming decades for USA, China, India and Europe, hence high greenhouse gas emissions are expected in future. Carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) is the only technology that can mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel...... the mass transfer of CO2 with slow-capturing but energetically favorable solvents can open up a variety of new process options for this technology. The ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which enhances the mass transfer of CO2 in the lungs by catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2, is one very...... enhanced CO2 capture technology by identifying the potentials and limitations in lab and in pilot scale and benchmarking the process against proven technologies. The main goal was to derive a realistic process model for technical size absorbers with a wide range of validity incorporating a mechanistic...

  16. Model-Based Systems Engineering for Capturing Mission Architecture System Processes with an Application Case Study - Orion Flight Test 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanne, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    Model-based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is an emerging methodology that can be leveraged to enhance many system development processes. MBSE allows for the centralization of an architecture description that would otherwise be stored in various locations and formats, thus simplifying communication among the project stakeholders, inducing commonality in representation, and expediting report generation. This paper outlines the MBSE approach taken to capture the processes of two different, but related, architectures by employing the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) as a standard for architecture description and the modeling tool MagicDraw. The overarching goal of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of MBSE as a means of capturing and designing a mission systems architecture. The first portion of the project focused on capturing the necessary system engineering activities that occur when designing, developing, and deploying a mission systems architecture for a space mission. The second part applies activities from the first to an application problem - the system engineering of the Orion Flight Test 1 (OFT-1) End-to-End Information System (EEIS). By modeling the activities required to create a space mission architecture and then implementing those activities in an application problem, the utility of MBSE as an approach to systems engineering can be demonstrated.

  17. Technoeconomic Assessment of an Advanced Aqueous Ammonia-Based Postcombustion Capture Process Integrated with a 650-MW Coal-Fired Power Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangkang; Yu, Hai; Yan, Shuiping; Feron, Paul; Wardhaugh, Leigh; Tade, Moses

    2016-10-04

    Using a rigorous, rate-based model and a validated economic model, we investigated the technoeconomic performance of an aqueous NH 3 -based CO 2 capture process integrated with a 650-MW coal-fired power station. First, the baseline NH 3 process was explored with the process design of simultaneous capture of CO 2 and SO 2 to replace the conventional FGD unit. This reduced capital investment of the power station by US$425/kW (a 13.1% reduction). Integration of this NH 3 baseline process with the power station takes the CO 2 -avoided cost advantage over the MEA process (US$67.3/tonne vs US$86.4/tonne). We then investigated process modifications of a two-stage absorption, rich-split configuration and interheating stripping to further advance the NH 3 process. The modified process reduced energy consumption by 31.7 MW/h (20.2% reduction) and capital costs by US$55.4 million (6.7% reduction). As a result, the CO 2 -avoided cost fell to $53.2/tonne: a savings of $14.1 and $21.9/tonne CO 2 compared with the NH 3 baseline and advanced MEA process, respectively. The analysis of energy breakdown and cost distribution indicates that the technoeconomic performance of the NH 3 process still has great potential to be improved.

  18. Multi-scale modeling of carbon capture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, Joel David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The development and scale up of cost effective carbon capture processes is of paramount importance to enable the widespread deployment of these technologies to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) in 2011 with the goal of developing a computational toolset that would enable industry to more effectively identify, design, scale up, operate, and optimize promising concepts. The first half of the presentation will introduce the CCSI Toolset consisting of basic data submodels, steady-state and dynamic process models, process optimization and uncertainty quantification tools, an advanced dynamic process control framework, and high-resolution filtered computationalfluid- dynamics (CFD) submodels. The second half of the presentation will describe a high-fidelity model of a mesoporous silica supported, polyethylenimine (PEI)-impregnated solid sorbent for CO2 capture. The sorbent model includes a detailed treatment of transport and amine-CO2- H2O interactions based on quantum chemistry calculations. Using a Bayesian approach for uncertainty quantification, we calibrate the sorbent model to Thermogravimetric (TGA) data.

  19. Single-electron capture in He2+-D2 collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R.

    1994-01-01

    Doubly differential cross sections of single-electron capture were measured for He 2+ impinging on a molecular deuterium target. The investigated collision energies are 4, 6 and 8 keV and the scattering angles range from 10' to 2 o 30' (laboratory frame). The exothermic capture leading to He + (1s) + D 2 +* was found to be the most important process at low energies and angles, whereas the endothermic channels leading to dissociative capture become the main processes at high scattering angles, i.e. at small impact parameters. (author)

  20. Techno-economic process design of a commercial-scale amine-based CO_2 capture system for natural gas combined cycle power plant with exhaust gas recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Usman; Agbonghae, Elvis O.; Hughes, Kevin J.; Ingham, Derek B.; Ma, Lin; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • EGR is a way to enhance the CO_2 content with reduction in design variables and cost. • Both process and economic analyses are essential to reach the optimum design variables. • Commercial-scale NGCC with and without EGR is presented. • Process design of the amine-based CO_2 capture plant is evaluated for with and without EGR. - Abstract: Post-combustion CO_2 capture systems are gaining more importance as a means of reducing escalating greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, for natural gas-fired power generation systems, exhaust gas recirculation is a method of enhancing the CO_2 concentration in the lean flue gas. The present study reports the design and scale-up of four different cases of an amine-based CO_2 capture system at 90% capture rate with 30 wt.% aqueous solution of MEA. The design results are reported for a natural gas-fired combined cycle system with a gross power output of 650 MW_e without EGR and with EGR at 20%, 35% and 50% EGR percentage. A combined process and economic analysis is implemented to identify the optimum designs for the different amine-based CO_2 capture plants. For an amine-based CO_2 capture plant with a natural gas-fired combined cycle without EGR, an optimum liquid to gas ratio of 0.96 is estimated. Incorporating EGR at 20%, 35% and 50%, results in optimum liquid to gas ratios of 1.22, 1.46 and 1.90, respectively. These results suggest that a natural gas-fired power plant with exhaust gas recirculation will result in lower penalties in terms of the energy consumption and costs incurred on the amine-based CO_2 capture plant.

  1. Annual Report: Carbon Capture (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebke, David; Morreale, Bryan; Richards, George; Syamlal, Madhava

    2014-04-16

    Capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a critical component in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-based processes. The Carbon Capture research to be performed is aimed at accelerating the development of efficient, cost-effective technologies which meet the post-combustion programmatic goal of capture of 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from an existing coal-fired power plant with less than a 35% increase in the cost of electricity (COE), and the pre-combustion goal of 90% CO{sub 2} capture with less than a 10% increase in COE. The specific objective of this work is to develop innovative materials and approaches for the economic and efficient capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-based processes, and ultimately assess the performance of promising technologies at conditions representative of field application (i.e., slip stream evaluation). The Carbon Capture research includes seven core technical research areas: post-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; pre-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; and oxygen (O{sub 2}) production. The goal of each of these tasks is to develop advanced materials and processes that are able to reduce the energy penalty and cost of CO{sub 2} (or O{sub 2}) separation over conventional technologies. In the first year of development, materials will be examined by molecular modeling, and then synthesized and experimentally characterized at lab scale. In the second year, they will be tested further under ideal conditions. In the third year, they will be tested under realistic conditions. The most promising materials will be tested at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) using actual flue or fuel gas. Systems analyses will be used to determine whether or not materials developed are likely to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) COE targets. Materials which perform well and appear likely to improve in performance will be licensed for further development outside of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL

  2. Impacts of carbon capture on power plant emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, R.; Wen, H. [Bechtel Power, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Post-combustion carbon dioxide capture processes currently include amine-based solvent scrubbing and ammonia solution scrubbing technologies. Both result in high emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia, as well as liquid discharge that contain chemical solvent. Additional solid wastes include sludge and spent solvent filtration medias. Process simulation software can be used to predict the amount of solvent vapor in the stack gas for both amine and ammonia solvent based capture processes. However, amine could decompose in most amine-based processes and release ammonia gas due to degradation by exposure to oxygen, sulfur impurities, and thermal conditions. As a regulated pollutant for emission control for some plants, ammonia emissions are a major concern for ammonia scrubbing processes. The energy requirement for carbon capture can be reduced by cooling the flue gas before entering the carbon dioxide absorber column. The resulting low flue gas temperature could create difficulties in dispersing the flue gas plume in the atmosphere. This paper presented a computer simulation of stack emission reduction.

  3. Dynamic stellar neutron-capture nucleosynthesis: the need for more nuclear data for the s-process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Howard, W.M.; Takahashi, K.; Ward, R.A.

    1984-09-01

    We summarize results from a detailed parameter study of the s-process in models which produce an exponential distribution of exposures by sequential irradiations and dredge up in the stellar environment. The calculations are based on a complete network of measured and calculated neutron capture and beta-decay rates as well as estimates for their temperature dependence. In the framework of these models we identify and systematically vary the astrophysical variables which affect the observed solar-system sigmaN (cross section times abundance) curve. Constraints are placed on the s-process neutron exposure and flux as well as the temperatures, densities, neutron pulse shape and inter-pulse period. The results also highlight important needs for better nuclear data in various mass regions. 26 references

  4. Capture of Planetesimals into a Circumterrestrial Swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    The lunar origin model considered in this report involves processing of protolunar material through a circumterrestrial swarm of particles. Once such a swarm has formed, it can gain mass by capturing infalling planetesimals and ejecta from giant impacts on the Earth, although the angular momentum supply from these sources remains a problem. The first stage of formation of a geocentric swarm by capture of planetesimals from initially heliocentric orbits is examined. The only plausible capture mechanism that is not dependent on very low approach velocities is the mutual collision of planetesimals passing within Earth's sphere of influence. The dissipation of energy in inelastic collisions or accretion events changes the value of the Jacobi parameter, allowing capture into bound geocentric orbits. This capture scenario was tested directly by many body numerical integration of planetesimal orbits in near Earth space.

  5. Algal Energy Conversion and Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazendonk, P.

    2015-12-01

    We address the potential for energy conversions and capture for: energy generation; reduction in energy use; reduction in greenhouse gas emissions; remediation of water and air pollution; protection and enhancement of soil fertility. These processes have the potential to sequester carbon at scales that may have global impact. Energy conversion and capture strategies evaluate energy use and production from agriculture, urban areas and industries, and apply existing and emerging technologies to reduce and recapture energy embedded in waste products. The basis of biocrude production from Micro-algal feedstocks: 1) The nutrients from the liquid fraction of waste streams are concentrated and fed into photo bioreactors (essentially large vessels in which microalgae are grown) along with CO2 from flue gasses from down stream processes. 2) The algae are processed to remove high value products such as proteins and beta-carotenes. The advantage of algae feedstocks is the high biomass productivity is 30-50 times that of land based crops and the remaining biomass contains minimal components that are difficult to convert to biocrude. 3) The remaining biomass undergoes hydrothermal liquefaction to produces biocrude and biochar. The flue gasses of this process can be used to produce electricity (fuel cell) and subsequently fed back into the photobioreactor. The thermal energy required for this process is small, hence readily obtained from solar-thermal sources, and furthermore no drying or preprocessing is required keeping the energy overhead extremely small. 4) The biocrude can be upgraded and refined as conventional crude oil, creating a range of liquid fuels. In principle this process can be applied on the farm scale to the municipal scale. Overall, our primary food production is too dependent on fossil fuels. Energy conversion and capture can make food production sustainable.

  6. Mass measurements of neutron rich isotopes in the Fe region and electron capture processes in neutron star crusts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, Alfredo; Matos, M.; Schatz, Hendrik; Amthor, A.M.; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Gupta, Sanjib; Hix, William Raphael; Lau, Rita; Moeller, Peter; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.M.; Shapira, Dan; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Experimental knowledge of nuclear masses of exotic nuclei is important for understanding nuclear structure far from the valley of stability, and as a direct input into astrophysical models. Electron capture processes in the crust of accreting neutron stars have been proposed as a heat source that can affect the thermal structure of the star. Nuclear masses of very neutron-rich nuclides are necessary inputs to model the electron capture process. The time-of-flight (TOF) mass measurement technique allows measurements on very short-lived nuclei. It has been effectively applied using the fast fragment beams produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab (NSCL) to reach masses very far from stability. Measurements were performed for neutron-rich isotopes in the region of the N=32 and N=40 subshells, which coincides with the mass range of carbon superburst ashes. We discuss reaction network calculations performed to investigate the impact of our new measurements and to compare the effect of using different global mass models in the calculations. It is observed that the process is sensitive to the differences in the odd-even mass staggering predicted by the mass models, and our new result for 66Mn has a significant impact on the distribution of heat sources in the crust.

  7. CHAOTIC CAPTURE OF NEPTUNE TROJANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David

    2009-01-01

    Neptune Trojans (NTs) are swarms of outer solar system objects that lead/trail planet Neptune during its revolutions around the Sun. Observations indicate that NTs form a thick cloud of objects with a population perhaps ∼10 times more numerous than that of Jupiter Trojans and orbital inclinations reaching ∼25 deg. The high inclinations of NTs are indicative of capture instead of in situ formation. Here we study a model in which NTs were captured by Neptune during planetary migration when secondary resonances associated with the mean-motion commensurabilities between Uranus and Neptune swept over Neptune's Lagrangian points. This process, known as chaotic capture, is similar to that previously proposed to explain the origin of Jupiter's Trojans. We show that chaotic capture of planetesimals from an ∼35 Earth-mass planetesimal disk can produce a population of NTs that is at least comparable in number to that inferred from current observations. The large orbital inclinations of NTs are a natural outcome of chaotic capture. To obtain the ∼4:1 ratio between high- and low-inclination populations suggested by observations, planetary migration into a dynamically excited planetesimal disk may be required. The required stirring could have been induced by Pluto-sized and larger objects that have formed in the disk.

  8. The national carbon capture center at the power systems development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-09-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Three reporting period, efforts at the NCCC/PSDF focused on testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; commissioning and initial testing at the post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  9. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-05-11

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Two reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on new technology assessment and test planning; designing and constructing post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  10. Capture of exogenous attention modulates the attentional blink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Simon; Andersen, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    When two targets (T1 & T2) are presented in rapid succession, observers often fail to report T2 if they attend to T1. Bottleneck theories propose that this attentional blink (AB) is due to T1 occupying a slow processing stage when T2 is presented. Accordingly, if increasing T1 difficulty increases...... T1 processing time, this should cause a greater AB. Attention capture hypotheses suggest that T1 captures attention, which cannot be reallocated to T2 in time. Accordingly, if increasing T1 difficulty, decreases saliency, this should cause a smaller AB. Studies examining how T1 difficulty affects...... with T1 contrast energy. Our results indicate that T1 capture modulates the AB. We suggest that this effect has confounded previous studies on the effect of T1 difficulty. In an electrophysiological version of the study we will further examine the implied relation between attention capture and the AB....

  11. Process discovery: Capturing the invisible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Processes are everywhere. Organizations have business processes to manufacture products, provide services, purchase goods, handle applications, etc. Also in our daily lives we are involved in a variety of processes, for example when we use our car or when we book a trip via the Internet. Although

  12. Basic Research Needs for Carbon Capture: Beyond 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alivisatos, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Buchanan, Michelle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2010-03-04

    This report is based on a SC/FE workshop on Carbon Capture: Beyond 2020, held March 4–5, 2010, to assess the basic research needed to address the current technical bottlenecks in carbon capture processes and to identify key research priority directions that will provide the foundations for future carbon capture technologies. The problem of thermodynamically efficient and scalable carbon capture stands as one of the greatest challenges for modern energy researchers. The vast majority of US and global energy use derives from fossil fuels, the combustion of which results in the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. These anthropogenic emissions are now altering the climate. Although many alternatives to combustion are being considered, the fact is that combustion will remain a principal component of the global energy system for decades to come. Today’s carbon capture technologies are expensive and cumbersome and energy intensive. If scientists could develop practical and cost-effective methods to capture carbon, those methods would at once alter the future of the largest industry in the world and provide a technical solution to one of the most vexing problems facing humanity. The carbon capture problem is a true grand challenge for today’s scientists. Postcombustion CO2 capture requires major new developments in disciplines spanning fundamental theoretical and experimental physical chemistry, materials design and synthesis, and chemical engineering. To start with, the CO2 molecule itself is thermodynamically stable and binding to it requires a distortion of the molecule away from its linear and symmetric arrangement. This binding of the gas molecule cannot be too strong, however; the sheer quantity of CO2 that must be captured ultimately dictates that the capture medium must be recycled over and over. Hence the CO2 once bound, must be released with relatively little energy input. Further, the CO2 must be rapidly and selectively pulled out of a mixture

  13. Radiative electron capture by channeled ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitarke, J.M.; Ritchie, R.H.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1989-01-01

    Considerable experimental data have been accumulated relative to the emission of photons accompanying electron capture by swift, highly stripped atoms penetrating crystalline matter under channeling conditions. Recent data suggest that the photon energies may be less than that expected from simple considerations of transitions from the valence band of the solid to hydrogenic states on the moving ion. We have studied theoretically the impact parameter dependence of the radiative electron capture (REC) process, the effect of the ion's wake and the effect of capture from inner shells of the solid on the photon emission probability, using a statistical approach. Numerical comparisons of our results with experiment are made. 13 refs., 6 figs

  14. Rate-based modelling of combined SO2 removal and NH3 recycling integrated with an aqueous NH3-based CO2 capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kangkang; Yu, Hai; Qi, Guojie; Feron, Paul; Tade, Moses; Yu, Jingwen; Wang, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A rigorous, rate-based model for an NH 3 –CO 2 –SO 2 –H 2 O system was developed. • Model predictions are in good agreement with pilot plant results. • >99.9% of SO 2 was captured and >99.9% of slipped ammonia was reused. • The process is highly adaptable to the variations of SO 2 /NH 3 level, temperatures. - Abstract: To reduce the costs of controlling emissions from coal-fired power stations, we propose an advanced and effective process of combined SO 2 removal and NH 3 recycling, which can be integrated with the aqueous NH 3 -based CO 2 capture process to simultaneously achieve SO 2 and CO 2 removal, NH 3 recycling and flue gas cooling in one process. A rigorous, rate-based model for an NH 3 –CO 2 –SO 2 –H 2 O system was developed and used to simulate the proposed process. The model was thermodynamically and kinetically validated by experimental results from the open literature and pilot-plant trials, respectively. Under typical flue gas conditions, the proposed process has SO 2 removal and NH 3 reuse efficiencies of >99.9%. The process is strongly adaptable to different scenarios such as high SO 2 levels in flue gas, high NH 3 levels from the CO 2 absorber and high flue gas temperatures, and has a low energy requirement. Because the process simplifies flue gas desulphurisation and resolves the problems of NH 3 loss and SO 2 removal, it could significantly reduce the cost of CO 2 and SO 2 capture by aqueous NH 3

  15. n-capture elements in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skúladóttir, Ása

    2018-06-01

    Sculptor is a well studied dwarf galaxy in the Local Group, which is dominated by an old stellar population (>10 Gyr) and is therefore an ideal system to study early chemical evolution. With high-resolution VLT/FLAMES spectra, R~20,000, we are able to get accurate abundances of several n-capture elements in ~100 stars, from both the lighter n-capture elements (Y) as well as the heavier ones, both tracers of the s-process (e.g. Ba) and the r-process (e.g. Eu). I will discuss the similarities and differences in the n-capture elements in Sculptor and the Milky Way, as well as other dwarf galaxies.

  16. Evaluating the impact of an ammonia-based post-combustion CO2 capture process on a steam power plant with different cooling water temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnenberg, Sebastian; Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Oexmann, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The use of aqueous ammonia is a promising option to capture carbon dioxide from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Compared to a capture process using monoethanolamine (MEA), the use of ammonia can reduce the heat requirement of the CO2 desorption significantly, although an additional effort...... pressure, solvent circulation rate, solvent recycling rate and chilling temperature) are evaluated and the optimal configuration with respect to the overall net efficiency penalty is determined.The study shows that the configuration of the process with absorption at low temperature (approximately 10°C...

  17. Neutron capture cross sections of Kr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiebiger Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron capture and β− -decay are competing branches of the s-process nucleosynthesis path at 85Kr [1], which makes it an important branching point. The knowledge of its neutron capture cross section is therefore essential to constrain stellar models of nucleosynthesis. Despite its importance for different fields, no direct measurement of the cross section of 85Kr in the keV-regime has been performed. The currently reported uncertainties are still in the order of 50% [2, 3]. Neutron capture cross section measurements on a 4% enriched 85Kr gas enclosed in a stainless steel cylinder were performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE. 85Kr is radioactive isotope with a half life of 10.8 years. As this was a low-enrichment sample, the main contaminants, the stable krypton isotopes 83Kr and 86Kr, were also investigated. The material was highly enriched and contained in pressurized stainless steel spheres.

  18. Application of a computer-aided framework for the design of CO2 capture and utilization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    , and (3) innovation, has been developed. In order to facilitate the implementation and ensure sustainability, this framework integrates a number of computer-aided methods and tools, that are important for carbon dioxide capture and utilization. Applying this framework helps to address the questions about...... opportunities and products are explored. Second, the selected processing route is designed and analyzed by using simulation software and sustainability (economic, environmental and LCA) analysis tools. From this stage, hot spotsand areas for improvement are also generated. Third, the targets for improvement...

  19. Physiological reactions to capture in hibernating brown bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alina L; Singh, Navinder J; Fuchs, Boris; Blanc, Stéphane; Friebe, Andrea; Laske, Timothy G; Frobert, Ole; Swenson, Jon E; Arnemo, Jon M

    2016-01-01

    Human disturbance can affect animal life history and even population dynamics. However, the consequences of these disturbances are difficult to measure. This is especially true for hibernating animals, which are highly vulnerable to disturbance, because hibernation is a process of major physiological changes, involving conservation of energy during a resource-depleted time of year. During the winters of 2011-15, we captured 15 subadult brown bears ( Ursus arctos ) and recorded their body temperatures ( n  = 11) and heart rates ( n = 10) before, during and after capture using biologgers. We estimated the time for body temperature and heart rate to normalize after the capture event. We then evaluated the effect of the captures on the pattern and depth of hibernation and the day of den emergence by comparing the body temperature of captured bears with that of undisturbed subadult bears ( n  = 11). Both body temperature and heart rate increased during capture and returned to hibernation levels after 15-20 days. We showed that bears required 2-3 weeks to return to hibernation levels after winter captures, suggesting high metabolic costs during this period. There were also indications that the winter captures resulted in delayed den emergence.

  20. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  1. Carbon capture and storage (CCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Amouroux, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The author first defines what carbon capture and storage (CCS)is, describes more precisely the various technologies, methods and processes involved in carbon capture, carbon transport, and carbon geological storage. He briefly evokes the various applications and uses of CCS. In the second part, he proposes an overview of advances and deadlocks of CCS in the world, of the status of installations and projects, of the development of capture practices in the industry, of some existing and important storage sites, of some pilot installations developed by various industrial actors in different countries (26 installations in the world). He indicates power stations equipped for CCS (in Canada, USA, United-Kingdom, Netherlands, Norway, China, South Korea and United Arab Emirates). He evokes projects which have been given up or postponed. He proposes an overview of policies implemented in different countries (USA, Canada, European Union, Australia, and others) to promote CCS

  2. Process development and exergy cost sensitivity analysis of a hybrid molten carbonate fuel cell power plant and carbon dioxide capturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Ansarinasab, Hojat; Moftakhari Sharifzadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Rosen, Marc A.

    2017-10-01

    An integrated power plant with a net electrical power output of 3.71 × 105 kW is developed and investigated. The electrical efficiency of the process is found to be 60.1%. The process includes three main sub-systems: molten carbonate fuel cell system, heat recovery section and cryogenic carbon dioxide capturing process. Conventional and advanced exergoeconomic methods are used for analyzing the process. Advanced exergoeconomic analysis is a comprehensive evaluation tool which combines an exergetic approach with economic analysis procedures. With this method, investment and exergy destruction costs of the process components are divided into endogenous/exogenous and avoidable/unavoidable parts. Results of the conventional exergoeconomic analyses demonstrate that the combustion chamber has the largest exergy destruction rate (182 MW) and cost rate (13,100 /h). Also, the total process cost rate can be decreased by reducing the cost rate of the fuel cell and improving the efficiency of the combustion chamber and heat recovery steam generator. Based on the total avoidable endogenous cost rate, the priority for modification is the heat recovery steam generator, a compressor and a turbine of the power plant, in rank order. A sensitivity analysis is done to investigate the exergoeconomic factor parameters through changing the effective parameter variations.

  3. Capturing spike variability in noisy Izhikevich neurons using point process generalized linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jacob; Kramer, Mark A.; Eden, Uri T.

    2018-01-01

    current. We then fit these spike train datawith a statistical model (a generalized linear model, GLM, with multiplicative influences of past spiking). For different levels of noise, we show how the GLM captures both the deterministic features of the Izhikevich neuron and the variability driven...... by the noise. We conclude that the GLM captures essential features of the simulated spike trains, but for near-deterministic spike trains, goodness-of-fit analyses reveal that the model does not fit very well in a statistical sense; the essential random part of the GLM is not captured....... are separately applied; understanding the relationships between these modeling approaches remains an area of active research. In this letter, we examine this relationship using simulation. To do so, we first generate spike train data from a well-known dynamical model, the Izhikevich neuron, with a noisy input...

  4. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-11-15

    Experimental capabilities in the field of neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy have expanded greatly in the last few years; this has been due in large part to the advent of high-quality Ge(Li) detectors, improvements in electronic data processing, and improvements in bent-crystal spectrometers. Previously unsuspected phenomena, such as the '5. 5-MeV1 anomaly, have appeared and new research tools, such as neutron guide tubes, have been brought into use. Equally exciting developments have occurred in the theory of neutron capture. Complex spectra have yielded to analysis after account had been taken of such effects as vibration, rotation and Coriolis forces, and the theoretical prediction of capture spectra seems to be a future possibility. In view of the International Atomic Energy Agency's close interest in this subject and the need for an international exchange of ideas to analyse and study the latest developments, the organizers of the Symposium felt that work on neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy had achieved such valuable and significant results that the time had come for this information to be presented, examined and discussed internationally.

  5. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Experimental capabilities in the field of neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy have expanded greatly in the last few years; this has been due in large part to the advent of high-quality Ge(Li) detectors, improvements in electronic data processing, and improvements in bent-crystal spectrometers. Previously unsuspected phenomena, such as the '5. 5-MeV1 anomaly, have appeared and new research tools, such as neutron guide tubes, have been brought into use. Equally exciting developments have occurred in the theory of neutron capture. Complex spectra have yielded to analysis after account had been taken of such effects as vibration, rotation and Coriolis forces, and the theoretical prediction of capture spectra seems to be a future possibility. In view of the International Atomic Energy Agency's close interest in this subject and the need for an international exchange of ideas to analyse and study the latest developments, the organizers of the Symposium felt that work on neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy had achieved such valuable and significant results that the time had come for this information to be presented, examined and discussed internationally

  6. High-flux MFI-alumina hollow fibres: a membrane-based process for on-board CO2 capture from internal combustion vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    This work focuses on the conception and development of a membrane-based process for an on-board CO 2 capture/storage application. In a first part, we simulate an on-board CO 2 capture unit based on a membrane process for the case study of a heavy vehicle (≥3500 kg). This study includes an energy analysis of the impact of gas separation and compression on the required membrane surface and module volume, as well the autonomy of the storage unit and the energy overconsumption involved in the process. In a second part, we study the influence of the hollow-fibre support quality on the final intergrowth level of nano-composite MFI-alumina membranes. Special attention is devoted to the influence of the isomorphic substitution of silica by boron and germanium, and replacement of the counter-cation (proton) by other elements, on the CO 2 /N 2 separation and permeance properties. Next, a complete chapter has been devoted to the evaluation of the thermodynamic (adsorption) and kinetic (diffusion) parameters in the CO 2 /N 2 separation. Finally, we analyze the influence of standard pollutants (water, NO x , hydrocarbons) on the CO 2 separation properties of the synthesized membranes. (author)

  7. Effect of fossil fuels on the parameters of CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Tibor; Mizsey, Peter

    2013-08-06

    The carbon dioxide capture is a more and more important issue in the design and operation of boilers and/or power stations because of increasing environmental considerations. Such processes, absorber desorber should be able to cope with flue gases from the use of different fossil primary energy sources, in order to guarantee a flexible, stable, and secure energy supply operation. The changing flue gases have significant influence on the optimal operation of the capture process, that is, where the required heating of the desorber is the minimal. Therefore special considerations are devoted to the proper design and control of such boiler and/or power stations equipped with CO2 capture process.

  8. Integrated Electrochemical Processes for CO2 Capture and Conversion to Commodity Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, T. Alan [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Jamison, Timothy [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Siemens Corporations (SCR) are developing new chemical synthesis processes for commodity chemicals from CO2. The process is assessed as a novel chemical sequestration technology that utilizes CO2 from dilute gas streams generated at industrial carbon emitters as a raw material to produce useful commodity chemicals. Work at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) commenced on October 1st, 2010, and finished on September 30th, 2013. During this period, we have investigated and accomplished five objectives that mainly focused on converting CO2 into high-value chemicals: 1) Electrochemical assessment of catalytic transformation of CO2 and epoxides to cyclic carbonates; 2) Investigation of organocatalytic routes to convert CO2 and epoxide to cyclic carbonates; 3) Investigation of CO2 Capture and conversion using simple olefins under continuous flow; 4) Microwave assisted synthesis of cyclic carbonates from olefins using sodium bicarbonates in a green pathway; 5) Life cycle analyses of integrated chemical sequestration process. In this final report, we will describe the detailed study performed during the three year period and findings and conclusions drawn from our research.

  9. Cribellate thread production in spiders: Complex processing of nano-fibres into a functional capture thread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, Anna-Christin; Kappel, Peter; Adamova, Hana; Baumgartner, Werner; Scholz, Ingo

    2015-11-01

    Spider silk production has been studied intensively in the last years. However, capture threads of cribellate spiders employ an until now often unnoticed alternative of thread production. This thread in general is highly interesting, as it not only involves a controlled arrangement of three types of threads with one being nano-scale fibres (cribellate fibres), but also a special comb-like structure on the metatarsus of the fourth leg (calamistrum) for its production. We found the cribellate fibres organized as a mat, enclosing two parallel larger fibres (axial fibres) and forming the typical puffy structure of cribellate threads. Mat and axial fibres are punctiform connected to each other between two puffs, presumably by the action of the median spinnerets. However, this connection alone does not lead to the typical puffy shape of a cribellate thread. Removing the calamistrum, we found a functional capture thread still being produced, but the puffy shape of the thread was lost. Therefore, the calamistrum is not necessary for the extraction or combination of fibres, but for further processing of the nano-scale cribellate fibres. Using data from Uloborus plumipes we were able to develop a model of the cribellate thread production, probably universally valid for cribellate spiders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O' Brien, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily

  11. Proceedings of the fourth workshop on radiative capture 1990, October 19--21, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wender, S.A.; Gossett, C.; Feldman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Fourth Workshop on Radiative Capture was held at the Berkeley Conference Center, Berkeley, CA, on October 19--21, 1990. This two-day workshop, which had seventeen presentations, addressed current theoretical and experimental issues in the field of nucleon capture and other nuclear radiative processes. The scientific program was divided into three sessions: (1) radiative capture at low energies; (2) few-nucleon systems and capture at intermediate energies; and (3) nucleon capture and other radiative processes. This proceedings of the conference contains the abstracts of the presented talks and the transparencies used by the speakers. Summary papers of the talks are also included when they were supplied by the speaker

  12. A pilot plant study for CO{sub 2} capture by aqueous ammonia applied to blast furnace gas in iron and steel making process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young Kim, J.; Han, K.; Dong Chun, H. [CO2 Project, Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study in which carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was captured from a demonstration iron and steel plant using low concentration aqueous ammonia as the absorbent chemical. The pilot plant was designed to process 50 Nm{sup 3}/h of blast furnace gas (BFG). The feed gas contained more than 20 per cent CO{sub 2} at 35 to 60 degrees C. Test runs revealed that the absorption efficiency of CO{sub 2} exceeded 80 per cent with a CO{sub 2} purity of more than 90 per cent in the product stream. The process parameters are currently being studied along with the various salts needed to prevent salt precipitation. It was determined that the use of waste heat recovery technology in the iron and steel-making process can render ammonia-based CO{sub 2} capture technology more economically feasible for the reduction of CO{sub 2}.

  13. Synthetic gas production from dry black liquor gasification process using direct causticization with CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, Muhammad; Yan, Jinyue; Dahlquist, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study synthetic gas production from dry black liquor gasification system. ► Direct causticization eliminates energy intensive lime kiln reducing biomass use. ► Results show large SNG production potential at significant energy efficiency (58%). ► Substantial CO 2 capture potential plus CO 2 reductions from natural gas replacement. ► Significant transport fuel replacement especially in Sweden and Europe. -- Abstract: Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from dry black liquor gasification (DBLG) system is an attractive option to reduce CO 2 emissions replacing natural gas. This article evaluates the energy conversion performance of SNG production from oxygen blown circulating fluidized bed (CFB) black liquor gasification process with direct causticization by investigating system integration with a reference pulp mill producing 1000 air dried tonnes (ADt) of pulp per day. The direct causticization process eliminates use of energy intensive lime kiln that is a main component required in the conventional black liquor recovery cycle with the recovery boiler. The paper has estimated SNG production potential, the process energy ratio of black liquor (BL) conversion to SNG, and quantified the potential CO 2 abatement. Based on reference pulp mill capacity, the results indicate a large potential of SNG production (about 162 MW) from black liquor but at a cost of additional biomass import (36.7 MW) to compensate the total energy deficit. The process shows cold gas energy efficiency of about 58% considering black liquor and biomass import as major energy inputs. About 700 ktonnes per year of CO 2 abatement i.e. both possible CO 2 capture and CO 2 offset from bio-fuel use replacing natural gas, is estimated. Moreover, the SNG production offers a significant fuel replacement in transport sector especially in countries with large pulp and paper industry e.g. in Sweden, about 72% of motor gasoline and 40% of total motor fuel could be replaced.

  14. The astrophysical r-process and its dependence on properties of nuclei far from stability: Beta strength functions and neutron capture rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.; Metzinger, J.; Oda, T.; Thielemann, F.K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    1981-01-01

    The question of the astrophysical site of the rapid neutron capture (r-) process which is believed to be responsible for the production of the heavy elements in the universe has been a problem in astrophysics for more than two decades. The solution of this problem is not only dependent on the development of realistic astrophysical supernova models, i.e. correct treatment of the hydrodynamics of gravitational collapse and supernova explosion and the equation of state of hot and dense matter, but is shown in this paper to be very sensitive also to 'standard' nuclear physics properties of nuclei far from stability such as beta decay properties and neutron capture rates. For both of the latter, strongly oversimplifying assumptions, not applying the development in nuclear physics during the last decade, have been made in almost all r-process calculations performed up to now. A critical discussion of the state of the art of such calculations seems therefore to be indicated. In this paper procedures are described which allow one to obtain: 1) β-decay properties (decay rates, β-delayed neutron emissions and fission rates); 2) neutron capture rates for neutron-rich nuclei considerably improved over what has been used up to now. The beta strength functions are calculated for approx. equal to6000 nuclei between beta stability line and neutron drip line. By hydrodynamical supernova explosion calculations using realistic stellar models it is shown that as a consequence of the improved β-rates explosive He burning is a convincing alternative site to the 'classical' r-process whose existence still is questionable. The new β-rates will be important also for the investigation of further astrophysical sites producing heavy elements such as the r(n)-processes in explosive C or Ne burning. (orig.)

  15. Target Capture during Mos1 Transposition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflieger, Aude; Jaillet, Jerôme; Petit, Agnès; Augé-Gouillou, Corinne; Renault, Sylvaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA transposition contributes to genomic plasticity. Target capture is a key step in the transposition process, because it contributes to the selection of new insertion sites. Nothing or little is known about how eukaryotic mariner DNA transposons trigger this step. In the case of Mos1, biochemistry and crystallography have deciphered several inverted terminal repeat-transposase complexes that are intermediates during transposition. However, the target capture complex is still unknown. Here, we show that the preintegration complex (i.e., the excised transposon) is the only complex able to capture a target DNA. Mos1 transposase does not support target commitment, which has been proposed to explain Mos1 random genomic integrations within host genomes. We demonstrate that the TA dinucleotide used as the target is crucial both to target recognition and in the chemistry of the strand transfer reaction. Bent DNA molecules are better targets for the capture when the target DNA is nicked two nucleotides apart from the TA. They improve strand transfer when the target DNA contains a mismatch near the TA dinucleotide. PMID:24269942

  16. Systematic framework for carbon dioxide capture and utilization processes to reduce the global carbon dioxide emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Plaza, Cristina Calvera; Gani, Rafiqul

    information-data on various carbon dioxide emission sources and available capture-utilization technologies; the model and solution libraries [2]; and the generic 3-stage approach for determining more sustainable solutions [3] through superstructure (processing networks) based optimization – adopted for global...... need to provide, amongst other options: useful data from in-house databases on carbon dioxide emission sources; mathematical models from a library of process-property models; numerical solvers from library of implemented solvers; and, work-flows and data-flows for different benefit scenarios...... to be investigated. It is useful to start by developing a prototype framework and then augmenting its application range by increasing the contents of its databases, libraries and work-flows and data-flows. The objective is to present such a prototype framework with its implemented database containing collected...

  17. Collision velocity dependence of double capture processes in N7+ and Ne8+ + He systems (v = 0.18 to 0.61 au)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Gleizes, A.

    1991-01-01

    Double capture processes depend on the collision velocity in the complicated way which is different for N 7+ and Ne 8+ + He collisional systems. Some examples of energy dependence for differential and total cross sections are given. (orig.)

  18. Micromotors to capture and destroy anthrax simulant spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Jahir; Pan, Guoqing; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Galarnyk, Michael; Wang, Joseph

    2015-03-07

    Towards addressing the need for detecting and eliminating biothreats, we describe a micromotor-based approach for screening, capturing, isolating and destroying anthrax simulant spores in a simple and rapid manner with minimal sample processing. The B. globilli antibody-functionalized micromotors can recognize, capture and transport B. globigii spores in environmental matrices, while showing non-interactions with excess of non-target bacteria. Efficient destruction of the anthrax simulant spores is demonstrated via the micromotor-induced mixing of a mild oxidizing solution. The new micromotor-based approach paves a way to dynamic multifunctional systems that rapidly recognize, isolate, capture and destroy biological threats.

  19. Introductory remarks on electron capture by multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    An overview is presented of applications of multicharged-ion electron capture and, through the qualitative assessment of availability of information, the general status of current understanding of such capture. A chart is given on which the various ion collision processes are related to other pertinent fields of physical research notably fusion, astrophysics, the solar corona, and lasers. The production and transport of ions is also noted. The symposium considers collision velocities less than 4 x 10 8 cm/s, where the capture cross sections are largest and where most of the available results are quite recent

  20. Optimization of the energy resolution and of the radioactive background rejection for ionization-heat detectors equipped with thermometric thin films for the direct WIMPs detection; Optimisation du pouvoir de resolution et du rejet du fond radioactif de detecteurs ionisation-chaleur equipes de couches minces thermometriques pour la detection directe de WIMPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolgorouky, Y.W.

    2008-09-15

    The EDELWEISS experiment aims at the direct detection of WIMPs as possible candidates for dark matter. It uses heat-and-ionization detectors that can discriminate these particles from the radioactive background. To date, this method is limited by events with incomplete charge collection that occur just beneath the detectors electrodes. In order to identify and reject these undesirable events, we have developed detectors equipped with thin films used both as thermometers - and hence sensitive to the transient athermal regime - and as electrodes for the charge collection. This thesis focuses on the optimization of such thin films regarding surface events rejection and on the modelling of the physical processes enabling this identification. The optimization must both maximize the fiducial volume and conserve an energy resolution such that the recoil energy threshold is of the order of 30 keV. Our work explores four generations of detectors each of which corresponds to successive evolutions in their conception. In all cases, the electrode-thermometer is an amorphous Anderson insulator NbSi thin film polarized by two interleaved comb-shaped niobium electrodes. In spite of constant progress in the successive detectors performances, the latest generation does not display the performances required for the EDELWEISS II experiment. Our work has shown the difficulty of the transient thermal signal modelling due to the complex contribution of the charge collection. This works has lead to new ideas regarding the detectors configuration, so that the athermal regime can be optimized to enhance both the rejection capability and the resolution. (author)

  1. Carrier Transport and Related Effects in Detectors of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundqvist, Kyle Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPS), which could explain the dark matter problem in cosmology and particle physics. By simultaneously measuring signals from deposited charge and the energy in nonequilibrium phonons created by particle interactions in intrinsic germanium crystals at a temperature of 40 mK, a signature response for each event is produced. This response, combined with phonon pulse-shape information, allows CDMS to actively discriminate candidate WIMP interactions with nuclei from electromagnetic radioactive background which interacts with electrons. The challenges associated with these techniques are unique. Carrier scattering is dominated by the spontaneous emission of Luke-Neganov phonons due to zeropoint fluctuations of the lattice ions. Drift fields are maintained at only a few V/cm, else these emitted phonons would dominate the phonons of the original interaction. The dominant systematic issues with CDMS detectors are due to the effects of space charge accumulation. It has been an open question how space charge accrues, and by which of several potential recombination and ionization processes. In this work, we have simulated the transport of electrons and holes in germanium under CDMS conditions. We have implemented both a traditional Monte Carlo technique based on carrier energy, followed later by a novel Monte Carlo algorithm with scattering rates defined and sampled by vector momentum. This vector-based method provides for a full anisotropic simulation of carrier transport including free-fight acceleration with an anisotropic mass, and anisotropic scattering rates. With knowledge of steady state carrier dynamics as a function of applied field, the results of our Monte Carlo simulations allow us to make a wide variety of predictions for energy dependent processes for both electrons and holes. Such processes include carrier capture by charged impurities, neutral impurities, static

  2. Precision mass measurements for studies of nucleosynthesis via the rapid neutron-capture process Penning-trap mass measurements of neutron-rich cadmium and caesium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085660; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Kreim, Susanne

    Although the theory for the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) was developed more than 55 years ago, the astrophysical site is still under a debate. Theoretical studies predict that the r-process path proceeds through very neutron-rich nuclei with very asymmetric proton- to-neutron ratios. Knowledge about the properties of neutron-rich isotopes found in similar regions of the nuclear chart and furthermore suitable for r-process studies is still little or even not existing. The basic nuclear properties such as binding energies, half-lives, neutron-induced or neutron-capture reaction cross-sections, play an important role in theoretical simulations and can vary or even drastically alternate results of these studies. Therefore, a considerable effort was put forward to access neutron-rich isotopes at radioactive ion-beam facilities like ISOLDE at CERN. The goal of this PhD thesis is to describe the experimental work done for the precision mass measurements of neutron-rich cadmium (129−131 Cd) and caesium...

  3. The astrophysical r-process and its dependence on properties of nuclei far from stability beta strength functions and neutron capture rates

    CERN Document Server

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H V; Metzinger, J; Oda, T; Thielemann, F K

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the astrophysical r-process and the question of its site are very sensitive to 'standard' nuclear physics parameters like the beta decay properties and neutron capture rates. Since for these quantities in almost all r-process calculations up to now, and also in all estimates of the production rates of chronometric pairs, only very rough assumptions have been made, it is attempted to present procedures which put the calculation of these quantities for nuclei far from stability on a reliable physical basis. This is done by a microscopic description of the beta strength function and by using a statistical model based on a 'next to first principles' optical potential including effects of deformation for the neutron capture rates. The beta -decay rates for approximately 6000 nuclei between the beta -stability line and the neutron drip line are calculated. The heavy element synthesis by explosive He burning then is calculated using these beta -rates and using realistic star models treating the supe...

  4. Pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide in a fixed bed reactor using the clathrate hydrate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Ponnivalavan; Kumar, Rajnish; Linga, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Hydrate based gas separation (HBGS) process with silica sand and silica gel as contact medium was employed to capture CO 2 from fuel gas mixture. Gas uptake measurement at three different pressures (7.5, 8.5 and 9.0 MPa) and 274.15 K were conducted for hydrate formation kinetics and overall conversion of water to hydrate, rate of hydrate formation were determined. Water conversion of up to 36% was achieved with silica sand bed compared to 13% conversion in the silica gel bed. Effect of driving force on the rate of hydrate formation and gas consumption was significant in silica sand bed whereas it was found to be insignificant in silica gel bed. Hydrate dissociation experiments by thermal stimulation (at constant pressure) alone and a combination of depressurization and thermal stimulation were carried out for complete recovery of the hydrated gas. A driving force of 23 K was found to be sufficient to recover all the hydrated gas within 1 h. This study indicates that silica sand can be an effective porous media for separation of CO 2 from fuel gas when compared to silica gel. - Highlights: ► The clathrate process for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide in a novel fixed bed reactor is presented. ► Performance of two contact media (silica gel and silica sand) was investigated. ► Water to hydrate conversion was higher in a silica sand column. ► A pressure reduction and thermal stimulation approach is presented for a complete recovery of the hydrated gas

  5. Capture of microtubule plus-ends at the actin cortex promotes axophilic neuronal migration by enhancing microtubule tension in the leading process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, B Ian; Wray, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are a critical part of neuronal polarity and leading process extension, thus microtubule movement plays an important role in neuronal migration. However, the dynamics of microtubules during the forward movement of the nucleus into the leading process (nucleokinesis) is unclear and may be dependent on the cell type and mode of migration used. In particular, little is known about cytoskeletal changes during axophilic migration, commonly used in anteroposterior neuronal migration. We recently showed that leading process actin flow in migrating GnRH neurons is controlled by a signaling cascade involving IP3 receptors, CaMKK, AMPK, and RhoA. In the present study, microtubule dynamics were examined in GnRH neurons. Failure of the migration of these cells leads to the neuroendocrine disorder Kallmann Syndrome. Microtubules translocated forward along the leading process shaft during migration, but reversed direction and moved toward the nucleus when migration stalled. Blocking calcium release through IP3 receptors halted migration and induced the same reversal of microtubule translocation, while blocking cortical actin flow prevented microtubules from translocating toward the distal leading process. Super-resolution imaging revealed that microtubule plus-end tips are captured at the actin cortex through calcium-dependent mechanisms. This work shows that cortical actin flow draws the microtubule network forward through calcium-dependent capture in order to promote nucleokinesis, revealing a novel mechanism engaged by migrating neurons to facilitate movement.

  6. Radiative bound-state-formation cross-sections for dark matter interacting via a Yukawa potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petraki, Kalliopi [LPTHE, CNRS, UMR 7589,4 Place Jussieu, F-75252, Paris (France); Nikhef,Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Postma, Marieke; Vries, Jordy de [Nikhef,Science Park 105, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-04-13

    We calculate the cross-sections for the radiative formation of bound states by dark matter whose interactions are described in the non-relativistic regime by a Yukawa potential. These cross-sections are important for cosmological and phenomenological studies of dark matter with long-range interactions, residing in a hidden sector, as well as for TeV-scale WIMP dark matter. We provide the leading-order contributions to the cross-sections for the dominant capture processes occurring via emission of a vector or a scalar boson. We offer a detailed inspection of their features, including their velocity dependence within and outside the Coulomb regime, and their resonance structure. For pairs of annihilating particles, we compare bound-state formation with annihilation.

  7. Hydrogen production by reforming of fossil and biomass fuels accompanied by carbon dioxide capture process is the energy source for the near future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboudheir, Ahmed; Idem, Raphael; Tontiwachwuthikul, Paitoon; Wilson, Malcolm; Kambietz, Lionel

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen has a significant future potential as an alternative energy source for the transportation sector as well as in residential homes and offices, H 2 in fuel cell power systems provides an alternative to direct fossil fuel and biomass combustion based technologies and offer the possibility for a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emission based on improved H 2 yield per unit of fossil fuel and biomass, compatibility with renewable energies and motivation to convert to a H 2 -based energy economy. Several practical techniques for H 2 production to service H 2 refuelling stations as well as homes and offices, all of which need to be located at the end of the energy distribution network, include: (1) the carbon dioxide reforming of natural gas; (2) reforming of gasoline; (3) reforming of crude ethanol. Locating the H 2 production at the end of the energy distribution network solves the well-known problems of metal fatigue and high cost of H 2 compression for long distance transportation if H 2 is produced in a large centralized plant. In addition, the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol and the need to reduce emissions of CO 2 to the atmosphere has prompted the capture and utilization of the CO 2 produced from the reforming process. In this research: (1) new efficient catalysts for each reforming process was developed; (2) a new efficient catalyst for our version of the water gas shift reaction to convert carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide was developed; (3) a new membrane separation process for production of high purity, fuel cell-grade H 2 was designed; (4) a numerical model for optimum process design and optimum utilization of resources both at the laboratory and industrial scales was developed; (5) various processes for CO 2 capture were investigated experimentally in order to achieve a net improvement in the absorption process; (6) the utilization of captured CO 2 for enhanced oil recovery and/or storage in an aging oil field were investigated; (7

  8. Neutron capture measurements on 62Ni, 63Ni and 197Au and their relevance for stellar nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Lederer, Claudia

    Neutron capture reactions in stars are responsible for forming about 99% of the elemental abundances heavier than Fe. Two processes contribute about equally to the overall abundance pattern: the slow neutron capture process (s process) where neutron densities are small and therefore radioactive decay is generally faster than subsequent neutron capture on radionuclides, and the rapid neutron capture process (r process) which takes place in environments of high neutron densities, driving the reaction path towards the neutron rich side. The key nuclear physics input for s process studies are stellar neutron capture cross sections, called MACS (Maxwellian-averaged cross section). In the course of this work, dierent reactions relevant to s process nucleosynthesis have been studied. To improve and check existing information, neutron capture cross sections of most stable Fe and Ni isotopes were measured via the time-of-flight technique at the n TOF facility at CERN. This campaign was triggered by a work of Sneden et...

  9. Gas hydrate formation process for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Ju Dong; Linga, Praveen; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Young Seok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Yang Do

    2010-01-01

    In this study, gas hydrate from CO 2 /H 2 gas mixtures with the addition of tetrahydrofuran (THF) was formed in a semi-batch stirred vessel at various pressures and temperatures to investigate the CO 2 separation/recovery properties. This mixture is of interest to CO 2 separation and recovery from Integrated Gasification Combine Cycle (IGCC) power plants. During hydrate formation the gas uptake was determined and composition changes in the gas phase were obtained by gas chromatography. The impact of THF on hydrate formation from the CO 2 /H 2 was observed. The addition of THF significantly reduced the equilibrium formation conditions. 1.0 mol% THF was found to be the optimum concentration for CO 2 capture based on kinetic experiments. The present study illustrates the concept and provides thermodynamic and kinetic data for the separation/recovery of CO 2 (pre-combustion capture) from a fuel gas (CO 2 /H 2 ) mixture.

  10. Neutron-capture nucleosynthesis in the first stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Sneden, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that metal-poor stars enhanced in carbon but containing low levels of neutron-capture elements may have been among the first to incorporate the nucleosynthesis products of the first generation of stars. We have observed 16 stars with enhanced carbon or nitrogen using the MIKE Spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory and the Tull Spectrograph on the Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We present radial velocities, stellar parameters, and detailed abundance patterns for these stars. Strontium, yttrium, zirconium, barium, europium, ytterbium, and other heavy elements are detected. In four stars, these heavy elements appear to have originated in some form of r-process nucleosynthesis. In one star, a partial s-process origin is possible. The origin of the heavy elements in the rest of the sample cannot be determined unambiguously. The presence of elements heavier than the iron group offers further evidence that zero-metallicity rapidly rotating massive stars and pair instability supernovae did not contribute substantial amounts of neutron-capture elements to the regions where the stars in our sample formed. If the carbon- or nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor stars with low levels of neutron-capture elements were enriched by products of zero-metallicity supernovae only, then the presence of these heavy elements indicates that at least one form of neutron-capture reaction operated in some of the first stars.

  11. Natural language processing systems for capturing and standardizing unstructured clinical information: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimeyer, Kory; Foster, Matthew; Pandey, Abhishek; Arya, Nina; Halford, Gwendolyn; Jones, Sandra F; Forshee, Richard; Walderhaug, Mark; Botsis, Taxiarchis

    2017-09-01

    We followed a systematic approach based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses to identify existing clinical natural language processing (NLP) systems that generate structured information from unstructured free text. Seven literature databases were searched with a query combining the concepts of natural language processing and structured data capture. Two reviewers screened all records for relevance during two screening phases, and information about clinical NLP systems was collected from the final set of papers. A total of 7149 records (after removing duplicates) were retrieved and screened, and 86 were determined to fit the review criteria. These papers contained information about 71 different clinical NLP systems, which were then analyzed. The NLP systems address a wide variety of important clinical and research tasks. Certain tasks are well addressed by the existing systems, while others remain as open challenges that only a small number of systems attempt, such as extraction of temporal information or normalization of concepts to standard terminologies. This review has identified many NLP systems capable of processing clinical free text and generating structured output, and the information collected and evaluated here will be important for prioritizing development of new approaches for clinical NLP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Single-electron capture in He[sup 2+]-D[sub 2] collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France))

    1994-02-14

    Doubly differential cross sections of single-electron capture were measured for He[sup 2+] impinging on a molecular deuterium target. The investigated collision energies are 4, 6 and 8 keV and the scattering angles range from 10' to 2[sup o]30' (laboratory frame). The exothermic capture leading to He[sup +] (1s) + D[sub 2][sup +*] was found to be the most important process at low energies and angles, whereas the endothermic channels leading to dissociative capture become the main processes at high scattering angles, i.e. at small impact parameters. (author).

  13. Effects of the number of people on efficient capture and sample collection: A lion case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam M. Ferreira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Certain carnivore research projects and approaches depend on successful capture of individuals of interest. The number of people present at a capture site may determine success of a capture. In this study 36 lion capture cases in the Kruger National Park were used to evaluate whether the number of people present at a capture site influenced lion response rates and whether the number of people at a sampling site influenced the time it took to process the collected samples. The analyses suggest that when nine or fewer people were present, lions appeared faster at a call-up locality compared with when there were more than nine people. The number of people, however, did not influence the time it took to process the lions. It is proposed that efficient lion capturing should spatially separate capture and processing sites and minimise the number of people at a capture site.

  14. Effects of the number of people on efficient capture and sample collection: a lion case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sam M; Maruping, Nkabeng T; Schoultz, Darius; Smit, Travis R

    2013-05-24

    Certain carnivore research projects and approaches depend on successful capture of individuals of interest. The number of people present at a capture site may determine success of a capture. In this study 36 lion capture cases in the Kruger National Park were used to evaluate whether the number of people present at a capture site influenced lion response rates and whether the number of people at a sampling site influenced the time it took to process the collected samples. The analyses suggest that when nine or fewer people were present, lions appeared faster at a call-up locality compared with when there were more than nine people. The number of people, however, did not influence the time it took to process the lions. It is proposed that efficient lion capturing should spatially separate capture and processing sites and minimise the number of people at a capture site.

  15. Searching for dark matter with neutrino telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, Dan; Silk, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    One of the most interesting mysteries of astrophysics is the puzzle of dark matter. Although numerous techniques have been explored and developed to detect this elusive substance, its nature remains unknown. One such method uses large high-energy neutrino telescopes to look for the annihilation products of dark matter annihilations. In this paper, we briefly review this technique. We describe the calculations used to find the rate of capture of WIMPs in the Sun or Earth and the spectrum of neutrinos produced in the resulting dark matter annihilations. We will discuss these calculations within the context of supersymmetry and models with universal extra dimensions, the lightest supersymmetric particle and lightest Kaluza-Klein particle providing the WIMP candidate in these cases, respectively. We will also discuss the status of some of the experiments relevant to these searches: AMANDA, IceCube and ANTARES

  16. Aqueous amine solution characterization for post-combustion CO_2 capture process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hadri, Nabil; Quang, Dang Viet; Goetheer, Earl L.V.; Abu Zahra, Mohammad R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The CO_2 solubility of 30 aqueous amine solutions was measured at 30 wt% and 313.15 K. • The CO_2 loading of HMD is the highest, and that of TEA is the lowest. • 2DMAE, 3DMA1P, 1DMA2P, MDEA, TMPAD and 2EAE have a low heat of absorption with CO_2. • 2EAE can be used as an alternative to MEA in the CO_2 capture process. - Abstract: This article presents a thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of CO_2 absorption by 30 aqueous amine solutions. A solvent screening setup (S.S.S.) was used to find the CO_2 loading (α) for 30 different aqueous amine solutions (30 wt%) at a pressure of 1 bar with feed gas containing 15 vol% CO_2 and 85 vol% N_2 at 313.15 K to provide reliable absorber parameters. The structures of various amines (linear, non-linear, polyamines, sterically hindered, etc.) were tested and the S.S.S. results showed that hexamethylenediamine (HMD) has higher CO_2 loading at 1.35 moles of CO_2/mole of amine, and triethanolamine (TEA) has the lowest at 0.39 mole of CO_2/mole of amine. The heat of absorption indicates that MDEA has the lowest and HMD has the highest at −52.51 kJ/mole of CO_2 and −98.39 kJ/mole of CO_2, respectively. The combined data for the CO_2 loading and the absorption heat generated 6 amines that have good properties for the post-combustion CO_2 capture process in comparison with that of MEA. These amines are made up of one secondary amine (2-ethylaminoethanol, 2EAE) and 5 tertiary amines (N-methyldiethanolamine, MDEA, 1-dimethylamino-2-propanol, 1DMA2P, 2-dimethylaminoethanol, 2DMAE, 3-dimethylamino-1-propanol, 3DMA1P and N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-1,3-propanediamine, TMPDA). In comparison with the amine reference MEA (ΔH = −85.13 kJ/mole of CO_2 and α = 0.58 mole CO_2/mole of amine), the 6 amines have heats of absorption that are between −68.95 kJ/mole of CO_2 and −52.51 kJ/mole of CO_2, and their CO_2 loading is between 0.52 and 1.16 mole of CO_2/mole amine. The third important parameter, namely the

  17. Electron capture rate of a composite of partially ionized atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1979-01-01

    Electron captures (or more generally β-transitions) are known to play key roles at various stages of stellar evolution and in many nucleosynthesis processes. With decreasing temperatures and densities, the bound electron captures start to compete with the free electron captures, and eventually in the low-temperature, low-density limit the total capture rate shall converge to that of the orbital electrons observed in laboratory. The authors calculate the occupation probabilities of the electron orbits and the electron capture rates in a mixture of atoms and ions which are supposedly under a chemical equilibrium. (orig./AH)

  18. Energy and material balance of CO2 capture from ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Frank

    2007-11-01

    Current Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies focus on large, stationary sources that produce approximately 50% of global CO2 emissions. We propose an industrial technology that captures CO2 directly from ambient air to target the remaining emissions. First, a wet scrubbing technique absorbs CO2 into a sodium hydroxide solution. The resultant carbonate is transferred from sodium ions to calcium ions via causticization. The captured CO2 is released from the calcium carbonate through thermal calcination in a modified kiln. The energy consumption is calculated as 350 kJ/mol of CO2 captured. It is dominated by the thermal energy demand of the kiln and the mechanical power required for air movement. The low concentration of CO2 in air requires a throughput of 3 million cubic meters of air per ton of CO2 removed, which could result in significant water losses. Electricity consumption in the process results in CO2 emissions and the use of coal power would significantly reduce to net amount captured. The thermodynamic efficiency of this process is low but comparable to other "end of pipe" capture technologies. As another carbon mitigation technology, air capture could allow for the continued use of liquid hydrocarbon fuels in the transportation sector.

  19. The capture rate of free-floating planets in our galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulinski, N.; Ribak, E. N.

    2017-09-01

    We propose that planetary nebulae and supernova remnants may constitute a significant source of free-floating planets. With a large population of free-floating planets, the rate at which these planets get captured by planetary systems may be non-negligible. We predict that about one out of every 100 sub-solar stars are expected to experience a capture of a free-floating planet during their lifetime. The capture cross section calculated through three-body scattering simulations in vacuum conditions. Since planetary systems usually contain multiple planets, and dissipation processes where not included in the simulation, the capture rate may be higher.

  20. Development of Dual-Phase Oxygen Transport Membranes for Carbon Capture Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirou, Stéven

    Fossil fuel based power plants and industrial production of cement and steel are major sources of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. One of the most promising approaches to capture and store CO2 from such large point sources is the oxy-fuel combustion route, where pure oxygen instead of air is used...

  1. Optional carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderson, T.; Scott, S.; Griffiths, J. [Jacobs Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    In the case of IGCC power plants, carbon capture can be carried out before combustion. The carbon monoxide in the syngas is catalytically shifted to carbon dioxide and then captured in a standard gas absorption system. However, the insertion of a shift converter into an existing IGCC plant with no shift would mean a near total rebuild of the gasification waste heat recovery, gas treatment system and HRSG, with only the gasifier and gas turbine retaining most of their original features. To reduce the extent, cost and time taken for the revamping, the original plant could incorporate the shift, and the plant would then be operated without capture to advantage, and converted to capture mode of operation when commercially appropriate. This paper examines this concept of placing a shift converter into an IGCC plant before capture is required, and operating the same plant first without and then later with CO{sub 2} capture in a European context. The advantages and disadvantages of this 'capture ready' option are discussed. 6 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Pilot testing of a membrane system for postcombustion CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, Tim [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Kniep, Jay [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Wei, Xiaotong [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Carlisle, Trevor [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); White, Steve [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Pande, Saurabh [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Fulton, Don [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Watson, Robert [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Hoffman, Thomas [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Freeman, Brice [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States); Baker, Richard [Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This final report summarizes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) to scale up an efficient post-combustion CO2 capture membrane process to the small pilot test stage (award number DE-FE0005795). The primary goal of this research program was to design, fabricate, and operate a membrane CO2 capture system to treat coal-derived flue gas containing 20 tonnes CO2/day (20 TPD). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Babcock and Wilcox (B&W), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), WorleyParsons (WP), the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), Enerkem (EK), and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). In addition to the small pilot design, build and slipstream testing at NCCC, other project efforts included laboratory membrane and module development at MTR, validation field testing on a 1 TPD membrane system at NCCC, boiler modeling and testing at B&W, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) by EPRI/WP, a case study of the membrane technology applied to a ~20 MWe power plant by ISTC, and an industrial CO2 capture test at an Enerkem waste-to-biofuel facility. The 20 TPD small pilot membrane system built in this project successfully completed over 1,000 hours of operation treating flue gas at NCCC. The Polaris™ membranes used on this system demonstrated stable performance, and when combined with over 10,000 hours of operation at NCCC on a 1 TPD system, the risk associated with uncertainty in the durability of postcombustion capture membranes has been greatly reduced. Moreover, next-generation Polaris membranes with higher performance and lower cost were validation tested on the 1 TPD system. The 20 TPD system also demonstrated successful operation of a new low-pressure-drop sweep module that will reduce parasitic energy losses at full scale by as much as 10 MWe. In modeling and pilot boiler testing, B&W confirmed the

  3. Gravitational capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, H.

    1979-01-01

    In spite of the strength of gravitational focres between celestial bodies, gravitational capture is not a simple concept. The principles of conservation of linear momentum and of conservation of angular momentum, always impose severe constraints, while conservation of energy and the vital distinction between dissipative and non-dissipative systems allows one to rule out capture in a wide variety of cases. In complex systems especially those without dissipation, long dwell time is a more significant concept than permanent capture. (author)

  4. Evaluating the impact of the carbon dioxide capturing process on the indices of economic efficiency in thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marukhyan, V.Z.; Elbakyan, S.H.

    2017-01-01

    Taking into account the input of carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas in the global warming process, the technological solutions of its capturing, and the implementation possibilities in environmentally safe thermal power plants are considered. In power plants equipped with effective systems for cleaning the fuel gas and the coal gasification, the influence of the CO 2 reduction and realization of quotes on the indices of economic efficiency is estimated

  5. Capture ready study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minchener, A.

    2007-07-15

    There are a large number of ways in which the capture of carbon as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) can be integrated into fossil fuel power stations, most being applicable for both gas and coal feedstocks. To add to the choice of technology is the question of whether an existing plant should be retrofitted for capture, or whether it is more attractive to build totally new. This miscellany of choices adds considerably to the commercial risk of investing in a large power station. An intermediate stage between the non-capture and full capture state would be advantageous in helping to determine the best way forward and hence reduce those risks. In recent years the term 'carbon capture ready' or 'capture ready' has been coined to describe such an intermediate stage plant and is now widely used. However a detailed and all-encompassing definition of this term has never been published. All fossil fuel consuming plant produce a carbon dioxide gas byproduct. There is a possibility of scrubbing it with an appropriate CO{sub 2} solvent. Hence it could be said that all fossil fuel plant is in a condition for removal of its CO{sub 2} effluent and therefore already in a 'capture ready' state. Evidently, the practical reality of solvent scrubbing could cost more than the rewards offered by such as the ETS (European Trading Scheme). In which case, it can be said that although the possibility exists of capturing CO{sub 2}, it is not a commercially viable option and therefore the plant could not be described as ready for CO{sub 2} capture. The boundary between a capture ready and a non-capture ready condition using this definition cannot be determined in an objective and therefore universally acceptable way and criteria must be found which are less onerous and less potentially contentious to assess. 16 refs., 2 annexes.

  6. The semi-Hooperon: Gamma-ray and anti-proton excesses in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Siqueira, Clarissa

    2017-12-01

    A puzzling excess in gamma-rays at GeV energies has been observed in the center of our galaxy using Fermi-LAT data. Its origin is still unknown, but it is well fitted by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) annihilations into quarks with a cross section around 10-26 cm3s-1 with masses of 20-50 GeV, scenario which is promptly revisited. An excess favoring similar WIMP properties has also been seen in anti-protons with AMS-02 data potentially coming from the Galactic Center as well. In this work, we explore the possibility of fitting these excesses in terms of semi-annihilating dark matter, dubbed as semi-Hooperon, with the process WIMP WIMPWIMP X being responsible for the gamma-ray excess, where X = h , Z. An interesting feature of semi-annihilations is the change in the relic density prediction compared to the standard case, and the possibility to alleviate stringent limits stemming from direct detection searches. Moreover, we discuss which models might give rise to a successful semi-Hooperon setup in the context of Z3,Z4 and extra "dark" gauge symmetries.

  7. The Diverse Origins of Neutron-capture Elements in the Metal-poor Star HD 94028: Possible Detection of Products of I-Process Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Pignatari, Marco; Herwig, Falk

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the composition and nucleosynthetic origins of the heavy elements in the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -1.62 ± 0.09) star HD 94028. Previous studies revealed that this star is mildly enhanced in elements produced by the slow neutron-capture process (s process; e.g., [Pb/Fe] = +0.79 ± 0.32) and rapid neutron-capture process (r process; e.g., [Eu/Fe] = +0.22 ± 0.12), including unusually large molybdenum ([Mo/Fe] = +0.97 ± 0.16) and ruthenium ([Ru/Fe] = +0.69 ± 0.17) enhancements. However, this star is not enhanced in carbon ([C/Fe] = -0.06 ± 0.19). We analyze an archival near-ultraviolet spectrum of HD 94028, collected using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope, and other archival optical spectra collected from ground-based telescopes. We report abundances or upper limits derived from 64 species of 56 elements. We compare these observations with s-process yields from low-metallicity AGB evolution and nucleosynthesis models. No combination of s- and r-process patterns can adequately reproduce the observed abundances, including the super-solar [As/Ge] ratio (+0.99 ± 0.23) and the enhanced [Mo/Fe] and [Ru/Fe] ratios. We can fit these features when including an additional contribution from the intermediate neutron-capture process (I process), which perhaps operated through the ingestion of H in He-burning convective regions in massive stars, super-AGB stars, or low-mass AGB stars. Currently, only the I process appears capable of consistently producing the super-solar [As/Ge] ratios and ratios among neighboring heavy elements found in HD 94028. Other metal-poor stars also show enhanced [As/Ge] ratios, hinting that operation of the I process may have been common in the early Galaxy. These data are associated with Program 072.B-0585(A), PI. Silva. Some data presented in this paper were obtained from the Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST). The Space Telescope Science Institute is

  8. Evaluation and Modeling of Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium and CO2 Absorption Enthalpies of Aqueous Designer Diamines for Post Combustion Capture Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiliang; Yang, Qi; Conway, William; Puxty, Graeme; Feron, Paul; Chen, Jian

    2017-06-20

    Novel absorbents with improved characteristics are required to reduce the existing cost and environmental barriers to deployment of large scale CO 2 capture. Recently, bespoke absorbent molecules have been specifically designed for CO 2 capture applications, and their fundamental properties and suitability for CO 2 capture processes evaluated. From the study, two unique diamine molecules, 4-(2-hydroxyethylamino)piperidine (A4) and 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-aminopiperidine (C4), were selected for further evaluation including thermodynamic characterization. The solubilities of CO 2 in two diamine solutions with a mass fraction of 15% and 30% were measured at different temperatures (313.15-393.15 K) and CO 2 partial pressures (up to 400 kPa) by thermostatic vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) stirred cell. The absorption enthalpies of reactions between diamines and CO 2 were evaluated at different temperatures (313.15 and 333.15 K) using a CPA201 reaction calorimeter. The amine protonation constants and associated protonation enthalpies were determined by potentiometric titration. The interaction of CO 2 with the diamine solutions was summarized and a simple mathematical model established that could make a preliminary but good prediction of the VLE and thermodynamic properties. Based on the analyses in this work, the two designer diamines A4 and C4 showed superior performance compared to amines typically used for CO 2 capture and further research will be completed at larger scale.

  9. Preliminary carbon dioxide capture technical and economic feasibility study evaluation of carbon dioxide capture from existing fired plants by hybrid sorption using solid sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Steven; Envergex, Srivats; Browers, Bruce; Thumbi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Barr Engineering Co. was retained by the Institute for Energy Studies (IES) at University of North Dakota (UND) to conduct a technical and economic feasibility analysis of an innovative hybrid sorbent technology (CACHYS™) for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation from coal combustion–derived flue gas. The project team for this effort consists of the University of North Dakota, Envergex LLC, Barr Engineering Co., and Solex Thermal Science, along with industrial support from Allete, BNI Coal, SaskPower, and the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council. An initial economic and feasibility study of the CACHYS™ concept, including definition of the process, development of process flow diagrams (PFDs), material and energy balances, equipment selection, sizing and costing, and estimation of overall capital and operating costs, is performed by Barr with information provided by UND and Envergex. The technology—Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents Capture (CACHYS™)—is a novel solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, utilization of novel process chemistry, contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO2 heat of reaction and promote fast CO2 capture, and a low-cost method of heat management. The technology’s other key component is the use of a low-cost sorbent.

  10. Scalable Photogrammetric Motion Capture System "mosca": Development and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyaz, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    Wide variety of applications (from industrial to entertainment) has a need for reliable and accurate 3D information about motion of an object and its parts. Very often the process of movement is rather fast as in cases of vehicle movement, sport biomechanics, animation of cartoon characters. Motion capture systems based on different physical principles are used for these purposes. The great potential for obtaining high accuracy and high degree of automation has vision-based system due to progress in image processing and analysis. Scalable inexpensive motion capture system is developed as a convenient and flexible tool for solving various tasks requiring 3D motion analysis. It is based on photogrammetric techniques of 3D measurements and provides high speed image acquisition, high accuracy of 3D measurements and highly automated processing of captured data. Depending on the application the system can be easily modified for different working areas from 100 mm to 10 m. The developed motion capture system uses from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for video sequences of object motion acquisition. All cameras work in synchronization mode at frame rate up to 100 frames per second under the control of personal computer providing the possibility for accurate calculation of 3D coordinates of interest points. The system was used for a set of different applications fields and demonstrated high accuracy and high level of automation.

  11. Impact of the uncertainty in α-captures on {sup 22}Ne on the weak s-process in massive stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, N. [Astrophysics group, EPSAM, Keele University, Keele, ST5 1BH, UK and NuGrid Project (United Kingdom); Hirschi, R. [Astrophysics group, EPSAM, Keele University, Keele, ST5 1BH, UK and Kavli IPMU (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Pignatari, M. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, CH-4056 (Switzerland); Herwig, F. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P5C2 (Canada); Beard, M. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Imbriani, G. [Dipartiment di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Görres, J.; Boer, R. J. de; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Massive stars at solar metallicity contribute to the production of heavy elements with atomic masses between A = 60 and A = 90 via the so-called weak s-process (which takes place during core He and shell C burning phases). Furthermore, recent studies have shown that rotation boosts the s-process production in massive stars at low metallicities, with a production that may reach the barium neutron-magic peak. These results are very sensitive to neutron source and neutron poison reaction rates. For the weak s-process, the main neutron source is the reaction {sup 22}Ne(α,n){sup 25}Mg, which is in competition with {sup 22}Ne(α,γ){sup 26}Mg. The uncertainty of both rates strongly affects the nucleosynthesis predictions from stellar model calculations. In this study, we investigate the impact of the uncertainty in α-captures on {sup 22}Ne on the s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars both at solar and at very low metallicity. For this purpose, we post-process, with the Nugrid mppnp code, non-rotating and rotating evolutionary models 25M{sub ⊙} stars at two different metallicities: Z = Z{sub ⊙} and Z = 10{sup −5}Z{sub ⊙}, respectively. Our results show that uncertainty of {sup 22}Ne(α,n){sup 25}Mg and {sup 22}Ne(α,γ){sup 26}Mg rates have a significant impact on the final elemental production especially for metal poor rotating models. Beside uncertainties in the neutron source reactions, for fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity we revisit the impact of the neutron poisoning effect by the reaction chain {sup 16}O(n,γ){sup 17}O(α,γ){sup 21}Ne, in competition with the {sup 17}O(α,n){sup 20}Ne, recycling the neutrons captured by {sup 16}O.

  12. Capture from pair production as a beam loss mechanism for heavy ions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Belkacem, A.; Claytor, N.; Dinneen, T.; Gould, H.

    1997-05-01

    Electron capture from electron-positron pair production is predicted to be a major source of beam loss for the heaviest ions at RHIC. Achieving the highest luminosity thus requires an understanding of the capture process. The authors report measurements of this process at Brookhaven National Laboratory's AGS using 10.8 GeV/nucleon Au 79+ projectiles on Au targets. Capture from pair production is a process in which the very high electromagnetic field involved in the collision of two relativistic heavy ions results in the production of an electron-positron pair with the capture of the electron by one of the ions. There are many theoretical papers published on capture from pair production with discrepancies between predicted cross sections. The experimental results are compared to theory and to previous experiments at 1 GeV/nucleon. The implications of extrapolations to RHIC energies are presented

  13. Modern alchemy: Fred Hoyle and element building by neutron capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbidge, E. Margaret

    Fred Hoyle's fundamental work on building the chemical elements by nuclear processes in stars at various stages in their lives began with the building of elements around iron in the very dense hot interiors of stars. Later, in the paper by Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, we four showed that Hoyle's "equilibrium process" is one of eight processes required to make all of the isotopes of all the elements detected in the Sun and stars. Neutron capture reactions, which Fred had not considered in his epochal 1946 paper, but for which experimental data were just becoming available in 1957, are very important, in addition to the energy-generating reactions involving hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, for building all of the elements. They are now providing clues to the late stages of stellar evolution and the earliest history of our Galaxy. I describe here our earliest observational work on neutron capture processes in evolved stars, some new work on stars showing the results of the neutron capture reactions, and data relating to processes ending in the production of lead, and I discuss where this fits into the history of stars in our own Galaxy.

  14. Oxy combustion with CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-01-15

    An update for oxyfuel-combustion carbon capture in the power industry is provided. The report was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on behalf of the Global CCS Institute. In the oxyfuel-combustion processes, the bulk nitrogen is removed from the air before combustion. The resulting combustion products will have CO2 content up to about 90 per cent (dry basis). The flue gas impurities (predominantly O2, N2, and Ar) may be removed by reducing the flue gas (at moderate pressure) to a temperature at which the CO2 condenses and the impurities do not. Oxyfuel-combustion may be employed with solid fuels such as coal, petroleum coke, and biomass, as well as liquid and gaseous fuels. Some key points raised in the oxyfuel-combustion carbon capture report are: The oxyfuel-combustion/CO2 capture power plant designs being developed and deployed for service in the next four or five years are based on individual component technologies and arrangements which have demonstrated sufficient maturity, with the greatest remaining technical challenge being integrating the systems into a complete steam-electric power plant; By its nature, an oxyfuel-coal power plant is likely to be a 'near zero' emitter of all criteria pollutants; Existing air-fired power plants might be retrofitted with an air separation unit, oxyfuel-fired burners, flue gas recycle, and a CO2 processing unit, with the large fleet of air-fired power plants in service calling for more study of this option; and, Future efficiency improvements to the oxyfuel-combustion process for power generation point toward an oxyfuel-combustion plant with near zero emissions of conventional pollutants, up to 98 per cent CO2 capture, and efficiency comparable to the best power plants currently being built.

  15. Capturing device for radioactive corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kiyoshi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To render the flow channel area uniform for each of coolants over the entire capturing device and reduce the corrosion of capturing materials due to coolants. Constitution: Most of radioactivity caused by radioactive corrosion products are due to Mn-54 radioactive nuclides and it has been known that the nuclides are readily deposited to the surface of nickel material in sodium at high temperature. It is difficult in a conventional capturing device constituted by winding a nickel plate fabricated with protrusions in a multiple-coaxial configuration, that the flow channel area is reduced in a portion of the flow channel and it is difficult to make the flow of the coolants uniform. In view of the above, by winding a nickel plate having a plurality of protrusions at the surface formed integrally by way of an electrolytic process into a multiple-coaxial or spiral shape, those having high resistance to the coolant corrosion can be obtained. (Takahashi, M.)

  16. The thermodynamics of direct air capture of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, Klaus S.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of thermodynamic constraints shows that the low concentration of carbon dioxide in ambient air does not pose stringent limits on air capture economics. The thermodynamic energy requirement is small even using an irreversible sorbent-based process. A comparison to flue gas scrubbing suggests that the additional energy requirement is small and can be supplied with low-cost energy. In general, the free energy expended in the regeneration of a sorbent will exceed the free energy of mixing, as absorption is usually not reversible. The irreversibility, which grows with the depth of scrubbing, tends to affect flue gas scrubbing more than air capture which can successfully operate while extracting only a small fraction of the carbon dioxide available in air. This is reflected in a significantly lower theoretical thermodynamic efficiency for a single stage flue gas scrubber than for an air capture device, but low carbon dioxide concentration in air still results in a larger energy demand for air capture. The energy required for capturing carbon dioxide from air could be delivered in various ways. I analyze a thermal swing and also a previously described moisture swing which is driven by the evaporation of water. While the total amount of heat supplied for sorbent regeneration in a thermal swing, in accordance with Carnot's principle, exceeds the total free energy requirement, the additional free energy required as one moves from flue gas scrubbing to air capture can be paid with an amount of additional low grade heat that equals the additional free energy requirement. Carnot's principle remains satisfied because the entire heat supplied, not just the additional amount, must be delivered at a slightly higher temperature. Whether the system is driven by water evaporation or by low grade heat, the cost of the thermodynamically-required energy can be as small as $1 to $2 per metric ton of carbon dioxide. Thermodynamics does not pose a practical constraint on the

  17. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddick, S N; Spyrou, A; Crider, B P; Naqvi, F; Larsen, A C; Guttormsen, M; Mumpower, M; Surman, R; Perdikakis, G; Bleuel, D L; Couture, A; Crespo Campo, L; Dombos, A C; Lewis, R; Mosby, S; Nikas, S; Prokop, C J; Renstrom, T; Rubio, B; Siem, S; Quinn, S J

    2016-06-17

    Nuclear reactions where an exotic nucleus captures a neutron are critical for a wide variety of applications, from energy production and national security, to astrophysical processes, and nucleosynthesis. Neutron capture rates are well constrained near stable isotopes where experimental data are available; however, moving far from the valley of stability, uncertainties grow by orders of magnitude. This is due to the complete lack of experimental constraints, as the direct measurement of a neutron-capture reaction on a short-lived nucleus is extremely challenging. Here, we report on the first experimental extraction of a neutron capture reaction rate on ^{69}Ni, a nucleus that is five neutrons away from the last stable isotope of Ni. The implications of this measurement on nucleosynthesis around mass 70 are discussed, and the impact of similar future measurements on the understanding of the origin of the heavy elements in the cosmos is presented.

  18. The Importance of Electron Captures in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langanke, K.; Sampaio, J.M.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear physics plays an essential role in the dynamics of a type II supernova (a collapsing star). Recent advances in nuclear many-body theory allow now to reliably calculate the stellar weak-interaction processes involving nuclei. The most important process is the electron capture on finite nuclei with mass numbers A > 55. It is found that the respective capture rates, derived from modern many-body models, differ noticeably from previous, more phenomenological estimates. This leads to significant changes in the stellar trajectory during the supernova explosion, as has been found in state-of-the-art supernova simulations. (author)

  19. Radiative electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggerstaff, J.A.; Appleton, B.R.; Datz, S.; Moak, C.D.; Neelavathi, V.N.; Noggle, T.S.; Ritchie, R.H.; VerBeek, H.

    1975-01-01

    Some data are presented for radiative electron capture by fast moving ions. The radiative electron capture spectrum is shown for O 8+ in Ag, along with the energy dependence of the capture cross-section. A discrepancy between earlier data, theoretical prediction, and the present data is pointed out. (3 figs) (U.S.)

  20. Carbon Capture and Storage: legal issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, M.J.

    2006-10-15

    Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) describes the process of capturing CO2 emissions from industrial and energy-related processes, compressing the gas to a liquid form, transporting it to a storage site (by pipeline, ship, truck or rail), and injecting it into a geological cavity – to isolate it from the atmosphere. CCS has been described as one option in the 'portfolio' of mitigation options - useful as a bridging technology to address the most prevalent greenhouse gases by volume in the short term, while economies make the shift from fossil fuels to low-carbon energy sources, including renewables. The IPCC has estimated that CCS has the potential to contribute 15-55% of the cumulative mitigation effort worldwide until 2100. However, for this to occur, the IPCC estimates that several hundreds or thousands of CO2 capture systems would need to be installed over the next century. Such a prospect raises a host of legal and regulatory issues and concerns. CCS activities will have to be undertaken in a manner consistent with the range of existing regulatory frameworks developed at the national level to address environmental and health and safety risks. But consistency with international law will also be essential where transboundary impacts are possible, transboundary transportation is involved, or offshore storage activities are contemplated.

  1. The Savannah River Site Waste Inventory Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, J.M.; Holmes, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Each hazardous and radioactive waste generator that delivers waste to Savannah River Site (SRS) treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facilities is required to implement a waste certification plan. The waste certification process ensures that waste has been properly identified, characterized, segregated, packaged, and shipped according to the receiving facilities waste acceptance criteria. In order to comply with the rigid acceptance criteria, the Reactor Division developed and implemented the Waste Inventory Management Program (WIMP) to track the generation and disposal of low level radioactive waste. The WIMP system is a relational database with integrated barcode technology designed to track the inventory radioactive waste. During the development of the WIMP several waste minimization tools were incorporated into the design of the program. The inclusion of waste minimization tools as part of the WIMP has resulted in a 40% increase in the amount of waste designated as compactible and an overall volume reduction of 5,000 cu-ft

  2. The influence of vibrissal somatosensory processing in rat superior colliculus on prey capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, P D N; Gouvêa, T S; de Oliveira, S R; Vautrelle, N; Redgrave, P; Comoli, E

    2011-03-10

    The lateral part of intermediate layer of superior colliculus (SCl) is a critical substrate for successful predation by rats. Hunting-evoked expression of the activity marker Fos is concentrated in SCl while prey capture in rats with NMDA lesions in SCl is impaired. Particularly affected are rapid orienting and stereotyped sequences of actions associated with predation of fast moving prey. Such deficits are consistent with the view that the deep layers of SC are important for sensory guidance of movement. Although much of the relevant evidence involves visual control of movement, less is known about movement guidance by somatosensory input from vibrissae. Indeed, our impression is that prey contact with whiskers is a likely stimulus to trigger predation. Moreover, SCl receives whisker and orofacial somatosensory information directly from trigeminal complex, and indirectly from zona incerta, parvicelular reticular formation and somatosensory barrel cortex. To better understand sensory guidance of predation by vibrissal information we investigated prey capture by rats after whisker removal and the role of superior colliculus (SC) by comparing Fos expression after hunting with and without whiskers. Rats were allowed to hunt cockroaches, after which their whiskers were removed. Two days later they were allowed to hunt cockroaches again. Without whiskers the rats were less able to retain the cockroaches after capture and less able to pursue them in the event of the cockroach escaping. The predatory behaviour of rats with re-grown whiskers returned to normal. In parallel, Fos expression in SCl induced by predation was significantly reduced in whiskerless animals. We conclude that whiskers contribute to the efficiency of rat prey capture and that the loss of vibrissal input to SCl, as reflected by reduced Fos expression, could play a critical role in predatory deficits of whiskerless rats. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cycle development and design for CO2 capture from flue gas by vacuum swing adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Webley, Paul A

    2008-01-15

    CO2 capture and storage is an important component in the development of clean power generation processes. One CO2 capture technology is gas-phase adsorption, specifically pressure (or vacuum) swing adsorption. The complexity of these processes makes evaluation and assessment of new adsorbents difficult and time-consuming. In this study, we have developed a simple model specifically targeted at CO2 capture by pressure swing adsorption and validated our model by comparison with data from a fully instrumented pilot-scale pressure swing adsorption process. The model captures nonisothermal effects as well as nonlinear adsorption and nitrogen coadsorption. Using the model and our apparatus, we have designed and studied a large number of cycles for CO2 capture. We demonstrate that by careful management of adsorption fronts and assembly of cycles based on understanding of the roles of individual steps, we are able to quickly assess the effect of adsorbents and process parameters on capture performance and identify optimal operating regimes and cycles. We recommend this approach in contrast to exhaustive parametric studies which tend to depend on specifics of the chosen cycle and adsorbent. We show that appropriate combinations of process steps can yield excellent process performance and demonstrate how the pressure drop, and heat loss, etc. affect process performance through their effect on adsorption fronts and profiles. Finally, cyclic temperature profiles along the adsorption column can be readily used to infer concentration profiles-this has proved to be a very useful tool in cyclic function definition. Our research reveals excellent promise for the application of pressure/vacuum swing adsorption technology in the arena of CO2 capture from flue gases.

  4. Simultaneous electron capture and excitation in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanis, J.A.; Bernstein, E.M.; Graham, W.G.; Clark, M.; Shafroth, S.M.; Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.; Meron, M.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent efforts to observe simultaneous electron capture-and-K-shell excitation in ion-atom collisions is presented. This process which has been referred to as resonant-transfer-and-excitation (RTE), is qualitatively analogous to dielectronic recombination (inverse Auger transition) in free-electron-ion collisions, and, hence, is expected to be resonant. Experimentally, events having the correct signature for simultaneous capture-and-excitation are isolated by detecting projectile K x rays in coincidence with ions which capture a single electron. In a recent experiment involving 70-160 MeV S 13+ ions incident on Ar, a maximum was observed in the yield of projectile K x rays associated with electron capture. This maximum is attributed to simultaneous capture - and excitation. The position (120 MeV) and width (60 MeV) of the observed maximum are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. The data indicate that RTE is an important mechanism for inner-shell vacancy production in the energy range studied

  5. A Search for Weakly Interacting Particles with the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruch, Tobias [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-01-01

    Dark matter particles cannot only be detected directly in laboratories, but also indirectly by their annihilation products. Previous predictions of the neutrino flux from WIMP annihilation in the Earth and the Sun have assumed that galactic dark matter is distributed according to the SHM. Although the dark disc has a local density comparable to the dark halo, its higher phase space density at low velocities greatly enhances capture rates in the Sun and Earth. For typical dark disc properties, the resulting muon flux from the Earth is increased by three orders of magnitude over the SHM, while for the Sun the increase is one order of magnitude. This significantly increases the prospects of neutrino telescopes to fix or constrain parameters in WIMP models. The flux from the Earth is extremely sensitive to the detailed properties of the dark disc, while the flux from the Sun is more robust.

  6. Toward the Development and Deployment of Large-Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Conversion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Zhihong; Eden, Mario R.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    In light of the depletion of fossil fuels and the increased daily requirements for liquid fuels and chemicals, CO2 should indeed be regarded as a valuable C-1. additional feedstock for sustainable manufacturing of liquid fuels and chemicals. Development and deployment of CO2 capture and chemical...... are three keys factors. The CO2 capture technologies from stationary sources and ambient air based on solvents, solid sorbents, and membranes are discussed first. Transforming CO2 to liquid fuels and chemicals, which are presently produced from petroleum, through thermochemical, electrochemical...

  7. Radiative muon capture on hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, W.; Ahmad, S.; Chen, C.Q.; Gumplinger, P.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Larabee, A.J.; Sample, D.G.; Zhang, N.S.; Armstrong, D.S.; Blecher, M.; Serna-Angel, A.; Azuelos, G.; von Egidy, T.; Macdonald, J.A.; Poutissou, J.M.; Poutissou, R.; Wright, D.H.; Henderson, R.S.; McDonald, S.C.; Taylor, G.N.; Doyle, B.; Depommier, P.; Jonkmans, G.; Bertl, W.; Gorringe, T.P.; Robertson, B.C.

    1991-03-01

    The induced pseudoscalar coupling constant, g P , of the weak hadronic current can be determined from the measurement of the branching ratio of radiative muon capture (RMC) on hydrogen. This rare process is being investigated in the TRIUMF RMC experiment which is now taking data. This paper describes the experiment and indicates the status of the data analysis. (Author) 8 refs., 7 figs

  8. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases Preliminary Year 1 Techno-Economic Study Results and Methodology for Gas Pressurized Stripping Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2013-03-01

    Under the DOE’s Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program, Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) is developing a novel gas pressurized stripping (GPS) process to enable efficient post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) from coal-fired power plants. A technology and economic feasibility study is required as a deliverable in the project Statement of Project Objectives. This study analyzes a fully integrated pulverized coal power plant equipped with GPS technology for PCC, and is carried out, to the maximum extent possible, in accordance to the methodology and data provided in ATTACHMENT 3 – Basis for Technology Feasibility Study of DOE Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL report on “Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity (Original Issue Date, May 2007), NETL Report No. DOE/NETL-2007/1281, Revision 1, August 2007” was used as the main source of reference to be followed, as per the guidelines of ATTACHMENT 3 of DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL-2007/1281 study compared the feasibility of various combinations of power plant/CO2 capture process arrangements. The report contained a comprehensive set of design basis and economic evaluation assumptions and criteria, which are used as the main reference points for the purpose of this study. Specifically, Nexant adopted the design and economic evaluation basis from Case 12 of the above-mentioned DOE/NETL report. This case corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe (net), supercritical greenfield PC plant that utilizes an advanced MEAbased absorption system for CO2 capture and compression. For this techno-economic study, CCS’ GPS process replaces the MEA-based CO2 absorption system used in the original case. The objective of this study is to assess the performance of a full-scale GPS-based PCC design that is integrated with a supercritical PC plant similar to Case 12 of the DOE/NETL report, such that it corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe

  9. Neutron-capture Nucleosynthesis in the First Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Sneden, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that metal-poor stars enhanced in carbon but containing low levels of neutron-capture elements may have been among the first to incorporate the nucleosynthesis products of the first generation of stars. We have observed 16 stars with enhanced carbon or nitrogen using the MIKE Spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory and the Tull Spectrograph on the Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We present radial velocities, stellar parameters, and detailed abundance patterns for these stars. Strontium, yttrium, zirconium, barium, europium, ytterbium, and other heavy elements are detected. In four stars, these heavy elements appear to have originated in some form of r-process nucleosynthesis. In one star, a partial s-process origin is possible. The origin of the heavy elements in the rest of the sample cannot be determined unambiguously. The presence of elements heavier than the iron group offers further evidence that zero-metallicity rapidly rotating massive stars and pair instability supernovae did not contribute substantial amounts of neutron-capture elements to the regions where the stars in our sample formed. If the carbon- or nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor stars with low levels of neutron-capture elements were enriched by products of zero-metallicity supernovae only, then the presence of these heavy elements indicates that at least one form of neutron-capture reaction operated in some of the first stars. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  10. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yongqi

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the methodology and preliminary results of a techno-economic analysis on a hot carbonate absorption process (Hot-CAP) with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture (PCC). This analysis was based on the Hot-CAP that is fully integrated with a sub-critical steam cycle, pulverized coal-fired power plant adopted in Case 10 of the DOE/NETL’s Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants. The techno-economic analysis addressed several important aspects of the Hot-CAP for PCC application, including process design and simulation, equipment sizing, technical risk and mitigation strategy, performance evaluation, and cost analysis. Results show that the net power produced in the subcritical power plant equipped with Hot-CAP is 611 MWe, greater than that with Econoamine (550 MWe). The total capital cost for the Hot-CAP, including CO{sub 2} compression, is $399 million, less than that for the Econoamine PCC ($493 million). O&M costs for the power plant with Hot-CAP is $175 million annually, less than that with Econoamine ($178 million). The 20-year levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the power plant with Hot-CAP, including CO2 transportation and storage, is 119.4 mills/kWh, a 59% increase over that for the plant without CO2 capture. The LCOE increase caused by CO{sub 2} capture for the Hot-CAP is 31% lower than that for its Econoamine counterpart.

  11. Dynamic Operation and Simulation of Post-Combustion CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Gladis, Arne; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    Thermal power need to operate, on a daily basis, with frequent and fast load changes to balance the large variations of intermittent energy sources, such as wind and solar energy. To make the integration of carbon capture to power plants economically and technically feasible, the carbon capture...... process has to be able to follow these fast and large load changes without decreasing the overall performance of the carbon capture plant. Therefore, dynamic models for simulation, optimization and control system design are essential. In this work, we compare the transient behavior of the model against...

  12. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility: Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The newly established NCCC will include multiple, adaptable test skids that will allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period One reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on developing a screening process for testing consideration of new technologies; designing and constructing pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; developing sampling and analytical methods; expanding fuel flexibility of the Transport Gasification process; and operating the gasification process for technology research and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  13. Context-Dependent Control over Attentional Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosman, Joshua D.; Vecera, Shaun P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the likelihood of a salient item capturing attention is dependent on the "attentional set" an individual employs in a given situation. The instantiation of an attentional set is often viewed as a strategic, voluntary process, relying on working memory systems that represent immediate task…

  14. Capture reactions into borromean two-proton systems at rp-waiting points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, D.; Jensen, A. S.; Fynbo, H. O. U.

    2016-01-01

    of the radiative capture reactions can be determined. We present numerical results for $E1$ and $E2$ photon emission, and discuss occurrence preferences in general as well as relative sizes of these most likely processes. Finally, we present narrow estimated intervals for the proton capture rates relevant...

  15. Capturing Thoughts, Capturing Minds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni

    2004-01-01

    Think Aloud is cost effective, promises access to the user's mind and is the applied usability technique. But 'keep talking' is difficult, besides, the multimodal interface is visual not verbal. Eye-tracking seems to get around the verbalisation problem. It captures the visual focus of attention...

  16. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-07-14

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of high efficiency coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to promote new technologies for CO2 capture from coal-derived flue gas and syngas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived flue gas and syngas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development paths to commercialization. During the calendar year 2013 portion of the Budget Period Four reporting period, efforts at the NCCC focused on post-combustion CO2 capture, gasification, and pre-combustion CO2 capture technology testing. Preparations for future testing were on-going as well, and involved facility upgrades and collaboration with numerous technology developers. In the area of post-combustion, testing was conducted on an enzyme-based technology, advanced solvents from two major developers, and a gas separation membrane. During the year, the gasification process was operated for three test runs, supporting development of water-gas shift and COS hydrolysis catalysts, a mercury sorbent, and several gasification support technologies. Syngas produced during gasification operation was also used for pre-combustion capture technologies, including gas separation membranes from three different technology developers, a CO2 sorbent, and CO2 solvents.

  17. Novel process designs to improve the efficiency of postcombustion carbon dioxide capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Fernandez, E.

    2013-01-01

    The term carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) refers to a range of technologies that can reduce CO2 emissions from fossil fuels enabling the continued use of this fuel type without compromising the security of electricity supply. The technologies applicable to CCS differ in many key aspects; the

  18. Thermal Integration of CO{sub 2} Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy

    2012-06-29

    Coal-fired power plants, equipped either with oxycombustion or post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, will require a CO{sub 2} compression system to increase the pressure of the CO{sub 2} to the level needed for sequestration. Most analyses show that CO{sub 2} compression will have a significant effect on parasitic load, will be a major capital cost, and will contribute significantly to reduced unit efficiency. This project used first principle engineering analyses and computer simulations to determine the effects of utilizing compressor waste heat to improve power plant efficiency and increase net power output of coal-fired power plants with carbon capture. This was done for units with post combustion solvent-based CO{sub 2} capture systems and for oxyfired power plants, firing bituminous, PRB and lignite coals. The thermal integration opportunities analyzed for oxycombustion capture are use of compressor waste heat to reheat recirculated flue gas, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals prior to pulverizing the coal. Among the thermal integration opportunities analyzed for post combustion capture systems are use of compressor waste heat and heat recovered from the stripper condenser to regenerate post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture solvent, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals. The overall conclusion from the oxyfuel simulations is that thermal integration of compressor heat has the potential to improve net unit heat rate by up to 8.4 percent, but the actual magnitude of the improvement will depend on the type of heat sink used and to a lesser extent, compressor design and coal rank. The simulations of a unit with a MEA post combustion capture system showed that thermal integration of either compressor heat or stripper condenser heat to preheat boiler feedwater would result in heat rate improvements from 1.20 percent to 4.19 percent. The MEA capture simulations further showed that partial drying of low rank coals, done in combination

  19. Optimization of the energy resolution and of the radioactive background rejection for ionization-heat detectors equipped with thermometric thin films for the direct WIMPs detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgorouky, Y.W.

    2008-09-01

    The EDELWEISS experiment aims at the direct detection of WIMPs as possible candidates for dark matter. It uses heat-and-ionization detectors that can discriminate these particles from the radioactive background. To date, this method is limited by events with incomplete charge collection that occur just beneath the detectors electrodes. In order to identify and reject these undesirable events, we have developed detectors equipped with thin films used both as thermometers - and hence sensitive to the transient athermal regime - and as electrodes for the charge collection. This thesis focuses on the optimization of such thin films regarding surface events rejection and on the modelling of the physical processes enabling this identification. The optimization must both maximize the fiducial volume and conserve an energy resolution such that the recoil energy threshold is of the order of 30 keV. Our work explores four generations of detectors each of which corresponds to successive evolutions in their conception. In all cases, the electrode-thermometer is an amorphous Anderson insulator NbSi thin film polarized by two interleaved comb-shaped niobium electrodes. In spite of constant progress in the successive detectors performances, the latest generation does not display the performances required for the EDELWEISS II experiment. Our work has shown the difficulty of the transient thermal signal modelling due to the complex contribution of the charge collection. This works has lead to new ideas regarding the detectors configuration, so that the athermal regime can be optimized to enhance both the rejection capability and the resolution. (author)

  20. Do I Have My Attention? Speed of Processing Advantages for the Self-Face Are Not Driven by Automatic Attention Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Helen; Dlugokencka, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    We respond more quickly to our own face than to other faces, but there is debate over whether this is connected to attention-grabbing properties of the self-face. In two experiments, we investigate whether the self-face selectively captures attention, and the attentional conditions under which this might occur. In both experiments, we examined whether different types of face (self, friend, stranger) provide differential levels of distraction when processing self, friend and stranger names. In Experiment 1, an image of a distractor face appeared centrally – inside the focus of attention – behind a target name, with the faces either upright or inverted. In Experiment 2, distractor faces appeared peripherally – outside the focus of attention – in the left or right visual field, or bilaterally. In both experiments, self-name recognition was faster than other name recognition, suggesting a self-referential processing advantage. The presence of the self-face did not cause more distraction in the naming task compared to other types of face, either when presented inside (Experiment 1) or outside (Experiment 2) the focus of attention. Distractor faces had different effects across the two experiments: when presented inside the focus of attention (Experiment 1), self and friend images facilitated self and friend naming, respectively. This was not true for stranger stimuli, suggesting that faces must be robustly represented to facilitate name recognition. When presented outside the focus of attention (Experiment 2), no facilitation occurred. Instead, we report an interesting distraction effect caused by friend faces when processing strangers’ names. We interpret this as a “social importance” effect, whereby we may be tuned to pick out and pay attention to familiar friend faces in a crowd. We conclude that any speed of processing advantages observed in the self-face processing literature are not driven by automatic attention capture. PMID:25338170

  1. Mesoporous amine-bridged polysilsesquioxane for CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Genggeng

    2011-01-01

    A novel class of amine-supported sorbents based on amine-bridged mesoporous polysilsesquioxane was developed via a simple one-pot sol-gel process. The new sorbent allows the incorporation of a large amount of active groups without sacrificing surface area or pore volume available for CO2 capture, leading to a CO2 capture capacity of 3.2 mmol g−1 under simulated flue gas conditions. The sorbent is readily regenerated at 100°C and exhibits good stability over repetitive adsorption-desorption cycling.

  2. Mountaineer Commerical Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deanna Gilliland; Matthew Usher

    2011-12-31

    The Final Technical documents all work performed during the award period on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. This report presents the findings and conclusions produced as a consequence of this work. As identified in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0002673, AEP's objective of the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (MT CCS II) project is to design, build and operate a commercial scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) system capable of treating a nominal 235 MWe slip stream of flue gas from the outlet duct of the Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system at AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant (Mountaineer Plant), a 1300 MWe coal-fired generating station in New Haven, WV. The CCS system is designed to capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the incoming flue gas using the Alstom Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) and compress, transport, inject and store 1.5 million tonnes per year of the captured CO{sub 2} in deep saline reservoirs. Specific Project Objectives include: (1) Achieve a minimum of 90% carbon capture efficiency during steady-state operations; (2) Demonstrate progress toward capture and storage at less than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE); (3) Store CO{sub 2} at a rate of 1.5 million tonnes per year in deep saline reservoirs; and (4) Demonstrate commercial technology readiness of the integrated CO{sub 2} capture and storage system.

  3. Selection of the optimum condition for electron capture detector operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, J.; Korus, A.

    1974-01-01

    A method of determination of the optimal work conditions for the electron capture detector is presented in the paper. Physical phenomena which occur in the detector, as well as the energetic dependence of the electron attachment process are taken into consideration. The influence of the kind of carrier gas, temperature, and the parameters of the supplied voltage in both direct and pulse methods on average values of electron energy is described. Dependence of the sensitivity of the electron capture detector on the carrier gas and the polarizing voltage is illustrated for the Model DNW-300 electron capture detector produced in Poland. Practical indications for selecting optimal conditions of electron capture detector operation are given at the end of the paper. (author)

  4. Double electron capture by protons in collisions with H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar-Zepeda, M.H.; Gleason, Cristian; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Magana, O.; Hinojosa, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Double electron capture of protons in collisions with molecular hydrogen in the energy range 1.5-10 keV was studied by measuring the resulting H - velocity distributions. In this paper, a technique that provides experimental evidence about double capture mechanisms is proposed. In addition, cross-sections for this process were measured in the energy range of 1-5 keV.

  5. New Adsorption Cycles for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Ritter; Armin Ebner; Steven Reynolds Hai Du; Amal Mehrotra

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this three-year project was to study new pressure swing adsorption (PSA) cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration at high temperature. The heavy reflux (HR) PSA concept and the use of a hydrotalcite like (HTlc) adsorbent that captures CO{sub 2} reversibly at high temperatures simply by changing the pressure were two key features of these new PSA cycles. Through the completion or initiation of nine tasks, a bench-scale experimental and theoretical program has been carried out to complement and extend the process simulation study that was carried out during Phase I (DE-FG26-03NT41799). This final report covers the entire project from August 1, 2005 to July 31, 2008. This program included the study of PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture by both rigorous numerical simulation and equilibrium theory analysis. The insight gained from these studies was invaluable toward the applicability of PSA for CO{sub 2} capture, whether done at ambient or high temperature. The rigorous numerical simulation studies showed that it is indeed possible to capture and concentrate CO{sub 2} by PSA. Over a wide range of conditions it was possible to achieve greater than 90% CO{sub 2} purity and/or greater than 90% CO{sub 2} recovery, depending on the particular heavy reflux (HR) PSA cycle under consideration. Three HR PSA cycles were identified as viable candidates for further study experimentally. The equilibrium theory analysis, which represents the upper thermodynamic limit of the performance of PSA process, further validated the use of certain HR PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration. A new graphical approach for complex PSA cycle scheduling was also developed during the course of this program. This new methodology involves a priori specifying the cycle steps, their sequence, and the number of beds, and then following a systematic procedure that requires filling in a 2-D grid based on a few simple rules, some heuristics and some experience. It has been

  6. Cameras and settings for optimal image capture from UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike; O'Connor, James; James, Mike R.

    2017-04-01

    Aerial image capture has become very common within the geosciences due to the increasing affordability of low payload (markets. Their application to surveying has led to many studies being undertaken using UAV imagery captured from consumer grade cameras as primary data sources. However, image quality and the principles of image capture are seldom given rigorous discussion which can lead to experiments being difficult to accurately reproduce. In this contribution we revisit the underpinning concepts behind image capture, from which the requirements for acquiring sharp, well exposed and suitable imagery are derived. This then leads to discussion of how to optimise the platform, camera, lens and imaging settings relevant to image quality planning, presenting some worked examples as a guide. Finally, we challenge the community to make their image data open for review in order to ensure confidence in the outputs/error estimates, allow reproducibility of the results and have these comparable with future studies. We recommend providing open access imagery where possible, a range of example images, and detailed metadata to rigorously describe the image capture process.

  7. Capture of free-floating planets by planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulinski, Nadav; Ribak, Erez N.

    2018-01-01

    Evidence of exoplanets with orbits that are misaligned with the spin of the host star may suggest that not all bound planets were born in the protoplanetary disc of their current planetary system. Observations have shown that free-floating Jupiter-mass objects can exceed the number of stars in our Galaxy, implying that capture scenarios may not be so rare. To address this issue, we construct a three-dimensional simulation of a three-body scattering between a free-floating planet and a star accompanied by a Jupiter-mass bound planet. We distinguish between three different possible scattering outcomes, where the free-floating planet may get weakly captured after the brief interaction with the binary, remain unbound or 'kick out' the bound planet and replace it. The simulation was performed for different masses of the free-floating planets and stars, as well as different impact parameters, inclination angles and approach velocities. The outcome statistics are used to construct an analytical approximation of the cross-section for capturing a free-floating planet by fitting their dependence on the tested variables. The analytically approximated cross-section is used to predict the capture rate for these kinds of objects, and to estimate that about 1 per cent of all stars are expected to experience a temporary capture of a free-floating planet during their lifetime. Finally, we propose additional physical processes that may increase the capture statistics and whose contribution should be considered in future simulations in order to determine the fate of the temporarily captured planets.

  8. New neutron capture and total cross section measurements on 88Sr and their impact on s-process nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P.E.; Spencer, R.R.; Guber, K.H.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have made new and improved measurements of the neutron capture and total cross sections of 88 Sr at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Improvements over previous measurements include a wider incident neutron energy range, the use of metallic rather than carbonate samples, better background subtraction, reduced sensitivity to sample-dependent backgrounds, and better pulse-height weighting functions. Because of its small cross section, the 88 Sr(n,γ) reaction is an important bottleneck during the s-process nucleosynthesis. Hence, an accurate determination of this rate is needed to better constrain the neutron exposure in s-process models and to more fully exploit the recently discovered isotopic anomalies in certain meteorites. They describe the experimental procedures, compare the results to previous data, and discuss their astrophysical impact

  9. Resonance parameters for measured keV neutron capture cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musgrove, A.R. de L

    1969-05-01

    All available neutron capture cross sections in the keV region ({approx} to 100 keV) have been fitted with resonance parameters. Capture cross sections for nuclides with reasonably well known average s-wave parameters, but no measured cross section, have been calculated and tabulated using p-and d- wave strength functions interpolated between fitted values. Several of these nuclides are of interest in the theory of slow nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in stars, and the product of cosmic abundance (due to the s-process) and capture cross section at 30 keV has been plotted versus mass number. (author)

  10. Atom capture and loss in ion molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breinig, M.; Lasley, S.E.; Gaither, C.C. III.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported in measuring the energy and angular distribution of protons emerging with velocity close to the beam velocity from the target region when Ar + beams collide with a CH 4 target and ArH + beams collide with a He target at asymptotically high speeds. The protons result from the transfer of a target constituent to the projectile (atom capture) or from the dissociation of the projectile molecule in the collision (atom loss). For atom capture processes the Thomas peak is clearly observed. 10 refs., 3 figs

  11. Gravitational wave from dark sector with dark pion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsumura, Koji [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamada, Masatoshi [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Yamaguchi, Yuya, E-mail: ko2@gauge.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: m.yamada@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de, E-mail: yy@particle.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the spectra of gravitational waves produced by chiral symmetry breaking in dark quantum chromodynamics (dQCD) sector. The dark pion (π) can be a dark matter candidate as weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) or strongly interacting massive particle (SIMP). For a WIMP scenario, we introduce the dQCD sector coupled to the standard model (SM) sector with classical scale invariance and investigate the annihilation process of the dark pion via the 2π → 2 SM process. For a SIMP scenario, we investigate the 3π → 2π annihilation process of the dark pion as a SIMP using chiral perturbation theory. We find that in the WIMP scenario the gravitational wave background spectra can be observed by future space gravitational wave antennas. On the other hand, when the dark pion is the SIMP dark matter with the constraints for the chiral perturbative limit and pion-pion scattering cross section, the chiral phase transition becomes crossover and then the gravitational waves are not produced.

  12. Capture by colour: evidence for dimension-specific singleton capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anthony M; Becker, Stefanie I; Remington, Roger W

    2015-10-01

    Previous work on attentional capture has shown the attentional system to be quite flexible in the stimulus properties it can be set to respond to. Several different attentional "modes" have been identified. Feature search mode allows attention to be set for specific features of a target (e.g., red). Singleton detection mode sets attention to respond to any discrepant item ("singleton") in the display. Relational search sets attention for the relative properties of the target in relation to the distractors (e.g., redder, larger). Recently, a new attentional mode was proposed that sets attention to respond to any singleton within a particular feature dimension (e.g., colour; Folk & Anderson, 2010). We tested this proposal against the predictions of previously established attentional modes. In a spatial cueing paradigm, participants searched for a colour target that was randomly either red or green. The nature of the attentional control setting was probed by presenting an irrelevant singleton cue prior to the target display and assessing whether it attracted attention. In all experiments, the cues were red, green, blue, or a white stimulus rapidly rotated (motion cue). The results of three experiments support the existence of a "colour singleton set," finding that all colour cues captured attention strongly, while motion cues captured attention only weakly or not at all. Notably, we also found that capture by motion cues in search for colour targets was moderated by their frequency; rare motion cues captured attention (weakly), while frequent motion cues did not.

  13. Materials For Gas Capture, Methods Of Making Materials For Gas Capture, And Methods Of Capturing Gas

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2013-06-20

    In accordance with the purpose(s) of the present disclosure, as embodied and broadly described herein, embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to materials that can be used for gas (e.g., CO.sub.2) capture, methods of making materials, methods of capturing gas (e.g., CO.sub.2), and the like, and the like.

  14. More Energy-Efficient CO2 Capture from IGCC GE Flue Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakpong Peampermpool

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions are one of the main reasons for the increase in greenhouse gasses in the earth’s atmosphere and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS is known as an effective method to reduce CO2 emissions on a larger scale, such as for fossil energy utilization systems. In this paper, the feasibility of capturing CO2 using cryogenic liquefaction and improving the capture rate by expansion will be discussed. The main aim was to design an energy-saving scheme for an IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 cryogenic liquefaction capture. The experimental results provided by the authors, using the feed gas specification of a 740 MW IGCC General Electric (GE combustion power plant, demonstrated that using an orifice for further expanding the vent gas after cryogenic capture from 57 bar to 24 bar gave an experimentally observed capture rate up to 65%. The energy-saving scheme can improve the overall CO2 capture rate, and hence save energy. The capture process has also been simulated using Aspen HYSYS simulation software to evaluate its energy penalty. The results show that a 92% overall capture rate can be achieved by using an orifice.

  15. Possibility of resonant capture of antiprotons by highly charged hydrogenlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genkin, M.; Lindroth, E.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, an experimental setup was proposed by Lapierre et al. which would allow antiprotons and highly charged ions to collide repeatedly in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) due to a nested trap configuration. As mentioned by the authors, such a setup may open the possibility to study antiproton capture into well-defined states through a resonant process which involves simultaneous electron excitation. In the present work, we give some theoretical estimations of the feasibility of that process. It appears that the exotic dielectronic-like process of resonant anti-proton capture in highly charged ions does not seem to be completely out of reach

  16. A bottleneck model of set-specific capture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Sledge Moore

    Full Text Available Set-specific contingent attentional capture is a particularly strong form of capture that occurs when multiple attentional sets guide visual search (e.g., "search for green letters" and "search for orange letters". In this type of capture, a potential target that matches one attentional set (e.g. a green stimulus impairs the ability to identify a temporally proximal target that matches another attentional set (e.g. an orange stimulus. In the present study, we investigated whether set-specific capture stems from a bottleneck in working memory or from a depletion of limited resources that are distributed across multiple attentional sets. In each trial, participants searched a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP stream for up to three target letters (T1-T3 that could appear in any of three target colors (orange, green, or lavender. The most revealing findings came from trials in which T1 and T2 matched different attentional sets and were both identified. In these trials, T3 accuracy was lower when it did not match T1's set than when it did match, but only when participants failed to identify T2. These findings support a bottleneck model of set-specific capture in which a limited-capacity mechanism in working memory enhances only one attentional set at a time, rather than a resource model in which processing capacity is simultaneously distributed across multiple attentional sets.

  17. Towards a resolution of the attentional-capture debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Tomer; Lamy, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    The relative contributions of stimulus-driven and goal-directed control of attention have been extensively studied by investigating which irrelevant stimuli capture attention. Although much of this research has focused on color-singleton distractors, the circumstances under which these capture attention remain controversial. In search for a target with a unique known color (known-singleton search), whether singletons in an irrelevant color can be successfully ignored is a hotly debated issue. In search for a target that is not a singleton (feature search), no capture by irrelevant-color singletons is typically observed, but a reverse cueing effect was occasionally reported in the spatial-cueing paradigm. In 3 experiments, we resolve these controversies, by showing that the net spatial effect observed in the spatial-cueing paradigm reflects the sum of 3 separate effects. (a) A same-location benefit, which is determined by the match between the cue and the target colors and indexes contingent attentional capture. (b) A same-location cost, which is also determined by the match between the cue and the target colors, but occurs after selection and indexes processes related to visual working memory; and (c) task-dependent capture by singletons that occurs only when the target is consistently a singleton. Crucially, we show that the same-location cost is strongly determined by cue exposure duration, which explains previous failures to isolate it. The implications of these findings for the attentional capture debate are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-12-30

    The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at the Power Systems Development Facility supports the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of promoting the United States’ energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable energy produced from coal. Work at the NCCC supports the development of new power technologies and the continued operation of conventional power plants under CO2 emission constraints. The NCCC includes adaptable slipstreams that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development path to commercialization. During its first contract period, from October 1, 2008, through December 30, 2014, the NCCC designed, constructed, and began operation of the Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Center (PC4). Testing of CO2 capture technologies commenced in 2011, and through the end of the contract period, more than 25,000 hours of testing had been achieved, supporting a variety of technology developers. Technologies tested included advanced solvents, enzymes, membranes, sorbents, and associated systems. The NCCC continued operation of the existing gasification facilities, which have been in operation since 1996, to support the advancement of technologies for next-generation gasification processes and pre-combustion CO2 capture. The gasification process operated for 13 test runs, supporting over 30,000 hours combined of both gasification and pre-combustion technology developer testing. Throughout the contract period, the NCCC incorporated numerous modifications to the facilities to accommodate technology developers and increase test capabilities. Preparations for further testing were ongoing to continue advancement of the most promising technologies for

  19. SCALABLE PHOTOGRAMMETRIC MOTION CAPTURE SYSTEM “MOSCA”: DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Knyaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wide variety of applications (from industrial to entertainment has a need for reliable and accurate 3D information about motion of an object and its parts. Very often the process of movement is rather fast as in cases of vehicle movement, sport biomechanics, animation of cartoon characters. Motion capture systems based on different physical principles are used for these purposes. The great potential for obtaining high accuracy and high degree of automation has vision-based system due to progress in image processing and analysis. Scalable inexpensive motion capture system is developed as a convenient and flexible tool for solving various tasks requiring 3D motion analysis. It is based on photogrammetric techniques of 3D measurements and provides high speed image acquisition, high accuracy of 3D measurements and highly automated processing of captured data. Depending on the application the system can be easily modified for different working areas from 100 mm to 10 m. The developed motion capture system uses from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for video sequences of object motion acquisition. All cameras work in synchronization mode at frame rate up to 100 frames per second under the control of personal computer providing the possibility for accurate calculation of 3D coordinates of interest points. The system was used for a set of different applications fields and demonstrated high accuracy and high level of automation.

  20. Precision mass measurements for studies of nucleosynthesis via the rapid neutron-capture process. Penning-trap mass measurements of neutron-rich cadmium and caesium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, Dinko

    2016-07-06

    Although the theory for the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) was developed more than 55 years ago, the astrophysical site is still under a debate. Theoretical studies predict that the r-process path proceeds through very neutron-rich nuclei with very asymmetric proton-to-neutron ratios. Knowledge about the properties of neutron-rich isotopes found in similar regions of the nuclear chart and furthermore suitable for r-process studies is still little or even not existing. The basic nuclear properties such as binding energies, half-lives, neutron-induced or neutron-capture reaction cross-sections, play an important role in theoretical simulations and can vary or even drastically alternate results of these studies. Therefore, a considerable effort was put forward to access neutron-rich isotopes at radioactive ion-beam facilities like ISOLDE at CERN. The goal of this PhD thesis is to describe the experimental work done for the precision mass measurements of neutron-rich cadmium ({sup 129-131}Cd) and caesium ({sup 132,146-148}Cs) isotopes. Measurements were done at the on-line radioactive ion-beam facility ISOLDE by using the four-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. The cadmium isotopes are key nuclides for the synthesis of stable isotopes around the mass peak A = 130 in the Solar System abundance.

  1. Interatomic Coulombic electron capture in atomic, molecular, and quantum dot systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bande Annika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interatomic Coulombic electron capture (ICEC process has recently been predicted theoretically for clusters of atoms and molecules. For an atom A capturing an electron e(ε it competes with the well known photorecombination, because in an environment of neutral or anionic neighboring atoms B, A can transfer its excess energy in the ultrafast ICEC process to B which is then ionized. The cross section for e(ε + A + B → A− + B+ + e(ε′ has been obtained in an asymptotic approximation based on scattering theory for several clusters [1,2]. It was found that ICEC starts dominating the PR for distances among participating species of nanometers and lower. Therefore, we believe that the ICEC process might be of importance in the atmosphere, in biological systems, plasmas, or in nanostructured materials. As an example for the latter, ICEC has been investigated by means of electron dynamics in a model potential for semiconductor double quantum dots (QDs [3]. In the simplest case one QD captures an electron while the outgoing electron is emitted from the other. The reaction probability for this process was found to be relatively large.

  2. Application of optimal design methodologies in retrofitting natural gas combined cycle power plants with CO_2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Ming; Aziz, Farah; Li, Baohong; Perry, Simon; Zhang, Nan; Bulatov, Igor; Smith, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new approach is proposed for retrofitting NGCC power plants with CO2 capture. • HTI techniques are developed for improving heat recovery in NGCC power plants. • EGR techniques are developed to increase the process overall energy efficiency. • The proposed methods are efficient for practical application. - Abstract: Around 21% of the world’s power production is based on natural gas. Energy production is considered to be the significant sources of carbon dioxide (CO_2) emissions. This has a significant effect on the global warming. Improving power plant efficiency and adding a CO_2 capture unit into power plants, have been suggested to be a promising countermeasure against global warming. This paper presents a new insight to the application of energy efficient technologies in retrofitting natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants with CO_2 capture. High fidelity models of a 420 MW NGCC power plant and a CO_2 capture plant with CO_2 compression train have been built and integrated for 90% capture level. These models have been then validated by comparisons with practical operating data and literature results. The novelty of the paper is to propose optimal retrofitting strategies to minimize the efficiency penalty caused by integrating carbon capture units into the power plant, including (1) implementing heat transfer intensification techniques to increase energy saving in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) of the power plant; (2) extracting suitable steam from the HRSG to supply the heat required by the capture process, thus on external heat is purchased; (3) employing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to increase the overall energy efficiency of the integrated process, which can benefit both power plant (e.g. increasing power plant efficiency) and capture process (e.g. reducing heat demands). Compared with the base case without using any integrating and retrofitting strategies, the optimal solution based on the proposed approaches

  3. Comparison of the potentials used for the calculation of the resonant coherent electron capture and loss cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauly, N.; Dubus, A.; Roesler, M.

    2003-01-01

    For incident protons with velocities around 1 a.u., electron capture and loss processes are known to play an important role. In particular, electron emission as well as electronic stopping power are strongly influenced by the charge changing processes. Several different electron capture and loss processes have been identified [Solid State Phys. 43 (1990) 229], i.e. Auger valence band processes, shell processes and resonant coherent processes. In the latter, the incident projectile undergoes a periodic excitation due to the periodic crystalline potential so that an electron can be lost or captured. In the literature, several different choices have been made for the crystalline potential. It is precisely the aim of the present work to review and compare the various potentials used in the literature and to show the influence of this choice on the resonant coherent electron capture and loss cross sections

  4. Colloidal processing and CO_2-capture performance Al_2O_3-zeolite 13X composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, L.; Akhtar, F.; Ojuva, A.; Bergstroem, L.

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchically porous composites for CO_2-capture have been produced by coating the inner walls of foam-like macroporous alumina monoliths, produced by templated synthesis, with microporous zeolite 13X particles. Homogeneous and dense coatings of the particulate adsorbent were obtained when the impregnation process was performed at a pH above 9. At this pH-level the colloidally stable suspensions of the negatively charged zeolite 13X particles could fill all the voids of the highly connected pore space of the alumina supports and attach to the monolith walls, which had been pre-coated with poly(ethylene imine). A CO_2-uptake as high as 5 mmol CO_2/g zeolite 13X was achieved for alumina-zeolite 13X composites through minimisation of the added inorganic binder, kaolin, to only 3.0 wt% with respect to zeolite content, and through optimisation of the thermal treatment.

  5. Possibility of a crossed-beam experiment involving slow-neutron capture by unstable nuclei - ``rapid-process tron''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, T.; Katayama, I.; Uwamino, Y.

    1993-02-01

    The possibility of a crossed beam facility of slow neutrons capturing unstable nuclei is examined in connection with the Japanese Hadron Project. With a pulsed proton beam of 50 Hz repetition and with a 100 μA average beam current, one obtains a spallation neutron source of 2.4 × 10 8 thermal neutrons/cm 3/spill over a 60 cm length with a 3 ms average duration time by using a D 2O moderator. By confining radioactive nuclei of 10 9 ions in a beam circulation ring of 0.3 MHz revolution frequency, so that nuclei pass through the neutron source, one obtains a collision luminosity of 3.9 × 10 24/cm 2/s. A new research domain aimed at studying rapid processes in nuclear genetics in a laboratory will be created.

  6. Theoretical interpretation of experimental data from direct dark matter detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung-Lin, Shan

    2007-10-15

    I derive expressions that allow to reconstruct the normalized one-dimensional velocity distribution function of halo WIMPs and to determine its moments from the recoil energy spectrum as well as from experimental data directly. The reconstruction of the velocity distribution function is further extended to take into account the annual modulation of the event rate. All these expressions are independent of the as yet unknown WIMP density near the Earth as well as of the WIMP-nucleus cross section. The only information about the nature of halo WIMPs which one needs is the WIMP mass. I also present a method for the determination of the WIMP mass by combining two (or more) experiments with different detector materials. This method is not only independent of the model of Galactic halo but also of that of WIMPs. (orig.)

  7. Theoretical interpretation of experimental data from direct dark matter detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Chung-Lin

    2007-10-01

    I derive expressions that allow to reconstruct the normalized one-dimensional velocity distribution function of halo WIMPs and to determine its moments from the recoil energy spectrum as well as from experimental data directly. The reconstruction of the velocity distribution function is further extended to take into account the annual modulation of the event rate. All these expressions are independent of the as yet unknown WIMP density near the Earth as well as of the WIMP-nucleus cross section. The only information about the nature of halo WIMPs which one needs is the WIMP mass. I also present a method for the determination of the WIMP mass by combining two (or more) experiments with different detector materials. This method is not only independent of the model of Galactic halo but also of that of WIMPs. (orig.)

  8. A Methodology for a Sustainable CO2 Capture and Utilization Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Fjellerup, Kasper; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    hydrogenation highlights the application. This case study illustrates the utility of the utilization network and elements of the methodology being developed. In addition, the conversion process is linked with carbon capture to evaluate the overall sustainability. Finally, the production of the other raw...... of Climate Change. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. [2] J. Wilcox, Carbon Capture. New York: Springer, 2012....

  9. European CO2 prices and carbon capture investments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, Luis M.; Chamorro, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    We assess the option to install a carbon capture and storage (CCS) unit in a coal-fired power plant operating in a carbon-constrained environment. We consider two sources of risk, namely the price of emission allowance and the price of the electricity output. First we analyse the performance of the EU market for CO 2 emission allowances. Specifically, we focus on the contracts maturing in the Kyoto Protocol's first commitment period (2008 to 2012) and calibrate the underlying parameters of the allowance price process. Then we refer to the Spanish wholesale electricity market and calibrate the parameters of the electricity price process. We use a two-dimensional binomial lattice to derive the optimal investment rule. In particular, we obtain the trigger allowance prices above which it is optimal to install the capture unit immediately. We further analyse the effect of changes in several variables on these critical prices, among them allowance price volatility and a hypothetical government subsidy. We conclude that, at current permit prices, immediate installation does not seem justified from a financial point of view. This need not be the case, though, if carbon market parameters change dramatically, carbon capture technology undergoes significant improvements, and/or a specific governmental policy to promote these units is adopted. (author)

  10. Digital Holographic Capture and Optoelectronic Reconstruction for 3D Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien P. Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of digital holography as a viable solution to 3D capture and display technology is examined. A review of the current state of the field is presented in which some of the major challenges involved in a digital holographic solution are highlighted. These challenges include (i the removal of the DC and conjugate image terms, which are features of the holographic recording process, (ii the reduction of speckle noise, a characteristic of a coherent imaging process, (iii increasing the angular range of perspective of digital holograms (iv and replaying captured and/or processed digital holograms using spatial light modulators. Each of these challenges are examined theoretically and several solutions are put forward. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the validity of the theoretical solutions.

  11. Control of a post-combustion CO2 capture plant during process start-up and load variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic and flexible operation of a carbon capture plant is important as thermal power plants must be operated very flexibly to accommodate large shares of intermittent energy sources such as wind and solar energy. To facilitate such operation, dynamic models for simulation, optimization...... and control system design are crucial. In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Moreover, we implement a decentralized proportional-integral (PI) based control scheme and we evaluate the performance of the control structure...... for various operational procedures, e.g. start-up, load changes, noise on the flue gas flow rate and composition. Note that the carbon capture plant is based on the solvent storage configuration. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing the issue of start-up operation and control of carbon...

  12. Electron capture Auger aftereffect of ammine cobalt complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Masayuki; Sano, Hirotoshi

    1976-01-01

    The study of ammine cobalt complex by luminescent Moessbauer spectrometry method was performed. The method was compared with hot atom chemistry method. The electron states in atoms are changed by the aftereffect on Auger emission following the electron capture process. The state of oxidation of disintegration products is usually higher than that of parent nuclei. However, sometimes, lower oxidation is seen in Fe-57, the daughter nuclei of Co-57. This phenomenon may be due to radiation chemistry process, and this effect can be observed by the luminescent Moessbauer spectrometry method. However, the range of the effect can not be seen by the Moessbauer method. Estimation showed that the Auger electrons stay within the surrounding area of the disintegration atom, and the effect does not reach to distant places. The yield of Fe-57 in the electron capture process of Co-57 in cobalt complex, the G-value, and the hot atom chemical yield were obtained. It is concluded that the aftereffect of the Auger process is the localized radiation chemistry effect. Good correlation was seen between the present method and the hot atom chemistry method. (Kato, T.)

  13. Debunching and Capture in the LEB for the SSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahale, N.; Furman, M.

    1991-05-01

    The authors present the details of the capture process in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) for the SSC. They consider only the longitudinal dynamics. Space charge forces are computed quasistatically. The beam pipe is considered to be perfectly conducting. With respect to maximizing the capture efficiency and minimizing the space charge tune spread, initial few milliseconds are very important. They present only the first few milliseconds of the cycle, during which space charge effects are significant. For the numerical simulation they use the code ESME.

  14. Task-irrelevant own-race faces capture attention: eye-tracking evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rong; Wang, Shuzhen; Rao, Congquan; Fu, Jia

    2013-04-01

    To investigate attentional capture by face's race, the current study recorded saccade latencies of eye movement measurements in an inhibition of return (IOR) task. Compared to Caucasian (other-race) faces, Chinese (own-race) faces elicited longer saccade latency. This phenomenon disappeared when faces were inverted. The results indicated that own-race faces capture attention automatically with high-level configural processing. © 2013 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2013 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  15. Stellar Neutron Capture Cross Sections of the Lu and Hf Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisshak, K.; Voss, F.; Kaeppeler, F.; Kazakov, L.; Krticka, M.

    2005-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of 175,176Lu and 176,177,178,179,180Hf have been measured in the energy range from 3 to 225 keV at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator relative to the gold standard. Neutrons were produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and capture events were detected by the Karlsruhe 4πBaF2 detector. The cross section ratios could be determined with uncertainties between 0.9 and 1.8% about a factor of five more accurate than previous data. A strong population of isomeric states was found in neutron capture of the Hf isotopes, which are only partially explained by CASINO/GEANT simulations based on the known level schemes.Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections were calculated for thermal energies between kT = 8 keV and 100 keV. Severe differences up to40% were found to the data of a recent evaluation based on existing experimental results. The new data allow for a much more reliable analysis of the important branching in the s-process synthesis path at 176Lu which can be interpreted as an s-process thermometer

  16. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of the Ba isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, F.; Wisshak, K.; Guber, K.; Kaeppeler, F.; Reffo, G.

    1994-03-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of 134 Ba, 135 Ba, 136 Ba, and 137 Ba were measured in the energy range from 5 to 225 keV at the Karlsruhe 3.75 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. Neutrons were produced via the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction by bombarding metallic Li targets with a pulsed proton beam. Capture events were registered with the Karlsruhe 4π Barium Fluoride Detector. Several runs have been performed under different experimental conditions to study the systematic uncertainties, which resulted mainly from the large ratios of total to capture cross sections of up to 400. The cross section ratios were determined with an overall uncertainty of ∼3%, an improvement by factors of five to eight compared to existing data. Severe discrepancies were found with respect to previous results. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections were calculated for thermal energies between kT=10 keV and 100 keV. These stellar cross sections were used in an s-process analysis. For the s-only isotopes 134 Ba and 136 Ba the N s ratio was determined to 0.875±0.025. Hence, a significant branching of the s-process path at 134 Cs can be claimed for the first time, in contrast to predictions from the classical approach. This branching yields information on the s-process temperature, indicating values around T 8 =2. The new cross sections are also important for the interpretation of barium isotopic anomalies, which were recently discovered in SiC grains of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Together with the results from previous experiments on tellurium and samarium, a general improvement of the N s systematics in the mass range A=120 to 150 is achieved. This allows for a more reliable separation of s- and r-process yields, resulting in an improved assignment of the respective contributions to elemental barium that is required for comparison with stellar observations. (orig.) [de

  17. Evaluation of Mars CO2 Capture and Gas Separation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Gibson, Tracy; Devor, Robert; Captain, James

    2011-01-01

    Recent national policy statements have established that the ultimate destination of NASA's human exploration program is Mars. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is a key technology required to ,enable such missions and it is appropriate to review progress in this area and continue to advance the systems required to produce rocket propellant, oxygen, and other consumables on Mars using the carbon dioxide atmosphere and other potential resources. The Mars Atmospheric Capture and Gas separation project is selecting, developing, and demonstrating techniques to capture and purify Martian atmospheric gases for their utilization for the production of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and water in ISRU systems. Trace gases will be required to be separated from Martian atmospheric gases to provide pure CO2 to processing elements. In addition, other Martian gases, such as nitrogen and argon, occur in concentrations high enough to be useful as buffer gas and should be captured as well. To achieve these goals, highly efficient gas separation processes will be required. These gas separation techniques are also required across various areas within the ISRU project to support various consumable production processes. The development of innovative gas separation techniques will evaluate the current state-of-the-art for the gas separation required, with the objective to demonstrate and develop light-weight, low-power methods for gas separation. Gas separation requirements include, but are not limited to the selective separation of: (1) methane and water from unreacted carbon oxides (C02-CO) and hydrogen typical of a Sabatier-type process, (2) carbon oxides and water from unreacted hydrogen from a Reverse Water-Gas Shift process, (3)/carbon oxides from oxygen from a trash/waste processing reaction, and (4) helium from hydrogen or oxygen from a propellant scavenging process. Potential technologies for the separations include' freezers, selective membranes, selective solvents, polymeric sorbents

  18. Thermodynamic simulation of CO{sub 2} capture for an IGCC power plant using the calcium looping cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. [National Engineering Laboratory for Coal-Burning Pollutant Emission Reduction, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zhao, C.; Ren, Q. [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

    2011-06-15

    A CO{sub 2} capture process for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant using the calcium looping cycle was proposed. The CO{sub 2} capture process using natural and modified limestone was simulated and investigated with the software package Aspen Plus. It incorporated a fresh feed of sorbent to compensate for the decay in CO{sub 2} capture activity during long-term cycles. The sorbent flow ratios have significant effect on the CO{sub 2} capture efficiency and net efficiency of the CO{sub 2} capture system. The IGCC power plant, using the modified limestone, exhibits higher CO{sub 2} capture efficiency than that using the natural limestone at the same sorbent flow ratios. The system net efficiency using the natural and modified limestones achieves 41.7% and 43.1%, respectively, at the CO{sub 2} capture efficiency of 90% without the effect of sulfation. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Solids Modelling and Capture Simulation of Piperazine in Potassium Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn; Thomsen, Kaj

    2012-01-01

    be a benefit to the capture process, but it could also result in unforeseen situations of potential hazardous operation, clogging, equipment failure etc.Security of the PZ process needs to be in focus. Flow assurance requires additional attention, especially due to the precipitation phenomenon. This entails...

  20. OCTAVIUS: evaluation of flexibility and operability of amine based post combustion CO2 capture at the Brindisi Pilot Plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangiaracina, A.; Zangrilli, L.; Robinson, L.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Os, P.J. van

    2014-01-01

    Solvent storage is an option for amine based post combustion capture that can be used to de-couple the capture of CO2 and the energy demand of the process. In this process, electricity output of a power station is temporarily increased by diverting steam from the CO2 capture plant back to the steam

  1. Processes for CO2 capture. Context of thermal waste treatment units. State of the art. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, A.; Roizard, D.; Favre, E.; Dufour, A.

    2013-01-01

    For most of industrial sectors, Greenhouse Gases (GHG) such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) are considered as serious pollutants and have to be controlled and treated. The thermal waste treatment units are part of industrial CO 2 emitters, even if they represent a small part of emissions (2,5 % of GHG emissions in France) compared to power plants (13 % of GHG emissions in France, one third of worldwide GHG emissions) or shaper industries (20 % of GHG emissions in France). Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) can be a solution to reduce CO 2 emissions from industries (power plants, steel and cement industries...). The issues of CCS applied to thermal waste treatment units are quite similar to those related to power plants (CO 2 flow, flue gas temperature and pressure conditions). The problem is to know if the CO 2 produced by waste treatment plants can be captured thanks to the processes already available on the market or that should be available by 2020. It seems technically possible to adapt CCS post-combustion methods to the waste treatment sector. But on the whole, CCS is complex and costly for a waste treatment unit offering small economies of scale. However, regulations concerning impurities for CO 2 transport and storage are not clearly defined at the moment. Consequently, specific studies must be achieved in order to check the technical feasibility of CCS in waste treatment context and clearly define its cost. (authors)

  2. Room-temperature ionic liquids and composite materials: platform technologies for CO(2) capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Jason E; Camper, Dean E; Gin, Douglas L; Noble, Richard D

    2010-01-19

    Clean energy production has become one of the most prominent global issues of the early 21st century, prompting social, economic, and scientific debates regarding energy usage, energy sources, and sustainable energy strategies. The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, specifically carbon dioxide (CO(2)), figures prominently in the discussions on the future of global energy policy. Billions of tons of annual CO(2) emissions are the direct result of fossil fuel combustion to generate electricity. Producing clean energy from abundant sources such as coal will require a massive infrastructure and highly efficient capture technologies to curb CO(2) emissions. Current technologies for CO(2) removal from other gases, such as those used in natural gas sweetening, are also capable of capturing CO(2) from power plant emissions. Aqueous amine processes are found in the vast majority of natural gas sweetening operations in the United States. However, conventional aqueous amine processes are highly energy intensive; their implementation for postcombustion CO(2) capture from power plant emissions would drastically cut plant output and efficiency. Membranes, another technology used in natural gas sweetening, have been proposed as an alternative mechanism for CO(2) capture from flue gas. Although membranes offer a potentially less energy-intensive approach, their development and industrial implementation lags far behind that of amine processes. Thus, to minimize the impact of postcombustion CO(2) capture on the economics of energy production, advances are needed in both of these areas. In this Account, we review our recent research devoted to absorptive processes and membranes. Specifically, we have explored the use of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in absorptive and membrane technologies for CO(2) capture. RTILs present a highly versatile and tunable platform for the development of new processes and materials aimed at the capture of CO(2) from power plant flue gas and

  3. Scopolamine Reduces Electrophysiological Indices of Distractor Suppression: Evidence from a Contingent Capture Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Laube

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Limited resources for the in-depth processing of external stimuli make it necessary to select only relevant information from our surroundings and to ignore irrelevant stimuli. Attentional mechanisms facilitate this selection via top-down modulation of stimulus representations in the brain. Previous research has indicated that acetylcholine (ACh modulates this influence of attention on stimulus processing. However, the role of muscarinic receptors as well as the specific mechanism of cholinergic modulation remains unclear. Here we investigated the influence of ACh on feature-based, top-down control of stimulus processing via muscarinic receptors by using a contingent capture paradigm which specifically tests attentional shifts toward uninformative cue stimuli which display one of the target defining features In a double-blind, placebo controlled study we measured the impact of the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine on behavioral and electrophysiological measures of contingent attentional capture. The results demonstrated all the signs of functional contingent capture, i.e., attentional shifts toward cued locations reflected in increased amplitudes of N1 and N2Pc components, under placebo conditions. However, scopolamine did not affect behavioral or electrophysiological measures of contingent capture. Instead, scopolamine reduced the amplitude of the distractor-evoked Pd component which has recently been associated with active suppression of irrelevant distractor information. The findings suggest a general cholinergic modulation of top-down control during distractor processing.

  4. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Syamlal, Madhava [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Cottrell, Roger [URS Corporation. (URS), San Francisco, CA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Kress, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sun, Xin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sundaresan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sahinidis, Nikolaos V. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Zitney, Stephen E. [NETL; Bhattacharyya, D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tong, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lin, Guang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dale, Crystal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Engel, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beattie, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shinn, John [SynPatEco. Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    2012-09-30

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is organized into 8 technical elements that fall under two focus areas. The first focus area (Physicochemical Models and Data) addresses the steps necessary to model and simulate the various technologies and processes needed to bring a new Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology into production. The second focus area (Analysis & Software) is developing the software infrastructure to integrate the various components and implement the tools that are needed to make quantifiable decisions regarding the viability of new CCS technologies. CCSI also has an Industry Advisory Board (IAB). By working closely with industry from the inception of the project to identify

  5. Groundwater capture processes under a seasonal variation in natural recharge and discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Thomas, III.; Vionnet, Leticia Beatriz

    "Capture" is the increase in recharge and the decrease in discharge that occurs when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system that was in a previous state of approximate dynamic equilibrium. Regional groundwater models are usually used to calculate capture in a two-step procedure. A steady-state solution provides an initial-head configuration, a set of flows through the boundaries for the modeled region, and the initial basis for the capture calculation. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions renders the capture calculation. When seasonality is a modeling issue, the use of a single initial hydraulic head and a single set of boundary flows leads to miscalculations of capture. Instead, an initial condition for each season should be used. This approach may be accomplished by determining steady oscillatory solutions, which vary through the seasons but repeat from year to year. A regional groundwater model previously developed for a portion of the San Pedro River basin, Arizona, USA, is modified to illustrate the effect that different initial conditions have on transient solutions and on capture calculations. Résumé Les "prélèvements" sont constitués par l'augmentation de la recharge et par la diminution de l'écoulement qui se produit lorsqu'un pompage est imposéà un système aquifère qui était auparavant dans un état proche de l'équilibre dynamique. Les modèles régionaux de nappe sont en général utilisés pour calculer les prélèvements dans une procédure à deux étapes. Une solution en régime permanent donne la configuration piézométrique initiale, un jeu de conditions aux limites pour la région modélisée et les données de base pour le calcul des prélèvements. Les solutions transitoires donnent les modifications globales des conditions aux limites. Lorsque des variations saisonnières sont produites en sortie du modèle, le recours à une

  6. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagyi-Palffy, A.

    2006-07-01

    The resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) in collisions involving highly-charged ions has been investigated theoretically. NEEC is a rare recombination process in which a free electron is captured into a bound shell of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. Total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are presented for various collision systems. The possibility to observe the NEEC in scattering experiments with trapped or stored ions was discussed focusing on the cases with the largest calculated resonance strength. As the photons emitted in different channels of the electron recombination process are indistinguishable in the total cross section, the interference between NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the nucleus and radiative recombination was investigated. The angular distribution of the emitted photons in the recombination process provides means to discern the two processes. Angular differential cross sections for the emitted photons in the case of E2 nuclear transitions were presented for several heavy elements. (orig.)

  7. Capture into resonance and phase-space dynamics in an optical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armon, Tsafrir; Friedland, Lazar

    2016-04-01

    The process of capture of a molecular ensemble into rotational resonance in the optical centrifuge is investigated. The adiabaticity and phase-space incompressibility are used to find the resonant capture probability in terms of two dimensionless parameters P1 ,2 characterizing the driving strength and the nonlinearity, and related to three characteristic time scales in the problem. The analysis is based on the transformation to action-angle variables and the single resonance approximation, yielding reduction of the three-dimensional rotation problem to one degree of freedom. The analytic results for capture probability are in good agreement with simulations. The existing experiments satisfy the validity conditions of the theory.

  8. Development of Electro-Microbial Carbon Capture and Conversion Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Al Rowaihi, Israa

    2017-01-01

    to fix ca. 800 Gt (gigaton) of CO2 in the planets largest carbon-capture process. Photosynthesis combines light harvesting, charge separation, catalytic water splitting, generation of reduction equivalents (NADH), energy (ATP) production and CO2 fixation

  9. Search for Dark Matter Interactions using Ionization Yield in Liquid Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarov, Sergey

    Cosmological observations overwhelmingly support the existence of dark matter which constitutes 87% of the universe's total mass. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are a prime candidate for dark matter, and the Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment aims to a direct-detection of a WIMP-nucleon interaction. The LUX detector is a dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber housed 4,850 feet underground at Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. We present the ionization-only analysis of the LUX 2013 WIMP search data. In the 1.04 x 104 kg-days exposure, thirty events were observed out of the 24.8 expected from radioactive backgrounds. We employ a cut-and-count method to set a 1-sided 90% C.L. upper limit for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-sections. A zero charge yield for nuclear-recoils below 0.7 keV is included upper limit calculation. This ionization-only analysis excludes an unexplored region of WIMP-nucleon cross-section for low-mass WIMPs achieving 1.56 x 10-43 cm2 WIMP-nucleon cross-section exclusion for a 5.1 GeV/ c2 WIMP.

  10. Laser capture microdissection: Arcturus(XT) infrared capture and UV cutting methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Rosa I; Blakely, Steven R; Liotta, Lance A; Espina, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a technique that allows the precise procurement of enriched cell populations from a heterogeneous tissue under direct microscopic visualization. LCM can be used to harvest the cells of interest directly or can be used to isolate specific cells by ablating the unwanted cells, resulting in histologically enriched cell populations. The fundamental components of laser microdissection technology are (a) visualization of the cells of interest via microscopy, (b) transfer of laser energy to a thermolabile polymer with either the formation of a polymer-cell composite (capture method) or transfer of laser energy via an ultraviolet laser to photovolatize a region of tissue (cutting method), and (c) removal of cells of interest from the heterogeneous tissue section. Laser energy supplied by LCM instruments can be infrared (810 nm) or ultraviolet (355 nm). Infrared lasers melt thermolabile polymers for cell capture, whereas ultraviolet lasers ablate cells for either removal of unwanted cells or excision of a defined area of cells. LCM technology is applicable to an array of applications including mass spectrometry, DNA genotyping and loss-of-heterozygosity analysis, RNA transcript profiling, cDNA library generation, proteomics discovery, and signal kinase pathway profiling. This chapter describes the unique features of the Arcturus(XT) laser capture microdissection instrument, which incorporates both infrared capture and ultraviolet cutting technology in one instrument, using a proteomic downstream assay as a model.

  11. Recent investigations on electronic capture in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivarola, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, electron capture processes in ion-atom collisions at various impact energy ranges are dicussed: i) intermediate non-relativistic energy; ii) high energy; iii) high relativistic energy. Much attention is given to the development and use of distorted wave models. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. Capture into resonance and phase space dynamics in optical centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armon, Tsafrir; Friedland, Lazar

    2016-05-01

    The process of capture of a molecular enesemble into rotational resonance in the optical centrifuge is investigated. The adiabaticity and phase space incompressibility are used to find the resonant capture probability in terms of two dimensionless parameters P1 , 2 characterising the driving strength and the nonlinearity, and related to three characteristic time scales in the problem. The analysis is based on the transformation to action-angle variables and the single resonance approximation, yielding reduction of the three-dimensional rotation problem to one degree of freedom. The analytic results for capture probability are in a good agreement with simulations. The existing experiments satisfy the validity conditions of the theory. This work was supported by the Israel Science Foundation Grant 30/14.

  13. Single-electron capture in low-energy Ar6+-He collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akguengoer, K.; Kamber, E.Y.; Ferguson, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Double differential cross sections for state-selective single-electron capture processes in Ar 6+ -He collisions have been measured at laboratory energies between 75 and 900 eV and scattering angles between 0 and 8 . At the lowest energy, the zero-angle spectrum shows capture into Ar 5+ (4p) to be the most important channel. However, as the scattering angle is increased, a second peak appears at angles ≥2 and becomes more pronounced relative to the 4p capture channel. The energy spectra are interpreted qualitatively in terms of the reaction windows, which are calculated using the single-crossing Landau-Zener model. Total and differential cross sections are also measured and compared with available measurements and calculations. (orig.)

  14. Radiative bound-state formation in unbroken perturbative non-Abelian theories and implications for dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Harz, Julia; Petraki, Kalliopi

    2018-01-01

    We compute the cross-sections for the radiative capture of non-relativistic particles into bound states, in unbroken perturbative non-Abelian theories. We find that the formation of bound states via emission of a gauge boson can be significant for a variety of dark matter models that feature non-Abelian long-range interactions, including multi-TeV scale WIMPs and dark matter co-annihilating with coloured partners. Our results disagree with previous computations, on the relative sign of the Ab...

  15. The problem of latent attentional capture: Easy visual search conceals capture by task-irrelevant abrupt onsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspelin, Nicholas; Ruthruff, Eric; Lien, Mei-Ching

    2016-08-01

    Researchers are sharply divided regarding whether irrelevant abrupt onsets capture spatial attention. Numerous studies report that they do and a roughly equal number report that they do not. This puzzle has inspired numerous attempts at reconciliation, none gaining general acceptance. The authors propose that abrupt onsets routinely capture attention, but the size of observed capture effects depends critically on how long attention dwells on distractor items which, in turn, depends critically on search difficulty. In a series of spatial cuing experiments, the authors show that irrelevant abrupt onsets produce robust capture effects when visual search is difficult, but not when search is easy. Critically, this effect occurs even when search difficulty varies randomly across trials, preventing any strategic adjustments of the attentional set that could modulate probability of capture by the onset cue. The authors argue that easy visual search provides an insensitive test for stimulus-driven capture by abrupt onsets: even though onsets truly capture attention, the effects of capture can be latent. This observation helps to explain previous failures to find capture by onsets, nearly all of which used an easy visual search. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Carbon Capture and Utilization in the Industrial Sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarras, Peter C; Comello, Stephen; Bains, Praveen; Charoensawadpong, Panunya; Reichelstein, Stefan; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2017-10-03

    The fabrication and manufacturing processes of industrial commodities such as iron, glass, and cement are carbon-intensive, accounting for 23% of global CO 2 emissions. As a climate mitigation strategy, CO 2 capture from flue gases of industrial processes-much like that of the power sector-has not experienced wide adoption given its high associated costs. However, some industrial processes with relatively high CO 2 flue concentration may be viable candidates to cost-competitively supply CO 2 for utilization purposes (e.g., polymer manufacturing, etc.). This work develops a methodology that determines the levelized cost ($/tCO 2 ) of separating, compressing, and transporting carbon dioxide. A top-down model determines the cost of separating and compressing CO 2 across 18 industrial processes. Further, the study calculates the cost of transporting CO 2 via pipeline and tanker truck to appropriately paired sinks using a bottom-up cost model and geo-referencing approach. The results show that truck transportation is generally the low-cost alternative given the relatively small volumes (ca. 100 kt CO 2 /a). We apply our methodology to a regional case study in Pennsylvania, which shows steel and cement manufacturing paired to suitable sinks as having the lowest levelized cost of capture, compression, and transportation.

  17. Study on keV-neutron capture cross sections and capture γ-ray spectra of 117,119Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, J.; Igashira, M.; Ohsaki, T.; Kim, G.N.; Chung, W.C.; Ro, T.I.

    2006-01-01

    The capture cross sections and capture γ-ray spectra of 117,119 Sn were measured in an incident neutron energy region from 10 to 100 keV and at 570 keV, using a 1.5-ns pulsed neutron source by the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction and a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) γ-ray spectrometer. A pulse-height weighting technique was applied to observed capture γ-ray pulse-height spectra to derive capture yields. The capture cross sections of 117,119 Sn were obtained with the error of about 5% by using the standard capture cross sections of 197 Au. The present cross sections were compared with previous experimental data and the evaluated values in JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI. The capture γ-ray spectra of 117,119 Sn were derived by unfolding the observed capture γ-ray pulse-height spectra. The calculations of capture cross sections and capture γ-ray spectra of 117,119 Sn were performed with the EMPIRE-II code. The calculated results were compared with the present experimental ones. (author)

  18. Technical and Energy Performance of an Advanced, Aqueous Ammonia-Based CO2 Capture Technology for a 500 MW Coal-Fired Power Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangkang; Yu, Hai; Feron, Paul; Tade, Moses; Wardhaugh, Leigh

    2015-08-18

    Using a rate-based model, we assessed the technical feasibility and energy performance of an advanced aqueous-ammonia-based postcombustion capture process integrated with a coal-fired power station. The capture process consists of three identical process trains in parallel, each containing a CO2 capture unit, an NH3 recycling unit, a water separation unit, and a CO2 compressor. A sensitivity study of important parameters, such as NH3 concentration, lean CO2 loading, and stripper pressure, was performed to minimize the energy consumption involved in the CO2 capture process. Process modifications of the rich-split process and the interheating process were investigated to further reduce the solvent regeneration energy. The integrated capture system was then evaluated in terms of the mass balance and the energy consumption of each unit. The results show that our advanced ammonia process is technically feasible and energy-competitive, with a low net power-plant efficiency penalty of 7.7%.

  19. Capturing a Commander's decision making style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eugene; Nguyen, Hien; Russell, Jacob; Kim, Keumjoo; Veenhuis, Luke; Boparai, Ramnjit; Stautland, Thomas Kristoffer

    2017-05-01

    A Commander's decision making style represents how he weighs his choices and evaluates possible solutions with regards to his goals. Specifically, in the naval warfare domain, it relates the way he processes a large amount of information in dynamic, uncertain environments, allocates resources, and chooses appropriate actions to pursue. In this paper, we describe an approach to capture a Commander's decision style by creating a cognitive model that captures his decisionmaking process and evaluate this model using a set of scenarios using an online naval warfare simulation game. In this model, we use the Commander's past behaviors and generalize Commander's actions across multiple problems and multiple decision making sequences in order to recommend actions to a Commander in a manner that he may have taken. Our approach builds upon the Double Transition Model to represent the Commander's focus and beliefs to estimate his cognitive state. Each cognitive state reflects a stage in a Commander's decision making process, each action reflects the tasks that he has taken to move himself closer to a final decision, and the reward reflects how close he is to achieving his goal. We then use inverse reinforcement learning to compute a reward for each of the Commander's actions. These rewards and cognitive states are used to compare between different styles of decision making. We construct a set of scenarios in the game where rational, intuitive and spontaneous decision making styles will be evaluated.

  20. Molecular treatment of single (dissociative and nondissociative) and double electron capture in He2+ + H2 collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L F; Macias, A; Mendez, L; Pons, B; Riera, A

    2003-01-01

    We present close-coupling calculations of total cross sections for single and double electron capture in He 2+ + H 2 collisions in the range 0.5- 25 keV amu -1 , and compare them with experimental data. We confirm the experimental finding that the dominant process for E ∼> 3 keV amu -1 is the nondissociative capture He 2+ + H 2 → He + (2l) + H 2 + (1σ g ), while at lower energies it is dissociative capture leading to He + (1s) + H + + H. Our calculations also show that He(1s2l) is the main output of the two electron capture process. (letter to the editor)

  1. Constraining Asymmetric Dark Matter through observations of compact stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouvaris, Christoforos; Tinyakov, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We put constraints on asymmetric dark matter candidates with spin-dependent interactions based on the simple existence of white dwarfs and neutron stars in globular clusters. For a wide range of the parameters (WIMP mass and WIMP-nucleon cross section), WIMPs can be trapped in progenitors in large...... numbers and once the original star collapses to a white dwarf or a neutron star, these WIMPs might self-gravitate and eventually collapse forming a mini-black hole that eventually destroys the star. We impose constraints competitive to direct dark matter search experiments, for WIMPs with masses down...

  2. The Calcium-Looping technology for CO_2 capture: On the important roles of energy integration and sorbent behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perejón, Antonio; Romeo, Luis M.; Lara, Yolanda; Lisbona, Pilar; Martínez, Ana; Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The Calcium Looping (CaL) technology is a potentially low cost and highly efficient postcombustion CO_2 capture technology. • Energy integration and sorbent behavior play a relevant role on the process. • The industrial competitiveness of the process depends critically on the minimization of energy penalties. • It may be used in precombustion capture systems and other industrial processes such as cement production. • Sorbent deactivation must be assessed under realistic conditions involving high CO_2 concentration in the calciner. - Abstract: The Calcium Looping (CaL) technology, based on the multicyclic carbonation/calcination of CaO in gas–solid fluidized bed reactors at high temperature, has emerged in the last years as a potentially low cost technology for CO_2 capture. In this manuscript a critical review is made on the important roles of energy integration and sorbent behavior in the process efficiency. Firstly, the strategies proposed to reduce the energy demand by internal integration are discussed as well as process modifications aimed at optimizing the overall efficiency by means of external integration. The most important benefit of the high temperature CaL cycles is the possibility of using high temperature streams that could reduce significantly the energy penalty associated to CO_2 capture. The application of the CaL technology in precombustion capture systems and energy integration, and the coupling of the CaL technology with other industrial processes are also described. In particular, the CaL technology has a significant potential to be a feasible CO_2 capture system for cement plants. A precise knowledge of the multicyclic CO_2 capture behavior of the sorbent at the CaL conditions to be expected in practice is of great relevance in order to predict a realistic capture efficiency and energy penalty from process simulations. The second part of this manuscript will be devoted to this issue. Particular emphasis is put on the

  3. Contingent capture of involuntary visual attention interferes with detection of auditory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamke, Marc R; Harris, Jill

    2014-01-01

    The involuntary capture of attention by salient visual stimuli can be influenced by the behavioral goals of an observer. For example, when searching for a target item, irrelevant items that possess the target-defining characteristic capture attention more strongly than items not possessing that feature. Such contingent capture involves a shift of spatial attention toward the item with the target-defining characteristic. It is not clear, however, if the associated decrements in performance for detecting the target item are entirely due to involuntary orienting of spatial attention. To investigate whether contingent capture also involves a non-spatial interference, adult observers were presented with streams of visual and auditory stimuli and were tasked with simultaneously monitoring for targets in each modality. Visual and auditory targets could be preceded by a lateralized visual distractor that either did, or did not, possess the target-defining feature (a specific color). In agreement with the contingent capture hypothesis, target-colored distractors interfered with visual detection performance (response time and accuracy) more than distractors that did not possess the target color. Importantly, the same pattern of results was obtained for the auditory task: visual target-colored distractors interfered with sound detection. The decrement in auditory performance following a target-colored distractor suggests that contingent capture involves a source of processing interference in addition to that caused by a spatial shift of attention. Specifically, we argue that distractors possessing the target-defining characteristic enter a capacity-limited, serial stage of neural processing, which delays detection of subsequently presented stimuli regardless of the sensory modality.

  4. Contingent capture of involuntary visual attention interferes with detection of auditory stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc R. Kamke

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The involuntary capture of attention by salient visual stimuli can be influenced by the behavioral goals of an observer. For example, when searching for a target item, irrelevant items that possess the target-defining characteristic capture attention more strongly than items not possessing that feature. Such contingent capture involves a shift of spatial attention toward the item with the target-defining characteristic. It is not clear, however, if the associated decrements in performance for detecting the target item are entirely due to involuntary orienting of spatial attention. To investigate whether contingent capture also involves a non-spatial interference, adult observers were presented with streams of visual and auditory stimuli and were tasked with simultaneously monitoring for targets in each modality. Visual and auditory targets could be preceded by a lateralized visual distractor that either did, or did not, possess the target-defining feature (a specific color. In agreement with the contingent capture hypothesis, target-colored distractors interfered with visual detection performance (response time and accuracy more than distractors that did not possess the target color. Importantly, the same pattern of results was obtained for the auditory task: visual target-colored distractors interfered with sound detection. The decrement in auditory performance following a target-colored distractor suggests that contingent capture involves a source of processing interference in addition to that caused by a spatial shift of attention. Specifically, we argue that distractors possessing the target-defining characteristic enter a capacity-limited, serial stage of neural processing, which delays detection of subsequently presented stimuli regardless of the sensory modality.

  5. Impaired contingent attentional capture predicts reduced working memory capacity in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta S Mayer

    Full Text Available Although impairments in working memory (WM are well documented in schizophrenia, the specific factors that cause these deficits are poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesized that a heightened susceptibility to attentional capture at an early stage of visual processing would result in working memory encoding problems. 30 patients with schizophrenia and 28 demographically matched healthy participants were presented with a search array and asked to report the orientation of the target stimulus. In some of the trials, a flanker stimulus preceded the search array that either matched the color of the target (relevant-flanker capture or appeared in a different color (irrelevant-flanker capture. Working memory capacity was determined in each individual using the visual change detection paradigm. Patients needed considerably more time to find the target in the no-flanker condition. After adjusting the individual exposure time, both groups showed equivalent capture costs in the irrelevant-flanker condition. However, in the relevant-flanker condition, capture costs were increased in patients compared to controls when the stimulus onset asynchrony between the flanker and the search array was high. Moreover, the increase in relevant capture costs correlated negatively with working memory capacity. This study demonstrates preserved stimulus-driven attentional capture but impaired contingent attentional capture associated with low working memory capacity in schizophrenia. These findings suggest a selective impairment of top-down attentional control in schizophrenia, which may impair working memory encoding.

  6. Impaired contingent attentional capture predicts reduced working memory capacity in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jutta S; Fukuda, Keisuke; Vogel, Edward K; Park, Sohee

    2012-01-01

    Although impairments in working memory (WM) are well documented in schizophrenia, the specific factors that cause these deficits are poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesized that a heightened susceptibility to attentional capture at an early stage of visual processing would result in working memory encoding problems. 30 patients with schizophrenia and 28 demographically matched healthy participants were presented with a search array and asked to report the orientation of the target stimulus. In some of the trials, a flanker stimulus preceded the search array that either matched the color of the target (relevant-flanker capture) or appeared in a different color (irrelevant-flanker capture). Working memory capacity was determined in each individual using the visual change detection paradigm. Patients needed considerably more time to find the target in the no-flanker condition. After adjusting the individual exposure time, both groups showed equivalent capture costs in the irrelevant-flanker condition. However, in the relevant-flanker condition, capture costs were increased in patients compared to controls when the stimulus onset asynchrony between the flanker and the search array was high. Moreover, the increase in relevant capture costs correlated negatively with working memory capacity. This study demonstrates preserved stimulus-driven attentional capture but impaired contingent attentional capture associated with low working memory capacity in schizophrenia. These findings suggest a selective impairment of top-down attentional control in schizophrenia, which may impair working memory encoding.

  7. Multi-fuel multi-product operation of IGCC power plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormos, Ana-Maria; Dinca, Cristian; Cormos, Calin-Cristian

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates multi-fuel multi-product operation of IGCC plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The investigated plant designs co-process coal with different sorts of biomass (e.g. sawdust) and solid wastes, through gasification, leading to different decarbonised energy vectors (power, hydrogen, heat, substitute natural gas etc.) simultaneous with carbon capture. Co-gasification of coal with different renewable energy sources coupled with carbon capture will pave the way towards zero emissions power plants. The energy conversions investigated in the paper were simulated using commercial process flow modelling package (ChemCAD) in order to produce mass and energy balances necessary for the proposed evaluation. As illustrative cases, hydrogen and power co-generation and Fischer–Tropsch fuel synthesis (both with carbon capture), were presented. The case studies investigated in the paper produce a flexible ratio between power and hydrogen (in the range of 400–600 MW net electricity and 0–200 MW th hydrogen considering the lower heating value) with at least 90% carbon capture rate. Special emphasis were given to fuel selection criteria for optimisation of gasification performances (fuel blending), to the selection criteria for gasification reactor in a multi-fuel multi-product operation scenario, modelling and simulation of whole process, to thermal and power integration of processes, flexibility analysis of the energy conversion processes, in-depth techno-economic and environmental assessment etc. - Highlights: • Assessment of IGCC-based energy vectors poly-generation systems with CCS. • Optimisation of gasification performances and CO 2 emissions by fuel blending. • Multi-fuel multi-product operation of gasification plants

  8. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...

  9. Marker-Free Human Motion Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grest, Daniel

    Human Motion Capture is a widely used technique to obtain motion data for animation of virtual characters. Commercial optical motion capture systems are marker-based. This book is about marker-free motion capture and its possibilities to acquire motion from a single viewing direction. The focus...

  10. Commercial Capabilities and Entrepreneurial Value Capturing in Dynamic Maritime Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sløk-Madsen, Stefan Kirkegaard

    This paper develops and tests a theory of entrepreneurial value capturing in maritime markets. The framework is argued to be applicable in all maritime fields and other fields with similar attributes but is specifically tested on Oil Service companies operating in the North Sea region...... market process view; building on Kirznerian alertness, Hayekian capital heterogeneity, and Knightian uncertainty. The theory helps explain value capturing from a firm perspective but also subsequent new firm creation or value loss. The model is tested and relevant managerial implications, as well...

  11. A two-magnet strategy for improved mixing and capture from biofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Andrew B.; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic beads are a popular method for concentrating biomolecules from solution and have been more recently used in multistep pre-arrayed microfluidic cartridges. Typical processing strategies rely on a single magnet, resulting in a tight cluster of beads and requiring long incubation times to achieve high capture efficiencies, especially in highly viscous patient samples. This report describes a two-magnet strategy to improve the interaction of the bead surface with the surrounding fluid inside of a pre-arrayed, self-contained assay-in-a-tube. In the two-magnet system, target biomarker capture occurs at a rate three times faster than the single-magnet system. In clinically relevant biomatrices, we find a 2.5-fold improvement in biomarker capture at lower sample viscosities with the two-magnet system. In addition, we observe a 20% increase in the amount of protein captured at high viscosity for the two-magnet configuration relative to the single magnet approach. The two-magnet approach offers a means to achieve higher biomolecule extraction yields and shorter assay times in magnetic capture assays and in self-contained processor designs. PMID:27158286

  12. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...

  13. Highly Surface-Active Ca(OH)2 Monolayer as a CO2 Capture Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özçelik, V Ongun; Gong, Kai; White, Claire E

    2018-03-14

    Greenhouse gas emissions originating from fossil fuel combustion contribute significantly to global warming, and therefore the design of novel materials that efficiently capture CO 2 can play a crucial role in solving this challenge. Here, we show that reducing the dimensionality of bulk crystalline portlandite results in a stable monolayer material, named portlandene, that is highly effective at capturing CO 2 . On the basis of theoretical analysis comprised of ab initio quantum mechanical calculations and force-field molecular dynamics simulations, we show that this single-layer phase is robust and maintains its stability even at high temperatures. The chemical activity of portlandene is seen to further increase upon defect engineering of its surface using vacancy sites. Defect-containing portlandene is capable of separating CO and CO 2 from a syngas (CO/CO 2 /H 2 ) stream, yet is inert to water vapor. This selective behavior and the associated mechanisms have been elucidated by examining the electronic structure, local charge distribution, and bonding orbitals of portlandene. Additionally, unlike conventional CO 2 capturing technologies, the regeneration process of portlandene does not require high temperature heat treatment because it can release the captured CO 2 by application of a mild external electric field, making portlandene an ideal CO 2 capturing material for both pre- and postcombustion processes.

  14. Quality and noise measurements in mobile phone video capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Doina; Pincenti, John

    2011-02-01

    The quality of videos captured with mobile phones has become increasingly important particularly since resolutions and formats have reached a level that rivals the capabilities available in the digital camcorder market, and since many mobile phones now allow direct playback on large HDTVs. The video quality is determined by the combined quality of the individual parts of the imaging system including the image sensor, the digital color processing, and the video compression, each of which has been studied independently. In this work, we study the combined effect of these elements on the overall video quality. We do this by evaluating the capture under various lighting, color processing, and video compression conditions. First, we measure full reference quality metrics between encoder input and the reconstructed sequence, where the encoder input changes with light and color processing modifications. Second, we introduce a system model which includes all elements that affect video quality, including a low light additive noise model, ISP color processing, as well as the video encoder. Our experiments show that in low light conditions and for certain choices of color processing the system level visual quality may not improve when the encoder becomes more capable or the compression ratio is reduced.

  15. Electron capture in collisions of S4+ with helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.G.; Stancil, P.C.; Turner, A.R.; Cooper, D.L.; Schultz, D.R.; Rakovic, M.J.; Fritsch, W.; Zygelman, B.

    2002-01-01

    Charge transfer due to collisions of ground-state S 4+ (3s 2 1 S) ions with helium is investigated for energies between 0.1 meV u -1 and 10 MeV u -1 . Total and state-selective single electron capture (SEC) cross sections and rate coefficients are obtained utilizing the quantum mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC), atomic-orbital close-coupling (AOCC), classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and continuum distorted wave methods. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Previous data are limited to a calculation of the total SEC rate coefficient using the Landau-Zener model that is, in comparison to the results presented here, three orders of magnitude smaller. The MOCC SEC cross sections at low energy reveal a multichannel interference effect. True double capture is also investigated with the AOCC and CTMC approaches while autoionizing double capture and transfer ionization (TI) is explored with CTMC. SEC is found to be the dominant process except for E>200 keV u -1 when TI becomes the primary capture channel. Astrophysical implications are briefly discussed. (author)

  16. Electron capture in collisions of S4+ with helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.; Turner, A. R.; Cooper, D. L.; Schultz, D. R.; Rakovic, M. J.; Fritsch, W.; Stancil, P. C.; Zygelman, B.

    2002-07-01

    Charge transfer due to collisions of ground-state S4+(3s2 1S) ions with helium is investigated for energies between 0.1 meV u-1 and 10 MeV u-1. Total and state-selective single electron capture (SEC) cross sections and rate coefficients are obtained utilizing the quantum mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC), atomic-orbital close-coupling (AOCC), classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and continuum distorted wave methods. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Previous data are limited to a calculation of the total SEC rate coefficient using the Landau-Zener model that is, in comparison to the results presented here, three orders of magnitude smaller. The MOCC SEC cross sections at low energy reveal a multichannel interference effect. True double capture is also investigated with the AOCC and CTMC approaches while autoionizing double capture and transfer ionization (TI) is explored with CTMC. SEC is found to be the dominant process except for E>200 keV u-1 when TI becomes the primary capture channel. Astrophysical implications are briefly discussed.

  17. Pre-Combustion Capture of CO2 in IGCC Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-12-15

    Pre-combustion capture involves reacting a fuel with oxygen or air and/or steam to give mainly a 'synthesis gas (syngas)' or 'fuel gas' composed of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The carbon monoxide is reacted with steam in a catalytic reactor, called a shift converter, to produce CO2 and more hydrogen. CO2 is then separated, usually by a physical or chemical absorption process, resulting in a hydrogen-rich fuel which can be used in many applications, such as boilers, furnaces, gas turbines, engines and fuel cells. Pre-combustion capture is suitable for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants especially since the CO2 partial pressures in the fuel gas are higher than in the flue gas. After the introduction there follows a short discussion of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. This is followed by chapters on the means of CO2 capture by physical and chemical solvents, solid sorbents, and membranes. The results and conclusions of techno-economic studies are introduced followed by a look at some of the pilot and demonstration plants relevant to pre-combustion capture in IGCC plants.

  18. Measurements of Pair Production and Electron Capture from the Continuum in Heavy Particle Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Large transient Coulomb fields, which are generated in collisions of high-Z systems at sufficiently high energies, lead to copious production of electron-positron pairs. It has been suggested that these lepton pairs might mask signals arising from plasma phase interaction. Pair-production cross sections have been calculated by several authors with results which differ significantly from each other. Some of the electrons produced may be captured into bound states of the ion, thereby, reducing its charge state by one unit. This process which has been termed ``Electron Capture from Pair Production``, represents the only electron capture pro which increases with energy, and as such, will dominate all others in the ultrarelativistic energy regime. Ions having undergone this process would be lost from storage-type accelerators. The absolute cross sections for capture have been calculated with results which differ by as much as an order of magnitude. If as large as some of the calculations predict, Relativistic Heav...

  19. CO{sub 2} Capture by Sub-ambient Membrane Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, S.; Hasse, D.; Sanders, E.; Chaubey, T.

    2012-11-30

    The main objective of the project was to develop a CO{sub 2} capture process based on sub-ambient temperature operation of a hollow fiber membrane. The program aims to reach the eventual DOE program goal of > 90% CO{sub 2} capture from existing PC fired power plants with < 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project involves closed-loop testing of commercial fiber bundles under simulated process conditions to test the mechanical integrity and operability of membrane module structural component under sub ambient temperature. A commercial MEDAL 12” bundle exhibited excellent mechanical integrity for 2 months. However, selectivity was ~25% lower than expected at sub-ambient conditions. This could be attributed to a small feed to permeate leak or bundle non-ideality. To investigate further, and due to compressor flow limitations, the 12” bundle was replaced with a 6” bundle to conduct tests with lower permeate/feed ratios, as originally planned. The commercial 6” bundle was used for both parametric testing as well as long-term stability testing at sub-ambient conditions. Parametric studies were carried out both near the start and end of the long-term test. The parametric studies characterized membrane performance over a broad range of feed conditions: temperature (-25°C to -45°C), pressure (160 psig to 200 psig), and CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18% to 12%). Performance of the membrane bundle was markedly better at lower temperature (-45ºC), higher pressure (200 psig) and higher CO{sub 2} feed concentration (18%). The long-term test was conducted at these experimentally determined “optimum” feed conditions. Membrane performance was stable over 8 months at sub-ambient temperature operation. The experimentally measured high performance of the membrane bundle at sub-ambient operating conditions provides justification for interest in sub-ambient membrane processing of flue gas. In a parallel activity, the impact of contaminants (100 ppm SOx and NOx

  20. Flexible dynamic operation of solar-integrated power plant with solvent based post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, Abdul; Sharma, Manish; Parvareh, Forough; Khalilpour, Rajab; Abbas, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Flexible operation of power and PCC plant may significantly increase operational revenue. • Higher optimal carbon capture rates observed with solar thermal energy input. • Solar thermal repowering of the power plant provides highest net revenue. • Constant optimal capture rate observed for one of the flexible operation cases. • Up to 42% higher revenue generation observed between two cases with solar input. - Abstract: This paper examines flexible operation of solvent-based post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) for the reduction of power plant carbon emissions while minimizing revenue loss due to the reduced power plant electricity output. The study is conducted using a model superstructure enveloping three plants; a power plant, a PCC plant and a solar thermal field where the power plant and PCC plant are operated flexibly under the influence of hourly electricity market and weather conditions. Reduced (surrogate) models for the reboiler duty and auxiliary power requirement for the carbon capture plant are generated and applied to simulate and compare four cases, (A) power plant with PCC, (B) power plant with solar assisted PCC, (C) power plant with PCC and solar repowering – variable net electricity output and (D) power plant with PCC and solar repowering – fixed net electricity output. Such analyses are conducted under dynamic conditions including power plant part-load operation while varying the capture rate to optimize the revenue of the power plant. Each case was simulated with a lower carbon price of $25/tonne-CO 2 and a higher price of $50/tonne-CO 2 . The comparison of cases B–D found that optimal revenue generation for case C can be up to 42% higher than that of solar-assisted PCC (case B). Case C is found to be the most profitable with the lowest carbon emissions intensity and is found to exhibit a constant capture rate for both carbon prices. The optimal revenue for case D is slightly lower than case C for the lower carbon

  1. Client/server approach to image capturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris; Stokes, Earle

    1998-01-01

    The diversity of the digital image capturing devices on the market today is quite astonishing and ranges from low-cost CCD scanners to digital cameras (for both action and stand-still scenes), mid-end CCD scanners for desktop publishing and pre- press applications and high-end CCD flatbed scanners and drum- scanners with photo multiplier technology. Each device and market segment has its own specific needs which explains the diversity of the associated scanner applications. What all those applications have in common is the need to communicate with a particular device to import the digital images; after the import, additional image processing might be needed as well as color management operations. Although the specific requirements for all of these applications might differ considerably, a number of image capturing and color management facilities as well as other services are needed which can be shared. In this paper, we propose a client/server architecture for scanning and image editing applications which can be used as a common component for all these applications. One of the principal components of the scan server is the input capturing module. The specification of the input jobs is based on a generic input device model. Through this model we make abstraction of the specific scanner parameters and define the scan job definitions by a number of absolute parameters. As a result, scan job definitions will be less dependent on a particular scanner and have a more universal meaning. In this context, we also elaborate on the interaction of the generic parameters and the color characterization (i.e., the ICC profile). Other topics that are covered are the scheduling and parallel processing capabilities of the server, the image processing facilities, the interaction with the ICC engine, the communication facilities (both in-memory and over the network) and the different client architectures (stand-alone applications, TWAIN servers, plug-ins, OLE or Apple-event driven

  2. Resource capture by single leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, S.P.

    1992-05-01

    Leaves show a variety of strategies for maximizing CO{sub 2} and light capture. These are more meaningfully explained if they are considered in the context of maximizing capture relative to the utilization of water, nutrients and carbohydrates reserves. There is considerable variation between crops in their efficiency of CO{sub 2} and light capture at the leaf level. Understanding of these mechanisms indicate some ways in which efficiency of resource capture could be level cannot be meaningfully considered without simultaneous understanding of implications at the canopy level. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Borophene as a Promising Material for Charge-Modulated Switchable CO2 Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2017-06-14

    Ideal carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture materials for practical applications should bind CO 2 molecules neither too weakly to limit good loading kinetics nor too strongly to limit facile release. Although charge-modulated switchable CO 2 capture has been proposed to be a controllable, highly selective, and reversible CO 2 capture strategy, the development of a practical gas-adsorbent material remains a great challenge. In this study, by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have examined the possibility of conductive borophene nanosheets as promising sorbent materials for charge-modulated switchable CO 2 capture. Our results reveal that the binding strength of CO 2 molecules on negatively charged borophene can be significantly enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO 2 capture coverage, the negatively charged borophene achieves CO 2 capture capacities up to 6.73 × 10 14 cm -2 . In contrast to the other CO 2 capture methods, the CO 2 capture/release processes on negatively charged borophene are reversible with fast kinetics and can be easily controlled via switching on/off the charges carried by borophene nanosheets. Moreover, these negatively charged borophene nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO 2 from mixtures with CH 4 , H 2 , and/or N 2 . This theoretical exploration will provide helpful guidance for identifying experimentally feasible, controllable, highly selective, and high-capacity CO 2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility.

  4. Measurement and Modelling of the Piperazine Potassium Carbonate Solutions for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj; Waseem Arshad, Muhammad

    The climate is in a critical state due to the impact of pollution by CO2 and similar greenhouse gasses. Action needs to be taken in order reduce the emission of harmful components. CO2 capture is one process to help the world population back on track in order to return to normal condition...... with the purpose of simulating the CO2 capture process. This involves equilibrium studies on physical properties in the activated carbonate solvent. Energy consumption while applying the promoted carbonate solutions using piperazine is given in overview....

  5. New Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections for 35,37Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guber, K.H.; Sayer, R.O.; Valentine, T.E.; Leal, L.C.; Spencer, R.R.; Harvey, J.A.; Koehler, P.E.; Rauscher, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) was used to measure neutron total and capture cross sections of natural chlorine in the energy range from 100 eV to 600 keV. We performed an R-matrix analysis of our new capture and transmission data up to 500 keV. From these resonance parameters new (n,γ) astrophysical reaction rates were determined over the entire energy range needed by the latest stellar models of the s process

  6. Opportunities for early Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Storage development in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, D. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    The outline of the presentation shows the following elements: China CCUS (Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Storage) policy, strategy and development status; International developments in CCUS; High-purity CO2 sources and potential EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) locations in China; Capture routes: (a) Separation technologies/processes, (b) CO2 purity specifications, compression and after treatment, (c) CO2 transportation options, (d) Associated Cost; Potential cost-effective full-chain CCUS projects in Shaanxi; Barriers to CCUS development in Shaanxi; and Conclusions.

  7. Differential cross sections for single-electron capture in He{sup 2+}-D collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Dagnac, R. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 31 - Toulouse (France)]|[Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)

    1995-06-14

    A translational energy spectroscopy technique was used to study single-electron capture into the He{sup +} (n = 2) and He{sup +} (n 3) states in He{sup 2+}-D collisions. Differential cross sections were determined at 4, 6 and 8 keV in the angular range 5`-1{sup o}30` (laboratory frame). As expected, single-electron capture into the n = 2 state was found to be the dominant process; total cross sections for capture into the He{sup +} (n = 3) state were compared to other experimental and theoretical results. (author).

  8. Measurement of keV-neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra of Er isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harun-Ar-Rashid, A.K.M.; Igashira, Masayuki; Ohsaki, Toshiro

    2000-01-01

    Neutron capture cross sections and capture γ-ray spectra of 166,167, 168 Er were measured in the energy region of 10 to 550 keV. The measurements were performed with a pulsed 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be neutron source and a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) γ-ray spectrometer. A pulse-height weighting technique and the standard capture cross sections of gold were used to derive the capture cross sections. The errors of the derived cross sections were about 5%. The present results were compared with other measurements and evaluations. The observed capture γ-ray pulse-height spectra were unfolded to obtain the corresponding γ-ray spectra. An anomalous shoulder was observed around 3 MeV in each of the capture γ-ray spectra. (author)

  9. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palffy, Adriana; Scheid, Werner; Harman, Zoltan

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC), in which a continuum electron is captured into a bound state of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. In order to derive the cross section a Feshbach projection operator formalism is introduced. Nuclear states and transitions are described by a nuclear collective model and making use of experimental data. Transition rates and total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are calculated for various heavy-ion collision systems

  10. Novel CO{sub 2} capture. Final CRADA Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2009-11-30

    The goal of this work was to use electrochemically driven pH control to develop a second generation, enzyme-based contained liquid membrane (CLM) permeator to extract CO{sub 2} from a variety of coal-based flue gas streams more efficiently than does the CLM current design, while achieving performance coincident with DOE targets of less than 45% Cost of electricity (COE) in 2007 and less than 20% COE in 2012. Central to this goal the CLM would be alkaline (>pH 8) at the feed gas side and acid (capture and release using Argonne's resin-wafer electrode ionization (RW-EDI) system integrated with Carbozyme's carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme. Argonne developed RW-EDI for pH controlled desalination of process streams (e.g. Patents 7,452,920 & 7,306,934). In the current work, Argonne captured CO{sub 2} as HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and released it as CO{sub 2}. The goal is to both capture CO{sub 2} from a simulated flue gas stream and release it within the DOE targets for increase in COE. Initial performance results indicate that the 2012 COE targets are achievable with the developed technology. The design is subject to patent-hold. This task was funded in an exploratory phase, so no process optimization was attempted. Argonne believes that with optimization this performance could be significantly improved.

  11. Biochar and enhanced phosphate capture: Mapping mechanisms to functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jessica G; Joseph, Stephen; Sohi, Saran P; Heal, Kate V

    2017-07-01

    A multi-technique analysis was performed on a range of biochar materials derived from secondary organic resources and aimed at sustainable recovery and re-use of wastewater phosphorus (P). Our purpose was to identify mechanisms of P capture in biochar and thereby inform its future optimisation as a sustainable P fertiliser. The biochar feedstock comprised pellets of anaerobically digested sewage sludge (PAD) or pellets of the same blended in the ratio 9:1 with ochre sourced from minewater treatment (POCAD), components which have limited alternative economic value. In the present study the feedstocks were pyrolysed at two highest treatment temperatures of 450 and 550 °C. Each of the resulting biochars were repeatedly exposed to a 20 mg l -1 PO 4 -P solution, to produce a parallel set of P-exposed biochars. Biochar exterior and/or interior surfaces were quantitatively characterised using laser-ablation (LA)-ICP-MS, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray. The results highlighted the general importance of Fe minerals in P capture. XPS analysis of POCAD550 indicated lower oxidation state Fe2p3 bonding compared to POCAD450, and LA-ICP-MS indicated stronger covariation of Fe and S, even after P exposure. This suggests that low-solubility Fe/S compounds are formed during pyrolysis, are affected by process parameters and impact on P capture. Other data suggested capture roles for aluminium, calcium and silicon. Overall, our analyses suggest that a range of mechanisms for P capture are concurrently active in biochar. We highlighted the potential to manipulate these through choice of form and composition of feedstock as well as pyrolysis processing, so that biochar may be increasingly tailored towards specific functionality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

    2004-09-30

    This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems

  13. Techniques for capturing bighorn sheep lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua B.; Walsh, Daniel P.; Goldstein, Elise J.; Parsons, Zachary D.; Karsch, Rebekah C.; Stiver, Julie R.; Cain, James W.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Jenks, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Low lamb recruitment is a major challenge facing managers attempting to mitigate the decline of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), and investigations into the underlying mechanisms are limited because of the inability to readily capture and monitor bighorn sheep lambs. We evaluated 4 capture techniques for bighorn sheep lambs: 1) hand-capture of lambs from radiocollared adult females fitted with vaginal implant transmitters (VITs), 2) hand-capture of lambs of intensively monitored radiocollared adult females, 3) helicopter net-gunning, and 4) hand-capture of lambs from helicopters. During 2010–2012, we successfully captured 90% of lambs from females that retained VITs to ≤1 day of parturition, although we noted differences in capture rates between an area of high road density in the Black Hills (92–100%) of South Dakota, USA, and less accessible areas of New Mexico (71%), USA. Retention of VITs was 78% with pre-partum expulsion the main cause of failure. We were less likely to capture lambs from females that expelled VITs ≥1 day of parturition (range = 80–83%) or females that were collared without VITs (range = 60–78%). We used helicopter net-gunning at several sites in 1999, 2001–2002, and 2011, and it proved a useful technique; however, at one site, attempts to capture lambs led to lamb predation by golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos). We attempted helicopter hand-captures at one site in 1999, and they also were successful in certain circumstances and avoided risk of physical trauma from net-gunning; however, application was limited. In areas of low accessibility or if personnel lack the ability to monitor females and/or VITs for extended periods, helicopter capture may provide a viable option for lamb capture.

  14. Pre-Combustion Carbondioxide Capture in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zeki YILMAZOĞLU

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants have a significant place big proportion in the production of electric energy. Thermal power plants are the systems which converts heat energy to mechanical energy and also mechanical energy to electrical energy. Heat energy is obtained from combustion process and as a result of this, some harmful emissions, like CO2, which are the reason for global warming, are released to atmosphere. The contribution of carbondioxide to global warming has been exposed by the previous researchs. Due to this fact, clean energy technologies are growing rapidly all around the world. Coal is generally used in power plants and when compared to other fossil energy sources unit electricity production cost is less than others. When reserve rate is taken into account, coal may be converted to energy in a more efficient and cleaner way. The aim for using the clean coal technologies are to eradicate the harmful emissions of coal and to store the carbondioxide, orginated from combustion, in different forms. In line with this aim, carbondioxide may be captured by either pre-combustion, by O2/CO2 recycling combustion systems or by post combustion. The integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC are available in pre-combustion capture systems, whereas in O2/CO2 recycling combustion systems there are ultrasuper critical boiler technologies and finally flue gas washing systems by amines exists in post combustion systems. In this study, a pre-combustion CO2 capture process via oxygen blown gasifiers is compared with a conventional power plant in terms of CO2 emissions. Captured carbondioxide quantity has been presented as a result of the calculations made throughout the study.

  15. Onboard Processing on PWE OFA/WFC (Onboard Frequency Analyzer/Waveform Capture) aboard the ERG (ARASE) Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, S.; Kasahara, Y.; Kojima, H.; Kasaba, Y.; Yagitani, S.; Ozaki, M.; Imachi, T.; Ishisaka, K.; Kurita, S.; Ota, M.; Kumamoto, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshizumi, M.; Matsuoka, A.; Teramoto, M.; Shinohara, I.

    2017-12-01

    Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) is a mission for understanding particle acceleration, loss mechanisms, and the dynamic evolution of space storms in the context of cross-energy and cross-regional coupling [Miyoshi et al., 2012]. The ERG (ARASE) satellite was launched on December 20, 2016, and successfully inserted into an orbit. The Plasma Wave Experiment (PWE) is one of the science instruments on board the ERG satellite to measure electric field and magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere. PWE consists of three sub-components, EFD (Electric Field Detector), OFA/WFC (Onboard Frequency Analyzer and Waveform Capture), and HFA (High Frequency Analyzer). Especially, OFA/WFC measures electric and magnetic field spectrum and waveform from a few Hz to 20 kHz. OFA/WFC processes signals detected by a couple of dipole wire-probe antenna (WPT) and tri-axis magnetic search coils (MSC) installed onboard the satellite. The PWE-OFA subsystem calculates and produces three kind of data; OFA-SPEC (power spectrum), OFA-MATRIX (spectrum matrix), and OFA-COMPLEX (complex spectrum). They are continuously processed 24 hours per day and all data are sent to the ground. OFA-MATRIX and OFA-COMPLEX are used for polarization analyses and direction finding of the plasma waves. The PWE-WFC subsystem measures raw (64 kHz sampled) and down-sampled (1 kHz sampled) burst waveform detected by the WPT and the MSC sensors. It activates by a command, automatic triggering, and scheduling. The initial check-out process of the PWE successfully completed, and initial data has been obtained. In this presentation, we introduce onboard processing technique on PWE OFA/WFC and its initial results.

  16. Simulation of argon response and light detection in the DarkSide-50 dual phase TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Asner, D. M.; Back, H. O.; Biery, K.; Bocci, V.; Bonfini, G.; Bonivento, W.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Caravati, M.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cataudella, V.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cicalò, C.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D' Angelo, D.; D' Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; de Candia, A.; Cecco, S. De; Deo, M. De; Filippis, G. De; Vincenzi, M. De; Derbin, A. V.; Rosa, G. De; Devoto, A.; Eusanio, F. Di; Pietro, G. Di; Dionisi, C.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giagu, S.; Giganti, C.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K.; Hughes, D.; Humble, P.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, An.; James, I.; Johnson, T. N.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Loer, B.; Longo, G.; Ma, Y.; Machado, A. A.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Martoff, C. J.; Meyers, P. D.; Milincic, R.; Monte, A.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Agasson, A. Navrer; Oleinik, A.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Razeti, M.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rescigno, M.; Riffard, Q.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Sablone, D.; Sands, W.; Sanfilippo, S.; Savarese, C.; Schlitzer, B.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Singh, P. N.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Verducci, M.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xiao, X.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-10-01

    Geant4-based Monte Carlo package named G4DS has been developed to simulate the response of DarkSide-50, an experiment operating since 2013 at LNGS, designed to detect WIMP interactions in liquid argon. In the process of WIMP searches, DarkSide-50 has achieved two fundamental milestones: the rejection of electron recoil background with a power of ~10^7, using the pulse shape discrimination technique, and the measurement of the residual 39Ar contamination in underground argon, ~3 orders of magnitude lower with respect to atmospheric argon.

  17. Kajian Pendekatan Binary Log dalam Change Data Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Febrian Rachmadhan Amri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The online business era causes the form of transactions to occur so quickly that the information stored in the data warehouse becomes invalid. Companies are required to have a strong system, which is a system that is real time in order to be able to perform data loading into the media repository that resides on different hosts in the near-real time. Data Warehouse is used as a media repository of data that has the nature of subject-oriented, integrated, time-variant, and is fixed. Data Warehouse can be built into real time management with the advantages possessed and utilize Change Data Capture. Change Data Capture (CDC is a technique that can be used as problem solution to build real time data warehousing (RTDW. The binary log approach in change data capture is made to record any data manipulation activity that occurs at the OLTP level and is managed back before being stored into the Data Warehouse (loading process. This can improve the quality of data management so that the creation of the right information, because the information available is always updated. Testing shows that Binary Log approach in Change Data Capture (BinlogCDC is able to generate real time data management, valid current information, dynamic communication between systems, and data management without losing any information from data manipulation.

  18. Attentional capture under high perceptual load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosman, Joshua D; Vecera, Shaun P

    2010-12-01

    Attentional capture by abrupt onsets can be modulated by several factors, including the complexity, or perceptual load, of a scene. We have recently demonstrated that observers are less likely to be captured by abruptly appearing, task-irrelevant stimuli when they perform a search that is high, as opposed to low, in perceptual load (Cosman & Vecera, 2009), consistent with perceptual load theory. However, recent results indicate that onset frequency can influence stimulus-driven capture, with infrequent onsets capturing attention more often than did frequent onsets. Importantly, in our previous task, an abrupt onset was present on every trial, and consequently, attentional capture might have been affected by both onset frequency and perceptual load. In the present experiment, we examined whether onset frequency influences attentional capture under conditions of high perceptual load. When onsets were presented frequently, we replicated our earlier results; attentional capture by onsets was modulated under conditions of high perceptual load. Importantly, however, when onsets were presented infrequently, we observed robust capture effects. These results conflict with a strong form of load theory and, instead, suggest that exposure to the elements of a task (e.g., abrupt onsets) combines with high perceptual load to modulate attentional capture by task-irrelevant information.

  19. Probabilities and energies to obtain the counting efficiency of electron-capture nuclides, KLMN model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas Galiano, G.; Grau Malonda, A.

    1994-01-01

    An intelligent computer program has been developed to obtain the mathematical formulae to compute the probabilities and reduced energies of the different atomic rearrangement pathways following electron-capture decay. Creation and annihilation operators for Auger and X processes have been introduced. Taking into account the symmetries associated with each process, 262 different pathways were obtained. This model allows us to obtain the influence of the M-electron-capture in the counting efficiency when the atomic number of the nuclide is high

  20. Probabilities and energies to obtain the counting efficiency of electron-capture nuclides. KLMN model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiano, G.; Grau, A.

    1994-01-01

    An intelligent computer program has been developed to obtain the mathematical formulae to compute the probabilities and reduced energies of the different atomic rearrangement pathways following electron-capture decay. Creation and annihilation operators for Auger and X processes have been introduced. Taking into account the symmetries associated with each process, 262 different pathways were obtained. This model allows us to obtain the influence of the M-electro capture in the counting efficiency when the atomic number of the nuclide is high. (Author)

  1. Electron Capture Cross Sections for Stellar Nucleosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Giannaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first stage of this work, we perform detailed calculations for the cross sections of the electron capture on nuclei under laboratory conditions. Towards this aim we exploit the advantages of a refined version of the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pn-QRPA and carry out state-by-state evaluations of the rates of exclusive processes that lead to any of the accessible transitions within the chosen model space. In the second stage of our present study, we translate the abovementioned e--capture cross sections to the stellar environment ones by inserting the temperature dependence through a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution describing the stellar electron gas. As a concrete nuclear target we use the 66Zn isotope, which belongs to the iron group nuclei and plays prominent role in stellar nucleosynthesis at core collapse supernovae environment.

  2. Impurity impacts on the purification process in oxy-fuel combustion based CO2 capture and storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Yan, J.; Yan, J.; Anheden, M.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the requirements of CO 2 transportation and storage, non-condensable gases, such as O 2 , N 2 and Ar should be removed from the CO 2 -stream captured from an oxy-fuel combustion process. For a purification process, impurities have great impacts on the design, operation and optimization through their impacts on the thermodynamic properties of CO 2 -streams. Study results show that the increments of impurities will make the energy consumption of purification increase; and make CO 2 purity of separation product and CO 2 recovery rate decrease. In addition, under the same operating conditions, energy consumptions have different sensitivities to the variation of the impurity mole fraction of feed fluids. The isothermal compression work is more sensitive to the variation of SO 2 ; while the isentropic compression work is more sensitive to the variation of Ar. In the flash system, the energy consumption of condensation in is more sensitive to the variation of Ar; but in the distillation system, the energy consumption of condensation is more sensitive to the variation of SO 2 , and CO 2 purity of separation is more sensitive to the variation of SO 2 . (author)

  3. Continuous counter-current chromatography for capture and polishing steps in biopharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinebach, Fabian; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    The economic advantages of continuous processing of biopharmaceuticals, which include smaller equipment and faster, efficient processes, have increased interest in this technology over the past decade. Continuous processes can also improve quality assurance and enable greater controllability, consistent with the quality initiatives of the FDA. Here, we discuss different continuous multi-column chromatography processes. Differences in the capture and polishing steps result in two different types of continuous processes that employ counter-current column movement. Continuous-capture processes are associated with increased productivity per cycle and decreased buffer consumption, whereas the typical purity-yield trade-off of classical batch chromatography can be surmounted by continuous processes for polishing applications. In the context of continuous manufacturing, different but complementary chromatographic columns or devices are typically combined to improve overall process performance and avoid unnecessary product storage. In the following, these various processes, their performances compared with batch processing and resulting product quality are discussed based on a review of the literature. Based on various examples of applications, primarily monoclonal antibody production processes, conclusions are drawn about the future of these continuous-manufacturing technologies. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J [Wexford, PA; Pennline, Henry W [Bethel Park, PA

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  5. Role of gel dosimeters in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajeali, Azim; Farajollahi, Ali Reza; Khodadadi, Roghayeh; Kasesaz, Yaser; Khalili, Assef

    2015-01-01

    Gel dosimeters have acquired a unique status in radiotherapy, especially with the advent of the new techniques in which there is a need for three-dimensional dose measurement with high spatial resolution. One of the techniques in which the use of gel dosimeters has drawn the attention of the researchers is the boron neutron capture therapy. Exploring the history of gel dosimeters, this paper sets out to study their role in the boron neutron capture therapy dosimetric process. - Highlights: • Gel dosimeters have been investigated. • Conventional dosimetric proses of BNCT has been investigated. • Role of gel dosimeters in BNCT has been investigated

  6. A case study employing operant conditioning to reduce stress of capture for red-bellied tamarins (Saguinus labiatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Yvonne; Amory, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Traditional techniques used to capture New World monkeys, such as net capture, can induce high levels of acute stress detrimental to welfare. Alternatively, training nonhuman animals via operant conditioning to voluntarily participate in husbandry and/or veterinary practices is accepted as a humane process that can reduce stress and improve welfare. This study details the use of operant conditioning using positive reinforcement training (PRT) and target training to train a family of 5 captive red-bellied tamarins (Saguinus labiatus) in a wildlife park to voluntarily enter a transportation box and remain calm for 1 min after 54 training sessions. Observations of 2 unrelated net-capture processes provided measures of locomotion and vocalizations as indicators of stress behavior that were compared with those of the trained tamarins. Net-captured monkeys exhibited rapid erratic locomotion and emitted long, high-frequency vocalizations during capture whereas the trained tamarins exhibited minimal locomotion and emitted only 4 brief vocalizations (root mean square 35 dB) during capture. This indicates that the use of PRT considerably reduced potential for stress and improved welfare during the capture and containment of the tamarins. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  7. New measurement of neutron capture resonances of 209Bi

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, C.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillode Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Kappeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Oshima, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, Alberto; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-01-01

    The neutron capture cross section of Bi209 has been measured at the CERN n TOF facility by employing the pulse-height-weighting technique. Improvements over previous measurements are mainly because of an optimized detection system, which led to a practically negligible neutron sensitivity. Additional experimental sources of systematic error, such as the electronic threshold in the detectors, summing of gamma-rays, internal electron conversion, and the isomeric state in bismuth, have been taken into account. Gamma-ray absorption effects inside the sample have been corrected by employing a nonpolynomial weighting function. Because Bi209 is the last stable isotope in the reaction path of the stellar s-process, the Maxwellian averaged capture cross section is important for the recycling of the reaction flow by alpha-decays. In the relevant stellar range of thermal energies between kT=5 and 8 keV our new capture rate is about 16% higher than the presently accepted value used for nucleosynthesis calculations. At th...

  8. Neutron capture cross section measurements: case of lutetium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roig, O.; Meot, V.; Belier, G.

    2011-01-01

    The neutron radiative capture is a nuclear reaction that occurs in the presence of neutrons on all isotopes and on a wide energy range. The neutron capture range on Lutetium isotopes, presented here, illustrates the variety of measurements leading to the determination of cross sections. These measurements provide valuable fundamental data needed for the stockpile stewardship program, as well as for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. Measurements, made in France or in United-States, involving complex detectors associated with very rare targets have significantly improved the international databases and validated models of nuclear reactions. We present results concerning the measurement