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Sample records for wimp annihilation energy

  1. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Cembranos, José Alberto; Cruz Dombriz, Álvaro de la; Dobado González, Antonio; Lineros, R. A.; López Maroto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation int...

  2. Study of WIMP annihilations into a pair of on-shell scalar mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lian-Bao

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we focus on new scalar ϕ mediated scalar/vectorial weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with ϕ 's mass slightly below the WIMP mass. To explain the Galactic center 1-3 GeV gamma-ray excess, here we consider the case that a WIMP pair predominantly annihilates into an on-shell ϕ ϕ pair with ϕ mainly decaying to τ τ ¯. The masses of WIMPs are in a range about 14-22 GeV, and the annihilations of WIMPs are phase space suppressed today. In this annihilation scheme, the couplings of the ϕ -standard model (SM) particles are almost arbitrarily small, and the WIMP-nucleus spin-independent scattering can be tolerant by the present dark matter (DM) direct detections. A scalar mediator-Higgs field mixing is introduced, which is small and available. The lower limit on the couplings of the ϕ -SM particles set by the thermal equilibrium in the early Universe is derived, and this constraint is above the neutrino background for scalar DM in direct detections. The WIMPs may be detectable at the upgraded DM direct detection experiment in the next few years, and the exotic decay h →ϕ ϕ , the production of ϕ may be observable at the future high-luminosity e+e- collider.

  3. WMAP7 and future CMB constraints on annihilating dark matter: implications for GeV-scale WIMPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütsi, G.; Chluba, J.; Hektor, A.; Raidal, M.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We calculate constraints from current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements on annihilating dark matter (DM) with masses below the electroweak scale: mDM = 5 - 100 GeV. In particular, we assume the S-wave annihilation mode to be dominant, and focus our attention on the lower end of this mass range, as DM particles with masses mDM ~ 10 GeV have recently been claimed to be consistent with the CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA results, while also providing viable DM candidates to explain the measurements of Fermi and WMAP haze. We study the model (in)dependence of the CMB power spectra on particle physics DM models, large-scale structure formation and cosmological uncertainties. We attempt to find a simple and practical recipe for estimating current and future CMB bounds on a broad class of DM annihilation models. Methods: We use a model-independent description for DM annihilation into a wide set of Standard Model particles simulated by PYTHIA Monte Carlo. Our Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations used for finding model constraints involve realistic CMB likelihoods and assume a standard 6-parameter ΛCDM background cosmological model, which is extended by two additional DM annihilation parameters: mDM and ⟨ σAυ ⟩ /mDM. Results: We show that in the studied DM mass range the CMB signal of DM annihilations is independent of the details of large-scale structure formation, distribution, and profile of DM halos and other cosmological uncertainties. All particle physics models of DM annihilation can be described with only one parameter, the fraction of energy carried away by neutrinos in DM annihilation. As the main result we provide a simple and rather generic fitting formula for calculating CMB constraints on the annihilation cross section of light WIMPs. We show that thermal relic DM in the CoGeNT, DAMA/LIBRA favored mass range is in a serious conflict with present CMB data for the annihilation channels with few neutrinos, and will definitely be tested

  4. WIMP Dark Matter and the First Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iocco, Fabio

    2010-11-01

    If weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) constitute the bulk of dark matter (DM), energy from the self-annihilation of these particles can affect Population III (Pop III) star formation via two mechanisms. Before the protostar forms, energy from DM annihilations can couple to primordial gas chemistry and slightly alter the properties of the cloud-without, however, inducing dramatic changes in the final mass of the star. Later, scattering between WIMPs and baryons within the protostar can in principle congregate enough DM for annihilations, rather than nuclear reactions, to support the star against gravity. In these proceedings I briefly summarize the state of the art of the field, as well the prospects for observing such stars.

  5. Study of High Energy Positron Annihilation in GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Chikuma, Naruhiro

    2014-01-01

    A high energy positron may annihilate with an electron in atoms not only into two photons, but also into muon pairs or hadrons if the energy is over the energy threshold, 43.69 GeV in laboratory frame with electrons at rest. This report shows modication of high energy electromagnetic processes in GEANT4(version 10.01.b01) in order to include these annihilation processes properly, validation of GEANT4 cross-sections of these processes by theoretical calculation, and the results of simulation for high energy processes in a simple setup. As a results of simulation, both of annihilation to muon pairs and to hadrons happen by the probability of 10-6 to 10-5.

  6. Annihilation of low energy antiprotons in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, S; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Burghart, G; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Canali, C; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Derking, J H; Di Domizio, S; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ferragut, R; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S N; Haider, S; Harasimovic, J; Huse, T; Jordan, E; Jørgensen, L V; Kaltenbacher, T; Kellerbauer, A; Knecht, A; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Magnani, A; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Moia, F; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Pacifico, N; Petrácek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Regenfus, C; Riccardi, C; Røhne, O; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Susa, A; Vasquez, M A Subieta; Špacek, M; Testera, G; Welsch, C P; Zavatarelli, S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, is to measure directly the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter. To achieve this goal, the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS collaboration will produce a pulsed, cold (100 mK) antihydrogen beam with a velocity of a few 100 m/s and measure the magnitude of the vertical deflection of the beam from a straight path. The final position of the falling antihydrogen will be detected by a position sensitive detector. This detector will consist of an active silicon part, where the annihilations take place, followed by an emulsion part. Together, they allow to achieve 1$%$ precision on the measurement of $\\bar{g}$ with about 600 reconstructed and time tagged annihilations. We present here, to the best of our knowledge, the first direct measurement of antiproton annihilation in a segmented silicon sensor, the first step towards designing a position sensitive silicon detector for the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment. We also pr...

  7. The zero age main sequence of WIMP burners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Scott, Pat; Edsjö, Joakim

    2008-02-01

    We modify a stellar structure code to estimate the effect upon the main sequence of the accretion of weakly-interacting dark matter onto stars and its subsequent annihilation. The effect upon the stars depends upon whether the energy generation rate from dark matter annihilation is large enough to shut off the nuclear burning in the star. Main sequence weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMP) burners look much like proto-stars moving on the Hayashi track, although they are in principle completely stable. We make some brief comments about where such stars could be found, how they might be observed and more detailed simulations which are currently in progress. Finally we comment on whether or not it is possible to link the paradoxically hot, young stars found at the galactic center with WIMP burners.

  8. Internal energy deposition into molecules upon positron-electron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Donohue, D.L.; McLuckey, S.A.; Crawford, O.H. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States))

    1994-05-01

    The dissociative ionization of organic molecules, induced by positrons having energies below the positronium threshold (0.5--3 eV), has been studied. Cross sections for the ionization-fragmentation processes increase as positron energies decrease. The data reveal that the energy required for dissociative ionization is supplied by the annihilation process, and that fragmentation occurs by breakage of C-C single bonds in preference to double and triple bonds.

  9. The Fraternal WIMP Miracle

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    We identify and analyze thermal dark matter candidates in the fraternal twin Higgs model and its generalizations. The relic abundance of fraternal twin dark matter is set by twin weak interactions, with a scale tightly tied to the weak scale of the Standard Model by naturalness considerations. As such, the dark matter candidates benefit from a "fraternal WIMP miracle," reproducing the observed dark matter abundance for dark matter masses between 50 and 150 GeV. However, the couplings dominantly responsible for dark matter annihilation do not lead to interactions with the visible sector. The direct detection rate is instead set via fermionic Higgs portal interactions, which are likewise constrained by naturalness considerations but parametrically weaker than those leading to dark matter annihilation. The predicted direct detection cross section is close to current LUX bounds and presents an opportunity for the next generation of direct detection experiments.

  10. Search for dark matter annihilations in the sun with the 79-string IceCube detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M G; Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2013-03-29

    We have performed a search for muon neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the center of the Sun with the 79-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino telescope. For the first time, the DeepCore subarray is included in the analysis, lowering the energy threshold and extending the search to the austral summer. The 317 days of data collected between June 2010 and May 2011 are consistent with the expected background from atmospheric muons and neutrinos. Upper limits are set on the dark matter annihilation rate, with conversions to limits on spin-dependent and spin-independent scattering cross sections of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) on protons, for WIMP masses in the range 20-5000  GeV/c2. These are the most stringent spin-dependent WIMP-proton cross section limits to date above 35  GeV/c2 for most WIMP models.

  11. Impacts of WIMP dark matter upon stellar evolution: main-sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Pat; Edsjo, Joakim

    2008-01-01

    The presence of large amounts of WIMP dark matter in stellar cores has been shown to have significant effects upon models of stellar evolution. We present a series of detailed grids of WIMP-influenced stellar models for main sequence stars, computed using the DarkStars code. We describe the changes in stellar structure and main sequence evolution which occur for masses ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 solar masses and metallicities from Z = 0.0003-0.02, as a function of the rate of energy injection by WIMPs. We then go on to show what rates of energy injection can be obtained using realistic orbital parameters for stars near supermassive black holes, including detailed considerations of dark matter halo velocity and density profiles. Capture and annihilation rates are strongly boosted when stars follow elliptical rather than circular orbits, causing WIMP annihilation to provide up to 100 times the energy of hydrogen fusion in stars at the Galactic centre.

  12. CMB bounds on dark matter annihilation: Nucleon energy losses after recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weniger, C.; Serpico, P.D.; Iocco, F.; Bertone, G.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the propagation and energy losses of protons and antiprotons produced by dark matter annihilation at redshifts 100annihilations into quarks, gluons and weak gauge bosons, protons and antiprotons carry about 20% of the energy injected into e± and γ’s,

  13. Secluded WIMPs, Dark QED with Massive Photons, and the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, E. C. F. S.; Pleitez, V.; Stecker, F. W.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a particular secluded WIMP dark matter model consisting of neutral fermions as the dark matter candidate and a Proca-Wentzel (PW) field as a mediator. In the model that we consider here, dark matter WIMPs interact with standard model (SM) particles only through the PW field of approximately MeV-multi-GeV mass particles. The interactions occur via a U(1)' mediator, V'(sub mu), which couples to the SM by kinetic mixing with U(1) hypercharge bosons, B'(sub mu). One important difference between our model and other such models in the literature is the absence of an extra singlet scalar, so that the parameter with dimension of mass M(sup 2, sub V) is not related to a spontaneous symmetry breaking. This QED based model is also renormalizable. The mass scale of the mediator and the absence of the singlet scalar can lead to interesting astrophysical signatures. The dominant annihilation channels are different from those usually considered in previous work. We show that the GeV energy gamma-ray excess in the galactic center region, as derived from Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Space Telescope data, can be attributed to such secluded dark matter WIMPs, given parameters of the model that are consistent with both the cosmological dark matter density and the upper limits on WIMP spin-independent elastic scattering. Secluded WIMP models are also consistent with suggested upper limits on a DM contribution to the cosmic-ray antiproton flux.

  14. Limits on dark matter annihilation in the sun using the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Adrián-Martínez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A search for muon neutrinos originating from dark matter annihilations in the Sun is performed using the data recorded by the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2012. In order to obtain the best possible sensitivities to dark matter signals, an optimisation of the event selection criteria is performed taking into account the background of atmospheric muons, atmospheric neutrinos and the energy spectra of the expected neutrino signals. No significant excess over the background is observed and 90% C.L. upper limits on the neutrino flux, the spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-sections are derived for WIMP masses ranging from 50 GeV to 5 TeV for the annihilation channels WIMP+WIMP→bb¯,W+W− and τ+τ−.

  15. WIMPs at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Prateek; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to $(WW, ZZ, hh, tt)$, dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for $b\\bar{b}$ is also enlarged to 35 GeV$\\lesssim m_\\chi \\lesssim$ 165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into $b$, $\\tau$, and light quark final states could descri...

  16. Testing quantum chromodynamics in electron-positron annihilation at high energies. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.S.

    1979-01-01

    Various measures of the distribution of hadronic energy produced in high energy electron-positron annihilation provide precise tests of the promising fundamental theory of hadronic physics, quantum chromodynamics. Recent work at the University of Washington on such energy cross sections is reviewed.

  17. Scalar electron production in e/sup +/ e/sup -/ annihilation at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, I.; Takasaki, F.; Shimizu, Y.; Kuroda, M.

    1985-08-22

    The cross section for single and pair productions of scalar electrons in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are calculated in the energy range of TRISTAN, SLC and LEP with specific emphasis on the contribution from the Z/sup 0/ boson and the zino. (orig.).

  18. Scalar electron production in e/sup +/ e annihilation at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, I.; National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Itabashi; Takasaki, F.; Shimizu, Y.; Kuroda, M.

    1985-08-22

    The cross section for single and pair productions of scalar electrons in e/sup +/e annihilation are calculated in the energy range of TRISTAN, SLC and LEP with specific emphasis on the contribution from the Z/sup 0/ boson and the zino. (orig.).

  19. Stellar energy loss rates in the pair-annihilation process beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Ruiz, M.A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimicas, Apartado Postal C-585, Zacatecas (Mexico); Gutierrez-Rodriguez, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Facultad de Fisica, Apartado Postal C-580, Zacatecas (Mexico); Gonzalez-Sanchez, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Facultad de Fisica, Apartado Postal C-580, Zacatecas (Mexico); PSL Research University, Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, CNRS UMR 8112, Paris (France)

    2017-01-15

    We calculate the stellar energy loss due to neutrino-pair production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation in the context of a 331 model, a left-right symmetric model and a simplest little Higgs model in a way that can be used in supernova calculations. We also present some simple estimates which show that such process can act as an efficient energy loss mechanism in the shocked supernova core. We find that the stellar energy loss is almost independent of the parameters of the models in the allowed range for these parameters. This work complements other studies on the stellar energy loss rate in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. (orig.)

  20. High Energy Electron Signals from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Philip; /SLAC; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP; Weiner, Neal; Yavin, Itay; /New York U., CCPP

    2012-04-09

    In this paper we discuss two mechanisms by which high energy electrons resulting from dark matter annihilations in or near the Sun can arrive at the Earth. Specifically, electrons can escape the sun if DM annihilates into long-lived states, or if dark matter scatters inelastically, which would leave a halo of dark matter outside of the sun. Such a localized source of electrons may affect the spectra observed by experiments with narrower fields of view oriented towards the sun, such as ATIC, differently from those with larger fields of view such as Fermi. We suggest a simple test of these possibilities with existing Fermi data that is more sensitive than limits from final state radiation. If observed, such a signal will constitute an unequivocal signature of dark matter.

  1. Energy Dependence of Inclusive Spectra in $e^{+} e^{-}$ Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krstic, P S; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova-Nová, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    Inclusive charged hadron distributions as obtaind from the DELPHI measurements at 130, 136, 161, 172 and 183 GeV are presented as a function of the variables rapidity, $\\xi_p$, $p$ and transversal momenta. Data are compared with event generators and with MLLA calculations, in order to examine the hypothesis of local parton hadron duality. The differential momentum spectra show an indication for coherence effects in the production of soft particles. The relation between the energy dependence of the charged multiplicity and the rapidity distribution is examined.

  2. Triplet-triplet annihilation photon-upconversion: towards solar energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Victor; Dzebo, Damir; Abrahamsson, Maria; Albinsson, Bo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2014-06-14

    Solar power production and solar energy storage are important research areas for development of technologies that can facilitate a transition to a future society independent of fossil fuel based energy sources. Devices for direct conversion of solar photons suffer from poor efficiencies due to spectrum losses, which are caused by energy mismatch between the optical absorption of the devices and the broadband irradiation provided by the sun. In this context, photon-upconversion technologies are becoming increasingly interesting since they might offer an efficient way of converting low energy solar energy photons into higher energy photons, ideal for solar power production and solar energy storage. This perspective discusses recent progress in triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) photon-upconversion systems and devices for solar energy applications. Furthermore, challenges with evaluation of the efficiency of TTA-photon-upconversion systems are discussed and a general approach for evaluation and comparison of existing systems is suggested.

  3. Test of multiplicity independence of single pi 'mean scaled' distributions in low-energy pp annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Angelini, C; Bigi, A; Casali, R; Defoix, C; Espigat, P; Flaminio, V; Laloum, M; Pazzi, R; Petitjean, P; Petri, C

    1977-01-01

    Dao et al. (1974) proposed the hypotheses that the distributions, properly normalized of 'mean scaled' variables in multiparticle production at high energies are independent of multiplicity, initial state and incident energy. The multiplicity dependence of fhe mean- scaled variables x/(x) are studied for various semi-inclusive (or exclusive) reactions in the pp annihilation around 1 GeV/c incident momentum (x=p/sub t/, mod p/sub L/ mod ) using the 81 cm CERN hydrogen bubble chamber data. It is found that the distributions are poorly described by universal functions. (6 refs).

  4. A map of the non-thermal WIMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungjin, E-mail: hjkim06@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon 34051 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jeong-Pyong, E-mail: hjp0731@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Shin, Chang Sub, E-mail: changsub.shin@apctp.org [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Postech, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-10

    We study the effect of the elastic scattering on the non-thermal WIMP, which is produced by direct decay of heavy particles at the end of reheating. The non-thermal WIMP becomes important when the reheating temperature is well below the freeze-out temperature. Usually, two limiting cases have been considered. One is that the produced high energetic dark matter particles are quickly thermalized due to the elastic scattering with background radiations. The corresponding relic abundance is determined by the thermally averaged annihilation cross-section at the reheating temperature. The other one is that the initial abundance is too small for the dark matter to annihilate so that the final relic is determined by the initial amount itself. We study the regions between these two limits, and show that the relic density depends not only on the annihilation rate, but also on the elastic scattering rate. Especially, the relic abundance of the p-wave annihilating dark matter crucially relies on the elastic scattering rate because the annihilation cross-section is sensitive to the dark matter velocity. We categorize the parameter space into several regions where each region has distinctive mechanism for determining the relic abundance of the dark matter at the present Universe. The consequence on the (in)direct detection is also studied.

  5. WIMP Theory Review

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2017-01-01

    The complementarity of direct, indirect and collider searches for dark matter has improved our understanding concerning the properties of the dark matter particle. In this short review, we present a step toward the fundamental nature of dark matter with direct detection experiments only, go through some of the potential dark matter signals in gamma-rays, x-rays, and anti-matter, and lastly discuss the prospects of WIMPs in the next decade.

  6. Dark Matter Annihilation at the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Timothy Ryan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Observations by the WMAP and PLANCK satellites have provided extraordinarily accurate observations on the densities of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy in the universe. These observations indicate that our universe is composed of approximately ve times as much dark matter as baryonic matter. However, e orts to detect a particle responsible for the energy density of dark matter have been unsuccessful. Theoretical models have indicated that a leading candidate for the dark matter is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which may be stable due to a conserved R-parity. This dark matter particle would still be capable of interacting with baryons via weak-force interactions in the early universe, a process which was found to naturally explain the observed relic abundance of dark matter today. These residual annihilations can persist, albeit at a much lower rate, in the present universe, providing a detectable signal from dark matter annihilation events which occur throughout the universe. Simulations calculating the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy almost universally predict the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy (GC) to provide the brightest signal from dark matter annihilation due to its relative proximity and large simulated dark matter density. Recent advances in telescope technology have allowed for the rst multiwavelength analysis of the GC, with suitable e ective exposure, angular resolution, and energy resolution in order to detect dark matter particles with properties similar to those predicted by the WIMP miracle. In this work, I describe ongoing e orts which have successfully detected an excess in -ray emission from the region immediately surrounding the GC, which is di cult to describe in terms of standard di use emission predicted in the GC region. While the jury is still out on any dark matter interpretation of this excess, I describe several related observations which may indicate a dark matter origin. Finally, I discuss the

  7. pbarp, pbarD, pbar sup 4 He annihilation cross sections at low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Tessaro, S; Capponi, M; Cereda, B; De Castro, S; Ferretti, A; Galli, D; Giacobbe, B; Marconi, U; Piccinini, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Spighi, R; Vecchi, S; Vezzani, A; Vigotti, F; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Zoccoli, A; Belli, G; Corradini, M; Donzella, A; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Venturelli, L; Zenoni, A; Cicalò, C; Masoni, A; Puddu, G; Serci, S; Temnikov, P P; Usai, G L; Ableev, V G; Denisov, O Yu; Gorchakov, O E; Prakhov, S N; Rozhdestvensky, A M; Sapozhnikov, M G; Tretyak, V I; Poli, M; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Lanaro, A; Lucherini, V; Nichitiu, F; Petrascu, C; Rosca, A; Cavion, C; Gastaldi, Ugo; Lombardi, M; Vannucci, Luigi; Vedovato, G; Andrighetto, A; Morando, M; Ricci, R A; Bendiscioli, G; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Saino, A; Salvini, P; Filippi, A; Balestra, F; Botta, E; Bressani, Tullio; Bussa, M P; Busso, L; Calvo, D; Cerello, P G; Costa, S; D'Isep, F; Fava, L; Feliciello, A; Ferrero, L; Garfagnini, R; Grasso, A; Maggiora, A; Marcello, S; Mirfakhraee, N; Panzieri, D; Parena, D; Rossetto, E; Tosello, F; Zosi, G; Agnello, M; Iazzi, F; Minetti, B; Pauli, G; Tessaro, S; Santi, L

    1999-01-01

    New measurements of the pbarp annihilation cross section have been performed with the OBELIX apparatus between 37 and 70 MeV/c. From previous samples of data it was already clear that the 1/p behaviour for the annihilation cross section is drastically modified at very low momenta, due to the Coulomb interaction. However, at the lowest measured momentum (43.6 MeV/c), the annihilation cross section was unexpectedly high; this evidence suggested a more accurate investigation of this region. Furthermore, measurements of annihilation cross section have been performed with pbar impinging on D sub 2 and sup 4 He targets.

  8. Positronium energy levels at order mα7: Vacuum polarization corrections in the two-photon-annihilation channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Adkins

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We have calculated all contributions to the energy levels of parapositronium at order mα7 coming from vacuum polarization corrections to processes involving virtual annihilation to two photons. This work is motivated by ongoing efforts to improve the experimental determination of the positronium ground-state hyperfine splitting.

  9. Exciplex-exciplex energy transfer and annihilation in solid films of porphyrin-fullerene dyads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehtivuori, Heli; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.

    2006-01-01

    Exciplex-exciplex annihilation was observed for the first time in porphyrin-fullerene molecular films. The films were prepared using Langmuir-Blodgett and drop casting methods. The exciplex-exciplex interactions were studied using femtosecond pump-probe method. The exciplex-exciplex annihilation can

  10. Search for neutrinos from annihilation of captured low-mass dark matter particles in the sun by super-kamiokande.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, K; Abe, K; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kametani, I; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; Nishimura, Y; Okumura, K; McLachlan, T; Labarga, L; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Berkman, S; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Goldhaber, M; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Wilking, M J; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2015-04-10

    Super-Kamiokande (SK) can search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) by detecting neutrinos produced from WIMP annihilations occurring inside the Sun. In this analysis, we include neutrino events with interaction vertices in the detector in addition to upward-going muons produced in the surrounding rock. Compared to the previous result, which used the upward-going muons only, the signal acceptances for light (few-GeV/c^{2}-200-GeV/c^{2}) WIMPs are significantly increased. We fit 3903 days of SK data to search for the contribution of neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun. We found no significant excess over expected atmospheric-neutrino background and the result is interpreted in terms of upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections under different assumptions about the annihilation channel. We set the current best limits on the spin-dependent WIMP-proton cross section for WIMP masses below 200  GeV/c^{2} (at 10  GeV/c^{2}, 1.49×10^{-39}  cm^{2} for χχ→bb[over ¯] and 1.31×10^{-40}  cm^{2} for χχ→τ^{+}τ^{-} annihilation channels), also ruling out some fraction of WIMP candidates with spin-independent coupling in the few-GeV/c^{2} mass range.

  11. High energy resolution and first time-dependent positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Jakob

    2010-04-03

    It was the aim of this thesis to improve the existing positron annihilation induced Auger spectrometer at the highly intense positron source NEPOMUC (NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh) in several ways: Firstly, the measurement time for a single spectrum should be reduced from typically 12 h to roughly 1 h or even less. Secondly, the energy resolution, which amounted to {delta}E/E{approx}10%, should be increased by at least one order of magnitude in order to make high resolution positron annihilation induced Auger spectroscopy (PAES)-measurements of Auger transitions possible and thus deliver more information about the nature of the Auger process. In order to achieve these objectives, the PAES spectrometer was equipped with a new electron energy analyzer. For its ideal operation all other components of the Auger analysis chamber had to be adapted. Particularly the sample manipulation and the positron beam guidance had to be renewed. Simulations with SIMION {sup registered} ensured the optimal positron lens parameters. After the adjustment of the new analyzer and its components, first measurements illustrated the improved performance of the PAES setup: Firstly, the measurement time for short overview measurements was reduced from 3 h to 420 s. The measurement time for more detailed Auger spectra was shortened from 12 h to 80 min. Secondly, even with the reduced measurement time, the signal to noise ratio was also enhanced by one order of magnitude. Finally, the energy resolution was improved to {delta}E/E < 1. The exceptional surface sensitivity and elemental selectivity of PAES was demonstrated in measurements of Pd and Fe, both coated with Cu layers of varying thickness. PAES showed that with 0.96 monolayer of Cu on Fe, more than 55% of the detected Auger electrons stem from Cu. In the case of the Cu coated Pd sample 0.96 monolayer of Cu resulted in a Cu Auger fraction of more than 30% with PAES and less than 5% with electron induced Auger spectroscopy

  12. On the Trail of WIMPs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fundamental particle nature of the Dark Matter (DM)that constitutes more than 80% of the gravitating matter inthe Universe is unknown. There is no suitable candidate forthis DM in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Theso-called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), predictedin many scenarios of ...

  13. On the Trail of WIMPs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fundamental particle nature of the Dark Matter (DM) that constitutes more than 80% of the gravitating matter in the Universe is unknown. There is no suitable candidate for this DM in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The so-called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), pre- dicted in many scenarios of ...

  14. Pre-launch Estimates for GLAST Sensitivity to Dark Matter Annihilation Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltz, E.A.; Berenji, B.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bertone, G.; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Bergstrom, L.; /Stockholm U.; Bloom, E.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bringmann, T.; /Stockholm U.; Chiang, J.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Conrad, J.; /Stockholm U.; Edmonds, Y.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Edsjo, J.; /Stockholm U.; Godfrey, G.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Hughes, R.E.; /Ohio State U.; Johnson, R.P.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Lionetto, A.; /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome2; Moiseev, A.A.; /CRESST; Morselli, A.; /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome2; Moskalenko, I.V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Nuss, E.; /Montpellier U.; Ormes, J.F.; /Denver U.; Rando, R.; /INFN, Padua /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /Ohio State U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ohio State U.

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to indirectly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through the {gamma}-ray signal that their pair annihilation produces. WIMPs are among the favorite candidates to explain the compelling evidence that about 80% of the mass in the Universe is non-baryonic dark matter (DM). They are serendipitously motivated by various extensions of the standard model of particle physics such as Supersymmetry and Universal Extra Dimensions (UED). With its unprecedented sensitivity and its very large energy range (20 MeV to more than 300 GeV) the main instrument on board the GLAST satellite, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will open a new window of discovery. As our estimates show, the LAT will be able to detect an indirect DM signature for a large class of WIMP models given a cuspy profile for the DM distribution. Using the current state of the art Monte Carlo and event reconstruction software developed within the LAT collaboration, we present preliminary sensitivity studies for several possible sources inside and outside the Galaxy. We also discuss the potential of the LAT to detect UED via the electron/positron channel. Diffuse background modeling and other background issues that will be important in setting limits or seeing a signal are presented.

  15. A General Relativistic Ray-tracing Method for Estimating the Energy and Momentum Deposition by Neutrino Pair Annihilation in Collapsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikae, Seiji; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro

    2010-09-01

    Bearing in mind the application to the collapsar models of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we develop a numerical scheme and code for estimating the deposition of energy and momentum due to the neutrino pair annihilation (ν + {\\bar{ν}} → e^{-} + e^{+}) in the vicinity of an accretion tori around a Kerr black hole. Our code is designed to solve the general relativistic (GR) neutrino transfer by a ray-tracing method. To solve the collisional Boltzmann equation in curved spacetime, we numerically integrate the so-called rendering equation along the null geodesics. We employ the Fehlberg (4,5) adaptive integrator in the Runge-Kutta method to perform the numerical integration accurately. For the neutrino opacity, the charged-current β-processes, which are dominant in the vicinity of the accretion tori, are taken into account. The numerical accuracy of the developed code is certified by several tests in which we show comparisons with the corresponding analytical solutions. In order to solve the energy-dependent ray-tracing transport, we propose that an adaptive-mesh-refinement approach, which we take for the two radiation angles (θ, phi) and the neutrino energy, is useful in reducing the computational cost significantly. Based on the hydrodynamical data in our collapsar simulation, we estimate the annihilation rates in a post-processing manner. Increasing the Kerr parameter from 0 to 1, it is found that the GR effect can increase the local energy deposition rate by about one order of magnitude, and the net energy deposition rate by several tens of percent. After the accretion disk settles into a stationary state (typically later than ~9 s from the onset of gravitational collapse), we point out that the neutrino-heating timescale in the vicinity of the polar funnel region can be shorter than the dynamical timescale. Our results suggest that the neutrino pair annihilation is potentially as important as the conventional magnetohydrodynamic mechanism for igniting the GRB

  16. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-06-24

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  17. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoto, G; Cirillo, E N M; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs ([Formula: see text] GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  18. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavoto, G. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Cirillo, E.N.M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento SBAI, Rome (Italy); Cocina, F. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Ferretti, J. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Polosa, A.D. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (∼ 11 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency. (orig.)

  19. Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the sun with the IceCube 22-string detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Bazo Alba, J L; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K-H; Benabderrahmane, M L; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bolmont, J; Böser, S; Botner, O; Bradley, L; Braun, J; Breder, D; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; Deyoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gozzini, R; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gunasingha, R M; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Hasegawa, Y; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülss, J-P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Imlay, R L; Inaba, M; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K-H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Knops, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Lauer, R; Leich, H; Lennarz, D; Lucke, A; Lundberg, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miyamoto, H; Mohr, A; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Münich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Patton, S; Pérez de Los Heros, C; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Potthoff, N; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Roucelle, C; Rutledge, D; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H-G; Sarkar, S; Satalecka, K; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schukraft, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M C; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sulanke, K-H; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terranova, C; Tilav, S; Tluczykont, M; Toale, P A; Tosi, D; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Walter, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebusch, C H; Wiedemann, A; Wikström, G; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S

    2009-05-22

    A search for muon neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the IceCube 22-string neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun and converted to limits on the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) proton cross sections for WIMP masses in the range 250-5000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on neutralino annihilation in the Sun.

  20. Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-04-28

    A search for muon neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the IceCube 22-string neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun and converted to limits on the WIMP-proton cross-sections for WIMP masses in the range 250-5000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on neutralino annihilation in the Sun.

  1. First search for dark matter annihilations in the Earth with the IceCube detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide (Australia); Abraham, K.; Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Holzapfel, K.; Huber, M.; Jurkovic, M.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Turcati, A.; Veenkamp, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bretz, H.P.; Franckowiak, A.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Spiering, C.; Stasik, A.; Stoessl, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Santen, J. van; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O' Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Krueger, C.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Rossem, M. van; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Xu, D.L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Andeen, K. [Marquette University, Department of Physics, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Anderson, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eller, P.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Pankova, D.V.; Quinnan, M.; Tesic, G.; Weiss, M.J. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Pino Rosendo, E. del; Di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Foesig, C.C.; Koepke, L.; Krueckl, G.; Peiffer, P.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Argueelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Moulai, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Glagla, M.; Glauch, T.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Kemp, J.; Konietz, R.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Penek, Oe.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schimp, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stahlberg, M.; Stettner, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Wallraff, M.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebusch, C.H. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Mandelartz, M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Tenholt, F. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Kopper, S.; Lauber, F.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Soldin, D. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); BenZvi, S.; Cross, R. [University of Rochester, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, NY (United States); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Friedman, E.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G.W. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S.; Tatar, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2017-02-15

    We present the results of the first IceCube search for dark matter annihilation in the center of the Earth. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), candidates for dark matter, can scatter off nuclei inside the Earth and fall below its escape velocity. Over time the captured WIMPs will be accumulated and may eventually self-annihilate. Among the annihilation products only neutrinos can escape from the center of the Earth. Large-scale neutrino telescopes, such as the cubic kilometer IceCube Neutrino Observatory located at the South Pole, can be used to search for such neutrino fluxes. Data from 327 days of detector livetime during 2011/2012 were analyzed. No excess beyond the expected background from atmospheric neutrinos was detected. The derived upper limits on the annihilation rate of WIMPs in the Earth and the resulting muon flux are an order of magnitude stronger than the limits of the last analysis performed with data from IceCube's predecessor AMANDA. The limits can be translated in terms of a spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section. For a WIMP mass of 50 GeV this analysis results in the most restrictive limits achieved with IceCube data. (orig.)

  2. Search for neutrinos from annihilation of captured low-mass dark matter particles in the Sun by Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Abe, K; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Irvine, T; Kajita, 2 T; Kametani, I; Kaneyuki, 2 K; Lee, K P; Nishimura, Y; Okumura, 2 K; McLachlan, T; Labarga, 2 L; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, 4 J L; Sulak, L R; Berkman, 4 S; Tanaka, 5 H A; Tobayama, 5 S; Goldhaber, M; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Wilking, M J; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2015-01-01

    Super-Kamiokande (SK) can search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) by detecting neutrinos produced from WIMP annihilations occurring inside the Sun. In this analysis, we include neutrino events with interaction vertices in the detector in addition to upward-going muons produced in the surrounding rock. Compared to the previous result, which used the upward-going muons only, the signal acceptances for light (few-GeV/$c^2$ $\\sim$ 200-GeV/$c^2$) WIMPs are significantly increased. We fit 3903 days of SK data to search for the contribution of neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun. We found no significant excess over expected atmospheric-neutrino background and the result is interpreted in terms of upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections under different assumptions about the annihilation channel. We set the current best limits on the spin-dependent (SD) WIMP-proton cross section for WIMP masses below 200 GeV/$c^2$ (at 10 GeV/$c^2$, 1.49$\\times 10^{-39}$ cm$^2$ for $\\chi\\c...

  3. Search for annihilating dark matter in the Sun with 3 years of IceCube data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide (Australia); Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bretz, H.P.; Franckowiak, A.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Spiering, C.; Stasik, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Santen, J. van [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O' Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Krueger, C.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Rossem, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Xu, D.L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Andeen, K. [Marquette University, Department of Physics, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Anderson, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eller, P.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Pankova, D.V.; Quinnan, M.; Tesic, G.; Weiss, M.J. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Pino Rosendo, E. del; Lorenzo, V. di; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Foesig, C.C.; Koepke, L.; Krueckl, G.; Peiffer, P.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Argueelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Moulai, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Glauch, T.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, T.; Konietz, R.; Leuermann, M.; Penek, Oe.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stettner, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Wallraff, M.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebusch, C.H. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Mandelartz, M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Tenholt, F. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Kopper, S.; Lauber, F.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Soldin, D. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); BenZvi, S.; Cross, R. [University of Rochester, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, NY (United States); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Friedman, E.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G.W. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Huber, M.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Turcati, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S.; Palczewski, T.; Tatar, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boerner, M.; Fuchs, T.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Pieloth, D.; Rhode, W.; Ruhe, T.; Sandrock, A.; Schlunder, P. [TU Dortmund University, Department of Physics, Dortmund (Germany); Bose, D.; Dujmovic, H.; In, S.; Jeong, M.; Kang, W.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Rott, C. [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Physics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2017-03-15

    We present results from an analysis looking for dark matter annihilation in the Sun with the IceCube neutrino telescope. Gravitationally trapped dark matter in the Sun's core can annihilate into Standard Model particles making the Sun a source of GeV neutrinos. IceCube is able to detect neutrinos with energies >100 GeV while its low-energy infill array DeepCore extends this to >10 GeV. This analysis uses data gathered in the austral winters between May 2011 and May 2014, corresponding to 532 days of live time when the Sun, being below the horizon, is a source of up-going neutrino events, easiest to discriminate against the dominant background of atmospheric muons. The sensitivity is a factor of two to four better than previous searches due to additional statistics and improved analysis methods involving better background rejection and reconstructions. The resultant upper limits on the spin-dependent dark matter-proton scattering cross section reach down to 1.46 x 10{sup -5} pb for a dark matter particle of mass 500 GeV annihilating exclusively into τ{sup +}τ{sup -} particles. These are currently the most stringent limits on the spin-dependent dark matter-proton scattering cross section for WIMP masses above 50 GeV. (orig.)

  4. Observation of short range three-particle correlations in e+e- annihilations at LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Barão, F; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brunet, J M; Brückman, P; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buys, A; Bärring, O; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Almagne, B; Da Silva, W; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dijkstra, H; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Dönszelmann, M; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Föth, H; Fürstenau, H; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Guy, J; Guz, Yu; Górski, M; Günther, M; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katargin, A; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Królikowski, J; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Kuznetsov, O; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; La Vaissière, C de; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; López, J M; López-Aguera, M A; López-Fernandez, A; Lörstad, B; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martí i García, S; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Maréchal, B; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myagkov, A; Myatt, Gerald; Mönig, K; Møller, R; Müller, H; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Némécek, S; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rídky, J; Rückstuhl, W; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Stäck, H; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Sánchez, J; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van Eldik, J; Van der Velde, C; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Wehr, A; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; de Boer, Wim; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Åsman, B; Österberg, K; Überschär, B; Überschär, S

    1995-01-01

    \\def\\tpc{three-particle correlation} \\def\\twopc{two-particle correlation} Measurements are presented of short range three-particle correlations in e^+ e^- annihilations at LEP using data collected by the DELPHI detector. %The jet structure is studied using three-particle correlation functions. At small values of the four-momentum difference, strong three-particle correlations are observed for like-sign (+++ and ---) and for unlike-sign (++- and +--) pion combinations which are not a consequence of two-particle correlations. A possible explanation of the observed effects in like-sign combinations is the existence of higher order Bose-Einstein interference, which significantly changes the particle distributions in jets.

  5. A search for WIMPs with the CoGeNT public dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Matthew; Kelso, Chris; Collar, Juan

    2016-03-01

    Since December 2009, the CoGeNT experiment has recorded interactions in the detector with the goal of either detecting dark matter or setting stringent limits on the mass and cross-section of these particles, assuming that dark matter is a form of WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle). The collaboration has made public this dataset to the broader community and this analysis is based on that dataset. We perform an unbinned, maximum likelihood fit to the data, accounting for known backgrounds and systematic effects. {articlar care is paid to detector effects which can mimic the energy distribution of WIMP interactions. We model the WIMP signal, parametrized by energy deposition and time of year, mass, cross-section, and choice of local WIMP velocity distribution. Monte Carlo studies are performed to verify the stability and sensitivity of the fits and all code used in the analysis is made publicly available. The current status of this analysis will be presented.

  6. Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics with the Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TApAS*) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartoszek, Larry [Bartoszek Engineering, Aurora, IL (United States); Piacentino, Giovanni M. [Univ. of Cassino (Italy); Phillips, Thomas J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Apollinari, Giorgio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Broemmelsiek, Daniel R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Brown, Charles N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Christian, David C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hahn, Alan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Papadimitriou, Vaia [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stancari, Michelle [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stefanski, Ray [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Volk, James T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Werkema, Steven [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wester, Willam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); White, Herman B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Yeh, G. P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Baldini, Wander [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Jackson, Gerald P. [Hbar Technologies, Chicago, IL (United States); Lau, Kwong [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Kaplan, Daniel M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Torun, Yagmur [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); White, Christopher G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States). et al.

    2008-01-01

    We propose to assemble a cost-effective, yet powerful, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events and use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, and precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration, with installation occurring during the accelerator downtime following the completion of the Tevatron run, and with funding largely from university research grants. The experiment will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle-physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S.

  7. Tests of models for parton fragmentation in e e annihilation. [29 GeV center-of-mass energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, J.W.

    1985-11-01

    We examine the distribution of particles in the three jet events of e e annihilation. The data was collected with the PEP-4/Time Projection Chamber detector at 29 GeV center-of-mass energy at PEP. The experimental distributions are compared to the predictions of several fragmentation models which describe the transition of quarks and gluons into hadrons. In particular, our study emphasizes the three fragmentation models which are currently in widest use: the Lund string model, the Webber cluster model and the independent fragmentation model. These three models each possess different Lorentz frame structures for the distribution of hadron sources relative to the overall event c.m. in three jet events. The Lund string and independent fragmentation models are tuned to describe global event properties of our multihadronic annihilation event sample. This tuned Lund string model provides a good description of the distribution of particles between jet axes in three jet events, while the independent fragmentation model does not. We verify that the failure of the independent fragmentation model is not a consequence of parameter tuning or of model variant. The Webber cluster model, which is untuned, does not describe the absolute particle densities between jets but correctly predicts the ratios of those densities, which are less sensitive to the tuning. These results provide evidence that the sources of hadrons are boosted with respect to the overall center-of-mass in three jet events, with components of motion normal to the jet axes. The distribution of particles close to jet axes provides additional support for this conclusion. 94 refs.

  8. ATHENA: an actual antihydrogen annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This is an image of an actual matter-antimatter annihilation due to an atom of antihydrogen in the ATHENA experiment, located on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN since 2001. The antiproton produces four charged pions (yellow) whose positions are given by silicon microstrips (pink) before depositing energy in CsI crystals (yellow cubes). The positron also annihilates to produce back-to-back gamma rays (red).

  9. Consequences of DM/antiDM Oscillations for Asymmetric WIMP Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cirelli, Marco; Servant, Geraldine; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2012-01-01

    Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, a scenario usually dubbed Asymmetric Dark Matter (aDM), we study the effect of oscillations between dark matter and its antiparticle on the re-equilibration of the initial asymmetry before freeze-out, which enable efficient annihilations to recouple. We calculate the evolution of the DM relic abundance and show how oscillations re-open the parameter space of aDM models, in particular in the direction of allowing large (WIMP-scale) DM masses. A typical wimp with a mass at the EW scale (\\sim 100 GeV - 1 TeV) presenting a primordial asymmetry of the same order as the baryon asymmetry naturally gets the correct relic abundance if the DM-number-violating Delta(DM) = 2 mass term is in the \\sim meV range. The re-establishment of annihilations implies that constraints from the accumulation of aDM in astrophysical bodies are evaded. On the other hand, the ordinary bounds from BBN, CMB and indirect detection signals on annihilating DM have to be consi...

  10. General relativistic ray-tracing algorithm for the determination of the electron-positron energy deposition rate from neutrino pair annihilation around rotating neutron and quark stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Z.; Harko, T.

    2011-11-01

    We present a full general relativistic numerical code for estimating the energy-momentum deposition rate (EMDR) from neutrino pair annihilation (?). The source of the neutrinos is assumed to be a neutrino-cooled accretion disc around neutron and quark stars. We calculate the neutrino trajectories by using a ray-tracing algorithm with the general relativistic Hamilton's equations for neutrinos and derive the spatial distribution of the EMDR due to the annihilations of neutrinos and antineutrinos around rotating neutron and quark stars. We obtain the EMDR for several classes of rotating neutron stars, described by different equations of state of the neutron matter, and for quark stars, described by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) bag model equation of state and in the colour-flavour-locked (CFL) phase. The distribution of the total annihilation rate of the neutrino-antineutrino pairs around rotating neutron and quark stars is studied for isothermal discs and accretion discs in thermodynamical equilibrium. We demonstrate both the differences in the equations of state for neutron and quark matter and rotation with the general relativistic effects significantly modify the EMDR of the electrons and positrons generated by the neutrino-antineutrino pair annihilation around compact stellar objects, as measured at infinity.

  11. A DEAP & CLEAN Program for WIMP Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Andrew

    2007-04-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) provide a compelling explanation for dark matter that could be directly detected as they recoil in massive and ultra-pure detector targets operating deep underground. Thus far, the direct detection of WIMPs has eluded the most sensitive of experiments and it is desirable to achieve sensitivities some three orders of magnitude beyond the state-of-the-art. This will require development of novel detector technologies exploiting target masses of order a ton and with unprecedented control of radioactive background in order to achieve the desired sensitivity of a single event per ton per year. We have realized a conceptually simple and scalable detector technology using the unique properties of scintillation light in liquid argon and liquid neon. Ultimately, we envision a very massive detector of liquid neon that could serve simultaneously as a detector of WIMP dark matter and low-energy (pp-fusion) solar neutrinos. A DEAP & CLEAN program will be described that makes effective use of liquid argon and liquid neon, interchangeably, in a single detector.

  12. Comparisons of Fully Differential Exact Results for O(alpha) Virtual Corrections to Single Hard Bremsstrahlung in e+e- Annihilation at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Glosser, C; Ward, B F L; Yost, S A

    2004-01-01

    We present comparisons of the fully differential exact virtual correction to the important single hard bremsstrahlung process in e+e- annihilation at high energies, which is essential for precision studies of the Standard Model from 1 GeV to 1 TeV, as calculated by two completely independent methods and groups. We show that the two sets of results are in excellent agreement. Phenomenological implications are discussed.

  13. Beyond WIMPs: the Quark (Anti Nugget Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhitnitsky Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We review a testable dark matter (DM model outside of the standard WIMP paradigm. The model is unique in a sense that the observed ratio Ωdark ≃ Ωvisible for visible and dark matter densities finds its natural explanation as a result of their common QCD origin when both types of matter (DM and visible are formed during the QCD phase transition and both are proportional to single dimensional parameter of the system, Λqcd. We argue that the charge separation effect also inevitably occurs during the same QCD phase transition in the presence of the CP odd axion field a(x. It leads to preferential formation of one species of nuggets on the scales of the visible Universe where the axion field a(x is coherent. A natural outcome of this preferential evolution is that only one type of the visible baryons (not anti- baryons remain in the system after the nuggets complete their formation. Unlike conventional WIMP dark matter candidates, the nuggets and anti-nuggets are strongly interacting but macroscopically large objects. The rare events of annihilation of the anti-nuggets with visible matter lead to a number of observable effects. We argue that the relative intensities for a number of measured excesses of emission from the centre of galaxy (covering more than 11 orders of magnitude are determined by standard and well established physics. At the same time the absolute intensity of emission is determined by a single new fundamental parameter of the theory, the axion mass, 10−6eV ≲ ma ≲ 10−3eV. Finally, we comment on implications of these studies for the axion search experiments, including microwave cavity and the Orpheus experiments.

  14. Beyond WIMPs: the Quark (Anti) Nugget Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2017-03-01

    We review a testable dark matter (DM) model outside of the standard WIMP paradigm. The model is unique in a sense that the observed ratio Ωdark ≃ Ωvisible for visible and dark matter densities finds its natural explanation as a result of their common QCD origin when both types of matter (DM and visible) are formed during the QCD phase transition and both are proportional to single dimensional parameter of the system, Λqcd. We argue that the charge separation effect also inevitably occurs during the same QCD phase transition in the presence of the CP odd axion field a(x). It leads to preferential formation of one species of nuggets on the scales of the visible Universe where the axion field a(x) is coherent. A natural outcome of this preferential evolution is that only one type of the visible baryons (not anti- baryons) remain in the system after the nuggets complete their formation. Unlike conventional WIMP dark matter candidates, the nuggets and anti-nuggets are strongly interacting but macroscopically large objects. The rare events of annihilation of the anti-nuggets with visible matter lead to a number of observable effects. We argue that the relative intensities for a number of measured excesses of emission from the centre of galaxy (covering more than 11 orders of magnitude) are determined by standard and well established physics. At the same time the absolute intensity of emission is determined by a single new fundamental parameter of the theory, the axion mass, 10-6eV ≲ ma ≲ 10-3eV. Finally, we comment on implications of these studies for the axion search experiments, including microwave cavity and the Orpheus experiments.

  15. The Vacancy Formation Energy in Crystalline Adamantane Determined by Positron Annihilation Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lightbody, D.; Sherwood, J. N.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1980-01-01

    The injection of positrons into crystalline adamantane results in the formation of positronium (Ps). At temperatures T> 400 K the mean lifetime of the long-lived ortho-positronium exhibits a sigmoidal increase with temperature characteristic of the trapping of this species in thermally created de...... energy of lattice vacancies in adamantane derived from self-diffusion studies....

  16. A Study of Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Huajie [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Robust results of WIMP direct detection experiments depend on rm understandings of nuclear recoils in the detector media. This thesis documents the most comprehensive study to date on nuclear recoils in liquid argon - a strong candidate for the next generation multi-ton scale WIMP detectors. This study investigates both the energy partition from nuclear recoil energy to secondary modes (scintillation and ionization) and the pulse shape characteristics of scintillation from nuclear recoils.

  17. The Virtual Correction to Bremsstrahlung in High-Energy e+ e- Annihilation: Comparison of Exact Results

    CERN Document Server

    Yost, S.A.; Jadach, S.; Ward, B.F.L.

    2004-01-01

    We have compared the virtual corrections to single hard bremsstrahlung as calculated by S. Jadach, M. Melles, B.F.L. Ward and S.A. Yost to several other expressions. The most recent of these comparisons is to the leptonic tensor calculated by J.H. Kuhn and G. Rodrigo for radiative return. Agreement is found to within a part in 10^5 or better, as a fraction of the Born cross section, for most of the range of photon energies. The massless limits have been shown to agree analytically to NLL order.

  18. Can multistate dark matter annihilation explain the high-energy cosmic ray lepton anomalies?

    CERN Document Server

    Cirelli, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Multistate dark matter (DM) models with small mass splittings and couplings to light hidden sector bosons have been proposed as an explanation for the PAMELA/Fermi/H.E.S.S. high-energy lepton excesses. We investigate this proposal over a wide range of DM density profiles, in the framework of concrete models with doublet or triplet dark matter and a hidden SU(2) gauge sector that mixes with standard model hypercharge. The gauge coupling is bounded from below by the DM relic density, and the Sommerfeld enhancement factor is explicitly computable for given values of the DM and gauge boson masses M, mu and the (largest) dark matter mass splitting delta M_{12}. Sommerfeld enhancement is stronger at the galactic center than near the Sun because of the radial dependence of the DM velocity profile, which strengthens the inverse Compton (IC) gamma ray constraints relative to usual assumptions. We find that the PAMELA/Fermi/H.E.S.S. lepton excesses are marginally compatible with the model predictions, and with CMB and ...

  19. Boffins go underground searching for Wimps

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In a bid to identify the prime suspect for Dark Matter known as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or Wimps, British scientists have installed detectors 1100m down a salt mine at Boulby on the North Yorkshire moors (1/2 page).

  20. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-10-31

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10-44 and 1.18×10-41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  1. Deformed shell model study of event rates for WIMP-73Ge scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, R.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2017-12-01

    The event detection rates for the Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) (a dark matter candidate) are calculated with 73Ge as the detector. The calculations are performed within the deformed shell model (DSM) based on Hartree-Fock states. First, the energy levels and magnetic moment for the ground state and two low-lying positive parity states for this nucleus are calculated and compared with experiment. The agreement is quite satisfactory. Then the nuclear wave functions are used to investigate the elastic and inelastic scattering of WIMP from 73Ge; inelastic scattering, especially for the 9/2+ → 5/2+ transition, is studied for the first time. The nuclear structure factors which are independent of supersymmetric model are also calculated as a function of WIMP mass. The event rates are calculated for a given set of nucleonic current parameters. The calculation shows that 73Ge is a good detector for detecting dark matter.

  2. QCD model and comparison with the results of e+e- of annihilation in 60 GeV centre of mass energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Hayati

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available   We present the QCD models based on the hadronization of final states of e+e- annihilations, in 60 GeV centre of mass energy in the AMY detector at the KEK collider TRISTAN. To achieve this, we first find the jet axis by using the momentum tensor and diagonilizing it for each event. The models under consideration are the Webber, the Matrix Elements and the Parton Shower. In most cases our results are consistent with the models. Our results are also consistent with those obtained from other experiments.

  3. Comparison of Exact Results for the Virtual Corrections to Bremsstrahlung in Electron-Positron Annihilation at High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Yost, S.A.; Jadach, S.; Ward, B.F.L.

    2004-01-01

    We have compared the virtual corrections to electron-positron annihilation to fermion pairs with single hard bremsstrahlung as calculated by S. Jadach, M. Melles, B.F.L. Ward and S.A. Yost to several other expressions. The most recent of these comparisons is to the leptonic tensor calculated by J.H. Kuhn and G. Rodrigo for radiative return. Agreement is found to within $10^{-5}$ or better, as a fraction of the Born cross section.

  4. Power Corrections to the Universal Heavy WIMP-Nucleon Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Hill, Richard J.; Solon, Mikhail P.; Wijangco, Alexander M.

    2018-01-25

    WIMP-nucleon scattering is analyzed at order $1/M$ in Heavy WIMP Effective Theory. The $1/M$ power corrections, where $M\\gg m_W$ is the WIMP mass, distinguish between different underlying UV models with the same universal limit and their impact on direct detection rates can be enhanced relative to naive expectations due to generic amplitude-level cancellations at leading order. The necessary one- and two-loop matching calculations onto the low-energy effective theory for WIMP interactions with Standard Model quarks and gluons are performed for the case of an electroweak SU(2) triplet WIMP, considering both the cases of elementary fermions and composite scalars. The low-velocity WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section is evaluated and compared with current experimental limits and projected future sensitivities. Our results provide the most robust prediction for electroweak triplet Majorana fermion dark matter direct detection rates; for this case, a cancellation between two sources of power corrections yields a small total $1/M$ correction, and a total cross section close to the universal limit for $M \\gtrsim {\\rm few} \\times 100\\,{\\rm GeV}$. For the SU(2) composite scalar, the $1/M$ corrections introduce dependence on underlying strong dynamics. Using a leading chiral logarithm evaluation, the total $1/M$ correction has a larger magnitude and uncertainty than in the fermionic case, with a sign that further suppresses the total cross section. These examples provide definite targets for future direct detection experiments and motivate large scale detectors capable of probing to the neutrino floor in the TeV mass regime.

  5. A study of $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation into hadrons in the 1600-2200 MeV energy range with the magnetic detector DMI at DCI

    CERN Document Server

    Bizot, J C; Cordier, A.; Delcourt, B.; Derado, I.; Eschstruth, P.; Fayard, L.; Jeanjean, J.; Jeanjean, M.; Mane, F.; Parvan, J.C.; Ribes, M.; Rumpf, F.; Bertrand, J.L.; Bisello, D.

    1979-01-01

    We Presents the results obtained with the Magnetic Detector DM1 on the Orsay e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams (DCI) for 1570< square root S<2180 MeV. The total integrated luminosity is 936 nb/sup -1/ over the whole energy range. Kinematics of annihilation events is determined by momentum measurements on the charged particles with an accuracy Delta p/p approximately=2.5% at 500 MeV/c over a solid angle Omega =.6*4 pi sr. Cross sections are given for e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation into pp, into four and five pions: pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ including rho /sup +/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/, pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ including omega pi /sup +/ pi /sup - /, and into strange mesons K/sup +/K/sup -/, K/sub S//sup 0/K/sub L //sup 0/, KK*, KK pi pi including K*K pi , inclusive K/sub S//sup 0/. Limits on rare channels like baryonium states, phi /sup 0/ pi /sup 0/, phi /sup 0/ eta /sup 0/ are also obtained. (9 refs).

  6. Working Group Report: WIMP Dark Matter Direct Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, P.; Galbiati, C.; McKinsey, D. N.; Robertson, H.; Tait, T. M.P.

    2013-10-30

    As part of the Snowmass process, the Cosmic Frontier WIMP Direct Detection subgroup (CF1) has drawn on input from the Cosmic Frontier and the broader Particle Physics community to produce this document. The charge to CF1 was (a) to summarize the current status and projected sensitivity of WIMP direct detection experiments worldwide, (b) motivate WIMP dark matter searches over a broad parameter space by examining a spectrum of WIMP models, (c) establish a community consensus on the type of experimental program required to explore that parameter space, and (d) identify the common infrastructure required to practically meet those goals.

  7. Exclusion limits on the WIMP nucleon elastic scattering cross-section from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golwala, Sunil Ramanlal [UC, Berkeley

    2000-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that a large fraction of the matter in the universe is nonluminous, nonbaryonic, and “cold” — nonrelativistic at the time matter began to dominate the energy density of the universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are an excellent candidate for nonbaryonic, cold dark matter. Minimal supersymmetry provides a natural WIMP candidate in the form of the lightest superpartner, with a typical mass Mδ ~ 100 GeV c-2 . WIMPs are expected to have collapsed into a roughly isothermal, spherical halo within which the visible portion of our galaxy resides. They would scatter off nuclei via the weak interaction, potentially allowingtheir direct detection. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) employs Ge and Si detectors to search for WIMPs via their elastic-scatteringinteractions with nuclei while discriminatingagainst interactions of background particles. The former yield nuclear recoils while the latter produce electron recoils. The ionization yield (the ratio of ionization production to recoil energy in a semiconductor) of a particle interaction differs greatly for nuclear and electron recoils. CDMS detectors measure phonon and electron-hole-pair production to determine recoil energy and ionization yield for each event and thereby discriminate nuclear recoils from electron recoils. This dissertation reports new limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic-scattering cross section that exclude unexplored parameter space above 10 GeV c-2 WIMP mass and, at > 75% CL, the entire 3σ allowed region for the WIMP signal reported by the DAMA experiment. The experimental apparatus, detector performance, and data analysis are fully described.

  8. Galactic annihilation emission from nucleosynthesis positrons

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, P.; Strong, A. W.; Jean, P.; Alexis, A.; Diehl, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Galaxy hosts a widespread population of low-energy positrons revealed by successive generations of gamma-ray telescopes through a bright annihilation emission from the bulge region, with a fainter contribution from the inner disk. The exact origin of these particles remains currently unknown. We estimate the contribution to the annihilation signal of positrons generated in the decay of radioactive 26Al, 56Ni and 44Ti. We adapted the GALPROP propagation code to simulate the transport and a...

  9. Extending the Sensitivity to the Detection of WIMP Dark Matter with an Improved Understanding of the Limiting Neutron Backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamat, Sharmila [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses position-sensitive Germanium and Silicon crystals in the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) believed to constitute most of the dark matter in the Universe. WIMP interactions with matter being rare, identifying and eliminating known backgrounds is critical for detection. Event-by-event discrimination by the detectors rejects the predominant gamma and beta backgrounds while Monte Carlo simulations help estimate, and subtract, the contribution from the neutrons. This thesis describes the effort to understand neutron backgrounds as seen in the two stages of the CDMS search for WIMPs. The first stage of the experiment was at a shallow site at the Stanford Underground Facility where the limiting background came from high-energy neutrons produced by cosmic-ray muon interactions in the rock surrounding the cavern. Simulations of this background helped inform the analysis of data from an experimental run at this site and served as input for the background reduction techniques necessary to set new exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section, excluding new parameter space for WIMPs of masses 8-20 GeV/c2. This thesis considers the simulation methods used as well as how various event populations in the data served as checks on the simulations to allow them to be used in the interpretation of the WIMP-search data. The studies also confirmed the presence of a limiting neutron background at the shallow site, necessitating the move to the 713-meter deep Soudan Underground Facility. Similar computer-based studies helped quantify the neutron background seen at the deeper site and informed the analysis of the data emerging from the first physics run of the experiment at Soudan. In conjunction with the WIMP-search and calibration data, the simulations confirmed that increased depth considerably reduced the neutron backgrounds seen, greatly improving the sensitivity to WIMP detection. The data

  10. WIMP search and a Cherenkov detector prototype for ILC polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Christoph

    2011-10-15

    The planned International Linear Collider (ILC) will be an essential experiment to precisely determine the properties and structure of physics at the TeV scale. An important feature of the ILC is the possibility to use polarized electrons and positrons. In part 1 of this thesis, a model independent search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) at ILC is presented. The signal channel under study is direct WIMP pair production with associated Initial State Radiation (ISR), e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {chi}{chi}{gamma}, where the WIMPs leave the detector without any further interaction, and only the emitted photon is detected. From the energy spectrum of the detected photons the coupling structure, cross sections, masses and the quantum number of the dominant partial wave in the production process can be inferred. The analysis includes the dominant SM, as well as machine-induced backgrounds, and is performed using a full simulation of the ILD detector concept. For an integrated luminosity of L=500 fb{sup -1}, the signal cross sections can be measured to a precision of 3%, dominated by systematic uncertainties on the polarization measurement of the initial electrons and positrons. Masses can be measured to a precision of up to 2% by a comparison of the data photon spectrum to parametrized template spectra. In part 2 of this thesis, a Cherenkov detector prototype for Compton polarimetry at ILC is presented. For the polarization measurement a systematic uncertainty of {delta} P/P = 0.25% or better is envisioned. To achieve this goal, the Cherenkov detector has to be precisely aligned with the fan of Compton scattered electrons and its signal response needs to be highly linear. For the detector prototype data driven alignment strategies have been developed by comparing data recorded at the Elsa accelerator in Bonn, Germany, with detailed Geant4 simulations. With the use of multi-anode photomultipliers, data driven alignment strategies promise to provide the

  11. Improved EDELWEISS-III sensitivity for low-mass WIMPs using a profile likelihood approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehn, L. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Armengaud, E.; Boissiere, T. de; Gros, M.; Navick, X.F.; Nones, C.; Paul, B. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Arnaud, Q. [Univ Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Lyon (France); Queen' s University, Kingston (Canada); Augier, C.; Billard, J.; Cazes, A.; Charlieux, F.; Jesus, M. de; Gascon, J.; Juillard, A.; Queguiner, E.; Sanglard, V.; Vagneron, L. [Univ Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Lyon (France); Benoit, A.; Camus, P. [Institut Neel, CNRS/UJF, Grenoble (France); Berge, L.; Chapellier, M.; Dumoulin, L.; Giuliani, A.; Le-Sueur, H.; Marnieros, S.; Olivieri, E.; Poda, D. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Bluemer, J. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Broniatowski, A. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Eitel, K.; Kozlov, V.; Siebenborn, B. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Foerster, N.; Heuermann, G.; Scorza, S. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Jin, Y. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS, Route de Nozay, Marcoussis (France); Kefelian, C. [Univ Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Lyon (France); Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kleifges, M.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Weber, M. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Kudryavtsev, V.A. [University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Pari, P. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Piro, M.C. [CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Rozov, S.; Yakushev, E. [JINR, Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Schmidt, B. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-15

    We report on a dark matter search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) in the mass range m{sub χ} element of [4, 30] GeV/c{sup 2} with the EDELWEISS-III experiment. A 2D profile likelihood analysis is performed on data from eight selected detectors with the lowest energy thresholds leading to a combined fiducial exposure of 496 kg-days. External backgrounds from γ- and β-radiation, recoils from {sup 206}Pb and neutrons as well as detector intrinsic backgrounds were modelled from data outside the region of interest and constrained in the analysis. The basic data selection and most of the background models are the same as those used in a previously published analysis based on boosted decision trees (BDT) [1]. For the likelihood approach applied in the analysis presented here, a larger signal efficiency and a subtraction of the expected background lead to a higher sensitivity, especially for the lowest WIMP masses probed. No statistically significant signal was found and upper limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section can be set with a hypothesis test based on the profile likelihood test statistics. The 90 % C.L. exclusion limit set for WIMPs with m{sub χ} = 4 GeV/c{sup 2} is 1.6 x 10{sup -39} cm{sup 2}, which is an improvement of a factor of seven with respect to the BDT-based analysis. For WIMP masses above 15 GeV/c{sup 2} the exclusion limits found with both analyses are in good agreement. (orig.)

  12. A search for gamma-ray imprints of annihilating dark matter in the galaxy, and the astrophysical implications of ultra-light fundamental vector bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zechlin, Hannes-Sebastian

    2013-12-15

    Standard Model extensions imply new elementary particles that can lead to specific astrophysical signatures. In particular, weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) can constitute the unknown non-luminous cold dark matter, which contributes approximately 84% to the matter content of the Universe. Annihilation or decay of WIMPs may lead to high-energy gamma-rays. In this thesis, new methods of searching for gamma-ray signals from annihilating dark matter are developed and applied. Moreover, astrophysical imprints of new ultra-light hidden U(1) gauge bosons in radio data are investigated. Hierarchical structure formation predicts a variety of smaller bound dark matter sub-halos in Milky-Way-like galactic hosts. It is shown that the Fermi-LAT is sufficiently sensitive for detecting up to a few nearby dark matter subhalos in terms of faint gamma-ray sources with a moderate angular extent. Searches in the first and second Fermi-LAT source catalogs reveal about ten candidate sources each. To discriminate the source candidates from conventional astrophysical objects, an analysis for spectral, spatial, positional, and temporal gamma-ray properties using 3.5 years of Fermi-LAT data is carried out. In addition, a multi-wavelength analysis of archival data or follow-up observations in the radio, infrared, optical, UV, X-ray, high-energy, and very-high energy gamma-ray bands is carried out. The broad-band spectra of all promising candidates are compatible with AGN, in particular high-energy peaked BL-Lac type objects (HBLs). Dark matter annihilation can contribute to the small-scale angular anisotropy spectrum of the diffuse gamma-ray background (DGB). The detection capabilities of currently operating imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) are studied. With CTA, a relative gamma-ray contribution from annihilating dark matter of 10% to the extragalactic DGB can be resolved via angular anisotropies. In terms of the dark

  13. High energy oxygen irradiation-induced defects in Fe-doped semi-insulating indium phosphide by positron annihilation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S.; Mandal, A.; Sohel, Md. A.; Saha, A. K.; Das, D.; Sen Gupta, A.

    2017-02-01

    Positron annihilation technique is applied to study the recovery of radiation-induced defects in 140 MeV oxygen (O6+) irradiated Fe-doped semi-insulating indium phosphide during annealing over a temperature region of 25∘C-650∘C. Lifetime spectra of the irradiated sample are fitted with three lifetime components. Trapping model analysis is used to characterize defect states corresponding to the de-convoluted lifetime values. After irradiation, the observed average lifetime of positron τavg = 263 ps at room temperature is higher than the bulk lifetime by 21 ps which reveals the presence of radiation-induced defects in the material. A decrease in τavg occurs during room temperature 25∘C to 200∘C indicating the dissociation of higher order defects, might be due to positron trapping in acceptor-type of defects (VIn). A reverse annealing stage is found at temperature range of 250∘C-425∘C for S-parameter probably due to the migration of vacancies and the formation of vacancy clusters. Increase in R-parameter from 325∘C to 425∘C indicates the change in the nature of predominant positron trapping sites. Beyond 425∘C, τavg, S-parameter and R-parameter starts decreasing and around 650∘C, τavg and S-parameter approached almost the bulk value showing the annealing out of radiation-induced defects.

  14. Positron annihilation with core and valence electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D G

    2015-01-01

    $\\gamma$-ray spectra for positron annihilation with the core and valence electrons of the noble gas atoms Ar, Kr and Xe is calculated within the framework of diagrammatic many-body theory. The effect of positron-atom and short-range positron-electron correlations on the annihilation process is examined in detail. Short-range correlations, which are described through non-local corrections to the vertex of the annihilation amplitude, are found to significantly enhance the spectra for annihilation on the core orbitals. For Ar, Kr and Xe, the core contributions to the annihilation rate are found to be 0.55\\%, 1.5\\% and 2.2\\% respectively, their small values reflecting the difficulty for the positron to probe distances close to the nucleus. Importantly however, the core subshells have a broad momentum distribution and markedly contribute to the annihilation spectra at Doppler energy shifts $\\gtrsim3$\\,keV, and even dominate the spectra of Kr and Xe at shifts $\\gtrsim5$\\,keV. Their inclusion brings the theoretical ...

  15. The Diurnal Variation of the Wimp Detection Event Rates in Directional Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D

    2009-01-01

    The recent WMAP data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Modern particle theories naturally provide viable cold dark matter candidates with masses in the GeV-TeV region. Supersymmetry provides the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), theories in extra dimensions supply the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) etc. The nature of dark matter can only be unraveled only by its direct detection in the laboratory. All such candidates will be called WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). In any case the direct dark matter search, which amounts to detecting the recoiling nucleus, following its collision with WIMP, is central to particle physics and cosmology. In this work we briefly review the theoretical elements relevant to the direct dark matter detection experiments, paying particular attention to directional experiments. i.e experiments in which, not only the energy but the direction of the recoiling nucleus is ob...

  16. QCD analyses and determinations of $\\alpha_{s}$ in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation at energies between 35 and 189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeifenschneider, P.; Movilla Fernandez, P.A.; Abbiendi, G.; Ackerstaff, K.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.; Jade, The

    2000-01-01

    We employ data taken by the JADE and OPAL experiments for an integrated QCD study in hadronic e+e- annihilations at c.m.s. energies ranging from 35 GeV through 189 GeV. The study is based on jet-multiplicity related observables. The observables are obtained to high jet resolution scales with the JADE, Durham, Cambridge and cone jet finders, and compared with the predictions of various QCD and Monte Carlo models. The strong coupling strength, alpha_s, is determined at each energy by fits of O(alpha_s^2) calculations, as well as matched O(alpha_s^2) and NLLA predictions, to the data. Matching schemes are compared, and the dependence of the results on the choice of the renormalization scale is investigated. The combination of the results using matched predictions gives alpha_s(MZ)=0.1187+{0.0034}-{0.0019}. The strong coupling is also obtained, at lower precision, from O(alpha_s^2) fits of the c.m.s. energy evolution of some of the observables. A qualitative comparison is made between the data and a recent MLLA p...

  17. A search for WIMPs and tests of local dark matter velocity distributions with the CoGeNT public dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Matthew; Kelso, Chris; Collar, Juan; Fields, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Since December 2009, the CoGeNT experiment has recorded interactions in the detector with the goal of either detecting dark matter or setting stringent limits on the mass and cross section of these particles, assuming that dark matter is a form of WIMP (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle). The collaboration has made public this dataset to the broader community and this analysis is based on that dataset. We perform an unbinned, maximum likelihood fit to the data, accounting for known backgrounds and systematic effects. We model the WIMP signal, parametrized by energy deposition and time of year, mass, cross-section, and choice of local WIMP velocity distribution. The velocity distribution is modeled with a Maxwellian-Boltzman distribution, as well as more directional streams. The current status of this analysis will be presented.

  18. Planck-scale effects on WIMP dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiane M Boucenna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists a widely known conjecture that gravitational effects violate global symmetries. We study the effect of global-symmetry violating higher-dimension operators induced by Planck-scale physics on the properties of WIMP dark matter. Using an effective description, we show that the lifetime of the WIMP dark matter candidate can satisfy cosmological bounds under reasonable assumptions regarding the strength of the dimension-five operators. On the other hand, the indirect WIMP dark matter detection signal is significantly enhanced due to new decay channels.

  19. Inclusive hadron production and two particle correlations in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV center-of-mass energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, M.

    1984-12-01

    We have studied hadron production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV center-of-mass energy using the PEP-4 Time Projection Chamber Detector. The inclusive cross sections and mean multiplicities for ..pi../sup + -/, K/sup + -/ and (p + anti p) production have been measured using ionization energy loss to separate particle species. We find on average 10.7 +- 0.6 ..pi../sup + -/, 1.35 +- .13 K/sup + -/ and 0.60 +- 0.08 (p + anti p) per multihadron event. The differential cross section is well described by a number of Monte Carlo hadronization models. In addition, we have observed correlations in rapidity space for identified pions and kaons. Short-range KK correlations provide evidence for local flavor compensation during hadronization. Long-range ..pi pi.. and KK correlations indicate that the initial partons carry flavor. We also observe significant long-range ..pi..K correlations as a result of heavy quark decays. 85 references, 67 figures, 11 tables.

  20. A study of the reaction $e^+ e^- \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^-\\gamma_{ISR}$ at LEP and search for new physics at annihilation energies near 80 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Yi, J; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    A study of the channel $e^{+}e^{-}~\\rightarrow~\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}\\gamma_{\\ sc ISR}$, where $\\gamma_{\\sc ISR}$ is an initial state radiation photon, is presented using data collected by the DELPHI experiment from 1991 to 1994. The total cross-section at effective annihilation energies ($\\sqrt{s'}$) below the $Z^0$ peak is obtained by using the events with relatively hard initial state radiative photon(s) ($E_{\\gamma}~>~$~1~GeV). The differential cross-section as a function of the muon polar production angle is also determined in order to extract the forward-backward asymmetries for the reaction $e^+ e^- \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ at energies $\\sqrt{s'}$ between 20 and 87~GeV. The ratio of the helicity cross-sections $\\frac{\\sigma_{LL}+\\sigma_{RR}}{\\sigma_{RL}+\\sigma_{LR}}$, where the two subscripts stand for the helicities of the incoming $e^-$ and outgoing $\\mu^-$ respectively, is extracted from the differential cross-sections in order to test the Standard Model and to look for new physics near 80 GeV. No deviation...

  1. CMB constraint on dark matter annihilation after Planck 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Nakayama, Kazunori, E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 133-0033 (Japan); Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toyokazu [Institute for Basic Science, Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Daejeon 34051 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-10

    We update the constraint on the dark matter annihilation cross section by using the recent measurements of the CMB anisotropy by the Planck satellite. We fully calculate the cascade of dark matter annihilation products and their effects on ionization, heating and excitation of the hydrogen, hence do not rely on any assumption on the energy fractions that cause these effects.

  2. Direct evidence for positron annihilation from shallow traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Hidalgo, C.

    1987-01-01

    For deformed Ag the temperature dependence of the positron lifetime parameters is followed between 12 and 300 K. Clear direct evidence for positron trapping and annihilation at shallow traps, with a positron binding energy of 9±2 meV and annihilation characteristics very similar to those in the p...

  3. Impact of dark matter decays and annihilations on structure formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: We derived the evolution of the energy deposition in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by different decaying (or annihilating) dark matter (DM) candidates. Heavy annihilating DM particles (with mass larger than a few GeV) have no influence on reionization and heating, even if we assume that

  4. Science plumbs new depths in hunt for Wimps

    CERN Multimedia

    Benfield, C

    2003-01-01

    Lord Sainsbury has officially opened a laboratory in the salt mine at Boulby near Whitby. The lab is searching for WIMPs and was recently awarded 3.1 millions pounds by PPARC to upgrade the facility (1 page).

  5. Status of TeO2 Detectors for WIMPS Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Nucciotii, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.; Vanzini, M.; Zanotti, L.; Bucci, C.; Pobes, C.; Giuliani, A.

    Thanks to very high energy resolutions , low energy thresholds and very high sensitivity to nuclear recoils, cryogenic thermal detectors my play an important role in study and search dark matter particles of the universe. Milano group works with this type of detectors since many years and, at presents, operates the bigger cryogenic thermal detector with a total mass of 6.8 kg of TeO2 crystals segmented in 20 active channels. This detector is in operation since 1998 and has realized to search for double beta decay of 130Te. As a by product of this measurement also dark matter study will be conducted and, especially in the last year, a strong effort was made to further reduce threshold and spurious background in low energy region . The preliminary data on WIMPs searches with this detector is here reported . The improvement of this experiment will be the realization of the CUORICINO detector. Some preliminary tests on this new detector will be presented and briefly discussed.

  6. Positron annihilation microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canter, K.F. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Advances in positron annihilation microprobe development are reviewed. The present resolution achievable is 3 {mu}m. The ultimate resolution is expected to be 0.1 {mu}m which will enable the positron microprobe to be a valuable tool in the development of 0.1 {mu}m scale electronic devices in the future. (author)

  7. Exploring the particle nature of dark matter with the All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Regina; Meyer, Manuel

    2017-08-01

    The era of precision cosmology has revealed that ~80% of the matter in the universe is dark matter. Two leading candidates, motivated by both particle and astrophysics, are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and Weakly Interacting Sub-eV Particles (WISPs) like axions and axionlike particles. Both WIMPs and WISPs have distinct gamma-ray signatures. Data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) continues to be an integral part of the search for these dark matter signatures spanning the 50 MeV to >300 GeV energy range in a variety of astrophysical targets. Thus far, there are no conclusive detections; however, there is an intriguing excess of gamma rays associated with Galactic center (GCE) that could be explained with WIMP annihilation. The angular resolution of the LAT at lower energies makes source selection challenging and the true nature of the detected signal remains unknown. WISP searches using, e.g. supernova explosions, spectra of blazars, or strongly magnetized environments, would also greatly benefit from increased angular and energy resolution, as well as from polarization measurements. To address these, we are developing AMEGO, the All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory. This instrument has a projected energy and angular resolution that will increase sensitivity by a factor of 20-50 over previous instruments. This will allow us to explore new areas of dark matter parameter space and provide unprecedented access to its particle nature.

  8. Exploring the particle nature of dark matter with the All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory (AMEGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Regina; Meyer, Manuel; Sánchez-Conde, Miguel; AMEGO

    2018-01-01

    The era of precision cosmology has revealed that ~80% of the matter in the universe is dark matter. Two leading candidates, motivated by both particle and astrophysics, are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and Weakly Interacting Sub-eV Particles (WISPs) like axions and axionlike particles. Both WIMPs and WISPs have distinct gamma-ray signatures. Data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) continues to be an integral part of the search for these dark matter signatures spanning the 50 MeV to >300 GeV energy range in a variety of astrophysical targets. Thus far, there are no conclusive detections; however, there is an intriguing excess of gamma rays associated with Galactic center (GCE) that could be explained with WIMP annihilation. The angular resolution of the LAT at lower energies makes source selection challenging and the true nature of the detected signal remains unknown. WISP searches using, e.g. supernova explosions, spectra of blazars, or strongly magnetized environments, would also greatly benefit from increased angular and energy resolution, as well as from polarization measurements. To address these, we are developing AMEGO, the All-sky Medium Energy Gamma-ray Observatory. This instrument has a projected energy and angular resolution that will increase sensitivity by a factor of 20-50 over previous instruments. This will allow us to explore new areas of dark matter parameter space and provide unprecedented access to its particle nature.

  9. TREX-DM: a low-background Micromegas-based TPC for low-mass WIMP detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguaz, F.J.; Garza, J.G.; Castel, J.F.; Cebrian, S.; Dafni, T.; Garcia, J.A.; Irastorza, I.G.; Lagraba, A.; Luzon, G.; Peiro, A. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Aznar, F. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Grupo de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Universidad de Zaragoza, Centro Universitario de la Defensa, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    If Dark Matter is made of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below ∝20 GeV, the corresponding nuclear recoils in mainstream WIMP experiments are of energies too close, or below, the experimental threshold. Gas Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) can be operated with a variety of target elements, offer good tracking capabilities and, on account of the amplification in gas, very low thresholds are achievable. Recent advances in electronics and in novel radiopure TPC readouts, especially micro-mesh gas structure (Micromegas), are improving the scalability and low-background prospects of gaseous TPCs. Here we present TREX-DM, a prototype to test the concept of a Micromegas-based TPC to search for low-mass WIMPs. The detector is designed to host an active mass of ∝0.300 kg of Ar at 10 bar, or alternatively ∝0.160 kg of Ne at 10 bar, with an energy threshold below 0.4 keVee, and is fully built with radiopure materials. We will describe the detector in detail, the results from the commissioning phase on surface, as well as a preliminary background model. The anticipated sensitivity of this technique may go beyond current experimental limits for WIMPs of masses of 2-8 GeV. (orig.)

  10. e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation into two hadrons in the energy interval 1400-2400 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alles-Borelli, V; Bollini, D; Brunini, P L; Fiorentino, E; Massam, Thomas; Monari, L; Palmonari, F; Rimondi, F; Zichichi, A

    1972-01-01

    The proof is given for the existence of the reaction e/sup +/e/sup -/ to /sup +or-/h/sup -or+/ in the energy range 1400-2400 MeV, and its energy dependence is compared with that of e/sup +/e/sup -/ to e/sup +or-/E/sup -or+/, in the same experimental conditions of observation. The exponent of the s-dependence of the ratio alpha =(e/sup +/e/sup -/ to h/sup +or-/h/sup -or+/)/(e/sup +/e/sup -/ to e/sup +or-/e/sup -or+ /) is measured to be n=2.08+or-0.45, in the s-range (1.96-5.76)GeV/sup 2/, on the basis of 51 e/sup +/e/sup -/ to /sup +or-/h/sup -or+/ events and 8918 e/sup +/e/sup -/ to /sup +or-/e/sup -or+/ events observed. (8 refs).

  11. Antiprotons from dark matter annihilation in the Galaxy. Astrophysical uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evoli, Carmelo [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Cholis, Ilias; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [INFN, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    The latest years have seen steady progresses in WIMP dark matter (DM) searches, with hints of possible signals suggested by both direct and indirect detection experiments. Antiprotons can play a key role validating those interpretations since they are copiously produced by WIMP annihilations in the Galactic halo, and the secondary antiproton background produced by Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions is predicted with fair accuracy and matches the observed spectrum very well. Using the publicly available numerical DRAGON code, we reconsider antiprotons as a tool to constrain DM models discussing its power and limitations. We provide updated constraints on a wide class of annihilating DM models by comparing our predictions against the most up-to-date anti p measurements, taking also into account the latest spectral information on the p, He and other CR nuclei fluxes. Doing that, we probe carefully the uncertainties associated to both secondary and DM originated antiprotons, by using a variety of distinctively different assumptions for the propagation of CRs and for the DM distribution in the Galaxy. We find that the impact of the astrophysical uncertainties on constraining the DM properties can be much stronger, up to a factor of {proportional_to}50, than the one due to uncertainties on the DM distribution ({proportional_to}2-6). Remarkably, even reducing the uncertainties on the propagation parameters derived by local observables, non-local effects can still change DM model constraints even by 50%. Nevertheless, current anti p data place tight constraints on DM models, excluding some of those suggested in connection with indirect and direct searches. Finally we discuss the power of upcoming CR spectral data from the AMS-02 observatory to drastically reduce the uncertainties discussed in this paper and estimate the expected sensitivity of this instrument to some sets of DM models. (orig.)

  12. Baryon production in $e^{+}e^{-}$-annihilation at PETRA

    CERN Document Server

    Bartel, Wulfrin; Dittmann, P; Eichler, R; Felst, R; Haidt, Dieter; Krehbiel, H; Meier, K; Naroska, Beate; O'Neill, L H; Steffen, P; Wenninger, Horst; Zhang, Y; Elsen, E E; Helm, M; Petersen, A; Warming, P; Weber, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Drumm, H; Heintze, J; Heinzelmann, G; Hellenbrand, K H; Heuer, R D; Von Krogh, J; Lennert, P; Kawabata, S; Matsumura, H; Nozaki, T; Olsson, J; Rieseberg, H; Wagner, A; Bell, A; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Wriedt, H; Allison, J; Ball, A H; Bamford, G; Barlow, R; Bowdery, C K; Duerdoth, I P; Hassard, J F; King, B T; Loebinger, F K; MacBeth, A A; McCann, H; Mills, H E; Murphy, P G; Prosper, H B; Stephens, K; Clarke, D; Goddard, M C; Marshall, R; Pearce, G F; Kobayashi, T; Komamiya, S; Koshiba, M; Minowa, M; Nozaki, M; Orito, S; Sato, A; Suda, T; Takeda, H; Totsuka, Y; Watanabe, Y; Yamada, S; Yanagisawa, C

    1981-01-01

    Data on p and Lambda production by e/sup +/e/sup -/-annihilation at CM energies between 30 and 36 GeV are presented. Indication for an angular anticorrelation in events with baryon-antibaryon pairs is seen.

  13. 6th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2010). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudis, Laura; Schumann, Marc (eds.)

    2010-11-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Axions, WIMPs, WISPs, and neutrinos in the universe, laboratory experimental searching for WISPs, astrophysical experimental searching for WISPs, direct and indirect detection of WIMPs, new ideas and developments, visions, large laboratories. (HSI)

  14. Proceedings of the 4th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Axel; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas (eds.)

    2008-08-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Physical foundations for WIMPs, axions, and WISPS, signals from astrophysical sources, direct searches for dark matter WIMPs, new theoretical developments, new experimental approaches. (HSI)

  15. Direct WIMP searches with XENON100 and XENON1T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Ferella Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON direct Dark Matter search program. It consists of an ultra-low background double phase (liquid-gas xenon filled time projection chamber with a total mass of 161 kg (62 in the target region and 99 in the active shield, installed at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS. Here the results from the 224.6 live days of data taken between March 2011 and April 2012 are reported. The experiment set one of the most stringent limits on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section to date (2 × 10−45 cm2 for a 55 Gev/c2 WIMP mass at 90 % confidence level and the most stringent on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction (3.5 × 10−40 for a 45 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. With the same dataset, XENON100 excludes also solar axion coupling to electrons at gAe > 7.7 × 10−12 for a mass of mAxion 1 × 10−12 at a mass range of mAxion = 5−10 keV/c2 (both 90 % C.L.. Moreover an absolute spectral comparison between simulated and measured nuclear recoil distributions of light and charge signals from a 241AmBe source demonstrates a high level of detector and systematics understanding. Finally, the third generation of the XENON experiments, XENON1T, is the first tonne scale direct WIMP search experiment currently under construction. The commissioning phase of XENON1T is expected to start in early 2015 followed, a few months after, by the first science run. The experiment will reach sensitivities on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section down to 2 ×10−47 cm2 after two years of data taking.

  16. The moment of truth for WIMP dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Gianfranco

    2010-11-18

    We know that dark matter constitutes 85 per cent of all the matter in the Universe, but we do not know of what it is made. Amongst the many dark matter candidates proposed, WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles) occupy a special place, because they arise naturally from new theories that seek to extend the standard model of particle physics. With the advent of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and a new generation of astroparticle experiments, the moment of truth has come for WIMPs: either we will discover them in the next five to ten years, or we will witness their inevitable decline.

  17. Biological Effectiveness of Antiproton Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggiore, C.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, N.

    2004-01-01

    from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status...

  18. Dark matter annihilation in the circumgalactic medium at high redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, S.; Mack, K. J.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2018-03-01

    Annihilating dark matter (DM) models offer promising avenues for future DM detection, in particular via modification of astrophysical signals. However, when modelling such potential signals at high redshift, the emergence of both DM and baryonic structure, as well as the complexities of the energy transfer process, needs to be taken into account. In the following paper, we present a detailed energy deposition code and use this to examine the energy transfer efficiency of annihilating DM at high redshift, including the effects on baryonic structure. We employ the PYTHIA code to model neutralino-like DM candidates and their subsequent annihilation products for a range of masses and annihilation channels. We also compare different density profiles and mass-concentration relations for 105-107 M⊙ haloes at redshifts 20 and 40. For these DM halo and particle models, we show radially dependent ionization and heating curves and compare the deposited energy to the haloes' gravitational binding energy. We use the `filtered' annihilation spectra escaping the halo to calculate the heating of the circumgalactic medium and show that the mass of the minimal star-forming object is increased by a factor of 2-3 at redshift 20 and 4-5 at redshift 40 for some DM models.

  19. NEWSdm: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search with directional measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Crescenzo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Direct Dark Matter searches are nowadays one of the most exciting research topics. Several experimental efforts are concentrated on the development, construction, and operation of detectors looking for the scattering of target nuclei with Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs). The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a challenging strategy to extend dark matter searches beyond the neutrino floor and provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Current directional experiments are based on the use of gas TPC whose sensitivity is strongly limited by the small achievable detector mass. We present an innovative directional experiment based on the use of a solid target made by newly developed nuclear emulsions and read-out systems reaching a position resolution of the order of 10 nm.

  20. NEWSdm: Nuclear Emulsions for WIMP Search with directional measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Crescenzo A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Dark Matter searches are nowadays one of the most exciting research topics. Several experimental efforts are concentrated on the development, construction, and operation of detectors looking for the scattering of target nuclei with Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs. The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a challenging strategy to extend dark matter searches beyond the neutrino floor and provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Current directional experiments are based on the use of gas TPC whose sensitivity is strongly limited by the small achievable detector mass. We present an innovative directional experiment based on the use of a solid target made by newly developed nuclear emulsions and read-out systems reaching a position resolution of the order of 10 nm.

  1. Positron annihilation in superconductive metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekhtjar, I.J.

    1969-03-10

    A correlation is shown between the parameters of superconductive metals and those of positron annihilation. Particular attention is paid to the density states obtained from the electron specific heat.

  2. Nucleon-antinucleon annihilation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dover, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress towards a microscopic understanding of nucleon- antinucleon N/ovr N/ annihilation is reviewed. We consider statistical models, the constraints imposed by SU(2) or SU(3) flavor symmetry and the spin-flavor-color dependence of effective operators for the creation/destruction of quark-antiquark (Q/ovr Q/) pairs in N/ovr N/ annihilation processes. The importance of dynamical selection rules is emphasized as a means of revealing the underlying reaction mechanism. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Constraints on low-mass WIMP interactions on 19F from PICASSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, S.; Behnke, E.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dai, X.; Das, M.; Davour, A.; Debris, F.; Dhungana, N.; Farine, J.; Gagnebin, S.; Giroux, G.; Grace, E.; Jackson, C. M.; Kamaha, A.; Krauss, C.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lafrenière, M.; Laurin, M.; Lawson, I.; Lessard, L.; Levine, I.; Levy, C.; MacDonald, R. P.; Marlisov, D.; Martin, J.-P.; Mitra, P.; Noble, A. J.; Piro, M.-C.; Podviyanuk, R.; Pospisil, S.; Saha, S.; Scallon, O.; Seth, S.; Starinski, N.; Stekl, I.; Wichoski, U.; Xie, T.; Zacek, V.

    2012-05-01

    Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c2. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c2 with a cross section on protons of σpSD=0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c2 favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than σpSI=1.41×10-4 pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.

  4. Constraints on low-mass WIMP interactions on {sup 19}F from PICASSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambault, S. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Behnke, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, IN 46634 (United States); Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Centre for AstroParticle Physics (CAPP), Kolkata 700064 (India); Dai, X. [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Das, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Centre for AstroParticle Physics (CAPP), Kolkata 700064 (India); Davour, A. [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Debris, F. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Dhungana, N.; Farine, J. [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Gagnebin, S. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Giroux, G. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Grace, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, IN 46634 (United States); Jackson, C.M. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Kamaha, A. [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Krauss, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); and others

    2012-05-03

    Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c{sup 2}. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c{sup 2} with a cross section on protons of {sigma}{sub p}{sup SD}=0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c{sup 2} favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than {sigma}{sub p}{sup SI}=1.41 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.

  5. Constraints on Low-Mass WIMP Interactions on 19F from PICASSO

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, S; Bhattacharjee, P; Bhattacharya, S; Dai, X; Das, M; Davour, A; Debris, F; Dhungana, N; Farine, J; Gagnebin, S; Giroux, G; Grace, E; Jackson, C M; Kamaha, A; Krauss, C; Kumaratunga, S; Lafrenière, M; Laurin, M; Lawson, I; Lessard, L; Levine, I; Levy, C; MacDonald, R P; Marlisov, D; Martin, J -P; Mitra, P; Noble, A J; Piro, M -C; Podviyanuk, R; Pospisil, S; Saha, S; Scallon, O; Seth, S; Starinski, N; Stekl, I; Wichoski, U; Xie, T; Zacek, V

    2012-01-01

    Recent results from the PICASSO dark matter search experiment at SNOLAB are reported. These results were obtained using a subset of 10 detectors with a total target mass of 0.72 kg of 19F and an exposure of 114 kgd. The low backgrounds in PICASSO allow recoil energy thresholds as low as 1.7 keV to be obtained which results in an increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below 10 GeV/c^2. No dark matter signal was found. Best exclusion limits in the spin dependent sector were obtained for WIMP masses of 20 GeV/c^2 with a cross section on protons of sigma_p^SD = 0.032 pb (90% C.L.). In the spin independent sector close to the low mass region of 7 GeV/c2 favoured by CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA, cross sections larger than sigma_p^SI = 1.41x10^-4 pb (90% C.L.) are excluded.

  6. Constraining annihilating dark matter by x-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Man Ho

    2017-09-01

    In the past decade, gamma-ray observations and radio observations put strong constraints on the parameters of dark matter annihilation. In this article, we suggest another robust way to constrain the parameters of dark matter annihilation. We expect that the electrons and positrons produced from dark matter annihilation would scatter with the cosmic microwave background photons and boost the photon energy to ˜ keV order. Based on the x-ray data from the Draco dwarf galaxy, the new constraints for some of the annihilation channels are generally tighter than the constraints obtained from 6 years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) gamma-ray observations of the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. The lower limits of dark matter mass annihilating via e+e-, μ+μ-, τ+τ-, gg, u\\bar{u} and b\\bar{b} channels are 40 GeV, 28 GeV, 30 GeV, 57 GeV, 58 GeV and 66 GeV respectively with the canonical thermal relic cross section. This method is particularly useful to constrain dark matter annihilating via e+e-, μ+μ-, gg, u\\bar{u} and b\\bar{b} channels.

  7. From creation and annihilation operators to statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyuelos, M.

    2018-01-01

    A procedure to derive the partition function of non-interacting particles with exotic or intermediate statistics is presented. The partition function is directly related to the associated creation and annihilation operators that obey some specific commutation or anti-commutation relations. The cases of Gentile statistics, quons, Polychronakos statistics, and ewkons are considered. Ewkons statistics was recently derived from the assumption of free diffusion in energy space (Hoyuelos and Sisterna, 2016); an ideal gas of ewkons has negative pressure, a feature that makes them suitable for the description of dark energy.

  8. Molecular model for annihilation rates in positron complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O. Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Walters, H.R. James [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Mohallem, Jose R. [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O. Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rachid@fisica.ufmg.br

    2008-02-15

    The molecular approach for positron interaction with atoms is developed further. Potential energy curves for positron motion are obtained. Two procedures accounting for the nonadiabatic effective positron mass are introduced for calculating annihilation rate constants. The first one takes the bound-state energy eigenvalue as an input parameter. The second is a self-contained and self-consistent procedure. The methods are tested with quite different states of the small complexes HPs, e{sup +}He (electronic triplet) and e{sup +}Be (electronic singlet and triplet). For states yielding the positronium cluster, the annihilation rates are quite stable, irrespective of the accuracy in binding energies. For the e{sup +}Be states, annihilation rates are larger and more consistent with qualitative predictions than previously reported ones.

  9. The phenomenology of superWIMP dark matter scenariow with long-lived sleptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisig, Jan

    2013-08-15

    -out. We provide a thorough survey for low stau yields including co-annihilation effects, resonance effects and effects from enhanced Higgs couplings and combinations thereof. We found allowed points down to 2 x 10{sup -16} and 5 x 10{sup -15} in the presence and absence of significant left-right mixing in the stau sector, respectively. In addition, by specifying the superWIMP to be the gravitino we explicitly connect the cosmological viability of parameter points with the bounds derived from laboratory observations in an extended Monte Carlo scan. Requiring the right Dark Matter abundance of the gravitino and incorporating thermal and non-thermal gravitino production we compute the required reheating temperature for each point and impose current bounds from Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We found points with a reheating temperature as high as T{sub R} >or similar 10{sup 9} GeV - as required by thermal leptogenesis - that pass all mentioned constraints.

  10. 5th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2009). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Lindner, Axel; Redondo, Javier (eds.)

    2010-06-15

    The following topics were dealt with: Direct searches for dark matter, indirect searches for WIMPS, photon generation and laser polarization experiments, direct axion signals, theoretic WISP developments. (HSI)

  11. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    During the last two decades, cosmology has become a precision observational science thanks (in part) to the incredible number of experiments performed to better understand the composition of the universe. The large amount of data accumulated strongly indicates that the bulk of the universe's matter is in the form of non-baryonic matter that does not interact electromagnetically. Combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and galaxy clusters confirms that most of the mass in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis and many other experiments indicate that ˜80% of the matter in the universe is dark, non-relativistic and cold. The dark matter resides in the halos surrounding galaxies, galaxy clusters and other large-scale structures. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are well motivated class of dark matter candidates that arise naturally in supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model of particles physics, and can be produced as non-relativistic thermal relics in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment seeks to directly detect the keV-scale energy deposited by WIMPs in the galactic halo when they scatter from nuclei in the crystalline detectors made of germanium and silicon. These detectors, called Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon detectors (ZIPs) are operated at ˜ 45 mK and simultaneously measure the ionization and the (athermal) phonons produced by particle interactions. The ratio of ionization and phonon energies allows discrimination of a low rate of nuclear recoils (expected for WIMPs) from an overwhelming rate of electron recoils (expected for most backgrounds). Phonon-pulse shape and timing enables further suppression of lower-rate interactions at the detector surfaces. This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets

  12. WIMP Dark Matter interpretation of Higgs results

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Renjie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The results from searching for dark matter either directly from invisible decay of Higgs bosons or in association with a Higgs boson at the LHC are presented. No significant excess is found beyond the Standard Model prediction, and upper limits are set on the production cross section times branching fraction using data collected in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV by the ATLAS and CMS detectors. An interpreted upper limit is presented on the allowed dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section.

  13. Measurement of R and search for new heavy quarks in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 50 and 52 GeV centre-of-mass energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, H.; Chiba, Y.; Endo, I.; Hayashibara, I.; Ohsugi, T.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, R.; Amako, K.; Arai, Y.; Boerner, H.

    1987-12-03

    The total cross section for the process of the e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation into hadrons has been measured at the centre-of-mass energies of 50 GeV and 52 GeV and a search has been made for new heavy quarks. The ratios R = sigma(E/sup +/e/sup -/ -> hadrons)/sigma/sub point/(e/sup +/e/sup -/ -> ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/) obtained are 4.4+-0.5 at 50 GeV and 4.7+-0.3 at 52 GeV, respectively. An additional systematic uncertainty is 10%. From the event shape analysis we found no evidence for a new quark with charge 2/3e.

  14. Goodbye to WIMPs: A Scalable Interface for ALMA Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J.; Pietriga, E.; Schilling, M.; Grosbol, P.

    2011-07-01

    The operators of the ALMA Observatory will monitor and control more than 50 mm/submm radio antennas and their associated instrumentation from an operations site that is separated from this hardware by 35-50 km. Software that enables them to identify trouble spots and react to failures quickly in this environment will be critical to the safe and efficient functioning of the observatory. Early commissioning of ALMA uses a operator interface implemented with a standard window, icon, menu, pointing device (WIMP) toolkit. Early experience indicates that this paradigm will not scale well as the number of antennas approaches its full complement. Operators lose time as they manipulate overlapping or tabbed windows to drill-down to detailed diagnostic data, losing a feeling for "where they are" in the process. The WIMP model reaches its limits when there is so much information to present to users that they cannot focus on details while maintaining a view from above. To simplify the operators' tasks and let them concentrate on the real issues at hand rather than continually re-organizing their use of screen space, we are replacing the existing top-level interface with a multi-scale interface that takes advantage of semantic zooming, dynamic network visualization and other advanced filtering, navigation and visualization features. Following the first of several planned participatory design workshops, we have developed prototypes to show how users' needs can be met with the kinds of navigation that become possible when the restrictions of the WIMP model are lifted. Cycles of design and implementation coupled with active user feedback will characterize this project up through deployment.

  15. Research paper citation record keeping: it is not for wimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, M V

    2008-10-01

    In an era in which academic institutions are held more accountable, a problem, which does not seem to have an immediate resolution, exists: how does one demonstrate the quality of one's work? Specifically, how does one show that his or her research is making an impact and is thought to be important? A variety of measures of scientific journal article importance, reflected mostly by citation analyses, have been focused on as being potential gold standards. However, although several measures have been reported, keeping a record of citation of individual research papers, primarily due to the effort involved in finding accurate information, is not for wimps.

  16. Consistency of WIMP Dark Matter as radiative neutrino mass messenger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle, Alexander [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Platscher, Moritz [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik,Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rojas, Nicolás; Valle, José W.F.; Vicente, Avelino [AHEP Group, Instituto de Física Corpuscular - C.S.I.C./Universitat de València,Parc Cientific de Paterna, C/Catedratico José Beltrán, 2 E-46980 Paterna (València) (Spain)

    2016-07-04

    The scotogenic scenario provides an attractive approach to both Dark Matter and neutrino mass generation, in which the same symmetry that stabilises Dark Matter also ensures the radiative seesaw origin of neutrino mass. However the simplest scenario may suffer from inconsistencies arising from the spontaneous breaking of the underlying ℤ{sub 2} symmetry. Here we show that the singlet-triplet extension of the simplest model naturally avoids this problem due to the presence of scalar triplets neutral under the ℤ{sub 2} which affect the evolution of the couplings in the scalar sector. The scenario offers good prospects for direct WIMP Dark Matter detection through the nuclear recoil method.

  17. Readout technologies for directional WIMP Dark Matter detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battat, J.B.R., E-mail: jbattat@wellesley.edu [Department of Physics, Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481 (United States); Irastorza, I.G. [Grupo de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Aleksandrov, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Asada, T. [Nagoya University, J-464-8602 Nagoya (Japan); Baracchini, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Billard, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, 53, avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble (France); IPNL, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue E. Fermi 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, 53, avenue des Martyrs, Grenoble (France); Buonaura, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Federico II, Napoli, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Burdge, K. [Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Caltech Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, Pasadena, CA (United States); Cebrián, S. [Grupo de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2016-11-29

    The measurement of the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils is a compelling but technologically challenging strategy to provide an unambiguous signature of the detection of Galactic dark matter. Most directional detectors aim to reconstruct the dark-matter-induced nuclear recoil tracks, either in gas or solid targets. The main challenge with directional detection is the need for high spatial resolution over large volumes, which puts strong requirements on the readout technologies. In this paper we review the various detector readout technologies used by directional detectors. In particular, we summarize the challenges, advantages and drawbacks of each approach, and discuss future prospects for these technologies.

  18. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Maggiore, C J; Bassler, N; Blackmore, E; Beyer, G; De Marco, J J; Doser, Michael; Gruhn, Charles R; Holzscheiter, M H; Ichioka, T; Iwamoto, K S; Knudsen, H V; Landua, Rolf; McBride, W H; Møller, S P; Petersen, J; Smathers, J B; Skarsgard, L D; Solberg, T; Uggerhøj, U; Withers, H R; Wouters, B G

    2004-01-01

    A new experiment, AD-4/ACE (antiproton cell experiment), has been approved by the CERN Research Board. The experiment is scheduled to begin taking data in June and continue through the 2003 run cycle. The experiment is designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in "biological dose" in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The background, description, and status of the experiment are given.

  19. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Beyer, Gerd; De Marco, John J.; Doser, Michael; Ichioka, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Knudsen, Helge V.; Landua, Rolf; Maggiore, Carl; McBride, William H.; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jorgen; Smathers, James B.; Skarsgard, Lloyd D.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.; Withers, H.Rodney; Vranjes, Sanja; Wong, Michelle; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in “biological dose” in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current status of the experiment are given.

  20. Biological effectiveness of antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; Agazaryan, N.; Bassler, Niels

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment designed to determine whether or not the densely ionizing particles emanating from the annihilation of antiprotons produce an increase in ‘‘biological dose’’ in the vicinity of the narrow Bragg peak for antiprotons compared to protons. This experiment is the first direct...... measurement of the biological effects of antiproton annihilation. The experiment has been approved by the CERN Research Board for running at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD) as AD-4/ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) and has begun data taking in June of 2003. The background, description and the current...

  1. Search for dark matter annihilation in the Galactic Center with IceCube-79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, School of Chemistry and Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Abraham, K.; Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Gross, A.; Holzapfel, K.; Huber, M.; Jurkovic, M.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Veenkamp, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Ackermann, M.; Berghaus, P.; Bernardini, E.; Bretz, H.P.; Cruz Silva, A.H.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Gora, D.; Jacobi, E.; Kaminsky, B.; Karg, T.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Schoenwald, A.; Shanidze, R.; Spiering, C.; Stasik, A.; Stoessl, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J.; Brown, A.M. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O' Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Arguelles, C.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hoshina, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Middlemas, E.; Morse, R.; Richter, S.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Santen, J.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, C.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wille, L. [Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Classen, L.; Kappes, A.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anderson, T.; Arlen, T.C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Groh, J.C.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Quinnan, M.; Smith, M.W.E.; Stanisha, N.A.; Tesic, G. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Koepke, L.; Kroll, G.; Luenemann, J.; Sander, H.G.; Schatto, K.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Blumenthal, J.; Glagla, M.; Gier, D.; Gretskov, P.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, B.; Hellwig, D.; Kemp, J.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Paul, L.; Puetz, J.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schimp, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schukraft, A.; Stahlberg, M.; Vehring, M.; Wallraff, M.; Wichary, C.; Wiebusch, C.H. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Fedynitch, A.; Kroll, M.; Saba, S.M.; Schoeneberg, S. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Klaes, J.; Kopper, S.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke, A.; Omairat, A.; Posselt, J.; Soldin, D. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Christy, B.; Felde, J.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Redl, P.; Schmidt, T.; Sullivan, G.W.; Wissing, H. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Ha, C.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boersma, D.J.; Botner, O.; Euler, S.; Hallgren, A.; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2015-10-15

    The Milky Way is expected to be embedded in a halo of dark matter particles, with the highest density in the central region, and decreasing density with the halo-centric radius. Dark matter might be indirectly detectable at Earth through a flux of stable particles generated in dark matter annihilations and peaked in the direction of the Galactic Center. We present a search for an excess flux of muon (anti-) neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Galactic Center using the cubic-kilometer-sized IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole. There, the Galactic Center is always seen above the horizon. Thus, new and dedicated veto techniques against atmospheric muons are required to make the southern hemisphere accessible for IceCube. We used 319.7 live-days of data from IceCube operating in its 79-string configuration during 2010 and 2011. No neutrino excess was found and the final result is compatible with the background. We present upper limits on the self-annihilation cross-section, left angle σ{sub A} right angle, for WIMP masses ranging from 30 GeV up to 10 TeV, assuming cuspy (NFW) and flat-cored (Burkert) dark matter halo profiles, reaching down to ≅ 4 . 10{sup -24} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1}, and ≅ 2.6 . 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} for the νanti ν channel, respectively. (orig.)

  2. Supersymmetry with Radiatively-Driven Naturalness: Implications for WIMP and Axion Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Jung Bae

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available By insisting on naturalness in both the electroweak and quantum chromodynamics (QCD sectors of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM, the portrait for dark matter production is seriously modified from the usual weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP miracle picture. In supersymmetry (SUSY models with radiatively-driven naturalness (radiative natural SUSY or radiative natural SUSY (RNS which include a Dine–Fischler–Srednicki–Zhitnitsky (DFSZ-like solution to the strong charge-conjugation-parity (CP and SUSY \\(\\mu\\ problems, dark matter is expected to be an admixture of both axions and higgsino-like WIMPs. The WIMP/axion abundance calculation requires simultaneous solution of a set of coupled Boltzmann equations which describe quasi-stable axinos and saxions. In most of parameter space, axions make up the dominant contribution of dark matter although regions of WIMP dominance also occur. We show the allowed range of Peccei-Quinn (PQ scale \\(f_a\\ and compare to the values expected to be probed by the axion dark matter search experiment (ADMX axion detector in the near future. We also show WIMP detection rates, which are suppressed from usual expectations, because now WIMPs comprise only a fraction of the total dark matter. Nonetheless, ton-scale noble liquid detectors should be able to probe the entirety of RNS parameter space. Indirect WIMP detection rates are less propitious since they are reduced by the square of the depleted WIMP abundance.

  3. Applications of slow positrons to cancer research: Search for selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean, Y.C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)]. E-mail: jeany@umkc.edu; Li Ying [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Liu Gaung [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Chen, Hongmin [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Zhang Junjie [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, 205 Spenscer Chemistry Building, 5009 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gadzia, Joseph E. [Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66103 (United States); Kansas Medical Clinic, Topeka, KS 66614 (United States)

    2006-02-28

    Slow positrons and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) have been applied to medical research in searching for positron annihilation selectivity to cancer cells. We report the results of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening energy spectroscopies in human skin samples with and without cancer as a function of positron incident energy (up to 8 {mu}m depth) and found that the positronium annihilates at a significantly lower rate and forms at a lower probability in the samples having either basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) than in the normal skin. The significant selectivity of positron annihilation to skin cancer may open a new research area of developing positron annihilation spectroscopy as a novel medical tool to detect cancer formation externally and non-invasively at the early stages.

  4. Limits on WIMP cross-sections from the NAIAD experiment at the Boulby Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Alner, G J; Arnison, G J; Barton, J C; Bewick, A; Bungau, C; Camanzi, B; Carson, M J; Davidge, D; Daw, E; Dawson, J V; Davies, G J; Davies, J C; Duffy, C; Durkin, T J; Gamble, T; Hart, S P; Hollingworth, R; Homer, G J; Howard, A S; Ivaniouchenkov, Yu; Jones, W G; Joshi, M K; Kirkpatrick, J; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lawson, T B; Lebedenko, V; Lehner, M J; Lewin, J D; Lightfoot, P K; Liubarsky, I; Lüscher, R; McMillan, J E; Morgan, B; Murphy, A; Nickolls, A; Nicklin, G; Paling, S M; Preece, R M; Quenby, J J; Roberts, J W; Robinson, M; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Spooner, N J C; Sumner, T J; Tovey, Daniel R; Tziaferi, E

    2005-01-01

    The NAIAD experiment (NaI Advanced Detector) for WIMP dark matter searches at the Boulby Underground Laboratory (North Yorkshire, UK) ran from 2000 until 2003. A total of 44.9 kg x years of data collected with 2 encapsulated and 4 unencapsulated NaI(Tl) crystals with high light yield were included in the analysis. We present final results of this analysis carried out using pulse shape discrimination. No signal associated with nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions was observed in any run with any crystal. This allowed us to set upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent and WIMP-proton spin-dependent cross-sections. The NAIAD experiment has so far imposed the most stringent constraints on the spin-dependent WIMP-proton cross-section.

  5. First spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon cross section limits from the LUX experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Beltrame, P; Bernard, E P; Bernstein, A; Biesiadzinski, T P; Boulton, E M; Bradley, A; Bramante, R; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Currie, A; Cutter, J E; Davison, T J R; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dobson, J E Y; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B N; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C R; Hanhardt, M; Haselschwardt, S J; Hertel, S A; Hogan, D P; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ignarra, C M; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Ji, W; Kazkaz, K; Khaitan, D; Knoche, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Lenardo, B G; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Malling, D C; Manalaysay, A; Mannino, R L; Marzioni, M F; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J A; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H N; Neves, F; O'Sullivan, K; Oliver-Mallory, K C; Ott, R A; Palladino, K J; Pangilinan, M; Pease, E K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Rhyne, C; Shaw, S; Shutt, T A; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Stephenson, S; Sumner, T J; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D J; Taylor, W; Tennyson, B P; Terman, P A; Tiedt, D R; To, W H; Tripathi, M; Tvrznikova, L; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Webb, R C; White, J T; Whitis, T J; Witherell, M S; Wolfs, F L H; Yazdani, K; Young, S K; Zhang, C

    2016-01-01

    We present the first experimental constraints on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon elastic cross sections from LUX data acquired in 2013. LUX is a dual-phase xenon time projection chamber operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota), which is designed to observe the recoil signature of galactic WIMPs scattering from xenon nuclei. A profile likelihood ratio analysis of $1.4~\\times~10^{4}~\\text{kg}\\cdot~\\text{days}$ of fiducial exposure allows 90% CL upper limits to be set on the WIMP-neutron (WIMP-proton) cross section of $\\sigma_n~=~9.4~\\times~10^{-41}~\\text{cm}^2$ ($\\sigma_p~=~2.9~\\times~10^{-39}~\\text{cm}^2$) at 33~GeV/c$^2$. The spin-dependent WIMP-neutron limit is the most sensitive constraint to date for this channel.

  6. Annihilation physics of exotic galactic dark matter particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    Various theoretical arguments make exotic heavy neutral weakly interacting fermions, particularly those predicted by supersymmetry theory, attractive candidates for making up the large amount of unseen gravitating mass in galactic halos. Such particles can annihilate with each other, producing secondary particles of cosmic-ray energies, among which are antiprotons, positrons, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. Spectra and fluxes of these annihilation products can be calculated, partly by making use of positron electron collider data and quantum chromodynamic models of particle production derived therefrom. These spectra may provide detectable signatures of exotic particle remnants of the big bang.

  7. The Distribution and Annihilation of Dark Matter Around Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.

    2015-01-01

    We use a Monte Carlo code to calculate the geodesic orbits of test particles around Kerr black holes, generating a distribution function of both bound and unbound populations of dark matter (DM) particles. From this distribution function, we calculate annihilation rates and observable gamma-ray spectra for a few simple DM models. The features of these spectra are sensitive to the black hole spin, observer inclination, and detailed properties of the DM annihilation cross-section and density profile. Confirming earlier analytic work, we find that for rapidly spinning black holes, the collisional Penrose process can reach efficiencies exceeding 600%, leading to a high-energy tail in the annihilation spectrum. The high particle density and large proper volume of the region immediately surrounding the horizon ensures that the observed flux from these extreme events is non-negligible.

  8. Positron annihilation spectroscopy applied to silicon-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, J W

    2000-01-01

    deposition on silicon substrates has been examined. The systematic correlations observed between the nitrogen content of the films and both the fitted Doppler parameters and the positron diffusion lengths are discussed in detail. Profiling measurements of silicon nitride films deposited on silicon substrates and subsequently implanted with silicon ions at a range of fluences were also performed. For higher implantation doses, damage was seen to extend beyond the film layers and into the silicon substrates. Subsequent annealing of two of the samples was seen to have a significant influence on the nature of the films. Positron annihilation spectroscopy, in conjunction with a variable-energy positron beam, has been employed to probe non-destructively the surface and near-surface regions of a selection of technologically important silicon-based samples. By measuring the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation lineshape, information on the positrons' microenvironment prior to annihilation may be obtained. T...

  9. A critical reevaluation of radio constraints on annihilating dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2015-04-01

    A number of groups have employed radio observations of the Galactic center to derive stringent constraints on the annihilation cross section of weakly interacting dark matter. In this paper, we show that electron energy losses in this region are likely to be dominated by inverse Compton scattering on the interstellar radiation field, rather than by synchrotron, considerably relaxing the constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section compared to previous works. Strong convective winds, which are well motivated by recent observations, may also significantly weaken synchrotron constraints. After taking these factors into account, we find that radio constraints on annihilating dark matter are orders of magnitude less stringent than previously reported, and are generally weaker than those derived from current gamma-ray observations.

  10. Finite Inflation, Holography, and Dark Matter Annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scacco, Andrew Joseph

    This thesis covers work on theoretical cosmology relating to inflation, de Sitter space, dark matter annihilation, and holography. A unifying feature of all these topics is that all of them occur in de Sitter space or focus on epochs of the Universe when the spacetime was close to de Sitter and that all of them have some connection to holography. Chapter 1 provides a pedagogical introduction to the fundamentals of cosmology, inflation, de Sitter space, dark matter annihilation and entanglement entropy. Chapter 2 covers the impact on the causal entropic principle of dark matter annihilation that we find to have the greatest relevance at late times in the future when the dark energy has driven the universe to be asymptotically de Sitter. In this chapter we estimate holographically preferred dark matter properties for a range of assumptions. Chapter 3 covers holographic bounds in models of finite inflation, specifically the Banks-Fischler bound and de Sitter equilibrium. The assumptions in each of these models are explored in detail and some interesting new connections are presented. Chapter 4 tests models of inflation with a fast-roll start that happen to satisfy the holographic bounds in Chapter 3 against cosmic microwave background data from Planck. We find a slight preference for a feature at the scale predicted by the Banks-Fischler bound though this preference is not found to be statistically significant. Chapter 5 contains a numerical computation of the holographic mutual information for an annular configuration of regions on a conformal field theory in de Sitter space using the AdS/CFT correspondence. This computation shows that the de Sitter space CFT entanglement entropy matches what would be expected from a Minkowski CFT and shows that the HRT conjecture works for this case.

  11. Simulation of structure and annihilation of screw dislocation dipoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben; Vegge, Tejs; Leffers, Torben

    2000-01-01

    .2 nm. In both cases the annihilation is initiated by cross-slip of one of the dislocations. For straight dislocations the activation energy shows a linear dependence on the inverse dipole height, and for flexible dislocations the dependence is roughly linear for the dipoles investigated....

  12. Tests of WIMP Dark Matter Candidates with Direct Dark Matter Detection Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Andreea Irina

    We reexamine the current direct dark matter (DM) detection data for several types of DM candidates, both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) and in a halo-independent manner. We consider the potential signals for light WIMPs that have appeared in three direct detection searches: DAMA, CDMS-II-Si, and CoGeNT, and we analyze their compatibility with the null results of other direct detection experiments. We first consider light WIMPs with exothermic scattering with nuclei (exoDM). Exothermic interactions favor light targets, thus reducing the importance of upper limits derived from Xe targets, the most restrictive of which is at present the LUX limit. In our SHM analysis the CDMS-II-Si and CoGeNT regions become allowed by these bounds, however the SuperCDMS limit rejects both regions for exoDM with isospin-conserving couplings. An isospin-violating coupling of the exoDM, in particular one with a neutron to proton coupling ratio of -0.8 (which we call "Ge-phobic"), maximally reduces the DM coupling to Ge and allows the CDMS-II-Si region to become compatible with all upper bounds. This is also clearly shown in our halo-independent analysis. Next, we extend and correct a recently proposed maximum-likelihood halo-independent method to analyze unbinned direct DM detection data. Instead of the recoil energy as an independent variable, we use the minimum speed a DM particle must have to impart a given recoil energy to a nucleus. This has the advantage of allowing us to apply the method to any type of target composition and interaction, e.g. with general momentum and velocity dependence, and with elastic or inelastic scattering. We prove the method and provide a rigorous statistical interpretation of the results. As first applications, we find that for dark matter particles with elastic spin-independent interactions and neutron to proton coupling ratio ƒn/ƒp = --0.7 ("Xe-phobic", which reduces maximally the coupling to Xe), the WIMP interpretation of the signal observed

  13. 7th Patras workshop on axions, WIMPs and WISPs (PATRAS 2011). Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zioutas, Konstantin; Schumann, Marc (eds.)

    2011-12-15

    The year 2011 was an exciting period to work on the ''dark side'' of the Universe. Several experimental claims of the direct detection of WIMP dark matter were challenged by the restrictive limits of several others. Dedicated experiments searching for axions, another well motivated dark matter candidate, and for axion-like particles continued to improve their limits and got an additional boost by puzzling astrophysical observations and new developments in theory. The LHC collected an unexpectedly large amount of data and started to produce results at an amazing speed. And finally, this year's Nobel price of physics was awarded to the observation of the accelerating expansion of the Universe, an effect which might be related to dark energy, whose nature remain among the biggest mysteries in physics. These exciting topics and many more important aspects of particle- and astroparticle physics were discussed between experimentalists and theorists at the 7th Patras Workshop on Axions, WIMPs, and WISPs. The workshop took place from June 27 - July 1, 2011, in the Royal Myconian and Myconian Imperial Resorts Hotels on the Greek island of Mykonos. As in the previous years, it was a very fruitful and lively meeting in an inspiring and open atmosphere, which allowed for many open and constructive discussions also on controversial topics. The scientific exchange, the beautiful scenery of the island, the venue itself, the food, an excursion to the ancient ruins of Delos, and finally an amazing conference dinner made this meeting really unique. The ''spirit'' of the workshop and its atmosphere cannot be brought to paper, but many of its scientific highlights are collected in these proceedings. We are looking forward to the 8th Patras Workshop, which will be held in Chicago (USA) July 18-22, 2012. It will be organized jointly by our US colleagues Andrei Afanasev (JLAB), Oliver Baker (Yale), and William Wester (FNAL).

  14. Simulation of the annihilation emission of galactic positrons; Modelisation de l'emission d'annihilation des positrons Galactiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, W

    2008-01-15

    Positrons annihilate in the central region of our Galaxy. This has been known since the detection of a strong emission line centered on an energy of 511 keV in the direction of the Galactic center. This gamma-ray line is emitted during the annihilation of positrons with electrons from the interstellar medium. The spectrometer SPI, onboard the INTEGRAL observatory, performed spatial and spectral analyses of the positron annihilation emission. This thesis presents a study of the Galactic positron annihilation emission based on models of the different interactions undergone by positrons in the interstellar medium. The models are relied on our present knowledge of the properties of the interstellar medium in the Galactic bulge, where most of the positrons annihilate, and of the physics of positrons (production, propagation and annihilation processes). In order to obtain constraints on the positrons sources and physical characteristics of the annihilation medium, we compared the results of the models to measurements provided by the SPI spectrometer. (author)

  15. Characterization of lacunar defects by positrons annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Barthe, M F; Blondiaux, G

    2003-01-01

    Among the nondestructive methods for the study of matter, the positrons annihilation method allows to sound the electronic structure of materials by measuring the annihilation characteristics. These characteristics depend on the electronic density as seen by the positon, and on the electron momentums distribution which annihilate with the positon. The positon is sensible to the coulombian potential variations inside a material and sounds preferentially the regions away from nuclei which represent potential wells. The lacunar-type defects (lack of nuclei) represent deep potential wells which can trap the positon up to temperatures close to the melting. This article describes the principles of this method and its application to the characterization of lacunar defects: 1 - positrons: matter probes (annihilation of electron-positon pairs, annihilation characteristics, positrons sources); 2 - positrons interactions in solids (implantation profiles, annihilation states, diffusion and trapping, positon lifetime spec...

  16. Generalized event shape and energy flow studies in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91.2-208.0 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, J; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefiev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillere, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Bohm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Romeo, G Cara; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; de Asmundis, R; Deglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degre, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; DeNotaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El Hage, A; Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagan, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; Garcia-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Gruenewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Herve, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, J; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; Konig, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V; Kraber, M; Kraemer, R W; Kruger, A; Kunin, A; Ladron de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levtchenko, P; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, F L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Mana, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novak, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroue, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pojidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A; Razis, P; Rembeczki, S; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sanchez, E; Schafer, C; Schegelsky, V; Schopper, H; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Straessner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillasi, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Toth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vasquez, R; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitsky, I; Viertel, G; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopianov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobiev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, An; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zoller, M

    2011-01-01

    We present results from a study of hadronic event structure in high energy e(+)e(-') interactions using the L3 detector at LEP. A new class of event shape distributions are measured at and above the Z boson pole for light quark (u, d, s, c) flavours. Energy flow correlations are studied for all hadronic events. Next-to-leading-log QCD calculations and QCD models with improved leading-log approximations are compared to data and good agreement is found at the Z-pole whereas some discrepancies are observed at higher centre-of-mass energies.

  17. Bolometer's development for the detection of dark matter; Instrumentation autour de bolometres pour la recherche de matiere sombre WIMPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvon, D

    2000-06-01

    The author reviews his contributions to the use of bolometers (cryogenic detectors) for the detection of wimps (weakly interactive massive particles). Wimps are detected through their elastic scattering on the nuclei of the detector, a heat signal, luminescence or ionization can be simultaneously detected (at least 2 signals are necessary to discard photon interactions). Bolometers operate at low temperatures (< 50 mK) so they allow very low detection threshold and resolution (< keV) with a full energy conversion for recoiling nuclei. In Saclay the technology of bolometers based on simultaneous detection of heat and ionisation has been developed and improvements have been studied (NbSi thin films bolometers). The first results obtained in the framework of the Edelweiss collaboration are presented. Other developments based on infra-red bolometry (Planck surveyor and Archeops projects) are briefly described. In an appendix the operating principle of a bolometer is presented. (A.C.)

  18. Annihilation of the electron-positron pairs in polyelectrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, Alexei M; Chishtie, Farrukh A [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2007-09-28

    Annihilation of the electron-positron pairs (or (e{sup -}, e{sup +})-pairs, for short) in various polyelectrons e{sup +}{sub n}e{sup -}{sub m} = e{sup -}{sub m}e{sup +}{sub n} (where n {>=} 1 and m {>=} 1) is considered. In particular, we discuss the three- and four-photon annihilation of the (e{sup -}, e{sup +})-pairs in the three-body Ps{sup -} ion and four-body bi-positronium system Ps{sub 2}. It is shown that the five-body e{sup +}{sub 2}e{sup -}{sub 3} ion is an unbound system. The closed-form expression is derived for the amplitude-square |M|{sup 2} of the three-photon annihilation of (e{sup -}, e{sup +})-pair at arbitrary energies of the colliding particles. Analogous amplitude-square |M|{sup 2} for the four-photon annihilation is reduced to the form which is convenient for future analytical calculations. A method which can be used to produce macroscopic polyelectrons is briefly discussed.

  19. Annihilation vs. Decay: Constraining dark matter properties from a gamma-ray detection

    CERN Document Server

    Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Most proposed dark matter candidates are stable and are produced thermally in the early Universe. However, there is also the possibility of unstable (but long-lived) dark matter, produced thermally or otherwise. We propose a strategy to distinguish between dark matter annihilation and/or decay in the case that a clear signal is detected in gamma-ray observations of Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies with current or future gamma-ray experiments. The sole measurement of the energy spectrum of an indirect signal would render the discrimination between these cases impossible. We show that by examining the dependence of the intensity and energy spectrum on the angular distribution of the emission, the origin could be identified as decay, annihilation, or both. In addition, once the type of signal is established, we show how these measurements could help to extract information about the dark matter properties, including mass, annihilation cross section, lifetime, dominant annihilation and decay channels, and the p...

  20. Measurement of hadron and lepton-pair production from e+e- annihilation at centre-of-mass energies of 130 and 136 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Hadronic and leptonic cross-sections and forward-backward asymmetries are measured using 5.7~pb$^{-1}$ of data taken with the ALEPH detector at LEP at $\\cms$ energies of 130 and 136~GeV. The results agree with Standard Model expectations. The measurement of hadronic cross-sections far away from the Z resonance improves the determination of the interference between photon and Z exchange. Constraints on models with extra Z bosons are presented.

  1. WIMP dark matter from gravitino decays and leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W.; Domcke, V.; Schmitz, K.

    2012-03-15

    The spontaneous breaking of B-L symmetry naturally accounts for the small observed neutrino masses via the seesaw mechanism. We have recently shown that the cosmological realization of B-L breaking in a supersymmetric theory can successfully generate the initial conditions of the hot early universe, i.e. entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter, if the gravitino is the lightest superparticle (LSP). This implies relations between neutrino and superparticle masses. Here we extend our analysis to the case of very heavy gravitinos which are motivated by hints for the Higgs boson at the LHC. We find that the nonthermal production of 'pure' wino or higgsino LSPs, i.e. weakly interacting particles (WIMPs), in heavy gravitino decays can account for the observed amount of dark matter while simultaneously fulfilling the constraints imposed by primordial nucleosynthesis and leptogenesis within a range of LSP, gravitino and neutrino masses. For instance, a mass of the lightest neutrino of 0.05 eV would require a higgsino mass below 900 GeV and a gravitino mass of at least 20 TeV.

  2. Positron Annihilation in the Bipositronium Ps2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, David H.; Frolov, Alexei M.

    2005-07-01

    The electron-positron-pair annihilation in the bipositronium PS2 is considered. In particular, the two-, three-, one- and zero-photon annihilation rates are determined to high accuracy. The corresponding analytical expressions are also presented. Also, a large number of bound state properties have been determined for this system.

  3. Toward a better understanding of resonant annihilation on molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surko, C. M.; Danielson, J. R.; Jones, A. C. L.

    2011-05-01

    For many if not most molecules, annihilation at positron energies ɛ in the range of the vibrational modes proceeds via vibrational Feshbach resonances (VFR) in which positrons attach to these targets., In small molecules, the theory of Gribakin and Lee provides a quantitative description of the annihilation rates, Zeff. However other effects are currently less well understood. Described here are some open questions and experiments using deuterium substitution that are designed to address them. They include the effect of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) on Zeff in large molecules (e.g., alkanes), the role of molecular rotations on VFR in very small molecules (e.g., ammonia), and the observation of combination and overtone modes in molecules of small to intermediate size (e.g., acetylene and ethylene). Work supported by NSF grant PHY 07-55809.

  4. High nuclear temperatures by antimatter-matter annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, W.R.; Strottman, D.

    1985-01-01

    It is suggested that the quark-gluon phase be created through the use of antiproton or antideuteron beams. The first advantage to this method, using higher energy antiprotons than 1.5 GeV/c, is that the higher momenta antiprotons penetrate more deeply so that mesons produced are more nearly contained within the nucleus. Another advantage is that the annihilation products are very forward-peaked and tend to form a beam of mesons so that the energy density does not disperse very rapidly. Calculations were performed using the intranuclear cascade to try to follow the process of annihilation in some detail. The intranuclear cascade type calculation method is compared to the hydrodynamic approach. 8 refs., 8 figs. (LEW)

  5. Spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon cross section limits from first data of PandaX-II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Changbo; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Han, Ke; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ren, Xiangxiang; Tan, Andi; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiming; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Mengjiao; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Ning

    2016-01-01

    We report new constrains on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron and WIMP-proton cross sections using recently released data from the PandaX-II experiment, a dual phase liquid xenon dark matter experiment at the China JinPing Underground Laboratory, with a total exposure of 3.3$\\times10^4$ kg-day. Assuming a standard axial-vector spin-dependent WIMP interaction with $^{129}$Xe and $^{131}$Xe nuclei, the most stringent upper limits on WIMP-neutron cross sections for WIMPs with masses above 10 GeV/c$^{2}$ are set in all direct detection experiments, with a minimum upper limit of $4.1\\times 10^{-41}$ cm$^2$ at 90\\% confidence level for a WIMP mass of 40 GeV/c$^{2}$, representing more than a factor of two improvement on the best available limits at high masses.

  6. Non-standard interactions and neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun

    OpenAIRE

    Demidov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the influence of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) on neutrino signal from dark matter annihilations in the Sun. Taking experimentally allowed benchmark values for the matter NSI parameters we show that the evolution of such neutrinos with energies at GeV scale can be considerably modified. We simulate propagation of neutrinos from the Sun to the Earth for realistic dark matter annihilation channels and find that the matter NSI can results in at least 30% corr...

  7. Retardation Effects and Virtual Annihilation Interactions in Relativistic Three-body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Razavi, Mohsen; Asgary, Somayeh

    2018-01-01

    The Hamiltonian formalism of quantum field theory and the variational methods in a reformulated model have been used to investigate the influence of retardation effects or virtual annihilation interactions in relativistic three-body wave equations for scalar two particles and one antiparticle interacting via a massive or massless mediating scalar field. The results show that the inclusion of virtual annihilation interactions or retardation effects can have noticeable consequence on the three-body binding energy at strong coupling.

  8. Skyrmion creation and annihilation by spin waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yizhou, E-mail: yliu062@ucr.edu; Yin, Gen; Lake, Roger K., E-mail: rlake@ece.ucr.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zang, Jiadong [Department of Physics and Material Science Program, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Shi, Jing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Single skyrmion creation and annihilation by spin waves in a crossbar geometry are theoretically analyzed. A critical spin-wave frequency is required both for the creation and the annihilation of a skyrmion. The minimum frequencies for creation and annihilation are similar, but the optimum frequency for creation is below the critical frequency for skyrmion annihilation. If a skyrmion already exists in the cross bar region, a spin wave below the critical frequency causes the skyrmion to circulate within the central region. A heat assisted creation process reduces the spin-wave frequency and amplitude required for creating a skyrmion. The effective field resulting from the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and the emergent field of the skyrmion acting on the spin wave drive the creation and annihilation processes.

  9. Joint Rome Workshop "Challenges in the Dark Sector: Alternatives to the WIMP paradigm”

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Identifying what Dark Matter (DM) is, as well as its nature and properties, remains a major challenge for both theoretical and experimental astroparticle physics communities. In the past decades, WIMP DM has been the most hunted candidate, with the result that nowadays WIMPS are cornered by large amounts of experimental data from Direct Detection, Indirect Detection, and Collider Experiments. If no WIMP signal is detected in the next few years, the possibility that this very appealing theoretical idea is not what Nature has chosen will become even more compelling and will boost theoretical studies and experimental searches for non-WIMP alternatives for DM. The aim of this 3-day meeting is to convene experts on alternatives to the WIMP paradigm to stimulate informal discussions on different possibilities (dark photons, axion-like particles, Majorons, self-interacting dark sectors, just to mention a few). We plan to have only three or four talks each day, and plenty of time to discuss implications of these DM s...

  10. Halo-independent determination of the unmodulated WIMP signal in DAMA: the isotropic case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondolo, Paolo; Scopel, Stefano

    2017-09-01

    We present a halo-independent determination of the unmodulated signal corresponding to the DAMA modulation if interpreted as due to dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). First we show how a modulated signal gives information on the WIMP velocity distribution function in the Galactic rest frame from which the unmodulated signal descends. Then we describe a mathematically-sound profile likelihood analysis in which the likelihood is profiled over a continuum of nuisance parameters (namely, the WIMP velocity distribution). As a first application of the method, which is very general and valid for any class of velocity distributions, we restrict the analysis to velocity distributions that are isotropic in the Galactic frame. In this way we obtain halo-independent maximum-likelihood estimates and confidence intervals for the DAMA unmodulated signal. We find that the estimated unmodulated signal is in line with expectations for a WIMP-induced modulation and is compatible with the DAMA background+signal rate. Specifically, for the isotropic case we find that the modulated amplitude ranges between a few percent and about 25% of the unmodulated amplitude, depending on the WIMP mass.

  11. Mode coupling and multiquantum vibrational excitations in Feshbach-resonant positron annihilation in molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribakin, G. F.; Stanton, J. F.; Danielson, J. R.; Natisin, M. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    The dominant mechanism of low-energy positron annihilation in polyatomic molecules is through positron capture in vibrational Feshbach resonances (VFR). In this paper, we investigate theoretically the effect of anharmonic terms in the vibrational Hamiltonian on positron annihilation rates. Such interactions enable positron capture in VFRs associated with multiquantum vibrational excitations, leading to enhanced annihilation. Mode coupling can also lead to faster depopulation of VFRs, thereby reducing their contribution to the annihilation rates. To analyze this complex picture, we use coupled-cluster methods to calculate the anharmonic vibrational spectra and dipole transition amplitudes for chloroform, chloroform-d1, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and methanol, and use these data to compute positron resonant annihilation rates for these molecules. Theoretical predictions are compared with the annihilation rates measured as a function of incident positron energy. The results demonstrate the importance of mode coupling in both enhancement and suppression of the VFR. There is also experimental evidence for the direct excitation of multimode VFR. Their contribution is analyzed using a statistical approach, with an outlook towards more accurate treatment of this phenomenon.

  12. First 5 tower WIMP-search results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search with improved understanding of neutron backgrounds and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings-Yeomans, Raul [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Non-baryonic dark matter makes one quarter of the energy density of the Universe and is concentrated in the halos of galaxies, including the Milky Way. The Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) is a dark matter candidate with a scattering cross section with an atomic nucleus of the order of the weak interaction and a mass comparable to that of an atomic nucleus. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) experiment, using Ge and Si cryogenic particle detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, aims to directly detect nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions. This thesis presents the first 5 tower WIMP-search results from CDMS-II, an estimate of the cosmogenic neutron backgrounds expected at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, and a proposal for a new measurement of high-energy neutrons underground to benchmark the Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the non-observation of WIMPs and using standard assumptions about the galactic halo [68], the 90% C.L. upper limit of the spin-independent WIMPnucleon cross section for the first 5 tower run is 6.6 × 10-44cm2 for a 60 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. A combined limit using all the data taken at Soudan results in an upper limit of 4.6×10-44cm2 at 90% C.L.for a 60 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. This new limit corresponds to a factor of ~3 improvement over any previous CDMS-II limit and a factor of ~2 above 60 GeV/c 2 better than any other WIMP search to date. This thesis presents an estimation, based on Monte Carlo simulations, of the nuclear recoils produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries (at the Soudan site) for a 5 tower Ge and Si configuration as well as for a 7 supertower array. The results of the Monte Carlo are that CDMS-II should expect 0.06 ± 0.02+0.18 -0.02 /kgyear unvetoed single nuclear recoils in Ge for the 5 tower configuration, and 0.05 ± 0.01+0.15 -0.02 /kg-year for the 7 supertower configuration. The systematic error is based on the available

  13. On thermal corrections to near-threshold annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyong; Laine, M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider non-relativistic ``dark'' particles interacting through gauge boson exchange. At finite temperature, gauge exchange is modified in many ways: virtual corrections lead to Debye screening; real corrections amount to frequent scatterings of the heavy particles on light plasma constituents; mixing angles change. In a certain temperature and energy range, these effects are of order unity. Taking them into account in a resummed form, we estimate the near-threshold spectrum of kinetically equilibrated annihilating TeV scale particles. Weakly bound states are shown to "melt" below freeze-out, whereas with attractive strong interactions, relevant e.g. for gluinos, bound states boost the annihilation rate by a factor 04... 8 with respect to the Sommerfeld estimate, thereby perhaps helping to avoid overclosure of the universe. Modestly non-degenerate dark sector masses and a way to combine the contributions of channels with different gauge and spin structures are also discussed.

  14. Search for bosonic super-WIMP interactions with the XENON100 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Althueser, L.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Capelli, C.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; di Gangi, P.; di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Howlett, J.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kazama, S.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lombardi, F.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Molinario, A.; Morâ, K.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Pizzella, V.; Piro, M.-C.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Ramírez García, D.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rupp, N.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. V.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Vargas, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wittweg, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, T.; Xenon Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We present results of searches for vector and pseudoscalar bosonic super-weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which are dark matter candidates with masses at the keV-scale, with the XENON100 experiment. XENON100 is a dual-phase xenon time projection chamber operated at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. A profile likelihood analysis of data with an exposure of 224.6 live days ×34 kg showed no evidence for a signal above the expected background. We thus obtain new and stringent upper limits in the (8 - 125 ) keV /c2 mass range, excluding couplings to electrons with coupling constants of ga e>3 ×10-13 for pseudo-scalar and α'/α >2 ×10-28 for vector super-WIMPs, respectively. These limits are derived under the assumption that super-WIMPs constitute all of the dark matter in our galaxy.

  15. Limits on spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon cross sections from the XENON10 experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, J; Aprile, E; Arneodo, F; Baudis, L; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Coelho, L C C; Dahl, C E; DeViveiros, L; Ferella, A D; Fernandes, L M P; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Giboni, K L; Gomez, R; Hasty, R; Kastens, L; Kwong, J; Lopes, J A M; Madden, N; Manalaysay, A; Manzur, A; McKinsey, D N; Monzani, M E; Ni, K; Oberlack, U; Orboeck, J; Plante, G; Santorelli, R; dos Santos, J M F; Shagin, P; Shutt, T; Sorensen, P; Schulte, S; Winant, C; Yamashita, M

    2008-08-29

    XENON10 is an experiment to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which may comprise the bulk of the nonbaryonic dark matter in our Universe. We report new results for spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions with 129Xe and 131Xe from 58.6 live days of operation at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. Based on the nonobservation of a WIMP signal in 5.4 kg of fiducial liquid xenon mass, we exclude previously unexplored regions in the theoretically allowed parameter space for neutralinos. We also exclude a heavy Majorana neutrino with a mass in the range of approximately 10 GeV/c2-2 TeV/c2 as a dark matter candidate under standard assumptions for its density and distribution in the galactic halo.

  16. Beyond WIMP: From Theory to Detection of Sub-GeV Dark Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The existence of dark matter has been well established with overwhelming evidence, but its particle identity is still unknown. For more than three decades, significant theoretical and experimental efforts have been directed towards the search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), often overlooking other possibilities. The lack of an unambiguous positive WIMP signal, at both indirect- and direct-detection experiments and at the LHC, stresses the need to expand dark matter research into additional theoretical scenarios and, more importantly, to develop new experimental capabilities that go beyond the limitations of WIMP detection. In this talk I will discuss new theoretical ideas and experimental avenues for searching for light, sub-GeV dark matter. Some emphasis will be given to direct detection experiments, where several new strategies to directly detect dark matter particles with MeV to GeV mass, far below standard direct detection capabilities, are developed.

  17. 750 GeV dark pion: Cousin of a dark G -parity odd WIMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Berger, Joshua; Lu, Ran

    2016-04-01

    We point out a potential common origin of the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton resonance and a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) candidate. In a dark QCD sector with an unbroken dark G parity, the diphoton resonance could be a dark G -even pion, while the WIMP could be the lightest dark G -odd pion. Both particles are Standard Model gauge singlets and have the same decay constant. For the dark pion decay constant of around 500 GeV, both the diphoton excess at the LHC and the dark matter thermal abundance can be accommodated in our model. Our model predicts additional dark G -even and dark G -odd color-octet pions within reach of the 13 TeV LHC runs. For the 5 +5 ¯ model, compatible with the grand unified theories, the WIMP mass is predicted to be within (613,750) GeV.

  18. Detection of WIMPs in the Edelweiss experiment. Study of the radioactive background noise and measurements with bolometers; Recherche des wimp's du halo galactique dans l'experience edelweiss: etude du bas bruit radioactif et mesures a l'aide de bolometres a double detection ionisation/chaleur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miramonti, L. [CEA/Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DAPNIA), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the detection of black matter in the form of WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particle). The characteristics of the interaction of WIMPs with matter are recalled. The very low number of expected events (<1 event/day.Kg) implies a radioactive background noise as weak as possible, furthermore the exponential decrease of the interacting rate with increasing energy calls for detectors with very low thresholds. Bolometers present advantages in WIMPs detection: i) very good resolution and very low thresholds, ii) very broad range of materials that can be used as absorber, the only requirements are: a crystal structure, to be a diamagnetic isolator and to have a convenient Debye temperature, iii) the possibility of detecting ionizing or non-ionizing particles, iv) the possibility of identifying the incident particle by measuring both temperature and another parameter such as ionization or scintillation, and v) the possibility of localizing the interaction inside the absorber by detecting ballistic phonons. The problematic of radioactive background noise is presented and the answers to the different sources (cosmic radiation,natural and artificial radioactivity) generating the background noise are examined. The materials used in the building of the detector and cryostat must be carefully chosen, they should be as little radioactive as possible. The test benches used to select materials for the Edelweiss experiment are described. The first measurements concerning the detectors Ge-4 and Ge-7 are presented. (A.C.)

  19. Effective theory of WIMP dark matter supplemented by simplified models: Singlet-like Majorana fermion case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Mukhopadhyay, Satyanarayan; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming

    2016-09-01

    We enumerate the set of simplified models which match onto the complete set of gauge invariant effective operators up to dimension six describing interactions of a singlet-like Majorana fermion dark matter with the standard model. Tree-level matching conditions for each case are worked out in the large mediator mass limit, defining a one-to-one correspondence between the effective operator coefficients and the simplified model parameters for weakly interacting models. Utilizing such a mapping, we compute the dark matter annihilation rate in the early universe, as well as other low-energy observables like nuclear recoil rates using the effective operators, while the simplified models are used to compute the dark matter production rates at high-energy colliders like LEP, LHC and future lepton colliders. Combining all relevant constraints with a profile-likelihood analysis, we then discuss the currently allowed parameter regions and prospects for future searches in terms of the effective operator parameters, reducing the model dependence to a minimal level. In the parameter region where such a model-independent analysis is applicable, and leaving aside the special dark matter mass regions where the annihilation proceeds through an s -channel Z or Higgs boson pole, the current constraints allow effective operator suppression scales (Λ ) of the order of a few hundred GeV for dark matter masses mχ>20 GeV at 95% C.L., while the maximum allowed scale is around 3 TeV for mχ˜O (1 TeV ) . An estimate of the future reach of ton-scale direct detection experiments and planned electron-positron colliders show that most of the remaining regions can be probed, apart from dark matter masses near half of the Z -boson mass (with 500 GeV <Λ <2 TeV ) and those beyond the kinematic reach of the future lepton colliders.

  20. Some information from nucleon-antinucleon annihilation at rest: e+e- annihilation, hadronic fragmentation, and deep inelastic scattering structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Pelaquier, E

    1974-01-01

    The experimental spectra of charged pions in NN annihilation at rest are described in a model of quasi-two-body decays. The same model predicts the pi /sup 0/, s, rho 's and omega 's spectra. These calculations are used to determine, in the vector dominance model, the pion spectra in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at the same energy. The NN system is then used as a heavy hadron in order to describe, in a model-independent way: the projectile fragmentation part in inclusive reactions; the valence part of the deep inelastic structure function. (0 refs).

  1. Dark matter annihilation feedback in cosmological simulations - I: Code convergence and idealized haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanus, N.; Elahi, P. J.; Lewis, G. F.

    2017-11-01

    We describe and test a novel dark matter annihilation feedback (DMAF) scheme that has been implemented into the well-known cosmological simulation code GADGET-2. In the models considered here, dark matter can undergo self-annihilation/decay into radiation and baryons. These products deposit energy into the surrounding gas particles and then the dark matter/baryon fluid is self-consistently evolved under gravity and hydrodynamics. We present tests of this new feedback implementation in the case of idealized dark matter haloes with gas components for a range of halo masses, concentrations and annihilation rates. For some dark matter models, DMAF's ability to evacuate gas is enhanced in lower mass, concentrated haloes where the injected energy is comparable to its gravitational binding energy. Therefore, we expect the strongest signs of dark matter annihilation to imprint themselves on to the baryonic structure of concentrated dwarf galaxies through their baryonic fraction and star formation history. Finally, we present preliminary results of the first self-consistent DMAF cosmological box simulations showing that the small-scale substructure is washed out for large annihilation rates.

  2. CPN/Tools: A Post-WIMP Interface for Editing and Simulating Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter; Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel; Mackay, Wendy E.

    2001-01-01

    CPN/Tools is a major redesign of the popular Design/CPN tool from the University of Aarhus CPN group. The new interface is based on advanced, post-WIMP interaction techniques, including bi-manual interaction, toolglasses and marking menus and a new metaphor for managing the workspace. It challeng...

  3. Ultra-cold WIMPs relics of non-standard pre-BBN cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Gelmini, Graciela B

    2008-01-01

    We point out that in scenarios in which the Universe evolves in a non-standard manner during and after the kinetic decoupling of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), these relics can be much colder than in standard cosmological scenarios (i.e. can be ultra-cold), possibly leading to the formation of smaller first objects in hierarchical structure formation scenarios.

  4. Detector Simulation and WIMP Search Analysis for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kevin [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Astrophysical and cosmological measurements on the scales of galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the universe indicate that 85% of the matter in the universe is composed of dark matter, made up of non-baryonic particles that interact with cross-sections on the weak scale or lower. Hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, represent a potential solution to the dark matter problem, and naturally arise in certain Standard Model extensions. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) collaboration aims to detect the scattering of WIMP particles from nuclei in terrestrial detectors. Germanium and silicon particle detectors are deployed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These detectors are instrumented with phonon and ionization sensors, which allows for discrimination against electromagnetic backgrounds, which strike the detector at rates orders of magnitude higher than the expected WIMP signal. This dissertation presents the development of numerical models of the physics of the CDMS detectors, implemented in a computational package collectively known as the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC). After substantial validation of the models against data, the DMC is used to investigate potential backgrounds to the next iteration of the CDMS experiment, known as SuperCDMS. Finally, an investigation of using the DMC in a reverse Monte Carlo analysis of WIMP search data is presented.

  5. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Knudsen, H; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  6. Production bias and cluster annihilation: Why necessary?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Trinkaus, H.; Woo, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    the primary cluster density is high. Therefore, a sustained high swelling rate driven by production bias must involve the annihilation of primary clusters at sinks. A number of experimental observations which are unexplainable in terms of the conventional dislocation bias for monointerstitials is considered....... It is found that the production bias and cluster annihilation are necessary to explain these observations, with, in many cases, the explicit consideration of the annihilation of the primary interstitial clusters.......-field approach. The production bias approach, on the other hand, is based on the physical features of the cascade damage and is therefore considered to be more appropriate for describing the damage accumulation under cascade damage conditions. However, production bias can not produce high a swelling rate when...

  7. Heavy-quark fragmentation fom e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and nu N scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlatter, D.

    1982-09-01

    The review covers early results, recent results from nu N scattering experiments, charm production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ at high energies, D/sup +/ cross-section in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, inclusive electrons in hadronic e/sup +/e/sup -/ events, and inclusive hadron spectra and scale breaking in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. 30 references, 18 figures. (GHT)

  8. Computer Simulation of Electron Positron Annihilation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, y

    2003-10-02

    With the launching of the Next Linear Collider coming closer and closer, there is a pressing need for physicists to develop a fully-integrated computer simulation of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation process at center-of-mass energy of 1TeV. A simulation program acts as the template for future experiments. Either new physics will be discovered, or current theoretical uncertainties will shrink due to more accurate higher-order radiative correction calculations. The existence of an efficient and accurate simulation will help us understand the new data and validate (or veto) some of the theoretical models developed to explain new physics. It should handle well interfaces between different sectors of physics, e.g., interactions happening at parton levels well above the QCD scale which are described by perturbative QCD, and interactions happening at much lower energy scale, which combine partons into hadrons. Also it should achieve competitive speed in real time when the complexity of the simulation increases. This thesis contributes some tools that will be useful for the development of such simulation programs. We begin our study by the development of a new Monte Carlo algorithm intended to perform efficiently in selecting weight-1 events when multiple parameter dimensions are strongly correlated. The algorithm first seeks to model the peaks of the distribution by features, adapting these features to the function using the EM algorithm. The representation of the distribution provided by these features is then improved using the VEGAS algorithm for the Monte Carlo integration. The two strategies mesh neatly into an effective multi-channel adaptive representation. We then present a new algorithm for the simulation of parton shower processes in high energy QCD. We want to find an algorithm which is free of negative weights, produces its output as a set of exclusive events, and whose total rate exactly matches the full Feynman amplitude calculation. Our strategy is to create

  9. Gamma-rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Central Region of the Galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serpico, Pasquale Dario; /CERN; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2009-02-01

    In this article, we review the prospects for the FERMI satellite (formerly known as GLAST) to detect gamma-rays from dark matter annihilations in the Central Region of the Milky Way, in light of the recent observations and discoveries of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. While the existence of significant astrophysical backgrounds in this part of the sky limits FERMI's discovery potential to some degree, this can be mitigated by exploiting the peculiar energy spectrum and angular distribution of the dark matter annihilation signal relative to those of astrophysical backgrounds.

  10. Stop co-annihilation in the minimal supersymmetric standard model revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Aaron; Shah, Nausheen R.; Vogl, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    We reexamine the stop co-annihilation scenario of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, wherein a binolike lightest supersymmetric particle has a thermal relic density set by co-annihilations with a scalar partner of the top quark in the early universe. We concentrate on the case where only the top partner sector is relevant for the cosmology, and other particles are heavy. We discuss the cosmology with focus on low energy parameters and an emphasis on the implications of the measured Higgs boson mass and its properties. We find that the irreducible direct detection signal correlated with this cosmology is generically well below projected experimental sensitivity, and in most cases lies below the neutrino background. A larger, detectable, direct detection rate is possible, but is unrelated to the co-annihilation cosmology. LHC searches for compressed spectra are crucial for probing this scenario.

  11. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy to test accelerated weathering of protective polymer coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.; Cao, H.; Chen, H.M.; Mallon, P.; Sandreczki, T.C.; Richardson, J.R.; Jean, Y.C. E-mail: jeany@umkc.edu; Nielsen, B.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T

    2000-06-01

    A variable mono-energetic positron beam with a computer-controlled system has recently been constructed at the University of Missouri-Kansas City for weathering studies of polymeric coatings. The beam is designed to measure the S-parameter from Doppler-broadening energy spectra and the sub-nanometer defect properties from positron annihilation lifetimes (PAL). Significant variations of S-parameter and ortho-positronium intensity in coatings, as obtained from the newly built beam and from the Electrotechnical Laboratory's beam, respectively, are observed as a function of depth and exposure time due to the Xe-light irradiation. A high sensitivity of positron annihilation signal response to the early stage of degradation is observed. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy to test accelerated weathering of polymeric coatings is discussed.

  12. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy to test accelerated weathering of protective polymer coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, R; Chen, H M; Mallon, P; Sandreczki, T C; Richardson, J R; Jean, Y C; Nielsen, B; Suzuki, R; Ohdaira, T

    2000-01-01

    A variable mono-energetic positron beam with a computer-controlled system has recently been constructed at the University of Missouri-Kansas City for weathering studies of polymeric coatings. The beam is designed to measure the S-parameter from Doppler-broadening energy spectra and the sub-nanometer defect properties from positron annihilation lifetimes (PAL). Significant variations of S-parameter and ortho-positronium intensity in coatings, as obtained from the newly built beam and from the Electrotechnical Laboratory's beam, respectively, are observed as a function of depth and exposure time due to the Xe-light irradiation. A high sensitivity of positron annihilation signal response to the early stage of degradation is observed. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy to test accelerated weathering of polymeric coatings is discussed.

  13. Limits on Light WIMPs with a Germanium Detector at 172 eVee threshold at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, S K; Kang, K J; Cheng, J P; Wong, H T; Li, Y J; Lin, S T; Chang, J P; Chen, N; Chen, Q H; Chen, Y H; Chuang, Y C; Deng, Z; Du, Q; Gong, H; Hao, X Q; He, H J; He, Q J; Huang, H X; Huang, T R; Jiang, H; Li, H B; Li, J M; Li, J; Li, X; Li, X Q; Li, X Y; Li, Y L; Liao, H Y; Lin, F K; Lü, L C; Ma, H; Mao, S J; Qin, J Q; Ren, J; Ruan, X C; Shen, M B; Singh, L; Singh, M K; Soma, A K; Su, J; Tang, C J; Tseng, C H; Wang, J M; Wang, L; Wang, Q; Wu, S Y; Wu, Y C; Xianyu, Z Z; Xiao, R Q; Xing, H Y; Xu, F Z; Xu, Y; Xu, X J; Xue, T; Yang, C W; Yang, L T; Yang, S W; Yi, N; Yu, C X; Yu, H; Yu, X Z; Zeng, X H; Zeng, Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y H; Zhao, M G; Zhao, W; Zhou, Z Y; Zhu, J J; Zhu, W B; Zhu, X Z; Zhu, Z H

    2014-01-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment reports results on light WIMP dark matter searches at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory with a germanium detector array with a total mass of 20 g. The physics threshold achieved is 172 eVee at 50% signal efficiency. With 0.784 kg-days of data, exclusion region on spin-independent coupling with the nucleon is derived, improving over our earlier bounds at WIMP mass less than 4.6 GeV.

  14. Photon-induced positron annihilation for standoff bomb detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. A.; Hashim, S.; Cabello, J.; Wells, K.; Dunn, W. L.

    2010-07-01

    We describe an approach to detect improvised explosive devices (IEDs) by using photon-induced positron annihilation radiation (PIPAR). This system relies on back-scattered γ photons from the target and surrounding objects following exposure to high energy X-rays from a betatron. In this work we simulate the use of Bremsstrahlung source operating at 3.5 MeV, with a scintillation detector, working in PIPAR mode, in order to reduce noise produced by undesired back-scattering from the surrounding objects. In this paper, we describe the basic imaging method and preliminary results on simulating a suitable betatron source. Two types of X-ray filters copper (Cu) and aluminium (Al), have been used in the simulation to observe their differences in the deposited energy spectrum in the iron target. It was found that the use of iron target in conjunction with 2 mm Al filter is capable of detecting annihilation γ photons. An initiated experiment with an interlaced source also shows promise.

  15. The need for expanded exploration of matter-antimatter annihilation for propulsion application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massier, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    The use of matter-antimatter annihilation as a propulsion application for interstellar travel is discussed. The physical basis for the superior energy release in such a system is summarized, and the problems associated with antimatter production, collection and storage are assessed. Advances in devising a workable propulsion system are reported, and the parameters of an antimatter propulsion system are described.

  16. Constraints on leptonically annihilating dark matter from reionization and extragalactic gamma background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütsi, G.; Hektor, A.; Raidal, M.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The PAMELA, Fermi and HESS experiments (PFH) have shown anomalous excesses in the cosmic positron and electron fluxes. A very exciting possibility is that those excesses are due to annihilating dark matter (DM). Aims: In this paper we calculate constraints on leptonically annihilating DM using observational data on diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background and measurements of the optical depth to the last-scattering surface, and compare those with the PFH favored region in the mDM- plane. Methods: Having specified the detailed form of the energy input with PYTHIA Monte Carlo tools we solve the radiative transfer equation which allows us to determine the amount of energy being absorbed by the cosmic medium and also the amount left over for the diffuse gamma background. Results: We find that the constraints from the optical depth measurements are able to rule out the PFH favored region fully for the τ-+τ+ annihilation channel and almost fully for the μ-+μ+ annihilation channel. It turns out that those constraints are quite robust with almost no dependence on low redshift clustering boost. The constraints from the γ-ray background are sensitive to the assumed halo concentration model and, for the power law model, rule out the PFH favored region for all leptonic annihilation channels. We also find that it is possible to have models that fully ionize the Universe at low redshifts. However, those models produce too large free electron fractions at z ≳ 100 and are in conflict with the optical depth measurements. Also, the magnitude of the annihilation cross-section in those cases is larger than suggested by the PFH data.

  17. Reevaluation of spin-dependent WIMP-proton interactions as an explanation of the DAMA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2015-08-01

    We reexamine the interpretation of the annual modulation signal observed by the DAMA experiment as due to WIMPs with a spin-dependent coupling mostly to protons. We consider both axial-vector and pseudo-scalar couplings, and elastic as well as endothermic and exothermic inelastic scattering. We conclude that the DAMA signal is in strong tension with null results of other direct detection experiments, particularly PICASSO and KIMS.

  18. Impact of a 'heavy' SIMPLE on the search for WIMP dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, F [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Morlat, T [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Girard, Ta [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Costa, M Felizardo da [Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Marques, Jg [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Ramos, Ar [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2006-05-15

    We examine the potential impact of a WIMP search based on CF3I-loaded SDDs, projected on the basis of the experience and results of the SIMPLE dark matter search. We find such a 'heavy' SIMPLE experiment to have spin-independent sensitivity comparable to that of leading searches like ZEPLIN-I and CDMS, while preserving the spin-dependent sensitivity of fluorine-based experiments.

  19. Reevaluation of spin-dependent WIMP-proton interactions as an explanation of the DAMA data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Huh, Ji-Haeng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA,475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-08-25

    We reexamine the interpretation of the annual modulation signal observed by the DAMA experiment as due to WIMPs with a spin-dependent coupling mostly to protons. We consider both axial-vector and pseudo-scalar couplings, and elastic as well as endothermic and exothermic inelastic scattering. We conclude that the DAMA signal is in strong tension with null results of other direct detection experiments, particularly PICASSO and KIMS.

  20. Nonthermal production of WIMPs, cosmic e± excesses, and γ rays from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Gondolo, Paolo; Li, Tianjun; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Yuan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a dark matter model and study aspects of its phenomenology. Our model is based on a new dark matter sector with a U(1)′ gauge symmetry plus a discrete symmetry added to the standard model of particle physics. The new fields of the dark matter sector have no hadronic charges and couple only to leptons. Our model cannot only give rise to the observed neutrino mass hierarchy, but can also generate the baryon number asymmetry via nonthermal leptogenesis. The breaking of the new U(1)′ symmetry produces cosmic strings. The dark matter particles are produced nonthermally from cosmic string loop decay which allows one to obtain sufficiently large annihilation cross sections to explain the observed cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes recently measured by the PAMELA, ATIC, PPB-BETS, Fermi-LAT, and HESS experiments while maintaining the required overall dark matter energy density. The high velocity of the dark matter particles from cosmic string loop decay leads to a low phase space dens...

  1. Dark Kinetic Heating of Neutron Stars and an Infrared Window on WIMPs, SIMPs, and Pure Higgsinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryakhtar, Masha; Bramante, Joseph; Li, Shirley Weishi; Linden, Tim; Raj, Nirmal

    2017-09-29

    We identify a largely model-independent signature of dark matter (DM) interactions with nucleons and electrons. DM in the local galactic halo, gravitationally accelerated to over half the speed of light, scatters against and deposits kinetic energy into neutron stars, heating them to infrared blackbody temperatures. The resulting radiation could potentially be detected by the James Webb Space Telescope, the Thirty Meter Telescope, or the European Extremely Large Telescope. This mechanism also produces optical emission from neutron stars in the galactic bulge, and x-ray emission near the galactic center because dark matter is denser in these regions. For GeV-PeV mass dark matter, dark kinetic heating would initially unmask any spin-independent or spin-dependent dark matter-nucleon cross sections exceeding 2×10^{-45}  cm^{2}, with improved sensitivity after more telescope exposure. For lighter-than-GeV dark matter, cross-section sensitivity scales inversely with dark matter mass because of Pauli blocking; for heavier-than-PeV dark matter, it scales linearly with mass as a result of needing multiple scatters for capture. Future observations of dark sector-warmed neutron stars could determine whether dark matter annihilates in or only kinetically heats neutron stars. Because inelastic interstate transitions of up to a few GeV would occur in relativistic scattering against nucleons, elusive inelastic dark matter like pure Higgsinos can also be discovered.

  2. Dark Kinetic Heating of Neutron Stars and an Infrared Window on WIMPs, SIMPs, and Pure Higgsinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryakhtar, Masha; Bramante, Joseph; Li, Shirley Weishi; Linden, Tim; Raj, Nirmal

    2017-09-01

    We identify a largely model-independent signature of dark matter (DM) interactions with nucleons and electrons. DM in the local galactic halo, gravitationally accelerated to over half the speed of light, scatters against and deposits kinetic energy into neutron stars, heating them to infrared blackbody temperatures. The resulting radiation could potentially be detected by the James Webb Space Telescope, the Thirty Meter Telescope, or the European Extremely Large Telescope. This mechanism also produces optical emission from neutron stars in the galactic bulge, and x-ray emission near the galactic center because dark matter is denser in these regions. For GeV-PeV mass dark matter, dark kinetic heating would initially unmask any spin-independent or spin-dependent dark matter-nucleon cross sections exceeding 2 ×10-45 cm2, with improved sensitivity after more telescope exposure. For lighter-than-GeV dark matter, cross-section sensitivity scales inversely with dark matter mass because of Pauli blocking; for heavier-than-PeV dark matter, it scales linearly with mass as a result of needing multiple scatters for capture. Future observations of dark sector-warmed neutron stars could determine whether dark matter annihilates in or only kinetically heats neutron stars. Because inelastic interstate transitions of up to a few GeV would occur in relativistic scattering against nucleons, elusive inelastic dark matter like pure Higgsinos can also be discovered.

  3. A possible signature of annihilating dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Man Ho

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we report a new signature of dark matter annihilation based on the radio continuum data of NGC 1569 galaxy detected in the past few decades. After eliminating the thermal contribution of the radio signal, an abrupt change in the spectral index is shown in the radio spectrum. Previously, this signature was interpreted as an evidence of convective outflow of cosmic ray. However, we show that the cosmic ray contribution is not enough to account for the observed radio flux. We then discover that if dark matter annihilates via the 4-e channel with the thermal relic cross-section, the electrons and positrons produced would emit a strong radio flux which can provide an excellent agreement with the observed signature. The best-fitting dark matter mass is 25 GeV.

  4. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter Using the First Five-Tower Run of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippini, Jeffrey Peter [UC, Berkeley

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades astronomers and physicists have accumulated a vast array of evidence that the bulk of the universe's matter is in some non-baryonic form that remains undetected by electromagnetic means. This \\dark matter" resides in diuse halos surrounding galaxies and other cosmic structures. Particle theorists have proposed a wide array of candidates for its nature. One particularly promising class of candidates are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs): quanta with masses of order 100 GeV/c2 and interactions characteristic of the weak nuclear force. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment seeks to directly detect the rare elastic interactions of galactic WIMPs with terrestrial nuclei. To this end, CDMS operates an array of crystalline Ge and Si particle detectors in Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. These crystals are operated at millikelvin temperatures and instrumented to measure the ionization and athermal phonons generated by each particle interaction. This combination provides a powerful two-fold discrimination against the interactions of particles generated by radioactive decay and cosmogenic showers. This dissertation describes the commissioning, analysis, and results of the rst WIMP-search data runs of the CDMS experiment with its full complement of 5 \\Towers" of detectors. These data represent a substantial increase in target mass and exposure over previous CDMS results. The results of this work place the most stringent limits yet set upon the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section for WIMP masses above 44 GeV/c2 , as well as setting competitive limits on spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon interactions. This work also outlines the larger context of this and other probes of the WIMP theory of dark matter, as well as some current development eorts toward a larger cryogenic experiment.

  5. Initial angular momentum state in pp annihilation at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Bizzarri, R

    1972-01-01

    The author shows that no quantitative statement on the relative importance of initial P-states in pp annihilation can be made. Annihilations in flight indicate that P-wave annihilation into K/sub 1 //sup 0/K/sub 1//sup 0/ is inhibited while annihilation into pi pi is enhanced and might suggest a P-wave contamination approximately 10%. The observatory of the final state K/sub 1//sup 0/K/sub 1//sup 0/n from annihilations at rest indicates that the depression of the K/sub 1//sup 0/K/sub 1//sup 0/ final state is not so important and suggests a P-wave contamination smaller than 4%. Furthermore the successes obtained in the analysis of various final states on the assumption of S-wave annihilation are hard to reconcile with a P-wave contribution bigger than approximately 5%. (20 refs).

  6. Particle-antiparticle asymmetries from annihilations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F; Petraki, Kalliopi; Volkas, Raymond R

    2014-10-31

    An extensively studied mechanism to create particle-antiparticle asymmetries is the out-of-equilibrium and CP violating decay of a heavy particle. We, instead, examine how asymmetries can arise purely from 2→2 annihilations rather than from the usual 1→2 decays and inverse decays. We review the general conditions on the reaction rates that arise from S-matrix unitarity and CPT invariance, and show how these are implemented in the context of a simple toy model. We formulate the Boltzmann equations for this model, and present an example solution.

  7. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...... of hydration and with temperature for the 50% sample. The 10% water sample was relatively insensitive to temperature variation. The results indicate that hydrated DNA containing up to 10% water behaves as a rigid crystalline solid but that the rigidity markedly decreases with a further increase in water...

  8. Improved limits on spin-dependent WIMP-proton interactions from a two liter CF3I bubble chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, E; Behnke, J; Brice, S J; Broemmelsiek, D; Collar, J I; Cooper, P S; Crisler, M; Dahl, C E; Fustin, D; Hall, J; Hinnefeld, J H; Hu, M; Levine, I; Ramberg, E; Shepherd, T; Sonnenschein, A; Szydagis, M

    2011-01-14

    Data from the operation of a bubble chamber filled with 3.5 kg of CF3I in a shallow underground site are reported. An analysis of ultrasound signals accompanying bubble nucleations confirms that alpha decays generate a significantly louder acoustic emission than single nuclear recoils, leading to an efficient background discrimination. Three dark matter candidate events were observed during an effective exposure of 28.1  kg  day, consistent with a neutron background. This observation provides strong direct detection constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20  GeV/c2.

  9. A Search of Low-Mass WIMPs with p-type Point Contact Germanium Detector in the CDEX-1 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, W; Kang, K J; Cheng, J P; Li, Y J; Wong, H T; Lin, S T; Chang, J P; Chen, J H; Chen, Q H; Chen, Y H; Deng, Z; Du, Q; Gong, H; Hao, X Q; He, H J; He, Q J; Huang, H X; Huang, T R; Jiang, H; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J M; Li, X; Li, X Y; Li, Y L; Lin, F K; Liu, S K; Lü, L C; Ma, H; Ma, J L; Mao, S J; Qin, J Q; Ren, J; Ruan, X C; Sharma, V; Shen, M B; Singh, L; Singh, M K; Soma, A K; Su, J; Tang, C J; Wang, J M; Wang, L; Wang, Q; Wu, S Y; Wu, Y C; Xianyu, Z Z; Xiao, R Q; Xing, H Y; Xu, F Z; Xu, Y; Xu, X J; Xue, T; Yang, L T; Yang, S W; Yi, N; Yu, C X; Yu, H; Yu, X Z; Zeng, M; Zeng, X H; Zeng, Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y H; Zhao, M G; Zhou, Z Y; Zhu, J J; Zhu, W B; Zhu, X Z; Zhu, Z H

    2016-01-01

    The CDEX-1 experiment conducted a search of low-mass (< 10 GeV/c2) Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) dark matter at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory using a p-type point-contact germanium detector with a fiducial mass of 915 g at a physics analysis threshold of 475 eVee. We report the hardware set-up, detector characterization, data acquisition and analysis procedures of this experiment. No excess of unidentified events are observed after subtraction of known background. Using 335.6 kg-days of data, exclusion constraints on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent and spin-dependent couplings are derived.

  10. Dark matter spin-dependent limits for WIMP interactions on {sup 19}F by PICASSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambault, S.; Aubin, F.; Auger, M. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Behnke, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, IN 46634 (United States); Beltran, B. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Clark, K.; Dai, X.; Davour, A. [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, K7L 3NG (Canada); Farine, J. [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Faust, R.; Genest, M.-H.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Krauss, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Kumaratunga, S. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Lawson, I. [SNOLAB, Sudbury, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Leroy, C.; Lessard, L. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Levy, C. [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, K7L 3NG (Canada); Levine, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, IN 46634 (United States)

    2009-11-30

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB reports new results for spin-dependent WIMP interactions on {sup 19}F using the superheated droplet technique. A new generation of detectors and new features which enable background discrimination via the rejection of non-particle induced events are described. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of {sup 19}F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75+-0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV/c{sup 2} new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on {sup 19}F of sigma{sub F}=13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of sigma{sub p}=0.16 pb and sigma{sub n}=2.60 pb respectively (90% C.L.). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  11. Dark Matter Spin-Dependent Limits for WIMP Interactions on 19-F by PICASSO

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, S; Auger, M; Behnke, E; Beltran, B; Clark, K; Dai, X; Davour, A; Farine, J; Faust, R; Genest, M-H; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Krauss, C; Kumaratunga, S; Lawson, I; Leroy, C; Lessard, L; Levy, C; Levine, I; MacDonald, R; Martin, J -P; Nadeau, P; Noble, A; Piro, M -C; Pospísil, S; Shepherd, T; Starinski, N; Stekl, I; Storey, C; Wichoski, U; Zacek, V

    2009-01-01

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB reports new results for spin-dependent WIMP interactions on $^{19}$F using the superheated droplet technique. A new generation of detectors and new features which enable background discrimination via the rejection of non-particle induced events are described. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of $^{19}$F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75 $\\pm$ 0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV/c$^2$ new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on $^{19}$F of $\\sigma_F$ = 13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of $\\sigma_p$ = 0.16 pb and $\\sigma_n$ = 2.60 pb respectively (90% C.L). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  12. Dark matter spin-dependent limits for WIMP interactions on {sup 19}F by PICASSO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, Berta, E-mail: bbeltran@phys.ualberta.c [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 2G7 (Canada)

    2010-01-01

    The PICASSO experiment at SNOLAB uses super-heated C{sub 4}F{sub 10} droplets suspended in a gel as a target sensitive to WIMP-proton spin-dependent elastic scattering. The phase II setup has been improved substantially in sensitivity by using an array of 32 detectors with an active mass of {approx}65 g each and largely reduced background. First results are presented for a subset of two detectors with target masses of {sup 19}F of 65 g and 69 g respectively and a total exposure of 13.75 {+-} 0.48 kgd. No dark matter signal was found and for WIMP masses around 24 GeV/c{sup 2} new limits have been obtained on the spin-dependent cross section on {sup 19}F of {sigma}{sub F} = 13.9 pb (90% C.L.) which can be converted into cross section limits on protons and neutrons of {sigma}{sub p} = 0.15 pb and {sigma}{sub n} = 2.45 pb respectively (90% C.L). The obtained limits on protons restrict recent interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulations in terms of spin-dependent interactions.

  13. Excited-state annihilation reduces power dependence of single-molecule FRET experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettels, Daniel; Haenni, Dominik; Maillot, Sacha; Gueye, Moussa; Barth, Anders; Hirschfeld, Verena; Hübner, Christian G; Léonard, Jérémie; Schuler, Benjamin

    2015-12-28

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments are an important method for probing biomolecular structure and dynamics. The results from such experiments appear to be surprisingly independent of the excitation power used, in contradiction to the simple photophysical mechanism usually invoked for FRET. Here we show that excited-state annihilation processes are an essential cause of this behavior. Singlet-singlet annihilation (SSA) is a mechanism of fluorescence quenching induced by Förster-type energy transfer between two fluorophores while they are both in their first excited singlet states (S1S1), which is usually neglected in the interpretation of FRET experiments. However, this approximation is only justified in the limit of low excitation rates. We demonstrate that SSA is evident in fluorescence correlation measurements for the commonly used FRET pair Alexa 488/Alexa 594, with a rate comparable to the rate of energy transfer between the donor excited state and the acceptor ground state (S1S0) that is exploited in FRET experiments. Transient absorption spectroscopy shows that SSA occurs exclusively via energy transfer from Alexa 488 to Alexa 594. Excitation-power dependent microsecond correlation experiments support the conclusion based on previously reported absorption spectra of triplet states that singlet-triplet annihilation (STA) analogously mediates energy transfer if the acceptor is in the triplet state. The results indicate that both SSA and STA have a pronounced effect on the overall FRET process and reduce the power dependence of the observed FRET efficiencies. The existence of annihilation processes thus seems to be essential for using FRET as a reliable spectroscopic ruler at the high excitation rates commonly employed in single-molecule spectroscopy.

  14. Consequences of DM/antiDM oscillations for asymmetric WIMP darkmatter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Panci, P.; Servant, G.

    2012-01-01

    a primordial asymmetry of the same order as the baryon asymmetry naturally gets the correct relic abundance if the DM-number-violating Delta(DM) = 2 mass term is in the similar to meV range. The re-establishment of annihilations implies that constraints from the accumulation of aDM in astrophysical bodies...

  15. The Antiproton-Nucleon Annihilation Process (Antiproton Collaboration Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkas, W. H.; Birge, R. W.; Chupp, W. W.; Ekspong, A. G.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldhaber, S.; Heckman, H. H.; Perkins, D. H.; Sandweiss, J.; Segre, E.; Smith, F. M.; Stork, D. H.; Rossum, L. Van; Amaldi, E.; Baroni, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Franzinetti, C.; Manfredini, A.

    1956-09-10

    In the exposure to a 700-MeV/c negative particle beam, 35 antiproton stars have been found. Of these antiprotons, 21 annihilate in flight and three give large-angle scatters ({Theta} > 15 , T{sub P-} > 50 Mev), while 14 annihilate at rest. From the interactions in flight we obtain the total cross section for antiproton interaction.

  16. Calculation Of Positron Annihilation Rates In Metals Using Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... electron-positron correlation in metals better than other models or approximations. Explanations for the observed discrepancies between the experimental and calculated positron annihilation rates in metals are given. Keywords: Metals, positrons, annihilation rates, enhancement factors. Nigerian Journal of Physics Vol.

  17. Antiproton-proton annihilation into light neutral meson pairs within an effective meson theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Bystritskiy, Yury M.; Ahmadov, Azad I.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle

    2017-08-01

    Antiproton-proton annihilation into light neutral mesons in the few GeV energy domain is investigated in view of a global description of the existing data and predictions for future work at the Antiproton Annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). An effective meson model earlier developed, with mesonic and baryonic degrees of freedom in s , t , and u channels, is applied here to π0π0 production. Form factors with logarithmic s and t (u ) dependencies are applied. A fair agreement with the existing angular distributions is obtained. Applying SU(3) symmetry, it is straightforward to recover the angular distributions for π0η and η η production in the same energy range. A good agreement is generally obtained with all existing data.

  18. Annihilation at rest of antiprotons and protons into neutral particles

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Baker, C.A.; Barnett, B.M.; Batty, C.J.; Benayoun, M.; Blum, P.; Braune, K.; Bugg, D.V.; Case, T.; Crede, V.; Crowe, K.M.; Doser, M.; Dunnweber, W.; Engelhardt, D.; Faessler, M.A.; Haddock, R.P.; Heinsius, F.H.; Heinzelmann, M.; Hessey, N.P.; Hidas, P.; Jamnik, D.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammel, P.; Kisiel, J.; Klempt, E.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Kurilla, U.; Landua, R.; Matthay, H.; Meyer, C.A.; Meyer-Wildhagen, F.; Montanet, L.; Ouared, R.; Peters, K.; Pick, B.; Popkov, W.; Ratajczak, M.; Regenfus, Christian; Reinnarth, J.; Roethel, W.; Sarantsev, A.V.; Spanier, S.; Strohbusch, U.; Suffert, M.; Suh, J.S.; Thoma, U.; Uman, I.; Wallis-Plachner, S.; Walther, D.; Wiedner, U.; Wittmack, K.; Zou, B.S.

    2003-01-01

    Annihilation of antiprotons and protons at rest into neutral particles has been studied with the Crystal Barrel detector at LEAR. Annihilation frequencies are determined for final states containing π 0 , η , η ′ and ω mesons using a liquid and a room temperature, 12 bar, gaseous hydrogen target. Including annihilation frequencies for production of neutral kaons from other experiments, the identified reactions for annihilation in liquid hydrogen add up to a branching fraction of (3.56±0.28)% per annihilation compared to the frequency of (3.50±0.30)% with which we observe the all-neutral decay modes inclusively. Since the exclusive final states are normalized to the Crystal Barrel measurement of the π 0 π 0 branching ratio, the latter result is strongly supported by this present study.

  19. Positron annihilation in the nuclear outflows of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Fiona H.; Crocker, Roland M.; Birnboim, Yuval; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Ruiter, Ashley J.

    2018-02-01

    Observations of soft gamma rays emanating from the Milky Way from SPI/INTEGRAL reveal the annihilation of ˜2 × 1043 positrons every second in the Galactic bulge. The origin of these positrons, which annihilate to produce a prominent emission line centred at 511 keV, has remained mysterious since their discovery almost 50 yr ago. A plausible origin for the positrons is in association with the intense star formation ongoing in the Galactic centre. Moreover, there is strong evidence for a nuclear outflow in the Milky Way. We find that advective transport and subsequent annihilation of positrons in such an outflow cannot simultaneously replicate the observed morphology of positron annihilation in the Galactic bulge and satisfy the requirement that 90 per cent of positrons annihilate once the outflow has cooled to 104 K.

  20. Precise tests of QCD in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, P.N.

    1997-03-01

    A pedagogical review is given of precise tests of QCD in electron-positron annihilation. Emphasis is placed on measurements that have served to establish QCD as the correct theory of strong interactions, as well as measurements of the coupling parameter {alpha}{sub s}. An outlook is given for future important tests at a high-energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider.

  1. A Bio-Inspired Model-Based Approach for Context-Aware Post-WIMP Tele-Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor López-Jaquero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tele-rehabilitation is one of the main domains where Information and Communication Technologies (ICT have been proven useful to move healthcare from care centers to patients’ home. Moreover, patients, especially those carrying out a physical therapy, cannot use a traditional Window, Icon, Menu, Pointer (WIMP system, but they need to interact in a natural way, that is, there is a need to move from WIMP systems to Post-WIMP ones. Moreover, tele-rehabilitation systems should be developed following the context-aware approach, so that they are able to adapt to the patients’ context to provide them with usable and effective therapies. In this work a model-based approach is presented to assist stakeholders in the development of context-aware Post-WIMP tele-rehabilitation systems. It entails three different models: (i a task model for designing the rehabilitation tasks; (ii a context model to facilitate the adaptation of these tasks to the context; and (iii a bio-inspired presentation model to specify thoroughly how such tasks should be performed by the patients. Our proposal overcomes one of the limitations of the model-based approach for the development of context-aware systems supporting the specification of non-functional requirements. Finally, a case study is used to illustrate how this proposal can be put into practice to design a real world rehabilitation task.

  2. Strangeness production in antiproton-nucleus annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosel U.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the microscopic transport calculations of p¯ $ar p$-nucleus interactions within a GiBUU model are presented. The dominating mechanism of hyperon production is the strangeness exchange processes K¯N $ar KN$ → γπ and K¯N $ar KN$ → ΞK. The calculated rapidity spectra of Ξ hyperons are significantly shifted to forward rapidities with respect to the spectra of S = −1 hyperons. We argue that this shift should be a sensitive test for the possible exotic mechanisms of p¯ $ar p$-nucleus annihilation. The production of the double Λ-hypernuclei by Ξ− interaction with a secondary target is calculated.

  3. Hyperfine splitting in positronium to O({alpha}{sup 7}m{sub e}). One-photon annihilation contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Marquard, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Penin, A.A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Piclum, J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; RWTH Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie; Steinhauser, M. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik

    2014-02-15

    We present the complete result for the O({alpha}{sup 7}m{sub e}) one-photon annihilation contribution to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state energy levels in positronium. Numerically it increases the prediction of quantum electrodynamics by 217{+-}1 kHz.

  4. Search for gluons in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Ross, Graham G

    1976-01-01

    The authors study the deviations to be expected at high energies from the recently observed two jet structure of hadronic final states in e /sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. Motivated by the approximate validity of the naive parton model and by asymptotic freedom they suggest that hard gluon bremsstrahlung may be the dominant source of hadrons with large momenta transverse to the main jet axes. This process should give rise to three-jet final states. These may be observable at the highest SPEAR or DORIS energies, and should be important at the higher PETRA or PEP energies. (15 refs).

  5. IceCube search for dark matter annihilation in nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohaichuk, S.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grandmont, D. T.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Macías, O.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a first search for self-annihilating dark matter in nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters using a sample of high-energy neutrinos acquired in 339.8 days of live time during 2009/10 with the IceCube neutrino observatory in its 59-string configuration. The targets of interest include the Virgo and Coma galaxy clusters, the Andromeda galaxy, and several dwarf galaxies. We obtain upper limits on the cross section as a function of the weakly interacting massive particle mass between 300 GeV and 100 TeV for the annihilation into bb¯, W+W-, τ+τ-, μ+μ-, and νν¯. A limit derived for the Virgo cluster, when assuming a large effect from subhalos, challenges the weakly interacting massive particle interpretation of a recently observed GeV positron excess in cosmic rays.

  6. Dynamics and heat diffusion of Abrikosov’s vortex-antivortex pairs during an annihilation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, E. C. S.; Sardella, E.; Ortiz, W. A.; Zadorosny, R.

    2017-10-01

    The manipulation and control of vortex states in superconducting systems are of great interest in view of possible applications, for which mesoscopic materials are good candidates. In this work, we studied the annihilation dynamics and the dissipative aspects of an Abrikosov’s vortex-antivortex pair in a mesoscopic superconducting system with a concentric hole. The generalized time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations were numerically solved. The main result is the appearance of a phase slip-like line due to the elongation of the vortex and antivortex cores. Under specific circumstances, thermal dissipation might be associated with a sizeable relaxation of the order parameter, so that the energy released in the annihilation of a vortex-antivortex pair might become detectable in measurements of the magnetization as a function of time.

  7. Studies of defects and defect agglomerates by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief introduction to positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), and in particular lo its use for defect studies in metals is given. Positrons injected into a metal may become trapped in defects such as vacancies, vacancy clusters, voids, bubbles and dislocations and subsequently annihilate from...... the trapped state iri the defect. The annihilation characteristics (e.g., the lifetime of the positron) can be measured and provide information about the nature of the defect (e.g., size, density, morphology). The technique is sensitive to both defect size (in the range from monovacancies up to cavities...

  8. Annihilating vacancies via dynamic reflection and emission of interstitials in nano-crystal tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyan; Duan, Guohua; Xu, Yichun; Zhang, Yange; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S.; Liang, Yunfeng; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-11-01

    Radiation damage not only seriously degrades the mechanical properties of tungsten (W) but also enhances hydrogen retention in the material. Introducing a large amount of defect sinks, e.g. grain boundaries (GBs) is an effective method for improving radiation-resistance of W. However, the mechanism by which the vacancies are dynamically annihilated at long timescale in nano-crystal W is still not clear. The dynamic picture for eliminating vacancies with single interstitials and small interstitial-clusters has been investigated by combining molecular dynamics, molecular statics and object Kinetic Monte Carlo methods. On one hand, the annihilation of bulk vacancies was enhanced due to the reflection of an interstitial-cluster of parallel ≤ft crowdions by the GB. The interstitial-cluster was observed to be reflected back into the grain interior when approaching a locally dense GB region. Near this region, the energy landscape for the interstitial was featured by a shoulder, different to the decreasing energy landscape of the interstitial near a locally loose region as indicative of the sink role of the GB. The bulk vacancy on the reflection path was annihilated. On the other hand, the dynamic interstitial emission efficiently anneals bulk vacancies. The single interstitial trapped at the GB firstly moved along the GB quickly and clustered to be the di-interstitial therein, reducing its mobility to a value comparable to that that for bulk vacancy diffusion. Then, the bulk vacancy was recombined via the coupled motion of the di-interstitial along the GB, the diffusion of the vacancy towards the GB and the accompanying interstitial emission. These results suggest that GBs play an efficient role in improving radiation-tolerance of nano-crystal W via reflecting highly-mobile interstitials and interstitial-clusters into the bulk and annihilating bulk vacancies, and via complex coupling of in-boundary interstitial diffusion, clustering of the interstitial and vacancy

  9. Tests der pertubativen QCD in der e+e Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Passon, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents the DELPHI measurement of event shape distributions and inclusive spectra in e+e- annihilation at LEP between 183 and 207 GeV. These data have been reprocessed in 2001 and the results supersede some older DELPHI measurements at the corresponding energies [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. The differential distributions in Ep = ln 1/xp and their maxima E* are compared with predictions in the MLLA/LPHD framework. These tests support the manifestation of coherence effects on the hadronic level. From the event shapes Thrust, C parameter heavy jet mass wide and total jet broadening s is extracted with four different methods: The differential distributions are compared to predictions in O s pure NLLA and O s + NLLA logR folded with fragmentation models For the mean values s is extracted using an analytical power correction ansatz. The s values are combined with results obtained at other LEP energies and at and around MZ This allows both a combined measurement of s and a test of the running of s The smallest unce...

  10. Soliton annihilation in the perturbed sine-Gordon system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm; Welner, D.

    1984-01-01

    Fluxon-antifluxon annihilation in the perturbed sine-Gordon equation with loss and driving terms is investigated. For the infinite line we find a simple analytic expression for the threshold driving term corresponding to annihilation. With the application of the results to a Josephson junction of...... of finite length an expression for the current voltage characteristic of a zero-field step is derived. The analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations. The method is extendable to other systems....

  11. Breit-Wigner Enhancement of Dark Matter Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibe, Masahiro; /SLAC; Murayama, Hitoshi; /Tokyo U., IPMU /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley; Yanagida, T.T.; /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U., IPMU

    2009-06-19

    We point out that annihilation of dark matter in the galactic halo can be enhanced relative to that in the early universe due to a Breit-Wigner tail, if the dark matter annihilates through a pole just below the threshold. This provides a new explanation to the 'boost factor' which is suggested by the recent data of the PAMELA, ATIC and PPB-BETS cosmic-ray experiments.

  12. X-Ray Lines from Dark Matter Annihilation at the keV Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2018-02-09

    In 2014, several groups reported hints for a yet unidentified line in astrophysical x-ray signals from galaxies and galaxy clusters at an energy of 3.5 keV. While it is not unlikely that this line is simply a reflection of imperfectly modeled atomic transitions, it has renewed the community's interest in models of keV-scale dark matter, whose decay would lead to such a line. The alternative possibility of dark matter annihilation into monochromatic photons is far less explored, a lapse that we strive to amend in this Letter. More precisely, we introduce a novel model of fermionic dark matter χ with O(keV) mass, annihilating to a scalar state ϕ which in turn decays to photons, for instance via loops of heavy vectorlike fermions. The resulting photon spectrum is box shaped, but if χ and ϕ are nearly degenerate in mass, it can also resemble a narrow line. We discuss dark matter production via two different mechanisms-misalignment and freeze-in-which both turn out to be viable in vast regions of parameter space. We constrain the model using astrophysical x-ray data, and we demonstrate that, thanks to the velocity dependence of the annihilation cross section, it has the potential to reconcile the various observations of the 3.5 keV line. We finally argue that the model can easily avoid structure formation constraints on keV-scale dark matter.

  13. Lambda production in electron-positron annihilation at 29 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baden, A.R.

    1986-08-01

    The inclusive cross-secton for the production of the singly-strange baryons lambda and anti lambda, along with the differential cross-sections in momentum and energy, are measured by e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 29GeV. The charged decay mode lambda ..-->.. p..pi.. is used in a search for polarization. Such a polarization may be used as a check of CP invariance in lambda production. The sample of events with two detected decays is analyzed for correlations in production angle. 43 refs., 44 figs.

  14. Antimatter annihilation detection with AEgIS

    CERN Document Server

    Gligorova, Angela

    2015-01-01

    AE ̄ gIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) is an antimatter exper- iment based at CERN, whose primary goal is to carry out the first direct measurement of the Earth’s gravitational acceleration on antimatter. A precise measurement of antimatter gravity would be the first precision test of the Weak Equivalence Principle for antimatter. The principle of the experiment is based on the formation of antihydrogen through a charge exchange reaction between laser excited (Rydberg) positronium and ultra-cold antiprotons. The antihydrogen atoms will be accelerated by an inhomogeneous electric field (Stark acceleration) to form a pulsed cold beam. The free fall of the antihydrogen due to Earth’s gravity will be measured using a moiré de- flectometer and a hybrid position detector. This detector is foreseen to consist of an active silicon part, where the annihilation of antihydrogen takes place, followed by an emulsion part coupled to a fiber time-of-flight detector. This overview prese...

  15. Gamma Rays from Top-Mediated Dark Matter Annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, C B; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Tait, Tim M P; Taoso, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Lines in the energy spectrum of gamma rays are a fascinating experimental signal, which are often considered "smoking gun" evidence of dark matter annihilation. The current generation of gamma ray observatories are currently closing in on parameter space of great interest in the context of dark matter which is a thermal relic. We consider theories in which the dark matter's primary connection to the Standard Model is via the top quark, realizing strong gamma ray lines consistent with a thermal relic through the forbidden channel mechanism proposed in the Higgs in Space Model. We consider realistic UV-completions of the Higgs in Space and related theories, and show that a rich structure of observable gamma ray lines is consistent with a thermal relic as well as constraints from dark matter searches and the LHC. Particular attention is paid to the one loop contributions to the continuum gamma rays, which can easily swamp the line signals in some cases, and have been largely overlooked in previous literature.

  16. SEARCH FOR DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION SIGNALS FROM THE FORNAX GALAXY CLUSTER WITH H.E.S.S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowski, A. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Acero, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Astroparticules, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, CC 70, Place Eugene Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Aharonian, F.; Bernloehr, K.; Bochow, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 103980, D 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Akhperjanian, A. G. [National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia, Yerevan (Armenia); Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Brucker, J. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Barnacka, A. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Barres de Almeida, U. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Becherini, Y. [Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Becker, J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D 44780 Bochum (Germany); Behera, B. [Landessternwarte, Universitaet Heidelberg, Koenigstuhl, D 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Birsin, E. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D 12489 Berlin (Germany); Biteau, J.; Brun, F. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Boisson, C. [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France); Bolmont, J. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252, Paris Cedex 5 (France); Bordas, P., E-mail: bjoern.opitz@desy.de [Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Sand 1, D 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: H.E.S.S. Collaboration; and others

    2012-05-10

    The Fornax galaxy cluster was observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System for a total live time of 14.5 hr, searching for very high energy (VHE; E > 100GeV) {gamma}-rays from dark matter (DM) annihilation. No significant signal was found in searches for point-like and extended emissions. Using several models of the DM density distribution, upper limits on the DM velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section ({sigma}v) as a function of the DM particle mass are derived. Constraints are derived for different DM particle models, such as those arising from Kaluza-Klein and supersymmetric models. Various annihilation final states are considered. Possible enhancements of the DM annihilation {gamma}-ray flux, due to DM substructures of the DM host halo, or from the Sommerfeld effect, are studied. Additional {gamma}-ray contributions from internal bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton radiation are also discussed. For a DM particle mass of 1 TeV, the exclusion limits at 95% of confidence level reach values of ({sigma}v){sup 95%C.L.} {approx} 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, depending on the DM particle model and halo properties. Additional contribution from DM substructures can improve the upper limits on ({sigma}v) by more than two orders of magnitude. At masses around 4.5 TeV, the enhancement by substructures and the Sommerfeld resonance effect results in a velocity-weighted annihilation cross-section upper limit at the level of ({sigma}v){sup 95%C.L.} {approx}10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}.

  17. THE EFFECTS OF DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION ON COSMIC REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Hooper, Dan; Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: kaurov@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We revisit the possibility of constraining the properties of dark matter (DM) by studying the epoch of cosmic reionization. Previous studies have shown that DM annihilation was unlikely to have provided a large fraction of the photons which ionized the universe, but instead played a subdominant role relative to stars and quasars. The DM might, however, have begun to efficiently annihilate with the formation of primordial microhalos at z  ∼ 100–200, much earlier than the formation of the first stars. Therefore, if DM annihilation ionized the universe at even the percent level over the interval z  ∼ 20–100, it could leave a significant imprint on the global optical depth, τ . Moreover, we show that cosmic microwave background polarization data and future 21 cm measurements will enable us to more directly probe the DM contribution to the optical depth. In order to compute the annihilation rate throughout the epoch of reionization, we adopt the latest results from structure formation studies and explore the impact of various free parameters on our results. We show that future measurements could make it possible to place constraints on the DM’s annihilation cross-sections, which are at a level comparable to those obtained from the observations of dwarf galaxies, cosmic-ray measurements, and studies of recombination.

  18. The Isotropic Radio Background and Annihilating Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Belikov, Alexander V. [Institut d' Astrophysique (France); Jeltema, Tesla E. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Linden, Tim [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Profumo, Stefano [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Slatyer, Tracy R. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Observations by ARCADE-2 and other telescopes sensitive to low frequency radiation have revealed the presence of an isotropic radio background with a hard spectral index. The intensity of this observed background is found to exceed the flux predicted from astrophysical sources by a factor of approximately 5-6. In this article, we consider the possibility that annihilating dark matter particles provide the primary contribution to the observed isotropic radio background through the emission of synchrotron radiation from electron and positron annihilation products. For reasonable estimates of the magnetic fields present in clusters and galaxies, we find that dark matter could potentially account for the observed radio excess, but only if it annihilates mostly to electrons and/or muons, and only if it possesses a mass in the range of approximately 5-50 GeV. For such models, the annihilation cross section required to normalize the synchrotron signal to the observed excess is sigma v ~ (0.4-30) x 10^-26 cm^3/s, similar to the value predicted for a simple thermal relic (sigma v ~ 3 x 10^-26 cm^3/s). We find that in any scenario in which dark matter annihilations are responsible for the observed excess radio emission, a significant fraction of the isotropic gamma ray background observed by Fermi must result from dark matter as well.

  19. X-Ray Lines from Dark Matter Annihilation at the keV Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2018-01-01

    In 2014, several groups reported hints for a yet unidentified line in astrophysical x-ray signals from galaxies and galaxy clusters at an energy of 3.5 keV. While it is not unlikely that this line is simply a reflection of imperfectly modeled atomic transitions, it has renewed the community’s interest in models of keV-scale dark matter, whose decay would lead to such a line. The alternative possibility of dark matter annihilation into monochromatic photons is far less explored, a lapse that w...

  20. On the observability of the gamma-ray line flux from dark matter annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudaz, S.; Stecker, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The limits on the possible cosmic gamma-ray line flux from the two-photon annihilation of dark matter in the Galaxy are discussed. These limits are derived using both particle physics and cosmological constraints on dark matter candidates which arise in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics. Results are given in terms of allowed and prescribed areas in the flux-energy plane. Then these bounds are used to consider the observability of the line flux above continuum background fluxes using future high-resolution gamma-ray telescopes.

  1. Measurements of R for e sup + e minus annihilation at the KEK collider TRISTAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumita, T.; Sagawa, H.; Auchincloss, P.; Blanis, D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Eno, S.; Fry, C.A.; Harada, H.; Ho, Y.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Mori, T.; Olsen, S.L.; Shaw, N.M.; Sill, A.; Thorndike, E.H.; Ueno, K.; Zheng, H.W.; Abe, K.; Fujii, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kim, S.K.; Kurihara, Y.; Maki, A.; Nozaki, T.; Omori, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sugimoto, Y.; Takaiwa, Y.; Terada, S.; Walker, R.; Imlay, R.; Kirk, P.; Lim, J.; McNeil, R.R.; Metcalf, W.; Myung, S.S.; Cheng, C.P.; Gu, P.; Li, J.; Li, Y.K.; Ye, M.H.; Zhu, Y.C.; Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Hu, K.P.; Low, E.H.; Mattson, M.E.; Piilonen, L.; Sterner, K.L.; Lusin, S.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wang, A.T.M.; Wilson, S.; Frautschi, M.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Trahern, C.G.; Breedon, R.E.; Kim, G.N.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.L.; Maeshima, K.; Malchow, R.L.; Smith, J.R.; Stuart, D.; Kajino, F.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Thomas, T.; Ishi, Y.; Miyano, K.; Miyata, H.; Sasaki, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Bacala, A.; Liu, J.; Park, I.H.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Vinson, J.; Kobayashi, S.; The AMY Collaboration

    1990-09-01

    The ratio {ital R} of the total cross section for {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} annihilation into hadrons to the lowest-order QED cross section for {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} has been measured for center-of-mass energies ranging from 50 to 61.4 GeV. If we allow for an overall shift of {minus}4.9%, about 1.5 times our estimated normalization error, the results are consistent with the standard-model predictions.

  2. Polymeric coating degradation in accelerated weathering investigated by using positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.; Mallon, P.E.; Chen, H.; Huang, C.-M.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.; Cao, H.; Peng, Q.; Richardson, J.R.; Huang, Y.Y.; Sandreczki, T.C.; Jean, Y.C. [Dept. of Chemistry and Physics, Univ. of Missouri-Kansas, Kansas City, MO (United States); Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nielsen, B. [Brookhaven National Labs, Upton, NY (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Photo-degradation of a polyurethane-based topcoat induced by accelerated Xe-lamp irradiation is studied using Doppler broadened energy spectra (DBES) and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy coupled with slow positron technique. Significant and similar variations of S-parameter and ortho-positronium intensity (I{sub 3}) on the coating are observed as functions of depth and of exposure time. Cross-link densities have been measured by the solvent-swelling method. A correlation between the increase of crosslink density and a reduction of free-volume and hole fraction during the degradation is observed. (orig.)

  3. Applications of positron annihilation to dermatology and skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guang; Chen, Hongmin; Chakka, Lakshmi [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gadzia, Joseph E. [Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66103 and Kansas Medical Clinic, Topeka, KS 66614 (United States); Jean, Y.C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li (China)

    2007-07-01

    Positronium annihilation lifetime experiments have been performed to investigate the interaction between skin cancer and positronium for human skin samples. Positronium annihilation lifetime is found to be shorter and intensity is found to be less for the samples with basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma than the normal skin samples. These results indicate a reduction of free volume in the molecular level for the skin with cancer with respect to the skin without cancer. Positron annihilation spectroscopy may be potentially developed as a new noninvasive and external method for dermatology clinics, early detection of cancer, and nano-PET technology in the future. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Internal-fusion diagrams for p-barp annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, H.; Tatur, S.

    1984-07-01

    We investigate p-barp annihilation into B-barB' (where B and B' represent baryons) via q-barq annihilation into Q-barQ (where q and Q represent quarks). Specifying the q-barq (or q-barQ) annihilation spin structure determines the ratios of all polarized amplitudes with B,B' from the 56 under SU(6). We propose to parametrize q-barq..-->..Q-barQ by intermediate gluon and meson states. The model with q-barq..-->..one gluon..-->..Q-barQ with Q = s is worked out in detail. With the exception of p-barp..-->..Sigma-bar/sup -/..sigma../sup asterisk+/+charge conjugate, it compares favorably with experiment.

  5. Notes on symmetric and exterior depth and annihilator numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Kampf

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We survey and compare invariants of modules over the polynomial ring and the exterior algebra. In our considerations, we focus on the depth. The exterior analogue of depth was first introduced by Aramova, Avramov and Herzog. We state similarities between the two notion of depth and exhibit their relation in the case of squarefree modules. Work of Conca, Herzog and Hibi and Trung, respectively, shows that annihilator numbers are a meaningful generalization of depth over the polynomial ring. We introduce and study annihilator numbers over the exterior algebra. Despite some minor differences in the definition, those invariants show common behavior. In both situations a positive linear combination of the annihilator numbers can be used to bound the symmetric and exterior graded Betti numbers, respectively, from above.

  6. Preferential positron annihilation in Fe-Al system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriplach, J.; Dauve, C. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Sob, M. [Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky, Brno (Czech Republic). Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie

    1997-10-01

    The effect of preferential positron annihilation in binary Fe-Al system is studied by means of LMTO electron and positron structure method. The study covers the whole concentration range from Fe to Al. The supercell approach is utilized to model the structure of alloys. We conclude that positron preferential occupation of Fe sites is negligible for small Al concentrations and increases with Al content. The nonlinear dependence of positron annihilation rate on Al concentration can be almost fully explained as a volume effect. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs.

  7. Heavy dark matter annihilation from effective field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovanesyan, Grigory; Slatyer, Tracy R; Stewart, Iain W

    2015-05-29

    We formulate an effective field theory description for SU(2)_{L} triplet fermionic dark matter by combining nonrelativistic dark matter with gauge bosons in the soft-collinear effective theory. For a given dark matter mass, the annihilation cross section to line photons is obtained with 5% precision by simultaneously including Sommerfeld enhancement and the resummation of electroweak Sudakov logarithms at next-to-leading logarithmic order. Using these results, we present more accurate and precise predictions for the gamma-ray line signal from annihilation, updating both existing constraints and the reach of future experiments.

  8. Some application of positron annihilation in physical metallurgy and metal physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizek, A. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie)

    1980-01-01

    A short description of two gamma spectrometers used for positron annihilation studies is given. The results of investigations of Ni-Co alloys, dislocation in pure aluminium and ionic radii of some metals by positrons annihilation are presented.

  9. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  10. Positron annihilation studies on chalcone chromophore doped PVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhajantri, R.F.; Ravindrachary, V.; Harisha, A.; Ismayil [Department of Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri (India); Ranganathaiah, C. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri (India)

    2009-11-15

    A novel organic non-linear optical material 1-(4-methylphenyl)-3-(4- N, N dimethyl amino phenyl)-2-propen-1-one (MPDMAPP) chalcone chromophore has been synthesized by standard method. Pure and MPDMAPP doped Poly(vinyl alcohol) films are prepared using solution casting method and characterized using UV-Visible absorption and Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopic study shows three absorption bands, 196-202 nm assigned to localized n {yields}{pi}* transitions, 205-320 nm to n {yields}{pi} inter-band and 385-428 nm assigned to {pi} {yields}{pi}* transition and arises due to the charge transfer complex. Using observed UV-Vis spectra, three optical energy gaps, E{sub g1} (4.96-4.25 eV), E{sub g2} (3.47-3.32 eV) and E{sub g3} (2.33-2.24 eV) have been estimated. The observed change in E{sub g} upon doping is understood based on the formation of charge transfer complex arising from the -HC=CH- structure present in the composite and due to the interactions of dopant and OH group of PVA. The PALS results shows that the o-Ps lifetime decreases continuously as doping concentration increases and I{sub 3} initially increases (from 18.82% to 20.95%) from 0 wt% to 0.05 wt% and then decreases gradually up to 16.76% for higher dopant concentrations with decrease in optical band gaps. The variation of positron data with E{sub g} is understood by correlating the probability of Ps formation with the complex. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Antiproton-proton annihilation into charged light meson pairs within effective meson theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Bystritskiy, Yury M.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle

    2017-04-01

    We revisit antiproton-proton annihilation into light mesons in the energy domain relevant to the antiproton annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) experiment at the GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) [2.25 (1.5 ) ≤√{s }(pL) ≤5.47 (15 ) GeV (GeV /c ) where √{s }(pL) is the total energy (the beam momentum in the laboratory frame)]. An effective meson model is developed, with mesonic and baryonic degrees of freedom. Form factors are added to take into account the composite nature of the interacting hadrons. A comparison is made with the existing data for charged pion pair production and predictions for angular distributions and energy dependence in the range 3.362 (5 ) ≤√{s }(pL) ≤4.559 (10.1 ) GeV (GeV /c ). The model is applied to π±p elastic scattering, using crossing symmetry, and to charged kaon pair production, on the basis of SU(3) symmetry. In all cases the results illustrate a nice agreement with the data.

  12. From superWIMPs to decaying dark matter. Models, bounds and indirect searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weniger, Christoph

    2010-06-15

    Despite lots of observational and theoretical efforts, the particle nature of dark matter remains unknown. Beyond the paradigmatic WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), many theoretically well motivated models exist where dark matter interacts much more weakly than electroweak with Standard Model particles. In this case new phenomena occur, like the decay of dark matter or the interference with the standard cosmology of the early Universe. In this thesis we study some of these aspects of superweakly coupled dark matter in general, and in the special case of hidden U(1){sub X} gauginos that kinetically mix with hypercharge. There, we will assume that the gauge group remains unbroken, similar to the Standard Model U(1){sub em}. We study different kinds of cosmological bounds, including bounds from thermal overproduction, from primordial nucleosynthesis and from structure formation. Furthermore, we study the possible cosmic-ray signatures predicted by this scenario, with emphasis on the electron and positron channel in light of the recent observations by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. Moreover we study the cosmic-ray signatures of decaying dark matter independently of concrete particle-physics models. In particular we analyze in how far the rise in the positron fraction above 10 GeV, as observed by PAMELA, can be explained by dark matter decay. Lastly, we concentrate on related predictions for gamma-ray observations with the Fermi LAT, and propose to use the dipole-like anisotropy of the prompt gamma-ray dark matter signal to distinguish exotic dark matter contributions from the extragalactic gamma-ray background. (orig.)

  13. Limits on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon cross sections from the first science run of the ZEPLIN-III experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedenko, V N; Araújo, H M; Barnes, E J; Bewick, A; Cashmore, R; Chepel, V; Currie, A; Davidge, D; Dawson, J; Durkin, T; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Horn, M; Howard, A S; Hughes, A J; Jones, W G; Joshi, M; Kalmus, G E; Kovalenko, A G; Lindote, A; Liubarsky, I; Lopes, M I; Lüscher, R; Lyons, K; Majewski, P; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2009-10-09

    We present new experimental constraints on the WIMP-nucleon spin-dependent elastic cross sections using data from the first science run of ZEPLIN-III, a two-phase xenon experiment searching for galactic dark matter weakly interacting massive particles based at the Boulby mine. Analysis of approximately 450 kg x days fiducial exposure allow us to place a 90%-confidence upper limit on the pure WIMP-neutron cross section of sigma(n)=1.9x10(-2) pb at 55 GeV/c(2) WIMP mass. Recent calculations of the nuclear spin structure based on the Bonn charge-dependent nucleon-nucleon potential were used for the odd-neutron isotopes 129Xe and 131Xe. These indicate that the sensitivity of xenon targets to the spin-dependent WIMP-proton interaction could be much lower than implied by previous calculations, whereas the WIMP-neutron sensitivity is impaired only by a factor of approximately 2.

  14. Effect of Voids on Angular Correlation of Positron Annihilation Photons in Molybdenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Petersen, K.; Cotterill, R. M. J.

    1972-01-01

    POSITRON annihilation investigations of defects in crystals have shown that for sufficiently high defect concentrations (typically above about 10−6) all positrons become trapped in the defects before annihilation, thus changing the characteristics of the annihilation process. For example, trappin...

  15. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Dwarf Galaxies. Jayashri Medhi. ∗. , H. L. Duorah, A. G. Barua & K. Duorah. Physics Department, Gauhati University, Gopinath Bardoloi Nagar, Guwahati 781 014, India. ∗ e-mail: jayashri.medhi@rediffmail.com. Received 18 May 2016; accepted 4 July ...

  16. Positron Annihilation in a Rubber Modified Epoxy Resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Jacobsen, F. M.; Pethrick, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Positron annihilation data is reported on a rubber-modified epoxy resin. Studies of the temperature dependence of the o-positronium lifetime indicated the existence of three distinct regions; the associated transition temperatures by comparison with dilatometric data can be ascribed respectively...

  17. Positron annihilation and tribological studies of nano-embedded Al ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Positron annihilation studies of aluminium alloys with nanodispersions of insoluble elements, i.e., In, Sn, Pb and Au were reported. The alloys were obtained using a rapid solidification process. For all alloys, except that with Au, the average diameter of nanoparticles in aluminium matrix was 100 nm, and variance of the size ...

  18. Positron annihilation in iron and B2-ordered alloys FeAl and FeTi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sob, M. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie)

    1982-03-01

    A band structure (BS) calculation of both the momentum density of annihilation pairs (MDAP) and the electron momentum density (EMD) is performed for B2-ordered stoichiometric alloys FeAl and FeTi as well as for pure iron in the principal crystallographic directions (100), (110) and (111). The electron and positron wavefunctions are determined by the symmetrised APW method. The electron-positron interaction is considered by means of the Kahana-like enhancement factor expressed as a function of the annihilating electron energy. Assuming a different enhancement for the contribution of nearly free electrons to that of d electrons gives better agreement between calculated and experimental results than the independent-particle model which is commonly used. It is found that the contribution of d electrons is enhanced by about a factor of two less than that of the nearly free electrons. An analysis of the experimental results for iron suggests that the majority spin bands ..sigma../sub 1/ are probably not intersected by the Fermi level and, therefore, the hole arms along the HN direction at the majority Fermi surface are not connected at N. This is at variance with the recent BS calculations for iron, but in agreement with the rigid-exchange-approximation calculation performed in this paper. A mutual comparison of the BS results leads to the conclusion that the low-energy parts of the electronic structures of B2-ordered transition metal alloys have approximately the same character.

  19. Dark Matter Annihilation in The Galactic Center As Seen by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Goodenough, Lisa; /New York U.

    2010-10-01

    We analyze the first two years of data from the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope from the direction of the inner 10{sup o} around the Galactic Center with the intention of constraining, or finding evidence of, annihilating dark matter. We find that the morphology and spectrum of the emission between 1.25{sup o} and 10{sup o} from the Galactic Center is well described by a the processes of decaying pions produced in cosmic ray collisions with gas, and the inverse Compton scattering of cosmic ray electrons in both the disk and bulge of the Inner Galaxy, along with gamma rays from known points sources in the region. The observed spectrum and morphology of the emission within approximately 1.25{sup o} ({approx}175 parsecs) of the Galactic Center, in contrast, cannot be accounted for by these processes or known sources. We find that an additional component of gamma ray emission is clearly present which is highly concentrated around the Galactic Center, but is not point-like in nature. The observed morphology of this component is consistent with that predicted from annihilating dark matter with a cusped (and possibly adiabatically contracted) halo distribution ({rho} {proportional_to} r{sup -1.34{+-}0.04}). The observed spectrum of this component, which peaks at energies between 2-4 GeV (in E{sup 2} units), is well fit by that predicted for a 7.3-9.2 GeV dark matter particle annihilating primarily to tau leptons with a cross section in the range of <{sigma}{nu}> = 3.3 x 10{sup -27} to 1.5 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}/s, depending on how the dark matter distribution is normalized. We discuss other possible sources for this component, but argue that they are unlikely to account for the observed emission.

  20. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  1. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to paired Bc production in e+e− annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Berezhnoy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We present theoretical analysis of paired Bc mesons production in e+e− annihilation at different energy scales taking into account full next-to-leading order QCD corrections. Both possible electroweak channels are considered: production via virtual photon and via virtual Z-boson. We study in detail the role of radiative QCD corrections, which were found to be significant especially at low energies. It is shown that the contribution from Z-boson is significant at high energies (s>MZ/2 especially in the case of paired production of pseudo-scalar and vector (Bc+Bc⁎ mesons. Azimuthal asymmetry induced by a P-violating weak interaction with Z-boson is also analyzed.

  2. Invariant-mass and fractional-energy dependence of inclusive production of dihadrons in e+e- annihilation at s=10.58 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, V.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Choi, S. -K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Guido, E.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W. -S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Jeon, H. B.; Jia, S.; Jin, Y.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Karyan, G.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kulasiri, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Merola, M.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Ono, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Pardi, S.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Santelj, L.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanuki, S.; Widmann, E.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Ye, H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2017-08-01

    The inclusive cross sections for dihadrons of charged pions and kaons (e+e- → hhX) in electronpositron annihilation are reported. They are obtained as a function of the total fractional energy and invariant mass for any di-hadron combination in the same hemisphere as defined by the thrust event-shape variable and its axis. Since same-hemisphere dihadrons can be assumed to originate predominantly from the same initial parton, di-hadron fragmentation functions are probed. These di-hadron fragmentationfunctions are needed as an unpolarized baseline in order to quantitatively understand related spindependent measurements in other processes and to apply them to the extraction of quark transversity distribution functions in the nucleon. The di-hadron cross sections are obtained from a 655 fb-1 data sample collected at or near the Y(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  3. Positron annihilation studies in binary solid solutions and mechanical mixtures of lanthanide dipivaloylmethanate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulgêncio, F., E-mail: fefulgencio@gmail.com [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais – UFMG, C.P. 702, CEP 31270-901 – Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, F.C. [Grupo de Pesquisa em Nanociências e Nanomateriais, Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Campus Timóteo, Timóteo, MG (Brazil); Windmöller, D.; Araujo, M.H.; Marques-Netto, A.; Machado, J.C. [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais – UFMG, C.P. 702, CEP 31270-901 – Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Magalhães, W.F., E-mail: welmag@ufmg.br [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais – UFMG, C.P. 702, CEP 31270-901 – Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-11-05

    Highlights: • Positronium formation in several Ln{sup 3+} complexes, except in Eu{sup 3+} complexes. • Positron annihilation spectroscopies used as a characterization tool of solid solutions and mechanical mixtures. • Measurements performed at different temperatures (80 and 295 K). - Abstract: Measurements using positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) and Doppler broadening annihilation radiation lineshape (DBARLS) spectroscopies were performed in several lanthanide dipivaloylmethanate complexes, Ln(dpm){sub 3} where Ln = Sm{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} and dpm = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-pentanedionate, and also on their binary solid solutions and mechanical mixtures, biphasic systems, of the general formula Ln{sub 1−x}Eu{sub x}(dpm){sub 3}. Expressive positronium formation was observed in all Ln(dpm){sub 3} complexes, except in Eu(dpm){sub 3} complex. The results indicate formation of solid solutions in the Sm{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+}and Tb{sup 3+} systems, where total inhibition of positronium formation was observed. A Stern–Volmer type equation, I{sub 3}{sup 0}/I{sub 3} = 1 + kx, was used to fit the data, enabling the calculation of the inhibition constants, k. A mechanical mixture behavior, with linear variation of I{sub 3} between the I{sub 3} values of the pure complexes, was observed in systems containing Ho{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} complexes, where no effective solid solution formation occurred due to differences between the crystalline structures of these complexes and Eu(dpm){sub 3}. No positronium quenching reactions were observed in the solid solutions. DBARLS results confirmed those of PALS, evidencing that the positron annihilation spectroscopies are useful techniques to characterize the formation of solid solutions. PALS measurements at 80 K were performed in the Sm{sub 1−x}Eu{sub x}(dpm){sub 3} and Gd{sub 1−x}Eu{sub x}(dpm){sub 3} solid solutions. The results indicate that, despite a contraction

  4. Neutrino fluxes from nonuniversal Higgs mass LSP annihilations in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Savage, Christopher; Spanos, Vassilis C.; 10.1103/PhysRevD.83.085023

    2011-01-01

    We extend our previous studies of the neutrino fluxes expected from neutralino LSP annihilations inside the Sun to include variants of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with squark, slepton and gaugino masses constrained to be universal at the GUT scale, but allowing one or two non-universal supersymmetry-breaking parameters contributing to the Higgs masses (NUHM1,2). As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM) with universal Higgs masses, there are large regions of the NUHM parameter space where the LSP density inside the Sun is not in equilibrium, so that the annihilation rate may be far below the capture rate, and there are also large regions where the capture rate is not dominated by spin-dependent LSP-proton scattering. The spectra possible in the NUHM are qualitatively similar to those in the CMSSM. We calculate neutrino-induced muon fluxes above a threshold energy of 10 GeV, appropriate for the IceCube/DeepCore detector, for points where the NUHM yields the correct cosmological r...

  5. Magnetic field annihilation and reconnection driven by femtosecond lasers in inhomogeneous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YouYuan; Li, FeiYu; Chen, Min; Weng, SuMing; Lu, QuanMing; Dong, QuanLi; Sheng, ZhengMing; Zhang, Jie

    2017-11-01

    The process of fast magnetic reconnection driven by intense ultra-short laser pulses in underdense plasma is investigated by particle-in-cell simulations. In the wakefield of such laser pulses, quasi-static magnetic fields at a few mega-Gauss are generated due to nonvanishing cross product Δ( n /γ) × p. Excited in an inhomogeneous plasma of decreasing density, the quasi-static magnetic field structure is shown to drift quickly both in lateral and longitudinal directions. When two parallel-propagating laser pulses with close focal spot separation are used, such field drifts can develop into magnetic reconnection (annihilation) in their overlapping region, resulting in the conversion of magnetic energy to kinetic energy of particles. The reconnection rate is found to be much higher than the value obtained in the Hall magnetic reconnection model. Our work proposes a potential way to study magnetic reconnection-related physics with short-pulse lasers of terawatt peak power only.

  6. Search for annihilating Dark Matter towards dwarf galaxies with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morselli Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard model of cosmology indicates that approximately 27% of the energy density of the Universe is in the form of dark matter. The nature of dark matter is an open question in modern physics. Indirect dark matter searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes are playing a crucial role in constraining the nature of the dark matter particle through the study of their potential annihilation that could produce very high energy gamma rays from different astrophysical structures. The Cherenkov Telescope Array will provide an unprecedented sensitivity over a range of dark matter mass from ~100 GeV to ~30 TeV. In this contribution we review the status of indirect dark matter searches at dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  7. Observation of Transverse $\\Lambda/\\bar{\\Lambda}$ Hyperon Polarization in $e^+e^-$ Annihilation at Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A; Adamczyk, K; Aihara, H; Said, S Al; Arinstein, K; Arita, Y; Asner, D M; Aso, T; Atmacan, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Ayad, R; Aziz, T; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bahinipati, S; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Ban, Y; Bansal, V; Barberio, E; Barrett, M; Bartel, W; Bay, A; Behera, P; Belhorn, M; Belous, K; Berger, M; Besson, D; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bloomfield, T; Blyth, S; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bookwalter, C; Boulahouache, C; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Breibeck, F; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Waheed, E; Červenkov, D; Chang, M -C; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, K -F; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Crnkovic, J; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, N; Di Carlo, S; Dingfelder, J; Doležal, Z; Dossett, D; Drásal, Z; Drutskoy, A; Dubey, S; Dutta, D; Dutta, K; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Frey, A; Frost, O; Fulsom, B G; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Getzkow, D; Gillard, R; Giordano, F; Glattauer, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Greenwald, D; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Grygier, J; Grzymkowska, O; Guan, Y; Guo, H; Haba, J; Hamer, P; Han, Y L; Hara, K; Hara, T; Hasegawa, Y; Hasenbusch, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; He, X H; Heck, M; Hedges, M T; Heffernan, D; Heider, M; Heller, A; Higuchi, T; Himori, S; Hirose, S; Horiguchi, T; Hoshi, Y; Hoshina, K; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hsu, C -L; Huschle, M; Hyun, H J; Igarashi, Y; Iijima, T; Imamura, M; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Itagaki, K; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Iwata, S; Jacobs, W W; Jaegle, I; Jeon, H B; Jin, Y; Joffe, D; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kakuno, H; Kaliyar, A B; Kang, J H; Kang, K H; Kapusta, P; Kataoka, S U; Kato, E; Kato, Y; Katrenko, P; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Keck, T; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, B H; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, H -J; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kleinwort, C; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, N; Koblitz, S; Kodyš, P; Koga, Y; Korpar, S; Kotchetkov, D; Kouzes, R T; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kronenbitter, B; Kuhr, T; Kulasiri, R; Kumar, R; Kumita, T; Kurihara, E; Kuroki, Y; Kuzmin, A; Kvasnička, P; Kwon, Y -J; Lai, Y -T; Lange, J S; Lee, D H; Lee, I S; Lee, S -H; Leitgab, M; Leitner, R; Levit, D; Lewis, P; Li, C H; Li, H; Li, J; Li, L; Li, X; Li, Y; Gioi, L Li; Libby, J; Limosani, A; Liu, C; Liu, Y; Liu, Z Q; Liventsev, D; Loos, A; Louvot, R; Lubej, M; Lukin, P; Luo, T; MacNaughton, J; Masuda, M; Matsuda, T; Matvienko, D; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Mikami, Y; Miyabayashi, K; Miyachi, Y; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Mohanty, S; Mohapatra, D; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mori, T; Morii, T; Moser, H -G; Müller, T; Muramatsu, N; Mussa, R; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakahama, Y; Nakamura, I; Nakamura, K R; Nakano, E; Nakano, H; Nakano, T; Nakao, M; Nakayama, H; Nakazawa, H; Nanut, T; Nath, K J; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Negishi, K; Neichi, K; Ng, C; Niebuhr, C; Niiyama, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, A; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ono, Y; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Oswald, C; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Palka, H; Panzenböck, E; Park, C -S; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Paul, S; Peak, L S; Pedlar, T K; Peng, T; Pesántez, L; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Prasanth, K; Prim, M; Prothmann, K; Pulvermacher, C; Purohit, M V; Rauch, J; Reisert, B; Ribežl, E; Ritter, M; Rorie, J; Rostomyan, A; Rozanska, M; Rummel, S; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, K; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sasaki, J; Sasao, N; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schlüter, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schönmeier, P; Schram, M; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Schwenker, B; Seidl, R; Seino, Y; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Seong, I S; Sevior, M E; Shang, L; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shibuya, H; Shimizu, N; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Singh, J B; Sinha, R; Smerkol, P; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Soloviev, Y; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Steder, M; Strube, J F; Stypula, J; Sugihara, S; Sugiyama, A; Sumihama, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Z; Takeichi, H; Takizawa, M; Tamponi, U; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, S; Tanida, K; Taniguchi, N; Taylor, G N; Tenchini, F; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Trusov, V; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uchida, T; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Uozumi, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Waheed, E; Wang, C H; Wang, J; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wehle, S; White, E; Widmann, E; Wiechczynski, J; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamada, S; Yamamoto, H; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yelton, J; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, L; Zhilich, V; Zhukova, V; Zhulanov, V; Ziegler, M; Zivko, T; Zupanc, A; Zwahlen, N

    2016-01-01

    We report the first observation of the polarization of $\\Lambda/\\bar{\\Lambda}$ hyperons transverse to its production plane in $e^+e^-$ annihilation. We observe a significant polarization that rises with the fractional energy carried by the hyperon as well as its transverse momentum. To define the production plane, we use the direction of the hyperon momentum together with either the thrust axis in the event or the momentum vector of a hadron in the opposite hemisphere. Furthermore, we investigate the contributions to the hyperon polarization from the feed-down from $\\Sigma^0/\\bar{\\Sigma}^0$ and $\\Lambda_c^{\\pm}$ decays. This measurement uses a dataset of 800.4\\~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the Belle experiment at or near a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV.

  8. Strong CMB constraint on P-wave annihilating dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Haipeng; Wise, Mark B.; Zhang, Yue

    2017-10-01

    We consider a dark sector consisting of dark matter that is a Dirac fermion and a scalar mediator. This model has been extensively studied in the past. If the scalar couples to the dark matter in a parity conserving manner then dark matter annihilation to two mediators is dominated by the P-wave channel and hence is suppressed at very low momentum. The indirect detection constraint from the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background is usually thought to be absent in the model because of this suppression. In this letter we show that dark matter annihilation via bound state formation occurs through the S-wave and hence there is a constraint on the parameter space of the model from the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  9. Positron annihilation studies of some charge transfer molecular complexes

    CERN Document Server

    El-Sayed, A; Boraei, A A A

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetimes were measured for some solid charge transfer (CT) molecular complexes of quinoline compounds (2,6-dimethylquinoline, 6-methoxyquinoline, quinoline, 6-methylquinoline, 3-bromoquinoline and 2-chloro-4-methylquinoline) as electron donor and picric acid as an electron acceptor. The infrared spectra (IR) of the solid complexes clearly indicated the formation of the hydrogen-bonding CT-complexes. The annihilation spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components using PATFIT program. The values of the average and bulk lifetimes divide the complexes into two groups according to the non-bonding ionization potential of the donor (electron donating power) and the molecular weight of the complexes. Also, it is found that the ionization potential of the donors and molecular weight of the complexes have a conspicuous effect on the average and bulk lifetime values. The bulk lifetime values of the complexes are consistent with the formation of stable hydrogen-bonding CT-complexes as inferred...

  10. Development and Testing of the Positron Identification by Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, D.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Bickford, B.

    2013-12-01

    Moderate energy positrons (~few to 10 MeV) have seldom been observed in the Heliosphere, due primarily to there not having been dedicated instruments for such measurements. Their detection would have implications in the study of Solar energetic particle events and the transport and modulation of the Solar wind and Galactic cosmic rays. The Positron Identification by Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) system is designed specifically to measure these moderate energy positrons by simultaneously detecting the two 511-keV gamma-ray photons that result from the positron stopping in the instrument and the subsequent electron-positron annihilation. This method is also expected to effectively discriminate positrons from protons by measuring the amount of energy deposited in the detectors (dE/dx versus residual energy). PICAP offers a low-mass, low-power option for measuring positrons, electrons and ions in space. Following Monte Carlo modeling, a PICAP laboratory prototype has been designed and built which can be easily adaptable to a space-flight design. This instrument is comprised of (Si) solid-state detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and high-Z BGO crystal scintillator suitable for detecting the 511-keV gamma rays. The prototype underwent preliminary laboratory testing and calibration using radioactive sources for the purpose of establishing functionality. It has also been exposed to energetic protons (up to ~200 MeV) at an accelerator facility, with future plans for exposure to energetic positrons and electrons. The goal is to validate modeling and determine the performance of the instrument concept. We plan to present a summary of modeling calculations and preliminary results from proton testing. This work is 95% supported by NASA Grant NNX10AC10G. A 3D model of the PICAP prototype with a one-quarter cutaway revealing the interior of the instrument

  11. Electronic structure of Mo and W investigated with positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutschke, Markus [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Sekania, Michael [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi (Georgia); Benea, Diana [Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (Germany); Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Joseph A.; Hugenschmidt, Christoph [FRM II, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Chioncel, Liviu [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Augsburg Center for Innovative Technologies, University of Augsburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We perform electronic structure calculations to analyze the momentum distribution of the transition metals molybdenum and tungsten. We study the influence of positron-electron and the electron-electron interactions on the shape of the two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) spectra. Our analysis is performed within the framework of the combined Density Functional (DFT) and Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). Computed spectra are compared with recent experimental investigations.

  12. Direct detection of dark matter with resonant annihilation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bo; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    In the scenario where the dark matter (DM) particles $\\chi\\bar\\chi$ pair annihilate through a resonance particle $R$, the constraint from DM relic density makes the corresponding cross section for DM-nuclei elastic scattering extremely small, and can be below the neutrino background induced by the coherent neutrino-nuclei scattering, which makes the DM particle beyond the reach of the conventional DM direct detection experiments. We present an improved analytical calculation of the DM relic d...

  13. Investigation of corrosion defects in titanium by positron annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzak Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The positron annihilation method was used to study the formation of defects in titanium samples during their corrosion in the vapor of a 3% HCl solution. In particular, the distribution of defects depending on the distance from the corroding surface and the impact of an external magnetic field on the concentration of vacancies forming during the corrosion of titanium layers close to the surface were determined.

  14. Concurrent spectrometry of annihilation radiation and characteristic gamma-rays for activity assessment of selected positron emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, S G; Steyn, G F; van Rooyen, T J; Szelecsényi, F; Kovács, Z; Vermeulen, C; van der Meulen, N P

    2017-11-01

    A method is described to determine the activity of non-pure positron emitters in a radionuclide production environment by assessing the 511keV annihilation radiation concurrently with selected γ-lines, using a single High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. Liquid sources of 22Na, 52Fe, 52mMn, 61Cu, 64Cu, 65Zn, 66Ga, 68Ga, 82Rb, 88Y, 89Zr and 132Cs were prepared specifically for this study. Acrylic absorbers surrounding the sources ensured that the emitted β+-particles could not escape and annihilate away from the source region. The absorber thickness was matched to the maximum β+ energy for each radionuclide. The effect on the 511keV detection efficiency by the non-homogeneous distribution of annihilation sites inside the source and absorber materials was investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. It was found that no self-absorption corrections other than those implicit to the detector calibration procedure needed to be applied. The medically important radionuclide, 64Cu, is of particular interest as its strongest characteristic γ-ray has an intensity of less than 0.5%. In spite of the weakness of its emission intensity, the 1346keV γ-line is shown to be suitable for quantifying the 64Cu production yield after chemical separation from the target matrix has been performed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic variants in urinary bladder cancer: collective power of the "wimp SNPs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golka, Klaus; Selinski, Silvia; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Marchan, Rosemarie; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger; Bolt, Hermann M; Hengstler, Jan G

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 300 validated associations between genetic variants and risk of approximately 70 common diseases. A small number of rare variants with a frequency of usually less than 1% are associated with a strongly enhanced risk, such as genetic variants of TP53, RB1, BRCA1, and BRCA2. Only a very small number of SNPs (with a frequency of more that 1% of the rare allele) have effects of a factor of two or higher. Examples include APOE4 in Alzheimer's disease, LOXL1 in exfoliative glaucoma, and CFH in age-related macular degeneration. However, the majority of all identified SNPs have odds ratios between 1.1 and 1.5. In the case of urinary bladder cancer, all known SNPs that have been validated in sufficiently large populations are associated with odds ratios smaller than 1.5. These SNPs are located next to the following genes: MYC, TP63, PSCA, the TERT-CLPTM1L locus, FGFR3, TACC3, NAT2, CBX6, APOBEC3A, CCNE1, and UGT1A. It is likely that these moderate risk or "wimp SNPs" interact, and because of their high number, collectively have a strong influence on whether an individual will develop cancer or not. It should be considered that variants identified so far explain only approximately 5-10% of the overall inherited risk. Possibly, the remaining variance is due to an even higher number of SNPs with odds ratios smaller than 1.1. Recent studies have provided the following information: (1) The functions of genes identified as relevant for bladder cancer focus on detoxification of carcinogens, control of the cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as maintenance of DNA integrity. (2) Many novel SNPs are far away from the protein coding regions, suggesting that these SNPs are located on distant-acting transcriptional enhancers. (3) The low odds ratio of each individual bladder cancer-associated SNP is too low to justify reasonable preventive measures. However, if the recently identified SNPs interact, they may

  16. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter Using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets accumulated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Results from the original analysis of these data were published in 2009; two events were observed in the signal region with an expected leakage of 0.9 events. Further investigation revealed an issue with the ionization-pulse reconstruction algorithm leading to a software upgrade and a subsequent reanalysis of the data. As part of the reanalysis, I performed an advanced discrimination technique to better distinguish (potential) signal events from backgrounds using a 5-dimensional chi-square method. This dataanalysis technique combines the event information recorded for each WIMP-search event to derive a backgrounddiscrimination parameter capable of reducing the expected background to less than one event, while maintaining high efficiency for signal events. Furthermore, optimizing the cut positions of this 5-dimensional chi-square parameter for the 14 viable germanium detectors yields an improved expected sensitivity to WIMP interactions relative to previous CDMS results. This dissertation describes my improved (and optimized) discrimination technique and the results obtained from a blind application to the reanalyzed CDMS II WIMP-search data.

  17. Antiproton annihilation physics annihilation physics in the Monte Carlo particle transport code particle transport code SHIELD-HIT12A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taasti, Vicki Trier; Knudsen, Helge; Holzscheiter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    . An experimental depth dose curve obtained by the AD-4/ACE collaboration was compared with an earlier version of SHIELD-HIT, but since then inelastic annihilation cross sections for antiprotons have been updated and a more detailed geometric model of the AD-4/ACE experiment was applied. Furthermore, the Fermi...... of these updates is tested by comparing simulated data with the antiproton depth dose curve in water. It is found that the implementation of these new capture probabilities results in an overestimation of the depth dose curve in the Bragg peak. This can be mitigated by scaling the antiproton collision cross...... sections, which restores the agreement, but some small deviations still remain. Best agreement is achieved by using the most recent antiproton collision cross sections and the Fermi–Teller Z-law, even if experimental data conclude that the Z-law is inadequately describing annihilation on compounds. We...

  18. Study of the electron-positron annihilation in the galactic center region with the Integral/SPI spectrometer; Etude de l'annihilation electron-positon dans la region du centre galactique avec le spectrometre INTEGRAL/SPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizun, P

    2007-04-15

    A spectral feature was detected in 1970 in the gamma-ray emission from the central regions of the Milky Way, during balloon flight observations. Located near 511 keV, this feature was soon attributed to the gamma-ray line tracing the annihilation of electrons with their anti-particles, positrons. However, none of the multiple astrophysical scenarios contemplated to explain the production of positrons in the Galactic bulge has been able to reproduce the high injection rate deduced from the flux of the 511 keV line, close to 10{sup 43} positrons per second. Launched in 2002, the European gamma-ray satellite INTEGRAL was provided with a spectrometer, SPI, whose unprecedented imaging and spectral capabilities in this energy range enable us to further study the source of the 511 keV line detected in the Galactic centre region. Indeed, a better determination of the spatial extent of the source, the intrinsic width of the line and the fraction of positrons annihilating in-flight, directly or via the formation of ortho-Positronium atoms would improve our knowledge of both the annihilation medium and the initial source of positrons, and could allow us to discriminate between the various explanatory scenarios. The first part of this thesis deals with a key ingredient in the extraction of the annihilation spectrum: the optimization of the instrumental background model. New data screening and tracer selection procedures are presented. Classical multi-linear models are compared to neural and Bayesian networks. Finally, three years of observation are used to constrain the width of the source and derive its spectrum. The second part of the thesis focuses on one of the possible scenarios explaining the high positron injection rate deduced from the flux of the 511 keV line: the annihilation of light dark matter particles into electron-positron pairs. The various radiation mechanisms involved are modeled and confronted to observations in order to set an upper limit on the injection

  19. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  20. Higher-order threshold resummation for semi-inclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Vogt, A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences

    2009-08-15

    The complete soft-enhanced and virtual-gluon contributions are derived for the quark coefficient functions in semi-inclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation to the third order in massless perturbative QCD. These terms enable us to extend the soft-gluon resummation for the fragmentation functions by two orders to the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (N{sup 3}LL) accuracy. The resummation exponent is found to be the same as for the structure functions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. This finding, together with known results on the higher-order quark form factor, facilitates the determination of all soft and virtual contributions of the fourth-order difference of the coefficient functions for these two processes. Unlike the previous (N{sup 2}LL) order in the exponentiation, the numerical effect of the N{sup 3}LL contributions turns out to be negligible at LEP energies. (orig.)

  1. Singlet-triplet annihilation limits exciton yield in poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    CERN Document Server

    Steiner, Florian; Lupton, John M

    2014-01-01

    Control of chain length and morphology in combination with single-molecule spectroscopy techniques provide a comprehensive photophysical picture of excited-state losses in the prototypical conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). A universal self-quenching mechanism is revealed, based on singlet-triplet exciton annihilation, which accounts for the dramatic loss in fluorescence quantum yield of a single P3HT chain between its solution (unfolded) and bulk-like (folded) state. Triplet excitons fundamentally limit the fluorescence of organic photovoltaic materials, which impacts on the conversion of singlet excitons to separated charge carriers, decreasing the efficiency of energy harvesting at high excitation densities. Interexcitonic interactions are so effective that a single P3HT chain of >100 kDa weight behaves like a two-level system, exhibiting perfect photon-antibunching.

  2. QCD studies with $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation data at 172-189 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied hadronic events from e+e- annihilation data at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt{s}=172, 183 and 189 GeV. The total integrated luminosity of the three samples, measured with the OPAL detector, corresponds to 250 pb^-1. We present distributions of event shape variables, charged particle multiplicity and momentum, measured separately in the three data samples. From these we extract measurements of the strong coupling alpha_s, the mean charged particle multiplicity and the peak position xi_0 in the xi_p=ln(1/x_p) distribution. In general the data are described well by analytic QCD calculations and Monte Carlo models. Our measured values of alpha_s, and xi_0 are consistent with previous determinations at sqrt{s}=MZ.

  3. Study of $ \\bar{p} $ and $ \\bar{n} $ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    % PS201 Study of $\\bar{p}$ and $\\bar{n}$ annihilations at LEAR with OBELIX, a large acceptance and high resolution detector based on the Open Axial Field Spectrometer \\\\ \\\\OBELIX is designed to study exclusive final states of antiproton and antineutron annihilations at low energies with protons and nuclei. \\\\ \\\\The physics motivations of the experiment are:\\\\ \\\\\\begin{itemize} \\item (gg, ggg), hybrids ($ q \\bar{q} g $), multiquarks ($ q q \\bar{q} \\bar{q} $) and light mesons ($ q \\bar{q} $) produced in $ N \\bar{N} $ annihilations and study of their spectroscopy and decays. Also broad structures will be searched for by comparing identical decay modes in exclusive final states of the same type occuring from initial states with different angular momentum or isospin. \\item Study of the dynamics of $ N \\bar{N} $ interactions and of the dependence of the final and intermediate resonant states of annihilation upon the quantum numbers of the initial $ N \\bar{N} $ state (angular momentum: S and P-wave in $\\bar{p}p $ at...

  4. Two Emission Mechanisms in the Fermi Bubbles: A Possible Signal of Annihilating Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2013-09-01

    We study the variation of the spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles with Galactic latitude. Far from the Galactic plane (|b| > 30 degrees), the observed gamma-ray emission is nearly invariant with latitude, and is consistent with arising from inverse Compton scattering of the interstellar radiation field by cosmic-ray electrons with an approximately power-law spectrum. The same electrons in the presence of microgauss-scale magnetic fields can also generate the the observed microwave "haze". At lower latitudes (b < 20 degrees), in contrast, the spectrum of the emission correlated with the Bubbles possesses a pronounced spectral feature peaking at 1-4 GeV (in E^2 dN/dE) which cannot be generated by any realistic spectrum of electrons. Instead, we conclude that a second (non-inverse-Compton) emission mechanism must be responsible for the bulk of the low-energy, low-latitude emission. This second component is spectrally similar to the excess GeV emission previously reported from the Galactic Center (GC), and also appears spatially consistent with a luminosity per volume falling approximately as r^-2.4, where r is the distance from the GC. We argue that the spectral feature visible in the low-latitude Bubbles is the extended counterpart of the GC excess, now detected out to at least 2-3 kpc from the GC. The spectrum and angular distribution of the signal is consistent with that predicted from ~10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to leptons, or from ~50 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to quarks, following a distribution similar to the canonical Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. We also consider millisecond pulsars as a possible astrophysical explanation for the signal, as observed millisecond pulsars possess a spectral cutoff at approximately the required energy. Any such scenario would require a large population of unresolved millisecond pulsars extending at least 2-3 kpc from the GC.

  5. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy study of roller burnished magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaleski Radosław

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of roller burnishing on Vickers’ hardness and positron lifetimes in the AZ91HP magnesium alloy was studied. The microhardness increases with an increase in the burnishing force and with a decrease in the feed. The comparison of various methods of analysis of positron annihilation lifetime (PAL spectra allowed identification of two components, which are related to solute-vacancy complexes and vacancy clusters, respectively. It was found that the increase in microhardness was related to the increase in the concentration of vacancy clusters.

  6. Multihadron-event properties in e sup + e sup minus annihilation at radical s =52--57 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.K.; Li, J.; Cheng, C.P.; Gu, P.; Ye, M.H.; Zhu, Y.C.; Imlay, R.; Kirk, P.; Lim, J.; McNeil, R.R.; Metcalf, W.; Myung, S.S.; Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Hu, K.P.; Low, E.H.; Mattson, M.E.; Piilonen, L.; Sterner, K.L.; Lusin, S.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wang, A.T.M.; Wilson, S.; Frautschi, M.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Trahern, C.G.; Breedon, R.E.; Kim, G.N.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.L.; Maeshima, K.; Malchow, R.L.; Smith, J.R.; Stuart, D.; Abe, K.; Fujii, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kim, S.K.; Kurihara, Y.; Maki, A.; Nozaki, T.; Omori, T.; Sagawa, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sugimoto, Y.; Takaiwa, Y.; Terada, S.; Walker, R.C.; Kajino, F.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Thomas, T.; Ishi, Y.; Miyano, K.; Miyata, H.; Sasaki, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Bacala, A.; Liu, J.; Park, I.H.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Vinson, J.; Auchincloss, P.; Blanis, D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Eno, S.; Fry, C.A.; Harada, H.; Ho, Y.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kumita, T.; Mori, T.; Olsen, S.L.; Shaw, N.M.; Sill, A.; Thorndike, E.H.; Ueno, K.; Zheng, H.W.; Kobayashi, S.; The AMY Collaboration

    1990-05-01

    We present the general properties of multihadron final states produced by {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} annihilation at center-of-mass energies from 52 to 57 GeV in the AMY detector at the KEK collider TRISTAN. Global shape, inclusive charged-particle, and particle-flow distributions are presented. Our measurements are compared with QCD+fragmentation models that use either leading-logarithmic parton-shower evolution or QCD matrix elements at the parton level, and either string or cluster fragmentation for hadronization.

  7. Sommerfeld enhancement of DM annihilation: resonance structure, freeze-out and CMB spectral bound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannestad, Steen; Bülow, Thomas Tram

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years there has been some interest in WIMP Dark Matter models featuring a velocity dependent cross section through the Sommerfeld enhancement mechanism, which is a non-relativistic effect due to massive bosons in the dark sector. In the first part of this article, we find analytic...

  8. Positron annihilation in modified zeolites LTA and 13X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral-Prieto, A.; Garcia-Sosa, I.; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Col. Escandon, Del. M. Hidalgo, Mexico D. F., c. p. 11801 (Mexico); Lopez-Castanares, R.; Olea-Cardoso, O. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan esquina paseo Tollocan, esquina paseo Colon, Toluca, c. p. 50120, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The pick-off annihilation lifetimes of o -Ps, {tau}{sub po}, in dehydrated Co{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} exchanged zeolites LTA, in dehydrated Co{sup 2+} exchanged zeolite 13X, and in dehydrated Na{sup +} zeolites LTA and 13X, are estimated. Although {tau}{sub po} can be estimated from the lifetime spectra of the cation exchanged zeolites LTA and 13X, this lifetime can not be estimated from those spectra of Na{sup +} zeolite LTA unambiguously. The estimated pick-off lifetimes due to the annihilation of o-Ps in the internal walls of the zeolites are systematically lower than the average lifetime of p-Ps and o-Ps in vacuum {tau}{sub a}=0.5 ns. Since the pick-off process of o-Ps occurs particularly on the internal cavity walls of dehydrated zeolites, the replacement of {tau}{sub a} by {tau}{sub po} within the classical model of Tao-Eldrup to calculate cavity radius should provide more realistic cavity radii of these porous materials than when using {l_brace}{tau}{sub a}{r_brace}. This suggestion is supported by previous and present results. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. INTEGRAL SPI Limits on Electron-Positron Annihilation Radiation from the Galactic Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Watanabe, K.; Jean, P.

    2005-01-01

    The center of our Galaxy is a known strong source of electron‐positron 511 keV annihilation radiation. Thus far, however, there have been no reliable detections of annihilation radiation outside of the central radian of our Galaxy. One of the primary objectives of the INTEGRAL (International Gamma...

  10. Positron annihilation in benzene and cyclohexane: a comparison between gas and liquid phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedus, Kamil

    2015-06-01

    A comparative study about positron annihilation in gas and liquid phases of two non-polar ring molecules: benzene (C6H6) and cyclohexane (C6H12) is presented including the most recent experimental and theoretical achievements. In addition the preliminary results of positron annihilation lifetime measurements in a liquid phase at room temperature for these two molecules are reported.

  11. Weak interaction effects in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation with polarised beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simard, R.

    1977-11-02

    Although the standard gauge model of weak and electromagnetic interactions based on the work of Salam and Weinberg has met with great success, there are experimental facts that will require its extension or its modification to a new gauge model; the discovery of a heavy lepton at SLAC and the absence of parity violation in atoms that is expected from the neutral weak current coupling to electrons are discussed. Three tests are proposed that bear on these questions. First, heavy lepton production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation when one of the incident beams is longitudinally polarized is considered and the purely leptonic decay of this heavy lepton is examined. An asymmetry in the inclusive angular distribution of one charged lepton (electron or muon) is important in determining the structure of weak interactions of the heavy lepton. In fact, this angular asymmetry easily distinguishes between the cases V - A and V + A for the heavy lepton current. Then, the decay channel L ..-->.. ..nu../sub L/ + one hadron is considered (L = heavy lepton) under the same experimental set-up and the inclusive one-hadron angular distribution examined. Parity nonconservation in the decay of the heavy lepton causes a conspicuous forward-backward asymmetry in the cos theta distribution of the inclusive hadron spectrum near the high energy end that can be distinguished easily from other sources of asymmetry. It is easy then to discover the chirality (V - A or V + A) of the heavy lepton current. Finally a test is proposed which provides unambigous and clear evidence for parity violation in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. It consists in measuring a possible left-right asymmetry of inclusive hadron production with highly transversely polarized e/sup +/e/sup -/ incident beams. If observed, this asymmetry provides evidence of a parity violating neutral current coupling to electrons.

  12. Limits on light WIMPs from the CDEX-1 experiment with a p-type point-contact germanium detector at the China Jingping Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Yue, Q; Kang, K J; Cheng, J P; Li, Y J; Lin, S T; Chang, J P; Chen, N; Chen, Q H; Chen, Y H; Chuang, Y C; Deng, Z; Du, Q; Gong, H; Hao, X Q; He, H J; He, Q J; Huang, H X; Huang, T R; Jiang, H; Li, H B; Li, J M; Li, J; Li, X; Li, X Y; Li, Y L; Liao, H Y; Lin, F K; Liu, S K; Lv, L C; Ma, H; Mao, S J; Qin, J Q; Ren, J; Ruan, X C; Shen, M B; Singh, L; Singh, M K; Soma, A K; Su, J; Tang, C J; Tseng, C H; Wang, J M; Wang, L; Wang, Q; Wong, H T; Wu, S Y; Wu, Y C; Xianyu, Z Z; Xiao, R Q; Xing, H Y; Xu, F Z; Xu, Y; Xu, X J; Xue, T; Yang, L T; Yang, S W; Yi, N; Yu, C X; Yu, H; Yu, X Z; Zeng, X H; Zeng, Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y H; Zhao, M G; Zhou, Z Y; Zhu, J J; Zhu, W B; Zhu, X Z; Zhu, Z H

    2014-01-01

    We report results of a search for light Dark Matter WIMPs with CDEX-1 experiment at the China Jingping Underground Laboratory, based on 53.9 kg-days of data from a p-type point-contact germanium detector enclosed by a NaI(Tl) crystal scintillator as anti-Compton detector. All events above the analysis threshold of 475 eVee can be quantitatively accounted for with the understood background channels, and there is no excess of residual events. An order of magnitude improvement in the sensitivities of spin-independent elastic cross-section over our previous results is achieved. Part of the allowed regions at WIMP mass of 6-20 GeV are probed and excluded.

  13. Experimental studies of unbiased gluon jets from $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilations using the jet boost algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    We present the first experimental results based on the jet boost algorithm, a technique to select unbiased samples of gluon jets in e+e- annihilations, i.e. gluon jets free of biases introduced by event selection or jet finding criteria. Our results are derived from hadronic Z0 decays observed with the OPAL detector at the LEP e+e- collider at CERN. First, we test the boost algorithm through studies with Herwig Monte Carlo events and find that it provides accurate measurements of the charged particle multiplicity distributions of unbiased gluon jets for jet energies larger than about 5 GeV, and of the jet particle energy spectra (fragmentation functions) for jet energies larger than about 14 GeV. Second, we apply the boost algorithm to our data to derive unbiased measurements of the gluon jet multiplicity distribution for energies between about 5 and 18 GeV, and of the gluon jet fragmentation function at 14 and 18 GeV. In conjunction with our earlier results at 40 GeV, we then test QCD calculations for the en...

  14. Positron Annihilation 3-D Momentum Spectrometry by Synchronous 2D-ACAR and DBAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, Larry W.; Bonavita, Angelo M.; Williams, Christopher S.; Fagan-Kelly, Stefan B.; Jimenez, Stephen M.

    2015-05-01

    A positron annihilation spectroscopy system capable of determining 3D electron-positron (e--e+) momentum densities has been constructed and tested. In this technique two opposed HPGe strip detectors measure angular coincidence of annihilation radiation (ACAR) and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) in coincidence to produce 3D momentum datasets in which the parallel momentum component obtained from the DBAR measurement can be selected for annihilation events that possess a particular perpendicular momentum component observed in the 2D ACAR spectrum. A true 3D momentum distribution can also be produced. Measurement of 3-D momentum spectra in oxide materials has been demonstrated including O-atom defects in 6H SiC and silver atom substitution in lithium tetraborate crystals. Integration of the 3-D momentum spectrometer with a slow positron beam for future surface resonant annihilation spectrometry measurements will be described. Sponsorship from Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  15. Development and Optimization of a Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectrometer to Measure Nanoscale Defects in Solids and Borane Cage Molecules in Aqueous Nitrate Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    protons and neutrons in a nucleus surrounded by a cloud of electrons. There is another type of matter with which we are not accustomed: antimatter ...For each type of matter there is an equivalent type of antimatter , exactly the same in nearly all ways except for electric charge (there are also...anti-neutrons with no charge). When matter and antimatter collide they destroy each other, or annihilate, releasing energy. 1 Positrons, or

  16. Annihilation range and final-state interaction in p¯p annihilation into π-π+

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bennich, B.; Kloet, W. M.; Loiseau, B.

    2003-07-01

    The large set of accurate data on differential cross section and analyzing power from the CERN LEAR experiment on p¯p→π-π+, in the range from 360 to 1550 MeV/c, is well reproduced within a distorted wave approximation approach. The initial p¯p scattering wave functions originate from a recent N¯N model. The transition operator is obtained from a combination of the 3P0 and 3S1 quark-antiquark annihilation mechanisms. A good fit to the data, in particular, the reproduction of the double-dip structure observed in the analyzing powers, requires quark wave functions for proton, antiproton, and pions with radii slightly larger than the respective measured charge radii. This corresponds to an increase in the range of the annihilation mechanisms, and consequently, the amplitudes for total angular momentum J=2 and higher are much larger than in previous approaches. The final-state ππ wave functions, parametrized in terms of ππ phase shifts and inelasticities, are also a very important ingredient for the fine tuning of the fit to the observables.

  17. Some results for the modulated differential rates at low energy transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D

    2012-01-01

    The differential event rate for direct detection of dark matter, both the time averaged and the modulated one due to the motion of the Earth, are discussed. The calculations focus on relatively light cold dark matter candidates (WIMP) and low energy transfers. It is shown that for sufficiently light WIMPs the extraction of relatively large nucleon cross sections is possible. Furthermore for some WIMP masses the modulation amplitude may change sign, meaning that, in such a case, the maximum rate may occur six months later than naively expected. This effect can be exploited to yield information about the mass of the dark matter candidate, if and when the observation of the modulation of the event rate is established.

  18. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Z.; /Caltech; Akerib, D.S.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Arrenberg, S.; /Zurich-Irchel U.; Bailey, C.N.; /Case Western Reserve U.; Balakishiyeva, D.; /Florida U.; Baudis, L.; /Zurich-Irchel U.; Bauer, D.A.; /Fermilab; Brink, P.L.; /SLAC; Bruch, T.; /Zurich-Irchel U.; Bunker, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-11-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below {approx}10 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2} and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  19. Darkside: A Depleted Argon Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alton, Drew; Durben, Dan; Keeter, Kara; Zehfus, Michael; Brice, Steve; Chou, Aaron; Hall, Jeter; Jostlein, Hans; Pordes, Stephen; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Brodsky, Jason [et al.

    2009-10-01

    The existence of dark matter is known from gravitational effects, but its nature remains a deep mystery. One possibility motivated by other considerations in elementary particle physics is that dark matter consists of undiscovered elementary particles. Axions and Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are two possibilities. Evidence for new particles that could constitute WIMP dark matter may come from upcoming experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN or from sensitive astronomical instruments that detect radiation produced by WIMP-WIMP annihilations in galaxy halos. The thermal motion of the WIMPS comprising the dark matter halo surrounding the galaxy and the earth should result in WIMP-nuclear collisions of sufficient energy to be observable by sensitive laboratory apparatus. The goal of this proposal is to develop and deploy a liquid argon detector that has high sensitivity for direct detection of WIMP collisions. Liquid argon is a promising medium for WIMP detection due to its efficient conversion of energy from WIMP induced nuclear recoils into both ionization and scintillation. In a Time Projection Chamber (TPC), scintillation and ionization can be independently detected and spatially resolved through large volumes of liquid. The relative size and time dependence of these signals permits discrimination of nuclear recoils from background events.

  20. Prospects for SIMPLE 2000 A large-mass, low-background Superheated Droplet Detector for WIMP searches

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I; Girard, T A; Limagne, D; Miley, H S; Waysand, G

    2000-01-01

    SIMPLE 2000 ({\\underline S}uperheated {\\underline I}nstrument for {\\underline M}assive {\\underline P}artic{\\underline {LE}} searches) will consist of an array of eight to sixteen large active mass ($\\sim15$ g) Superheated Droplet Detectors(SDDs) to be installed in the new underground laboratory of Rustrel-Pays d'Apt. Several factors make of SDDs an attractive approach for the detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), namely their intrinsic insensitivity to minimum ionizing particles, high fluorine content, low cost and operation near ambient pressure and temperature. We comment here on the fabrication, calibration and already-competitive first limits from SIMPLE prototype SDDs, as well as on the expected immediate increase in sensitivity of the program, which aims at an exposure of $>$25 kg-day during the year 2000. The ability of modest-mass fluorine-rich detectors to explore regions of neutralino parameter space beyond the reach of the most ambitious cryogenic projects is pointed out.

  1. Higgs shifts from electron-positron annihilations near neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, Gary A. [Dartmouth College, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hanover, NH (United States); Onofrio, Roberto [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' Galileo Galilei' , Padova (Italy); ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    We discuss the potential for using neutron stars to determine bounds on the Higgs-Kretschmann coupling by looking at peculiar shifts in gamma-ray spectroscopic features. In particular, we reanalyze multiple lines observed in GRB781119 detected by two gamma-ray spectrometers, and derive an upper bound on the Higgs-Kretschmann coupling that is much more constraining than the one recently obtained from white dwarfs. This calls for targeted analyses of spectra of gamma-ray bursts from more recent observatories, dedicated searches for differential shifts on electron-positron and proton-antiproton annihilation spectra in proximity of compact sources, and signals of electron and proton cyclotron lines from the same neutron star. (orig.)

  2. Electronic Structure of Rare-Earth Metals. II. Positron Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R. W.; Mackintosh, Allan

    1968-01-01

    The angular correlation of the photons emitted when positrons annihilate with electrons has been studied in single crystals of the rare-earth metals Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, and in a single crystal of an equiatomic alloy of Ho and Er. A comparison of the results for Y with the calculations...... of Loucks shows that the independent-particle model gives a good first approximation to the angular distribution, although correlation effects probably smear out some of the structure. The angular distributions from the heavy rare-earth metals are very similar to that from Y and can be understood...... surface normal to the c axis. The same aspects of the Fermi surface are believed to be important in determining the stability of the periodic magnetic structures formed in some of the metals, and there is a strong correlation between the structure in the angular distribution and the magnetic properties...

  3. Fission of heavy hypernuclei formed in antiproton annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, T.A.; Bocquet, J.P.; Ericsson, G.; Johansson, T.; Krogulski, T.; Lewis, R.A.; Malek, F.; Maurel, M.; Monnand, E.; Mougey, J.; Nifenecker, H.; Passaneau, J.; Perrin, P.; Polikanov, S.M.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Ristori, C.; Smith, G.A.; Tibell, G. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States) Institut des Sciences Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particles, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and University of Grenoble, Grenoble, CEDEX (France) Department of Radiation Sciences, Uppsala University, P. O. Box 535, S-75121 Uppsala (Sweden) Warsaw University, Bialystok Branch, PL-15-424 Bialystok (Poland) DRFMC, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, Boite Postale 85X, 3804 1 Grenoble (France) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States) Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschumg Darmstadt, Postfach 110541, D-6100 Darmstadt (Germany) Centre de Spectrometr

    1993-05-01

    Heavy hypernuclei are produced in the annihilation of antiprotons in [sup 238]U. The delayed fission of heavy hypernuclei and hypernuclei of fission fragments are observed by using the recoil-distance method in combination with measurement of secondary electron multiplicity. The lifetime of hypernuclei in the region of uranium is found to be (1.25[plus minus]0.15)[times]10[sup [minus]10] sec. It is observed that [Lambda] hyperons predominantly stick to the heavier fission fragments. The yield of hypernuclei is found to be (7.4[plus minus]1.7)[times]10[sup [minus]3] per stopped antiproton. No coincidences with [ital K][sup +] were found. Statistical and systematic errors on the number of events expected do not rule out this possibility.

  4. Positron-annihilation spectroscopy of defects in metals: an assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has made significant contributions to our knowledge regarding lattice defects in metals in two areas: (i) the determination of atomic defect properties, particularly those of monovacancies, and (ii) the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development during post-irradiation of post-quench annealing. The application of PAS to the study of defects in metals is selectively reviewed and critically assessed within the context of other available techniques for such investigations. Possibilities for using the positron as a localized probe of the structure of atomic defects are discussed. Finally, the present status and future potential of PAS as a tool for the study of defects in metals are considered relative to other available techniques. 92 references, 20 figures.

  5. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for characterizing neutron irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.N. Taylor; M. Shimada; D.W. Akers; M.W. Drigert; B.J. Merrill; Y. Hatano

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten samples (6 mm diameter, 0.2 mm thick) were irradiated to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa with neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma in the tritium plasma experiment (TPE) at 100, 200 and 500ºC to a total fluence of 1 x 1026 m-2. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation spectroscopy (DB-PAS) were performed at various stages to characterize damage and retention. We present the first known results of neutron damaged tungsten characterized by DB-PAS in order to study defect concentration. Two positron sources, 22Na and 68Ge, probe ~58 µm and through the entire 200 µm thick samples, respectively. DB-PAS results reveal clear differences between the various irradiated samples. These results, and the calibration of DB-PAS to NRA data are presented.

  6. Positron annihilation studies on reactor irradiated and thermal annealed ferrocene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques Netto, A. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia de Aniquilacao de Positrons-LEAP, Depto. de Quimica, ICEX, Univ. Federal de Minas Gerais-UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Carvalho, R.S. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia de Aniquilacao de Positrons-LEAP, Depto. de Quimica, ICEX, Univ. Federal de Minas Gerais-UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Magalhaes, W.F. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia de Aniquilacao de Positrons-LEAP, Depto. de Quimica, ICEX, Univ. Federal de Minas Gerais-UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Sinisterra, R.D. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia de Aniquilacao de Positrons-LEAP, Depto. de Quimica, ICEX, Univ. Federal de Minas Gerais-UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1996-10-01

    Retention and thermal annealing following (n, {gamma}) reaction in solid ferrocene, Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PAL). Positronium (Ps) formation was observed in the non-irradiated compound with a probability or intensity (I{sub 3}) of 30%. Upon irradiation of the compound with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor, I{sub 3} decreases with increasing irradiation time. Thermal treatment again increases I{sub 3} values from 16% to 25%, revealing an important proportion of molecular reformation without variation of the ortho-positronium lifetime ({tau}{sub 3}). These results point out the major influence of the electronic structure as determining the Ps yields in the pure complex. In the irradiated and non irradiated complexes the results are satisfactorily explained on the basis of the spur model. (orig.)

  7. Moisture dependence of positron annihilation spectra in nylon-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J.; St. Clair, T. L.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Positron annihilation time spectra have been measured in nylon-6 samples as a function of their moisture content. The measured average long life component lifetime values are: 1722 + or - 47 ps (dry), 1676 + or - 40 ps (14.6 percent saturation value), 1719 + or - 26 ps (29.3 percent saturation value), 1720 + or - 35 ps (50 percent of saturation value), 1857 + or - 35 ps (78.1 percent saturation value), and 1936 + or - 57 ps (saturated). It appears that nylon-6 has a special affinity for water at low concentration levels where H2O molecules enter between the (C = O - H-N) chemical bonds between nylon molecular chains. As the water concentration increases beyond a critical level, nylon-6 specimens start trapping H2O molecules in other bond sites or potential wells. The trapped water increases the free volume in the test specimens and reduces Ps atom formation as well as its subsequent decay rate.

  8. Positron annihilation lifetime study of low temperature irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1997-11-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime measurements have been made for electron and neutron irradiated Fe, Fe-Cr, Fe-Cu, Fe-Si, Fe-16Cr-17Ni specimens, and isochronal annealing behaviors were obtained for these metals and alloys. It was found that vacancies start to migrate at about 200 K in Fe and form microvoids, but by the addition of small amount of alloying elements this behavior was changed depending on the alloying elements. Positron lifetime calculations were made to explain the experimental results using EAM (embedded atom method) type potential for the lattice relaxation and the atomic superposition method for the lifetime calculation. Fairly good agreements were obtained for the positron lifetime in a vacancy in Fe and other alloys. (author)

  9. P -wave coupled channel effects in electron-positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Meng-Lin; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    P -wave coupled channel effects arising from the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds in e+e- annihilations are systematically studied. We provide an exploratory study by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with short-ranged contact potentials obtained in the heavy quark limit. These contact potentials can be extracted from the P -wave interactions in the e+e- annihilations, and then be employed to investigate possible isosinglet P -wave hadronic molecules. In particular, such an investigation may provide information about exotic candidates with quantum numbers JPC=1-+ . In the mass region of the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds, there are two quark model bare states, i.e. the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ), which are assigned as (13D1) and (31S1) states, respectively. By an overall fit of the cross sections of e+e-→D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , D*D¯*, we determine the physical coupling constants to each channel and extract the pole positions of the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ). The deviation of the ratios from that in the heavy quark spin symmetry (HQSS) limit reflects the HQSS breaking effect due to the mass splitting between the D and the D*. Besides the two poles, we also find a pole a few MeV above the D D¯ *+c .c . threshold which can be related to the so-called G (3900 ) observed earlier by BABAR and Belle. This scenario can be further scrutinized by measuring the angular distribution in the D*D¯* channel with high luminosity experiments.

  10. Defect identification in semiconductors with positron annihilation: experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomisto, Filip

    2015-03-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is a very powerful technique for the detection, identification and quantification of vacancy-type defects in semiconductors. In the past decades, it has been used to reveal the relationship between opto-electronic properties and specific defects in a wide variety of materials - examples include parasitic yellow luminescence in GaN, dominant acceptor defects in ZnO and broad-band absorption causing brown coloration in natural diamond. In typical binary compound semiconductors, the selective sensitivity of the technique is rather strongly limited to cation vacancies that possess significant open volume and suitable charge (negative of neutral). On the other hand, oxygen vacancies in oxide semiconductors are a widely debated topic. The properties attributed to oxygen vacancies include the inherent n-type conduction, poor p-type dopability, coloration (absorption), deep level luminescence and non-radiative recombination, while the only direct experimental evidence of their existence has been obtained on the crystal surface. We will present recent advances in combining state-of-the-art positron annihilation experiments and ab initio computational approaches. The latter can be used to model both the positron lifetime and the electron-positron momentum distribution - quantities that can be directly compared with experimental results. We have applied these methods to study vacancy-type defects in III-nitride semiconductors (GaN, AlN, InN) and oxides such as ZnO, SnO2, In2O3andGa2O3. We will show that cation-vacancy-related defects are important compensating centers in all these materials when they are n-type. In addition, we will show that anion (N, O) vacancies can be detected when they appear as complexes with cation vacancies.

  11. Measurement of inclusive particle spectra and test of MLLA prediction in e+e- annihilation at \\Sqrt s = 58 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, R; Yamaguchi, A; Abe, K; Abe, T; Adachi, I; Adachi, K; Aoki, M; Awa, S; Emi, K; Enomoto, R; Fujii, H; Fujii, K; Fujii, T; Fujimoto, J; Fujita, K; Fujiwara, N; Hayashii, H; Howell, B; Iida, N; Inoue, Y; Iwasaki, H; Iwasaki, M; Kaneyuki, K; Kajikawa, R; Kato, S; Kawabata, S; Kichimi, H; Kobayashi, M; Koltick, D S; Levine, I; Minami, S; Miyabayashi, K; Miyamoto, A; Muramatsu, K; Nagai, K; Nakabayashi, K; Nakano, E; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Ochi, A; Ochiai, F; Ohishi, N; Ohnishi, Y; Ohshima, Y; Okuno, H; Okusawa, T; Shinohara, T; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, T; Tanimori, T; Tauchi, T; Teramoto, Y; Toomi, N; Tsukamoto, T; Tsumura, O; Uno, S; Watanabe, T; Watanabe, Y; Yamamoto, A

    1994-01-01

    Inclusive momentum spectra are measured for all charged particles and for each of \\pi^{\\pm}, K^{\\pm}, K^0/\\overline{K^0}, and p/\\overline{p} in hadronic events produced via e^+e^- annihilation at \\sqrt{s}=58GeV . The measured spectra are compared with QCD predictions based on the modified leading log approximation(MLLA). The MLLA model reproduces the measured spectra well. The energy dependence of the peak positions of the spectra is studied by comparing the measurements with those at other energies. The energy dependence is also well described by the MLLA model.

  12. Dark matter, neutron stars, and strange quark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, M Angeles; Silk, Joseph; Stone, Jirina R

    2010-10-01

    We show that self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter accreted onto neutron stars may provide a mechanism to seed compact objects with long-lived lumps of strange quark matter, or strangelets, for WIMP masses above a few GeV. This effect may trigger a conversion of most of the star into a strange star. We use an energy estimate for the long-lived strangelet based on the Fermi-gas model combined with the MIT bag model to set a new limit on the possible values of the WIMP mass that can be especially relevant for subdominant species of massive neutralinos.

  13. Phénoménologie d'annihilation de matière noire et de violation non-minimale de la saveur dans le MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Björn

    In absence of direct experimental evidence, it is essential to constrain the parameter space of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) both at the Supersymmetry breaking and the electroweak scale. After a brief introduction to Supersymmetry (SUSY), we present an extensive analysis of electroweak, low energy, and cosmological constraints in minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) and gauge-mediated SUSY-breaking (GMSB) scenarios. We include the possibility of non-minimal flavour violation (NMFV) in the squark sector and define ``collider-friendly'' benchmark points based on detailed scans of the parameter space. We then consider neutralino pair annihilation into quark-antiquark pairs that dominates wide ranges of the mSUGRA parameter space. We present the corresponding full one-loop QCD and SUSY-QCD calculation and show numerically that the loop diagrams have an important impact on the annihilation cross section and, in consequence, in the prediction of the dark matter relic density, resulting in a modificatio...

  14. Observation of $e^+e^-$ Annihilations into the $\\boldmath{C=+1}$ Hadronic Final States $\\rho^0\\rho^0$ and $\\phi\\rho^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Y; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côte, D; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We report the first observation of $e^+e^-$ annihilations into states of positive $C$-parity, namely $\\rho^0 \\rho^0$ and $\\phi\\rho^0$. The two states are observed in the $\\pip\\pim\\pip\\pim$ and $K^+K^-\\pip\\pim$ final states, respectively, in a data sample of 225~$fb^{-1}$ collected by the $BaBar$~experiment at the $PEP-II$ $e^+e^-$ storage rings at energies near $\\sqrt{s} ~=$ 10.58~$GeV$. The distributions of $\\cos\\theta^*$, where $\\theta^*$ is the center-of-mass polar angle of the $\\phi$ meson or the forward $\\rho^0$ meson, suggest production by two-virtual-photon annihilation. We measure cross sections within the range $|\\cos\\theta^*| ~<~ 0.8$ of $\\sigma(\\e^+e^- \\to \\rho^0 \\rho^0) ~=~

  15. The Diurnal Variation of the Wimp Detection Event Rates in Directional Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Vergados, J D; Moustakidis, Ch. C.

    2009-01-01

    The recent WMAP data have confirmed that exotic dark matter together with the vacuum energy (cosmological constant) dominate in the flat Universe. Modern particle theories naturally provide viable cold dark matter candidates with masses in the GeV-TeV region. Supersymmetry provides the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), theories in extra dimensions supply the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) etc. The nature of dark matter can only be unraveled only by its direct detection in the labo...

  16. Lorentz contraction, geometry and range in antiproton-proton annihilation into two pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bennich, Bruno; Kloet, W. M.

    2005-10-01

    We present a geometric interpretation of the so-called annihilation range in reactions of the type p¯p → two light mesons based upon Lorentz effects in the highly relativistic final states (γ = Ecm/2mc2 ≃ 6.8 - 8.0). Lorentz-boosted meson wave functions, within the framework of the constituent quark model, result in a richer angular dependence of the annihilation amplitudes and thus in higher partial wave contributions (J > 1) than usually obtained. This approach sheds some light on what could be a "short" annihilation range and how it is influenced by the angular distribution of the final states.

  17. Relativistic treatment of pion wave functions in the annihilation p¯ p→ π- π+

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bennich, B.; Kloet, W. M.

    2004-09-01

    Quark model intrinsic wave functions of highly energetic pions in the reaction p¯ p→ π- π+ are subjected to a relativistic treatment. The annihilation is described in a constituent quark model with A2 and R2 flavor-flux topology, and the annihilated quark-antiquark pairs are in 3P0 and 3S1 states. We study the effects of pure Lorentz transformations on the antiquark and quark spatial wave functions and their respective spinors in the pion. The modified quark geometry of the pion has considerable impact on the angular dependence of the annihilation mechanisms.

  18. Revisiting big-bang nucleosynthesis constraints on dark-matter annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawasaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects of dark-matter annihilation during the epoch of big-bang nucleosynthesis on the primordial abundances of light elements. We improve the calculation of the light-element abundances by taking into account the effects of anti-nucleons emitted by the annihilation of dark matter and the interconversion reactions of neutron and proton at inelastic scatterings of energetic nucleons. Comparing the theoretical prediction of the primordial light-element abundances with the latest observational constraints, we derive upper bounds on the dark-matter pair-annihilation cross section. Implication to some of particle-physics models are also discussed.

  19. Study of radiation damage in metals by positron annihilation. [Neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauster, W.B

    1977-01-01

    Positron annihilation is a sensitive technique for probing defects in metals and it has recently been shown to be a valuable tool for the study of radiation damage. After an introduction to the three basic experimental methods (angular correlation, Doppler broadening, and lifetime measurements), the interaction of positrons with lattice defects is reviewed. Results for the annealing of damage after low temperature irradiation are used to show that positron annihilation has provided new information on annealing kinetics. The role of positron techniques in characterizing complex defect structures resulting from high-temperature neutron irradiation is reviewed and the possible utility of positron annihilation as a nondestructive monitor of property changes is pointed out.

  20. Ar irradiated Cr rich Ni alloy studied using positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sanjay; Menon, Ranjini; Sharma, S. K.; Srivastava, A. P.; Mukherjee, S.; Nabhiraj, P. Y.; Pujari, P. K.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.

    2016-10-01

    The present study focuses on understanding the effect of Ar ion irradiation at room temperature on Cr rich Ni-Cr alloy. The alloy is irradiated with Ar9+ ions (energy 315 keV) for total dose varying from 9.3 × 1014 to 2.3 × 1016 ion/cm2. The changes in the microstructure of the irradiated samples have been characterized by depth dependent Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) measurements using a slow positron beam facility. The variation in S-E profiles as a function of total dose corroborated with S-W curves indicates that the type of defects is also varied with the increase in total dose. The S-E profiles have been fitted using variable energy positron fit (VEPFIT) program considering a three layer structure for the irradiated samples. Estimated displacement damage profile as a function of increasing dose has been analyzed and a possible mechanism has been attributed to explain the observations made from S-parameter variation.

  1. Exotic particles at the LHC. Production via the Higgs portal and WIMP dark matter searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessler, Andre Georg

    2016-09-05

    This thesis addresses two different aspects of the search for Physics Beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First, and motivated by the recent discovery of a new interaction mediated by the Higgs boson, we systematically analyze the impact of the Higgs interaction on the production of new particles at the LHC. Second, we investigate the collider signatures of long-lived particles decaying into leptons and invisible energy, and which are predicted to exist in a class of neutrino mass models with a weakly interacting dark matter particle.

  2. Calculations of gamma-ray spectral profiles of linear alkanes in the positron annihilation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoguang [Molecular Model Discovery Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Science, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria, 3122 (Australia); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Ludong University, Shandong, Yantai, 264025 (China); Wang, Feng, E-mail: fwang@swin.edu.au [Molecular Model Discovery Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Science, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria, 3122 (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The study calculates gamma-ray profiles for linear alkanes (n up to 12) quantum mechanically;. • “Profile quality” has been defined as the root-mean square deviation (RMSD) between the theoretical and the experimental results in the entire region of the profile. • Excellent agreement with measurements suggests that the theory model is applicable to predict other alkanes such as heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}) etc. • The study suggested that gamma-ray spectra may be more sensitive to study smaller alkanes (and their isomers), rather than larger alkanes (i.e., n > 12). - Abstract: The positron–electron annihilation gamma-ray spectra of linear alkanes C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2} (n = 1–12) have been studied systematically. A profile quality (PQ) parameter, χ, is introduced to assess the agreement between the obtained theoretical profiles and the experimental measurements in the entire region of energy shift of the spectra. Together with the Doppler shift (Δε) of the gamma-ray spectra, the two parameters, χ and Δε, are able to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the calculated gamma-ray spectra with respect to available experiment. Applying the recently developed docking model, the present study determines the positrophilic electrons for individual alkanes from which the gamma-ray spectral profiles are calculated. The results achieve an excellent agreement with experiment, not only with respect to the Doppler shift, but also with respect to the gamma-ray profiles in the photon energy region up to 5 keV. The study further calculates the gamma-ray spectra of other linear alkanes in the series without available experimental measurements, such as heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}), octane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), decane (C{sub 10}H{sub 22}) and undecane (C{sub 11}H{sub 24}). The results obtained show a dominance of the positrophilic electrons in the lowest occupied valence orbital (LOVO) in the positron–electron annihilation process, in agreement with

  3. Acceleration of MR parameter mapping using annihilating filter‐based low rank hankel matrix (ALOHA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Dongwook; Jin, Kyong Hwan; Kim, Eung Yeop; Park, Sung‐Hong; Ye, Jong Chul

    2016-01-01

    .... However, increased scan time makes it difficult for routine clinical use. This article aims at developing an accelerated MR parameter mapping technique using annihilating filter based low-rank Hankel matrix approach (ALOHA...

  4. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Knudsen, Helge; Møller, Søren Pape

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproto...... annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured....

  5. Bubble detector measurements of a mixed radiation field from antiproton annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bassler, Niels; Møller, Søren Pape; Petersen, Jørgen B.; Rahbek, Dennis; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2006-01-01

    In the light of recent progress in the study of the biological potential of antiproton tumour treatment it is important to be able to characterize the neutron intensity arising from antiproton annihilation using simple, compact and reliable detectors. The intensity of fast neutrons from antiproton annihilation on polystyrene has been measured with bubble detectors and a multiplicity has been derived as well as an estimated neutron equivalent dose. Additionally the sensitivity of bubble detectors towards protons was measured.

  6. Measurement of J/psi production in continuum e(+)e(-) annihilations near square root of s = 10.6 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; Branson, J G; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P; Dima, M O; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Borean, C; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Pallavicini, M; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Lacker, H M; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Martin, R; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Forti, A C; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Weatherall, J H; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Lin, C S; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Elmer, P; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, C; Zito, M; Copty, N; Purohit, M V; Singh, H; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Aston, D; Baird, K; Bloom, E; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, M; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Gowdy, S J; Grosso, P; Himel, T; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Manzin, G; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Mount, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Quinn, H; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stahl, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Talby, M; Tanaka, H A; Trunov, A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Hart, E; Weidemann, A W; Benninger, T; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A; Zanin, D; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Vaugin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; De Silva, A; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Di Lodovico, F; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Neal, H

    2001-10-15

    The production of J/psi mesons in continuum e(+)e(-) annihilations has been studied with the BABAR detector at energies near the Upsilon(4S) resonance. The mesons are distinguished from J/psi production in B decays through their center-of-mass momentum and energy. We measure the cross section e(+)e(-)-->J/psi X to be 2.52+/-0.21+/-0.21 pb. We set a 90% C.L. upper limit on the branching fraction for direct Upsilon(4S)-->J/psi X decays at 4.7 x 10(-4).

  7. The C parameter distribution in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, E; Gardi, Einan; Magnea, Lorenzo

    2003-01-01

    We study perturbative and non-perturbative aspects of the distribution of the C parameter in e+e- annihilation using renormalon techniques. We perform an exact calculation of the characteristic function, corresponding to the C parameter differential cross section for a single off-shell gluon. We then concentrate on the two-jet region, derive the Borel representation of the Sudakov exponent in the large-beta_0 limit and compare the result to that of the thrust T. Analysing the exponent, we distinguish two ingredients: the jet function, depending on Q^2C, summarizing the effects of collinear radiation, and a function describing soft emission at large angles, with momenta of order QC. The former is the same as for the thrust upon scaling C by 1/6, whereas the latter is different. We verify that the rescaled C distribution coincides with that of 1-T to next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy, as predicted by Catani and Webber, and demonstrate that this relation breaks down beyond this order owing to soft radiation a...

  8. Jets in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, S.C.

    1980-08-01

    The properties of jets produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation have been investigated using data taken with the Mark 1 detector at SPEAR. The momentum distributions parallel and perpendicular to the jet axis were measured for all charged tracks, for K/sup 0/'s, and for rho/sup 0/'s. The K/sup 0/ and rho/sup 0/ Pt/sup 2/ distributions are well fit by the form dn/dPt/sup 2/ = A exp(-B/sup +/ Pt/sup 2/) with B = 4.6 +/- 0.2 for K/sup 0/'s and 5 +/- 1 for rho/sup 0/'s. The charged particle Pt/sup 2/ distribution cannot be fit with a single exponential, but is similar to that of K/sup 0/'s and rho/sup 0/'s above Pt/sup 2/ approx. 0.2 GeV/sup 2/. The charged particle and K/sup 0/ parallel momentum distributions are similar in shape and approximately exponential. The production of rho/sup 0/'s at low parallel momentum is suppressed. The average number of rho/sup 0/'s per event is 0.4 +/- 0.1. 59 figures, 7 tables.

  9. a Symmetry Based Study of Positron Annihilation Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Gh.; Adam, S.

    We describe a method for off-line analysis of spectra measured by two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation ({2D}-{ACAR}) positron spectroscopy. The method takes into account, at all its stages, two salient data features: the piecewise constant discretization of the {2D} physical momentum distribution into square pixels, performed by the setup, and the occurrence of a characteristic {2D} projected symmetry of the positron-electron pair momentum distribution. Several validating criteria are derived which secure significantly increased reliability of the output. The method is tested on {2D}-{ACAR} spectra measured on (R)Ba2Cu3O7-δ (R123; R= Y, Dy) single crystals. It resolves ridge Fermi surfaces ({FS}) up to 3rd Umklapp components on both kinds of R123 spectra. Moreover, on a c-axis-projected Y123 spectrum, measured at 300 K, it resolves a small but clear signature of the pillbox {FS} at the S point of the first Brillouin zone as well.

  10. Hunting for glueballs in electron-positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley Brodsky; Alfred Scharff Goldhaber; Jungil Lee

    2003-05-01

    We calculate the cross section for the exclusive production of J{sup PC} = 0{sup ++} glueballs G{sub 0} in association with the J/{psi} in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation using the pQCD factorization formalism. The required long-distance matrix element for the glueball is bounded by CUSB data from a search for resonances in radiative {Upsilon} decay. The cross section for e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} J/{psi} + G{sub 0} at {radical}s = 10.6 GeV is similar to exclusive charmonium-pair production e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} J/{psi} + h for h = {eta}{sub c} and {chi}{sub c0}, and is larger by a factor 2 than that for h = {eta}{sub c}(2S). As the subprocesses {gamma}* {yields} (c {bar c}) (c {bar c}) and {gamma}* {yields} (c {bar c}) (g g) are of the same nominal order in perturbative QCD, it is possible that some portion of the anomalously large signal observed by Belle in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} J/{psi} X may actually be due to the production of charmonium-glueball J/{psi} G{sub J} pairs.

  11. Search for JPC=1-+ exotic state in e +e- annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian

    2014-06-01

    The P-wave and S-wave heavy-light mesons and their charge conjugates, i.e., D1(2420)D¯+c .c., D1(2420)D¯*+c .c., and D2(2460)D¯*+c .c., can couple to states with vector quantum number JPC=1-- and exotic quantum number JPC=1-+ in a relative S wave. Near threshold, the heavy-light meson pair may form hadronic molecules due to the strong S-wave coupling, and the mysterious vector state Y(4260) could be such a state of the D1(2420)D¯+c .c. molecule. This implies the possible existence of its conjugate partner made of the same heavy-light mesons but with exotic quantum number JPC=1-+. We evaluate the production rate of such exotic hadronic molecules and propose a direct experimental search for them in e +e- annihilation. Confirmation of such exotic states in experiment will certainly deepen our insights into strong QCD and the arrangement of multiquark degrees of freedom.

  12. Timelike Virtual Compton Scattering from Electron-Positron Radiative Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasev, Andrei; /Hampton U. /Jefferson Lab; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Carlson, Carl E.; /William-Mary Coll.; Mukherjee, Asmita; /Indian Inst. Tech., Mumbai

    2009-03-31

    We propose measurements of the deeply virtual Compton amplitude (DVCS) {gamma}* {yields} H{bar H}{gamma} in the timelike t = (p{sub H} + p{sub {bar H}}){sup 2} > 0 kinematic domain which is accessible at electron-positron colliders via the radiative annihilation process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} H{bar H}{gamma}. These processes allow the measurement of timelike deeply virtual Compton scattering for a variety of H{bar H} hadron pairs such as {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, and D{bar D} as well as p{bar p}. As in the conventional spacelike DVCS, there are interfering coherent amplitudes contributing to the timelike processes involving C = - form factors. The interference between the amplitudes measures the phase of the C = + timelike DVCS amplitude relative to the phase of the timelike form factors and can be isolated by considering the forward-backward e{sup +} {leftrightarrow} e{sup -} asymmetry. The J = 0 fixed pole contribution which arises from the local coupling of the two photons to the quark current plays a special role. As an example we present a simple model.

  13. Timelike Virtual Compton Scattering from Electron-Positron Radiative Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanaciev,Andrei Afanasev, Stanley J. Brodsky, Carl E. Carlson, Asmita Mukherjee

    2010-02-01

    We propose measurements of the deeply virtual Compton amplitude (DVCS), gamma* to H H-bar gamma, in the timelike t = (p_{H} + p_{H-bar})^2 > 0 kinematic domain which is accessible at electron-positron colliders via the radiative annihilation process e+ e- to H H-bar gamma. These processes allow the measurement of timelike deeply virtual Compton scattering for a variety of H H-bar hadron pairs such as pi+ pi-, K+ K-, and D D-bar as well as p p-bar. As in the conventional spacelike DVCS, there are interfering coherent amplitudes contributing to the timelike processes involving C= - form factors. The interference between the amplitudes measures the phase of the C=+ timelike DVCS amplitude relative to the phase of the timelike form factors and can be isolated by considering the forward-backward e+ \\leftrightarrow e- asymmetry. The J=0 fixed pole contribution which arises from the local coupling of the two photons to the quark current plays a special role. As an example we present a simple model.

  14. Jet physics in e+e- annihilation from 14 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Kluth, S

    2004-01-01

    Results from the study of jets in hadronic final states produced in e+e- annihilation at sqrt(s)=14 to 209 GeV are discussed. Precise measurements of the strong coupling alpha_S at many points of sqrt(s) provide convincing evidence for the running of alpha_S as expected by QCD. Several measurements of the running b-quark mass m_b(M_Z) are combined yielding m_b(M_Z)=(2.92+-0.03(stat.)+-0.31(syst.)) GeV and compared with low energy results. Strong evidence for the running of the b-quark mass is found. Experimental investigations of the gauge structure of QCD are reviewed and then combined with the results for the colour factors C_A=2.89+-0.01(stat.)+- 0.21(syst.) and C_F=1.30+-0.01(stat.)+-0.09(syst.) and correlation coefficient rho=0.82. The uncertainties on the colour factors are below 10% and the agreement with the QCD expectation C_A=3 and C_F=4/3 is excellent.

  15. On various possibilities of interpretation of the effective enhancement factor in positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontrym-Sznajd, G.; Sob, M.

    1988-06-01

    The momentum dependence of the effective enhancement factor epsilon-bar (rho) is investigated on the basis of a two-band model of the electron-positron wavefunction and using the example of ordered Cu/sub 50/Zn/sub 50/ alloy. It is shown that the use of energy-dependent enhancement factors together with the selective enhancement of contributions of different electronic states has a remarkable influence on epsilon-bar (rho) in comparison with the commonly used electron-gas results. Additionally, if the Fermi surface crosses the Brillouin zone boundary, one can obtain a jump of epsilon-bar (rho) in the region of band superposition. In case of a selective enhancement, an effective de-enhancement of the total momentum density of annihilation pairs at the higher momenta appears as well. At the present level of knowledge, these aspects cannot be qualitatively distinguished from the lattice effects predicted by Fujiwara et al and Sormann et al because they produce a similar momentum dependence in epsilon-bar (rho).

  16. Confronting electron-positron annihilation into hadrons with QCD: an operator product expansion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstein, S.; Dominguez, C. A.; Eidelman, S. I.; Spiesberger, H.; Schilcher, K.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental data on the total cross section of e + e - annihilation into hadrons are confronted with QCD and the operator product expansion using finite energy sum rules. Specifically, the power corrections in the operator product expansion, i.e. the vacuum condensates, of dimension d = 2, 4 and 6 are determined using recent isospin I = 0 + {1} data sets. Reasonably stable results are obtained which are compatible within errors with values from τ -decay. However, the rather large data uncertainties, together with the current value of the strong coupling constant, lead to very large errors in the condensates. It also appears that the separation into isovector and isoscalar pieces introduces additional uncertainties and errors. In contrast, the high precision τ -decay data of the ALEPH collaboration in the vector channel allows for a more precise determination of the condensates. This is in spite of QCD asymptotics not quite been reached at the end of the τ spectrum. We point out that isospin violation is negligible in the integrated cross sections, unlike the case of individual channels.

  17. Creation and Annihilation of Skyrmions in the Frustrated Magnets with Competing Exchange Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Chi, Xiaodan; Li, Xuesi; Liu, Yan; Du, An

    2017-11-22

    In triangular-lattice magnets, the coexistence of third-neighbor antiferromagnetic and nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic exchange interactions can induce rich magnetic phases including noncoplanar skyrmion crystals. Based on Monte Carlo simulation, we studied the dependence of magnetic phase transition on exchange interaction strength. Under the consideration of uniaxial anisotropy and magnetic field both perpendicular to the film plane, a large antiferromagnetic exchange interaction induces a high frustration. When the value of antiferromagnetic exchange interaction is one and a half times larger than the ferromagnetic one, a magnetic phase composed of canting spin stripes, never observed in the chiral magnets, forms. Interestingly, different canting spin stripes along three 120 degree propagation directions may coexist randomly in a magnetic phase, attesting that the canting spin stripes are three-fold degenerate states akin to helices and the multiple state of canting spin stripes is a circular configuration with zero skyrmion charge number. Moreover, skyrmions and antiskyrmions can be observed simultaneously in the configuration at the low temperature nearly close to 0 K, and their configuration and diameter properties are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms of skyrmion creation and annihilation are properly interpreted by comparing exchange and Zeeman energy terms.

  18. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Gaugliardo, P. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Physics, University of Western Australia (Australia); Farnan, I.; Zhang, M. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Vance, E.R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R.B. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (Australia); Mudie, S. [The Australian Synchrotron, Victoria (Australia); Buckman, S.J. [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sullivan, J.P., E-mail: james.sullivan@anu.edu.au [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼10{sup 19} α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter. - Highlights: • Study of a range of naturally occurring zircons damaged by alpha radiation. • Characterised using a range of techniques, including PALS spectroscopy. • Effects on hydrous material appear important, rather than direct radiation damage. • Annealing is shown to remove the observed voids.

  19. Phenomenological study of exclusive binary light particle production from antiproton-proton annihilation at FAIR/PANDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Exclusive binary annihilation reactions induced by antiprotons of momentum from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c can be extensively investigated at FAIR/PANDA [1]. We are especially interested in the channel of charged pion pairs. Whereas this very probable channel constitutes the major background for other processes of interest in the PANDA experiment, it carries unique physical information on the quark content of proton, allowing to test different models (quark counting rules, statistical models,..). To study the binary reactions of light meson formation, we are developing an effective Lagrangian model based on Feynman diagrams which takes into account the virtuality of the exchanged particles. Regge factors [2] and form factors are introduced with parameters which may be adjusted on the existing data. We present preliminary results of our formalism for different reactions of light meson production leading to reliable predictions of cross sections, energy and angular dependencies in the PANDA kinematical range.

  20. Measurement of the strong coupling $\\alpha^{s}$ from four-jet observables in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Data from e+e- annihilation into hadrons at centre-of-mass energies between 91 GeV and 209 GeV collected with the OPAL detector at LEP, are used to study the four-jet rate as a function of the Durham algorithm resolution parameter ycut. The four-jet rate is compared to next-to-leading order calculations that include the resummation of large logarithms. The strong coupling measured from the four-jet rate is alphas(Mz0)= 0.1182+-0.0003(stat.)+-0.0015(exp.)+-0.0011(had.)+-0.0012(scale)+-0.0013(mass) in agreement with the world average. Next-to-leading order fits to the D-parameter and thrust minor event-shape observables are also performed for the first time. We find consistent results, but with significantly larger theoretical uncertainties.

  1. Spin annihilations of and spin sifters for transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves in co- and counter-rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung-In; Mok, Jinsik

    2014-01-01

    This study is motivated in part to better understand multiplexing in wireless communications, which employs photons carrying varying angular momenta. In particular, we examine both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves in either co-rotations or counter-rotations. To this goal, we analyze both Poynting-vector flows and orbital and spin parts of the energy flow density for the combined fields. Consequently, we find not only enhancements but also cancellations between the two modes. To our surprise, the photon spins in the azimuthal direction exhibit a complete annihilation for the counter-rotational case even if the intensities of the colliding waves are of different magnitudes. In contrast, the orbital flow density disappears only if the two intensities satisfy a certain ratio. In addition, the concepts of spin sifters and enantiomer sorting are illustrated.

  2. Spin annihilations of and spin sifters for transverse electric and transverse magnetic waves in co- and counter-rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-In Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is motivated in part to better understand multiplexing in wireless communications, which employs photons carrying varying angular momenta. In particular, we examine both transverse electric (TE and transverse magnetic (TM waves in either co-rotations or counter-rotations. To this goal, we analyze both Poynting-vector flows and orbital and spin parts of the energy flow density for the combined fields. Consequently, we find not only enhancements but also cancellations between the two modes. To our surprise, the photon spins in the azimuthal direction exhibit a complete annihilation for the counter-rotational case even if the intensities of the colliding waves are of different magnitudes. In contrast, the orbital flow density disappears only if the two intensities satisfy a certain ratio. In addition, the concepts of spin sifters and enantiomer sorting are illustrated.

  3. Systematics of the rare-gas core contributions to the positron annihilation spectra of some simple and transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sob, M. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie)

    1985-01-01

    Taking into account the core electron enhancement factor the rare-gas core contribution to the angular correlation positron annihilation spectra and to the total annihilation rate in some simple and transition metals are calculated. It is shown that the valence high-momentum part of the Gaussian fraction is not negligible in simple metals. In 3d and 4d metals, the rare-gas core part of the total annihilation rate amounts from 9 to 37%. The results are expected to help in the correct interpretation of the positron annihilation data.

  4. Pore annihilation in a single-crystal nickel-base superalloy during hot isostatic pressing: Experiment and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epishin, Alexander, E-mail: alex_epishin@yahoo.de [Technical University of Berlin, Institute of Material Sciences and Technologies, Metallic Materials, secr. BH18, Ernst-Reuter-Platz 1, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Fedelich, Bernard [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Link, Thomas [Technical University of Berlin, Institute of Material Sciences and Technologies, Metallic Materials, secr. BH18, Ernst-Reuter-Platz 1, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Feldmann, Titus [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Svetlov, Igor L. [All-Russian Institute of Aviation Materials (VIAM), Radio Street, 105005 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-01

    Pore annihilation during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was investigated in the single-crystal nickel-base superalloy CMSX-4 experimentally by interrupted HIP tests at 1288 °C/103 MPa. The kinetics of pore annihilation was determined by density measurement and quantitative metallography. Transmission electron microscopy of a HIPed specimen showed that the pores shrink via dislocation movement on octahedral glide planes. Theoretically pore closure under HIP condition was modelled by the finite element method using crystal plasticity and large strain theories. The modelling gives a similar kinetics of pore annihilation as observed experimentally, however somewhat higher annihilation rate.

  5. Annihilation probability density and other applications of the Schwinger multichannel method to the positron and electron scattering; Densidade de probabilidade de aniquilacao e outras aplicacoes do metodo multicanal de Schwinger ao espalhamento de positrons e eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varella, Marcio Teixeira do Nascimento

    2001-12-15

    We have calculated annihilation probability densities (APD) for positron collisions against He atom and H{sub 2} molecule. It was found that direct annihilation prevails at low energies, while annihilation following virtual positronium (Ps) formation is the dominant mechanism at higher energies. In room-temperature collisions (10{sup -2} eV) the APD spread over a considerable extension, being quite similar to the electronic densities of the targets. The capture of the positron in an electronic Feshbach resonance strongly enhanced the annihilation rate in e{sup +}-H{sub 2} collisions. We also discuss strategies to improve the calculation of the annihilation parameter (Z{sub eff} ), after debugging the computational codes of the Schwinger Multichannel Method (SMC). Finally, we consider the inclusion of the Ps formation channel in the SMC and show that effective configurations (pseudo eigenstates of the Hamiltonian of the collision ) are able to significantly reduce the computational effort in positron scattering calculations. Cross sections for electron scattering by polyatomic molecules were obtained in three different approximations: static-exchange (SE); tatic-exchange-plus-polarization (SEP); and multichannel coupling. The calculations for polar targets were improved through the rotational resolution of scattering amplitudes in which the SMC was combined with the first Born approximation (FBA). In general, elastic cross sections (SE and SEP approximations) showed good agreement with available experimental data for several targets. Multichannel calculations for e{sup -} -H{sub 2}O scattering, on the other hand, presented spurious structures at the electronic excitation thresholds (author)

  6. Charged-particle multiplicities in e sup + e sup minus annihilations at radical s =50--61. 4 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, H.W.; Perez, P.; Auchincloss, P.; Blanis, D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Eno, S.; Fry, C.A.; Harada, H.; Ho, Y.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kumita, T.; Mori, T.; Olsen, S.L.; Shaw, N.M.; Sill, A.; Thorndike, E.H.; Ueno, K.; Imlay, R.; Kirk, P.; Lim, J.; McNeil, R.R.; Metcalf, W.; Myung, S.S.; Cheng, C.P.; Gu, P.; Li, J.; Li, Y.K.; Ye, M.H.; Zhu, Y.C.; Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Hu, K.P.; Low, E.H.; Mattson, M.E.; Piilonen, L.; Sterner, K.L.; Lusin, S.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wang, A.T.M.; Wilson, S.; Frautschi, M.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Trahern, C.G.; Breedon, R.E.; Kim, G.N.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.L.; Maeshima, K.; Malchow, R.L.; Smith, J.R.; Stuart, D.; Abe, K.; Fujii, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kim, S.K.; Kurihara, Y.; Maki, A.; Nozaki, T.; Omori, T.; Sagawa, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sugimoto, Y.; Takaiwa, Y.; Terada, S.; Walker, R.; Kajino, F.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Thomas, T.; Ishi, Y.; Miyano, K.; Miyata, H.; Sasaki, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Bacala, A.; Liu, J.; Park, I.H.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Vinson, J.; Koba; The AMY Collaboration

    1990-08-01

    We present the charged-particle multiplicity distributions for {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} annihilation at center-of-mass energies from 50 to 61.4 GeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 30 pb{sup {minus}1} obtained with the AMY detector at the KEK storage ring TRISTAN. The charged-particle multiplicity distributions deviate significantly from the modified Poisson and pair Poisson distributions, but follow Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling and are well reproduced by the LUND parton-shower model.

  7. Mass limits of charged Higgs boson at large tan. beta. from e sup + e sup minus annihilations at radical s =50--60. 8 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.R.; McNeil, R.R.; Breedon, R.E.; Kim, G.N.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.L.; Maeshima, K.; Malchow, R.L.; Rowe, J.; Stuart, D.; Imlay, R.; Kirk, P.; Lim, J.; Metcalf, W.; Myung, S.S.; Cheng, C.P.; Gu, P.; Li, J.; Li, Y.K.; Ye, M.H.; Zhu, Y.C.; Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Hu, K.P.; Low, E.H.; Mattson, M.E.; Piilonen, L.; Sterner, K.L.; Lusin, S.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wang, A.T.M.; Wilson, S.; Frautschi, M.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Trahern, C.G.; Abe, K.; Fujii, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kim, S.K.; Kurihara, Y.; Maki, A.; Nozaki, T.; Omori, T.; Sagawa, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sugimoto, Y.; Takaiwa, Y.; Terada, S.; Walker, R.; Kajino, F.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Thomas, T.; Ishi, Y.; Miyano, K.; Miyata, H.; Sasaki, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Bacala, A.; Liu, J.; Park, I.H.; Sannes, F.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Vinson, J.; Auchincloss, P.; Blanis, D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Eno, S.; Fry, C.A.; Harada, H.; Ho, Y.H.; Kim, B.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kumita, T.; Mori, T.; Olsen, S.L.; Shaw, N.M.; Sill, A.; Thorndike, E.H.; Ueno, K.; Velissa; The AMY Collaboration

    1990-08-01

    A search for the pair production of charged Higgs particles decaying via the {ital H}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{tau}{bar {nu}} mode has been made in {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}} annihilations at center-of-mass energies between 50 and 60.8 GeV using the AMY detector at the KEK collider TRISTAN. No evidence for their existence is observed and 95%-C.L. mass limits are presented. The result has been interpreted in terms of the tan{beta} parameter in the Higgs sector.

  8. SUSY-QCD corrections to (co)annihilation and their impact on the relic density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harz, Julia [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Herrmann, Bjoern [Laboratoire d' Annecy de Physique Theorique, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Klasen, Michael [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Muenster (Germany); Kovarik, Karol [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Le Boulc' h, Quentin [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Grenoble (France)

    2013-07-01

    We computed the full O(α{sub s}) supersymmetric QCD corrections for neutralino-stop co-annihilation in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). It is shown that these annihilation channels are phenomenologically relevant within the so-called phenomenological MSSM, in particular in the light of the observation of a Higgs-like particle with a mass of about 126 GeV at the LHC. Numerical results for the co-annihilation cross sections and the predicted neutralino relic density are presented. It will be demonstrated that the impact of including these corrections on the cosmologically preferred region of parameter space is larger than the current experimental uncertainty from WMAP data.

  9. Neutralino-stop co-annihilation into electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons at one loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harz, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Herrmann, B. [Univ. Savoie/CNRS, Annecy-le-Vieux (France). LAPTh; Klasen, M. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Kovarik, K. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Le Boulc' h, Q. [Grenoble Univ. (France). CNRS-IN2P3/INPG

    2012-12-15

    We compute the full O({alpha}{sub s}) supersymmetric QCD corrections for neutralino-stop co-annihilation into electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We show that these annihilation channels are phenomenologically relevant within the so-called phenomenological MSSM, in particular in the light of the observation of a Higgs-like particle with a mass of about 126 GeV at the LHC. We present in detail our calculation, including the renormalization scheme, the infrared treatment, and the kinematical subtleties to be addressed. Numerical results for the co-annihilation cross sections and the predicted neutralino relic density are presented. We demonstrate that the impact of including the corrections on the cosmologically preferred region of parameter space is larger than the current experimental uncertainty from WMAP data.

  10. Investigation of silicon sensors for their use as antiproton annihilation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacifico, N., E-mail: nicola.pacifico@cern.ch [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics and Technology, Allégaten 55, 5007 Bergen (Norway); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Department of Physics, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); INFN-TIFPA, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Caccia, M. [University of Insubria, Dipartimento di Scienza ed Alta Tecnologia, via Valleggio 11, Como (Italy); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Caravita, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); University of Genoa, Department of Physics, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Castelli, F. [University of Milano, Department of Physics, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-11-21

    We present here a new application of silicon sensors aimed at the direct detection of antinucleons annihilations taking place inside the sensor's volume. Such detectors are interesting particularly for the measurement of antimatter properties and will be used as part of the gravity measurement module in the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. One of the goals of the AEg{sup ¯}IS experiment is to measure the gravitational acceleration of antihydrogen with 1% precision. Three different silicon sensor geometries have been tested with an antiproton beam to investigate their properties as annihilation detection devices: strip planar, 3D pixels and monolithic pixel planar. In all cases we were successfully detecting annihilations taking place in the sensor and we were able to make a first characterization of the clusters and tracks.

  11. Observational Constraints of 30–40 GeV Dark Matter Annihilation in Galaxy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Ho Chan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been shown that the annihilation of 30–40 GeV dark matter particles through bb- channel can satisfactorily explain the excess GeV gamma-ray spectrum near the Galactic Center. In this paper, we apply the above model to galaxy clusters and use the latest upper limits of gamma-ray flux derived from Fermi-LAT data to obtain an upper bound of the annihilation cross section of dark matter. By considering the extended density profiles and the cosmic ray profile models of 49 galaxy clusters, the upper bound of the annihilation cross section can be further tightened to σv≤9×10-26 cm3 s−1. This result is consistent with the one obtained from the data near the Galactic Center.

  12. Antiproton Annihilation in Hydrogen at Rest. I. Reaction p-bar+p-->K+K-bar+ pi

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsch, L; Franzini, P; Miller, D; Tan, T H; Steinberger, J; Plano, R; Yaeger, P

    1965-01-01

    In a study of 735 000 antiproton annihilations at rest in the hydrogen bubble chamber, 182 examples of the reaction K1K1 pi 0 and 851 examples of the reaction K1K± pi ± were recorded. The distributions in the internal variables of these reactions are presented. A substantial fraction of the latter reaction proceeds through an intermediate K* state; p-bar+p-->K+K*. The theory of the interference effects in this reaction is presented and compared with the experimental result. It is concluded that the KK* annihilation proceeds dominantly from the 3S, I=1 state of the N-barN system. The fraction of p-barp annihilations into KK* is given as fKK*=(2.1±0.3) x 10-3.

  13. Early Stages of Precipitation Process in Al-(Mn-)Sc-Zr Alloy Characterized by Positron Annihilation

    KAUST Repository

    Vlach, Martin

    2015-01-29

    Thermal effects on the precipitation stages in as-cast Al-0.70 at. pct Mn-0.15 at. pct Sc-0.05 at. pct Zr alloy were studied. The role of lattice defects was elucidated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening) enabling investigation of solutes clustering at the atomic scale. This technique has never been used in the Al-Sc- and/or Al-Zr-based alloys so far. Studies by positron annihilation were combined with resistometry, hardness measurements, and microstructure observations. Positrons trapped at defects are preferentially annihilated by Sc electrons. Lifetime of trapped positrons indicates that Sc atoms segregate at dislocations. Maximum fraction of positrons annihilated by Sc electrons occurring at 453 K (180 °C) suggests that clustering of Sc bound with vacancies takes place. It is followed by peak of this fraction at 573 K (300 °C). A rise of the contribution of trapped positrons annihilated by Zr electrons starting at 513 K (240 °C) and attaining maximum also at 573 K (300 °C) confirms that Zr participates in precipitation of the Al3Sc particles already at these temperatures. The pronounced hardening at 573 K (300 °C) has its nature in the precipitation of the Al3Sc particles with a Zr-rich shell. The contribution of trapped positrons annihilated by Mn electrons was found to be negligible. © 2015, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International.

  14. Tachyon condensation due to domain-wall annihilation in Bose-Einstein condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hiromitsu; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Tsubota, Makoto; Nitta, Muneto

    2012-12-14

    We show theoretically that a domain-wall annihilation in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates causes tachyon condensation accompanied by spontaneous symmetry breaking in a two-dimensional subspace. Three-dimensional vortex formation from domain-wall annihilations is considered a kink formation in subspace. Numerical experiments reveal that the subspatial dynamics obey the dynamic scaling law of phase-ordering kinetics. This model is experimentally feasible and provides insights into how the extra dimensions influence subspatial phase transition in higher-dimensional space.

  15. Low temperature exciton-exciton annihilation in amphi-PIPE J-aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spitz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The mobility of optically excited excitons on J-aggregates can be demonstrated by the phenomena of exciton-exciton annihilation. In this intensity-dependent process the collision of two excitons results in their annihilation and hence in a shortening of the mean excitation lifetime. By measuring the intensity-dependent fluorescent lifetime in contrast to the predicted immobilization of the excitons at low temperature we could prove the excellent mobility of the excitons at a temperature (4K, which is far below their expected freezing point.

  16. Direct Detection Phenomenology in Models Where the Products of Dark Matter Annihilation Interact with Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherry, John F.; Frandsen, Mads T.; Shoemaker, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    experiments is controlled by relativistic kinematics. This results in a distinctive recoil spectrum, a non-standard and or even absent annual modulation, and the ability to probe DM masses as low as a $\\sim$10 MeV. We use current LUX data to show that experimental sensitivity to thermal relic annihilation...... to nuclei, the limit from annihilation to relativistic particles in the Sun can be stronger than that of conventional non-relativistic direct detection by more than three orders of magnitude for masses in a 2-7 GeV window....

  17. Decaying vs annihilating dark matter in light of a tentative gamma-ray line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, Wilfried; Garny, Mathias

    2012-06-15

    Recently reported tentative evidence for a gamma-ray line in the Fermi-LAT data is of great potential interest for identifying the nature of dark matter. We compare the implications for decaying and annihilating dark matter taking the constraints from continuum gamma-rays, antiproton flux and morphology of the excess into account. We find that higgsino and wino dark matter are excluded, also for nonthermal production. Generically, the continuum gamma-ray ux severely constrains annihilating dark matter. Consistency of decaying dark matter with the spatial distribution of the Fermi-LAT excess would require an enhancement of the dark matter density near the Galactic center.

  18. Positron annihilation spectroscopy on a beam of positrons the LEPTA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmanova, E. V.; Eseev, M. K.; Kobets, A. G.; Meshkov, I. N.; Orlov, O. S.; Sidorin, A. A.; Siemek, K.; Horodek, P.

    2017-01-01

    The results and possibilities of the samples surfaces research by the Doppler method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) for a monochromatic beam of positrons at the LEPTA facility are presented in this paper. Method with high-resolution sensitivity to defects like vacancies and dislocations allows scanning of the surface and near-surface sample layers to a depth of several micrometers by the method of Doppler broadening of annihilation lines. The opportunities for the development of a PAS method based on the measurement of the positron lifetime in the sample irradiated by ordered flow of positrons from the injector of accelerator complex LEPTA at JINR are discussed.

  19. Enhanced lines and box-shaped features in the gamma-ray spectrum from annihilating dark matter in the NMSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeño, D. G.; Peiró, M.; Robles, S.

    2016-04-01

    We study spectral features in the gamma-ray emission from dark matter (DM) annihilation in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), with either neutralino or right-handed (RH) sneutrino DM . We perform a series of scans over the NMSSM parameter space, compute the DM annihilation cross section into two photons and the contribution of box-shaped features, and compare them with the limits derived from the Fermi-LAT search for gamma-ray lines using the latest Pass 8 data. We implement the LHC bounds on the Higgs sector and on the masses of supersymmetric particles as well as the constraints on low-energy observables. We also consider the recent upper limits from the Fermi-LAT satellite on the continuum gamma-ray emission from dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). We show that in the case of the RH sneutrino the constraint on gamma-ray spectral features can be more stringent than the dSph bounds. This is due to the Breit-Wigner enhancement near the ubiquitous resonances with a CP even Higgs and the contribution of scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs final states to box-shaped features. By contrast, for neutralino DM, the di-photon final state is only enhanced in the resonance with a Z boson and box-shaped features are even more suppressed. Therefore, the observation of spectral features could constitute a discriminating factor between both models. In addition, we compare our results with direct DM searches, including the SuperCDMS and LUX limits on the elastic DM-nucleus scattering cross section and show that some of these scenarios would be accessible to next generation experiments. Thus, our findings strengthen the idea of complementarity among distinct DM search strategies.

  20. Homo- or Hetero- Triplet-Triplet Annihilation? A Case Study with Perylene-Bodipy Dyads/Triads

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xiaoneng

    2017-07-06

    The photophysical processes of intramolecular ‘ping-pong’ energy transfers in the iodinated reference dyad BDP-I2-Py, as well as the uniodinated dyad BDP-Py and triad BDP-2Py, were studied. For BDP-I2-Py, a forward Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the perylene (Py) unit to the diiodoBDP unit (7 ps) and a backward triplet energy transfer (TTET, 3 ns) from the diiodoBDP unit to the Py unit were observed. For the BDP-Py and BDP-2Py systems, a FRET (5 ~ 8 ps) and a photo-induced electron transfer (PET) (1-1.5 ns) were observed in acetonitrile. The uniodinated dyad and triad were used as the triplet energy acceptor and emitter for a TTA upconversion with palladium tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin as the triplet photosensitizer. A maximum upconversion quantum yield of 12.6 % was measured. Given that the dyad (BDP-Py) contains one BDP unit and one Py unit, while the triad (BDP-2Py) contains two Py units and one BDP unit, and based on the results from steady-state femtosecond and nanosecond transient optical spectroscopies, it is concluded that neither intramolecular homo- triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) nor intramolecular hetero-TTA is possible during a TTA upconversion for those upconversion systems.

  1. Comparisons of Exact Results for the Virtual Photon Contribution to Single Harg Bremsstrahlung in Radiative Return for $e^{+}e^{-}$ Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Jadach, Stanislaw; Yost, S A

    2006-01-01

    We compare fully differential exact results for the virtual photon correction to single hard photon bremsstrahlung obtained using independent calculations, both for electron-positron annihilation at high-energy colliders and for radiative returnapplications. The results are compared using Monte Carlo evaluations of the matrix elements as well as by direct analytical evaluation of certain critical limits. Special attention is given to the issues of numerical stability and the treatment of finite-mass corrections. It is found that agreement on the order of 10^{-5} or better is obtained over most of the range of hard photon energies, at CMS energies relevant to both high energy collisions and radiative return experiments.

  2. SUSY-QCD corrections to the (co)annihilation of neutralino dark matter within the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinecke, Moritz

    2015-06-15

    Based on experimental observations, it is nowadays assumed that a large component of the matter content in the universe is comprised of so-called cold dark matter. Furthermore, latest measurements of the temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background provided an estimation of the dark matter relic density at a measurement error of one percent (concerning the experimental 1σ-error). The lightest neutralino χ 0{sub 1}, a particle which subsumes under the phenomenologically interesting category of weakly interacting massive particles, is a viable dark matter candidate for many supersymmetric (SUSY) models whose relic density Ω{sub χ} {sub 0{sub 1}} happens to lie quite naturally within the experimentally favored ballpark of dark matter. The high experimental precision can be used to constrain the SUSY parameter space to its cosmologically favored regions and to pin down phenomenologically interesting scenarios. However, to actually benefit from this progress on the experimental side it is also mandatory to minimize the theoretical uncertainties. An important quantity within the calculation of the neutralino relic density is the thermally averaged sum over different annihilation and coannihilation cross sections of the neutralino and further supersymmetric particles. It is now assumed and also partly proven that these cross sections can be subject to large loop corrections which can even shift the associated Ω{sub χ} {sub 0{sub 1}} by a factor larger than the current experimental error. However, most of these corrections are yet unknown. In this thesis, we calculate higher-order corrections for some of the most important (co)annihilation channels both within the framework of the R-parity conserving Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and investigate their impact on the final neutralino relic density Ω{sub χ} {sub 0{sub 1}}. More precisely, this work provides the full O(α{sub s}) corrections of supersymmetric quantum chromodynamics (SUSY

  3. The semi-Hooperon: Gamma-ray and anti-proton excesses in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Siqueira, Clarissa

    2017-12-01

    A puzzling excess in gamma-rays at GeV energies has been observed in the center of our galaxy using Fermi-LAT data. Its origin is still unknown, but it is well fitted by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) annihilations into quarks with a cross section around 10-26 cm3s-1 with masses of 20-50 GeV, scenario which is promptly revisited. An excess favoring similar WIMP properties has also been seen in anti-protons with AMS-02 data potentially coming from the Galactic Center as well. In this work, we explore the possibility of fitting these excesses in terms of semi-annihilating dark matter, dubbed as semi-Hooperon, with the process WIMP WIMPWIMP X being responsible for the gamma-ray excess, where X = h , Z. An interesting feature of semi-annihilations is the change in the relic density prediction compared to the standard case, and the possibility to alleviate stringent limits stemming from direct detection searches. Moreover, we discuss which models might give rise to a successful semi-Hooperon setup in the context of Z3,Z4 and extra ;dark; gauge symmetries.

  4. Low energy analysis techniques for CUORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduino, C.; Alfonso, K.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Benato, G.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Branca, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Cappelli, L.; Cardani, L.; Carniti, P.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; D'Addabbo, A.; D'Aguanno, D.; Dafinei, I.; Davis, C. J.; Dell'Oro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Drobizhev, A.; Fang, D. Q.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Hansen, E.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Leder, A.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Ma, Y. G.; Maino, M.; Marini, L.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P. J.; Napolitano, T.; Nastasi, M.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Novati, V.; Nucciotti, A.; O'Donnell, T.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sakai, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Santone, D.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Singh, V.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-12-01

    CUORE is a tonne-scale cryogenic detector operating at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) that uses tellurium dioxide bolometers to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of ^{130}Te. CUORE is also suitable to search for low energy rare events such as solar axions or WIMP scattering, thanks to its ultra-low background and large target mass. However, to conduct such sensitive searches requires improving the energy threshold to 10 keV. In this paper, we describe the analysis techniques developed for the low energy analysis of CUORE-like detectors, using the data acquired from November 2013 to March 2015 by CUORE-0, a single-tower prototype designed to validate the assembly procedure and new cleaning techniques of CUORE. We explain the energy threshold optimization, continuous monitoring of the trigger efficiency, data and event selection, and energy calibration at low energies in detail. We also present the low energy background spectrum of CUORE-0 below 60 keV. Finally, we report the sensitivity of CUORE to WIMP annual modulation using the CUORE-0 energy threshold and background, as well as an estimate of the uncertainty on the nuclear quenching factor from nuclear recoils inCUORE-0.

  5. Limits on dark matter annihilation in the sun using the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M.C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L.A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A.J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C.W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J.A.; Mathieu, A.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G.E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D.F.E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Taiuti, M.; Tönnis, C.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J.D.; Zúñiga, J.

    A search for muon neutrinos originating from dark matter annihilations in the Sun is performed using the data recorded by the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2012. In order to obtain the best possible sensitivities to dark matter signals, an optimisation of the event selection criteria is

  6. DLTS study of annihilation of oxidation induced deep-level defects ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This paper describes the fabrication of MOS capacitor and DLTS study of annihilation of deep- level defects upon thermal annealing. Ni/SiO2/n-Si MOS structures fabricated on n-type Si wafers were inves- tigated for process-induced deep-level defects. The deep-level traps in Si substrates induced during the pro-.

  7. Iteratively reweighted generalized rank annihilation method 1. Improved handling of prediction bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, N.M.; Ferre, J.; Boque, R.

    2001-01-01

    The generalized rank annihilation method (GRAM) is a method for curve resolution and calibration that uses two bilinear matrices simultaneously, i.e., one for the unknown and one for the calibration sample. A GRAM calculation amounts to solving an eigenvalue problem for which the eigenvalues are

  8. Voices of Sexual Distortion: Rape, Birth, and Self-Annihilation Metaphors in the "Alien Trilogy."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Discusses myth, metaphor, and subjectivity in the popular science fiction film series sometimes referred to as the "Alien Trilogy." Traces how images of rape, birth, and self-annihilation deconstruct liberalized myths of gender and family, destabalizing the conventional frame through which the rhetorical subject is constructed. (SR)

  9. Efficient delayed fluorescence via triplet-triplet annihilation for deep-blue electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, P-Y; Chou, H-H; Chen, Y-H; Su, T-H; Liao, C-Y; Lin, H-W; Lin, W-C; Yen, H-Y; Chen, I-C; Cheng, C-H

    2014-07-04

    Four 2-(styryl)triphenylene derivatives (TSs) were synthesized for deep-blue dopant materials. By using a pyrene-containing compound, DMPPP, as the host, the TS-doped devices exhibited significant delayed fluorescence via triplet-triplet annihilation, providing the highest quantum efficiency of 10.2% and a current efficiency of 12.3 cd A(-1).

  10. The study of synthetic food dyes by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivtsaev, A. A.; Razov, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    By method of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), substances are food dyes were studied: E-102 (Tartrazine), E-124 (Ponso 4R), E 132 (Indigo carmine), E-133 (Brilliant Blue), E-151 (Black Shiny). They are examined for the presence of carcinogenic properties. The difference between dyes having explicit carcinogenic properties and mutagenic properties (non-explicit carcinogens) is established.

  11. Interference between scaling and cluster decay phenomena in inclusive e$\\^{+}\\e^{-} annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Schierholz, G

    1976-01-01

    A recent model discussion for inclusive e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation which stresses Bjorken scaling near x=1 genuinely extends to incorporate hadronic cluster decay phenomena near x=0. A synthesis of seemingly different models is achieved. (9 refs).

  12. PROSPECTS FOR PENTAQUARK SEARCHES IN E+D- ANNIHILATIONS AND VV COLLISIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARMSTRONG,S.; MELLADO,B.; WU,S.L.

    2004-06-28

    Recent strong experimental evidence of a narrow exotic S = +1 baryon resonance, {Theta}{sup +}, suggests the existence of other exotic baryons. We discuss the prospects of confirming earlier experimental evidence of {Theta}{sup +} and the observation of additional hypothetical exotic baryons in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations and {gamma}{gamma} collisions at LEP and B Factories.

  13. Comment on "Protonium annihilation into $\\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ at rest in a liquid hydrogen target"

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Bugg, D V; Case, T; Credé, V; Crowe, K M; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; Meyer, C A; Meyer-Wildhagen, F; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Reinnarth, J; Röthel, W; Sarantsev, A V; Spanier, S; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Uman, I; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K; Zou, B S

    2002-01-01

    We comment on the recent paper published by the Obelix Collaboration on protonium annihilation into pi /sup 0/ pi /sup 0/ at rest in a liquid hydrogen target ÝPhys. Rev. D 65, 012001 (2002)¿, with particular reference to the discrepancy with the results obtained by the Crystal Barrel Collaboration.

  14. A study of Two Photon Decays of Charmonium Resonances Formed in Proton Anti-Proton Annihilations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedlar, Todd Kristofer [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1999-06-01

    In this dissertation we describe the results of an investigation of the production of charmonium states (ηc, η'c, χ0 and χ2) in Fermilab experiment E835 via antiproton-proton annihilation and their detection via their decay into two photons.

  15. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Smith High-Velocity Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gomez-Vargas, German A.; Hewitt, John W.; Linden, Tim; Tibaldo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use gamma-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant gamma-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section (approximately 3 x 10 (sup -26) cubic centimeters per second) for dark matter masses less than or approximately 30 gigaelectronvolts annihilating via the B/B- bar oscillation or tau/antitau channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

  16. Studies of Phase Transformation in Molecular Crystals Using the Positron Annihilation Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Lightbody, David; Sherwood, John N.

    1980-01-01

    An examination has been made of the brittle/plastic phase transformation in the molecular crystals cyclohexane, DL-camphene and succinonitrile using the positron annihilation technique. In each material, the transition is characterized by a distinct increase in ortho-positronium lifetime. The inf...

  17. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Unlock the mysteries of energy! Energy is more than ""the ability to do work""; we present these concepts in a way that makes them more accessible to students and easier to understand. The best way to understand energy is to first look at all the different kinds of energy including: What Is Energy, Mechanical Energy, Thermal, Sound Energy and Waves, as well as Light Energy.

  18. The Galactic 511 keV line: analysis and interpretation of Integral observations; L'annihilation des positrons galactiques: analyse et interpretation des donnees INTEGRAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lonjou, V

    2005-09-15

    Ever since the discovery of the 511 keV annihilation line emission from the galactic center region in the late seventies, the origin of galactic positrons has been the topic of a vivid scientific debate. It is also one of the prime scientific objectives of the imaging spectrometer SPI on board ESA's INTEGRAL observatory. In this thesis first a description of the most important SPI sub-system is given - the detector plane. Procedures for detector energy calibration and detector degradation analysis are developed. The determination of instrumental background models, a crucial aspect of data analysis, is elaborated. These background models are then applied to deriving sky maps and spectra of unprecedented quality of the Galactic positron annihilation radiation. The emission is centered on the galactic center with a spatial resolution of 8 degrees (FWHM), a second spatial component appears clearly: the galactic disc. The ray energy has been measured with unprecedented accuracy: 511.0 {+-} 0.03 keV for a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 2.07 {+-} 0.1 keV. The total galactic flux ranges from 1.09 to 2.43 10{sup -3} ph.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} including uncertainties on spatial distribution. Finally, the implications of these observations for the production of positrons by various Galactic populations are discussed.

  19. Prospects for discovering a neutrino line induced by dark matter annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Aisati, Chaimae; Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Hambye, Thomas; Vanderheyden, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    In the near future, neutrino telescopes are expected to improve their sensitivity to the flux of monochromatic neutrinos produced by dark matter (DM) in our galaxy. This is illustrated by a new limit on the corresponding cross section that we derive from public IceCube data. In this context, we study which DM models could produce an observable flux of monochromatic neutrinos from DM annihilations. To this end, we proceed in two steps. First, within a set of simple and minimal assumptions concerning the properties of the DM particle, we determine the models that could give rise to a significant annihilation into monochromatic neutrinos at the freeze-out epoch. The list of models turns out to be very limited as a result of various constraints, in particular direct detection and neutrino masses at loop level. Given the fact that, even if largely improved, the sensitivities will be far from reaching the thermal annihilation cross section soon, a signal could only be observed if the annihilation into neutrinos today is boosted with respect to the freeze-out epoch. This is why, in a second step, we analyze the possibility of having such a large enhancement from the Sommerfeld effect. For each scenario, we also compute the cross sections into other annihilation products and confront our results with experimental constraints. We find that, within our simple and minimal assumptions, the expectation to observe monochromatic neutrinos is only possible in very specific scenarios. Some will be confirmed or excluded in the near future because they predict signals slightly below the current experimental sensitivities. We also discuss how these prospects change by relaxing our assumptions as well as by considering other types of sharp spectral features. For the latter, we consider boxed-shaped and bremsstrahlung spectra and provide the corresponding limits from IceCube data.

  20. Creation and Annihilation of Nodes for the Moving Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprat, Andrew Paul

    The Moving Finite Element method and its more geometrically based improvement, Gradient Weighted Moving Finite Elements (GWMFE), approximate the true solution of a PDE using piecewise linear (PL) functions with moving nodes. GWMFE has proved to be extremely efficient at moving its nodes around locally to where they are needed. However, there are problems which can lead to a gradual over-accumulation or under-accumulation of nodes in certain regions, and GWMFE is much less efficient at shifting nodes globally as needed from one region to another. We therefore develop techniques to occasionally create and annihilate nodes as needed by the solution graph. An algorithm is developed which incorporates creation and annihilation 'modules' which assess whether the gridding of a given PL manifold is 'acceptable' or whether the creation or annihilation of nodes is called for. The modules are designed to (1) interact 'fruitfully' with each other, (2) produce an output gridding that is acceptable even if later perturbed by small amounts, (3) keep deformation of the manifold (due to annihilations) to within user-specified tolerances. For the two-dimensional PL manifold case, a 'Local Optimization Procedure' originally introduced by Lawson to achieve Delaunay triangulations of planar point sets is modified to achieve acceptable triangulations of non-planar polygonal regions resulting from node annihilations. We give numerical results for a variety of GWMFE trials in one and two space dimensions, including some quite nontrivial computations for colliding and reflecting shocks of the shallow water equation in 2-D. These techniques promise to make GWMFE in 1-D and 2-D much more efficient and robust. These techniques in computational geometry for 'massaging' a PL manifold should have a great variety of other applications.

  1. Positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening study in 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ion irradiated polystyrene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asad Ali, S., E-mail: asadapd@yahoo.co [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Kumar, Rajesh [Department of Physics, University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, G.G.S.I.P University, New Delhi 110403 (India); Nambissan, P.M.G. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Singh, F. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Prasad, Rajendra [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Vivekananda College of Technology and Management, Aligarh 202002 (India)

    2010-06-15

    Swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of polymeric materials results in the change of their free volume properties which have strong correlation with their macroscopic properties. The modification depends on the polymer and ion beam parameters, namely ion energy, fluence and ion species. Polystyrene films were irradiated with Li{sup 3+} ions of energy 50 MeV from 15 UD Pelletron accelerators at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India to the fluences of 10{sup 11}, 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. Nanosized free volume parameters in the polymer have been studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS). From o-Ps lifetime {tau}{sub 3,} free volume hole radius, mean free volume of microvoids and fractional free volume are computed and modification in free volume with the fluence is studied. Free volume parameters change slowly with ion fluence with a decrease at the highest fluence of 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The decrease in {tau}{sub 3} and I{sub 3} (reflecting the number of free volume holes) may be interpreted on the process of cross-linking. S parameter obtained from DBS measurements showed a minor decrease with increasing fluence.

  2. Noise-induced creation and annihilation of dissipative solitons (DS) in a passively mode-locked laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teamir, Tesfay; Elahi, Parviz; Makey, Ghaith; Fatih, Ilday

    Passive mode-locking, resulting in self-organized formation of femtoseconds-long laser pulses, constitutes a far-from-equilibrium steady state. Mode-locking is not only important for laser technology, but also of fundamental interest for broad class of systems. Despite numerous studies on their nonlinear dynamics, there is little understanding of the transitions that intrinsic noise can induce. We show that transitions between single-DS and multi-DS states can be triggered. Near critical points, DS states are observed to repeatedly exchange energy among themselves, form DS clusters with varying or vibrating temporal separation, often followed by random transformations among different states. This critical behavior appears to be caused by soliton-soliton or soliton-generated dispersive wave interactions. Irrespective of the specifics of the state, the measured noise level of the laser starts at a moderate value, is then reduced, as the DS's energy is increased. Further increases in power (nonlinearity) drives it towards a noisy critical state, where creation or annihilation of pulses occurs just before a new steady state is formed. These noise-induced transitions between steady states can shed light on the thermodynamics of far-from-equilibrium systems. TàBITAK (113F319) and ERC CoG (617521).

  3. Investigation of the crystal lattice defects by means of the positrons annihilations; Badania defektow sieci krystalicznej metoda anihilacji pozytonow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryzek, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    In this report the positrons annihilation methods as a tool for the crystal defects studies is presented. The short description of the positron - crystal interactions and different positron capture models are discussed. 192 refs, 67 figs, 6 tabs.

  4. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Foland, Andrew Dean

    2007-01-01

    Energy is the central concept of physics. Unable to be created or destroyed but transformable from one form to another, energy ultimately determines what is and isn''t possible in our universe. This book gives readers an appreciation for the limits of energy and the quantities of energy in the world around them. This fascinating book explores the major forms of energy: kinetic, potential, electrical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear.

  5. Search for Two Omega Meson Decays of Charmonium Resonances Produced in Proton - Antiproton Annihilations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, Jason J. [Northwestern U.

    2002-01-01

    In Fermilab experiment E835 a search has been performed for two w(782) vector meson decays of charmonium produced via $p\\bar{p}$ annihilation. All states with even charge conjugation quantum number are theoretically accessible via $ww$. No charmonium signals were clearly visible. The large nonresonant continuum from fjp annihilation to ww was observed to be predominantly pseudoscalar. 903 upper limit confidence intervals were calculated for $B(\\eta_c \\to $ww$)$ assuming various phase shifts, $\\delta$, between the resonant and nonresonant $ww$ production giving a range from 0.543 for $\\delta$ = 180° to 18% for $\\delta$ = 0°. Upper limits on $B(\\bar{p}p \\to \\eta^{\\prime}_c$) x $B(\\eta^{\\prime}_c \\to ww$) are also given over a range of assumed masses and widths for the $\\eta^{\\prime}_c$.

  6. Nanoscopic properties of silica filled polydimethylsiloxane by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, P.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Maurer, F.H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was performed on a series of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/fumed silicon dioxide (SiO2) composites at temperatures between -185 and 100degreesC to study the effect of filler content and filler particle size on the free volume properties...... and the positron annihilation characteristics. The glass transition behavior of the PDMS/SiO2 composites was determined with differential scanning calorimetry. A clear influence on the o-Ps lifetime (73) in the polymer upon addition of nano-sized fumed SiO2 was observed at all temperatures. The observed o......-Ps lifetime behavior was related to filler content and filler particle size. A transition in the temperature dependence of the o-Ps lifetime was observed close to -35degreesC above which temperature PDMS exhibits long o-Ps lifetimes. A relationship between tau(3) and the surface tension, equivalent...

  7. A study of some properties for substituted Li-ferrite using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hassan Aly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS is used to investigate polycrystalline substituted Li-ferrite samples. The dray ceramic technique was used to prepare all investigated samples. The variation of positron annihilation parameters I1%, I2%, τ1, and τ2 has been demonstrated with porosity and the initial permeability against the ionic radii of substituted ions for Li ferrite. The grain size (G.S. increased with increasing the ionic radii of the substituted ions for Li-ferrite. The correlation between I2 and τ2 has opposite behavior with the ionic radii of the substituted ions. Whereas the correlation between I1 and τ1; has nearly the same behavior with the ionic radii of the substituted ions except for V and Gd samples. There is mostly a direct correlation between the electrical resistivity and I2 values except for Sm sample with increasing the ionic radii of substituted ions.

  8. Surfaces of colloidal PbSe nanocrystals probed by thin-film positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron-electron momentum density (PEMD studies on multilayers of PbSe nanocrystals (NCs, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show that positrons are strongly trapped at NC surfaces, where they provide insight into the surface composition and electronic structure of PbSe NCs. Our analysis indicates abundant annihilation of positrons with Se electrons at the NC surfaces and with O electrons of the oleic ligands bound to Pb ad-atoms at the NC surfaces, which demonstrates that positrons can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the surface physics and chemistry of nanocrystals inside multilayers. Ab initio electronic structure calculations provide detailed insight in the valence and semi-core electron contributions to the positron-electron momentum density of PbSe. Both lifetime and PEMD are found to correlate with changes in the particle morphology characteristic of partial ligand removal.

  9. Positron Annihilation and Complementary Studies of Copper Sandblasted with Alumina Particles at Different Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Horodek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Positron annihilation spectroscopy and complementary methods were used to detect changes induced by sandblasting of alumina particles at different pressures varying from 1 to 6 bar in pure well-annealed copper. The positron lifetime measurements revealed existence of dislocations and vacancy clusters in the adjoined surface layer. The presence of retained alumina particles in the copper at the depth below 50 µm was found in the SEM pictures and also in the annihilation line shape parameter profiles measured in the etching experiment. The profiles show us that the total depth of damaged zones induced by sandblasting of alumina particles ranges from 140 µm up to ca. 800 µm and it depends on the applied pressure. The work-hardening of the adjoined surface layer was found in the microhardness measurements at the cross-section of the sandblasted samples.

  10. Detection of Ti-rich precipitations in iron by means of positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriplach, J.; Dauwe, C.; Segers, D. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Sob, M. [Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky, Brno (Czech Republic). Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie

    1997-10-01

    A possibility of detection of various Ti-rich precipitates in iron (steel) using positron annihilation spectroscopy is analysed. First, we investigate precipitates with sulfur (Ti{sub 9}S{sub 9}, Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2}), which have not been studied yet. We used the ab initio LMTO method and calculate positron affinities of all studied perfect systems. We also employ an improved supercell technique and atomic superimposed method and determine positron lifetimes for systems with vacancies. It turns out that even undefected Ti{sub 9}S{sub 9} and Ti{sub 4}C{sub 2}S{sub 2} precipitates can bind a positron and, therefore, can be detected in positron annihilation experiments in contrast to TiC and TiN precipitates which can trap positrons only if they contain vacancies. (author). 15 refs, 4 tabs, 1 fig.

  11. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) study of the as prepared and calcined MFI zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnar, Sanja; Vrankić, Martina; Bosnar, Damir; Ren, Nan; Šarić, Ankica

    2017-11-01

    The synthesis of high silica zeolites in many cases implies the usage of organic structural direction agents (SDA). However, to manifest their functionalities, the SDA occluded inside the channels of the as-synthesized structure should be removed, usually by a high temperature treatment (calcination). In this paper, the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was used to monitor the development of accessible spaces, their sizes and distributions in MFI zeolites, ZSM-5 and silicalite-1 in order to give an additional insight in the process of the SDA removal. For that purpose, a conventional PALS setup with 22Na positron source was applied. It was established that there is a pronounced difference between positron annihilation data for these two zeolites of the same structural type. The samples were additionally analysed by X-ray powder diffraction at room temperature with a crystal structure refinement and thermogravimetry.

  12. Free volume structure of realgar α-As4S4 by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Demchenko, P.

    2015-04-01

    Atomic-deficient free volume structure of realgar α-As4S4, the low-temperature modification, of tetraarsenic tetrasulfide polymorphs, is studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Eventual channels of positron annihilation in this molecular crystal are shown to be connected with low electron density entities around cage As4S4 molecules composing realgar-type structure of monoclinic P21/n space group. The overlapped spaces of bond-free solid angles around S atoms forming self-closed As4S4 molecules contribute preferentially to positron trapping modes, while a competitive influence of bound positron-electron states (positronium) stabilized in intermolecular spaces occurs also to be essential in the decomposed lifetime spectra too.

  13. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PAL) as a tool to study rubber (polyisoprene) vulcanizate network structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallon, P.E.; Huang, C.M.; Chen, H.; Zhang, R.; Jean, Y.C. [Missouri Univ., Kansas City, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Gradwell, M.H.S. [Port Elizabeth Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-07-01

    We have applied the technique of positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) to study the nature and the characteristics of polyisoprene network structures produced by three distinctly different crosslinking systems. The crosslinking systems are: Dicumly peroxide (DCP, which leads to carbon-carbon crosslinks), tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD) accelerated sulfur crosslinking and 2-bisbenzothiazole-2,2'-disulfide (MBTS) accelerated sulfur crosslinking. The positron annihilation lifetime measurements give information about the fractional free volume, the mean free volume hole size and the distribution of the free volume hole size for the vulcanizates. The inhibition effect of the curatives needs to be taken into account when interpreting the various positron lifetime parameters for the crosslinked samples. Each of the different crosslinking systems produces distinctly different trends. These differences are interpreted in terms of the network structures, which are in turn related to the differences in the mechanisms of the crosslinking reaction. (orig.)

  14. Branching ratios for pbarp annihilation at rest into two-body final states

    CERN Document Server

    Abele, A; Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Bischoff, S; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Bugg, D V; Case, T; Crowe, K M; Degener, T; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Giarritta, P; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Herbstrith, A; Herz, M; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Hodd, C; Holtzhaussen, C; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Lakata, M; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; McCrady, R; Meier, J; Meyer, C A; Montanet, Lucien; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Röthel, W; Spanier, S; Stöck, H; Strassburger, C; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Tischhäuser, M; Uman, I; Völcker, C; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K; Zou, B S

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of two-body branching ratios for pbarp annihilations at rest in liquid and gaseous (12 rho sub S sub T sub P) hydrogen are reported. Channels studied are pbarp-> pi sup 0 pi sup 0 ,pi sup 0 eta, K sup 0 sub S K sup 0 sub L , K sup + K sup -. The branching ratio for the pi sup 0 pi sup 0 channel in liquid H sub 2 is measured to be (6.14+-0.40)x10 sup - sup 4. The results are compared with those from other experiments. The fraction of P-state annihilation for a range of target densities from 0.002 rho sub S sub T sub P to liquid H sub 2 is determined. Values obtained include 0.11+-0.02 in liquid H sub 2 and 0.48+-0.04 in 12 rho sub S sub T sub P H sub 2 gas.

  15. Gamma-ray Background Spectrum and Annihilation Rate in the Baryon-symmetric Big-bang Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puget, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt was made to acquire experimental information on the problem of baryon symmetry on a large cosmological scale by observing the annihilation products. Data cover absorption cross sections and background radiation due to other sources for the two main products of annihilation, gamma rays and neutrinos. Test results show that the best direct experimental test for the presence of large scale antimatter lies in the gamma ray background spectrum between 1 and 70 MeV.

  16. Constraints on the Sommerfeld-enhanced dark matter annihilation from the gamma rays of subhalos and dwarf galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Bo-Qiang(Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008, China); Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The substructures of the Galactic dark matter halo such as dark matter subhalos and dwarf galaxies have very low velocity dispersions, which makes them useful in constraining the scenario of Sommerfeld-enhanced dark matter annihilation. We calculate the velocity distribution of dark matter particles in dark matter halo substructures using the Eddington's formula with NFW density profile. We parametrize the effect of Sommerfeld enhancement of s-wave dark matter annihilation on the gamma-ray fl...

  17. Exact solutions for reconnective annihilation in magnetic configurations with three sources

    OpenAIRE

    Tassi, E.; Titov, V. S.; Hornig, G.

    2002-01-01

    Exact solutions of the steady resistive three dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations in cylindrical coordinates for an incompressible plasma are presented. The solutions are translationally invariant along one direction and in general they describe a process of reconnective annihilation in a curved current layer with non vanishing magnetic field. In the derivation of the solutions the ideal case with vanishing resistivity and electric field is considered first and then generali...

  18. On the role of neutrinos telescopes in the search for Dark Matter annihilations in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Masiero, Antonio; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2017-12-01

    The observation of GeV neutrinos coming from the Sun would be a clear signal of dark matter if neutrinos produced by cosmic rays interaction are an irreducible but suppressed background. Current neutrino detectors have so far failed to detect such a signal, however, and bounds from direct and indirect dark matter searches may significantly restrict the possibility of observing it in future experiments such as Hyper-Kamiokande or IceCube-Gen2. In this work we assess, in the light of current data and of expected experimental sensitivities, the prospects for the detection of a neutrino signal from dark matter annihilations in the Sun. To be as general as possible, equilibrium between the capture and the annihilation rates in the Sun is not assumed in our analysis; instead, the dark matter scattering and annihilation cross sections are taken as free and independent parameters. We consider capture via both spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions, and annihilations into three representative final states: bbar b, W^+W^-, and τ+τ-. We find that when the capture in the Sun is dominated by spin-independent interactions, current direct detection bounds already preclude the observation of a neutrino signal in future experiments. For capture via spin-dependent interactions, a strong complementarity is observed, over most of the parameter space, between future neutrino detectors and planned direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments, such as PICO-500 and CTA. In this case, we also identify some regions of the parameter space that can be probed, via the neutrino flux from the Sun, only by future neutrino experiments.

  19. Model-independent constraints on dark matter annihilation in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Boddy, Kimberly; Kumar, Jason; Marfatia, Danny; Sandick, Pearl

    2018-01-01

    We present a general, model-independent formalism for determining bounds on the production of photons in dwarf spheroidal galaxies via dark matter annihilation, applicable to any set of assumptions about dark matter particle physics or astrophysics. As an illustration, we analyze gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to constrain a variety of nonstandard dark matter models, several of which have not previously been studied in the context of dwarf galaxy searches.

  20. Gravity-mediated dark matter annihilation in the Randall-Sundrum model

    OpenAIRE

    Rueter, T; Rizzo, T.; Hewett, J.

    2017-01-01

    Observational evidence for dark matter stems from its gravitational interactions, and as of yet there has been no evidence for dark matter interacting via other means. We examine models where dark matter interactions are purely gravitational in a Randall-Sundrum background. In particular, the Kaluza-Klein tower of gravitons which result from the warped fifth dimension can provide viable annihilation channels into Standard Model final states, and we find that we can achieve values of the annih...

  1. First evidence for the annihilation decay mode $B^{+} \\to D_{s}^{+} \\phi$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, V; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Maino, M; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, H; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for the hadronic annihilation decay mode $B^{+} \\to D_s^{+}\\phi$ is found with greater than $3\\sigma$ significance. The branching fraction and \\CP asymmetry are measured to be \\begin{eqnarray} \\mathcal{B}(B^{+} \\to D_s^{+}\\phi) &=& \\left(1.87^{\\,+1.25}_{\\,-0.73}\\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.19\\, ({\\rm syst}) \\pm 0.32\\, ({\\rm norm})\\right) \\times 10^{-6}, \

  2. Trojan War displayed as a full annihilation-diffusion-reaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    The diffusive pair annihilation model with embedded topological domains and archaeological data is applied in an analysis of the hypothetical Trojan-Greek war during the late Bronze Age. Estimations of parameter are explicitly made for critical dynamics of the model. In particular, the 8-metre walls of Troy could be viewed as the effective shield that provided the technological difference between the two armies. Suggestively, the numbers in The Iliad are quite sound, being in accord with Lanchester's laws of warfare.

  3. High strain rate deformation and positron annihilation in Fe-3. 5wt. %Si single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sob, M.; Buchar, J. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie); Bucki, M. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Fyzikalni Ustav)

    1984-08-01

    It is shown that dynamic loading has a greater effect on the parameters of angular correlation positron annhilation curves than static loading has for the same total permanent strain; this is related to the more extensive changes in the material during dynamic deformation (vacancy clusters, twinning). The anisotropy of the deformation processes for different crystallographic orientations of the samples is also indicated by the changes in positron annihilation parameters.

  4. Gravitational Perturbations as a Possible Cause for Instability in the Measurements of Positron Annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikin B. P.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The annihilation of positrons is measured in a wide range of studies in the field of physical chemistry [1, 2]. One of the problems in these studies is the instability of the results of measurements [3–5]. As shown in our research, instability may result from the change of nonregistering gravitational effects related to alteration of the tidal forces upon the change of moon phases and the seasonal changes of the distance between the Earth and the Sun.

  5. Information on individual interfaces in ternary polymer blends from positron annihilation lifetime studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghala, D.; Ramya, P.; Pasang, T.; Ravikumar, H. B.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2012-06-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy has been used to determine the free volume content in the ternary blends of SAN/EVA/PVC. The method of deriving hydrodynamic interaction parameter (α) in binary polymer blends was modified for ternary polymer blend system characterized by three distinct interfaces. Each interface characterized, is associated with an α and its assertion for the ternary blend are compared with available literature data.

  6. Probing dark matter decay and annihilation with Fermi LAT observations of nearby galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaoyuan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Vertongen, Gilles [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Weniger, Christoph [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Galaxy clusters are promising targets for indirect dark matter searches. Gamma-ray signatures from the decay or annihilation of dark matter particles inside these clusters could be observable with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on three years of Fermi LAT gamma-ray data, we analyze the flux coming from eight nearby clusters individually as well as in a combined likelihood analysis. Concentrating mostly on signals from dark matter decay, we take into account uncertainties of the cluster masses as determined by X-ray observations and model the cluster emission with extended sources. We do not find significant emission from any of the considered clusters and present limits on the dark matter lifetime and annihilation cross-section. We compare our lifetime limits derived from cluster observations with the limits that can be obtained from the extragalactic gamma-ray background, and find that in case of hadronic decay the cluster limits become competitive at dark matter masses below a few hundred GeV. Finally, we show that in presence of dark matter substructures down to 10{sup -6} solar masses the limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section could improve by a factor of a few hundred, possibly going down to the thermal cross-section of 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} for dark matter masses annihilation into b anti b. As a direct application of our results, we derive limits on the lifetime of gravitino dark matter in scenarios with R-parity violation. Implications of these limits for the possible observation of long-lived superparticles at the LHC are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Positron annihilation characteristics of ODS and non-ODS EUROFER isochronally annealed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Y. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)], E-mail: yanicet@fis.ucm.es; Castro, V. de; Monge, M.A.; Munoz, A.; Leguey, T.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2008-05-31

    Yttrium oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and non-ODS EUROFER produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing have been subjected to isochronal annealing up to 1523 K, and the evolution of the open-volume defects and their thermal stability have been investigated using positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) techniques. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations have also been performed on the studied samples to verify the characteristics of the surviving defects after annealing at 1523 K. The CDB spectra of ODS EUROFER exhibit a characteristic signature that is attributed to positron annihilation in Ar-decorated cavities at the oxide particle/matrix interfaces. The variation of the positron annihilation parameters with the annealing temperature shows three stages: up to 623 K, between 823 and 1323 K, and above 1323 K. Three-dimensional vacancy clusters, or voids, are detected in either materials in as-HIPed condition and after annealing at T {<=} 623 K. In the temperature range 823-1323 K, these voids' growth and nucleation and the growth of other new species of voids take place. Above 1323 K, some unstable cavities start to anneal out, and cavities associated to oxide particles and other small precipitates survive to annealing at 1523 K. The TEM observations and the positron annihilation results indicate that these cavities should be decorated with Ar atoms absorbed during the mechanical alloying process.

  8. Positron annihilation lifetime study of extended defects in semiconductor glasses and polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyko, Olha [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University, Pekarska str. 69, 79010 Lviv (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, Yaroslav [Department of Optoelectronics and Information Technologies, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Dragomanova str. 50, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials, Scientific Research Company ' ' Carat' ' , Stryjska str. 202, 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Filipecki, Jacek [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University in Czestochowa, Armii Krajowej al. 13/15, 42200 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2013-01-15

    The processes of atomic shrinkage in network-forming solids initiated by external influences are tested using technique of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at the example of chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors of arsenic sulphide type and acrylic polymers for dental application. Two state positron trapping is shown to be responsible for atomic shrinkage in chalcogenide glasses, while mixed trapping and ortho-positronium decaying is character for volumetric densification and stress propagation in acrylic dental polymers. At the basis of the obtained results it is concluded that correct analysis of externally-induced shrinkage in polymer networks under consideration can be developed by using original positron lifetime data treatment algorithms to compensate defect-free bulk annihilation channel within two-state positron trapping model and account for an interbalance between simultaneously co-existing positron trapping and orth-positronium related decaying channels within mixed three-state positron annihilation model (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Electron Positron Annihilation Radiation from SgrA East at the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Fatuzzo, M; Rafelski, Johann; Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio; Rafelski, Johann

    2001-01-01

    Maps of the Galactic electron-positron annihilation radiation show evidence for three distinct and significant features: (1) a central bulge source, (2) emission in the Galactic plane, and (3) an enhancement of emission at positive latitudes above the Galactic Center. In this paper, we explore the possibility that Sgr A East, a very prominent radio structure surrounding the Galactic nucleus, may be a significant contributer to the central bulge feature. The motivation for doing so stems from a recently proposed link between this radio object and the EGRET gamma-ray source 2EG J1746-2852. If this association is correct, then Sgr A East is also expected to be a source of copious positron production. The results presented here show that indeed Sgr A East must have produced a numerically significant population of positrons, but also that most of them have not yet had sufficient time to thermalize and annihilate. As such, Sgr A East by itself does not appear to be the dominant current source of annihilation radiat...

  10. Neutralino dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic gamma rays as a signal of low mass superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Hooper, Dan; Marfatia, Danny; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2010-01-01

    We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes, in which gauge bosons and their associated gauginos exist as strings attached to stacks of D-branes, and chiral matter exists as strings stretching between intersecting D-branes. Under the assumptions that the fundamental string scale is in the TeV range and the theory is weakly coupled, we study models of supersymmetry for which signals of annihilating neutralino dark matter are observable. In particular, we construct a model with a supersymmetric R-symmetry violating (but R-parity conserving) effective Lagrangian that allows for the s-wave annihilation of neutralinos, once gauginos acquire mass through an unspecified mechanism. The model yields bino-like neutralinos (with the measured relic abundance) that annihilate to a gamma-gamma final state with a substantial branching fraction (~ 10%) that is orders of magnitude larger than in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. A very bright gamma-ray spectral line could be ...

  11. Ageing phenomenon in acrylic polymer dental materials detected by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipecki, Jacek; Chamerski, Kordian; Boyko, Olha; Kotynia, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Polymer materials based on acrylic monomers are commonly used in dentistry. It is important to research the structure of dental filling materials towards the material ageing. The study has been conducted in order to determine the presence of free volume gaps in the structure of polymer materials. Brand new, acrylic polymer based samples of dental Dipol materials were used as a research material. The study was conducted by means of the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). As a result of the conducted measurements, curves describing numbers of counts of the acts of annihilation in the time function were obtained. The conducted studies revealed the existence of four components τ1, τ2, τ3 and τ4. The τ3 and τ4 components are attributed to the pick-off annihilation of o-Ps orthopositronium trapping by free volume gaps and provide information about geometrical parameters of the volumes. LT 9 computer program was used to calculate components. Free volume holes were determined from empirical relationship between the radius of free volume and the long lifetime components. Conducted studies indicate the presence of free volume holes in the research materials. It has been noted that a new long lifetime component is assigned to a new kind of free volumes that exist in the structure of material related to the material ageing.

  12. Weak annihilation and new physics in charmless [Formula: see text] decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobeth, Christoph; Gorbahn, Martin; Vickers, Stefan

    We use currently available data of nonleptonic charmless 2-body [Formula: see text] decays ([Formula: see text]) that are mediated by [Formula: see text] QCD- and QED-penguin operators to study weak annihilation and new-physics effects in the framework of QCD factorization. In particular we introduce one weak-annihilation parameter for decays related by [Formula: see text] quark interchange and test this universality assumption. Within the standard model, the data supports this assumption with the only exceptions in the [Formula: see text] system, which exhibits the well-known "[Formula: see text] puzzle", and some tensions in [Formula: see text]. Beyond the standard model, we simultaneously determine weak-annihilation and new-physics parameters from data, employing model-independent scenarios that address the "[Formula: see text] puzzle", such as QED-penguins and [Formula: see text] current-current operators. We discuss also possibilities that allow further tests of our assumption once improved measurements from LHCb and Belle II become available.

  13. Dark matter annihilation into four-body final states and implications for the AMS antiproton excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Steven J.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Strigari, Louis E.

    2018-01-01

    We consider dark matter annihilation into a general set of final states of standard model particles, including two-body and four-body final states that result from the decay of intermediate states. For dark matter masses ˜10 - 105 GeV , we use updated data from Planck and from high gamma-ray experiments such as Fermi-LAT, MAGIC, and VERITAS to constrain the annihilation cross section for each final state. The Planck constraints are the most stringent over the entire mass range for annihilation into light leptons, and the Fermi-LAT constraints are the most stringent for four-body final states up to masses ˜104 GeV . We consider these constraints in light of the recent AMS antiproton results, and show that for light mediators it is possible to explain the AMS data with dark matter, and remain consistent with Fermi-LAT Inner Galaxy measurements, for mχ˜60 - 100 GeV mass dark matter and mediator masses mϕ/mχ≲1 .

  14. Weak annihilation and new physics in charmless B → MM decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobeth, Christoph [Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Gorbahn, Martin [University of Liverpool, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Vickers, Stefan [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    We use currently available data of nonleptonic charmless 2-body B → MM decays (MM = PP, PV,VV) that are mediated by b → (d, s) QCD- and QED-penguin operators to study weak annihilation and new-physics effects in the framework of QCD factorization. In particular we introduce one weak-annihilation parameter for decays related by (u <-> d) quark interchange and test this universality assumption. Within the standard model, the data supports this assumption with the only exceptions in the B → Kπ system, which exhibits the well-known ''ΔA{sub CP} puzzle'', and some tensions in B → K*φ. Beyond the standard model, we simultaneously determine weak-annihilation and new-physics parameters from data, employing model independent scenarios that address the ''ΔA{sub CP} puzzle'', such as QED-penguins and b → s anti uu current-current operators. We discuss also possibilities that allow further tests of our assumption once improved measurements from LHCb and Belle II become available. (orig.)

  15. Stringent constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section from the region of the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Dan; Kelso, Chris; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2013-06-01

    For any realistic halo profile, the Galactic Center is predicted to be the brightest source of gamma-rays from dark matter annihilations. Due in large part to uncertainties associated with the dark matter distribution and astrophysical backgrounds, however, the most commonly applied constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section have been derived from other regions, such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In this article, we study Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope data from the direction of the inner Galaxy and derive stringent upper limits on the dark matter's annihilation cross section. Even for the very conservative case of a dark matter distribution with a significant (˜kpc) constant-density core, normalized to the minimum density needed to accommodate rotation curve and microlensing measurements, we find that the Galactic Center constraint is approximately as stringent as those derived from dwarf galaxies (which were derived under the assumption of an NFW distribution). For NFW or Einasto profiles (again, normalized to the minimum allowed density), the Galactic Center constraints are typically stronger than those from dwarfs.

  16. Multi-photon creation and single-photon annihilation of electron-positron pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Huayu

    2011-04-27

    In this thesis we study multi-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production in a trident process, and singlephoton e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation in a triple interaction. The pair production is considered in the collision of a relativistic electron with a strong laser beam, and calculated within the theory of laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics. A regularization method is developed systematically for the resonance problem arising in the multi-photon process. Total production rates, positron spectra, and relative contributions of different reaction channels are obtained in various interaction regimes. Our calculation shows good agreement with existing experimental data from SLAC, and adds further insights into the experimental findings. Besides, we study the process in a manifestly nonperturbative domain, whose accessibility to future all-optical experiments based on laser acceleration is shown. In the single-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation, the recoil momentum is absorbed by a spectator particle. Various kinematic configurations of the three incoming particles are examined. Under certain conditions, the emitted photon exhibits distinct angular and polarization distributions which could facilitate the detection of the process. Considering an equilibrium relativistic e{sup +}e{sup -} plasma, it is found that the single-photon process becomes the dominant annihilation channel for plasma temperatures above 3 MeV. Multi-particle correlation effects are therefore essential for the e{sup +}e{sup -} dynamics at very high density. (orig.)

  17. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of High Performance Polymer Films under CO2 Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.A. Quarles; John R. Klaehn; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2010-08-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. Different polymers are found to behave differently. Some polymers studied form positronium and some, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those samples that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don’t form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. Some polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO2 pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO2 pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO2 into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm.

  18. Possible Dark Matter Annihilation Signal in the AMS-02 Antiproton Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming-Yang; Yuan, Qiang; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2017-05-12

    Using the latest AMS-02 cosmic-ray antiproton flux data, we search for a potential dark matter annihilation signal. The background parameters about the propagation, source injection, and solar modulation are not assumed a priori but based on the results inferred from the recent B/C ratio and proton data measurements instead. The possible dark matter signal is incorporated into the model self-consistently under a Bayesian framework. Compared with the astrophysical background-only hypothesis, we find that a dark matter signal is favored. The rest mass of the dark matter particles is ∼20-80  GeV, and the velocity-averaged hadronic annihilation cross section is about (0.2-5)×10^{-26}  cm^{3} s^{-1}, in agreement with that needed to account for the Galactic center GeV excess and/or the weak GeV emission from dwarf spheroidal galaxies Reticulum 2 and Tucana III. Tight constraints on the dark matter annihilation models are also set in a wide mass region.

  19. Positron annihilation spectroscopy study on annealing effect of CuO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jianjian; Wang, Jiaheng; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Zhejie; Wu, Yichu, E-mail: ycwu@whu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Technology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Nuclear Solid State Physics, Wuhan University (WHU), Wuhan (China)

    2016-03-15

    The microstructure and defects of CuO nanoparticles under isochronal annealing were investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). XRD and SEM results indicated that the average grain sizes of CuO nanoparticles grew slowly below 800 °C, and then increased rapidly with the annealing temperature from 800 to 1000 °C. Positron lifetime analysis exhibited that positrons were mainly annihilated in mono-vacancies (V{sub Cu}, V{sub O}) and vacancy clusters when annealing from 200 to 800 °C. Furthermore, W-S plot of Doppler broadening spectra at different annealing temperatures found that the (W, S) points distributed on two different defect species, which suggested that V{sup −}{sub Cu} - V{sup +}{sub O} complexes were produced when the grains grew to bigger size after annealing above 800 °C, and positrons might annihilate at these complexes. (author)

  20. Stringent constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section from the region of the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; Kelso, Chris; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2013-06-01

    For any realistic halo profile, the Galactic Center is predicted to be the brightest source of gamma-rays from dark matter annihilations. Due in large part to uncertainties associated with the dark matter distribution and astrophysical backgrounds, however, the most commonly applied constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section have been derived from other regions, such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In this article, we study Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope data from the direction of the inner Galaxy and derive stringent upper limits on the dark matter's annihilation cross section. Even for the very conservative case of a dark matter distribution with a significant (~kpc) constant-density core, normalized to the minimum density needed to accommodate rotation curve and microlensing measurements, we find that the Galactic Center constraint is approximately as stringent as those derived from dwarf galaxies (which were derived under the assumption of an NFW distribution). For NFW or Einasto profiles (again, normalized to the minimum allowed density), the Galactic Center constraints are typically stronger than those from dwarfs.

  1. Positron annihilation lifetime study of polyvinylpyrrolidone for nanoparticle-stabilizing pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, O; Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Ingram, A; Shpotyuk, Y

    2016-01-05

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy was applied to characterize free-volume structure of polyvinylpyrrolidone used as nonionic stabilizer in the production of many nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. The polymer samples with an average molecular weight of 40,000 g mol(-1) were pelletized in a single-punch tableting machine under an applied pressure of 0.7 GPa. Strong mixing in channels of positron and positronium trapping were revealed in the polyvinylpyrrolidone pellets. The positron lifetime spectra accumulated under normal measuring statistics were analysed in terms of unconstrained three- and four-term decomposition, the latter being also realized under fixed 0.125 ns lifetime proper to para-positronium self-annihilation in a vacuum. It was shown that average positron lifetime extracted from each decomposition was primary defined by long-lived ortho-positronium component. The positron lifetime spectra treated within unconstrained three-term fitting were in obvious preference, giving third positron lifetime dominated by ortho-positronium pick-off annihilation in a polymer matrix. This fitting procedure was most meaningful, when analysing expected positron trapping sites in polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized nanocomposite pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Study of color-octet matrix elements through J/ψ production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yi-Jie; Xu, Guang-Zhi; Zhang, Pan-Pan; Liu, Kui-Yong [Liaoning University, Department of Physics, Shenyang (China); Zhang, Yu-Jie [Beihang University, School of Physics, Beijing (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-09-15

    In this paper, the color-octet long distance matrix elements are studied through the inclusive J/ψ production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation within the framework of non-relativistic QCD factorization. The calculations are up-to next-to-leading order with the radiative and relativistic corrections in the energy region of the B-factory and the near-threshold region of 4.6-5.6 GeV. A constraint of the long distance matrix elements (left angle {sup 1}S{sub 0}{sup 8} right angle, left angle {sup 3}P{sub 0}{sup 8} right angle) is obtained. Through our estimation, the P-wave color-octet matrix element (left angle 0 vertical stroke {sup 3}P{sup 8}{sub 0} vertical stroke 0 right angle) should be of the order of 0.008m{sub c}{sup 2} GeV{sup 3} or less. The constrained region is not compatible with the values of the long distance matrix elements fitted at hadron colliders. (orig.)

  3. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Confounded by kinetic energy? Suspect that teaching about simple machines isn t really so simple? Exasperated by electricity? If you fear the study of energy is beyond you, this entertaining book will do more than introduce you to the topic. It will help you actually understand it. At the book s heart are easy-to-grasp explanations of energy basics work, kinetic energy, potential energy, and the transformation of energy and energy as it relates to simple machines, heat energy, temperature, and heat transfer. Irreverent author Bill Robertson suggests activities that bring the basic concepts of energy to life with common household objects. Each chapter ends with a summary and an applications section that uses practical examples such as roller coasters and home heating systems to explain energy transformations and convection cells. The final chapter brings together key concepts in an easy-to-grasp explanation of how electricity is generated. Energy is the second book in the Stop Faking It! series published by NS...

  4. Measurement of the branching ratio $\\Gamma(\\overline{p}p\\to e^{+}e^{-})/\\Gamma(\\overline{p}p\\to total)$ in antiproton-proton annihilation at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Bassompierre, G; Dalpiaz, P; Dalpiaz, P F; Gissinger, G; Jacquey, S; Peroni, C; Schneegans, M; Tecchio, L B

    1976-01-01

    Analyzing a sample of 220000 events from an experiment still in progress at the CERN Proton Synchrotron, 60 pairs of electrons with an energy above 700 MeV have been observed. The electrons, produced by annihilation of antiproton stopped in a liquid-hydrogen target, are detected with optical spark chambers and scintillation counters. Twenty-nine out of these 60 pairs have been found to be collinear; normalizing with respect to the hadronic two-body channels pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ and K/sup +/K/sup -/, a branching raio B/sub ee/= Gamma (pp to e/sup +/e/sup -/) Gamma /(pp to total)=(3.2+or-0.9)*10/sup -7/ has been obtained. (11 refs).

  5. Test of N.bar.N potential models isospin relations in p.bar.d annihilations at rest and the search for quasinuclear bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Abele, A; Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Bischoff, S; Blüm, H P; Braune, K; Case, T; Credé, V; Crowe, K M; Degener, T F; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Giarritta, P; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Herbstrith, A; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Holtzhaussen, C; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Lakata, M T; Landua, Rolf; Mathhay, H; Meyer, C A; Meyer-Wildhagen, F; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Röthel, W; Spanier, S M; Stöck, H; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Tischhäuser, M; Uman, I; Völcker, C; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K

    2000-01-01

    We have determined branching ratios for antiproton annihilations at rest on protons or neutrons in liquid deuterium which we compare to frequencies of isospin-related processes in antiproton-proton annihilations. Using the annihilation rates into pi /sup 0/ pi /sup 0 / and pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ where the annihilation took place on the proton or neutron, respectively, we discuss the fraction of S-wave and P-wave annihilation in liquid D/sub 2/. The frequencies for pi /sup -/ omega and rho /sup -/ pi /sup 0/, and pi /sup -/ eta and pi /sup -/ eta ' and the corresponding frequencies for pp annihilations are used to determine isoscalar and isovector contributions to the protonium wave function. We observe rho - omega interference in pp to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ eta and pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ annihilation. The annihilation rate for pd to K/sup -/K/sup 0/p confirms the dominance of the isovector contribution to NN to KK annihilations. Furthermore, we searched for narrow quasinuclear bound states close to t...

  6. Synchrotron Emission from Dark Matter Annihilation: Predictions for Constraints from Non-detections of Galaxy Clusters with New Radio Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Emma; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Splettstoesser, Megan; Profumo, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    The annihilation of dark matter particles is expected to yield a broad radiation spectrum via the production of Standard Model particles in astrophysical environments. In particular, electrons and positrons from dark matter annihilation produce synchrotron radiation in the presence of magnetic fields. Galaxy clusters are the most massive collapsed structures in the universe, and are known to host ˜μG-scale magnetic fields. They are therefore ideal targets to search for, or to constrain the synchrotron signal from dark matter annihilation. In this work, we use the expected sensitivities of several planned surveys from the next generation of radio telescopes to predict the constraints on dark matter annihilation models which will be achieved in the case of non-detections of diffuse radio emission from galaxy clusters. Specifically, we consider the Tier 1 survey planned for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) at 120 MHz, the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey planned for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) at 1.4 GHz, and planned surveys for Aperture Tile in Focus (APERTIF) at 1.4 GHz. We find that, for massive clusters and dark matter masses ≲ 100 {GeV}, the predicted limits on the annihilation cross section would rule out vanilla thermal relic models for even the shallow LOFAR Tier 1, ASKAP, and APERTIF surveys.

  7. Improving the sensitivity of gamma-ray telescopes to dark matter annihilation in dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Eric [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). Center for Particle Astrophysics; Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Linden, Tim [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Kavli Inst. for Cosmological Physics

    2015-03-01

    The Fermi-LAT Collaboration has studied the gamma-ray emission from a stacked population of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and used this information to set constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. Interestingly, their analysis uncovered an excess with a test statistic (TS) of 8.7. If interpreted naively, this constitutes a 2.95σ local excess (p-value=0.003), relative to the expectations of their background model. In order to further test this interpretation, the Fermi-LAT team studied a large number of blank sky locations and found TS>8.7 excesses to be more common than predicted by their background model, decreasing the significance of their dwarf excess to 2.2σ(p-value=0.027). We argue that these TS>8.7 blank sky locations are largely the result of unresolved blazars, radio galaxies, and star-forming galaxies, and show that multiwavelength information can be used to reduce the degree to which such sources contaminate the otherwise blank sky. In particular, we show that masking regions of the sky that lie within 1° of sources contained in the BZCAT or CRATES catalogs reduce the fraction of blank sky locations with TS>8.7 by more than a factor of 2. Taking such multiwavelength information into account can enable experiments such as Fermi to better characterize their backgrounds and increase their sensitivity to dark matter in dwarf galaxies, the most important of which remain largely uncontaminated by unresolved point sources. We also note that for the range of dark matter masses and annihilation cross sections currently being tested by studies of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, simulations predict that Fermi should be able to detect a significant number of dark matter subhalos. These subhalos constitute a population of subthreshold gamma-ray point sources and represent an irreducible background for searches for dark matter annihilation in dwarf galaxies.

  8. Study of the weak annihilation contributions in charmless B{sub s} → VV decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Qin [Henan Normal University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Henan (China); Central China Normal University, Institute of Particle Physics and Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Wuhan, Hubei (China); Li, Xiaonan; Sun, Junfeng [Henan Normal University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Henan (China); Li, Xin-Qiang [Central China Normal University, Institute of Particle Physics and Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, in order to probe the spectator-scattering and weak annihilation contributions in charmless B{sub s} → VV (where V stands for a light vector meson) decays, we perform the χ{sup 2}-analyses for the endpoint parameters within the QCD factorization framework, under the constraints from the measured anti B{sub s} → ρ{sup 0}φ, φK{sup *0}, φφ and K{sup *0} anti K{sup *0} decays. The fitted results indicate that the endpoint parameters in the factorizable and nonfactorizable annihilation topologies are non-universal, which is also favored by the charmless B → PP and PV (where P stands for a light pseudo-scalar meson) decays observed in previous work. Moreover, the abnormal polarization fractions f{sub L,} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} (anti B{sub s} → K{sup *0} anti K{sup *0}) = (20.1±7.0)%, (58.4±8.5)% measured by the LHCb collaboration can be reconciled through the weak annihilation corrections. However, the branching ratio of anti B{sub s} → φK{sup *0} decay exhibits a tension between the data and theoretical result, which dominates the contributions to χ{sub min}{sup 2} in the fits. Using the fitted endpoint parameters, we update the theoretical results for the charmless B{sub s} → VV decays, which will be further tested by the LHCb and Belle-II experiments in the near future. (orig.)

  9. Collins effect in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering and in electron positron annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, A V; Schweitzer, P

    2006-01-01

    The Collins fragmentation function is extracted from HERMES data on azimuthal single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering, and BELLE data on azimuthal asymmetries in electron positron annihilations. A Gaussian model is assumed for the distribution of transverse parton momenta and predictions are used from the chiral quark-soliton model for the transversity distribution function. We find that the HERMES and BELLE data yield a consistent picture of the Collins fragmentation function which is compatible with COMPASS data and the information previously obtained from an analysis of DELPHI data. Estimates for future experiments are made.

  10. Positron annihilation and thermally stimulated current of electron beam irradiated polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Shigetaka; Shinyama, Katsuyoshi; Baba, Makoto [Hachinohe Inst. of Tech., Hachinohe, Aomori (Japan); Suzuki, Takenori

    1997-03-01

    Positron lifetime measurements were applied to electron beam irradiated poly(ether-ether-ketone). The lifetime, {tau}{sub 3}, of the ortho-positronium of unirradiated and 5 MGy irradiated specimen became rapidly longer above about 150degC. {tau}{sub 3} of 50 MGy and 100 MGy irradiated specimen was shorter than that of unirradiated one. Thermally stimulated current (TSC) decreased with increasing the dose before voltage application. In the case of voltage application, a TSC peak appeared and the peak value decreased with increased the dose. The correlation between the results of positron annihilation and TSC was investigated. (author)

  11. Direct photon production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W.T.; Qi, N.; Read A.L. Jr.; Smith, J.G.; Camporesi, T.; De Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H.T.; Hurst, R.B.; Sleeman, J.C.; Venuti, J.P.; Wald, H.B.; Weinstein, R.; Band, H.R.; Gettner, M.W.; Goderre, G.P.; Meyer, O.A.; Moromisato, J.H.; Shambroom, W.D.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W.W.; Chadwick, G.B.; Clearwater, S.H.; Coombes, R.W.; Kaye, H.S.; Lau, K.H.; Leedy, R.E.; Lynch, H.L.; Messner, R.L.; Moss, L.J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H.N.; Ritson, D.M.; Rosenberg, L.J.; Wiser, D.E.; Zdarko, R.W.; Groom, D.E.; Lee, H.Y.; Delfino, M.C.; Heltsley, B.K.; Johnson, J.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-01-14

    Direct photon production in hadronic events from e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation has been studied at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with use of the MAC detector at the PEP storage ring. A charge asymmetry A = (-12.3 +- 3.5)% is observed in the final-state jets. The cross section and the charge asymmetry are in good agreement with the predictions of the fractionally charged quark-parton model. Both the charge asymmetry and total yield have been used to determine values of quark charges. Limits have been established for anomalous sources of direct photons.

  12. NNLO QCD corrections to event orientation in e+e- annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrmann, T.; Glover, E. W. N.; Huss, A.; Niehues, J.; Zhang, H.

    2017-12-01

    We present a new implementation of the NNLO QCD corrections to three-jet final states and related event-shape observables in electron-positron annihilation. Our implementation is based on the antenna subtraction method, and is performed in the NNLOJET framework. The calculation improves upon earlier results by taking into account the full kinematical information on the initial state momenta, thereby allowing the event orientation to be computed to NNLO accuracy. We find the event-orientation distributions at LEP and SLC to be very robust under higher order QCD corrections.

  13. General calculation of the cross section for dark matter annihilations into two photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Rivera, Andres

    2017-03-01

    Assuming that the underlying model satisfies some general requirements such as renormalizability and CP conservation, we calculate the non-relativistic one-loop cross section for any self-conjugate dark matter particle annihilating into two photons. We accomplish this by carefully classifying all possible one-loop diagrams and, from them, reading off the dark matter interactions with the particles running in the loop. Our approach is general and leads to the same results found in the literature for popular dark matter candidates such as the neutralinos of the MSSM, minimal dark matter, inert Higgs and Kaluza-Klein dark matter.

  14. J-PET detector system for studies of the electron-positron annihilations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlik-Niedźwiecka M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET has been recently constructed at the Jagiellonian University as a prototype of a cost-effective scanner for the metabolic imaging of the whole human body. J-PET detector is optimized for the measurement of momentum and polarization of photons from the electron-positron annihilations. It is built out of strips of plastic scintillators, forming three cylindrical layers. As detector of gamma quanta it will be used for studies of discrete symmetries and multiparticle entanglement of photons originating from the decays of ortho-positronium atoms.

  15. Application of the Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy for Chromium Effect Investigation in Binary Fe-Cr Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sojak, S.; Krsjak, V.; Slugen, V.; Stancek, S.; Petriska, M.; Vitazek, K.; Stacho, M. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2008-07-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is one of the non-destructive techniques applied with advantage for evaluation of the radiation treated materials microstructure. In this work, the PAS was used for study of different Fe-Cr alloys implanted by ions of helium. Investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistance. In particular, the vacancy type defects (mono-vacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. The results show that the specific content of chromium has important influence on the size and distribution of induced defects. (authors)

  16. Study of antiproton annihilation on neutrons into $\\omega\\pi^{-} \\pi^{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Case, A; Credé, V; Crowe, K M; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; Meyer, C A; Meyer-Wildhagen, F; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Reinnarth, J; Sarantsev, A V; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Uman, I; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K

    2004-01-01

    Data are presented on antiproton neutron annihilation at rest into omega pi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/ taken with the Crystal Barrel detector at LEAR (CERN) using a liquid deuterium target. The partial wave analysis shows evidence for at least two omega pi vector resonances above the rho (770) ground-state. Possible evidence for a third rho ' state with a mass around 1180 MeV is discussed. The results are compared to model dependent predictions concerning the nature of the rho ' states. (35 refs).

  17. Chemical analysis of precipitates in metallic alloys using coincidence Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2000-01-01

    Two-detector coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) method of positron annihilation radiation is applied to the study of precipitates in metals. As the first step, the CDB spectra for many kinds of elements are measured to obtain the 'fingerprint' of each element for the chemical analysis of the precipitates in metals. Utilizing the fingerprint of Cu, we made chemical analysis of nano-particles formed in the initial stage of thermal aging in a Fe-Cu alloy, and found that the particles are consisting of Cu only and free from vacancies, which demonstrates the usefulness of this method in the study of the precipitates.

  18. New data on OZI rule violation in $\\overline{P}P$ annihilation at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, A.; De Castro, S.; Feretti, A.; Galli, D.; Giacobbe, B.; Marconi, U.; Poli, M.; Piccinini, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Spighi, R.; Vecchi, S.; Vezzani, A.; Vigotti, F.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Zoccoli, A.; Belli, G.; Corradini, M.; Donzella, A.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Venturelli, L.; Zenoni, A.; Cicalo, C.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Temnikov, P.P.; Usai, G.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Gorchakov, O.E.; Nomokonov, V.P.; Prakhov, S.N.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Tretyak, V.I.; Gianotti, P.; Guaraldo, C.; Lanaro, A.; Lucherini, V.; Nichitiu, F.; Petrascu, C.; Rosca, A.; Ableev, V.G.; Cavion, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Lombardi, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Morando, M.; Bendiscioli, G.; Filippini, V.; Fontana, A.; Montagna, P.; Rotondi, A.; Saino, A.; Salvini, P.; Balestra, F.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bussa, M.P.; Busso, L.; Calvo, D.; Cerello, P.; Costa, S.; Fava, L.; Feliciello, A.; Ferrero, L.; Filippi, A.; Garfagnini, R.; Grasso, A.; D'Isep, D.; Maggiora, A.; Marcello, S.; Panzieri, D.; Parena, D.; Rossetto, E.; Tosello, F.; Zosi, G.; Agnello, M.; Iazzi, F.; Minetti, B.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Pauli, G.; Tessaro, S.; Santi, L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of a measurement of the ratio R =3D Y(phi pi+ pi-) / Y(omega = pi+ pi-) for antiproton annihilation at rest in a gaseous and in a liquid hydrogen target are presented. It was found that the value of this ratio increases with the decreasing of the dipion mass, which demonstrates the difference in the phi and omega production mechanisms. An indication on the momentum transfer dependence of the apparent OZI rule violation for phi production from the 3S1 initial state was found.

  19. Positron annihilation in structural vacancies in Al-rich NiAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, A.L.; Leon, L.A.; Raigoza, N.; Duque, C.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia); Kuriplach, J. [Department of Low Temperature Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Hou, M. [Physique des Solides Irradies et des Nanostructures, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-07-01

    Positron annihilation in structural vacancies in B2 Al-rich NiAl alloys is studied theoretically. For this purpose we use the atomic superposition method combined with molecular dynamics employed for relaxations of random vacancy configurations. We found that the defect lifetime decreases with the increasing Ni vacancy concentration. Calculated positron lifetimes are discussed in terms of the 'vacancy-superstructure' effect and compared with experimental positron lifetime data available. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Study of the ortho-positron annihilation process in zeolite Y; Estudio del proceso de aniquilacion de ortopositronio en zeolita Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado D, M. E.

    2010-07-01

    For several years a great interest has existed for the study of the natural and synthetic zeolites due to its properties. The porosity, one of their main characteristics allows that these materials are used as molecular sieves, catalysts, gases drying, etc. In order to investigating the porosity and other zeolite properties one carries out the study of the process of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (Pals). This is a technique that provides information about the size and the pores form since is highly sensitive to the free volume and the superficial area of those porous materials as the zeolites. The study began with the elaboration of zeolite Y tablets in a hydraulic press where different pressures (from 0 to 1.26 GPa) and masses (70, 80 and 100 mg) were proven to obtain the estimate porosity of each tablet. A graph was elaborated and the effect of the mass and pressure with regard to the zeolite porosity was analyzed. Later on, the powder and tablets of 70 mg were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (the glass size, interplanar distance, length and the volume of the unitary cell); scanning electron microscopy (the particles size and morphology); thermo gravimetric analysis (dehydration temperature and the stability up to 700 C) and the Brunauer Emmett Teller method (specific area). After the zeolite Y tablets characterization was carried out the positron annihilation process by means of Pals where its free volume of zeolite Y was analyzed, which includes to the structural cavities and the interparticle volume. The powdered zeolite was analyzed to different experimental conditions (preparation of the sample and the Pals equipment) to obtain the optimal conditions (a window with a time of 400 ns and a enlarged energy window) of analysis. On the other hand, the tablets were analyzed under optimal conditions to obtain the four components of time and intensity ({tau}, {Iota}), result of the different ways of positrons annihilation in the zeolite

  1. Non-relativistic pair annihilation of nearly mass degenerate neutralinos and charginos III. Computation of the Sommerfeld enhancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneke, M.; Hellmann, C. [Physik Department T31, Technische Universität München,James-Franck-Straße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen University,D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Ruiz-Femenía, P. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de València,Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-05-22

    This paper concludes the presentation of the non-relativistic effective field theory formalism designed to calculate the radiative corrections that enhance the pair-annihilation cross sections of slowly moving neutralinos and charginos within the general minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). While papers I and II focused on the computation of the tree-level annihilation rates that feed into the short-distance part, here we describe in detail the method to obtain the Sommerfeld factors that contain the enhanced long-distance corrections. This includes the computation of the potential interactions in the MSSM, which are provided in compact analytic form, and a novel solution of the multi-state Schrödinger equation that is free from the numerical instabilities generated by large mass splittings between the scattering states. Our results allow for a precise computation of the MSSM neutralino dark matter relic abundance and pair-annihilation rates in the present Universe, when Sommerfeld enhancements are important.

  2. Vacancy-type defects in bulk GaN grown by the Na-flux method probed using positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uedono, Akira; Imanishi, Masayuki; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Ishibashi, Shoji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Mori, Yusuke

    2017-10-01

    Defects in bulk GaN grown by the Na-flux method have been studied using a positron annihilation technique. Pyramidal bulk samples showed striation and inhomogeneous color distributions. Measurements of the Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation and lifetime spectra of positrons revealed that the concentration of vacancy-type defects increased with decreasing transparency of the samples. The major defect species was identified as a Ga vacancy coupled with nitrogen vacancies. A correlation between the oxygen incorporation and the introduction of such vacancies was observed. For c-plane GaN grown by a coalescence growth method, the concentration of vacancy-type defects was close to or under the detection limit of positron annihilation technique (≤1015cm-3), suggesting that high-quality bulk GaN can be fabricated using this method.

  3. First-principles calculations of momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs in defects in UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2017-01-01

    We performed first-principles calculations of the momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs in vacancies in uranium dioxide. Full atomic relaxation effects (due to both electronic and positronic forces) were taken into account and self-consistent two-component density functional theory schemes were used. We present one-dimensional momentum distributions (Doppler-broadened annihilation radiation line shapes) along with line-shape parameters S and W. We studied the effect of the charge state of the defect on the Doppler spectra. The effect of krypton incorporation in the vacancy was also considered and it was shown that it should be possible to observe the fission gas incorporation in defects in UO2 using positron annihilation spectroscopy. We suggest that the Doppler broadening measurements can be especially useful for studying impurities and dopants in UO2 and of mixed actinide oxides.

  4. Fear of self-annihilation and existential uncertainty as predictors of worldview defense: Comparing terror management and uncertainty theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark

    2017-06-14

    Terror management theory (TMT) proposes that thoughts of death trigger a concern about self-annihilation that motivates the defense of cultural worldviews. In contrast, uncertainty theorists propose that thoughts of death trigger feelings of uncertainty that motivate worldview defense. University students (N = 414) completed measures of the chronic fear of self-annihilation and existential uncertainty as well as the need for closure. They then evaluated either a meaning threat stimulus or a control stimulus. Consistent with TMT, participants with a high fear of self-annihilation and a high need for closure showed the greatest dislike of the meaning threat stimulus, even after controlling for their existential uncertainty. Contrary to the uncertainty perspective, fear of existential uncertainty showed no significant effects.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of titania nanorods from ilmenite for photocatalytic annihilation of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Diptipriya; Jada, Naresh; Kumar, Rohit; Ramasamy, Sakthivel; Pandey, Sony; Das, Trupti; Kalidoss, Jayasankar; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Tiwari, Ashish

    2014-11-01

    Titania nanorod structures have been obtained by thermal plasma reduction of ilmenite (FeTiO₃) followed by chemical treatments. Inherently present iron in the titania nanorods acts as a dopant which results in shifting the absorption edge of titania from ultraviolet to visible region. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study confirms the existence of rutile phase of titania. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the presence of Ti(4+), O(2-), Fe(3+) and surface hydroxyl group. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) confirms the formation of nanorod structure having width of 6 nm and length of 32 nm. Photocatalytic annihilation property of titania nanorods derived from ilmenite (titania-I), rutile titania obtained from titanium(IV) butoxide (titania-A) and Degussa P25 titania was studied under UV and UV-Visible irradiation conditions separately and compared. The time required for complete photocatalytic annihilation of Escherichiacoli cells are 10, 15 and 45 min under UV irradiation whereas it has taken 15, 10-15, 30 min under UV-Visible irradiation for titania-A, Degussa P25 titania and titania-I respectively. It is observed that titania-I shows significantly stronger antibacterial property under UV-Visible irradiation compared to UV alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Isotope Effects on Delayed Annihilation Time Spectra of Antiprotonic Helium Atoms in Low-Temperature Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Ketzer, B; Daniel, H; Von Egidy, T; Niestroj, A; Schmid, S; Schmid, W; Yamazaki, T; Sugai, I; Nakayoshi, K; Hayano, R S; Maas, F E; Torii, H A; Ishikawa, T; Tamura, H; Morita, N; Horváth, D; Eades, John; Widmann, E

    1996-01-01

    The delayed annihilation time spectra (DATS) of antiprotonic helium atoms have been studied in isotopically pure low temperature ^3He and ^4He gas at various densities. The DATS taken at 5.8~K and 400~mbar are very similar in shape except for i) a small difference in the time scale and ii) the presence of a distinct fast decay component in the case of ^3He. The ratio of overall trapping times (mean lifetimes against annihilation), R = T_{\\mathrm{trap}}(\\mbox{^{4}He})/T_{\\mathrm{trap}}(\\mbox{^{3}He}), has been determined to be 1.144 \\pm 0.009, which is in good agreement with a theoretical estimate yielding R = [(M^*(\\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{4}He})/ M^*(\\mbox{\\overline{ \\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{3}He})]^2=1.14, where M^* denotes the reduced mass of the \\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{He^{++}}\\ system. The presence of a short-lived component with a lifetime of (0.154\\pm 0.007)\\ \\mbox{\\mus} in the case of \\mbox{^{3}He}\\ suggests that the \\mbox{\\overline{\\mathrm{p}}}\\mbox{^{3}He^{+}}\\ atom has a state of in...

  7. CP violation induced by the double resonance for pure annihilation decay process in perturbative QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue, Gang; Li, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Yu-Ting [Henan University of Technology, College of Science, Zhengzhou (China); Lu, Ye [Guangxi Normal University, Department of Physics, Guilin (China)

    2017-08-15

    In a perturbative QCD approach we study the direct CP violation in the pure annihilation decay process of anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -} induced by the ρ and ω double resonance effect. Generally, the CP violation is small in the pure annihilation type decay process. However, we find that the CP violation can be enhanced by double ρ-ω interference when the invariant masses of the π{sup +}π{sup -} pairs are in the vicinity of the ω resonance. For the decay process of anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -}, the CP violation can reach A{sub CP}(anti B{sup 0}{sub s} → π{sup +}π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup -}) = 27.20{sup +0.05+0.28+7.13}{sub -0.15-0.31-6.11}%. (orig.)

  8. Transverse parton momenta in single inclusive hadron production in e+e- annihilation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglione, M.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J. O.; Taghavi, R.

    2017-09-01

    We study the transverse momentum distributions of single inclusive hadron production in e+e- annihilation processes. Although the only available experimental data are scarce and quite old, we find that the fundamental features of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) evolution, historically addressed in Drell-Yan processes and, more recently, in Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes, are visible in e+e- annihilations as well. Interesting effects related to its non-perturbative regime can be observed. We test two different parameterizations for the p⊥ dependence of the cross section: the usual Gaussian distribution and a power-law model. We find the latter to be more appropriate in describing this particular set of experimental data, over a relatively large range of p⊥ values. We use this model to map some of the features of the data within the framework of TMD evolution, and discuss the caveats of this and other possible interpretations, related to the one-dimensional nature of the available experimental data.

  9. Vacancy profile in reverse osmosis membranes studied by positron annihilation lifetime measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, A.; Goto, H.; Shintani, T.; Hirose, M.; Suzuki, R.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The positron annihilation technique using a slow positron beam can be used for the study of the vacancy profiles in typical reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this study, the vacancy profile in the polyamide membrane that exhibits a high permselectivity between ions and water was studied using the positron annihilation technique and molecular dynamics simulations. Ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetimes in the surface region of the membranes were evaluated by using a slow positron beam. The diffusion behavior of Na+ and water in the polyamides was simulated by molecular dynamics (MD) methods using the TSUBAME2 supercomputer at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and discussed with the vacancy profile probed by the o-Ps. The results suggested that the large hydration size of Na+ compared to the vacancy size in the polyamides contributes to the increased diffusivity selectivity of water/Na+ that is related to the NaCl desalination performance of the membrane. Both the hydration size of the ions and the vacancy size appeared to be significant parameters to discuss the diffusivity selectivity of water/ions in typical polyamide membranes.

  10. Investigations on variation of defects in fused silica with different annealing atmospheres using positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Yilan; Liu, Jiandang; Gu, Bingchuan; Jiang, Xiaolong; Bai, Yang; Zhang, Chuanchao; Wang, Haijun; Luan, Xiaoyu; Ye, Bangjiao; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liao, Wei

    2017-10-01

    The laser damage resistance properties of the fused silica can be influenced by the microstructure variation of the atom-size intrinsic defects and voids in bulk silica. Two positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques have been used to investigate the microstructure variation of the vacancy clusters and the structure voids in the polishing redeposition layer and the defect layer of fused silica after annealing in different atmospheres. The fused silica samples were isothermally annealed at 1000 K for 3 h in a furnace under an air atmosphere, a vacuum atmosphere and a hydrogen atmosphere, respectively. The positron annihilation results show that ambient oxygen atmosphere only affects the surface of the fused silica (about 300 nm depth) due to the large volume and low diffusion coefficient of the oxygen atom. However, hydrogen atoms can penetrate into the defect layer inside the fused silica and then have an influence on vacancy defects and vacancy clusters, while having no effect on the large voids. Besides, research results indicate that an annealing process can reduce the size and concentration of vacancy clusters. The obtained data can provide important information for understanding the laser damage mechanism and improving laser damage resistance properties of the fused silica optics.

  11. Annihilation rates of 3D2(2--) and 3D3(3--) heavy quarkonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianhong; Fu, Hui-Feng; Jiang, Yue; Li, Qiang; Wang, Guo-Li

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the annihilation decay rates of the 3D 2(2--) and 3D 3(3--) charmonia and bottomonia by using the instantaneous Bethe-Salpeter (BS) method. The wave functions of states with quantum numbers JPC = 2-- and 3-- are constructed. By solving the corresponding instantaneous BS equations, we obtain the mass spectra and wave functions of the quarkonia. The annihilation amplitude is written within Mandelstam formalism and the relativistic corrections are taken into account properly. This is important, especially for high excited states, since their relativistic corrections are large. The results for the 3g channel are as follows: Γ13D2(cc¯)→ggg = 9.24 keV, Γ13D3(cc¯)→ggg = 25.0 keV, Γ13D2(bb¯)→ggg = 1.87 keV and Γ13D3(bb¯)→ggg = 0.815 keV.

  12. Dedicated Searches for Low and High Mass Wimps with the SuperCDMS Soudan iZIP Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welliver, Bradford [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Recent cosmological evidence suggests most of the mass of the universe takes the form of a type of particle that we have not been able to directly detect. Nearly 80 years that have elapsed since the rst hints of this dark matter started to appear from astronomers without any direct detection. The high precision era of cosmology and unifying models of particle physics developed in the 20 th century have presented us with an exciting mystery at the intersection of these two elds that needs to be solved. SuperCDMS Soudan operates specialized germanium detectors (iZIPs) that are cooled to milliKelvin temperatures deep underground in the Soudan Underground Laboratory with the hope of detecting a rare collision between dark matter and a nucleus. A search for low-mass dark matter comes with multiple unique challenges since the background discrimination abilities of these detectors becomes less powerful at the low energies needed to probe low-mass dark matter since the signal to noise ratio deteriorates. Using a sophisticated background model via a pulse rescaling technique, SuperCDMS Soudan was able to produce a world leading exclusion limit on low-mass dark matter. Effort is to extend the analysis to higher masses require long running times during which many aspects of the detectors or the environment can change. Additional challenges are offered by the powerful background discrimination ability of the iZIP. The background distributions are well separated from the signal region, meaning most of the leakage arises from low-probability tails of the background distributions. In the absence of an enormous dataset, extrapolations from the bulk of the distribution are required. While attempting to obtain a model of gamma induced electron-recoils leaking into the signal region of the detector from high radius a curious asymmetry between the sides of the detectors was discovered potentially indicating an electronics or detector design problem. This thesis describes the physics

  13. Generalized 3P 0 and 3S 1 annihilation potentials for overlinepp decay into two mesons based on a simple quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathas, George; Kloet, W. M.

    1993-03-01

    Within the quark model a generalization is proposed of the commonly used annihilation potential to describe antiproton- proton annihilation into two mesons, the so-called 3P 0 and 3S 1 mechanisms. This generalized potential treats the two mechanisms in a more symmetric way, has additional angular dependence, and results in an expanded set of selection rules.

  14. Thermal desorption gas chromatography and positron annihilation spectroscopy, contribution to alpha decay studies in actinide-doped matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudil, D.; Jegou, C.; Vella, F.; Folch, B.; Broudic, V. [Commissariat a l' energie Atomique, Rhone Valley Research Center, 30200 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Pik, R. [CNRS-CRPG, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Barthe, M. F. [CNRS-CEMHTI, 45071 Orleans (France); Cuney, M. [Universite de Nancy, CNRS, CREGU, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Pipon, Y. [IPNL CNRS, IN2P3 UMR 5822, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2009-07-01

    A thermal desorption system coupled with a gas analyzer has been adapted and nuclearized to investigate He behavior in actinide-doped samples used to simulate alpha decay aging. This technique widely used in standard laboratories allows measurements of the helium balance and reduced diffusion coefficients, and a preliminary evaluation of helium locations (related to defects and thermal annealing). In our system implemented in a hot cell, small samples are annealed at up to 1100 C degrees in controlled atmosphere. They are inserted in a 10 to 20 cm{sup 3} vessel connected to a micro gas chromatography detector. Initial system calibration allowed concentration measurements within about 10%. Comparisons with the CNRS/CRPG rare gas analysis laboratory at Nancy (France) were applied on natural uranium oxides originating from Oklo (Gabon) and Mistamisk (Canada). The latest results obtained on Mistamisk samples are in good agreement, with a maximum relative deviation of 14%. The data were used to determine the activation energy of about 1 eV.at{sup -1}. On (U,Pu)O{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} samples the experiments highlight the impact of defects (up to 100 dpa) on He mobility. The defect population must now be characterized to improve our knowledge of He/defect interactions and mechanisms. In addition and synergy to the macroscopic release measurements by gas chromatography, positron annihilation spectroscopy, an effective nondestructive technique for vacancy defect investigation, was also developed and nuclearized in our hot cell laboratory as part of a project supported by the NOMADE and MATINEX research groups. Specific protocols for doped sample analysis were also developed and validated with UO{sub 2} and (U,Pu)O{sub 2} samples. (authors)

  15. Particle tracking at 4 K: The Fast Annihilation Cryogenic Tracking (FACT) detector for the AEgIS antimatter gravity experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storey, J., E-mail: james.storey@cern.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Canali, C. [University of Zurich, Physics Institute, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ahlén, O. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Belov, A.S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bräunig, P. [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bremer, J. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Brusa, R.S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento and INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Burghart, G. [European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Physics Department, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cabaret, L. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, ENS Cachan, Bâtiment 505, Campus d' Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Carante, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Caravita, R. [University of Milano, Department of Physics, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2013-12-21

    The AEgIS experiment is an international collaboration with the main goal of performing the first direct measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter. Critical to the success of AEgIS is the production of cold antihydrogen (H{sup ¯}) atoms. The FACT detector is used to measure the production and temperature of the H{sup ¯} atoms and for establishing the formation of a H{sup ¯} beam. The operating requirements for this detector are very challenging: it must be able to identify each of the thousand or so annihilations in the 1 ms period of pulsed H{sup ¯} production, operate at 4 K inside a 1 T solenoidal field and not produce more than 10 W of heat. The FACT detector consists of two concentric cylindrical layers of 400 scintillator fibres with a 1 mm diameter and a 0.6 mm pitch. The scintillating fibres are coupled to clear fibres which transport the scintillation light to 800 silicon photomultipliers. Each silicon photomultiplier signal is connected to a linear amplifier and a fast discriminator, the outputs of which are sampled continuously by Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). In the course of the developments for the FACT detector we have established the performance of scintillating fibres at 4 K by means of a cosmic-ray tracker operating in a liquid helium cryostat. The FACT detector was installed in the AEgIS apparatus in December 2012 and will be used to study the H{sup ¯} formation when the low energy antiproton physics programs resume at CERN in the Summer of 2014. This paper presents the design requirements and construction methods of the FACT detector and provides the first results of the detector commissioning.

  16. Production of charged pions, kaons and protons in e+e- annihilations into hadrons at sqrt{s} = 10.54 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J P

    2013-01-01

    Inclusive production cross sections of $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$ and $p\\bar{p}$ in $e^+e^-$ annihilations are measured at a center-of-mass energy of 10.54 GeV, using a relatively small sample of very high quality data from the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II $B$-factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The drift chamber and Cherenkov detector provide clean samples of identified $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$ and $p\\bar{p}$ over a wide range of momenta. Since the center-of-mass energy is below the threshold to produce a $B\\bar{B}$ pair, with $B$ a bottom-quark meson, these data represent a pure $e^+e^- \\rightarrow q\\bar{q}$ sample with four quark flavors, and are used to test QCD predictions and hadronization models. Combined with measurements at other energies, in particular at the $Z^0$ resonance, they also provide precise constraints on the scaling properties of the hadronization process over a wide energy range.

  17. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, Pavel A., E-mail: andreevpa@physics.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    We discuss the complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider the contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in the spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider the propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider the oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive the set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory to the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate the contribution of the Darwin and annihilation interactions in the Landau damping of the Langmuir waves. We should mention that the annihilation interaction does not change number of particles in the system. It does not related to annihilation itself, but it exists as a result of interaction of an electron-positron pair via conversion of the pair into virtual photon. A pair of the non-linear Schrodinger equations for the electron-positron plasmas including the Darwin and annihilation interactions is derived. Existence of the conserving helicity in electron-positron quantum plasmas of spinning particles with the Darwin and annihilation interactions is demonstrated. We show that the annihilation interaction plays an important role in the quantum electron-positron plasmas giving the contribution of the same magnitude as the spin-spin interaction.

  18. Characterization of control mesoporous glasses (CPGs) using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayed Ahmed, Essmat Mahmoud Hassan

    2008-01-30

    This thesis has two main goals. Firstly and for the first time, the positron annihilation lifetime technique (PALS) is used to characterize the control porous glasses (CPGs) media. All the positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) investigations have been interested in the commercial Vycor glass media of pores size {<=} 4 nm. Therefore, the PALS is used to establish basic correlations between the important physical properties of the CPG (pore size, surface area, and porosity) and the orthopositronium (o-Ps) lifetime. The second goal is to use these correlations to verify the validity of some suggested models and theories to discover possible deviations from the expected behaviour and to discuss the physical point of view for these deviations. Chapter 1 presents an overview of positron, positronium and their interaction with solid materials. Chapter 2 of this thesis is concerned with characterization of porous glass materials. This chapter discusses in detail the preparation methods of porous glasses specially control porous glass and Vycor glass. The gas adsorption phenomenon in porous glass and the related definitions are discussed. The most important terms of the porous glass such as pore size, shape, volume, pore size distribution, surface area, and porosity are discussed. Chapter 3 presents in detail the well known models and the derived equations which correlate between the lifetime of the o-Ps long-lived component and the pore size, pore shape and the temperature dependence of the porous media. Chapter 4 presents an overview of the main experimental techniques used in this thesis, namely positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Chapter 5 explains the sample preparation for the measurements. The chapter represents also the experimental data for the correlation between the o-Ps lifetime and pore sizes for a system of CPG media (from 1 nm to 64 nm). I also studied the temperature dependence of the o-Ps long-lived component in different pore sizes. In this

  19. Precipitation of Silicon in a Solid Quenched Aluminium- ilicon (1.3 at yo) Alloy Studied by Positron Annihilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seegers, D.; Van Mourik, P.; Van Wijngaarden, M.H.; Rao, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    Doppler broadening of the positron annihilation line was measured for quenched and aged specimens of an aluminium-silicon (1.29 at%Si) alloy. One set of specimens was aged at room temperature (set A) and one set was isochronally (t = 30 min) aged at temperatures ranging from 347 to 884 K (set B).

  20. Temperature dependence of o-Ps annihilation lifetime in non-uniform cylindrical pores in comparison with ETE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaghani, Morteza, E-mail: m.khaghani@pgs.usb.ac.ir; Mehmandoost-Khajeh-Dad, Ali Akbar, E-mail: mehmandoost@phys.usb.ac.ir

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Using the well known multi-physics program COMSOL calculating o-Ps annihilation lifetime in complex geometries. • Investigation of shape non-uniformity of cylindrical pores on o-Ps annihilation lifetime. • Verifying temperature dependency of o-Ps lifetime in non-uniform cylindrical pores. • Suggesting PALS at low temperature as a method to verify pore uniformity in porous material. - Abstract: Ortho-positronium (o-Ps) annihilation lifetime was calculated in non-uniform cylinder-shaped pores by solving Schrodinger equation using a well-known multi-physics program called COMSOL. The o-Ps annihilation lifetime variation in terms of temperature was calculated on the basis of ETE model via a numerical method. The COMSOL simulations indicate that as long as the pore is uniform cylinder-shaped, the results agree with those of two-dimensional ETE model, whereas deformations in the cylinder shape (indentation or protrusion) change the temperature behavior of ETE model and, thereby, higher values are predicted for o-Ps lifetime in the pore at lower temperatures. The geometry of the non-uniform cylinder-shaped pores, which is accompanied by empirical evidence, can be used for the analysis of empirical results obtained from positron lifetime spectroscopy in different temperatures.

  1. 3D-AP and positron annihilation study of precipitation behavior in Cu-Cr-Zr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatakeyama, M.; Toyama, T.; Yang, J.

    2009-01-01

    Precipitation behavior in a Cu-0.78%Cr-0.13%Zr alloy during aging and reaging has been studied by laser-assisted local electrode three-dimensional atom probe (Laser-LEAP) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). After the prime aging at 460 degrees C, Cr clusters enriched with Zr were observed...

  2. Survivorship of male and female Bactrocera dorsalis in the field and the effect of male annihilation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male Annihilation Technique (MAT) is a key component of the Oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae) management because of the “strong” attraction of males to the lure methyl eugenol. The optimal application density for MAT has not been investigated for this economically ...

  3. The Characterization of the Gamma-Ray Signal from the Central Milky Way: A Compelling Case for Annihilating Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daylan, Tansu [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Finkbeiner, Douglas P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Linden, Tim [Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Portillo, Stephen K. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center, Cambridge, MA (United States); Rodd, Nicholas L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, MA (United States); Slatyer, Tracy R. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-02-26

    Past studies have identified a spatially extended excess of ~1-3 GeV gamma rays from the region surrounding the Galactic Center, consistent with the emission expected from annihilating dark matter. We revisit and scrutinize this signal with the intention of further constraining its characteristics and origin. By applying cuts to the Fermi event parameter CTBCORE, we suppress the tails of the point spread function and generate high resolution gamma-ray maps, enabling us to more easily separate the various gamma-ray components. Within these maps, we find the GeV excess to be robust and highly statistically significant, with a spectrum, angular distribution, and overall normalization that is in good agreement with that predicted by simple annihilating dark matter models. For example, the signal is very well fit by a 31-40 GeV dark matter particle annihilating to b quarks with an annihilation cross section of sigma v = (1.4-2.0) x 10^-26 cm^3/s (normalized to a local dark matter density of 0.3 GeV/cm^3). Furthermore, we confirm that the angular distribution of the excess is approximately spherically symmetric and centered around the dynamical center of the Milky Way (within ~0.05 degrees of Sgr A*), showing no sign of elongation along or perpendicular to the Galactic Plane. The signal is observed to extend to at least 10 degrees from the Galactic Center, disfavoring the possibility that this emission originates from millisecond pulsars.

  4. Asymmetric dark matter: residual annihilations and self-interactions arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Baldes, Iason; Panci, Paolo; Petraki, Kalliopi; Sala, Filippo; Taoso, Marco

    The putative discrepancies between observations of the small scale galactic structure and the predictions of collisionless cold dark matter may be resolved if dark matter possesses sizable self-interactions. The coupling of dark matter to a light force mediator can ensure sufficiently large self-interactions, reproduce the observed relic abundance via freeze-out and satisfy constraints from cluster mergers and direct detection. However, strong bounds on such scenarios still arise from indirect detection, particularly from the CMB and $\\gamma$-rays observations. As a simple way to alleviate this tension, we consider the possibility of dark matter possessing a particle-antiparticle asymmetry. First, we point out that, contrary to the common perception, significant residual annihilations occur even for highly asymmetric dark matter coupled to light force carriers. We compute the indirect detection signals and corresponding constraints from the CMB, $\\gamma$-ray, neutrino and antiproton searches. On this basis, w...

  5. Evidence for confinement induced phase separation in ethanol–water mixture: a positron annihilation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthulakshmi, T.; Dutta, D.; Maheshwari, Priya; Pujari, P. K.

    2018-01-01

    We report an experimental evidence for the phase separation of ethanol–water mixture confined in mesoporous silica with different pore size using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). A bulk-like liquid in the core of the pore and a distinct interfacial region near the pore surface have been identified based on ortho-positronium lifetime components. The lifetime corresponding to the core liquid shows similar behavior to the bulk liquid mixture while the interfacial lifetime shows an abrupt rise within a particular range of ethanol concentration depending on the pore size. This abrupt increase is attributed to the appearance of excess free-volume near the interfacial region. The excess free-volume is originated due to microphase separation of confined ethanol–water primarily at the vicinity of the pore wall. We envisage that probing free-volume changes at the interface using PALS is a sensitive way to investigate microphase separation under nanoconfinement.

  6. Massive lepton pair production in hadronic collisions. [Review, Drell-Yan quark annihilation, scaling violations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.L.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of theoretical attempts to describe the massive lepton pair continuum produced in hadronic collisions. Beginning with the classical Drell-Yan quark-antiquark annihilation model, its expectations are compared with data. Scaling violations and corrections to the Drell-Yan pictured are discussed. Next, original work is presented bearing on the understanding of the transverse momentum distributions of the dileptons. In a parton model, the quark-gluon scattering graphs which provide scaling violations also endow the dileptons with relatively large (P/sub T/). Comparisons with available data support these QCD expectations; further tests of the QCD predictions are proposed. Implications are drawn for W production experiments, and predictions are presented for reactions initiated by antiprotons.

  7. The precipitation process in Mg-Ca-(Zn) alloys investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Yanicet [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: yanicet@fis.ucm.es; Monge, Miguel Angel; Pareja, Ramiro [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2008-09-08

    Coincidence doppler broadening (CDB) spectroscopy has been applied to study the precipitation process induced by aging in Mg-1.0 wt.% Ca and Mg-1.0 wt.% Ca-1.0 wt.% Zn alloys. In addition positron lifetime experiments and microhardness measurements have been performed. A peak centered at {approx}11.5 x 10{sup -3}m{sub 0}c is found in the CDB ratio spectra of the alloys aged at 473 K. It is attributed to annihilations with the core electrons of Ca. The results indicate the formation of a particle dispersion that hardens the alloys. This dispersion is correlated with the appearance of the peak attributed to Ca atoms. Zn atoms in the Mg matrix inhibit the formation of quenched-in vacancies bound to Ca atoms in the aged ternary alloy producing the dispersion refinement.

  8. Analyzing the scalar top co-annihilation region at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carena, M.; /Fermilab; Finch, A.; /Lancaster U.; Freitas, A.; Milstene, C.; /Fermilab; Nowak, H.; /DESY, Zeuthen; Sopczak, A.; /Lancaster U.

    2005-08-01

    The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model opens the possibility of electroweak baryogenesis provided that the light scalar top quark (stop) is lighter than the top quark. In addition, the lightest neutralino is an ideal candidate to explain the existence of dark matter. For a light stop with mass close to the lightest neutralino, the stop-neutralino co-annihilation mechanism becomes efficient, thus rendering the predicted dark matter density compatible with observations. Such a stop may however remain elusive at hadron colliders. Here it is shown that a future linear collider provides a unique opportunity to detect and study the light stop. The production of stops with small stop-neutralino mass differences is studied in a detailed experimental analysis with a realistic detector simulation including a CCD vertex detector for flavor tagging. Furthermore, the linear collider, by precision measurements of superpartner masses and mixing angles, also allows to determine the dark matter relic density with an accuracy comparable to recent astrophysical observations.

  9. Generalized threshold resummation for semi-inclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Presti, N.A.; Vogt, A. [Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Almasy, A.A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Recently methods have been developed to extend the resummation of large-x double logarithms in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) to terms not addressed by the soft-gluon exponentiation. Here we briefly outline our approach based on fixed-order results, the general large-x structure in dimensional regularization and the all-order factorization of mass singularities, which is directly applicable also to semi-inclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation (SIA). We then present some main results for the corresponding timelike splitting functions and transverse and longitudinal fragmentation functions. The close relation between DIS and SIA facilitates the determination of additional third-order results for the latter function which is fully known only at the next-to-leading order. Therefore all above quantities can be resummed at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. (orig.)

  10. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Sótér, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Barna, D.; Horváth, D.; Hori, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons (ASACUSA) experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 x 1 mm^2. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ~ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen a...

  11. Spatially resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy on friction stir weld induced defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Karin; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Pikart, Philip; Böni, Peter

    2010-04-01

    A friction stir welded (FSW) Al alloy sample was investigated by Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) of the positron annihilation line. The spatially resolved defect distribution showed that the material in the joint zone becomes completely annealed during the welding process at the shoulder of the FSW tool, whereas at the tip, annealing is prevailed by the deterioration of the material due to the tool movement. This might be responsible for the increased probability of cracking in the heat affected zone of friction stir welds. Examination of a material pairing of steel S235 and the Al alloy Silafont36 by coincident Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) indicates the formation of annealed steel clusters in the Al alloy component of the sample. The clear visibility of Fe in the CDB spectra is explained by the very efficient trapping at the interface between steel cluster and bulk.

  12. Limits on compositeness of quarks and leptons from e+e- annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroha, Hubert

    1990-06-01

    Data of the CELLO experiment on pair production of electrons, muons, taus, and heavy quarks are investigated in terms of compositeness. CELLO performs simultaneously measurements of the differential cross sections for c(c bar) and b(b bar) production e+e- annihilation. Different methods are compared for treating the common normalization errors of the data points when fitting the predicted cross sections. Difficulties in the interpretation of experimental limits on a compositeness scale not mentioned in previous measurements are discussed. The composite scale turns out not to be the appropriate parameter to estimate effects of a possible substructure of quarks and leptons. Limits on it from different experiments can neither be compared nor combined with each other. Therefore an analysis of the combined data on fermion pair production from PEP and PETRA is performed.

  13. Antiproton-proton annihilation at rest into $K^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Abele, A; Amsler, Claude; Baker, C A; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Berdoz, A R; Bischoff, S; Blüm, H P; Braune, K; Bugg, D V; Case, T; Cramer, O; Crowe, K M; Degener, T F; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Giarritta, P; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Herbstrith, A; Herz, M; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Hodd, C; Holtzhaussen, C; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Lakata, M T; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; McCrady, R G; Meier, J; Meyer, C A; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Röthel, W; Seibert, R; Spanier, S M; Stöck, H; Strassburger, C; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Tischhäuser, M; Uman, I; Völcker, C; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K; Zou Bing Song

    1999-01-01

    The annihilation channel pp to K/sup +/K/sup -/ pi /sup 0/ in liquid hydrogen at rest has been studied with the Crystal Barrel detector at LEAR. The measured branching ratio is: BR(pp to K/sup +/K/sup -/ pi /sup 0/)=(2.37+or-0.15)*10/sup -3/. A partial wave analysis shows that this reaction is dominated by the pi (KK)/sub S/, KK*(892) and pi phi (1020) intermediate states. Weak signals are observed for pi a /sub 2/(1320), pi f/sub 2/(1270), pi f/sub 2/'(1525) and K(K pi )/sub S/. A satisfactory description of the Dalitz plot requires the introduction of pi (KK)/sub P/ intermediate states with at least one pole. (25 refs).

  14. Critical behaviour of annihilating random walk of two species with exclusion in one dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Ódor, G; Odor, Geza; Menyhard, Nora

    2000-01-01

    The $A+A\\to 0$, $B+B\\to 0 $ process with exclusion between the differentkinds is investigated here numerically. Before treating this model explicitly,we study the generalized Domany-Kinzel cellular automaton model of Hinrichsenon the line of the parameter space where only compact clusters can grow. Thesimplest version is treated with two absorbing phases in addition to the activeone. The two kinds of kinks which arise in this case do not react leading tokinetics differing from standard annihilating random walk of two species. Timedependent simulations are presented here to illustrate the differences causedby exclusion in the scaling properties of usually discussed characteristicquantities. The dependence on the density and composition of the initial stateis most apparent. Making use of the parallelism between this process anddirected percolation limited by a reflecting parabolic surface we argue thatthe two kinds of kinks exert marginal perturbation on each other leading todeviations from standard annihilatin...

  15. On the peculiarities of positron annihilation features in silicalite-1 and Y-zeolites

    CERN Document Server

    Kajcsos, Z; Liszka, L; Billard, I; Bonnenfant, A; Azenma, E; Lázár, K; Pal-Borbely, G; Caullet, P; Patarin, J; Lohonyai, L

    2000-01-01

    Conditions that facilitate high Ps formation and interactions that modify the o-Ps lifetime were investigated by positron annihilation techniques in silicalite-1 and various Y-zeolites. Long lifetimes, up to 135 ns, and o-Ps fractions as high as 40% were found. The influence of heat treatment (in the range of 90-520 K), capillary condensation of N sub 2 (0.085 MPa) and correlation with water removal was examined in Y-zeolites and in silicalite-1, respectively. The latter matrix was also studied in the presence of liquids. In various samples unexpected features were found (peculiar changes in the 2 gamma/3 gamma ratio, inversion in the trend of lifetime variations, disappearance of specific components, etc.), denoting the complexity of the processes governing the fate of e sup sup + and Ps.

  16. A Positron Annihilation Study of Copper Containing a High Concentration of Krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Evans, John H.

    1982-01-01

    Bulk Cu samples containing up to 4 at.% Kr have been produced by the Harwell combined ion implantation and sputtering method at temperatures near ambient, and then examined by the positron annihilation technique. Both angular correlation and lifetime measurements were made and, in addition......, the specimen substructure was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The main results were a very large increase in angular correlation peak counts and a single measured positron lifetime of approximately 260 ps. The possible defects which might act as positron traps, and give rise to the observed...... changes, are discussed, with particular emphasis on the very high concentration of small Kr bubbles (approximately 1.5-3 nm in diameter) in the material....

  17. Geometric alignment of the CMD-3 endcap electromagnetic calorimeter using events of two-quantum annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetshin, R. R.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    Since 2010 the electromagnetic endcap calorimeter based on BGO crystals is used in experiments as one of the systems of the CMD-3 detector. The spacial resolution is one of crucial parameters of the calorimeter. Inaccurate knowledge of the real calorimeter position can limit the resolution. In this work the alignment of the center of the calorimeter with respect to the tracking system of the CMD-3 detector has been performed using events of two-quantum annihilation. The alignment technique that has been used to determine the position of the calorimeter is described. Finally, the improvement in spacial resolution of the calorimeter after applying the correction for the real calorimeter position is shown.

  18. Confronting spectral functions from ee annihilation and tau decays: consequences for the muon magnetic moment

    CERN Document Server

    Davier, M; Zhang, Z; Eidelman, S

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum polarization integrals involve the vector spectral functions which can be experimentally determined from two sources: (i) e sup + e sup - annihilation cross sections and (ii) hadronic tau decays. Recently results with comparable precision have become available from CMD-2 on one side, and ALEPH, CLEO and OPAL on the other. The comparison of the respective spectral functions involves a correction from isospin-breaking effects, which is evaluated. After the correction it is found that the dominant pi pi spectral functions do not agree within experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Some disagreement is also found for the 4 pi spectral functions. The consequences of these discrepancies for vacuum polarization calculations are presented, with the emphasis on the muon anomalous magnetic moment. The work includes a complete re-evaluation of all exclusive cross sections, taking into account the most recent data that became available in particular from the Novosibirsk experiments and applying corrections for...

  19. The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy to the study of glassy and partially crystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zipper, M.D.; Hill, A.J. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Materials Engineering

    1994-12-31

    The use of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) as a materials characterisation technique is discussed and is illustrated by examples from the authors` laboratory. A brief guide to interpretation of PALS results for metals, semiconductors, ionic solids and molecular solids is presented; however, the paper focuses on recent results for glassy and partially crystalline ionic and molecular solids. Case studies are presented in which the phenomena studied by PALS include miscibility of polymer blends, plasticization of solid polymer electrolytes, crystallinity in molecular and ionic solids, nanostructure of glass-ceramics, and refractivity of fluoride glasses. Future directions for PALS research of the electronic and defect structures of materials are discussed. 140 refs., 1 tab., 19 figs.

  20. On the Correlation between EPR and Positron Annihilation Measurements on gamma-Irradiated Acetyl Methionine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Lund-Thomsen, E.; Mogensen, O. E.

    1972-01-01

    The dose dependence of the relative EPR signal intensity and positron lifetime spectrum was measured for γ‐irradiated acetyl methionine in the dose range from 0 to 30 Mrad. Angular correlation measurements were performed for the doses 0 and 30 Mrad. The result of the irradiation was the creation...... of EPR centers and inhibition of positronium formation. For one sample, irradiated with a dose of 30 Mrad, EPR and positron lifetime spectra were followed over a period of 50 days after the irradiation. The inhibiting effect and the EPR signal intensity decreased with time. No simple correlation could...... be established between the number of EPR centers and the positron annihilation data, but other possible explanations are discussed....

  1. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy of mechanically milled protein fibre powders and their free volume aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, K.; Sellaiyan, S.; Rajkhowa, R.; Tsuzuki, T.; Lin, T.; Smith, S. V.; Wang, X.; Uedono, A.

    2013-06-01

    The present study reports the fabrication of ultra-fine powders from animal protein fibres such as cashmere guard hair, merino wool and eri silk along with their free volume aspects. The respectively mechanically cleaned, scoured and degummed cashmere guard hair, wool and silk fibres were converted into dry powders by a process sequence: Chopping, Attritor Milling, and Spray Drying. The fabricated protein fibre powders were characterised by scanning electron microscope, particle size distribution and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The PALS results indicated that the average free volume size in protein fibres increased on their wet mechanical milling with a decrease in the corresponding intensities leading to a resultant decrease in their fractional free volumes.

  2. Electroweak and Higgs boson internal bremsstrahlung. General considerations for Majorana dark matter annihilation and application to MSSM neutralinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Torsten; Calore, Francesca; Galea, Ahmad; Garny, Mathias

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that the annihilation of Majorana dark matter into fermions is helicity suppressed. Here, we point out that the underlying mechanism is a subtle combination of two distinct effects, and we present a comprehensive analysis of how the suppression can be partially or fully lifted by the internal bremsstrahlung of an additional boson in the final state. As a concrete illustration, we compute analytically the full amplitudes and annihilation rates of supersymmetric neutralinos to final states that contain any combination of two standard model fermions, plus one electroweak gauge boson or one of the five physical Higgs bosons that appear in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We classify the various ways in which these three-body rates can be large compared to the two-body rates, identifying cases that have not been pointed out before. In our analysis, we put special emphasis on how to avoid the double counting of identical kinematic situations that appear for two-body and three-body final states, in particular on how to correctly treat differential rates and the spectrum of the resulting stable particles that is relevant for indirect dark matter searches. We find that both the total annihilation rates and the yields can be significantly enhanced when taking into account the corrections computed here, in particular for models with somewhat small annihilation rates at tree-level which otherwise would not be testable with indirect dark matter searches. Even more importantly, however, we find that the resulting annihilation spectra of positrons, neutrinos, gamma-rays and antiprotons differ in general substantially from the model-independent spectra that are commonly adopted, for these final states, when constraining particle dark matter with indirect detection experiments.

  3. Stringent constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section from subhalo searches with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Asher; Hooper, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The dark matter halo of the Milky Way is predicted to contain a very large number of smaller subhalos. As a result of the dark matter annihilations taking place within such objects, the most nearby and massive subhalos could appear as point-like or spatially extended gamma-ray sources, without observable counterparts at other wavelengths. In this paper, we use the results of the Aquarius simulation to predict the distribution of nearby subhalos, and compare this to the characteristics of the unidentified gamma-ray sources observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Focusing on the brightest high latitude sources, we use this comparison to derive limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section. For dark matter particles lighter than ~200 GeV, the resulting limits are the strongest obtained to date, being modestly more stringent than those derived from observations of dwarf galaxies or the Galactic Center. We also derive independent limits based on the lack of unidentified gamma-ray sources with discernible spatial extension, but these limits are a factor of ~2-10 weaker than those based on point-like subhalos. Lastly, we note that four of the ten brightest high-latitude sources exhibit a similar spectral shape, consistent with 30-60 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to b quarks with an annihilation cross section on the order of sigma v ~ (5-10) x 10^-27 cm^3/s, or 8-10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating to taus with sigma v ~ (2.0-2.5) x 10^-27 cm^3/s.

  4. Galactic center gamma-ray excess from dark matter annihilation: is there a black hole spike?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Brian D; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shelton, Jessie

    2014-10-10

    If the supermassive black hole Sgr A* at the center of the Milky Way grew adiabatically from an initial seed embedded in a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter (DM) halo, then the DM profile near the hole has steepened into a spike. We calculate the dramatic enhancement to the gamma-ray flux from the Galactic center (GC) from such a spike if the 1-3 GeV excess observed in Fermi data is due to DM annihilations. We find that for the parameter values favored in recent fits, the point-source-like flux from the spike is 35 times greater than the flux from the inner 1° of the halo, far exceeding all Fermi point source detections near the GC. We consider the dependence of the spike signal on astrophysical and particle parameters and conclude that if the GC excess is due to DM, then a canonical adiabatic spike is disfavored by the data. We discuss alternative Galactic histories that predict different spike signals, including (i) the nonadiabatic growth of the black hole, possibly associated with halo and/or black hole mergers, (ii) gravitational interaction of DM with baryons in the dense core, such as heating by stars, or (iii) DM self-interactions. We emphasize that the spike signal is sensitive to a different combination of particle parameters than the halo signal and that the inclusion of a spike component to any DM signal in future analyses would provide novel information about both the history of the GC and the particle physics of DM annihilations.

  5. Image Reconstruction from Under sampled Fourier Data Using the Polynomial Annihilation Transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, Richard K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gelb, Anne [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Platte, Rodrigo [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-09-09

    Fourier samples are collected in a variety of applications including magnetic resonance imaging and synthetic aperture radar. The data are typically under-sampled and noisy. In recent years, l1 regularization has received considerable attention in designing image reconstruction algorithms from under-sampled and noisy Fourier data. The underlying image is assumed to have some sparsity features, that is, some measurable features of the image have sparse representation. The reconstruction algorithm is typically designed to solve a convex optimization problem, which consists of a fidelity term penalized by one or more l1 regularization terms. The Split Bregman Algorithm provides a fast explicit solution for the case when TV is used for the l1l1 regularization terms. Due to its numerical efficiency, it has been widely adopted for a variety of applications. A well known drawback in using TV as an l1 regularization term is that the reconstructed image will tend to default to a piecewise constant image. This issue has been addressed in several ways. Recently, the polynomial annihilation edge detection method was used to generate a higher order sparsifying transform, and was coined the “polynomial annihilation (PA) transform.” This paper adapts the Split Bregman Algorithm for the case when the PA transform is used as the l1 regularization term. In so doing, we achieve a more accurate image reconstruction method from under-sampled and noisy Fourier data. Our new method compares favorably to the TV Split Bregman Algorithm, as well as to the popular TGV combined with shearlet approach.

  6. Origin and consequence of the supersymmetry breaking: -) phenomenology of neutralinos annihilation in Zh and WW, -) (0,1/2) representation and duality; Origine et manifestation de la brisure de supersymetrie: phenomenologie de l'annihilation de neutralinos en Zh et WW. Representation (0,1/2) et dualite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labonne, B

    2007-01-15

    Supersymmetry is an interesting extension of the Standard Model. Hence, its formal and phenomenological aspects need to be understood before establishing it as realized in Nature. Supersymmetry offers a natural dark matter candidate. To check this hypothesis, a crucial point would be the indirect detection of neutralino annihilation products. Among annihilation channels, the one with a Z boson and a Higgs scalar, is of interest because of the hard spectrum it yields. However, the spectra needs to be weighted by branching ratios.The Zh channel is then known to be suppressed. We notice that the deeper broken the supersymmetry, the stronger the suppression. Thus the channel suppression has to be understood in terms of gauge independence of different diagrams involved, and high energy unitarity. A key element of the suppression for this channel is the Z boson polarization, which comes from the initial Majorana particles at rest. Finally, we investigate the role of polarization in the WW channel. Here, polarization does not suppress the channel but modifies the shape of the decay products spectra. This could be important from an experimental point of view. On a more formal side, we point out different kinds of representations of the (0,1/2) multiplet in superspace. First we focus on a new kind of superfield called X. Next we present a duality in 4 dimensions, before showing its extension to superspace. Without supersymmetry, this duality links a 3-form to a constant. In superspace, we find that the duality links a 3-form superfield to the new X superfield. It is essential to understand that some components of the 3-form and the X superfield seem to help supersymmetry breaking. Finally we try to transmit this breaking to usual chiral superfields. (author)

  7. Scaling violations of quark and gluon jet fragmentation functions in $e^{+}e{-}$ annihilations at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91.2 and 183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    Flavour inclusive, udsc and b fragmentation functions in unbiased jets, and flavour inclusive, udsc, b and gluon fragmentation functions in biased jets are measured in e+e- annihilations from data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 91.2, and 183-209 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The unbiased jets are defined by hemispheres of inclusive hadronic events, while the biased jet measurements are based on three-jet events selected with jet algorithms. Several methods are employed to extract the fragmentation functions over a wide range of scales. Possible biases are studied in the results are obtained. The fragmentation functions are compared to results from lower energy e+e- experiments and with earlier LEP measurements and are found to be consistent. Scaling violations are observed and are found to be stronger for the fragmentation functions of gluon jets than for those of quarks. The measured fragmentation functions are compared to three recent theoretical next-to-leading order calculations and to the p...

  8. D meson production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. [3. 7 to 7. 0 GeV, total cross section, branching ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapidis, P.A.

    1979-06-01

    The production of D mesons in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation for the center-of-mass energy range 3.7 to 7.0 GeV was studied with the MARK I magnetic detector at SPEAR. A resonance was observed in the total cross section for hadron production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at an energy just above the threshold for charm production. This resonance, which is named psi'', has a mass of 3772 +- 6 MeV/c/sup 2/, a total width of 28 +- 5 MeV/c/sup 2/, a partial width to electron pairs of 345 +- 85 eV/c/sup 2/, and decays almost exclusively into D anti D pairs. The psi'' provides a rich source of background-free and kinematically well defined D mesons for study. From produced in the decay of the psi'' the masses of the D/sup 0/ and D/sup +/ mesons were determined to be 1863.3 +- 0.9 MeV/c/sup 2/ and 1868.3 +- 0.9 MeV/c/sup 2/ respectively. Also the branching fractions for D/sup 0/ decay to K/sup -/..pi../sup +/, anti K/sup 0/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ and K/sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/ were determined to be (2.2 +- 0.6)%, (4.0 +- 1.3)%, and (3.2 +- 1.1)% and the branching fractions for D/sup +/ decay to anti K/sup 0/..pi../sup +/ and K/sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/ to be (1.5 +- 0.60)% and (3.9 +- 1.0)%. The average number of kaons per D decay was found to be 0.52 +- 0.14 K/sup 0/'s and 0.42 +- 0.12 K/sup +/'s. The rate for inclusive production of D mesons at center-of-mass energies above the psi'' was measured; it is found that it can account for most, if not all, of the observed increase in the total hadronic cross-section for center-of-mass energies above 4 GeV. The inclusive momentum and energy spectra for D's were measured at the highest available center-of-mass energy (7 GeV). The energy spectra are rapidly decreasing functions of energy with a slope similar to the slope of the charged pion spectrum at the same center-of-mass energy. This behavior suggests that the fragmentation function of

  9. Positron lifetime measurements and positron-annihilation induced auger electron spectroscpy using slow positron beams; Teisoku yodenshi bimu wo mochiita yodenshi jumyo sokutei oyobi yodenshi shometsu reiki oje denshi bunko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, R. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-02-20

    Slow positron beam with less than several eV can be controlled freely such as accelerating, throttling the beam size, shortening the pulse or making pulse with short time width and so forth. These low positron beams are applied to various measurements like Doppler broadening measurement of annihilation {gamma} rays or lifetime measurement of positron, and secondary particle measurements using positron microscope, positron electron ray diffraction, flight time method and so forth. In particular, these recent years, high intensity slow positron beams were possible using accelerators like electron linac and its application is increasing. In this report, pulse shortening method for high intensity slow positron beam, and incidence energy variable positron lifetime measurement method using this slow pulsed beam and flight time type positron-annihilation-induced auger electron spectroscopy are outlined. In future, these measurements can be possible to carry out with high resolution and also with high counting rate if higher intensity monochromatic excellent positron beam than present one is produced. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Study of b anti-b Production in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at S**(1/2) = 29-GeV with the Aid of Neural Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D.

    2003-12-19

    We present a measurement of {sigma}(b{bar b})/{sigma}(q{bar q}) in the annihilation process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} q{bar q} {yields} hadrons at {radical}s = 29 GeV. The analysis is based on 66 pb{sup -1} of data collected between 1984 and 1986 with the TPC/2{gamma} detector at PEP. To identify bottom events, we use a neural network with inputs that are computed from the 3-momenta of all of the observed charged hadrons in each event. We also present a study of bias in techniques for measuring inclusive {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, and p/{bar p} production in the annihilation process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} b{bar b} {yields} hadrons at {radical}s = 29 GeV, using a neural network to identify bottom-quark jets. In this study, charged particles are identified by a simultaneous measurement of momentum and ionization energy loss (dE/dx).

  11. PREFACE: The 16th International Conference on Positron Annihilation (ICPA-16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Ashraf; Coleman, Paul; Dugdale, Stephen; Roussenova, Mina

    2013-06-01

    The 16th International Conference on Positron Annihilation (ICPA-16) was held at the University of Bristol, United Kingdom during 19-24 August, 2012. This triennial conference is the foremost gathering of the Positron Annihilation Physics community and it was hosted in the UK for the first time since the series of meetings first started back in 1965. The University of Bristol, the Alma Mater of Paul Dirac, is situated at the heart of the city, and it has established a worldwide reputation in research and teaching. Many of the topics which were discussed during ICPA-16 form an integral part of the research themes in the schools of Physics, Chemistry and Engineering of this University. ICPA-16 attracted a diverse audience, both from academic and industrial institutions, with over 200 participants from 29 countries. It continued the long held tradition of showcasing novel research in the field of positron annihilation and a total of 170 papers were presented as talks and posters. The papers reported studies of metallic and semi-conducting solids, polymers and soft matter, porous materials, surfaces and interfaces, as well as advances in experimental, analytical and biomedical applications. The high quality of the presented work, coupled with the enthusiastic exchange of ideas, provided an invaluable forum, especially for younger researchers and postgraduate students. The excellence of student presentations was acknowledged by the award of prizes for the best student posters, which were received by David Billington (University of Bristol, UK), Moussa Sidibe (CEMHTI, France) and Hongxia Xu (Tohoku University, Japan). All papers published in the Conference Proceedings were reviewed by ICPA-16 participants. We are indebted to all reviewers who contributed their time and intellectual resources, allowing the refereeing and editing process to move smoothly toward the compilation of the Proceedings. Our sincere thanks and gratitude go to everyone who contributed to the

  12. Impact of SUSY-QCD corrections on neutralino-stop co-annihilation and the neutralino relic density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harz, Julia [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Herrmann, Bjoern [Savoie Univ./CNRS, Annecy-le-Vieux (France). LAPTh; Klasen, Michael [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Kovarik, Karol [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Le Boulc' h, Quentin [Grenoble Univ./CNRS-IN2P3/INPG, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2013-02-15

    We have calculated the full O({alpha}{sub s}) supersymmetric QCD corrections to neutralino-stop coannihilation into electroweak vector and Higgs bosons within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM).We performed a parameter study within the phenomenological MSSM and demonstrated that the studied co-annihilation processes are phenomenologically relevant, especially in the context of a 126 GeV Higgs-like particle. By means of an example scenario we discuss the effect of the full next-to-leading order corrections on the co-annihilation cross section and show their impact on the predicted neutralino relic density. We demonstrate that the impact of these corrections on the cosmologically preferred region of parameter space is larger than the current experimental uncertainty of WMAP data.

  13. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation from Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies with Six Years of Fermi Large Area Telescope Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M; Albert, A; Anderson, B; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caputo, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Essig, R; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Gomez-Vargas, G A; Grenier, I A; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Horan, D; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Llena Garde, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Malyshev, D; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Meyer, M; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Sánchez-Conde, M; Schulz, A; Sehgal, N; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strigari, L; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Werner, M; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Zaharijas, G; Zimmer, S

    2015-12-04

    The dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are some of the most dark matter (DM) dominated objects known. We report on γ-ray observations of Milky Way dSphs based on six years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data processed with the new Pass8 event-level analysis. None of the dSphs are significantly detected in γ rays, and we present upper limits on the DM annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 15 dSphs. These constraints are among the strongest and most robust to date and lie below the canonical thermal relic cross section for DM of mass ≲100  GeV annihilating via quark and τ-lepton channels.

  14. Isotoxal star-shaped polygonal voids and rigid inclusions in nonuniform antiplane shear fields. Part II: Singularities, annihilation and invisibility

    CERN Document Server

    Corso, Francesco Dal; Bigoni, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Notch stress intensity factors and stress intensity factors are obtained analytically for isotoxal star-shaped polygonal voids and rigid inclusions (and also for the corresponding limit cases of star-shaped cracks and stiffeners), when loaded through remote inhomogeneous (self-equilibrated, polynomial) antiplane shear stress in an infinite linear elastic matrix. Usually these solutions show stress singularities at the inclusion corners. It is shown that an infinite set of geometries and loading conditions exist for which not only the singularity is absent, but the stress vanishes ('annihilates') at the corners. Thus the material, which even without the inclusion corners would have a finite stress, remains unstressed at these points in spite of the applied remote load. Moreover, similar conditions are determined in which a star-shaped crack or stiffener leaves the ambient stress completely unperturbed, thus reaching a condition of 'quasi-static invisibility'. Stress annihilation and invisibility define optimal...

  15. Can the relic density of self-interacting dark matter be due to annihilations into Standard Model particles?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Xiaoyong [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste, 34014 (Italy); Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Hambye, Thomas [Service de Physique Théorique, Université Libre de Bruxelles,Boulevard du Triomphe, CP225, Brussels, 1050 (Belgium)

    2016-11-08

    Motivated by the hypothesis that dark matter self-interactions provide a solution to the small-scale structure formation problems, we investigate the possibilities that the relic density of a self-interacting dark matter candidate can proceed from the thermal freeze-out of annihilations into Standard Model particles. We find that scalar and Majorana dark matter in the mass range of 10–500 MeV, coupled to a slightly heavier massive gauge boson, are the only possible candidates in agreement with multiple current experimental constraints. Here dark matter annihilations take place at a much slower rate than the self-interactions simply because the interaction connecting the Standard Model and the dark matter sectors is small. We also discuss prospects of establishing or excluding these two scenarios in future experiments.

  16. Atomic configuration and electronic structure of extended defects from the point of view of positron annihilation: a grain boundary example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sob, M.; Turek, I. [Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky, Brno (Czech Republic). Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie; Vitek, V. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-10-01

    A quantum-mechanical approach for determining the electronic structure and atomic configuration of extended defects in metals is described and importance of theoretical methods for interpretation of positron annihilation spectroscopy data is stressed. As an example, atomic configuration of the {Sigma} = 5(210)/[001] tilt grain boundary in tungsten is determined and local densities of states at atoms in defect region are discussed. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs.

  17. Coherent states of the real symplectic group in a complex analytic parametrization. II. Annihilation-operator coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesne, C.

    1986-03-01

    In the present series of papers, the coherent states of Sp(2d,R), corresponding to the positive discrete series irreducible representations , encountered in physical applications, are analyzed in detail with special emphasis on those of Sp(4,R) and Sp(6,R). The present paper discusses the annihilation-operator coherent states, i.e., the eigenstates of the noncompact lowering generators corresponding to complex eigenvalues. These states generalize the coherent states introduced by Barut and Girardello for Sp(2,R), and later on extended by Deenen and Quesne to the Sp(2d,R) irreducible representations of the type . When λ1,...,λd are not all equal, it was shown by Deenen and Quesne that the eigenvalues do not completely specify the eigenstates of the noncompact lowering generators. In the present work, their characterization is completed by a set of continuous labels parametrizing the (unitary-operator) coherent states of the maximal compact subgroup U(d). The resulting coherent states are therefore of mixed type, being annihilation-operator coherent states only as regards the noncompact generators. A realization in a subspace of a Bargmann space of analytic functions shows that such coherent states satisfy a unity resolution relation in the representation space of , and therefore may be used as a continuous basis in such space. The analytic functions and the differential operators representing the representation space discrete bases and the Sp(2d,R) generators, respectively, are found in explicit form. It is concluded that the annihilation-operator coherent state representation provides the mathematical foundation for the use of differentiation operators with respect to the noncompact raising generators in symbolic expressions of the Sp(2d,R) generators. This is to be compared with the habit of replacing a boson annihilation operator by a symbolic differentiation with respect to the corresponding creation operator, accounted for by the Bargmann representation of

  18. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products

    OpenAIRE

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the f...

  19. All-flavour search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Milky Way with IceCube/DeepCore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide (Australia); Abraham, K.; Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Holzapfel, K.; Huber, M.; Jurkovic, M.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Turcati, A.; Veenkamp, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-department, Garching (Germany); Ackermann, M.; Bernardini, E.; Blot, S.; Bretz, H.P.; Cruz Silva, A.H.; Franckowiak, A.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Gora, D.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Kintscher, T.; Kunwar, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Satalecka, K.; Schoenwald, A.; Spiering, C.; Stasik, A.; Stoessl, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Santen, J. van; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O' Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hoshina, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; Krueger, C.; Mancina, S.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Rossem, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Xu, D.L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Anton, G.; Katz, U.; Kittler, T.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Andeen, K. [Marquette University, Department of Physics, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Anderson, T.; Arlen, T.C.; Dunkman, M.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Pankova, D.V.; Quinnan, M.; Tesic, G. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Del Pino Rosendo, E.; Di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Foesig, C.C.; Koepke, L.; Krueckl, G.; Sandroos, J.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Arguelles, C.; Axani, S.; Collin, G.H.; Conrad, J.M.; Jones, B.J.P.; Moulai, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Glagla, M.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Kemp, J.; Konietz, R.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Penek, Oe.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schimp, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stahlberg, M.; Vehring, M.; Wallraff, M.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebusch, C.H. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Mandelartz, M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Tenholt, F. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Kopper, S.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Omairat, A.; Posselt, J.; Soldin, D. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); BenZvi, S. [University of Rochester, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, NY (United States); Berghaus, P. [National Research Nuclear University, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G.W.; Wissing, H. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S.; Tatar, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

    2016-10-15

    We present the first IceCube search for a signal of dark matter annihilations in the Milky Way using all-flavour neutrino-induced particle cascades. The analysis focuses on the DeepCore sub-detector of IceCube, and uses the surrounding IceCube strings as a veto region in order to select starting events in the DeepCore volume. We use 329 live-days of data from IceCube operating in its 86-string configuration during 2011-2012. No neutrino excess is found, the final result being compatible with the background-only hypothesis. From this null result, we derive upper limits on the velocity-averaged self-annihilation cross-section, left angle σ{sub A}v right angle, for dark matter candidate masses ranging from 30 GeV up to 10 TeV, assuming both a cuspy and a flat-cored dark matter halo profile. For dark matter masses between 200 GeV and 10 TeV, the results improve on all previous IceCube results on left angle σ{sub A}v right angle, reaching a level of 10{sup -23} cm{sup 3} s {sup -1}, depending on the annihilation channel assumed, for a cusped NFW profile. The analysis demonstrates that all-flavour searches are competitive with muon channel searches despite the intrinsically worse angular resolution of cascades compared to muon tracks in IceCube. (orig.)

  20. All-flavour Search for Neutrinos from Dark Matter Annihilations in the Milky Way with IceCube/DeepCore

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00266703

    2016-01-01

    We present the first IceCube search for a signal of dark matter annihilations in the Milky Way using all-flavour neutrino-induced particle cascades. The analysis focuses on the DeepCore sub-detector of IceCube, and uses the surrounding IceCube strings as a veto region in order to select starting events in the DeepCore volume. We use 329 live-days of data from IceCube operating in its 86-string configuration during 2011-2012. No neutrino excess is found, the final result being compatible with the background-only hypothesis. From this null result, we derive upper limits on the velocity-averaged self-annihilation cross-section, , for dark matter candidate masses ranging from 30 GeV up to 10 TeV, assuming both a cuspy and a flat-cored dark matter halo profile. For dark matter masses between 200 GeV and 10 TeV, the results improve on all previous IceCube results on , reaching a level of 10^{-23} cm^3 s^-1, depending on the annihilation channel assumed, for a cusped NFW profile. The analysis demonstrates that all-f...

  1. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy and Small Angle Neutron Scattering Characterization of Nanostructural Features in Irradiated Fe-Cu-Mn Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, B D; Asoka-Kumar, P; Howell, R H; Odette, G R; Sterne, P A

    2001-01-01

    Radiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels results from a high number density of nanometer sized Cu-Mn-Ni rich precipitates (CRPs) and sub-nanometer matrix features, thought to be vacancy-solute cluster complexes (VSC). However, questions exist regarding both the composition of the precipitates and the defect character and composition of the matrix features. We present results of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) characterization of irradiated and thermally aged Fe-Cu and Fe-Cu-Mn alloys. These complementary techniques provide insight into the composition and character of both types of nanoscale features. The SANS measurements indicate populations of CRPs and VSCs in both alloys. The CRPs are coarser in the Fe-Cu alloy and the number densities of CRP and VSC increase with the addition of Mn. The PAS involved measuring both the positron lifetimes and the Doppler broadened annihilation spectra in the high momentum region to provide elemental sensitivity at the annihilation site. The spectra in Fe-Cu-Mn specimens thermally aged to peak hardness at 450 C and irradiated at 288 C are nearly identical to elemental Cu. Positron lifetime and spectrum measurements in Fe-Cu specimens irradiated at 288 C clearly show the existence of long lifetime ({approx}500 ps) open volume defects, which also contain Cu. Thus the SANS and PAS provide a self-consistent picture of nanostructures composed of CRPs and VSCs and tend to discount high Fe concentrations in the CRPs.

  2. Investigation of the Degree of Disorder of the Structure of Polymer Soft Contact Lenses Using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy PALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipecki, Jacek; Kotynia, Katarzyna; Filipecka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogel and silicone-hydrogel polymeric materials are widely used in ophthalmology for the manufacture of contact lenses. An important aspect is the investigation of the structure of these materials. This study has been conducted in order to compare the degree of disorder and presence of free volumes in the internal structure of the polymeric soft contact lenses Omafilcon A (hydrogel) and Comfilcon A (silicone-hydrogel). Differences in the occurrence of trapping centers for positrons and free volumes between the types of investigated contact lenses have been demonstrated. Two types of polymeric contact lenses were used as materials: Omafilcon A (hydrogel) and Comfilcon A (silicone-hydrogel). The study was performed using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). When the results of the measurements has been obtained, a graphical curve has created to describe the relationship of the number of annihilation acts in time. Significant changes were observed between the contact lenses investigated in positron trapping in macropores (based on a two-state model) and the presence of free volumes (based on the Tao-Eldrup model). The use of the positron annihilation two-state model made it possible to demonstrate that a higher positron trapping rate in macropores occurs in the silicone-hydrogel contact lens. Additionally, calculations using the Tao-Eldrup model show the existence of free volumes in both types of materials. The size and fraction of free volumes is much larger in the silicone-hydrogel contact lens.

  3. High-Energy Compton Scattering Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hartemann, Fred V; Barty, C; Crane, John; Gibson, David J; Hartouni, E P; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    No monochromatic, high-brightness, tunable light sources currently exist above 100 keV. Important applications that would benefit from such new hard x-ray sources include: nuclear resonance fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy, and MeV flash radiography. The peak brightness of Compton scattering light sources is derived for head-on collisions and found to scale with the electron beam brightness and the drive laser pulse energy. This gamma 2

  4. Positron annihilation study of aluminum, titanium, and iron alloys surface after shot peening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleski, R.; Gorgol, M.; Wiertel, M. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Institute of Physics, Lublin (Poland); Zaleski, K. [Lublin University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Lublin (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Shot peening influence on alloys based on iron, aluminum, and titanium was studied using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and residual stress measurements. The PALS spectra were analyzed assuming two lifetime components. While the residual stresses change in a similar way in all the samples, the PALS results show an opposite tendency of a component relative intensities change with the time of shot peening for the Ti alloy as compared to steel or the Al alloy. A comparison between the depth profiles of positron implantation and the residual stress distribution reveals that the positron range covers a whole depth where residual stress is observed only in the Ti alloy. Based on this observation, the evolution of the defect concentration is presumed, consisting in migration of large defects away from the surface, while only smaller ones remain close to the surface. Furthermore, the positron lifetime distribution in the Al alloy was determined using the MELT program. The results showed that the initial single, wide distribution of lifetime splits into two narrower ones with increasing shot peening time. (orig.)

  5. Study of anisothermal ageing of CANTiM shape memory alloys by positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C. W. H.; Chung, C. Y.

    1996-04-01

    The thermal-elastic property of high temperature CuAlNiMnTi shape memory alloys was found strongly affected by anisothermal ageing. With slow cycling (cycled at low heating and cooling rates), the transformation temperatures increase with the number of thermal cycle while the transformation enthalpy decreases and finally drop to zero, which indicated a total deterioration of the shape memory effect. Martensite stabilisation was found to be the cause of such deterioration. Positron Annihilation technique was employed to study the properties of the vacancies during the anisothermal ageing process. This was compared with the isothermal aged results. We propose that the changes in the quantity and characteristics of vacancies during anisothermal ageing are only responsible for the kinetics of the martensitic transformation. The result is the shift of transformation temperatures. However, the presence of vacancy agglomerations may have assisted the diffusion of atoms during ageing. Other factors like microstructural changes and atomic reordering will lead to the irreversible martensite stabilisation and make the transformation thermodynamically unfavourable.

  6. Search for Prompt Production of $\\chi_{c}$ and X(3872) in e^+e^- Annihilations

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bequilleux, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Röthel, W; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-01-01

    We have searched for prompt production of $\\chi_{c1}$, $\\chi_{c2}$ and X(3872) in continuum e^+e^- annihilations using a 386 fb^{-1} data sample collected around $\\sqrt{s} = 10.6$ GeV with the BABAR detector using the $\\gamma J/\\psi$ decay mode. After accounting for the feed-down from $\\psi(2S)\\to\\gamma\\chi_{c1,2}$, no significant signal for prompt $\\chi_{c1,2}$ production is observed. We present improved upper limits on the cross-section, with the rest of the event consisting of more than two charged tracks, to be 77 fb for $\\chi_{c1}$ and 79 fb for $\\chi_{c2}$ with $e^+e^-$ center-of-mass frame $\\chi_c$ momentum greater than 2.0 GeV at 90% confidence level. These limits are consistent with NRQCD predictions. We also set an upper limit on the prompt production of X(3872) through the decay $X(3872)\\to \\gamma J/\\psi$.

  7. Acceleration of MR parameter mapping using annihilating filter-based low rank hankel matrix (ALOHA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Jin, Kyong Hwan; Kim, Eung Yeop; Park, Sung-Hong; Ye, Jong Chul

    2016-12-01

    MR parameter mapping is one of clinically valuable MR imaging techniques. However, increased scan time makes it difficult for routine clinical use. This article aims at developing an accelerated MR parameter mapping technique using annihilating filter based low-rank Hankel matrix approach (ALOHA). When a dynamic sequence can be sparsified using spatial wavelet and temporal Fourier transform, this results in a rank-deficient Hankel structured matrix that is constructed using weighted k-t measurements. ALOHA then utilizes the low rank matrix completion algorithm combined with a multiscale pyramidal decomposition to estimate the missing k-space data. Spin-echo inversion recovery and multiecho spin echo pulse sequences for T1 and T2 mapping, respectively, were redesigned to perform undersampling along the phase encoding direction according to Gaussian distribution. The missing k-space is reconstructed using ALOHA. Then, the parameter maps were constructed using nonlinear regression. Experimental results confirmed that ALOHA outperformed the existing compressed sensing algorithms. Compared with the existing methods, the reconstruction errors appeared scattered throughout the entire images rather than exhibiting systematic distortion along edges and the parameter maps. Given that many diagnostic errors are caused by the systematic distortion of images, ALOHA may have a great potential for clinical applications. Magn Reson Med 76:1848-1864, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Effect of Hydrogen on Vacancy Formation in Sputtered Cu Films Studied by Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Atsushi; Kihara, Teruo; Kubo, Daichi; Mizuno, Masataka; Araki, Hideki; Onishi, Takashi; Shirai, Yasuharu

    2013-04-01

    As a part of the LSI interconnect fabrication process, a post-deposition high-pressure annealing process is proposed for embedding copper into trench structures. The embedding property of sputtered Cu films has been recognized to be improved by adding hydrogen to the sputtering argon gas. In this study, to elucidate the