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Sample records for williams-beuren syndrome deletion

  1. Infantile ictal apneas in a child with williams-beuren syndrome.

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    Myers, Kenneth A; McLeod, D Ross; Bello-Espinosa, Luis

    2013-02-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a genetic disorder rarely associated with seizures. The few described cases of Williams-Beuren syndrome and epilepsy have primarily involved infantile spasms and deletions extending beyond the common deletion region for this disorder. We present the case of a 5-week-old child with ictal apneas and typical Williams-Beuren syndrome deletion. Diagnosis was challenging, because the child had cardiac, respiratory, and gastrointestinal abnormalities typically associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome, which are also associated with cyanotic episodes. The results of interictal electroencephalography were normal, illustrating that prolonged electroencephalography is often essential in evaluation of suspected ictal apneas. Seizure freedom was achieved with carbamazepine. Sudden death is seen in Williams-Beuren syndrome, and this case raises the question whether some of these cases may be related to ictal apneas and could potentially be preventable with appropriate pharmaceutical intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A new case of keratoconus associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

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    Viana, Melissa Machado; Frasson, Maria; Leão, Letícia Lima; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Cunha, Pricila da Silva; de Aguiar, Marcos José Burle

    2013-09-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a multisystemic genetic disorder caused by a contiguous gene deletion at 7q11.23. Keratoconus is a complex disease and it is suspected to have a genetic origin, although the specific gene responsible for keratoconus has not been identified. Although there are several ocular features in Williams-Beuren syndrome, keratoconus is not regularly described as part of this syndrome. To report a new patient with keratoconus and Williams-Beuren syndrome. This is the third case of an association between Williams-Beuren syndrome and keratoconus. The authors believe that the Williams-Beuren syndrome chromosome region can be a possible target for further investigation as the genetic basis of keratoconus.

  3. Arterial Hypertension in a Child with Williams-Beuren Syndrome (7q11.23 Chromosomal Deletion

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    Cristina de Sylos

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 7-year-old male child diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome and arterial hypertension refractory to clinical treatment. The diagnosis was confirmed by genetic study. Narrowing of the descending aorta and stenosis of the renal arteries were also diagnosed. Systemic vascular alterations caused by deletion of the elastin gene may occur early in individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome, leading to the clinical manifestation of systemic arterial hypertension refractory to drug treatment.

  4. Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with single kidney and nephrocalcinosis: a case report.

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    Abidi, Kamel; Jellouli, Manel; Ben Rabeh, Rania; Hammi, Yousra; Gargah, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by congenital heart defects, abnormal facial features, mental retardation with specific cognitive and behavioral profile, growth hormone deficiency, renal and skeletal anomalies, inguinal hernia, infantile hypercalcaemia. We report a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with a single kidney and nephrocalcinosis complicated by hypercalcaemia. A male infant, aged 20 months presented growth retardation associated with a psychomotor impairment, dysmorphic features and nephrocalcinosis. He had also hypercalciuria and hypercalcemia. Echocardiography was normal. DMSA renal scintigraphy showed a single functioning kidney. The FISH generated one ELN signal in 20 metaphases read and found the presence of ELN deletion, with compatible Williams-Beuren syndrome.

  5. The contribution of CLIP2 haploinsufficiency to the clinical manifestations of the Williams-Beuren syndrome.

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    Vandeweyer, Geert; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Reyniers, Edwin; Kooy, R Frank

    2012-06-08

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare contiguous gene syndrome, characterized by intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, connective-tissue abnormalities, cardiac defects, structural brain abnormalities, and transient infantile hypercalcemia. Genes lying telomeric to RFC2, including CLIP2, GTF2I and GTF2IRD1, are currently thought to be the most likely major contributors to the typical Williams syndrome cognitive profile, characterized by a better-than-expected auditory rote-memory ability, a relative sparing of language capabilities, and a severe visual-spatial constructive impairment. Atypical deletions in the region have helped to establish genotype-phenotype correlations. So far, however, hardly any deletions affecting only a single gene in the disease region have been described. We present here two healthy siblings with a pure, hemizygous deletion of CLIP2. A putative role in the cognitive and behavioral abnormalities seen in Williams-Beuren patients has been suggested for this gene on the basis of observations in a knock-out mouse model. The presented siblings did not show any of the clinical features associated with the syndrome. Cognitive testing showed an average IQ for both and no indication of the Williams syndrome cognitive profile. This shows that CLIP2 haploinsufficiency by itself does not lead to the physical or cognitive characteristics of the Williams-Beuren syndrome, nor does it lead to the Williams syndrome cognitive profile. Although contribution of CLIP2 to the phenotype cannot be excluded when it is deleted in combination with other genes, our results support the hypothesis that GTF2IRD1 and GTF2I are the main genes causing the cognitive defects associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

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    Mıhçı, Ercan; Nur, Banu Güzel; Berker-Karaüzüm, Sibel; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune, gastrointestinal disorder characterized by intolerance to the dietary grain protein gluten. An increased prevalence of celiac disease has been reported in Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, but there has been only few previous reports with respect to the association of celiac disease in Williams-Beuren syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of celiac disease in our 24 Williams-Beuren syndrome patients. Gastrointestinal problems and celiac disease symptoms of patients were noted. All patients were analyzed by the titer of tissue transglutaminases IgA and IgG. HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy was performed to the patients with positive serology. We also performed gluten free diet in the presence of compatible symptoms, serology, HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy. In our study, two patients had positive tTG antibodies, but only one had positive biopsy finding for celiac disease. The frequency of celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome was estimated as 1/24 (4.1%). Though the number of participants in this study was limited, the results show that the frequency of celiac disease is higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome compared to the general population. We suggest that a high suspicion and testing for celiac disease should be recommended at certain intervals in all cases with Williams-Beuren syndrome to detect the cause of growth retardation and gastrointestinal problems.

  7. Constitutional and somatic deletions of the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

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    Guenat, David; Quentin, Samuel; Rizzari, Carmelo; Lundin, Catarina; Coliva, Tiziana; Edery, Patrick; Fryssira, Helen; Bermont, Laurent; Ferrand, Christophe; Soulier, Jean; Borg, Christophe; Rohrlich, Pierre-Simon

    2014-11-07

    Here, we report and investigate the genomic alterations of two novel cases of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) in children with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a multisystem disorder caused by 7q11.23 hemizygous deletion. Additionally, we report the case of a child with NHL and a somatic 7q11.23 deletion. Although the WBS critical region has not yet been identified as a susceptibility locus in NHL, it harbors a number of genes involved in DNA repair. The high proportion of pediatric NHL reported in WBS is intriguing. Therefore, the role of haploinsufficiency of genes located at 7q11.23 in lymphomagenesis deserves to be investigated.

  8. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

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    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  9. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Hassan Zamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD, skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6 in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2 (ELN X1 (7q22 X2 ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  10. [Diagnosis of a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome with nephrocalcinosis using chromosome microarray analysis].

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    Jin, S J; Liu, M; Long, W J; Luo, X P

    2016-12-02

    Objective: To explore the clinical phenotypes and the genetic cause for a boy with unexplained growth retardation, nephrocalcinosis, auditory anomalies and multi-organ/system developmental disorders. Method: Routine G-banding and chromosome microarray analysis were applied to a child with unexplained growth retardation, nephrocalcinosis, auditory anomalies and multi-organ/system developmental disorders treated in the Department of Pediatrics of Tongji Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in September 2015 and his parents to conduct the chromosomal karyotype analysis and the whole genome scanning. Deleted genes were searched in the Decipher and NCBI databases, and their relationships with the clinical phenotypes were analyzed. Result: A six-month-old boy was refered to us because of unexplained growth retardation and feeding intolerance.The affected child presented with abnormal manifestation such as special face, umbilical hernia, growth retardation, hypothyroidism, congenital heart disease, right ear sensorineural deafness, hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. The child's karyotype was 46, XY, 16qh + , and his parents' karyotypes were normal. Chromosome microarray analysis revealed a 1 436 kb deletion on the 7q11.23(72701098_74136633) region of the child. This region included 23 protein-coding genes, which were reported to be corresponding to Williams-Beuren syndrome and its certain clinical phenotypes. His parents' results of chromosome microarray analysis were normal. Conclusion: A boy with characteristic manifestation of Williams-Beuren syndrome and rare nephrocalcinosis was diagnosed using chromosome microarray analysis. The deletion on the 7q11.23 might be related to the clinical phenotypes of Williams-Beuren syndrome, yet further studies are needed.

  11. [Vascular malformations in the Williams-Beuren syndrome: report of three new cases].

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    Sator, Hicham; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Rhouni, Fatima Ezzahra; Benjouad, Ibitihale; Dafiri, Rachida; Chat, Latifa

    2016-01-01

    The Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare genetic disease. It combines classically specific facial dysmorphism, cardiovascular malformations and specific neuropsychological profile. We report three cases of Williams-Beuren syndrome in children with particular emphasis on vascular abnormalities observed on CT angiography and MR angiography.

  12. Bilateral vocal cord paralysis and hypothyroidism as presenting symptoms of Williams-Beuren syndrome: a case report.

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    Koren, Ilana; Kessel, Ira; Rotschild, Avi; Cohen-Kerem, Raanan

    2015-09-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of 1.5-1.8Mb genes on chromosome 7q11.23. The syndrome was first described as a triad of supra-valvular aortic stenosis, mental retardation, and distinctive facial features. Our patient was referred due to audible inspiratory stridor when he was seven days old. Following endoscopy he was diagnosed with bilateral vocal cord paralysis and was eventually intubated due to respiratory de-compensation followed by tracheotomy. On further workup he was diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Genetic workup supported the diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome. We report here a case with an unusual clinical presentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anterior segment dysgenesis associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

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    Todorova, Margarita G; Grieshaber, Matthias C; Cámara, Rafael J A; Miny, Peter; Palmowski-Wolfe, Anja M

    2014-05-21

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is characterized by mild mental retardation, specific neurocognitive profile, hypercalcemia during infancy, distinctive facial features and cardiovascular diseases. We report on complete ophthalmologic, sonographic and genetic evaluation of a girl with a clinical phenotype of Williams-Beuren syndrome, associated with unilateral anterior segment dysgenesis and bilateral cleft of the soft and hard palate. These phenotypic features have not been linked to the haploinsufficiency of genes involved in the microdeletion. A term born girl presented at the initial examination with clouding of the right cornea. On ultrasound biomicroscopy the anterior chamber structures were difficult to differentiate, showing severe adhesions from the opacified cornea to the iris with a kerato-irido-lenticular contact to the remnant lens, a finding consistent with Peters' anomaly. Genetic analyses including FISH confirmed a loss of the critical region 7q11.23, usually associated with the typical Williams-Beuren syndrome. Microsatellite analysis showed a loss of about 2.36 Mb. A diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome was made based on the microdeletion of 7q11.23. The unique features, including unilateral microphthalmia and anterior segment dysgenesis, were unlikely to be caused by the microdeletion. Arguments in favor of the latter are unilateral manifestation, as well as the fact that numerous patients with deletions of comparable or microscopically visible size have not shown similar manifestations.

  14. Importance of dietary calcium and vitamin D in the treatment of hypercalcaemia in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameris, A.L.L.; Geesing, C.L.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Schreuder, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by the deletion of 26-28 genes on chromosome 7. Fifteen percent of WBS patients present with hypercalcaemia during infancy, which is generally mild and resolves spontaneously before the age of 4 years. The

  15. Ischemic Stroke in Williams-Beuren Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Wei-Der Lee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A 15-year-old girl was admitted because of an acute onset of facial palsy and right hemiparesis. The patient had a history of moderate mental retardation and developmental delay. On admission, her vital signs were stable, except for high blood pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an infarct involving the left internal capsule and putamen. Because of the patient's young age, an extensive stroke survey was performed. Williams-Beuren syndrome was finally confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Compared with the previously reported cases, no evidence of cerebral arterial stenosis or cardiac abnormalities was found by noninvasive imaging techniques. Because Williams-Beuren syndrome is a complex, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with prominent cardiovascular features, regular assessment and antihypertensive treatment are necessary to minimize the lifelong cardiovascular risk in patients with this syndrome.

  16. Functional and genetic characterization of two extremely rare cases of Williams-Beuren syndrome associated with chronic granulomatous disease

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    Stasia, Marie J.; Mollin, Michele; Martel, Cecile; Satre, Veronique; Coutton, Charles; Amblard, Florence; Vieville, Gaelle; van Montfrans, Joris M.; Boelens, Jaap J.; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; van Leeuwen, Karen; de Boer, Martin; Brion, Jean-Paul; Roos, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multi-systemic manifestations, caused by a heterozygous segmental deletion of 1.55-1.83Mb at chromosomal band 7q11.23. The deletion can include the NCF1 gene that encodes the p47(phox) protein, a component of the leukocyte NADPH

  17. Rare genomic rearrangement in a boy with Williams-Beuren syndrome associated to XYY syndrome and intriguing behavior.

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    Dutra, Roberta L; Piazzon, Flavia B; Zanardo, Évelin A; Costa, Thais Virginia Moura Machado; Montenegro, Marília M; Novo-Filho, Gil M; Dias, Alexandre T; Nascimento, Amom M; Kim, Chong Ae; Kulikowski, Leslie D

    2015-12-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is caused by a hemizygous contiguous gene microdeletion of 1.55-1.84 Mb at 7q11.23 region. Approximately, 28 genes have been shown to contribute to classical phenotype of SWB with presence of dysmorphic facial features, supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS), intellectual disability, and overfriendliness. With the use of Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization and other molecular cytogenetic techniques, is possible define with more accuracy partial or atypical deletion and refine the genotype-phenotype correlation. Here, we report on a rare genomic structural rearrangement in a boy with atypical deletion in 7q11.23 and XYY syndrome with characteristic clinical signs, but not sufficient for the diagnosis of WBS. Cytogenetic analysis of G-banding showed a karyotype 47,XYY. Analysis of DNA with the technique of MLPA (Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification) using kits a combination of kits (P064, P036, P070, and P029) identified an atypical deletion on 7q11.23. In addition, high resolution SNP Oligonucleotide Microarray Analysis (SNP-array) confirmed the alterations found by MLPA and revealed others pathogenic CNVs, in the chromosomes 7 and X. The present report demonstrates an association not yet described in literature, between Williams-Beuren syndrome and 47,XYY. The identification of atypical deletion in 7q11.23 concomitant to additional pathogenic CNVs in others genomic regions allows a better comprehension of clinical consequences of atypical genomic rearrangements. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Reciprocal duplication of the Williams-Beuren syndrome deletion on chromosome 7q11.23 is associated with schizophrenia.

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    Mulle, Jennifer Gladys; Pulver, Ann E; McGrath, John A; Wolyniec, Paula S; Dodd, Anne F; Cutler, David J; Sebat, Jonathan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Nestadt, Gerald; Conrad, Donald F; Hurles, Matthew; Barnes, Chris P; Ikeda, Masashi; Iwata, Nakao; Levinson, Douglas F; Gejman, Pablo V; Sanders, Alan R; Duan, Jubao; Mitchell, Adele A; Peter, Inga; Sklar, Pamela; O'Dushlaine, Colm T; Grozeva, Detelina; O'Donovan, Michael C; Owen, Michael J; Hultman, Christina M; Kähler, Anna K; Sullivan, Patrick F; Kirov, George; Warren, Stephen T

    2014-03-01

    Several copy number variants (CNVs) have been implicated as susceptibility factors for schizophrenia (SZ). Some of these same CNVs also increase risk for autism spectrum disorders, suggesting an etiologic overlap between these conditions. Recently, de novo duplications of a region on chromosome 7q11.23 were associated with autism spectrum disorders. The reciprocal deletion of this region causes Williams-Beuren syndrome. We assayed an Ashkenazi Jewish cohort of 554 SZ cases and 1014 controls for genome-wide CNV. An excess of large rare and de novo CNVs were observed, including a 1.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 7q11.23 identified in two unrelated patients. To test whether this 7q11.23 duplication is also associated with SZ, we obtained data for 14,387 SZ cases and 28,139 controls from seven additional studies with high-resolution genome-wide CNV detection. We performed a meta-analysis, correcting for study population of origin, to assess whether the duplication is associated with SZ. We found duplications at 7q11.23 in 11 of 14,387 SZ cases with only 1 in 28,139 control subjects (unadjusted odds ratio 21.52, 95% confidence interval: 3.13-922.6, p value 5.5 × 10(-5); adjusted odds ratio 10.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.46-79.62, p value .007). Of three SZ duplication carriers with detailed retrospective data, all showed social anxiety and language delay premorbid to SZ onset, consistent with both human studies and animal models of the 7q11.23 duplication. We have identified a new CNV associated with SZ. Reciprocal duplication of the Williams-Beuren syndrome deletion at chromosome 7q11.23 confers an approximately tenfold increase in risk for SZ. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Autistic disorder in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome: a reconsideration of the Williams-Beuren syndrome phenotype.

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    Tordjman, Sylvie; Anderson, George M; Botbol, Michel; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Carlier, Michèle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Baumann, Clarisse; Cohen, David; Lagneaux, Céline; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Verloes, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare developmental disorder caused by deletion of contiguous genes at 7q11.23, has been characterized by strengths in socialization (overfriendliness) and communication (excessive talkativeness). WBS has been often considered as the polar opposite behavioral phenotype to autism. Our objective was to better understand the range of phenotypic expression in WBS and the relationship between WBS and autistic disorder. The study was conducted on 9 French individuals aged from 4 to 37 years old with autistic disorder associated with WBS. Behavioral assessments were performed using Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) scales. Molecular characterization of the WBS critical region was performed by FISH. FISH analysis indicated that all 9 patients displayed the common WBS deletion. All 9 patients met ADI-R and ADOS diagnostic criteria for autism, displaying stereotypies and severe impairments in social interaction and communication (including the absence of expressive language). Additionally, patients showed improvement in social communication over time. The results indicate that comorbid autism and WBS is more frequent than expected and suggest that the common WBS deletion can result in a continuum of social communication impairment, ranging from excessive talkativeness and overfriendliness to absence of verbal language and poor social relationships. Appreciation of the possible co-occurrence of WBS and autism challenges the common view that WBS represents the opposite behavioral phenotype of autism, and might lead to improved recognition of WBS in individuals diagnosed with autism.

  20. Fissured and geographic tongue in Williams-Beuren syndrome

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    Neeta Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a rare, most often sporadic, genetic disease caused by a chromosomal microdeletion at locus 7q11.23 involving 28 genes. It is characterized by congenital heart defects, neonatal hypercalcemia, skeletal and renal abnormalities, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder, and dysmorphic facies. A number of clinical findings has been reported, but none of the studies evaluated this syndrome considering oral cavity. We here report a fissured and geographic tongue in association with WBS.

  1. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH as a diagnostic tool for Williams-Beuren syndrome

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    Deise Helena de Souza

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with commercial probes covering the elastin gene (ELN was used to determine the frequency of the 7q11.23 deletion in 18 children clinically diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS. A de novo deletion was detected in 15 of the children (83%. Diagnostic investigation for WBS started late in childhood (median = 5.8 years. All the children showed facial features typical of the syndrome, mental retardation and developmental delay. Over-friendliness was observed in the majority of cases. Clinodactyly of the 5th finger (n = 13, cardiovascular disease (n = 9, loquacity (n = 9, low birthweight (n = 8, and failure to thrive (n = 9 were observed only in those children with the deletion. Respiratory problems (n = 9, though not previously reported in the literature, was a common finding in the group studied. Our results confirmed that FISH is useful in identifying 7q11.23 deletions in cases of WBS. Clinical manifestations were more evident in the deletion-positive children.

  2. Epilepsy is a possible feature in Williams-Beuren syndrome patients harboring typical deletions of the 7q11.23 critical region.

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    Nicita, Francesco; Garone, Giacomo; Spalice, Alberto; Savasta, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Kluger, Gerhard; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Pruna, Dario; Freri, Elena; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are rarely reported in Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS)--a contiguous-gene-deletion disorder caused by a 7q11.23 heterozygous deletion of 1.5-1.8 Mb--and no previous study evaluated electro-clinical features of epilepsy in this syndrome. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that atypical deletion (e.g., larger than 1.8 Mb) may be responsible for a more pronounced neurological phenotypes, especially including seizures. Our objectives are to describe the electro-clinical features in WBS and to correlate the epileptic phenotype with deletion of the 7q11.23 critical region. We evaluate the electro-clinical features in one case of distal 7q11.23 deletion syndrome and in eight epileptic WBS (eWBS) patients. Additionally, we compare the deletion size-and deleted genes-of four epileptic WBS (eWBS) with that of four non-epileptic WBS (neWBS) patients. Infantile spasms, focal (e.g., motor and dyscognitive with autonomic features) and generalized (e.g., tonic-clonic, tonic, clonic, myoclonic) seizures were encountered. Drug-resistance was observed in one patient. Neuroimaging discovered one case of focal cortical dysplasia, one case of fronto-temporal cortical atrophy and one case of periventricular nodular heterotopia. Comparison of deletion size between eWBS and neWBS patients did not reveal candidate genes potentially underlying epilepsy. This is the largest series describing electro-clinical features of epilepsy in WBS. In WBS, epilepsy should be considered both in case of typical and atypical deletions, which do not involve HIP1, YWHAG or MAGI2. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ocular Features in 16 Brazilian Patients with Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

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    Viana, Melissa Machado; Frasson, Maria; Galvão, Henrique; Leão, Letícia Lima; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; da Silva Cunha, Pricila; Burle de Aguiar, Marcos José

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) is a multisystem disorder caused by the deletion of contiguous genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Ophthalmologic abnormalities and deficits in visual motor integration are important features of WBS. Here we describe our experience with Brazilian WBS patients and their ophthalmologic features. Sixteen patients with confirmed WBS went through thorough ophthalmologic examination. The most frequent ocular findings in our group of patients were stellate iris pattern (81.2%), hyperopic astigmatism (50%), hyperopia (37.5%), tortuosity of retinal vessel (37.5%) and strabismus (18.7%). This is the second report of ophthalmologic abnormalities in a group of Brazilian individuals with WBS. It is extremely valuable that specific populations are studied so that clinical diagnosis can be refined and management of patients can be driven to the most common presentations of the disease.

  4. Williams syndrome

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    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  5. Williams-Beuren syndrome: pitfalls for diagnosis in limited resources setting

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    Lumaka, Aimé; Lukoo, Rita; Mubungu, Gerrye; Lumbala, Paul; Mbayabo, Gloire; Mupuala, Aimée; Lukusa-Tshilobo, Prosper; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Patients with Williams?Beuren Syndrome can be recognized clinically, given the characteristic dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and behavior. We report on a Congolese boy with typical WBS facial characteristics. He suffered meningitis and coma at the age of 2 years then subsequently presented with profound intellectual disability and atypical behavior. The WBS was only made at age 8.2 years and confirmed with FISH testing and microarray?CGH. The present report aims to...

  6. A child of Williams-Beuren syndrome for inguinal hernia repair: Perioperative management concerns

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    Sangeeta Deka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome, commonly known as Williams syndrome (WS, is a multi-organ disorder. The principal anomalies of the syndrome are developmental delay, unusual craniofacial dysmorphic features, and cardiovascular anomalies such as valvular or supravalvular aortic stenosis, pulmonary artery stenosis, and coronary insufficiency. Sudden cardiac death during minor procedures even in the absence of gross cardiovascular pathology is the most dreaded complication in these patients. A 7-year-old child with WS was posted for left-sided inguinal hernia repair under general anesthesia. Our article describes the uneventful perioperative course of the patient and highlights the concerns and complications that may be an integral part with the syndrome.

  7. Metabolic abnormalities in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

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    Palacios-Verdú, María Gabriela; Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Borralleras, Cristina; Flores, Raquel; Del Campo, Miguel; Campuzano, Victoria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, OMIM-194050) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystemic manifestations caused by a 1.55-1.83 Mb deletion at 7q11.23 including 26-28 genes. Reported endocrine and metabolic abnormalities include transient hypercalcaemia of infancy, subclinical hypothyroidism in ∼ 30% of children and impaired glucose tolerance in ∼ 75% of adult individuals. The purpose of this study was to further study metabolic alterations in patients with WBS, as well as in several mouse models, to establish potential candidate genes. We analysed several metabolic parameters in a cohort of 154 individuals with WBS (data available from 69 to 151 cases per parameter), as well as in several mouse models with complete and partial deletions of the orthologous WBS locus, and searched for causative genes and potential modifiers. Triglyceride plasma levels were significantly decreased in individuals with WBS while cholesterol levels were slightly decreased compared with controls. Hyperbilirubinemia, mostly unconjugated, was found in 18.3% of WBS cases and correlated with subclinical hypothyroidism and hypotriglyceridemia, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms. Haploinsufficiency at MLXIPL and increased penetrance for hypomorphic alleles at the UGT1A1 gene promoter might underlie the lipid and bilirubin alterations. Other disturbances included increased protein and iron levels, as well as the known subclinical hypothyroidism and glucose intolerance. Our results show that several unreported biochemical alterations, related to haploinsufficiency for specific genes at 7q11.23, are relatively common in WBS. The early diagnosis, follow-up and management of these metabolic disturbances could prevent long-term complications in this disorder. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Elastins from patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome and healthy individuals differ on the molecular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Andrea; Huertas, Angela C Mora; Schräder, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a congenital disorder, which involves the heterozygous deletion of the elastin gene and other genes on chromosome 7. Clinical symptoms that are associated with hemizygosity of the essential extracellular matrix protein elastin include premature aging of the skin...... and supravalvular aortic stenosis. However, only little is known about the molecular basis of structural abnormalities in the connective tissue of WBS patients. Therefore, for the first time this study aimed to systematically characterize and compare the structure and amount of elastin present in skin and aortic...... tissue from WBS patients and healthy individuals. Elastin fibers were isolated from tissue biopsies, and it was found that skin of WBS patients contains significantly less elastin compared to skin of healthy individuals. Scanning electron microscopy and mass spectrometric measurements combined...

  9. Sizeable acquired subglottic cyst in a baby with Williams-Beuren syndrome: association or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, Athanasios; Tsakalides, Christos; Chatziavramidis, Angelos; Karagianni, Paraskevi; Dimitriadou, Meropi; Konstantinidis, Iordanis

    2013-10-15

    We describe a case of an acquired subglottic cyst presented with persistent stridor and voice hoarsening in a baby diagnosed with Williams-Beuren syndrome that was born premature and required intubation during neonatal period. We also comment on whether this is a coincidence or there can be an association between impaired elastogenesis, a feature of patients with the syndrome and the formation of a subglottic cyst. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Williams-Beuren syndrome: pitfalls for diagnosis in limited resources setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaka, Aimé; Lukoo, Rita; Mubungu, Gerrye; Lumbala, Paul; Mbayabo, Gloire; Mupuala, Aimée; Tshilobo, Prosper Lukusa; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2016-03-01

    Patients with Williams-Beuren Syndrome can be recognized clinically, given the characteristic dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and behavior. We report on a Congolese boy with typical WBS facial characteristics. He suffered meningitis and coma at the age of 2 years then subsequently presented with profound intellectual disability and atypical behavior. The WBS was only made at age 8.2 years and confirmed with FISH testing and microarray-CGH. The present report aims to warn clinicians that infections may associate and/or modify a genetic disease as this may be observed in developing countries given the prevalence of infectious diseases.

  11. Increased prevalences of left-handedness and left-eye sighting dominance in individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. van Strien (Jan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractHandedness and eye sighting dominance were assessed in a sample of 50 individuals (25 male, 25 female; aged 5 – 38 years) with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS). The prevalences of left-handedness and left-eyedness were compared to the normative prevalences in the general population. We

  12. Malformations vasculaires au cours du syndrome de Williams ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le syndrome de Williams-Beuren est une maladie génétique rare, il associe classiquement une dysmorphie faciale assez spécifique, des malformations cardiovasculaires et un profil neuropsychologique particulier. Nous rapportons les observations de trois enfants atteints du syndrome de Williams-Beuren en insistant ...

  13. Do the exome: A case of Williams-Beuren syndrome with severe epilepsy due to a truncating de novo variant in GABRA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Bernt; Trollmann, Regina; Büttner, Christian; Caliebe, Almuth; Thiel, Christian T; Hüffmeier, Ulrike; Reis, André; Zweier, Christiane

    2016-10-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a relatively common, clinically recognizable microdeletion syndrome. In most cases the typical heterozygous deletion of 1.5 Mb on chromosome 7q11.23 spanning about 26 genes can be identified. Also some larger or smaller atypical deletions have been reported and associated with additional or atypical phenotypic aspects. We report on an individual with typical WBS due to the common deletion and with refractory infantile spasms. Using trio-exome sequencing, we identified a de novo truncating variant c.1200del, p (Lys401Serfs*25) in GABRA1 as the likely cause of the early onset epilepsy. This unique case not only allows to further define the phenotypic spectrum of infantile epileptic encephalopathy associated with rare de novo GABRA1 variants but exemplifies the need for a sensitive review of unclear associations in clinically defined syndromes and for extended diagnostic work-up in individuals with unusual presentations of a genetically confirmed diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. [Williams-Beuren syndrome (Williams syndrome). Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklós, Györgyi; Fekete, György; Haltrich, Irén; Tóth, Miklós; Reismann, Péter

    2017-11-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, that occurs equally in all ethnic groups and both sexes. The diagnosis might be missed during childhood in mild cases. However, establishing the diagnosis is important, not only to find the cause of intellectual disability but to look for cardiovascular, endocrine, psychiatry, urology and other conditions, which can occur at any age in the patients' lifetime. This case report presents the story of 47-year-old woman, who was admitted with haematemesis. During her stay on the ward, in the light of the distinctive facial features, mental retardation, and social behaviour patterns, the possibility of Williams syndrome emerged. Later, the diagnosis was confirmed by genetic analysis. This female is the oldest living patient with Williams syndrome in Hungary. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(47): 1883-1888.

  15. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Yuan SM. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 225-232. Williams syndrome (WS), also known as Williams-Beuren syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder involving multiple systems including the circulatory system. However, the etiologies of the associated congenital heart defects in WS patients have not been sufficiently elucidated and represent therapeutic challenges. The typical congenital heart defects in WS were supravalvar aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis (both valvular and peripheral), aortic coarctation and mitral valvar prolapse. The atypical cardiovascular anomalies include tetralogy of Fallot, atrial septal defects, aortic and mitral valvular insufficiencies, bicuspid aortic valves, ventricular septal defects, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, double chambered right ventricle, Ebstein anomaly and arterial anomalies. Deletion of the elastin gene on chromosome 7q11.23 leads to deficiency or abnormal deposition of elastin during cardiovascular development, thereby leading to widespread cardiovascular abnormalities in WS. In this article, the distribution, treatment and surgical outcomes of typical and atypical cardiac defects in WS are discussed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do well on tasks that involve spoken language, music, and learning by repetition (rote memorization). Affected individuals ... Resources (5 links) Disease InfoSearch: Williams syndrome Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah MalaCards: williams-beuren ...

  17. Síndrome de Williams-Beuren. Enfoque diagnóstico a través del fenotipo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Angelina Lacruz-Rengel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumen (español El síndrome de Williams-Beuren es un trastorno genético del desarrollo neurológico que incluye diferentes manifestaciones clínicas como retardo en el crecimiento e intelectual, cardiopatía congénita y rasgo facial distintivo. El objetivo de este estudio es describir las características clínicas que conducen a su diagnóstico, conocer su evolución fenotípica y las medidas terapéuticas adecuadas. Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, descriptivo, tipo serie de casos, en el que se incluyeron todos los pacientes con el diagnóstico de síndrome de Williams-Beuren, evaluados en el Instituto Autónomo Hospital Universitario de Los Andes, durante enero de 2000 a junio de 2014. El principal motivo de consulta fue la presencia de dismorfía facial y cardiopatía congénita, en la totalidad de los casos. La estenosis de la arteria pulmonar bilateral fue el tipo de cardiopatía congénita más frecuente en 4/7 pacientes. El síndrome de Williams-Beuren es una entidad genética que muestra un amplio espectro de características clínicas. Conocer todos estos hallazgos permite realizar el diagnóstico, ofrecer una adecuada atención médica, psicoterapéutica y educativa que permite mejorar su calidad de vida, sobrevida e inserción a la sociedad Abstract (english Williams-Beuren syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder that includes different clinical manifestations as growth retardation and intellectual, congenital heart disease and distinctive facial features. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical features that leading to their diagnosis, know their phenotypic evolution and provide appropriate treatment. A retrospective, descriptive case series study, which included all patients with a diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome, evaluated in the Autonomous Institute University Hospital of Los Andes, from January 2000 to June 2014 was performed. The main complaint was the presence of facial dysmorphic and

  18. A novel dNTP-limited PCR and HRM assay to detect Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lichen; Zhang, Xiaoqing; You, Guoling; Yu, Yongguo; Fu, Qihua

    2018-06-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is caused by a microdeletion of chromosome arm 7q11.23. A rapid and inexpensive genotyping method to detect microdeletion on 7q11.23 needs to be developed for the diagnosis of WBS. This study describes the development of a new type of molecular diagnosis method to detect microdeletion on 7q11.23 based upon high-resolution melting (HRM). Four genes on 7q11.23 were selected as the target genes for the deletion genotyping. dNTP-limited duplex PCR was used to amplify the reference gene, CFTR, and one of the four genes respectively on 7q11.23. An HRM assay was performed on the PCR products, and the height ratio of the negative derivative peaks between the target gene and reference gene was employed to analyze the copy number variation of the target region. A new genotyping method for detecting 7q11.23 deletion was developed based upon dNTP-limited PCR and HRM, which cost only 96 min. Samples from 15 WBS patients and 12 healthy individuals were genotyped by this method in a blinded fashion, and the sensitivity and specificity was 100% (95% CI, 0.80-1, and 95% CI, 0.75-1, respectively) which was proved by CytoScan HD array. The HRM assay we developed is an rapid, inexpensive, and highly accurate method for genotyping 7q11.23 deletion. It is potentially useful in the clinical diagnosis of WBS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Autosomal dominant inheritance of Williams-Beuren syndrome in a father and son with haploinsufficiency for FKBP6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Kay; Simeonov, Emil; Beckett, William; Donnai, Dian; Tassabehji, May

    2005-04-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a neurodevelopmental microdeletion disorder that usually occurs sporadically due to its location within a highly repetitive genomic region that is unstable and prone to unequal cross-over during meiosis. The consequential loss of chromosomal material includes approximately 1.5 Mb of DNA at 7q11.23. Whilst cases of dominant inheritance have been described in the literature, there have been few reports of molecular confirmation and none have carried out detailed genotyping. We describe a Bulgarian father and son with WBS detected by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (with an elastin gene probe) and loss of heterozygosity mapping using microsatellite markers located in the critical region. These individuals appear to have a common WBS heterozygous deletion, confirming the expected dominant transmission and adding to the few familial cases reported. The deletion includes the gene FKBP6 which has recently been shown to play a role in homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis and male fertility in mouse models. Homozygous Fkbp6 -/- male mice are infertile and our data suggests that haploinsufficiency for FKBP6 does not appear to preclude male fertility in WBS, although male infertility involving this gene has the potential to follow the mouse model as a human autosomal recessive condition.

  20. Synaptic plasticity and spatial working memory are impaired in the CD mouse model of Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borralleras, Cristina; Mato, Susana; Amédée, Thierry; Matute, Carlos; Mulle, Christophe; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Campuzano, Victoria

    2016-08-02

    Mice heterozygous for a complete deletion (CD) equivalent to the most common deletion found in individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) recapitulate relevant features of the neurocognitive phenotype, such as hypersociability, along with some neuroanatomical alterations in specific brain areas. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these phenotypes still remain largely unknown. We have studied the synaptic function and cognition in CD mice using hippocampal slices and a behavioral test sensitive to hippocampal function. We have found that long-term potentiation (LTP) elicited by theta burst stimulation (TBS) was significantly impaired in hippocampal field CA1 of CD animals. This deficit might be associated with the observed alterations in spatial working memory. However, we did not detect changes in presynaptic function, LTP induction mechanisms or AMPA and NMDA receptor function. Reduced levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were present in the CA1-CA3 hippocampal region of CD mice, which could account for LTP deficits in these mice. Taken together, these results suggest a defect of CA1 synapses in CD mice to sustain synaptic strength after stimulation. These data represent the first description of synaptic functional deficits in CD mice and further highlights the utility of the CD model to study the mechanisms underlying the WBS neurocognitive profile.

  1. ABORDAGEM DIAGNÓSTICA DA SÍNDROME DE WILLIAMS - BEUREN.

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Marina Machado

    2016-01-01

    As anomalias cromossômicas causam fenótipos específicos e complexos resultantes de desequilíbrios na dose normal de genes localizados em um segmento cromossômico específico, sendo responsáveis por 60 % ou mais das síndromes genéticas identificáveis. A Síndrome de Williams-Beuren (SWB) caracteriza-se por anomalias múltiplas e deficiência intelectual, descrita independentemente por Williams et al. (1961) e por Beuren et al. (1962). A SWB consiste em uma doença genética causada pela microdeleção...

  2. Alternative treatment for open bite Class III malocclusion in a child with Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Modesto Vieira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS is a rare genetic condition that affects approximately 1 in every 20,000 - 50,000 live births. WBS children have specific skeletal deformities, dental malformations and rare lingual muscle dysfunction. The need for orthodontic and orthognathic therapy has arisen and has been considered a real clinical challenge even for experienced professionals, once it requires a complex and individualized treatment plan. This study reports a case of orthopedic expansion of the maxilla, in which a modified facial mask was used for protraction of the maxillary complex associated with clockwise rotation of the maxilla. In addition, special considerations about treatment time and orthopedic outcomes are discussed.

  3. Reduction of NADPH-oxidase activity ameliorates the cardiovascular phenotype in a mouse model of Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Campuzano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark feature of Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a generalized arteriopathy due to elastin deficiency, presenting as stenoses of medium and large arteries and leading to hypertension and other cardiovascular complications. Deletion of a functional NCF1 gene copy has been shown to protect a proportion of WBS patients against hypertension, likely through reduced NADPH-oxidase (NOX-mediated oxidative stress. DD mice, carrying a 0.67 Mb heterozygous deletion including the Eln gene, presented with a generalized arteriopathy, hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy, associated with elevated angiotensin II (angII, oxidative stress parameters, and Ncf1 expression. Genetic (by crossing with Ncf1 mutant and/or pharmacological (with ang II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, or NOX inhibitor apocynin reduction of NOX activity controlled hormonal and biochemical parameters in DD mice, resulting in normalized blood pressure and improved cardiovascular histology. We provide strong evidence for implication of the redox system in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular disease in a mouse model of WBS. The phenotype of these mice can be ameliorated by either genetic or pharmacological intervention reducing NOX activity, likely through reduced angII-mediated oxidative stress. Therefore, anti-NOX therapy merits evaluation to prevent the potentially serious cardiovascular complications of WBS, as well as in other cardiovascular disorders mediated by similar pathogenic mechanism.

  4. Investigation of deletions at 7q11.23 in 44 patients referred for Williams-Beuren syndrome, using FISH and four DNA polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Beck, B; Gyftodimou, J

    1997-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with a submicroscopic deletion of the elastin gene (ELN) at 7q11.23. The deletion encompasses closely linked DNA markers. We have investigated 44 patients referred for possible WS using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with a P1 clone...... containing an insert from the ELN, as well as performing genotype analysis of patients and parents with four DNA polymorphisms. Twenty-four patients were found to have deletions, 19 of whom were found clinically to have typical WS. The facial features were especially characteristic. None of the patients...

  5. Evaluation of the influence of clinical symptoms on the quality of life in individuals with Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Parolin Jackowski

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS results from a deletion in the chromosome 7q11.23. Psychiatric symptoms, such as Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, and others, have been described in this syndrome. Objective: The main purpose of this study was to identify related clinical symptoms in individuals with WBS and the impact of this disorder in their quality of life. Method: The study sample included 42 individuals aged 11 to 16 years divided into two groups: a study group composed of 20 individuals with WBS and a control group comprising 22 individuals with typical development. The following instruments were used in this evaluation: Brazilian Criterion of Economic Classification (CCEB, to estimate the purchasing power of urban households; Strengths & Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ, to provide a useful measure of psychopathology applied to children and youth aged 4-17 years; and Quality of Life Evaluation Scale (AUQEI, to assess the feeling of well-being according to the opinion of the child and adolescent. Results: The results suggest that adolescents with WBS have a good quality of life despite presenting greater possibilities of psychiatric symptoms. These results are valid considering that quality of life is measured from the opinion of the assessed individual. Conclusion: We hypothesized that adolescents with WBS can present a distortion of reality regarding the positive/optimistic factor, possibly based on some characteristics of the syndrome such as being always cheerful and smiling, which are factors associated with intellectual disability.

  6. Williams-Beuren Syndrome: A Clinical Study of 55 Brazilian Patients and the Diagnostic Use of MLPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Sayuri Honjo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS is a genetic disease caused by a microdeletion in the 7q11.23 region. It is characterized by congenital heart disease, mainly supravalvular aortic stenosis, mental retardation, mild short stature, facial dysmorphisms, and variable abnormalities in different systems. Objectives. To report the clinical findings of 55 Brazilian patients confirmed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Methods. Patients were followed up for 4 years at the Genetics Unit of the Instituto da Criança of the Hospital das Clínicas, FMUSP, Brazil. A kit specific for WBS was used to detect the 7q11.23 microdeletion. Results. Two patients with negative FISH results had positive MLPA results for WBS. The characteristics of the patients with the deletion were as follows: typical WBS facies (98.2%, neuropsychomotor delay (98.2%, hypersocial behavior (94.5%, hyperacusis (94.5%, and congenital heart disease (81.8%. Conclusions. MLPA was effective in detecting the microdeletion in the 7q11.23 region to confirm the diagnosis of WBS. MLPA was also able to confirm the diagnosis of WBS in two patients with typical clinical characteristics but negative FISH results. Thus, MLPA is a promising method in the diagnostic investigation of WBS. WBS is a multisystemic disorder and therefore requires multidisciplinary care and specific follow-up to prevent complications.

  7. Social-emotional and behavioral adjustment in children with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosch, A; Pankau, R

    1994-12-01

    In children with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), disturbed behaviors (neurotic, antisocial, and hyperactive) [Arnold et al., 1985: Dev Med Child Neurol 27:49-59; Udwin et al., 1987: J Child Psychol Psychiat 28:297-309] have been described. To study the behavior disturbances and social-emotional adjustment in children with WBS, a group of N = 19 patients was compared with a control group, matched for age, gender, and nonverbal reasoning abilities. Parents were asked to assess the children's behavior in terms of a list of 20 items of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) [Achenbach and Edelbrock, 1983: Manual for the Child Behavior Checklist] and the Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS) [Lüer et al., 1972: Kurzform der Vineland Social Maturity Scale]. As compared with the control group, children with WBS differ significantly in their social behavior towards strangers. They exhibit no reserve or distancing behavior and would, for instance, follow a stranger without hesitation. They are described as showing a hypersensitivity to sounds that is more pronounced than in the control group. Finally, they are found to be significantly less well-adjusted socially than the control individuals.

  8. Clinical and neuropsychiatric status in children with Williams-Beuren Syndrome in Upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Khaled; Abdelrahman, Ahmed A; Abdallah, Alameldin M; Othman, Hisham A K; Badry, Reda

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and explore the clinical, neuropsychiatric status and EEG pattern in a series of children with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) in Assiut, Upper Egypt. We aimed to provide a comprehensive data comparable to what has been published, to enable us to make comparisons across different cultural areas. This will contribute to a better definition of the neuropsychiatric features that may be specific to WBS that allows early and better detection and management of those children. A series of 17 WBS children patients who consulted at our hospital were evaluated. The patients were assessed mainly for clinical, neurological, psychiatric and EEG status. We performed FISH for all patients. All patients had a deletion of the long arm of chromosome 7 (7q 11.23). All had elfin facies. Neurological examination revealed hypotonia in 25% of patients and rigidity (12.50%), brisk deep tendon reflexes (25%), abnormal plantar response (12.50%). Cerebellar and extrapyramidal signs were frequent: dysmetria (31.25%), dysdiadochokinesia (31.25%) and ataxia (18.75%). Epileptic seizures were present in 31.25% of patients and ADHD (37.5%). Autism was present in one patient. EEG abnormalities were present in 31.25%. Congenital cardiopathies were present in 62.50%. Our data showed that WBS children had multi-systemic clinical complications and the management of those patients requires the pediatrician to understand the natural course of this condition, awareness of potential medical problems, and periodic baseline clinical, neuropsychiatric evaluations, monitoring, and rapid intervention to improve the medical care for patients who have WBS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-11-23

    Nov 23, 2015 ... found the presence of deletion of ELN locus, compatible with. Williams-Beuren syndrome. The diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome was made, and the patient is under observation, with a decline of eight months. Discussion. This paper is about an original case of Williams-Beuren syndrome associated ...

  10. Description of common musculoskeletal findings in Williams Syndrome and implications for therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copes, L E; Pober, B R; Terilli, C A

    2016-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), is a relatively rare genetic disorder affecting ∼1/10,000 persons. Since the disorder is caused by a micro-deletion of ∼1.5 Mb, it is not surprising that the manifestations of WS are extremely broad, involving most body systems. In this paper, we primarily focus on the musculoskeletal aspects of WS as these findings have not been the subject of a comprehensive review. We review the MSK features commonly seen in individuals with WS, along with related sensory and neurological issues interacting with and compounding underlying MSK abnormalities. We end by providing perspective, particularly from the vantage point of a physical therapist, on therapeutic interventions to address the most common MSK and related features seen in WS. Clin. Anat. 29:578-589, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A rare association of central hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency in a boy with Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Dayal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hypothyroidism related to morphological and volumetric abnormalities of the thyroid gland is one of the commonest of several endocrine dysfunctions in Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS. We report a 10-month-old boy with WBS who presented with central hypothyroidism. During the neonatal period, he had prolonged jaundice, feeding difficulties and episodes of colic that continued during early infancy. Additionally, there was slowing of growth and mild developmental delay. He underwent surgical repair for supravalvular aortic stenosis at 6 months of age. An evaluation done to exclude cortisol deficiency before initiating levothyroxine lead to the detection of secondary adrenal insufficiency, unreported previously in WBS. In addition, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3 levels were low. This report of hypopituitarism in WBS indicates a need for complete evaluation of pituitary dysfunction in children with WBS.

  12. Perfil comunicativo de indivíduos com a síndrome de Williams-Beuren Communicative profile of individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Freitas Rossi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever o perfil comunicativo de indivíduos com a síndrome de Williams-Beuren. MÉTODOS: A casuística foi composta por 12 indivíduos com a síndrome com idade cronológica entre 6;6 a 23;6 (Grupo 1 que foram comparados a outros 12 sem a síndrome e com idade mental semelhante e sem dificuldades de linguagem/aprendizagem (Grupo 2. Os indivíduos foram avaliados em situação de conversação para classificação dos comportamentos verbais e não-verbais, segundo critérios pragmáticos, levantamento do número de turnos por minuto, enunciados por turno, Extensão Média de Enunciados, levantamento quanto à freqüência e tipologia de disfluências da fala e classificação quanto ao tipo de pausas plenas do discurso. RESULTADOS: O perfil comunicativo do Grupo 1 mostrou facilidade para interagirem em situação de comunicação com a presença de limitações lingüísticas estruturais e funcionais variáveis, quando comparados aos indivíduos do Grupo 2. Os indivíduos do Grupo 1 freqüentemente utilizaram estratégias comunicativas, na tentativa de preencherem o espaço comunicativo, como o uso de clichês, efeitos sonoros, recursos entonacionais e as pausas plenas que mostraram ser favoráveis do ponto de vista sócio-comunicativo, enquanto que os comportamentos verbais ecolálicos e perseverativos prejudicam o desempenho comunicativo desses indivíduos. CONCLUSÃO: O desempenho comunicativo mais prejudicado do Grupo 1 permitiu especular que comprometimentos lingüísticos nesta condição podem estar presentes, independente da diferença entre idade cronológica e mental. Estudos mais abrangentes poderão responder ao questionamento da dissociação de habilidades cognitivas e lingüísticas nesta síndrome e também no que diz respeito à complexa esta correlação em meio aos distúrbios da comunicação humana.PURPOSE: To describe the communicative profile of individuals with Williams-Beuren syndrome. METHODS: The sample

  13. A new diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome in a 49-year-old man with severe bullous emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Monica H; Carmichael, Nikkola; Bieber, Frederick R; Wiener, Daniel C; Madan, Rachna; Pober, Barbara R; Raby, Benjamin A

    2017-08-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a chromosomal microdeletion syndrome typically presenting with intellectual disability, a unique personality, a characteristic facial appearance, and cardiovascular disease. Several clinical features of WBS are thought to be due to haploinsufficiency of elastin (ELN), as the ELN locus is included within the WBS critical region at 7q11.23. Emphysema, a disease attributed to destruction of pulmonary elastic fibers, has been reported in patients without WBS who have pathogenic variants in ELN but only once (in one patient) in WBS. Here we report a second adult WBS patient with emphysema where the diagnosis of WBS was established subsequent to the discovery of severe bullous emphysema. Haploinsufficiency of ELN likely contributed to this pulmonary manifestation of WBS. This case emphasizes the contribution of rare genetic variation in cases of severe emphysema and provides further evidence that emphysema should be considered in patients with WBS who have respiratory symptoms, as it may be under-recognized in this patient population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Notas no percurso: linguagem musical e Síndrome de Williams/Notes on the way: musical language and Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Souza Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo versa sobre uma síndrome em particular chamada Síndrome de Williams-Beuren. Esta síndrome possui uma relação específica com a música, relação esta que estará no fulcro de nossas preocupações durante as páginas que se seguem. Num primeiro momento faremos uma apresentação da síndrome e de suas singularidades; em seguida nos debruçaremos sobre a especificidade que aqui está em questão, ou seja, a relação da síndrome com o universo sonoro; por fim, traremos um caso com o qual tivemos contato envolvendo a educação musical em contexto da síndrome, e discutiremos a respeito dos elementos que esse contato nos trouxe para pensar essa curiosa e relevante relação entre arte-educação e o desenvolvimento neuropsicológico atípico. The present article is about a particular syndrome, called Williams-Beuren. This syndrome has a very specific relationship with music, which will be at the heart of our concerns over the following pages. Initially we will make a presentation of the syndrome and its singularities. Then we will focus on the uniqueness of the correlation between Williams-Beuren and the musical world. Finally, we will discuss a case which involves musical education in the context of this syndrome, and discuss about the elements, brought by that contact, that are useful to think about this curious and relevant relationship between art education and atypical neuropsychological development.

  15. Sono-vigília, aspectos de memória e melatonina em Síndrome de Williams-Beuren: uma revisão de literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Donadon Santoro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome de Williams-Beuren, distúrbio genético (microdeleção na região cromossômica 7q11.23, apresenta como fenótipo aparente habilidade social que contrasta com o mau funcionamento cognitivo global e visuo-espacial, problemas na forma receptiva, estrutural e semântica da comunicação, além de déficits na atenção, hiperatividade e na memória visuoespacial. Outra caracteristica são desordens no ciclo sono-vigília, com sono ineficaz, resistência em ir para a cama, acordares durante a noite e sonolência durante o dia. Uma possibilidade ainda não explorada nesta síndrome seria o padrão anormal na síntese de melatonina, hormônio capaz de modular a qualidade do sono. Considerando que a qualidade do sono é diretamente influenciada pelos níveis de melatonina e que tanto a melatonina quanto o sono são essenciais para o desenvolvimento adequado das funções cognitivas, buscou-se nesta revisão de literatura quais estudos investigaram separadamente e ou correlacionaram estes três aspectos (melatonina, sono-vigília e memória na síndrome de Williams-Beuren. Para busca, foram utilizadas as bases de dados Medline/Pubmed, SciELO e Lilacs, com os seguintes descritores: "Williams Beuren syndrome, síndrome de Williams Beuren, memory, memória, sleep-wake, sono-vigília, melatonin e melatonina", por meio de cruzamento e com o conectivo AND. O levantamento bibliográfico mostrou que não existem na literatura trabalhos que correlacionaram estas três variáveis entre si nem tampouco trabalhos que investigaram a melatonina na síndrome de Williams-Beuren. As investigações sobre sono assim como as investigações sobre memória são criticamente discutidas neste trabalho que ressalta a necessidade de estudos que correlacionem estes parâmetros, bem como outros fatores comportamentais, cognitivos e bioquímicos a eles relacionados.

  16. Comparing the Broad Socio-Cognitive Profile of Youth with Williams Syndrome and 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, O.; Feldman, R.; Burg-Malki, M.; Keren, M.; Geva, R.; Diesendruck, G.; Gothelf, D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have assessed the socio-cognitive profile in Williams syndrome (WS) and, independently, in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Yet, a cross-syndrome comparison of these abilities between individuals with these two syndromes with known social deficits has not been conducted. Methods: Eighty-two children participated…

  17. Bone mineral status and metabolism in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagi, Stefano; Manoni, Cristina; Scalini, Perla; Chiarelli, Francesco; Verrotti, Alberto; Cecchi, Cecilia; Lapi, Elisabetta; Giglio, Sabrina; Romano, Silvia; de Martino, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate bone mineral status and metabolism in a cohort of patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS). Thirty-one children (15 females, 16 males; mean age 9.6±2.74 years) and 10 young adults (6 females, 4 males; mean age 21.4±5.11 years) with WBS were cross-sectionally evaluated and compared with two age-, sex-, and body-size-matched paediatric (155 subjects, 75 females and 80 males; mean age 9.7±2.93 years) and adult (50 subjects, 30 females and 20 males; mean age 22.3±5.42 years) healthy controls. We evaluated ionised and total calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase levels, and urinary deoxypyridinoline concentrations. We also calculated the phalangeal amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS) and the bone transmission time (BTT) z-scores. WBS patients showed a significantly reduced AD-SoS z-score (p <0.001) and BTT z-score (p <0.001) compared with the controls. This finding persisted when we divided the sample into paediatric and adult patients. WBS patients also had significantly higher ionised (p <0.001) and total calcium (p <0.001) levels as well as higher PTH levels (p <0.001) compared with the controls. Furthermore, WBS children and adolescents had significantly lower serum osteocalcin levels (p <0.001) and urinary deoxypyridinoline concentrations (p <0.001) than controls. WBS subjects exhibit a significant reduction in bone mineral status and impaired bone metabolism. These findings point to the need for close monitoring of WBS patients.

  18. Lower urinary tract symptoms in children and adolescents with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammour, Z M; de Bessa, J; Hisano, M; Bruschini, H; Kim, C A; Srougi, M; Gomes, C M

    2017-04-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a genetic condition caused by a microscopic deletion in the chromosome band 7q11.23. Individuals with WBS may present with congenital cardiovascular defects, neurodevelopmental disturbances and structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) seem to be frequent in this population, but studies on this topic are scarce and based on small case series. To systematically evaluate the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and the acquisition of bladder control in a large population with WBS. A cross-sectional study evaluating 87 consecutive patients with WBS; there were 41 girls and 46 boys. Genetic studies confirmed WBS in all patients. Subjects were clinically evaluated with: a history of LUTS obtained from the parents and child, a structured questionnaire of LUTS, a 3-day urinary frequency-volume chart, a quality of life question regarding LUTS, and physical examination. A history regarding the acquisition of bladder control was directly evaluated from the parents. Mean age of patients was 9.0 ± 4.2 years, ranging from 3 to 19 years. Based on the symptoms questionnaire and the frequency-volume chart, 70 patients (80.5%) were symptomatic. The most common symptom was urgency, affecting 61 (70.1%) patients, followed by increased urinary frequency in 60 (68.9%) patients, and urge-incontinence in 53 (60.9%), as shown in Summary Fig. More than half of the children reported nocturnal enuresis, including 61% of the girls and 52% of the boys. Twenty-three patients (25.6%) had a history of urinary tract infections. The mean age for acquisition of dryness during the day was 4.4 ± 1.9 years. Parents of 61 patients (70.1%) acknowledged that LUTS had a significant impact on the quality of life of their children. A high prevalence of LUTS was confirmed with a significant negative impact on quality of life in a large population of children and adolescents with WBS. It was shown for the first time

  19. Williams syndrome deletions and duplications: Genetic windows to understanding anxiety, sociality, autism, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard J; Procyshyn, Tanya L

    2017-08-01

    We describe and evaluate an integrative hypothesis for helping to explain the major neurocognitive features of individuals with Williams syndrome region deletions and duplications. First, we demonstrate how the cognitive differences between Williams syndrome individuals, individuals with duplications of this region, and healthy individuals parallel the differences between individuals subject to effects of increased or decreased oxytocin. Second, we synthesize evidence showing that variation in expression of the gene GTF2I (General Transcription Factor II-I) underlies the primary social phenotypes of Williams syndrome and that common genetic variation in GTF2I mediates oxytocin reactivity, and its correlates, in healthy populations. Third, we describe findings relevant to the hypothesis that the GTF2I gene is subject to parent of origin effects whose behavioral expression fits with predictions from the kinship theory of genomic imprinting. Fourth, we describe how Williams syndrome can be considered, in part, as an autistic syndrome of Lorna Wing's 'active-but-odd' autism subtype, in contrast to associations of duplications with both schizophrenia and autism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Developmental Course of Conversational Behaviour of Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Heuvel, Ellen; Botting, Nicola; Boudewijns, Inge; Manders, Eric; Swillen, Ann; Zink, Inge

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated three conversational subskills in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS, n = 8, ages 7-13) and Williams syndrome (WS, n = 8, ages 6-12). The researchers re-evaluated these subskills after 18 to 24 months and compared them to those of peers with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID) and IID and comorbid…

  1. Skin findings in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; Danback, Joshua R; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-09-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the skin and vascular elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%), and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity), and E (Young's modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Williams Syndrome with a “Twist”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina Maritsi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome is a rare genetic condition with multisystemic involvement, caused by a microscopic deletion in the chromosome band 7q11.23. We describe the first case of a toddler with Williams syndrome who developed Benign Paroxysmal Torticollis (BPT, a benign dystonic disorder of unknown aetiology.

  3. Assessment of Intellectual and Visuo- Spatial Abilities in Children and Adults with Williams Syndrome / Evaluación de habilidades intelectuales y visuoespaciales de niños y adultos con Síndrome de Williams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Teixeira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Williams-Beuren syndrome (SWB, also known as Williams syndrome, is a contiguous gene deletion of the region 7q.11.23. The main clinical characteristics are typical faces, supravalvular aortic stenosis, failure to thrive, short stature, transient neonatal hypercalcemia, delayed language, friendly personality, hyperacusis and intellectual disability. The diagnosis of SWB is confirmed by the detection of micro deletion by different techniques of molecular cytogenetics, FISH, MLPA or polymorphic markers. This study assessed the verbal intelligence quotient (IQ and performance and visuospatial skills in children and adults with WBS. The composed group was of 31 WBS patients (19 M and 12 F, whose ages ranged from 9 to 26 years (M 14.45 y. All patients had the diagnosis confirmed molecularly. The tests used were the WISC-III, WAIS-III and Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test. The results indicated a total IQ ranged from 51 to 86 (M 63: 22 with mild intellectual disability, 4 with moderate intellectual disability, 4 borderlines and 1 below the normal media. All patients had marked visual-spatial deficits. The results suggest nonverbal reasoning, visuo-spatial perception, spatial representation, working memory, motor planning and executive functions are very affected in this group.

  4. MLPA analysis for a panel of syndromes with mental retardation reveals imbalances in 5.8% of patients with mental retardation and dysmorphic features, including duplications of the Sotos syndrome and Williams-Beuren syndrome regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Maria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Bryndorf, Thue

    2007-01-01

    MLPA analysis for a panel of syndromes with mental retardation (MRS-MLPA) was used for investigation of 258 mentally retarded and dysmorphic patients with normal conventional karyotypes (P064 probe set, MRC-Holland, for detection of (micro)deletions associated with 1p36-deletion, Sotos, Williams...... referred with a clinical suspicion of a specific syndrome, which was confirmed in 17 patients (21.3%). The remaining 90 patients were referred because of mental retardation and dysmorphism but without suspicion of a specific syndrome. Seven imbalances, including four duplications, were detected in these 90...

  5. Developmental course of conversational behaviour of children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Van Den Heuvel, E.; Botting, N.; Boudewijns, I.; Manders, E.; Swillen, A.; Zink, I.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated three conversational subskills in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS, n = 8, ages 7–13) and Williams syndrome (WS, n = 8, ages 6–12). We re-evaluated these subskills after 18 to 24 months and compared them to those of peers with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID) and IID and comorbid autism spectrum disorders (IID+ASD). Children with 22q11.2DS became less actively involved over time. Lower assertiveness than in children with IID was demonstrated. ...

  6. Mother-Child Interaction as a Window to a Unique Social Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Omri; Feldman, Ruth; Burg-Malki, Merav; Keren, Miri; Geva, Ronny; Diesendruck, Gil; Gothelf, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Mother-child interactions in 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) were coded for maternal sensitivity/intrusiveness, child's expression of affect, levels of engagement, and dyadic reciprocity. WS children were found to express more positive emotions towards their mothers compared to 22q11.2DS children and those with…

  7. Williams Syndrome and 15q Duplication: Coincidence versus Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Aditi; Agarwal, Swashti; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystem disorder caused by contiguous gene deletion in 7q11.23, commonly associated with distinctive facial features, supravalvular aortic stenosis, short stature, idiopathic hypercalcemia, developmental delay, joint laxity, and a friendly personality. The clinical features of 15q11q13 duplication syndrome include autism, mental retardation, ataxia, seizures, developmental delay, and behavioral problems. We report a rare case of a girl with genetically confirmed Williams syndrome and coexisting 15q duplication syndrome. The patient underwent treatment for central precocious puberty and later presented with primary amenorrhea. The karyotype revealed 47,XX,+mar. FISH analysis for the marker chromosome showed partial trisomy/tetrasomy for proximal chromosome 15q (15p13q13). FISH using an ELN -specific probe demonstrated a deletion in the Williams syndrome critical region in 7q11.23. To our knowledge, a coexistence of Williams syndrome and 15q duplication syndrome has not been reported in the literature. Our patient had early pubertal development, which has been described in some patients with Williams syndrome. However, years later after discontinuing gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue treatment, she developed primary amenorrhea.

  8. Activity of genes with functions in human Williams-Beuren Syndrome are impacted by mobile element insertions in the gray wolf genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonHoldt, Bridgett M; Ji, Sarah S; Aardema, Matthew L; Stahler, Daniel; Udell, Monique A R; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2018-06-01

    In canines, transposon dynamics have been associated with a hyper-social behavioral syndrome, although the functional mechanism has yet to be described. We investigate the epigenetic and transcriptional consequences of these behavior-associated mobile element insertions in dogs and Yellowstone wolves. We posit that the transposons themselves may not be the causative feature; rather, their transcriptional regulation may exert the functional impact. We survey four outlier transposons associated with hyper-sociability, with the expectation that they are targeted for epigenetic silencing. We predict hyper-methylation of mobile element insertions (MEIs), suggestive that the epigenetic silencing of and not the MEIs themselves may be driving dysregulation of nearby genes. We found that transposon-derived sequences are significantly hyper-methylated, regardless of their copy number or species. Further, we have assessed transcriptome sequence data and found evidence that mobile element insertions impact the expression levels of six genes (WBSCR17, LIMK1, GTF2I, WBSCR27, BAZ1B, and BCL7B), all of which have known roles in human Williams-Beuren syndrome due to changes in copy number, typically hemizygosity. Although further evidence is needed, our results suggest that a few insertions alter local expression at multiple genes, likely through a cis-regulatory mechanism that excludes proximal methylation.

  9. Haploinsufficiency of BAZ1B contributes to Williams syndrome through transcriptional dysregulation of neurodevelopmental pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalli, Matthew A; Jang, Jiwon; Park, Joo-Hye C; Wang, Yidi; Guzman, Elmer; Zhou, Hongjun; Audouard, Morgane; Bridges, Daniel; Tovar, Kenneth R; Papuc, Sorina M; Tutulan-Cunita, Andreea C; Huang, Yadong; Budisteanu, Magdalena; Arghir, Aurora; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-04-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a genomic deletion of ∼28 genes that results in a cognitive and behavioral profile marked by overall intellectual impairment with relative strength in expressive language and hypersocial behavior. Advancements in protocols for neuron differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells allowed us to elucidate the molecular circuitry underpinning the ontogeny of WS. In patient-derived stem cells and neurons, we determined the expression profile of the Williams-Beuren syndrome critical region-deleted genes and the genome-wide transcriptional consequences of the hemizygous genomic microdeletion at chromosome 7q11.23. Derived neurons displayed disease-relevant hallmarks and indicated novel aberrant pathways in WS neurons including over-activated Wnt signaling accompanying an incomplete neurogenic commitment. We show that haploinsufficiency of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler, BAZ1B, which is deleted in WS, significantly contributes to this differentiation defect. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq) revealed BAZ1B target gene functions are enriched for neurogenesis, neuron differentiation and disease-relevant phenotypes. BAZ1B haploinsufficiency caused widespread gene expression changes in neural progenitor cells, and together with BAZ1B ChIP-seq target genes, explained 42% of the transcriptional dysregulation in WS neurons. BAZ1B contributes to regulating the balance between neural precursor self-renewal and differentiation and the differentiation defect caused by BAZ1B haploinsufficiency can be rescued by mitigating over-active Wnt signaling in neural stem cells. Altogether, these results reveal a pivotal role for BAZ1B in neurodevelopment and implicate its haploinsufficiency as a likely contributor to the neurological phenotypes in WS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Clinical utility of an array comparative genomic hybridization analysis for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagihashi, Tatsuhiko; Torii, Chiharu; Takahashi, Reiko; Omori, Mikimasa; Kosaki, Rika; Yoshihashi, Hiroshi; Ihara, Masahiro; Minagawa-Kawai, Yasuyo; Yamamoto, Junichi; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2014-11-01

    To reveal the relation between intellectual disability and the deleted intervals in Williams syndrome, we performed an array comparative genomic hybridization analysis and standardized developmental testing for 11 patients diagnosed as having Williams syndrome based on fluorescent in situ hybridization testing. One patient had a large 4.2-Mb deletion spanning distally beyond the common 1.5-Mb intervals observed in 10/11 patients. We formulated a linear equation describing the developmental age of the 10 patients with the common deletion; the developmental age of the patient with the 4.2-Mb deletion was significantly below the expectation (developmental age = 0.51 × chronological age). The large deletion may account for the severe intellectual disability; therefore, the use of array comparative genomic hybridization may provide practical information regarding individuals with Williams syndrome. © 2014 Japanese Teratology Society.

  11. Handedness and corpus callosal morphology in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A; Wilson, Sarah J; Chen, Jian; Wood, Amanda G; Reutens, David C

    2013-02-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 7q11.23, resulting in atypical brain structure and function, including abnormal morphology of the corpus callosum. An influence of handedness on the size of the corpus callosum has been observed in studies of typical individuals, but handedness has not been taken into account in studies of callosal morphology in Williams syndrome. We hypothesized that callosal area is smaller and the size of the splenium and isthmus is reduced in individuals with Williams syndrome compared to healthy controls, and examined age, sex, and handedness effects on corpus callosal area. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained on 25 individuals with Williams syndrome (18 right-handed, 7 left-handed) and 25 matched controls. We found that callosal thickness was significantly reduced in the splenium of Williams syndrome individuals compared to controls. We also found novel evidence that the callosal area was smaller in left-handed participants with Williams syndrome than their right-handed counterparts, with opposite findings observed in the control group. This novel finding may be associated with LIM-kinase hemizygosity, a characteristic of Williams syndrome. The findings may have significant clinical implications in future explorations of the Williams syndrome cognitive phenotype.

  12. 17q12 Deletion in a patient with Williams syndrome: Case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Lilian; Samanich, Joy; Pan, Quilu; Mehta, Lakshmi; Marion, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a complex genomic disorder entailing distinctive facial dysmorphism, cardiovascular abnormalities, intellectual disabilities, unusual behavioral features, and a specific cognitive profile with considerable variability. Additional symptoms include endocrine abnormalities, renal anomalies and connective tissue disorders. We report a monozygotic twin patient with WS who presented with multicystic kidneys in the newborn period, and, in addition to the typical WS deletion...

  13. Coronary ostium occlusion by coronary cusp displacement in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Ebata, Ryota; Funabashi, Nobusada; Matsumiya, Goro; Saito, Yuko Kazato; Takechi, Fumie; Yonemori, Yoko; Nakatani, Yukio; Shimojo, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Williams syndrome is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome resulting from a heterozygous deletion on chromosome 7q11.23, and is characterized by distinctive facial features and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). This syndrome rarely presents unpredictable cardiac death, and yet, as illustrated in the present case, it is still not possible to predict it, even on close monitoring. We herein describe the case of a 6-year-old Japanese girl with Williams syndrome, who had sudden cardiac collapse due to cardiac infarction after pharyngitis. Cardiac failure followed a critical course that did not respond to catecholamine support or heart rest with extracardiac mechanical support. Although marked coronary stenosis was not present, the left coronary cusp abnormally adhered to the aortic wall, which may synergistically cause coronary ostium occlusion with SVAS. Altered hemodynamic state, even that caused by the common cold, may lead to critical myocardial events in Williams syndrome with SVAS. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. 17q12 Deletion in a patient with Williams syndrome: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lilian; Samanich, Joy; Pan, Quilu; Mehta, Lakshmi; Marion, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a complex genomic disorder entailing distinctive facial dysmorphism, cardiovascular abnormalities, intellectual disabilities, unusual behavioral features, and a specific cognitive profile with considerable variability. Additional symptoms include endocrine abnormalities, renal anomalies and connective tissue disorders. We report a monozygotic twin patient with WS who presented with multicystic kidneys in the newborn period, and, in addition to the typical WS deletion at 7q11.23, was found to have a de novo 1.7 Mb deletion in the 17q12 region on microarray comparative genomic hybridization. The co-twin was selectively terminated at 23 wk of gestation after being diagnosed with bilateral multicystic dysplastic kidneys and anhydramnios. Review of the literature shows that deletion of chromosome 17q12, encompassing hepatocyte nuclear factor 1beta gene, is associated with cystic renal disease and is the first recurrent genomic deletion associated with maturity onset diabetes of the young. In addition, reports of female reproductive tract malformations and patients with neurocognitive or psychiatric phenotypes have recently been described. This review of the literature summarizes 47 other cases involving 17q12 deletions with wide variability in phenotype, possibly suggesting a contiguous gene syndrome. It is likely that the additional 17q12 deletion has played a role in modifying the phenotype in our patient. This case highlights the importance of using array comparative genomic hybridization in the clinical setting to uncover the etiology of atypical findings in individuals with known microdeletion syndromes.

  15. Cognitive and behavioral heterogeneity in genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F.L. Pegoraro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study aimed to investigate the cognitive and behavioral profiles, as well as the psychiatric symptoms and disorders in children with three different genetic syndromes with similar sociocultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Methods: thirty-four children aged 6 to 16 years, with Williams-Beuren syndrome (n = 10, Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 11, and Fragile X syndrome (n = 13 from the outpatient clinics of Child Psychiatry and Medical Genetics Department were cognitively assessed through the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III. Afterwards, a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ, verbal IQ, performance IQ, standard subtest scores, as well as frequency of psychiatric symptoms and disorders were compared among the three syndromes. Results: significant differences were found among the syndromes concerning verbal IQ and verbal and performance subtests. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that vocabulary and comprehension subtest scores were significantly higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome in comparison with Prader-Willi and Fragile X syndromes, and block design and object assembly scores were significantly higher in Prader-Willi syndrome compared with Williams-Beuren and Fragile X syndromes. Additionally, there were significant differences between the syndromes concerning behavioral features and psychiatric symptoms. The Prader-Willi syndrome group presented a higher frequency of hyperphagia and self-injurious behaviors. The Fragile X syndrome group showed a higher frequency of social interaction deficits; such difference nearly reached statistical significance. Conclusion: the three genetic syndromes exhibited distinctive cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric patterns. Resumo: Objetivo: investigar o perfil cognitivo e comportamental, sintomas e transtornos psiquiátricos em crianças com três diferentes síndromes genéticas, com antecedentes socioculturais e socioeconômicos semelhantes. Métodos: trinta e quatro

  16. Drosophila Model for the Analysis of Genesis of LIM-kinase 1-Dependent Williams-Beuren Syndrome Cognitive Phenotypes: INDELs, Transposable Elements of the Tc1/Mariner Superfamily and MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Savvateeva-Popova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Genomic disorders, the syndromes with multiple manifestations, may occur sporadically due to unequal recombination in chromosomal regions with specific architecture. Therefore, each patient may carry an individual structural variant of DNA sequence (SV with small insertions and deletions (INDELs sometimes less than 10 bp. The transposable elements of the Tc1/mariner superfamily are often associated with hotspots for homologous recombination involved in human genetic disorders, such as Williams Beuren Syndromes (WBS with LIM-kinase 1-dependent cognitive defects. The Drosophila melanogaster mutant agnts3 has unusual architecture of the agnostic locus harboring LIMK1: it is a hotspot of chromosome breaks, ectopic contacts, underreplication, and recombination. Here, we present the analysis of LIMK1-containing locus sequencing data in agnts3 and three D. melanogaster wild-type strains—Canton-S, Berlin, and Oregon-R. We found multiple strain-specific SVs, namely, single base changes and small INDEls. The specific feature of agnts3 is 28 bp A/T-rich insertion in intron 1 of LIMK1 and the insertion of mobile S-element from Tc1/mariner superfamily residing ~460 bp downstream LIMK1 3′UTR. Neither of SVs leads to amino acid substitutions in agnts3 LIMK1. However, they apparently affect the nucleosome distribution, non-canonical DNA structure formation and transcriptional factors binding. Interestingly, the overall expression of miRNAs including the biomarkers for human neurological diseases, is drastically reduced in agnts3 relative to the wild-type strains. Thus, LIMK1 DNA structure per se, as well as the pronounced changes in total miRNAs profile, probably lead to LIMK1 dysregulation and complex behavioral dysfunctions observed in agnts3 making this mutant a simple plausible Drosophila model for WBS.

  17. Language and Literacy Development of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Children with the syndrome evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative…

  18. Cognitive and behavioral heterogeneity in genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F.L. Pegoraro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this study aimed to investigate the cognitive and behavioral profiles, as well as the psychiatric symptoms and disorders in children with three different genetic syndromes with similar sociocultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. METHODS: thirty-four children aged 6 to 16 years, with Williams-Beuren syndrome (n = 10, Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 11, and Fragile X syndrome (n = 13 from the outpatient clinics of Child Psychiatry and Medical Genetics Department were cognitively assessed through the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III. Afterwards, a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ, verbal IQ, performance IQ, standard subtest scores, as well as frequency of psychiatric symptoms and disorders were compared among the three syndromes. RESULTS: significant differences were found among the syndromes concerning verbal IQ and verbal and performance subtests. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that vocabulary and comprehension subtest scores were significantly higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome in comparison with Prader-Willi and Fragile X syndromes, and block design and object assembly scores were significantly higher in Prader-Willi syndrome compared with Williams-Beuren and Fragile X syndromes. Additionally, there were significant differences between the syndromes concerning behavioral features and psychiatric symptoms. The Prader-Willi syndrome group presented a higher frequency of hyperphagia and self-injurious behaviors. The Fragile X syndrome group showed a higher frequency of social interaction deficits; such difference nearly reached statistical significance. CONCLUSION: the three genetic syndromes exhibited distinctive cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric patterns.

  19. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26-28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed.

  20. Inversion of the Williams syndrome region is a common polymorphism found more frequently in parents of children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobart, Holly H; Morris, Colleen A; Mervis, Carolyn B; Pani, Ariel M; Kistler, Doris J; Rios, Cecilia M; Kimberley, Kendra W; Gregg, Ronald G; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-05-15

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem disorder caused by deletion of about 1.55 Mb of DNA (including 26 genes) on chromosome 7q11.23, a region predisposed to recombination due to its genomic structure. Deletion of the Williams syndrome chromosome region (WSCR) occurs sporadically. To better define chance for familial recurrence and to investigate the prevalence of genomic rearrangements of the region, 257 children with WS and their parents were studied. We determined deletion size in probands by metaphase FISH, parent-of-origin of the deleted chromosome by molecular genetic methods, and inversion status of the WSCR in both parents by interphase FISH. The frequency of WSCR inversion in the transmitting parent group was 24.9%. In contrast, the rate of inversion in the non-transmitting parent group (a reasonable estimate of the rate in the general population) was 5.8%. There were no significant gender differences with respect to parent-of-origin for the deleted chromosome or the incidence of the inversion polymorphism. There was no difference in the rate of spontaneous abortion for mothers heterozygous for the WSCR inversion relative to mothers without the inversion. We calculate that for a parent heterozygous for a WSCR inversion, the chance to have a child with WS is about 1 in 1,750, in contrast to the 1 in 9,500 chance for a parent without an inversion.

  1. Orientation Perception in Williams Syndrome: Discrimination and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Melanie; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, which stems from a genetic deletion on chromosome 7 and causes a profound weakness in visuospatial cognition. Our current study explores how orientation perception may contribute to the visuospatial deficits in WS. In Experiment 1, we found that WS individuals and normal 3-4 year olds…

  2. Williams syndrome predisposes to vascular stiffness modified by antihypertensive use and copy number changes in NCF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A; Danback, Joshua R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; Reusz, Gyorgy S; Kis, Eva; Bhatt, Ami B; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome is caused by the deletion of 26 to 28 genes, including elastin, on human chromosome 7. Elastin insufficiency leads to the cardiovascular hallmarks of this condition, namely focal stenosis and hypertension. Extrapolation from the Eln(+/-) mouse suggests that affected people may also have stiff vasculature, a risk factor for stroke, myocardial infarction, and cardiac death. NCF1, one of the variably deleted Williams genes, is a component of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex and is involved in the generation of oxidative stress, making it an interesting candidate modifier for vascular stiffness. Using a case-control design, vascular stiffness was evaluated by pulse wave velocity in 77 Williams cases and matched controls. Cases had stiffer conducting vessels than controls (PWilliams syndrome. Pulse wave velocity increased with age at comparable rates in cases and controls, and although the degree of vascular stiffness varied, it was seen in both hypertensive and normotensive Williams participants. Use of antihypertensive medication and extension of the Williams deletion to include NCF1 were associated with protection from vascular stiffness. These findings demonstrate that vascular stiffness is a primary vascular phenotype in Williams syndrome and that treatment with antihypertensives or agents inhibiting oxidative stress may be important in managing patients with this condition, potentially even those who are not overtly hypertensive.

  3. Deletion 22q13.3 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phelan Mary C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deletion 22q13.3 syndrome (deletion 22q13 syndrome or Phelan-McDermid syndrome is a chromosome microdeletion syndrome characterized by neonatal hypotonia, global developmental delay, normal to accelerated growth, absent to severely delayed speech, and minor dysmorphic features. The deletion occurs with equal frequency in males and females and has been reported in mosaic and non-mosaic forms. Due to lack of clinical recognition and often insufficient laboratory testing, the syndrome is under-diagnosed and its true incidence remains unknown. Common physical traits include long eye lashes, large or unusual ears, relatively large hands, dysplastic toenails, full brow, dolicocephaly, full cheeks, bulbous nose, and pointed chin. Behavior is autistic-like with decreased perception of pain and habitual chewing or mouthing. The loss of 22q13.3 can result from simple deletion, translocation, ring chromosome formation and less common structural changes affecting the long arm of chromosome 22, specifically the region containing the SHANK3 gene. The diagnosis of deletion 22q13 syndrome should be considered in all cases of hypotonia of unknown etiology and in individuals with absent speech. Although the deletion can sometimes be detected by high resolution chromosome analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH or array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH is recommended for confirmation. Differential diagnosis includes syndromes associated with hypotonia, developmental delay, speech delay and/or autistic-like affect (Prader-Willi, Angelman, Williams, Smith-Magenis, Fragile X, Sotos, FG, trichorhinophalangeal and velocardiofacial syndromes, autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy. Genetic counseling is recommended and parental laboratory studies should be considered to identify cryptic rearrangements and detect parental mosaicism. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered for future pregnancies in those families with inherited rearrangements

  4. The gene for replication factor C subunit 2 (RFC2) is within the 7q11.23 Williams syndrome deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peoples, R.; Perez-Jurado, L.; Francke, U.; Yu-Ker Wang [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Kaplan, P. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder with multiple system manifestations, including supraval var aortic stenosis (SVAS), peripheral pulmonic stenosis, connective tissue abnormalities, short stature, characteristic personality profile and cognitive deficits, and variable hypercalcemia in infancy. It is caused by heterozygosity for a chromosomal deletion of part of band 7q11.23 including the elastin locus (ELN). Since disruption of the ELN gene causes autosomal dominant SVAS, it is assumed that ELN haploinsufficiency is responsible for the cardiovascular features of WS. The deletion that extends from the ELN locus in both directions is {ge}200 kb in size, although estimates of {ge}2 Mb are suggested by high-resolution chromosome banding and physical mapping studies. We have searched for additional dosage-sensitive genes within the deletion that may be responsible for the noncardiovascular features. We report here that the gene for replication factor C subunit 2 (RFC2) maps within the WS deletion region and was found to be deleted in all of 18 WS patients studied. The protein product of RFC2 is part of a multimeric complex involved in DNA elongation during replication. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Williams syndrome and mature B-Leukemia: A random association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimi, Valentina; Fazio, Grazia; Dell'Acqua, Fabiola; Maitz, Silvia; Galbiati, Marta; Rizzari, Carmelo; Biondi, Andrea; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-12-01

    Williams syndrome (WBS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder with specific phenotypic characteristics and cardiac abnormalities, but is not considered as a cancer predisposing condition. However, in rare cases, malignancies have been described in patients with WBS, with hematologic cancer (mainly Burkitt Lymphoma and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia) as the most represented. We report here the case of a boy with WS and B-NHL. This is the unique case within the large cohort of patients (n = 117) followed in our institution for long time (mean clinical follow-up, 13 years). We herewith propose that the BCL7B gene, located in the chromosomal region commonly deleted in Williams syndrome, could potentially have a role in this particular association. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Case report of sudden death in a child with Williams syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by distinctive personality traits, facial features (so called “elfin face”) and cardiac abnormalities, of which supravalvular aortic stenosis is the most common lesion found. The cause is a deletion of a group of genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Administration of ...

  7. A Diagnosis to Consider in an Adult Patient with Facial Features and Intellectual Disability: Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Özlem Akgün; Şimşek Kiper, Pelin Özlem; Utine, Gülen Eda; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Boduroğlu, Koray

    2017-03-01

    Williams syndrome (OMIM #194050) is a rare, well-recognized, multisystemic genetic condition affecting approximately 1/7,500 individuals. There are no marked regional differences in the incidence of Williams syndrome. The syndrome is caused by a hemizygous deletion of approximately 28 genes, including ELN on chromosome 7q11.2. Prenatal-onset growth retardation, distinct facial appearance, cardiovascular abnormalities, and unique hypersocial behavior are among the most common clinical features. Here, we report the case of a patient referred to us with distinct facial features and intellectual disability, who was diagnosed with Williams syndrome at the age of 37 years. Our aim is to increase awareness regarding the diagnostic features and complications of this recognizable syndrome among adult health care providers. Williams syndrome is usually diagnosed during infancy or childhood, but in the absence of classical findings, such as cardiovascular anomalies, hypercalcemia, and cognitive impairment, the diagnosis could be delayed. Due to the multisystemic and progressive nature of the syndrome, accurate diagnosis is critical for appropriate care and screening for the associated morbidities that may affect the patient's health and well-being.

  8. Disparities in visuo-spatial constructive abilities in Williams syndrome patients with typical deletion on chromosome 7q11.23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Yukako; Tokita, Yoshihito; Mizuno, Seiji; Nakamura, Miho

    2017-02-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is known for its uneven cognitive abilities, especially the difficulty in visuo-spatial cognition, though there are some inter-individual phenotypic differences. It has been proposed that the difficulty in visuo-spatial cognition of WS patients can be attributed to a haploinsufficiency of some genes located on the deleted region in 7q11.23, based on an examination of atypical deletions identified in WS patients with atypical cognitive deficits. According to this hypothesis, the inter-individual differences in visuo-spatial cognitive ability arise from variations in deletion. We investigated whether there were inter-individual differences in the visuo-spatial constructive abilities of five unrelated WS patients with the typical deletion on chromosome 7q11.23 that includes the candidate genes contributing visuo-spatial difficulty in WS patients. We used tests with three-dimensional factors such as Benton's three-dimensional block construction test, which are considered to be more sensitive than those with only two-dimensional factors. There were diverse inter-individual differences in the visuo-spatial constructive abilities among the present participants who shared the same typical genomic deletion of WS. One of the participants showed almost equivalent performances to typically developing adults in those tests. In the present study, we found a wide range of cognitive abilities in visuo-spatial construction even among the patients with a common deletion pattern of WS. The findings suggest that attributing differences in the phenotypes entirely to genetic factors such as an atypical deletion may not be always correct. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep-EEG in dizygotic twins discordant for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Szocs, Katalin; Réthelyi, János M; Gerván, Patrícia; Kovács, Ilona

    2014-01-30

    Reports on twin pairs concordant and discordant for Williams syndrome were published before, but no study unravelled sleep physiology in these cases yet. We aim to fill this gap by analyzing sleep records of a twin pair discordant for Williams syndrome extending our focus on presleep wakefulness and sleep spindling. We performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of the 7q11.23 region of a 17 years old dizygotic opposite-sex twin pair discordant for Williams syndrome. Polysomnography of laboratory sleep at this age was analyzed and followed-up after 1.5 years by ambulatory polysomnography. Sleep stages scoring, EEG power spectra and sleep spindle analyses were carried out. The twin brother showed reduced levels of amplification for all of the probes in the 7q11.23 region indicating a typical deletion spanning at least 1.038 Mb between FKBP6 and CLIP2. The results of the twin sister showed normal copy numbers in the investigated region. Lower sleep times and efficiencies, as well as higher slow wave sleep percents of the twin brother were evident during both recordings. Roughly equal NREM, Stage 2 and REM sleep percents were found. EEG analyses revealed state and derivation-independent decreases in alpha power, lack of an alpha spectral peak in presleep wakefulness, as well as higher NREM sleep sigma peak frequency in the twin brother. Faster sleep spindles with lower amplitude and shorter duration characterized the records of the twin brother. Spectra show a striking reliability and correspondence between the two situations (laboratory vs. home records). Alterations in sleep and specific neural oscillations including the alpha/sigma waves are inherent aspects of Williams syndrome.

  10. Comparing the broad socio-cognitive profile of youth with Williams syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, O; Feldman, R; Burg-Malki, M; Keren, M; Geva, R; Diesendruck, G; Gothelf, D

    2017-12-01

    Numerous studies have assessed the socio-cognitive profile in Williams syndrome (WS) and, independently, in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Yet, a cross-syndrome comparison of these abilities between individuals with these two syndromes with known social deficits has not been conducted. Eighty-two children participated in four study groups: WS (n = 18), 22q112.DS (n = 24), age-matched individuals with idiopathic developmental disability (IDD; n = 20) and typically developing (TD) controls (n = 20). Participants completed four socio-cognitive tests: facial emotion recognition, mental state attribution, differentiating real from apparent emotions and trait inference based on motives and actions-outcomes. The current findings demonstrate that children with WS were better in labelling happy faces compared with children with 22q11.2DS, partially reflecting their exaggerated social drive. In the false belief task, however, the WS and IDD groups performed poorly compared with the 22q11.2DS group, possibly due to their difficulty to interpret subtle social cues. When asked to identify the gap between real-negative vs. apparent-positive emotions, the 22q11.2DS group performed similarly to TD children but better than the WS group, possibly due to their anxious personality and their innate bias towards negatively valence cues. Finally, individuals with WS were more willing to become friends with a story character even when the character's motives were negative, reflecting their difficulty to avoid potentially harmful real-life situations. Overall, our multi-facet socio-cognitive battery uncovered strengths and weaknesses in social cognition that are syndrome-specific, shared among the genetic syndromes, or common to the three clinical groups compared with healthy controls. Our findings underscore the need to devise age-specific and condition-specific assessment tools and intervention programs towards improving these children's socio-cognitive deficits. © 2017

  11. The Tumor Suppressor BCL7B Functions in the Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Uehara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human BCL7 gene family consists of BCL7A, BCL7B, and BCL7C. A number of clinical studies have reported that BCL7 family is involved in cancer incidence, progression, and development. Among them, BCL7B, located on chromosome 7q11.23, is one of the deleted genes in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome. Although several studies have suggested that malignant diseases occurring in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome are associated with aberrations in BCL7B, little is known regarding the function of this gene at the cellular level. In this study, we focused on bcl-7, which is the only homolog of BCL7 gene family in Caenorhabditis elegans, and analyzed bcl-7 deletion mutants. As a result, we found that bcl-7 is required for the asymmetric differentiation of epithelial seam cells, which have self-renewal properties as stem cells and divide asymmetrically through the WNT pathway. Distal tip cell development, which is regulated by the WNT pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans, was also affected in bcl-7-knockout mutants. Interestingly, bcl-7 mutants exhibited nuclear enlargement, reminiscent of the anaplastic features of malignant cells. Furthermore, in KATOIII human gastric cancer cells, BCL7B knockdown induced nuclear enlargement, promoted the multinuclei phenotype and suppressed cell death. In addition, this study showed that BCL7B negatively regulates the Wnt-signaling pathway and positively regulates the apoptotic pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BCL7B/BCL-7 has some roles in maintaining the structure of nuclei and is involved in the modulation of multiple pathways, including Wnt and apoptosis. This study may implicate a risk of malignancies with BCL7B-deficiency, such as Williams-Beuren syndrome.

  12. A human neurodevelopmental model for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Trujillo, Cleber A; Freitas, Beatriz C; Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Herai, Roberto H; Yu, Diana X; Brown, Timothy T; Marchetto, Maria C; Bardy, Cedric; McHenry, Lauren; Stefanacci, Lisa; Järvinen, Anna; Searcy, Yvonne M; DeWitt, Michelle; Wong, Wenny; Lai, Philip; Ard, M Colin; Hanson, Kari L; Romero, Sarah; Jacobs, Bob; Dale, Anders M; Dai, Li; Korenberg, Julie R; Gage, Fred H; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric; Semendeferi, Katerina; Muotri, Alysson R

    2016-08-18

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uncommon hypersociability and a mosaic of retained and compromised linguistic and cognitive abilities. Nearly all clinically diagnosed individuals with Williams syndrome lack precisely the same set of genes, with breakpoints in chromosome band 7q11.23 (refs 1-5). The contribution of specific genes to the neuroanatomical and functional alterations, leading to behavioural pathologies in humans, remains largely unexplored. Here we investigate neural progenitor cells and cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome and typically developing induced pluripotent stem cells. Neural progenitor cells in Williams syndrome have an increased doubling time and apoptosis compared with typically developing neural progenitor cells. Using an individual with atypical Williams syndrome, we narrowed this cellular phenotype to a single gene candidate, frizzled 9 (FZD9). At the neuronal stage, layer V/VI cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome were characterized by longer total dendrites, increased numbers of spines and synapses, aberrant calcium oscillation and altered network connectivity. Morphometric alterations observed in neurons from Williams syndrome were validated after Golgi staining of post-mortem layer V/VI cortical neurons. This model of human induced pluripotent stem cells fills the current knowledge gap in the cellular biology of Williams syndrome and could lead to further insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the disorder and the human social brain.

  13. Cognitive-behavioral phenotypes of Williams syndrome are associated with genetic variation in the GTF2I gene, in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard J; Hurd, Peter L

    2014-11-28

    Individuals with Williams syndrome, a neurogenetic condition caused by deletion of a set of genes at chromosomal location 7q11.23, exhibit a remarkable suite of traits including hypersociality with high, nonselective friendliness and low social anxiety, expressive language relatively well-developed but under-developed social-communication skills overall, and reduced visual-spatial abilities. Deletions and duplications of the Williams-syndrome region have also been associated with autism, and with schizophrenia, two disorders centrally involving social cognition. Several lines of evidence have linked the gene GTF2I (General Transcription Factor IIi) with the social phenotypes of Williams syndrome, but a role for this gene in sociality within healthy populations has yet to be investigated. We genotyped a large set of healthy individuals for two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the GTF2I gene that have recently been significantly associated with autism, and thus apparently exhibit functional effects on autism-related social phenotypes. GTF2I genotypes for these SNPs showed highly significant association with low social anxiety combined with reduced social-communication abilities, which represents a metric of the Williams-syndrome cognitive profile as described from previous studies. These findings implicate the GTF2I gene in the neurogenetic basis of social communication and social anxiety, both in Williams syndrome and among individuals in healthy populations.

  14. RNA-Seq analysis of Gtf2ird1 knockout epidermal tissue provides potential insights into molecular mechanisms underpinning Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Susan M; Canales, Cesar P; Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Mendoza-Reinosa, Veronica; Beverdam, Annemiek; Hardeman, Edna C; Wilkins, Marc R; Palmer, Stephen J

    2016-06-13

    Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) is a genetic disorder associated with multisystemic abnormalities, including craniofacial dysmorphology and cognitive defects. It is caused by a hemizygous microdeletion involving up to 28 genes in chromosome 7q11.23. Genotype/phenotype analysis of atypical microdeletions implicates two evolutionary-related transcription factors, GTF2I and GTF2IRD1, as prime candidates for the cause of the facial dysmorphology. Using a targeted Gtf2ird1 knockout mouse, we employed massively-parallel sequencing of mRNA (RNA-Seq) to understand changes in the transcriptional landscape associated with inactivation of Gtf2ird1 in lip tissue. We found widespread dysregulation of genes including differential expression of 78 transcription factors or coactivators, several involved in organ development including Hey1, Myf6, Myog, Dlx2, Gli1, Gli2, Lhx2, Pou3f3, Sox2, Foxp3. We also found that the absence of GTF2IRD1 is associated with increased expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation, including growth factors consistent with the observed phenotype of extreme thickening of the epidermis. At the same time, there was a decrease in the expression of genes involved in other signalling mechanisms, including the Wnt pathway, indicating dysregulation in the complex networks necessary for epidermal differentiation and facial skin patterning. Several of the differentially expressed genes have known roles in both tissue development and neurological function, such as the transcription factor Lhx2 which regulates several genes involved in both skin and brain development. Gtf2ird1 inactivation results in widespread gene dysregulation, some of which may be due to the secondary consequences of gene regulatory network disruptions involving several transcription factors and signalling molecules. Genes involved in growth factor signalling and cell cycle progression were identified as particularly important for explaining the skin dysmorphology observed in this

  15. 3D PATTERN OF BRAIN ABNORMALITIES IN WILLIAMS SYNDROME VISUALIZED USING TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Reiss, Allan L.; Lee, Agatha D.; Bellugi, Ursula; Galaburda, Albert M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Mills, Debra L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with deletion of ~20 contiguous genes in chromosome band 7q11.23. Individuals with WS exhibit mild to moderate mental retardation, but are relatively more proficient in specific language and musical abilities. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to visualize the complex pattern of gray/white matter reductions in WS, based on fluid registration of structural brain images.

  16. Williams syndrome and its cognitive profile: the importance of eye movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Herwegen J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jo Van Herwegen Department of Psychology, Kingston University London, Surrey, UK Abstract: People with Williams syndrome (WS, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by a deletion on the long arm of chromosome 7, often show an uneven cognitive profile with participants performing better on language and face recognition tasks, in contrast to visuospatial and number tasks. Recent studies have shown that this specific cognitive profile in WS is a result of atypical developmental processes that interact with and affect brain development from infancy onward. Using examples from language, face processing, number, and visuospatial studies, this review evaluates current evidence from eye-tracking and developmental studies and argues that domain general processes, such as the ability to plan or execute saccades, influence the development of these domain-specific outcomes. Although more research on eye movements in WS is required, the importance of eye movements for cognitive development suggests a possible intervention pathway to improve cognitive abilities in this population. Keywords: Williams syndrome, eye movements, face processing, language, number, visuospatial abilities

  17. Language and Communicative Development in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Becerra, Angela M.

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by a microdeletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, is associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability or learning difficulties. Most individuals with Williams syndrome evidence a cognitive profile including relative strengths in verbal short-term memory and language, and…

  18. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  19. Mental Health Problems in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Elison, Sarah; Howlin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Although many researchers have investigated emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals with Williams syndrome, few have used standardized diagnostic assessments. We examined mental health problems in 92 adults with Williams syndrome using the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities--PAS-ADD (Moss,…

  20. Investigating the ''social brain'' through Williams syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Masanori; Mimura, Masaru; Reiss, A.L.; Hoeft, F.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in social cognitive neuroscience have led to the concept of the ''social brain''. The social brain includes neural processes specialized for processing social information necessary for the recognition of self and others, and interpersonal relationships. Because of its unique behavioral phenotypic features which includes 'hypersociability', Williams syndrome has gained popularity among social cognitive neuroscientists. Individuals with Williams syndrome share the same genetic risk factor for cognitive-behavioral dysfunction utilizing brain imaging to elucidate endophenotype provides us with an unprecendented opportunity to study gene, brain and behavior relationships especially those related to social cognition. In this review, we provide an overview of neuroimaging studies on social cognition in Williams syndrome and discuss the neural basis of the social brain. (author)

  1. Brief Report: Functional MRI of a Patient with 7q11.23 Duplication Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Paolo; Serino, Domenico; Caldini, Bernardo; Scarponi, Laura; Merla, Giuseppe; Testa, Giuseppe; Muti, Marco; Napolioni, Valerio; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Piccirilli, Massimo; Donti, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The duplication of the Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) region (7q11.23) is a copy number variant associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One of the most intriguing aspects is that the reciprocal microdeletion causes WBS, characterized by hypersociability, marked empathy, and a relative capacity in verbal short-term memory and language.…

  2. Emotional Responsivity in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Debbie J.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Most, David E.; Philofsky, Amy; Rogers, Sally J.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that young children with Williams syndrome show higher rates of emotional responsivity relative to other children with developmental disabilities was explored. Performance of 23 young children with Williams syndrome and 30 MA-matched children with developmental disabilities of nonspecific etiologies was compared on an adaptation of…

  3. Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams Syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader-Willi and Down Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, R.; Oliver, C.; Moss, J.; Adams, D.; Berg, K.; Burbidge, C.; Howlin, P.; Nelson, L.; Stinton, C.; Waite, J.

    2018-01-01

    This study describes the profile of repetitive behaviour in individuals with Williams syndrome, utilising cross-syndrome comparisons with people with Prader-Willi and Down syndromes. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire was administered to caregivers of adults with Williams (n = 96), Prader-Willi (n = 103) and Down (n = 78) syndromes. There were…

  4. Colour discrimination and categorisation in Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Farran, E. K.; Cranwell, M. B.; Alvarez, J.; Franklin, A.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) present with impaired functioning of the dorsal visual stream relative to the ventral visual stream. As such, little attention has been given to ventral stream functions in WS. We investigated colour processing, a predominantly ventral stream function, for the first time in nineteen individuals with Williams syndrome. Colour discrimination was assessed using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test. Colour categorisation was assessed using a match-to-sample ...

  5. Global and local music perception in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deruelle, Christine; Schön, Daniele; Rondan, Cécilie; Mancini, Josette

    2005-04-25

    Musical processing can be decomposed into the appreciation of global and local elements. This global/local dissociation was investigated with the processing of contour-violated and interval-violated melodies. Performance of a group of 16 children with Williams syndrome and a group of 16 control children were compared in a same-different task. Control participants were more accurate in detecting differences in the contour-violated than in the interval-violated condition while Williams syndrome individuals performed equally well in both conditions. This finding suggests that global precedence may occur at an early perceptual stage in normally developing children. In contrast, no such global precedence is observed in the Williams syndrome population. These data are discussed in the context of atypical cognitive profiles of individuals with Williams syndrome.

  6. Intracranial arteries in individuals with the elastin gene hemideletion of Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wint, D P; Butman, J A; Masdeu, J C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Mervis, C B; Sarpal, D; Morris, C A; Berman, K F

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a rare genetic disorder with a striking neurobehavioral profile characterized by extreme sociability and impaired visuospatial construction abilities, is caused by a hemideletion that includes the elastin gene, resulting in frequent supravavular aortic stenosis and other stenotic arterial lesions. Strokes have been reported in Williams syndrome. Although the extracranial carotid artery has been studied in a sample of patients with Williams syndrome, proximal intracranial arteries have not. Using MRA, we studied the intracranial vessels in 27 participants: 14 patients with Williams syndrome (age range, 18-44 years; mean age, 27.3 ± 9.1; 43% women) and 13 healthy control participants with similar age and sex distribution (age range, 22-52 years; mean age, 33.4 ± 7.6; 46% women). All participants with Williams syndrome had hemideletions of the elastin gene. Blinded to group allocation or to any other clinical data, a neuroradiologist determined the presence of intracranial vascular changes in the 2 groups. The Williams syndrome group and the healthy control group had similar patency of the proximal intracranial arteries, including the internal carotid and vertebral arteries; basilar artery; and stem and proximal branches of the anterior cerebral artery, MCA, and posterior cerebral arteries. The postcommunicating segment of the anterior cerebral artery was longer in the Williams syndrome group. Despite the elastin haploinsufficiency, the proximal intracranial arteries in Williams syndrome preserve normal patency.

  7. White matter integrity deficits in prefrontal-amygdala pathways in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Suzanne N; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Anderson, Adam W; Blackford, Jennifer Urbano

    2012-01-16

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with significant non-social fears. Consistent with this elevated non-social fear, individuals with Williams syndrome have an abnormally elevated amygdala response when viewing threatening non-social stimuli. In typically-developing individuals, amygdala activity is inhibited through dense, reciprocal white matter connections with the prefrontal cortex. Neuroimaging studies suggest a functional uncoupling of normal prefrontal-amygdala inhibition in individuals with Williams syndrome, which might underlie both the extreme amygdala activity and non-social fears. This functional uncoupling might be caused by structural deficits in underlying white matter pathways; however, prefrontal-amygdala white matter deficits have yet to be explored in Williams syndrome. We used diffusion tensor imaging to investigate prefrontal-amygdala white matter integrity differences in individuals with Williams syndrome and typically-developing controls with high levels of non-social fear. White matter pathways between the amygdala and several prefrontal regions were isolated using probabilistic tractography. Within each pathway, we tested for between-group differences in three measures of white matter integrity: fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and parallel diffusivity (λ(1)). Individuals with Williams syndrome had lower FA, compared to controls, in several of the prefrontal-amygdala pathways investigated, indicating a reduction in white matter integrity. Lower FA in Williams syndrome was explained by significantly higher RD, with no differences in λ(1), suggestive of lower fiber density or axon myelination in prefrontal-amygdala pathways. These results suggest that deficits in the structural integrity of prefrontal-amygdala white matter pathways might underlie the increased amygdala activity and extreme non-social fears observed in Williams syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Association between Williams syndrome and adrenal insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rchachi, Meryem; Larwanou, Maazou Mahamane; El Ouahabi, Hanan; Ajdi, Farida

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a developmental disorder including dysmorphia, cardiovascular malformations and a specific neuropsychological profile together with other associated disorders. We report the case of a 17-year old girl, born of a non-inbred marriage, with Williams syndrome discovered during an assessment of degree of failure to thrive. Its association with primary adrenal insufficiency makes it unique. Diagnosis is confirmed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis. Its management consists of the implementation of treatment for adrenal insufficiency associated with a clinico-biological monitoring.

  9. Discovering Structure in Auditory Input: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, Mayada; Cohen, Henri; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    We examined auditory perception in Williams syndrome by investigating strategies used in organizing sound patterns into coherent units. In Experiment 1, we investigated the streaming of sound sequences into perceptual units, on the basis of pitch cues, in a group of children and adults with Williams syndrome compared to typical controls. We showed…

  10. Deletions at chromosome regions 7q11.23 and 7q36 in a patient with Williams syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, C. H.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. J.; Eussen, B. J.; van der Heide, A. A.; van Luijk, R. B.; van Drunen, E.; Beverloo, B. B.; Visscher, F.; van Hemel, J. O.

    2001-01-01

    We report on a patient with Williams syndrome and a complex de novo chromosome rearrangement, including microdeletions at 7q11.23 and 7q36 and additional chromosomal material at 7q36. The nature of this additional material was elucidated by spectral karyotyping and first assigned to chromosome 22.

  11. Increased overall cortical connectivity with syndrome specific local decreases suggested by atypical sleep-EEG synchronization in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert; Kovács, Ilona

    2017-07-21

    Williams syndrome (7q11.23 microdeletion) is characterized by specific alterations in neurocognitive architecture and functioning, as well as disordered sleep. Here we analyze the region, sleep state and frequency-specific EEG synchronization of whole night sleep recordings of 21 Williams syndrome and 21 typically developing age- and gender-matched subjects by calculating weighted phase lag indexes. We found broadband increases in inter- and intrahemispheric neural connectivity for both NREM and REM sleep EEG of Williams syndrome subjects. These effects consisted of increased theta, high sigma, and beta/low gamma synchronization, whereas alpha synchronization was characterized by a peculiar Williams syndrome-specific decrease during NREM states (intra- and interhemispheric centro-temporal) and REM phases of sleep (occipital intra-area synchronization). We also found a decrease in short range, occipital connectivity of NREM sleep EEG theta activity. The striking increased overall synchronization of sleep EEG in Williams syndrome subjects is consistent with the recently reported increase in synaptic and dendritic density in stem-cell based Williams syndrome models, whereas decreased alpha and occipital connectivity might reflect and underpin the altered microarchitecture of primary visual cortex and disordered visuospatial functioning of Williams syndrome subjects.

  12. Conceptualizing neurodevelopmental disorders through a mechanistic understanding of fragile X syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lawrence K; Quintin, Eve-Marie; Haas, Brian W; Reiss, Allan L

    2012-04-01

    The overarching goal of this review is to compare and contrast the cognitive-behavioral features of fragile X syndrome (FraX) and Williams syndrome and to review the putative neural and molecular underpinnings of these features. Information is presented in a framework that provides guiding principles for conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior associations in neurodevelopmental disorders. Abnormalities, in particular cognitive-behavioral domains with similarities in underlying neurodevelopmental correlates, occur in both FraX and Williams syndrome including aberrant frontostriatal pathways leading to executive function deficits, and magnocellular/dorsal visual stream, superior parietal lobe, inferior parietal lobe, and postcentral gyrus abnormalities contributing to deficits in visuospatial function. Compelling cognitive-behavioral and neurodevelopmental contrasts also exist in these two disorders, for example, aberrant amygdala and fusiform cortex structure and function occurring in the context of contrasting social behavioral phenotypes, and temporal cortical and cerebellar abnormalities potentially underlying differences in language function. Abnormal dendritic development is a shared neurodevelopmental morphologic feature between FraX and Williams syndrome. Commonalities in molecular machinery and processes across FraX and Williams syndrome occur as well - microRNAs involved in translational regulation of major synaptic proteins; scaffolding proteins in excitatory synapses; and proteins involved in axonal development. Although the genetic variations leading to FraX and Williams syndrome are different, important similarities and contrasts in the phenotype, neurocircuitry, molecular machinery, and cellular processes in these two disorders allow for a unique approach to conceptualizing gene-brain-behavior links occurring in neurodevelopmental disorders.

  13. The use of emotions in narratives in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Aznar, Ana; Tenenbaum, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Although individuals with Williams syndrome are very sociable, they tend to have limited contact and friendships with peers. In typically developing children the use of positive emotions (e.g., happy) has been argued to be related to peer relationships and popularity. The current study investigated the use and development of emotion words in Williams syndrome using cross-sectional developmental trajectories and examined children's use of different types of emotion words. Nineteen children with Williams syndrome (WS) and 20 typically developing (TD) children matched for chronological age told a story from a wordless picture book. Participants with WS produced a similar number of emotion words compared to the control group and the use of emotion words did not change when plotted against chronological age or vocabulary abilities in either group. However, participants with WS produced more emotion words about sadness. Links between emotion production and friendships as well as future studies are discussed. After reading this article, readers will be able to: explain the development of positive and negative emotions in Williams syndrome and recognize that emotion production is atypical in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Probed Serial Recall in Williams Syndrome: Lexical Influences on Phonological Short-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Jan; McCormack, Teresa; Boucher, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic disorder that, it has been claimed, results in an unusual pattern of linguistic strengths and weaknesses. The current study investigated the hypothesis that there is a reduced influence of lexical knowledge on phonological short-term memory in Williams syndrome. Fourteen children with Williams syndrome and 2…

  15. Using novel control groups to dissect the amygdala's role in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Avery, Suzanne N; Blackford, Jennifer Urbano

    2011-07-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder with an intriguing behavioral phenotype-hypersociability combined with significant non-social fears. Previous studies have demonstrated abnormalities in amygdala function in individuals with Williams syndrome compared to typically-developing controls. However, it remains unclear whether the findings are related to the atypical neurodevelopment of Williams syndrome, or are also associated with behavioral traits at the extreme end of a normal continuum. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare amygdala blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses to non-social and social images in individuals with Williams syndrome compared to either individuals with inhibited temperament (high non-social fear) or individuals with uninhibited temperament (high sociability). Individuals with Williams syndrome had larger amygdala BOLD responses when viewing the non-social fear images than the inhibited temperament control group. In contrast, when viewing both fear and neutral social images, individuals with Williams syndrome did not show smaller amygdala BOLD responses relative to the uninhibited temperament control group, but instead had amygdala responses proportionate to their sociability. These results suggest heightened amygdala response to non-social fear images is characteristic of WS, whereas, variability in amygdala response to social fear images is proportionate to, and might be explained by, levels of trait sociability.

  16. Dissociation of spatial memory systems in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostelmann, Mathilde; Fragnière, Emilie; Costanzo, Floriana; Di Vara, Silvia; Menghini, Deny; Vicari, Stefano; Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta

    2017-11-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic deletion syndrome, is characterized by severe visuospatial deficits affecting performance on both tabletop spatial tasks and on tasks which assess orientation and navigation. Nevertheless, previous studies of WS spatial capacities have ignored the fact that two different spatial memory systems are believed to contribute parallel spatial representations supporting navigation. The place learning system depends on the hippocampal formation and creates flexible relational representations of the environment, also known as cognitive maps. The spatial response learning system depends on the striatum and creates fixed stimulus-response representations, also known as habits. Indeed, no study assessing WS spatial competence has used tasks which selectively target these two spatial memory systems. Here, we report that individuals with WS exhibit a dissociation in their spatial abilities subserved by these two memory systems. As compared to typically developing (TD) children in the same mental age range, place learning performance was impaired in individuals with WS. In contrast, their spatial response learning performance was facilitated. Our findings in individuals with WS and TD children suggest that place learning and response learning interact competitively to control the behavioral strategies normally used to support human spatial navigation. Our findings further suggest that the neural pathways supporting place learning may be affected by the genetic deletion that characterizes WS, whereas those supporting response learning may be relatively preserved. The dissociation observed between these two spatial memory systems provides a coherent theoretical framework to characterize the spatial abilities of individuals with WS, and may lead to the development of new learning strategies based on their facilitated response learning abilities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Anxiety and Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jacqui; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Connolly, Brenda; McConachie, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Williams syndrome are vulnerable to anxiety. The factors that contribute to this risk remain unclear. This study compared anxiety in autism spectrum disorder and Williams Syndrome and examined the relationship between repetitive behaviours and anxiety. Thirty-four children with autism and twenty children…

  18. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan

    1988-01-01

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures

  19. The proceedings of the 15th professional conference on Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Jennifer R; Martens, Marilee A; Pober, Barbara R

    2017-05-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a contiguous gene deletion disorder, caused by the deletion of approximately 26-28 genes from chromosome 7 (7q11.23). Individuals with WS have complex medical, developmental, and behavioral features, requiring multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary collaboration. Guidelines detailing the identification, evaluation, and monitoring of individuals with WS need clarification, especially for primary care providers who are first-line in their management. This report summarizes the proceedings of the 2016 Professional Conference on WS in Columbus, OH. Presentations were directed towards primary care providers and subspecialists, emphasizing evidence-based practices for treating the prevalent medical and behavioral features of WS. Included in this report are findings from a panel of cardiovascular experts discussing three case studies on treatment of hypertension and the use of sedation or anesthesia for non-cardiac procedures. Abstracts from individual expert presenters are included, covering various medical and behavioral topics, and providing updates in management of WS individuals. The following topics were discussed: differences in phenotypes of 7q11.23 deletion versus duplication, growth parameters, endocrine concerns, sleep difficulties, behaviors to monitor, and pharmacological options, the neurodevelopmental profile of WS individuals, and the importance of monitoring medical and behavioral concerns as WS individuals transition to adulthood. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Orthodontic Treatment and Maxillary Anterior Segmental Distraction Osteogenesis of a Subject with Williams–Beuren Syndrome and Isolated Cleft Palate: A Long-Term Follow-Up from the Age of 5 to 24 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirota, Tatsuo; Adel, Mohamed; Takahashi, Masahiro; Haga, Shugo; Nagahama, Ryo; Nakashima, Misato; Furuhata, Mayu; Kamatani, Takaaki; Maki, Koutaro

    2017-01-01

    Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a rare multisystem disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion of the elastin gene on chromosome 7q11.23. WBS patients have characteristic skeletal features and dental anomalies accompanied by mental retardation, a friendly outgoing personality, and mild to moderate intellectual disability or learning problems. In this case report, we present the combined orthodontic and surgical treatment of a WBS patient with an isolated cleft palate through a long-term follow-up from the age of 5 to 24 years. During the period of active treatment, comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with maxillary anterior segmental distraction osteogenesis and prosthetic treatment using dental implants were effective in dramatically improving the patient's malocclusion. The patient's mental abilities and the cooperation shown by the patient and her family were crucial for the success of this complex and long-term treatment course. PMID:28744380

  1. Orthodontic Treatment and Maxillary Anterior Segmental Distraction Osteogenesis of a Subject with Williams–Beuren Syndrome and Isolated Cleft Palate: A Long-Term Follow-Up from the Age of 5 to 24 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsutaro Yamaguchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS is a rare multisystem disorder caused by a hemizygous deletion of the elastin gene on chromosome 7q11.23. WBS patients have characteristic skeletal features and dental anomalies accompanied by mental retardation, a friendly outgoing personality, and mild to moderate intellectual disability or learning problems. In this case report, we present the combined orthodontic and surgical treatment of a WBS patient with an isolated cleft palate through a long-term follow-up from the age of 5 to 24 years. During the period of active treatment, comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with maxillary anterior segmental distraction osteogenesis and prosthetic treatment using dental implants were effective in dramatically improving the patient’s malocclusion. The patient’s mental abilities and the cooperation shown by the patient and her family were crucial for the success of this complex and long-term treatment course.

  2. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Francesca; Menghini, Deny; Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  3. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Foti

    Full Text Available Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for

  4. Genetics Home Reference: proximal 18q deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... characteristic features. Most cases of proximal 18q deletion syndrome are the result of a new (de novo) deletion and are not inherited from a ... J, Fox PT, Stratton RF, Perry B, Hale DE. Recurrent interstitial deletions of proximal 18q: a new syndrome involving expressive speech delay. Am J Med Genet ...

  5. Music and Anxiety in Williams Syndrome: A Harmonious or Discordant Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Rosner, Beth A.; Ly, Tran; Sagun, Jaclyn

    2005-01-01

    In this two-part study, we assessed musical involvements in two samples of persons with Williams syndrome compared to others with mental retardation and also related musicality to anxiety and fears in Study 2. Relative to others with mental retardation, those with Williams syndrome were more likely to take music lessons, play an instrument, and…

  6. Long-term memory for verbal and visual information in Down syndrome and Williams syndrome: performance on the Doors and People test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Christopher; Baddeley, Alan D; Phillips, Caroline

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Williams syndrome and Down syndrome may be associated with specific short-term memory deficits. Individuals with Williams syndrome perform relatively poorly on tests of visuo-spatial short-term memory and individuals with Down syndrome show a relative deficit on verbal short-term memory tasks. However, these patterns of impairments may reflect the impact of generally impaired visuo-spatial processing skills in Williams syndrome, and verbal abilities in Down syndrome. The current study explored this possibility by assessing long-term memory among 15 individuals with Williams syndrome and 20 individuals with Down syndrome using the Doors and People test, a battery which assesses recall and recognition of verbal and visual information. Individuals' performance was standardised for age and level of intellectual ability with reference to that shown by a sample of 110 typically developing children. The results showed that individuals with Down syndrome have no differential deficits in long-term memory for verbal information, implying that verbal short-term memory deficits in this population are relatively selective. Instead both individuals with Down syndrome and with Williams syndrome showed some evidence of relatively poor performance on tests of long-term memory for visual information. It is therefore possible that visuo-spatial short-term memory deficits that have previously been demonstrated in Williams syndrome may be secondary to more general problems in visuo-spatial processing in this population.

  7. Experiences of Bullying for Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H.; Lough, Emma; Griffin, Megan M.; Lane, Laurel A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disability experience high rates of bullying, but it is not known how people with specific syndromes, such as Williams syndrome (WS), experience and respond to bullying. Given their behavioral profile, including hypersociability and heightened anxiety, and their risk for experiencing other forms of…

  8. Stranger Danger Awareness in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, D. M.; Kirk, H.; Hanley, M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is characterised by a distinctive cognitive profile and an intriguing social phenotype. Individuals with the disorder are often highly social engaging with familiar and unfamiliar people and once in an interaction they often show subtle abnormalities of social behaviour. Atypically…

  9. N-acetylcysteine for neuropsychiatric symptoms in a woman with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineiro, Mildred Lopez; Roberts, Antoinette M; Waxler, Jessica L; Mullett, Jennifer E; Pober, Barbara R; McDougle, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Williams syndrome is a relatively rare genetic disorder caused by the hemizygous microdeletion of a region in chromosome 7q11.23. Individuals with Williams syndrome typically present with a highly social, overfriendly, and empathic personality. Comorbid medical and neuropsychiatric disorders are common. Reports of effective pharmacological treatment of associated neuropsychiatric disorders are limited. The authors describe the successful treatment of interfering anger, aggression, and hair-pulling with N-acetylcysteine in a 19-year-old woman with Williams syndrome. The neuropsychiatric symptoms emerged 1 week following an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, for which fentanyl, midazolam, and propofol were used as anesthetics. The patient's treatment course and hypothesized mechanisms underlying the clinical presentation and symptom resolution are described. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Electrophysiological Correlates of Semantic Processing in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ana P.; Galdo-Alvarez, Santaigo; Sampaio, Adriana; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder due to microdeletion in chromosome 7, has been described as a syndrome with an intriguing socio-cognitive phenotype. Cognitively, the relative preservation of language and face processing abilities coexists with severe deficits in visual-spatial tasks, as well as in tasks involving…

  11. Leftward lateralization of auditory cortex underlies holistic sound perception in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengenroth, Martina; Blatow, Maria; Bendszus, Martin; Schneider, Peter

    2010-08-23

    Individuals with the rare genetic disorder Williams-Beuren syndrome (WS) are known for their characteristic auditory phenotype including strong affinity to music and sounds. In this work we attempted to pinpoint a neural substrate for the characteristic musicality in WS individuals by studying the structure-function relationship of their auditory cortex. Since WS subjects had only minor musical training due to psychomotor constraints we hypothesized that any changes compared to the control group would reflect the contribution of genetic factors to auditory processing and musicality. Using psychoacoustics, magnetoencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging, we show that WS individuals exhibit extreme and almost exclusive holistic sound perception, which stands in marked contrast to the even distribution of this trait in the general population. Functionally, this was reflected by increased amplitudes of left auditory evoked fields. On the structural level, volume of the left auditory cortex was 2.2-fold increased in WS subjects as compared to control subjects. Equivalent volumes of the auditory cortex have been previously reported for professional musicians. There has been an ongoing debate in the neuroscience community as to whether increased gray matter of the auditory cortex in musicians is attributable to the amount of training or innate disposition. In this study musical education of WS subjects was negligible and control subjects were carefully matched for this parameter. Therefore our results not only unravel the neural substrate for this particular auditory phenotype, but in addition propose WS as a unique genetic model for training-independent auditory system properties.

  12. Leftward lateralization of auditory cortex underlies holistic sound perception in Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Wengenroth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individuals with the rare genetic disorder Williams-Beuren syndrome (WS are known for their characteristic auditory phenotype including strong affinity to music and sounds. In this work we attempted to pinpoint a neural substrate for the characteristic musicality in WS individuals by studying the structure-function relationship of their auditory cortex. Since WS subjects had only minor musical training due to psychomotor constraints we hypothesized that any changes compared to the control group would reflect the contribution of genetic factors to auditory processing and musicality. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using psychoacoustics, magnetoencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging, we show that WS individuals exhibit extreme and almost exclusive holistic sound perception, which stands in marked contrast to the even distribution of this trait in the general population. Functionally, this was reflected by increased amplitudes of left auditory evoked fields. On the structural level, volume of the left auditory cortex was 2.2-fold increased in WS subjects as compared to control subjects. Equivalent volumes of the auditory cortex have been previously reported for professional musicians. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There has been an ongoing debate in the neuroscience community as to whether increased gray matter of the auditory cortex in musicians is attributable to the amount of training or innate disposition. In this study musical education of WS subjects was negligible and control subjects were carefully matched for this parameter. Therefore our results not only unravel the neural substrate for this particular auditory phenotype, but in addition propose WS as a unique genetic model for training-independent auditory system properties.

  13. The developmental trajectory of disruptive behavior in Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Lauren J; Gray, Kylie M; Howlin, Patricia; Taffe, John; Tonge, Bruce J; Einfeld, Stewart L

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental trajectories of verbal aggression, physical aggression, and temper tantrums in four genetic syndrome groups. Participants were part of the Australian Child to Adult Development Study (ACAD), which collected information from a cohort of individuals with an intellectual disability at five time points over 18 years. Data were examined from a total of 248 people with one of the four following syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, or Williams syndrome. Changes in behaviors were measured using validated items from the Developmental Behavior Checklist (DBC). The results indicate that, while verbal aggression shows no evidence of diminishing with age, physical aggression, and temper tantrums decline with age before 19 years for people with Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, and William syndrome; and after 19 years for people with Prader-Willi syndrome. These findings offer a somewhat more optimistic outlook for people with an intellectual disability than has previously been suggested. Research is needed to investigate the mechanisms predisposing people with PWS to persistence of temper tantrums and physical aggression into adulthood. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: 17q12 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with 17q12 deletion syndrome have delayed development (particularly speech and language delays), intellectual disability, or behavioral or psychiatric disorders. Behavioral and psychiatric conditions that have been reported in people with 17q12 deletion syndrome include autism ...

  15. Fading-Figure Tracing in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Chiyoko; Inui, Toshio; Iwata, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe impairment of visuospatial abilities. Figure-drawing abilities, which are thought to reflect visuospatial abilities, have yet to be fully investigated in WS. The purpose of the present study was to clarify whether drawing abilities differ between WS individuals and…

  16. MRI Amygdala Volume in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Sampaio, Cassandra; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Fernandez, Montse; Garayzabal, Elena; Shenton, Martha E.; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing characteristics of Williams Syndrome individuals is their hypersociability. The amygdala has been consistently implicated in the etiology of this social profile, particularly given its role in emotional and social behavior. This study examined amygdala volume and symmetry in WS individuals and in age and sex matched…

  17. Attention to Faces in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Jones, Nicola; Brown, Philippa H.; Robinson, Lucy J.; Langton, Stephen R. H.; Bruce, Vicki; Riby, Leigh M.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with distinct social behaviours. One component of the WS social phenotype is atypically prolonged face fixation. This behaviour co-exists with attention difficulties. Attention is multi-faceted and may impact on gaze behaviour in several ways. Four experiments assessed (i) attention capture by faces, (ii)…

  18. Cross Syndrome Comparison of Sleep Problems in Children with Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Anna; Hill, Catherine M.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous findings of frequent sleep problems in children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS), the present study aimed to expand our knowledge by using parent report and actigraphy to define sleep problems more precisely in these groups. Twenty-two school-aged children with DS, 24 with WS and 52 typically developing (TD)…

  19. Auditory Attraction: Activation of Visual Cortex by Music and Sound in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype, including cognitive-linguistic features, nonsocial anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with Williams syndrome and typically…

  20. Attentional Disengagement in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Key, Alexandra P.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a distinctive behavioral and cognitive profile, including widespread problems with attention. However, the specific nature of their attentional difficulties, such as inappropriate attentional allocation and/or poor attentional disengagement abilities, has yet to be…

  1. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals dynamic evolution of the elastin gene that has involved purifying selection and lineage-specific insertions/deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Eric D

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elastin gene (ELN is implicated as a factor in both supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and Williams Beuren Syndrome (WBS, two diseases involving pronounced complications in mental or physical development. Although the complete spectrum of functional roles of the processed gene product remains to be established, these roles are inferred to be analogous in human and mouse. This view is supported by genomic sequence comparison, in which there are no large-scale differences in the ~1.8 Mb sequence block encompassing the common region deleted in WBS, with the exception of an overall reversed physical orientation between human and mouse. Results Conserved synteny around ELN does not translate to a high level of conservation in the gene itself. In fact, ELN orthologs in mammals show more sequence divergence than expected for a gene with a critical role in development. The pattern of divergence is non-conventional due to an unusually high ratio of gaps to substitutions. Specifically, multi-sequence alignments of eight mammalian sequences reveal numerous non-aligning regions caused by species-specific insertions and deletions, in spite of the fact that the vast majority of aligning sites appear to be conserved and undergoing purifying selection. Conclusions The pattern of lineage-specific, in-frame insertions/deletions in the coding exons of ELN orthologous genes is unusual and has led to unique features of the gene in each lineage. These differences may indicate that the gene has a slightly different functional mechanism in mammalian lineages, or that the corresponding regions are functionally inert. Identified regions that undergo purifying selection reflect a functional importance associated with evolutionary pressure to retain those features.

  2. A case of William's syndrome associated peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis

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    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Hwang, Mi Soo; Kim, Sun Yong; Chang, Jae Chun; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Yeungam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-06-15

    William's syndrome, in order to more completely delineate the total spectrum of the disorder, indicates that 'infantile hypercalcemia', 'peculiar facies' and 'supravalvular aortic stenosis.' In has other many vascular anomalies, such as peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, coronary arterial stenosis, celiac arterial stenosis, and renal aterial stenosis. Only 32% of the patients have evidence of supravalvular aortic stenosis. And it is very rare disease entity that has been reported rarely in Korea. Recently authors experienced a case that was questioned William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis, clinically and preliminary radiologically and this case was confirmed by operation. Here we report a case of William's syndrome with peripheral pulmonary arterial stenosis and reviewed literatures.

  3. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  4. Williams Syndrome: from genes to clinical features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van Hagen (Johanna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIt all started with the discovery of a narrowing of the ascending aorta, beginning at the superior margin of the sinus of Valsalva in 1842 by N. Chevers (Burn, 1986;Chevers, 1842). This narrowing was named supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in 1930 by L. Mencarelli (Burn, 1986;Beuren,

  5. Colour discrimination and categorisation in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Emily K; Cranwell, Matthew B; Alvarez, James; Franklin, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) present with impaired functioning of the dorsal visual stream relative to the ventral visual stream. As such, little attention has been given to ventral stream functions in WS. We investigated colour processing, a predominantly ventral stream function, for the first time in nineteen individuals with Williams syndrome. Colour discrimination was assessed using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test. Colour categorisation was assessed using a match-to-sample test and a colour naming task. A visual search task was also included as a measure of sensitivity to the size of perceptual colour difference. Results showed that individuals with WS have reduced colour discrimination relative to typically developing participants matched for chronological age; performance was commensurate with a typically developing group matched for non-verbal ability. In contrast, categorisation was typical in WS, although there was some evidence that sensitivity to the size of perceptual colour differences was reduced in this group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Williams syndrome prosociality gene GTF2I mediates oxytocin reactivity and social anxiety in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procyshyn, Tanya L; Spence, Jason; Read, Silven; Watson, Neil V; Crespi, Bernard J

    2017-04-01

    The neurohormone oxytocin plays a central role in human social behaviour and cognition, and oxytocin dysregulation may contribute to psychiatric disorders. However, genetic factors influencing individual variation in the oxytocinergic system remain poorly understood. We genotyped 169 healthy adults for a functional polymorphism in GTF2I ( general transcription factor II-I ), a gene associated with high prosociality and reduced social anxiety in Williams syndrome, a condition reported to involve high oxytocin levels and reactivity. Participants' salivary oxytocin levels were measured before and after watching a validated empathy-inducing video. Oxytocin reactivity, defined as pre- to post-video percentage change in salivary oxytocin, varied substantially and significantly between individuals with different GTF2I genotypes, with, additionally, a trend towards an interaction between genotype and sex. Individuals with more oxytocin-reactive genotypes also reported significantly lower social anxiety. These findings suggest a model whereby GTF2I has a continuum of effects on human sociality, from the extreme social phenotypes and oxytocin dysregulation associated with gene deletion in Williams syndrome, to individual differences in oxytocin reactivity and sociality associated with common polymorphisms in healthy populations. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Viewing Social Scenes: A Visual Scan-Path Study Comparing Fragile X Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tracey A.; Porter, Melanie A.; Langdon, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Williams syndrome (WS) are both genetic disorders which present with similar cognitive-behavioral problems, but distinct social phenotypes. Despite these social differences both syndromes display poor social relations which may result from abnormal social processing. This study aimed to manipulate the location of…

  8. Attention in Williams Syndrome and Down's Syndrome: Performance on the New Early Childhood Attention Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge, Kate; Braddick, Oliver; Anker, Shirley; Woodhouse, Margaret; Atkinson, Janette

    2013-01-01

    Attentional problems are commonly reported as a feature of the behavioural profile in both Williams syndrome (WS) and Down's syndrome (DS). Recent studies have begun to investigate these impairments empirically, acknowledging the need for an approach that considers cross-syndrome comparisons and developmental changes across the different component…

  9. Analysis of Speech Fluency in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia Freitas; Sampaio, Adriana; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Giacheti, Celia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder, often referred as being characterized by dissociation between verbal and non-verbal abilities, although the number of studies disputing this proposal is emerging. Indeed, although they have been traditionally reported as displaying increased speech fluency, this topic has not been…

  10. Attribution of Negative Intention in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    People with Williams syndrome (WS) are said to have sociable and extremely trusting personalities, approaching strangers without hesitation. This study investigated whether people with WS are less likely than controls to attribute negative intent to others when interpreting a series of ambiguous pictures. This may, at least partially, explain…

  11. Outcome in Adult Life for People with Williams Syndrome Results from a Survey of 239 Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, P.; Udwin, O.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although there has been considerable research into the genotype and phenotype of Williams syndrome, there have been relatively few studies of long-term prognosis. As a preliminary to a more detailed investigation of adults with Williams syndrome, a parental questionnaire was distributed to members of the UK Williams Syndrome…

  12. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  13. Brief Report: Developing Spatial Frequency Biases for Face Recognition in Autism and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Hayley C.; Annaz, Dagmara; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether contrasting face recognition abilities in autism and Williams syndrome could be explained by different spatial frequency biases over developmental time. Typically-developing children and groups with Williams syndrome and autism were asked to recognise faces in which low, middle and high spatial frequency…

  14. Fears, Hyperacusis and Musicality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Stefan; Rosander, Michael; Andersson, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    The study investigated the prevalence of fear and hyperacusis and the possible connections between fear, hyperacusis and musicality in a Swedish sample of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). The study included 38 individuals and a cross-sectional design, with no matched control group. Two persons, who knew the participant well, completed a…

  15. Executive Functions in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menghini, D.; Addona, F.; Costanzo, F.; Vicari, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The present study was aimed at investigating working memory (WM) and executive functions capacities in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) as compared with mental-age matched typically developing (TD) children. Method: In order to serve the study goal, a sizeable battery of tasks tapping WM as well as attention, memory, planning,…

  16. Rare Copy Number Variants in a Population Based Investigation of Hypoplastic Right Heart Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Aggeliki; Sicko, Robert J.; Kay, Denise M.; Rigler, Shannon L.; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Caggana, Michele; Browne, Marilyn L.; Fan, Ruzong; Romitti, Paul A.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Mills, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoplastic right heart syndrome (HRHS) is a rare congenital defect characterized by underdevelopment of the right heart structures commonly accompanied by an atrial septal defect. Familial HRHS reports suggest genetic factor involvement. We examined the role of copy number variants (CNVs) in HRHS. Methods We genotyped 32 HRHS cases identified from all New York State live births (1998–2005) using Illumina HumanOmni2.5 microarrays. CNVs were called with PennCNV and prioritized if they were ≥20Kb, contained ≥10 SNPs and had minimal overlap with CNVs from in-house controls, the Database of Genomic Variants, HapMap3 and CHOP database. Results We identified 28 CNVs in 17 cases; several encompassed genes important for right heart development. One case had a 2p16–2p23 duplication spanning LBH, a limb and heart development transcription factor. Lbh mis-expression results in right ventricular hypoplasia and pulmonary valve defects. This duplication also encompassed SOS1, a factor associated with pulmonary valve stenosis in Noonan syndrome. Sos1−/− mice display thin and poorly trabeculated ventricles. In another case, we identified a 1.5Mb deletion associated with Williams Beuren syndrome, a disorder that includes valvular malformations. A third case had a 24Kb deletion upstream of the TGFβ ligand ITGB8. Embryos genetically null for Itgb8, and its intracellular interactant Band 4.1B, display lethal cardiac phenotypes. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study of CNVs in HRHS. We identified several rare CNVs that overlap genes related to right ventricular wall and valve development, suggesting that genetics plays a role in HRHS and providing clues for further investigation. PMID:28009100

  17. Williams syndrome-specific neuroanatomical profile and its associations with behavioral features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chun Chieh; Brown, Timothy T; Bartsch, Hauke; Kuperman, Joshua M; Hagler, Donald J; Schork, Andrew; Searcy, Yvonne; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric; Dale, Anders M

    2017-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder with unique behavioral features. Yet the rareness of WS has limited the number and type of studies that can be conducted in which inferences are made about how neuroanatomical abnormalities mediate behaviors. In this study, we extracted a WS-specific neuroanatomical profile from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements and tested its association with behavioral features of WS. Using a WS adult cohort (22 WS, 16 healthy controls), we modeled a sparse representation of a WS-specific neuroanatomical profile. The predictive performances are robust within the training cohort (10-fold cross-validation, AUC = 1.0) and accurately identify all WS individuals in an independent child WS cohort (seven WS, 59 children with diverse developmental status, AUC = 1.0). The WS-specific neuroanatomical profile includes measurements in the orbitofrontal cortex, superior parietal cortex, Sylvian fissures, and basal ganglia, and variability within these areas related to the underlying size of hemizygous deletion in patients with partial deletions. The profile intensity mediated the overall cognitive impairment as well as personality features related to hypersociability. Our results imply that the unique behaviors in WS were mediated through the constellation of abnormalities in cortical-subcortical circuitry consistent in child WS and adult WS. The robustness of the derived WS-specific neuroanatomical profile also demonstrates the potential utility of our approach in both clinical and research applications.

  18. Psycholinguistic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia F.; Heinze, Elena Garayzabal; Giacheti, Celia M.; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psycholinguistic abilities of children with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA). Performance on the ITPA was analysed in a group with WS (N=20, mean age=8.5 years, SD=1.62) and two typically developing groups,…

  19. 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome: An Underdiagnosed Cause of Mental Retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ilknur Erol

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phelan-McDermid syndrome, also known as 22q13.3 deletion syndrome, is characterized by global developmental delay, absent or delayed speech, generalized hypotonia, and minor physical anomalies. The deletion typically involves the terminal band 22q13.3 and has been associated with both familial and de-novo translocations. We report the case of an 11-year-old Turkish girl with 22q13.3 deletion syndrome presenting with repeated seizures during the course of a rubella infection. We also review the clinical features of 22q13.3 deletion syndrome and emphasize the importance of considering a rare microdeletion syndrome for idiopathic mental retardation when results of a routine karyotype analysis are normal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a Turkish patient with isolated 22q13.3 deletion syndrome. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 169-173

  20. Genetics Home Reference: distal 18q deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 18q deletion syndrome chromosome 18q monosomy chromosome 18q- syndrome De Grouchy syndrome del(18q) syndrome monosomy 18q Related Information How ... MS, Tienari PJ, Wirtavuori KO, Valanne LK. 18q-syndrome: brain MRI shows poor differentiation of gray and white matter on ... RL, Hale DE, Rose SR, Leach RJ, Cody JD. The spectrum ...

  1. Repetition Priming in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Age-Related Dissociation between Implicit and Explicit Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Kittler, Phyllis; Brown, W. Ted; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Devenny, Darlynne A.

    2005-01-01

    We examined implicit and explicit memory in adults with Williams syndrome. An age-related dissociation was found; repetition priming (reflecting implicit memory) did not show change with age, but free recall (reflecting explicit memory) was markedly reduced. We also compared the performance of adults with Williams syndrome to adults with Down…

  2. Dual-Task Processing as a Measure of Executive Function: A Comparison between Adults with Williams and Down Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Devenny, Darlynne A.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral phenotypes of individuals with Williams syndrome and individuals with Down syndrome have been contrasted in relation to short-term memory. People with Down syndrome are stronger visuospatially and those with Williams syndrome are stronger verbally. We examined short-term memory, then explored whether dual-task processing further…

  3. How Executive Functions Are Related to Intelligence in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ana; Cruz, Raquel; Sampaio, Adriana; Garayzabal, Elena; Martinez-Regueiro, Rocio; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Carracedo, Angel; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome is characterized by impairments in executive functions (EFs). However, it remains unknown how distinct types of EFs relate to intelligence in this syndrome. The present study analyzed performance on working memory, inhibiting and shifting, and its links to IQ in a sample of 17 individuals with WS, and compared them with a group…

  4. Kallmann syndrome and ichthyosis: a case of contiguous gene deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Berges-Raso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous form of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and characterized by anosmia or hyposmia due to hypoplasia of the olfactory bulbs; osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome can develop due to longstanding untreated hypogonadism. Kallmann syndrome affects 1 in 10 000 men and 1 in 50 000 women. Defects in 17 genes, including KAL1, have been implicated. Kallmann syndrome can be associated with X-linked ichthyosis, a skin disorder characterized by early onset dark, dry, irregular scales affecting the limb and trunk, caused by a defect of the steroid sulfatase gene (STS. Both KAL1 and STS are located in the Xp22.3 region; therefore, deletions in this region cause a contiguous gene syndrome. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with ichthyosis referred for evaluation of excessive height (2.07 m and weight (BMI: 29.6 kg/m2, microgenitalia and absence of secondary sex characteristics. We diagnosed Kallmann syndrome with ichthyosis due to a deletion in Xp22.3, a rare phenomenon.

  5. Adaptive Functioning in Williams Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawn, Gabrielle; Porter, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    Literature on the level of adaptive functioning and relative strengths and weaknesses in functioning of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) was reviewed. The electronic databases PsycINFO, PubMed, Expanded Academic, Web of Science, Scopus and ProQuest were searched electronically for relevant articles and dissertations using the search terms…

  6. A Cross-Syndrome Study of the Development of Holistic Face Recognition in Children with Autism, Down Syndrome, and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.; Thomas, Michael S. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report a cross-syndrome comparison of the development of holistic processing in face recognition in school-aged children with developmental disorders: autism, Down syndrome, and Williams syndrome. The autism group was split into two groups: one with high-functioning children and one with low-functioning children. The latter group has rarely…

  7. Acquired retinal pigmentary degeneration in a child with 13q deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Zenia P; Belin, Peter J; Cavuoto, Kara M; Jayakar, Parul; McKeown, Craig A

    2015-10-01

    Orbeli syndrome, or 13q deletion syndrome, is a rare condition caused by a distal deletion in the long arm of chromosome 13. The syndrome is characterized by severe physical malformations and developmental delays and has been associated with numerous ocular manifestations. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with 13q deletion syndrome, who was evaluated for impaired vision and found to have bilateral retinal pigmentary changes resembling those seen in retinitis pigmentosa. There has only been one other case of retinal pigment variation in association with 13q deletion syndrome; however, this represents the first case of bilateral symmetric retinal pigmentary changes with corresponding rod and cone dysfunction on electroretinography. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dankner, Nathan; Pryweller, Jennifer R.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffus...

  9. The work experience of a patient affected by Williams Syndrome: a pilot project at the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Francesca; Macchiaiolo, Marina; Carlevaris, Carla Maria; Bartuli, Andrea

    2017-05-31

    A new approach has been designed at the Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital in Rome aimed at increasing empowerment in Williams Syndrome individuals through tutor-assisted work activities. Williams Syndrome is characterized by a combination of distinguishing physical traits, congenital anomalies, intellectual disabilities, and a specific developmental profile.This manuscript describes the case of a Williams Syndrome patient.There are only few papers in the scientific literature describing interventions targeting improvement in the quality of life of adult Williams Syndrome individuals. Therefore, this experience may prove useful to several patients, their families, and the experts helping them.We described an example of intervention aimed at guiding and facilitating a Williams Syndrome patient within a work environment, taking into consideration the peaks and valleys of these individuals' specific abilities.Based on our results, we also stressed the need to promote a set of projects and initiatives aimed at enhancing as much as possible self-sufficiency and psycho-affective balance in Williams Syndrome individuals, in order to protect their dignity and self-esteem.

  10. Health and Social Outcomes in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Findings from Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elison, Sarah; Stinton, Chris; Howlin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated trajectories of cognitive, language and adaptive functioning in Williams syndrome (WS) but little is known about how other aspects of the Williams syndrome behavioural phenotype change across the life-span. Therefore, the present study examined age associated changes in a number of different domains of…

  11. Advocating for Inclusion of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and explore the experience of inclusion of students with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic condition of a microdeletion on chromosome 7 which has medical, behavior, and cognitive issues. The study was conducted by gaining an understanding from the parents' point of view. The study was twofold. First, the…

  12. Anaesthesia-related haemodynamic complications in Williams syndrome patients: a review of one institution's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M; Fahy, C J; Costi, D A; Kelly, A J; Burgoyne, L L

    2014-09-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic disorder associated with cardiac pathology, including supravalvular aortic stenosis and coronary artery stenosis. Sudden cardiac death has been reported in the perioperative period and attributed to cardiovascular pathology. In this retrospective audit, case note and anaesthetic records were reviewed for all confirmed Williams syndrome patients who had received an anaesthetic in our institution between July 1974 and November 2009. There were a total of 108 anaesthetics administered in 29 patients. Twelve of the anaesthetics (11.1%) were associated with cardiac complications including cardiac arrest in two cases (1.85%). Of the two cardiac arrests, one patient died within the first 24 hours postanaesthetic and the other patient survived, giving an overall mortality of 0.9% (3.4%). We conclude that Williams syndrome confers a significant anaesthetic risk, which should be recognised and considered by clinicians planning procedures requiring general anaesthesia.

  13. Gender Attribution and Gender Agreement in French Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boloh, Yves; Ibernon, Laure; Royer, Stephanie; Escudier, Frederique; Danillon, Aurelia

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies on grammatical gender in French individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have led to conflicting findings and interpretations regarding keys abilities--gender attribution and gender agreement. New production data from a larger SW sample (N = 24) showed that gender attribution scores in SW participants exactly mirrored those of…

  14. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of…

  15. Binding of Visual and Spatial Short-Term Memory in Williams Syndrome and Moderate Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Christopher; Phillips, Caroline; Baddeley, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    A main aim of this study was to test the claim that individuals with Williams syndrome have selectively impaired memory for spatial as opposed to visual information. The performance of 16 individuals with Williams syndrome (six males, 10 females; mean age 18y 7mo [SD 7y 6mo], range 9y 1mo-30y 7mo) on tests of short-term memory for item and…

  16. Pulmonary arterial stent implantation in an adult with Williams syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, Herre J.; Henneman, Onno D. F.; van Delden, Otto M.; Biervliet, Jules D.; Kloek, Jaap J.; Reekers, Jim A.; Bresser, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old patient who presented with pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction due to pulmonary artery stenoses as a manifestation of Williams syndrome, mimicking chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The patient was treated with balloon angioplasty and stent

  17. Beyond Behaviour: Is Social Anxiety Low in Williams Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Helen F.; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) exhibit striking social behaviour that may be indicative of abnormally low social anxiety. The present research aimed to determine whether social anxiety is unusually low in WS and to replicate previous findings of increased generalised anxiety in WS using both parent and self report. Fifteen individuals…

  18. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  19. [An updated review of 1p36 deletion (monosomy) syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Sabina; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    The Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome is part of the group of diseases known as Rare Diseases. The objective of the present work is to review the characteristics of Monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome phenotype includes: dysmorphic craniofacial features; large anterior fontanelle, unibrow, deep-set eyes, epicanthus, wide nasal root/bridge, mandible hypoplasia, abnormal location of the pinna, philtrum and pointed chin; neurological alterations: seizures and hydrocephalus (in some cases). Cerebral malformations: ventricular hypertrophy, increased subarachnoid space, morphological alterations of corpus callosum, cortical atrophy, delays in myelinisation, periventricular leukomalacia and periventricular heterotopia. These alterations produce intellectual disability and delays in motor growth, communication skills, language, social and adaptive behaviour. It is Hearing and vision impairments are also observed in subjects with this syndrome, as well as alterations of cardiac, endocrine and urinary systems and alterations at skin and skeletal level. Approximately 100 cases have been documented since 1981. This rare disease is the most common subtelomeric-micro-deletion syndrome. In situ hybridization with fluorescence (FISH) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH-array) are at present the two best diagnostic techniques. There is currently no effective medical treatment for this disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  1. Binding of visual and spatial short-term memory in Williams syndrome and moderate learning disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Christopher; Phillips, Caroline; Baddeley, Alan D

    2007-04-01

    A main aim of this study was to test the claim that individuals with Williams syndrome have selectively impaired memory for spatial as opposed to visual information. The performance of 16 individuals with Williams syndrome (six males, 10 females; mean age 18y 7mo [SD 7y 6mo], range 9y 1mo-30y 7mo) on tests of short-term memory for item and location information was compared with that shown by individuals with moderate learning difficulties (12 males, four females; mean age 10y 3mo [SD 1y], range 8y 6mo-11y 7mo) and typically developing children (six males, 10 females; mean age 6y 8mo [SD 7mo], range 5y 10mo-7y 9mo) of an equivalent level of visuospatial ability. A second aim was to determine whether individuals had impaired ability to 'bind' visual spatial information when required to recall 'item in location' information. In contrast to previous findings, there was no evidence that individuals with Williams syndrome were more impaired in the spatial than the visual memory condition. However, individuals with both Williams syndrome and moderate learning difficulties showed impaired memory for item in location information, suggesting that problems of binding may be generally associated with learning disability.

  2. The Role of Spiral Multidetector Dynamic CT in the Study of Williams-Campbell Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scioscio, V. di; Zompatori, M.; Mistura, I.; Montanari, P.; Santilli, L.; Luccaroni, R.; Sverzellati, N.

    2006-01-01

    Williams-Campbell syndrome is a cystic bronchiectatic disease secondary to deficiency or defect of cartilaginous plates in the wall of the airways. In the literature, two main forms are suggested: congenital and acquired (post-infectious). The most frequent symptoms are represented by recurrent pulmonary infections from childhood. Multislice spiral dynamic CT has a major role in the study of cystic pulmonary disease and in differentiating Williams-Campbell syndrome from the other causes of cystic bronchiectasis, in which even lung function tests can give deceptive results

  3. The Role of Spiral Multidetector Dynamic CT in the Study of Williams-Campbell Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scioscio, V. di; Zompatori, M.; Mistura, I.; Montanari, P.; Santilli, L.; Luccaroni, R.; Sverzellati, N. [Medical Univ. of Bologna, S. Orsola-Malpighi Policlinic (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-10-15

    Williams-Campbell syndrome is a cystic bronchiectatic disease secondary to deficiency or defect of cartilaginous plates in the wall of the airways. In the literature, two main forms are suggested: congenital and acquired (post-infectious). The most frequent symptoms are represented by recurrent pulmonary infections from childhood. Multislice spiral dynamic CT has a major role in the study of cystic pulmonary disease and in differentiating Williams-Campbell syndrome from the other causes of cystic bronchiectasis, in which even lung function tests can give deceptive results.

  4. Early onset intellectual disability in chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Marco; Muzio, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, or DiGeorge syndrome, or velocardiofacial syndrome, is one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes in humans. This syndrome is commonly caused by a microdelection from chromosome 22 at band q11.2. Although this genetic disorder may reflect several clinical abnormalities and different degrees of organ commitment, the clinical features that have driven the greatest amount of attention are behavioral and developmental features, because individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have a 30-fold risk of developing schizophrenia. There are differing opinions about the cognitive development, and commonly a cognitive decline rather than an early onset intellectual disability has been observed. We report a case of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome with both early assessment of mild intellectual disabilities and tetralogy of Fallot as the only physic manifestation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Syndrome identification based on 2D analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stefan; Vollmar, Tobias; Tasse, Christiane; Wurtz, Rolf P; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2006-10-01

    Clinical evaluation of children with developmental delay continues to present a challenge to the clinicians. In many cases, the face provides important information to diagnose a condition. However, database support with respect to facial traits is limited at present. Computer-based analyses of 2D and 3D representations of faces have been developed, but it is unclear how well a larger number of conditions can be handled by such systems. We have therefore analysed 2D pictures of patients each being affected with one of 10 syndromes (fragile X syndrome; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; Williams-Beuren syndrome; Prader-Willi syndrome; Mucopolysaccharidosis type III; Cri-du-chat syndrome; Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome; Sotos syndrome; Microdeletion 22q11.2; Noonan syndrome). We can show that a classification accuracy of >75% can be achieved for a computer-based diagnosis among the 10 syndromes, which is about the same accuracy achieved for five syndromes in a previous study. Pairwise discrimination of syndromes ranges from 80 to 99%. Furthermore, we can demonstrate that the criteria used by the computer decisions match clinical observations in many cases. These findings indicate that computer-based picture analysis might be a helpful addition to existing database systems, which are meant to assist in syndrome diagnosis, especially as data acquisition is straightforward and involves off-the-shelf digital camera equipment.

  6. Case report of sudden death in a child with Williams syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two year old child, confirmed with Williams syndrome (WS) ... and no relevant cardiac history such as chest pain or episodes ... brain, abdominal and pelvic organ blocks. .... a fully functional operating theatre complex presents a number.

  7. Aortic anomalies in an adolescent with the Williams' elfin facies syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.; Azouz, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    An adolescent with classical Williams' syndrome who presented with hypertensive encephalopathy is described. He had the unusual combination of supravalvular aortic stenosis, long segment coarctation of the aorta, aortic hypoplasia and a high bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. Surgical resection of the coarctation was required; however, the patient has remained moderately hypertensive. The aortic anomalies in this syndrome are reviewed and their frequency and importance examined. (orig.)

  8. Speech Timing and Verbal Short-Term Memory: Evidence for Contrasting Deficits in Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrold, Christopher; Cowan, Nelson; Hewes, Alexa K.; Riby, Deborah M.

    2004-01-01

    This study explored the degree of verbal short-term memory deficit among individuals with Down syndrome and Williams syndrome, and the extent to which any such impairment could be accounted for by a relative slowing of rehearsal and output processes. Measures of serial recall and detailed assessments of speeded articulation for short and long…

  9. Atypical Sleep Architecture and Altered EEG Spectra in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, F.; Bodizs, R.; Kovacs, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods: In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants…

  10. The Development of Route Learning in Down Syndrome, Williams Syndrome and Typical Development: Investigations with Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Harry R. M.; Farran, Emily K.; Courbois, Yannick; Lemahieu, Axelle; Sockeel, Pascal; Mellier, Daniel; Blades, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The ability to navigate new environments has a significant impact on the daily life and independence of people with learning difficulties. The aims of this study were to investigate the development of route learning in Down syndrome (N = 50), Williams syndrome (N = 19), and typically developing children between 5 and 11 years old (N = 108); to…

  11. The Interplay between Anxiety and Social Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Hanley, Mary; Kirk, Hannah; Clark, Fiona; Little, Katie; Fleck, Ruth; Janes, Emily; Kelso, Linzi; O'Kane, Fionnuala; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Allday, Marianne Hvistendahl; Hocking, Darren; Cornish, Kim; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore…

  12. How Flexible is the Use of Egocentric Versus Allocentric Frame of Reference in the Williams Syndrome Population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiz, J; Majerus, S; Barisnikov, K

    2017-09-28

    This study examined the spontaneous use of allocentric and egocentric frames of reference and their flexible use as a function of instructions. The computerized spatial reference task created by Heiz and Barisnikov (2015) was used. Participants had to choose a frame of reference according to three types of instructions: spontaneous, allocentric and egocentric. The performances of 16 Williams Syndrome participants between 10 and 41 years were compared to those of two control groups (chronological age and non-verbal intellectual ability). The majority of Williams Syndrome participants did not show a preference for a particular frame of reference. When explicitly inviting participants to use an allocentric frame of reference, all three groups showed an increased use of the allocentric frame of reference. At the same time, an important heterogeneity of type of frame of reference used by Williams Syndrome participants was observed. Results demonstrate that despite difficulties in the spontaneous use of allocentric and egocentric frames of reference, some Williams Syndrome participants show flexibility in the use of an allocentric frame of reference when an explicit instruction is provided. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Perceptual Speech and Paralinguistic Skills of Adolescents with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Patricia M.; Pittelko, Stephen; Fillingane, Evan; Rustman, Emily; Lund, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare selected speech and paralinguistic skills of speakers with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing peers and to demonstrate the feasibility of providing preexisting databases to students to facilitate graduate research. In a series of three studies, conversational samples of 12 adolescents with…

  14. Comprehension of Metaphor and Metonymy in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Van Herwegen, Jo; Thomas, Michael; Fishman, Roza; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Background: Figurative language, such as metaphor and metonymy, is very common in daily language use. Its underlying cognitive processes are sometimes viewed as lying at the interface of language and thought. Williams syndrome, which is a rare genetic developmental disorder, provides an opportunity to study this interface because individuals with…

  15. Behavioral Profiles of Children with Williams Syndrome from Spain and the United States: Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Débora; Brun-Gasca, Carme; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2017-01-01

    To identify similarities and differences in the behavioral profile of children with Williams syndrome from Spain (n = 53) and the United States (n = 145), we asked parents of 6- to 14-year-olds with Williams syndrome to complete the Child Behavior Checklist 6-18. The distribution of raw scores was significantly higher for the Spanish sample than…

  16. Audiological follow-up of 24 patients affected by Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barozzi, Stefania; Soi, Daniela; Spreafico, Emanuela; Borghi, Anna; Comiotto, Elisabetta; Gagliardi, Chiara; Selicorni, Angelo; Forti, Stella; Cesarani, Antonio; Brambilla, Daniele

    2013-09-01

    Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with cardiovascular problems, facial abnormalities and several behavioural and neurological disabilities. It is also characterized by some typical audiological features including abnormal sensitivity to sounds, cochlear impairment related to the outer hair cells of the basal turn of the cochlea, and sensorineural or mixed hearing loss, predominantly in the high frequency range. The aim of this report is to describe a follow-up study of auditory function in a cohort of children affected by this syndrome. 24 patients, aged 5-14 years, were tested by means of air/bone conduction pure-tone audiometry, immittance test and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. They were evaluated again 5 years after the first assessment, and 10 of them underwent a second follow-up examination after a further 5 years. The audiometric results showed hearing loss, defined by a pure tone average >15 dB HL, in 12.5% of the participants. The incidence of hearing loss did not change over the 5-year period and increased to 30% in the patients who underwent the 10-year follow-up. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss was detected in 20% of the patients. A remarkable finding of our study regarded sensorineural hearing impairment in the high frequency range, which increased significantly from 25% to 50% of the participants over the 5-year period. The increase became even more significant in the group of patients who underwent the 10-year follow-up, by which time the majority of them (80%) had developed sensorineural hearing loss. Otoacoustic emissions were found to be absent in a high percentage of patients, thus confirming the cochlear fragility of individuals with Williams syndrome. Our study verified that most of the young Williams syndrome patients had normal hearing sensitivity within the low-middle frequency range, but showed a weakness regarding the high frequencies, the threshold of which worsened significantly over time in

  17. Examining Reports of Mental Health in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Tomlinson, Katie; Estes, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have a disposition towards anxiety. Information regarding this is typically derived from parents and carers. The perspectives of the individuals with WS are rarely included in research of this nature. We examined the mental health of 19 adults with WS using explicit (psychiatric…

  18. Human versus Non-Human Face Processing: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andreia; Rosset, Delphine; Deruelle, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Increased motivation towards social stimuli in Williams syndrome (WS) led us to hypothesize that a face's human status would have greater impact than face's orientation on WS' face processing abilities. Twenty-nine individuals with WS were asked to categorize facial emotion expressions in real, human cartoon and non-human cartoon faces presented…

  19. Personal Space Regulation in Williams Syndrome: The Effect of Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Emma; Flynn, Emma; Riby, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Personal space refers to a protective barrier that we strive to maintain around our body. We examined personal space regulation in young people with Williams syndrome (WS) and their typically developing, chronological age-matched peers using a parent report questionnaire and a stop-distance paradigm. Individuals with WS were reported by their…

  20. Partial USH2A deletions contribute to Usher syndrome in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna D; Kann, Erik; Albrechtsen, Anders; Mehrjouy, Mana M; Bak, Mads; Tommerup, Niels; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Rosenberg, Thomas; Jensen, Hanne; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2015-12-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital hearing impairment, progressive visual loss owing to retinitis pigmentosa and in some cases vestibular dysfunction. Usher syndrome is divided into three subtypes, USH1, USH2 and USH3. Twelve loci and eleven genes have so far been identified. Duplications and deletions in PCDH15 and USH2A that lead to USH1 and USH2, respectively, have previously been identified in patients from United Kingdom, Spain and Italy. In this study, we investigate the proportion of exon deletions and duplications in PCDH15 and USH2A in 20 USH1 and 30 USH2 patients from Denmark using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Two heterozygous deletions were identified in USH2A, but no deletions or duplications were identified in PCDH15. Next-generation mate-pair sequencing was used to identify the exact breakpoints of the two deletions identified in USH2A. Our results suggest that USH2 is caused by USH2A exon deletions in a small fraction of the patients, whereas deletions or duplications in PCDH15 might be rare in Danish Usher patients.

  1. Sequence homology at the breakpoint and clinical phenotype of mitochondrial DNA deletion syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Wang, Jing; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Landsverk, Megan; Douglas, Ganka; Brundage, Ellen K; Craigen, William J; Schmitt, Eric S; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2010-12-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41). Only 15% (3/20) of the young patients (deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17) exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier onset and more severe disease with multisystem involvement.

  2. Recurrence and Variability of Germline EPCAM Deletions in Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Roland P.; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Bodmer, Danielle; Hoenselaar, Eveline; Goossens, Monique; Haufe, Aline; Kamping, Eveline; Niessen, Renee C.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Redeker, Bert; Tops, Carli M. J.; van Gijn, Marielle E.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena; Kahl, Philip; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Stemmler, Susanne; Betz, Beate; Hutter, Pierre; Bunyan, David J.; Syngal, Sapna; Culver, Julie O.; Graham, Tracy; Chan, Tsun L.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; van Krieken, J. Han J. M.; Schackert, Hans K.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    Recently, we identified 3' end deletions in the EPCAM gene as a novel cause of Lynch syndrome. These truncating EPCAM deletions cause allele-specific epigenetic silencing of the neighboring DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2 in tissues expressing EPCAM. Here we screened a cohort of unexplained Lynch-like

  3. RBPJ is disrupted in a case of proximal 4p deletion syndrome with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tojo; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Endo, Wakaba; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Hino-fukuyo, Naomi; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Iwasaki, Masaki; Tominaga, Teiji; Kure, Shigeo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-06-01

    Proximal 4p deletion syndrome is characterized clinically by mental retardation, minor dysmorphic facial features, and is occasionally complicated with epilepsy. More than 20 cases of proximal 4p deletion syndrome have been reported, but the causative gene(s) remain elusive. We describe here a 2-year-old female patient with a common manifestation of proximal 4p deletion syndrome and infantile epileptic encephalopathy possessing a de novo balanced translocation t(4;13)(p15.2;q12.13). The patient was diagnosed as infantile spasms at 9 months of age. She presented with dysmorphic facial features and global developmental delay, compatible with proximal 4p deletion syndrome. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we determined the translocation breakpoint at 4p15.2 to be within RBPJ. RBPJ is a transcription factor in the Notch/RBPJ signaling pathway, playing a crucial role in the developing human brain, and particularly telencephalon development. Our findings, combined with those of previous studies, strongly suggest that RBPJ is causative for proximal 4p deletion syndrome and epilepsy in this case. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Interplay between Executive Control and Motor Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Darren R.; Thomas, Daniel; Menant, Jasmine C.; Porter, Melanie A.; Smith, Stuart; Lord, Stephen R.; Cornish, Kim M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, show specific weaknesses in visual attention and response inhibition within the visuospatial domain. Here we examine the extent to which impairments in attentional control extend to the visuomotor domain using a…

  5. Adaptive Behavior and Problem Behavior in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Laura J.; Fidler, Deborah J.; Hepburn, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study compares the adaptive behavior profile of 18 young children with Williams syndrome (WS) and a developmentally matched group of 19 children with developmental disabilities and examines the relationship between adaptive behavior and problem behaviors in WS. Parents completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales--Interview…

  6. Coexistence of 9p Deletion Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günes, Serkan; Ekinci, Özalp; Ekinci, Nuran; Toros, Fevziye

    2017-01-01

    Deletion or duplication of the short arm of chromosome 9 may lead to a variety of clinical conditions including craniofacial and limb abnormalities, skeletal malformations, mental retardation, and autism spectrum disorder. Here, we present a case report of 5-year-old boy with 9p deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorder.

  7. Elicited Production of Relative Clauses in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Relative clauses have been implicated alternately as a strength and a weakness in the language of people with Williams Syndrome (WS). To clarify the facts, an elicited production test was administered to 10 people with WS (age 10-16 years), 10 typically developing children (age 4-7 years), and 12 typically developing adults. Nearly every WS…

  8. An estimation of the prevalence of genomic disorders using chromosomal microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillentine, Madelyn A; Lupo, Philip J; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Schaaf, Christian P

    2018-04-24

    Multiple genomic disorders result from recurrent deletions or duplications between low copy repeat (LCR) clusters, mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination. These copy number variants (CNVs) often exhibit variable expressivity and/or incomplete penetrance. However, the population prevalence of many genomic disorders has not been estimated accurately. A subset of genomic disorders similarly characterized by CNVs between LCRs have been studied epidemiologically, including Williams-Beuren syndrome (7q11.23), Smith-Magenis syndrome (17p11.2), velocardiofacial syndrome (22q11.21), Prader-Willi/Angelman syndromes (15q11.2q12), 17q12 deletion syndrome, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1/hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (PMP22, 17q11.2). We have generated a method to estimate prevalence of highly penetrant genomic disorders by (1) leveraging epidemiological data for genomic disorders with previously reported prevalence estimates, (2) obtaining chromosomal microarray data on genomic disorders from a large medical genetics clinic; and (3) utilizing these in a linear regression model to determine the prevalence of this syndromic copy number change among the general population. Using our algorithm, the prevalence for five clinically relevant recurrent genomic disorders: 1q21.1 microdeletion (1/6882 live births) and microduplication syndromes (1/6309), 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome (1/5525), and 16p11.2 microdeletion (1/3021) and microduplication syndromes (1/4216), were determined. These findings will inform epidemiological strategies for evaluating those conditions, and our method may be useful to evaluate the prevalence of other highly penetrant genomic disorders.

  9. An Investigation into Semantic and Phonological Processing in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheryl S.; Binder, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The current study examined semantic and phonological processing in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Previous research in language processing in individuals with WS suggests a complex linguistic system characterized by "deviant" semantic organization and differential phonological processing. Method: Two experiments…

  10. Genes, language, and the nature of scientific explanations: the case of Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Julien; Landau, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss two experiments of nature and their implications for the sciences of the mind. The first, Williams syndrome, bears on one of cognitive science's holy grails: the possibility of unravelling the causal chain between genes and cognition. We sketch the outline of a general framework to study the relationship between genes and cognition, focusing as our case study on the development of language in individuals with Williams syndrome. Our approach emphasizes the role of three key ingredients: the need to specify a clear level of analysis, the need to provide a theoretical account of the relevant cognitive structure at that level, and the importance of the (typical) developmental process itself. The promise offered by the case of Williams syndrome has also given rise to two strongly conflicting theoretical approaches-modularity and neuroconstructivism-themselves offshoots of a perennial debate between nativism and empiricism. We apply our framework to explore the tension created by these two conflicting perspectives. To this end, we discuss a second experiment of nature, which allows us to compare the two competing perspectives in what comes close to a controlled experimental setting. From this comparison, we conclude that the "meaningful debate assumption", a widespread assumption suggesting that neuroconstructivism and modularity address the same questions and represent genuine theoretical alternatives, rests on a fallacy.

  11. Developmental Trajectories of Structural and Pragmatic Language Skills in School-Aged Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Heuvel, E.; Manders, E.; Swillen, A.; Zink, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to compare developmental courses of structural and pragmatic language skills in school-aged children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID). Comparison of these language trajectories could highlight syndrome-specific developmental features. Method: Twelve monolingual…

  12. Histology of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and non-syndromic children with velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josine C C Widdershoven

    Full Text Available Plastic surgeons aim to correct velopharyngeal insufficiency manifest by hypernasal speech with a velopharyngoplasty. The functional outcome has been reported to be worse in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome than in patients without the syndrome. A possible explanation is the hypotonia that is often present as part of the syndrome. To confirm a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, specimens of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle were taken from children with and without the syndrome. Histologic properties were compared between the groups. Specimens from the two groups did not differ regarding the presence of increased perimysial or endomysial space, fiber grouping by size or type, internalized nuclei, the percentage type I fibers, or the diameters of type I and type II fibers. In conclusion, a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome could not be confirmed.

  13. Histology of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and non-syndromic children with velopharyngeal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdershoven, Josine C C; Spruijt, Nicole E; Spliet, Wim G M; Breugem, Corstiaan C; Kon, Moshe; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B

    2011-01-01

    Plastic surgeons aim to correct velopharyngeal insufficiency manifest by hypernasal speech with a velopharyngoplasty. The functional outcome has been reported to be worse in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome than in patients without the syndrome. A possible explanation is the hypotonia that is often present as part of the syndrome. To confirm a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, specimens of the pharyngeal constrictor muscle were taken from children with and without the syndrome. Histologic properties were compared between the groups. Specimens from the two groups did not differ regarding the presence of increased perimysial or endomysial space, fiber grouping by size or type, internalized nuclei, the percentage type I fibers, or the diameters of type I and type II fibers. In conclusion, a myogenic component of the etiology of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome could not be confirmed.

  14. Prosodic Abilities of Spanish-Speaking Adolescents and Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Castilla, Pastora; Sotillo, Maria; Campos, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the relevant role of prosody in communication, and in contrast with other linguistic components, there is paucity of research in this field for Williams syndrome (WS). Therefore, this study performed a systematic assessment of prosodic abilities in WS. The Spanish version of the Profiling Elements of Prosody in Speech-Communication…

  15. Diurnal Cortisol Profile in Williams Syndrome in Novel and Familiar Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam Diane; Tomarken, Andrew J.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder associated with high rates of anxiety and social issues. We examined diurnal cortisol, a biomarker of the stress response, in adults with WS in novel and familiar settings, and compared these profiles to typically developing (TD) adults. WS and TD participants had similar profiles in…

  16. A Rare Syndrome of Deletion in 2 Siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravindhan Veerapandiyan MBBS

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 gene codes for an ionotropic glutamate delta-2 receptor, which is selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells, and facilitates cerebellar synapse organization and transmission. The phenotype associated with the deletion of Glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 gene in humans was initially defined in 2013. In this case report, the authors describe 2 brothers who presented with developmental delay, tonic upward gaze, nystagmus, oculomotor apraxia, hypotonia, hyperreflexia, and ataxia. They were found to have a homozygous intragenic deletion within the Glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 gene at exon 2. Our patients serve as an addition to the literature of previously reported children with this rare clinical syndrome associated with Glutamate receptor, ionotropic, delta 2 deletion.

  17. Featural versus configural face processing in a rare genetic disorder: Williams syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isaac, L.; Lincoln, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Williams syndrome (WMS) is a rare genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 20 000 live births. Among other characteristics, WMS has a distinctive cognitive profile with spared face processing and language skills that contrasts with impairment in the cognitive domains of

  18. Williams Syndrome and Anesthesia for Non-cardiac Surgery: High Risk Can Be Mitigated with Appropriate Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Morgan L; Nasr, Viviane G; Toohey, Rebecca; DiNardo, James A

    2018-03-23

    Patients with Williams syndrome are considered at high risk for anesthesia-related adverse events. At our institution, all William syndrome patients undergoing cardiac surgical, cardiac catheterization/interventional procedures, and cardiac imaging studies are cared for by cardiac anesthesiologists. All William syndrome patients undergoing non-cardiac surgical, interventional, or imaging studies are cared for by main operating room pediatric anesthesiologists with consultative input from a cardiac anesthesiologist. We reviewed our experience with 75 patients undergoing 202 separate anesthetics for 95 non-cardiac procedures and 107 cardiac procedures from 2012 to 2016. The mean age was 7.5 ± 7.0 years and the mean weight was 22.3 ± 17.0 kg. One hundred and eighty-seven patients had a general anesthetic (92.6%). Medications used included etomidate in 26.2%, propofol in 37.6%, isoflurane in 47.5%, and sevoflurane in 68.3%. Vasopressors and inotropes were required including calcium (22.8%), dopamine (10.4%), norepinephrine (17.3%), phenylephrine (35.1%), vasopressin (0.5%), and ephedrine (5.4%). The median length of stay after anesthesia was 2.8 days (range 0-32). No adverse events occurred in 89.6% of anesthetics. There were two cases of cardiac arrest, one of which required extracorporeal life support for resuscitation. Of the non-cardiac surgical procedures, 95.7% did not have a cardiovascular adverse event. Patients with Williams syndrome are at high risk for anesthesia, especially when undergoing cardiac procedures. The risk can be mitigated with appropriate planning and adherence to the hemodynamic goals for non-cardiac surgical procedures.

  19. Drug-Coated Balloon Angioplasty: A Novel Treatment for Pulmonary Artery In-Stent Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer L; Glickstein, Julie S; Crystal, Matthew A

    2017-12-01

    A 20-month-old boy with Williams syndrome had undergone multiple surgical and catheter-based interventions for resistant peripheral pulmonary arterial stenoses with eventual bilateral stent placement and conventional balloon angioplasty. He persistently developed suprasystemic right ventricular (RV) pressure. Angioplasty with a drug-coated balloon (DCB) was performed for in-stent restenosis and to remodel his distal pulmonary vessels bilaterally. This resulted in immediate improvement in the in-stent stenosis and resultant decrease in RV pressure. Follow-up catheterization two months later continued to show long-lasting improvement in the in-stent stenosis. We hypothesize that the anti-proliferative effects of DCBs may be of benefit in the arteriopathy associated with Williams syndrome. We report this as a novel use of a DCB in the pulmonary arterial circulation in a patient with Williams syndrome.

  20. Sleep EEG Fingerprints Reveal Accelerated Thalamocortical Oscillatory Dynamics in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodizs, Robert; Gombos, Ferenc; Kovacs, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Sleep EEG alterations are emerging features of several developmental disabilities, but detailed quantitative EEG data on the sleep phenotype of patients with Williams syndrome (WS, 7q11.23 microdeletion) is still lacking. Based on laboratory (Study I) and home sleep records (Study II) here we report WS-related features of the patterns of…

  1. Toddlers with Williams Syndrome Process Upright but Not Inverted Faces Holistically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashon, Cara H.; Ha, Oh-Ryeong; DeNicola, Christopher A.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2013-01-01

    Holistic processing of upright, but not inverted, faces is a marker of perceptual expertise for faces. This pattern is shown by typically developing individuals beginning at age 7 months. Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by extreme interest in faces from a very young age. Research on the effects of…

  2. Neurocognitive profile in psychotic versus nonpsychotic individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Ronnie; Yi, James; Calkins, Monica; Guri, Yael; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Emanuel, Beverly S; Zackai, Elaine H; Ruparel, Kosha; Carmel, Miri; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Gothelf, Doron

    2016-10-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with increased rates of psychotic disorders and cognitive deficits, but large scale studies are needed to elucidate their interaction. The objective of this two-center study was to identify the neurocognitive phenotype of individuals with 22q11DS and psychotic disorders. We hypothesized that psychotic 22q11DS individuals compared to nonpsychotic deleted individuals would have more severe neurocognitive deficits, especially in executive function and social cognition. These deficits would be present when compared to IQ- matched individuals with Williams Syndrome (WS). Three groups were ascertained from the Tel Aviv and Philadelphia centers: 22q11DS individuals with a psychotic disorder (n=31), nonpsychotic 22q11DS (n=86) and typically-developing controls (TD, n=828). In Tel Aviv a group of individuals with WS (n=18) matched in IQ to the 22q11DS psychotic group was also included. The Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB) was used to assess a wide-range of cognitive functions and all patients underwent structured psychiatric evaluations. 22q11DS individuals performed poorly on all CNB domains compared to TD. Participants with 22q11DS and psychosis, compared to nonpsychotic 22q11DS, had more severe deficits in global neurocognitive performance (GNP), executive function, social cognition and episodic memory domains. The primary deficits were also significant when comparing the Tel Aviv 22q11DS psychotic group to IQ-matched individuals with WS. In conclusion, 22q11DS individuals with a psychotic disorder have specific neurocognitive deficits that are reliably identified cross nationality using the CNB. These cognitive dysfunctions should be further studied as potential endophenotypes of psychosis in 22q11DS and as targets for intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Perceiving Facial and Vocal Expressions of Emotion in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesa-Skwerer, Daniela; Faja, Susan; Schofield, Casey; Verbalis, Alyssa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2006-01-01

    People with Williams syndrome are extremely sociable, empathic, and expressive in communication. Some researchers suggest they may be especially sensitive to perceiving emotional expressions. We administered the Faces and Paralanguage subtests of the Diagnostic Analysis of Nonverbal Accuracy Scale (DANVA2), a standardized measure of emotion…

  4. The Production of Figurative Language in Typically Developing Children and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Lauren; Van Herwegen, Jo

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the development of figurative language production, including different types of figurative expressions, during a fictional narrative in 20 typically developing (TD) children and 20 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 7-18 years old. In contrast to previous studies, developmental trajectories showed that (1) the…

  5. A Comparison between Linguistic Skills and Socio-Communicative Abilities in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, P.; Menghini, D.; Marotta, L.; De Peppo, L.; Ravà, L.; Salvaguardia, F.; Varuzza, C.; Vicari, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) show a disharmonic linguistic profile with a clear pattern of strengths and weaknesses. Despite their sociable nature, atypical socio-communicative abilities and deficits in communication and relationship with others have been found. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether…

  6. Evaluation of a Stranger Safety Training Programme for Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are reported to display increased sociability towards strangers, leading to increased social vulnerability. No research has examined real life interactions of adults with WS towards strangers and no interventions have been implemented to teach stranger safety skills to this population. Method:…

  7. Contrast-Marking Prosodic Emphasis in Williams Syndrome: Results of Detailed Phonetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiwako; Martens, Marilee A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Past reports on the speech production of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) suggest that their prosody is anomalous and may lead to challenges in spoken communication. While existing prosodic assessments confirm that individuals with WS fail to use prosodic emphasis to express contrast, those reports typically lack detailed…

  8. Two novel deletions (array CGH findings) in pigment dispersion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikelsaar, Ruth; Molder, Harras; Bartsch, Oliver; Punab, Margus

    2007-12-01

    We report the first male with pigment dispersion syndrome and a balanced translocation t(10;15)(p11.1;q11.1). Cytogenetic analyses using Giemsa banding and FISH methods, and array CGH were performed. Array CGH analyses did not show altered DNA sequences in the breakpoints of the translocation, but revealed two novel deletions in 2q22.1 and 18q22.1. We suppose that the coexistence of t(10;15) and pigment dispersion syndrome in our patient is a coincidence. The deletion in 2q22.1, where the gene LRP1B has been located, may play a major role in the dysembryogenesis of the eye and cause the disorder.

  9. Parents perceptions of social inclusion for children with Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gulliver, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explores parents’ perceptions of social inclusion for children with Williams Syndrome; a rare intellectual disability with a distinct social cognitive profile. 5 interviews with parents give rich understanding to what parents’ value for their child’s education, and how this is achieved. Thematic analysis highlights key similarities and differences in experiences between parents of children attending mainstream schools and one special school. Severity of disability affects how pare...

  10. Morphological differences in the mirror neuron system in Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Rowena; Brown, Timothy T.; Erhart, Matthew; Järvinen, Anna M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by an overly gregarious personality, including high empathetic concern for others. Although seemingly disparate from the profile of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), both are associated with deficits in social communication/cognition. Notably, the mirror neuron system (MNS) has been implicated in social dysfunction for ASD; yet, the integrity of this network and its association with social functioning in WS remains unknown. Magnetic re...

  11. Supporting Children with Genetic Syndromes in the Classroom: The Example of 22q Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Stedman, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of children are likely to have a known genetic cause for their special educational needs. One such genetic condition is 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), a genetic syndrome associated with early speech and language difficulties, global and specific cognitive impairments, difficulties with attention and difficulties with…

  12. Spatial-Sequential and Spatial-Simultaneous Working Memory in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Silvia; De Mori, Letizia; Mammarella, Irene C.; Carretti, Barbara; Vianello, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare visuospatial working memory performance in 18 individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and 18 typically developing (TD) children matched for nonverbal mental age. Two aspects were considered: task presentation format (i.e., spatial-sequential or spatial-simultaneous), and level of attentional control…

  13. Patterns and Trajectories in Williams Syndrome: The Case of Visual Orientation Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Melanie; Englund, Julia A.; Ahlers, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a developmental disorder typified by deficits in visuospatial cognition. To understand the nature of this deficit, we characterized how people with WS perceive visual orientation, a fundamental ability related to object identification. We compared WS participants to typically developing children (3-6 years of age) and…

  14. Factor Structure of the Children's Behavior Questionnaire in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyfer, Ovsanna; John, Angela E.; Woodruff-Borden, Janet; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2012-01-01

    To examine the factor structure of temperament in 5-10-year-olds with Williams syndrome, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the responses of parents of 192 children on the children's behavior questionnaire. Four factors were identified. Two corresponded to factors reported for typically developing children: effortful control and…

  15. Severity of Hyperacusis Predicts Individual Differences in Speech Perception in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, M.; Cohen, H.; Cohen, M.; Rosen, S.; Karmiloff-Smith, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams Syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder of genetic origin, characterised by relative proficiency in language in the face of serious impairment in several other domains. Individuals with WS display an unusual sensitivity to noise, known as hyperacusis. Methods: In this study, we examined the extent to which hyperacusis…

  16. Diagnosis of supravalvar stenosis of aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumskij, V.I.; Konstantinova, N.V.; Pokidkin, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors analyzed the potentialities of combined radiodiagnosis of supravalvar stenosis (SS) and concomitant diseases of the heart and major vessels (Williams-Beuren syndrome) in 7 patients aged 7 mos. to 24 yrs. Polypositional chest and heart X-ray procedure, catheterization of the cardiac cavities, pulmonary artery and aorta, left ventriculography (6), right ventriculography (4) and angiopulmonography were used. The diagnostic potentialities of each method were defined

  17. A novel 5-bp deletion in Clarin 1 in a family with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoury, Elie; El Zir, Elie; Mansour, Ahmad; Mégarbané, André; Majewski, Jacek; Slim, Rima

    2011-11-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a Lebanese family with two sibs diagnosed with Usher Syndrome. Exome capture and sequencing were performed on DNA from one affected member using Agilent in solution bead capture, followed by Illumina sequencing. This analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous 5-bp deletion, in Clarin 1 (CLRN1), a known gene responsible for Usher syndrome type III. The deletion is inherited from both parents and segregates with the disease phenotype in the family. The 5-bp deletion, c.301_305delGTCAT, p.Val101SerfsX27, is predicted to result in a frameshift and protein truncation after 27 amino acids. Sequencing all the coding regions of the CLRN1 gene in the proband did not reveal any other mutation or variant. Here we describe a novel deletion in CLRN1. Our data support previously reported intra familial variability in the clinical features of Usher syndrome type I and III.

  18. Deletion of 7q33-q35 in a Patient with Intellectual Disability and Dysmorphic Features: Further Characterization of 7q Interstitial Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Dilzell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report concerns a 16-year-old girl with a 9.92 Mb, heterozygous interstitial chromosome deletion at 7q33-q35, identified using array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient has dysmorphic facial features, intellectual disability, recurrent infections, self-injurious behavior, obesity, and recent onset of hemihypertrophy. This patient has overlapping features with previously reported individuals who have similar deletions spanning the 7q32-q36 region. It has been difficult to describe an interstitial 7q deletion syndrome due to variations in the sizes and regions in the few patients reported in the literature. This case contributes to the further characterization of an interstitial distal 7q deletion syndrome.

  19. Parent and Teacher Perspectives about Problem Behavior in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Lira, Ernesto N.; Li-Barber, Kirsten T.; Gallo, Frank J.; Brei, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    Problem behavior of 52 children with Williams syndrome ages 6 to 17 years old was examined based on both parent and teacher report. Generally good inter-rater agreement was found. Common areas of problem behavior based both on parent and teacher report included attention problems, anxiety difficulties, repetitive behaviors (e.g., obsessions,…

  20. The Use of Cohesive Markers in Narratives by Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how children and adolescents with Williams syndrome (WS; ages 8 years, 0 months [8;0]-14;5) used referential devices (determiners and pronouns), tense, and connectives to create cohesion in oral narratives based on a storybook compared to typically developing mentally and chronologically age-matched children. WS children used…

  1. Williams Syndrome Hypersociability: A Neuropsychological Study of the Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Fernandez, Montse; Sousa, Nuno; Pinheiro, Ana; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome display indiscriminate approach towards strangers. Neuroimaging studies conducted so far have linked this social profile to structural and/or functional abnormalities in WS amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In this study, the neuropsychological hypotheses of amygdala and prefrontal cortex involvement in WS…

  2. Ocular Findings in Children With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, Bahar; Topcu-Yilmaz, Pinar; Bozkurt, Banu; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Guner, Sukru Nail; Sayar, Esra Hazar; Reisli, Ismail

    2016-07-01

    To identify the ocular features of children diagnosed as having 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in a Turkish population, which is the most common microdeletion syndrome with a wide range of facial and ocular abnormalities. Sixteen children aged between 4 months and 18 years with a microdeletion in chromosome 22q11.2 underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination including uncorrected and best corrected visual acuity testing, stereoscopic vision examination, biomicroscopic and indirect fundus examination, and ocular motility testing. All patients had at least one ocular abnormality. The major abnormalities were eyelid abnormalities (eye hooding, narrow palpebral fissure, telecanthus, hypertelorism, sparse and thin eyebrows and eyelashes, blepharitis, and distichiasis), posterior embryotoxon, and tortuous retinal vessels in at least half of the patients. Other ophthalmological disorders were refractive errors, iris remnants, and strabismus. The chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is associated with a wide range of ocular disorders, which necessitates a comprehensive eye examination for appropriate treatment and follow-up. Ocular findings sometimes can provide a clue to the diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletion. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53(4):218-222]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Updating the profile of C-terminal MECP2 deletions in Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, A; Percy, A; Christodoulou, J; Ravine, D; Ho, G; Jacoby, P; Anderson, A; Pineda, M; Ben Zeev, B; Bahi-Buisson, N; Smeets, E; Leonard, H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare the phenotype of Rett syndrome cases with C-terminal deletions to that of cases with different MECP2 mutations and to examine the phenotypic variation within C-terminal deletions. Methods Cases were selected from InterRett, an international database and from the population-based Australian Rett Syndrome Database. Cases (n=832) were included if they had a pathogenic MECP2 mutation in which the nature of the amino acid change was known. Three severity scale systems were used, and individual aspects of the phenotype were also compared. Results Lower severity was associated with C-terminal deletions (n=79) compared to all other MECP2 mutations (e.g. Pineda scale C-terminals mean 15.0 (95% CI 14.0–16.0) vs 16.2 (15.9–16.5). Cases with C-terminal deletions were more likely to have a normal head circumference (odds ratio 3.22, 95% CI 1.53 – 6.79) and weight (odds ratio 2.97, 95% CI 1.25–5.76). Onset of stereotypies tended to be later (median age 2.5 years vs 2 years, pmiddle of the range. In terms of individual aspects of phenotype growth and ability to ambulate appear to be particular strengths. By pooling data internationally this study has achieved the case numbers to provide a phenotypic profile of C-terminal deletions in Rett syndrome. PMID:19914908

  4. Familial deletion 18p syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemyre Emmanuelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion 18p is a frequent deletion syndrome characterized by dysmorphic features, growth deficiencies, and mental retardation with a poorer verbal performance. Until now, five families have been described with limited clinical description. We report transmission of deletion 18p from a mother to her two daughters and review the previous cases. Case presentation The proband is 12 years old and has short stature, dysmorphic features and moderate mental retardation. Her sister is 9 years old and also has short stature and similar dysmorphic features. Her cognitive performance is within the borderline to mild mental retardation range. The mother also presents short stature. Psychological evaluation showed moderate mental retardation. Chromosome analysis from the sisters and their mother revealed the same chromosomal deletion: 46, XX, del(18(p11.2. Previous familial cases were consistent regarding the transmission of mental retardation. Our family differs in this regard with variable cognitive impairment and does not display poorer verbal than non-verbal abilities. An exclusive maternal transmission is observed throughout those families. Women with del(18p are fertile and seem to have a normal miscarriage rate. Conclusion Genetic counseling for these patients should take into account a greater range of cognitive outcome than previously reported.

  5. Mental Health Concerns in Williams Syndrome: Intervention Considerations and Illustrations from Case Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristin D.; Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.

    2009-01-01

    The refinement of the Williams syndrome phenotype has frequently included the study of behavioral and temperamental features common to individuals with this disorder. Within this line of research, the importance of evaluating incidence of psychopathology has been increasingly recognized, with studies consistently identifying an increased risk for…

  6. The Development of Metaphorical Language Comprehension in Typical Development and in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Van Duuren, Mike; Purser, Harry R. M.; Mareschal, Denis; Ansari, Daniel; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    The domain of figurative language comprehension was used to probe the developmental relation between language and cognition in typically developing individuals and individuals with Williams syndrome. Extending the work of Vosniadou and Ortony, the emergence of nonliteral similarity and category knowledge was investigated in 117 typically…

  7. Sleep Patterns and Daytime Sleepiness in Adolescents and Young Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. E.; Malow, B. A.; Newman, K. D.; Roof, E.; Dykens, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are common in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders and may adversely affect daytime functioning. Children with Williams syndrome have been reported to have disturbed sleep; however, no studies have been performed to determine if these problems continue into adolescence and adulthood. Methods: This study…

  8. Cortisol Reactivity and Performance Abilities in Social Situations in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypersociability and anxiety. However, little is known about how these salient aspects of the phenotype are related or their underlying physiology. We examined cortisol reactivity in WS because cortisol is responsive to psychosocial stress. Compared to typically developing…

  9. Audio-visual speech perception in infants and toddlers with Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, and Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Dean; D'Souza, Hana; Johnson, Mark H; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2016-08-01

    Typically-developing (TD) infants can construct unified cross-modal percepts, such as a speaking face, by integrating auditory-visual (AV) information. This skill is a key building block upon which higher-level skills, such as word learning, are built. Because word learning is seriously delayed in most children with neurodevelopmental disorders, we assessed the hypothesis that this delay partly results from a deficit in integrating AV speech cues. AV speech integration has rarely been investigated in neurodevelopmental disorders, and never previously in infants. We probed for the McGurk effect, which occurs when the auditory component of one sound (/ba/) is paired with the visual component of another sound (/ga/), leading to the perception of an illusory third sound (/da/ or /tha/). We measured AV integration in 95 infants/toddlers with Down, fragile X, or Williams syndrome, whom we matched on Chronological and Mental Age to 25 TD infants. We also assessed a more basic AV perceptual ability: sensitivity to matching vs. mismatching AV speech stimuli. Infants with Williams syndrome failed to demonstrate a McGurk effect, indicating poor AV speech integration. Moreover, while the TD children discriminated between matching and mismatching AV stimuli, none of the other groups did, hinting at a basic deficit or delay in AV speech processing, which is likely to constrain subsequent language development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Contiguous gene deletion of chromosome 2p16.3-p21 as a cause of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Lynn, Patricio B; Wang, Lu; Walsh, Michael; Gopalan, Anuradha; Shia, Jinru; Tran, Christina; Man, Fung Ying; McBride, Sean; Schattner, Mark; Zhang, Liying; Weiser, Martin R; Stadler, Zsofia K

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by pathogenic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Although commonly associated with clinical features such as intellectual disability and congenital anomalies, contiguous gene deletions may also result in cancer predisposition syndromes. We report on a 52-year-old male with Lynch syndrome caused by deletion of chromosome 2p16.3-p21. The patient had intellectual disability and presented with a prostatic adenocarcinoma with an incidentally identified synchronous sigmoid adenocarcinoma that exhibited deficient MMR with an absence of MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression. Family history was unrevealing. Physical exam revealed short stature, brachycephaly with a narrow forehead and short philtrum, brachydactyly of the hands, palmar transverse crease, broad and small feet with hyperpigmentation of the soles. The patient underwent total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis for a pT3N1 sigmoid adenocarcinoma. Germline genetic testing of the MSH2, MSH6, and EPCAM genes revealed full gene deletions. SNP-array based DNA copy number analysis identified a deletion of 4.8 Mb at 2p16.3-p21. In addition to the three Lynch syndrome associated genes, the deleted chromosomal section encompassed genes including NRXN1, CRIPT, CALM2, FBXO11, LHCGR, MCFD2, TTC7A, EPAS1, PRKCE, and 15 others. Contiguous gene deletions have been described in other inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis. Our report and review of the literature suggests that contiguous gene deletion within the 2p16-p21 chromosomal region is a rare cause of Lynch syndrome, but presents with distinct phenotypic features, highlighting the need for recognition and awareness of this syndromic entity.

  11. Item and Error Analysis on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Farran, Emily; Annaz, Dagmara

    2011-01-01

    Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) is a standardised test that is commonly used to obtain a non-verbal reasoning score for children. As the RCPM involves the matching of a target to a pattern it is also considered to be a visuo-spatial perception task. RCPM is therefore frequently used in studies in Williams Syndrome (WS), in order to…

  12. Longitudinal Trajectories of Intellectual and Adaptive Functioning in Adolescents and Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M. H.; Lense, M. D.; Dykens, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with a distinct cognitive-behavioural phenotype including mild to moderate intellectual disability, visual-spatial deficits, hypersociability, inattention and anxiety. Researchers typically characterise samples of individuals with WS by their intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviour. Because…

  13. Heterogeneity of Social Approach Behaviour in Williams Syndrome: The Role of Response Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Katie; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Clark, Fiona; Fleck, Ruth; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2013-01-01

    The developmental disorder of Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with an overfriendly personality type, including an increased tendency to approach strangers. This atypical social approach behaviour (SAB) has been linked to two potential theories: the amygdala hypothesis and the frontal lobe hypothesis. The current study aimed to investigate…

  14. Gaze Aversion during Social Style Interactions in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa; Riby, Deborah M.

    2013-01-01

    During face-to-face interactions typically developing individuals use gaze aversion (GA), away from their questioner, when thinking. GA is also used when individuals with autism (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS) are thinking during question-answer interactions. We investigated GA strategies during face-to-face social style interactions with…

  15. Genome rearrangements detected by SNP microarrays in individuals with intellectual disability referred with possible Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel M Pani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID affects 2-3% of the population and may occur with or without multiple congenital anomalies (MCA or other medical conditions. Established genetic syndromes and visible chromosome abnormalities account for a substantial percentage of ID diagnoses, although for approximately 50% the molecular etiology is unknown. Individuals with features suggestive of various syndromes but lacking their associated genetic anomalies pose a formidable clinical challenge. With the advent of microarray techniques, submicroscopic genome alterations not associated with known syndromes are emerging as a significant cause of ID and MCA.High-density SNP microarrays were used to determine genome wide copy number in 42 individuals: 7 with confirmed alterations in the WS region but atypical clinical phenotypes, 31 with ID and/or MCA, and 4 controls. One individual from the first group had the most telomeric gene in the WS critical region deleted along with 2 Mb of flanking sequence. A second person had the classic WS deletion and a rearrangement on chromosome 5p within the Cri du Chat syndrome (OMIM:123450 region. Six individuals from the ID/MCA group had large rearrangements (3 deletions, 3 duplications, one of whom had a large inversion associated with a deletion that was not detected by the SNP arrays.Combining SNP microarray analyses and qPCR allowed us to clone and sequence 21 deletion breakpoints in individuals with atypical deletions in the WS region and/or ID or MCA. Comparison of these breakpoints to databases of genomic variation revealed that 52% occurred in regions harboring structural variants in the general population. For two probands the genomic alterations were flanked by segmental duplications, which frequently mediate recurrent genome rearrangements; these may represent new genomic disorders. While SNP arrays and related technologies can identify potentially pathogenic deletions and duplications, obtaining sequence information

  16. Enhanced Maternal Origin of the 22q11.2 Deletion in Velocardiofacial and DiGeorge Syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delio, Maria; Guo, Tingwei; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Velocardiofacial and DiGeorge syndromes, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), are congenital-anomaly disorders caused by a de novo hemizygous 22q11.2 deletion mediated by meiotic nonallelic homologous recombination events between low-copy repeats, also known as segmental duplication...

  17. Autism, ADHD, Mental Retardation and Behavior Problems in 100 Individuals with 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Lena; Rasmussen, Peder; Oskarsdottir, Solveig; Gillberg, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence and type of associated neuropsychiatric problems in children and adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome. One-hundred consecutively referred individuals with 22q11 deletion syndrome were given in-depth neuropsychiatric assessments and questionnaires screens. Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and/or attention…

  18. Neonatal hypocalcemia, neonatal seizures, and intellectual disability in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Evelyn Ning Man; George, Susan R.; Andrade, Danielle M.; Chow, Eva W. C.; Silversides, Candice K.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hypocalcemia is a common endocrinological condition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Neonatal hypocalcemia may affect neurodevelopment. We hypothesized that neonatal hypocalcemia would be associated with rare, more severe forms of intellectual disability in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Methods We used a logistic regression model to investigate potential predictors of intellectual disability severity, including neonatal hypocalcemia, neonatal seizures, and complex congenital heart disease, e.g., interrupted aortic arch, in 149 adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Ten subjects had moderate-to-severe intellectual disability. Results The model was highly significant (P < 0.0001), showing neonatal seizures (P = 0.0018) and neonatal hypocalcemia (P = 0.047) to be significant predictors of a more severe level of intellectual disability. Neonatal seizures were significantly associated with neonatal hypocalcemia in the entire sample (P < 0.0001), regardless of intellectual level. There was no evidence for the association of moderate- to-severe intellectual disability with other factors such as major structural brain malformations in this sample. Conclusion The results suggest that neonatal seizures may increase the risk for more severe intellectual deficits in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, likely mediated by neonatal hypocalcemia. Neonatal hypocalcemia often remains unrecognized until the postseizure period, when damage to neurons may already have occurred. These findings support the importance of early recognition and treatment of neonatal hypocalcemia and potentially neonatal screening for 22q11.2 deletions. PMID:23765047

  19. Mathematical Learning Disabilities in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smedt, Bert; Swillen, Ann; Verschaffel, Lieven; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLD) occur frequently in children with specific genetic disorders, like Turner syndrome, fragile X syndrome and neurofibromatosis. This review focuses on MLD in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). This syndrome is the most common known microdeletion syndrome with a prevalence of at…

  20. Pamidronate Rescue Therapy for Hypercalcemia in a Child With Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami A. Sanjad

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A 15-month-old male infant diagnosed with Williams Syndrome (WS was admitted with severe hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. Intravenous hydration and furosemide failed to yield an appreciable and sustainable fall in serum calcium, while the injection of pamidronate achieved a significant decrease in serum calcium in a short period of time. This bisphosphonate could be considered as a second-line treatment for refractory hypercalcemia in WS.

  1. Differentiated psychopharmacological treatment in three genetic subtypes of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Leeuw, N. de

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), mostly caused by the common deletion including the TBX- and COMT-genes (LCR22A-D), is highly associated with somatic anomalies. The distal deletion (distal of LCR22D) comprises the MAPK1-gene and is associated with specific heart defects. The

  2. Genetics Home Reference: 22q13.3 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ... Veltman JA, de Vries BB. Molecular characterisation of patients with subtelomeric 22q ... L, Enns GM, Hoyme HE. Terminal 22q deletion syndrome: a newly recognized cause of ...

  3. The development of perceptual grouping in infants with Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Farran, E. K.; Brown, J. H.; Cole, V. L.; Houston-Price, C.; Karmiloff-Smith, A.

    2007-01-01

    Perceptual grouping by luminance similarity and by proximity was investigated in infants with Williams syndrome (WS) aged between 6 and 36 months (visit 1, N=29). WS infants who were still under 36 months old, 8 months later, repeated the testing procedure (visit 2, N=15). Performance was compared to typically developing (TD) infants aged from 2 to 20 months (N=63). Consistent with the literature, TD participants showed grouping by luminance at the youngest testing age, 2 months. Grouping by ...

  4. Memory profiles of Down, Williams, and fragile X syndromes: implications for reading development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Frances A; Moore, Marie S; Loveall, Susan J; Merrill, Edward C

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to understand the types of memory impairments that are associated with intellectual disability (ID, formerly called mental retardation) and the implications of these impairments for reading development. Specifically, studies on working memory, delayed memory and learning, and semantic/conceptual memory in Down syndrome, Williams syndrome, and fragile X syndrome were examined. A distinct memory profile emerged for each of the 3 etiologies of ID. Memory profiles are discussed in relation to strengths and weaknesses in reading skills in these three etiologies. We suggest that reading instruction be designed to capitalize on relatively stronger memory skills while providing extra support for especially challenging aspects of reading.

  5. SNORD116 deletions cause Prader-Willi syndrome with a mild phenotype and macrocephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, P; Grasso, M; Acquaviva, F; Gennaro, E; Galli, M L; Falco, M; Scarano, F; Scarano, G; Lonardo, F

    2017-10-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex condition caused by lack of expression of imprinted genes in the paternally derived region of chromosome 15 (15q11q13). A small number of patients with Prader-Willi phenotype have been discovered to have narrow deletions, not encompassing the whole critical region, but only the SNORD116 cluster, which includes genes codifying for small nucleolar RNAs. This kind of deletion usually is not detected by the classic DNA methylation analysis test. We present the case of a male patient with a mild Prader-Willi phenotype and a small deletion including SNORD116, diagnosed by methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. The patient showed neonatal hypotonia, hyperphagia, obesity, central hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, strabismus. Stature and intellectual development are within the normal range. The presence of macrocephaly, observed in other cases of SNORD116 deletions as well, is uncommon for the classic phenotype of the syndrome. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Referential Communication Skills of Children with Williams Syndrome: Understanding when Messages Are Not Adequate

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Angela E.; Rowe, Melissa L.; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Although children with Williams syndrome have relatively good structural language and concrete vocabulary abilities, they have difficulty with pragmatic aspects of language. To investigate the impact of pragmatic difficulties on listener-role referential communication, we administered a picture placement task designed to measure ability to…

  7. Attention Bias to Emotional Faces Varies by IQ and Anxiety in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Lauren M.; Oates, Joyce M.; Dai, Yael G.; Dodd, Helen F.; Waxler, Jessica; Clements, Caitlin C.; Weill, Sydney; Hoffnagle, Alison; Anderson, Erin; MacRae, Rebecca; Mullett, Jennifer; McDougle, Christopher J.; Pober, Barbara R.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) often experience significant anxiety. A promising approach to anxiety intervention has emerged from cognitive studies of attention bias to threat. To investigate the utility of this intervention in WS, this study examined attention bias to happy and angry faces in individuals with WS (N = 46). Results showed…

  8. Social Attention, Joint Attention and Sustained Attention in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Williams Syndrome: Convergences and Divergences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanti, Giacomo; Fanning, Peter A. J.; Hocking, Darren R.; Sievers, Stephanie; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    There is limited knowledge on shared and syndrome-specific attentional profiles in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS). Using eye-tracking, we examined attentional profiles of 35 preschoolers with ASD, 22 preschoolers with WS and 20 typically developing children across social and non-social dimensions of attention. Children…

  9. Parent insights into atypicalities of social approach behaviour in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, E; Rodgers, J; Janes, E; Little, K; Riby, D M

    2016-11-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome have been reported to show high levels of social interest and a desire to interact with others irrespective of their familiarity. This high social motivation, when combined with reduced intellectual capacity and a profile of atypical social behaviour, is important in terms of social vulnerability of individuals with the disorder. Therefore, social approach to unfamiliar people and the role of this behaviour within the Williams syndrome (WS) social phenotype warrant further research to inform social skills' intervention design. The current study used parent interviews (n = 21) to probe aspects of social behaviour and interactions with strangers, as well as the impact of such behaviour on the family. Using thematic analysis, it was possible to explore themes that emerged from the interviews, offering qualitatively rich insight into the variability of social approach behaviour in WS. Thematic analysis confirmed a significant desire to interact with strangers as well as a lack of awareness of appropriate social boundaries. However, parental reports about their child's social approach behaviour varied considerably. The within-syndrome variability of the sample was emphasised in parental reports of their child's personality characteristics (e.g. levels of impulsiveness), as well as the level of parental supervision employed. These in-depth parent insights can help target the needs of individuals with WS and emphasise that an individual approach to intervention will be essential because of the heterogeneity of the WS social profile. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cognitive, Linguistic and Adaptive Functioning in Williams Syndrome: Trajectories from Early to Middle Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, Patricia; Elison, Sarah; Udwin, Orlee; Stinton, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about trajectories of cognitive functioning as individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) move though adulthood. Method: The present study investigated cognitive, linguistic and adaptive functioning in adults with WS aged 19-55 years, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal approaches. Results: Data from the…

  11. Performance on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 by Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, C. Holley; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the performance of 292 4- to 17-year-olds with Williams syndrome (WS) on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 (KBIT-2; Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004). Mean IQ Composite, Verbal standard score (SS), and Nonverbal SS were in the borderline range relative to the general population, with variability similar to the general population.…

  12. Atypical Verbal Communication Pattern According to Others' Attention in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kosuke; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka; Okada, Masako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    Children with Williams syndrome (WS) have been reported to often face problems in daily communication and to have deficits in their pragmatic language abilities. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether children with WS could modify their verbal communication according to others' attention in order to share what they did. The children with WS…

  13. Neural correlates of reward processing in adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duin, Esther D. A.; Goossens, Liesbet; Hernaus, Dennis; da Silva Alves, Fabiana; Schmitz, Nicole; Schruers, Koen; van Amelsvoort, Therese

    2016-01-01

    Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is caused by a microdeletion on chromosome 22q11.2 and associated with an increased risk to develop psychosis. The gene coding for catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) is located at the deleted region, resulting in disrupted dopaminergic

  14. Rare human diseases: 9p deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan V.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to review the anamnesis, pheno - and genotype in patients with rare chromosome disorders such as 9p deletion syndrome. Genetic methods of investigation (clinical and genealogical, cytogenetic, FISH- method, paraclinical and instrumental methods of examination were used. Karyotyping was performed by the G-method of differential staining of chromosomes. Only three cases of pathology were diagnosed in the Medical Genetics Center over the last 10 years. By anamnesis data nobody in the probands’ families had bad habits, was exposed to occupational hazards, took part in the elimination of the Chernobyl accident or lived in contaminated areas. Clinical signs of diseases have not been identified in probands’ parents. All probands had trigonocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds, ocular hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, flat face and nasal bridge, low set ears with malformed auricles. Two patients of three ones had exophthalmos, contracture of the second and third fingers, abnormal external genitalia. In all three cases there was monosomy of chromosome 9 of critical segment p 24. Normal karyotypes were seen in all parents, so there were three cases of new mutations of 9p deletion syndrome. Retardation of physical, psycho-spech, mental development in proband with or without congenital anomalies requires medical genetic counseling in a specialized institution. Cases of reproductive loss in anamnesis require cytogenetic investigation of fetal membranes and amniotic fluid.

  15. Brief Report: Major Depressive Disorder with Psychotic Features in Williams Syndrome--A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Francisca; Keary, Christopher J.; Mullett, Jennifer E.; Palumbo, Michelle L.; Waxler, Jessica L.; Pober, Barbara R.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2018-01-01

    Descriptions of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and co-morbid major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features have not appeared in the literature. In addition to reviewing previous reports of psychotic symptoms in persons with WS, this paper introduces clinical histories and therapeutic management strategies for three previously…

  16. Brief Report: Exploring the Relationship between Sensory Processing and Repetitive Behaviours in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between sensory processing abnormalities and repetitive behaviours in children with Williams Syndrome (WS; n = 21). This is a novel investigation bringing together two clinical phenomena for the first time in this neuro-developmental disorder. Parents completed the Sensory Profile (Short Form; Dunn in The…

  17. 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome is associated with perioperative outcome in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer-Rosa, Laura; Pinto, Nelangi; Yang, Wei; Tanel, Ronn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth

    2013-10-01

    We sought to investigate the impact of 22q11.2 deletion on perioperative outcome in tetralogy of Fallot. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with tetralogy of Fallot who underwent complete surgical reconstruction at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between 1995 and 2006. Inclusion criteria included diagnosis of tetralogy of Fallot and known genotype. Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney tests were used for categoric and continuous variables, respectively. Regression analysis was used to determine whether deletion status predicts outcome. We studied 208 subjects with tetralogy of Fallot, 164 (79%) without and 44 (20%) with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. There were no differences in sex, race, gestational age, age at diagnosis, admission weight, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Presenting anatomy, survival, complications and reoperations were also comparable between patients with and without 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Those with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome had more aortopulmonary shunts preceding complete surgical repair (21% vs 7%, P = .02). This association was present after adjustment for presenting anatomy (stenosis, atresia, or absence of pulmonary valve and common atrioventricular canal) and surgical era. In addition, those with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome had longer cardiopulmonary bypass time (84 vs 72 minutes, P = .02) and duration of intensive care (6 vs 4 days, P = .007). Genotype affects early operative outcomes in tetralogy of Fallot resulting, in particular, in longer duration of intensive care. Future studies are required to determine factors contributing to such differences in this susceptible population. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxytocin and vasopressin are dysregulated in Williams Syndrome, a genetic disorder affecting social behavior.

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    Li Dai

    Full Text Available The molecular and neural mechanisms regulating human social-emotional behaviors are fundamentally important but largely unknown; unraveling these requires a genetic systems neuroscience analysis of human models. Williams Syndrome (WS, a condition caused by deletion of ~28 genes, is associated with a gregarious personality, strong drive to approach strangers, difficult peer interactions, and attraction to music. WS provides a unique opportunity to identify endogenous human gene-behavior mechanisms. Social neuropeptides including oxytocin (OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP regulate reproductive and social behaviors in mammals, and we reasoned that these might mediate the features of WS. Here we established blood levels of OT and AVP in WS and controls at baseline, and at multiple timepoints following a positive emotional intervention (music, and a negative physical stressor (cold. We also related these levels to standardized indices of social behavior. Results revealed significantly higher median levels of OT in WS versus controls at baseline, with a less marked increase in AVP. Further, in WS, OT and AVP increased in response to music and to cold, with greater variability and an amplified peak release compared to controls. In WS, baseline OT but not AVP, was correlated positively with approach, but negatively with adaptive social behaviors. These results indicate that WS deleted genes perturb hypothalamic-pituitary release not only of OT but also of AVP, implicating more complex neuropeptide circuitry for WS features and providing evidence for their roles in endogenous regulation of human social behavior. The data suggest a possible biological basis for amygdalar involvement, for increased anxiety, and for the paradox of increased approach but poor social relationships in WS. They also offer insight for translating genetic and neuroendocrine knowledge into treatments for disorders of social behavior.

  19. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

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    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  20. Pulmonary Arterial Stent Implantation in an Adult with Williams Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reesink, Herre J.; Henneman, Onno D. F.; Delden, Otto M. van; Biervliet, Jules D.; Kloek, Jaap J.; Reekers, Jim A.; Bresser, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old patient who presented with pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction due to pulmonary artery stenoses as a manifestation of Williams syndrome, mimicking chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The patient was treated with balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. Short-term follow-up showed a good clinical result with excellent patency of the stents but early restenosis of the segments in which only balloon angioplasty was performed. These stenoses were subsequently also treated successfully by stent implantation. Stent patency was observed 3 years after the first procedure

  1. Surgical repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis in children with williams syndrome: a 30-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Tyson A; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Wheaton, Gavin; Weintraub, Robert G; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2015-04-01

    Williams syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder associated with supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in childhood. We reviewed outcomes of children with Williams syndrome who underwent repair of SVAS during a 30-year period at a single institution. Between 1982 and 2012, 28 patients with Williams syndrome were operated on for SVAS. Mean age at operation was 5.2 years (range, 3 months to 13 years), and mean weight at operation was 18.6 kg (range, 4.1 to 72.4 kg). Associated cardiac lesions in 11 patients (39.3%) were repaired at the time of the SVAS repair. The most common associated cardiac lesion was main pulmonary artery stenosis (8 of 28 [28%]). A 3-patch repair was performed in 10 patients, a Doty repair in 17, and a McGoon repair in 1 (3.6%). There were no early deaths. Follow-up was 96% complete (27 of 28). Overall mean follow-up was 11.2 years (range, 1 month to 27.3 years). Mean follow-up was 5 years (range, 1 month to 14.3 years) for the 3-patch repair patients and 14.7 years (range, 6 weeks to 27 years) for the Doty repair patients. Of the 17 Doty patients, there were 4 (24%) late deaths, occurring at 6 weeks, 3.5 years, 4 years, and 16 years after the initial operation. There were no late deaths in the 3-patch repair patients. Overall survival was 86% at 5, 10, and 15 years after repair. Survival was 82% at 5, 10 and 15 years for the Doty repair patients. Overall, 6 of 27 patients (22%) patients required late reoperation at a mean of 11.2 years (range, 3.6 to 23 years). No 3-patch repair patients required reoperation. Overall freedom from reoperation was 91% at 5 years and 73% at 10 and 15 years. Freedom from reoperation for the Doty repair patients was 93% at 5 years and 71% at 10 and 15 years. Surgical repair of SVAS in children Williams syndrome has excellent early results. However, significant late mortality and morbidity warrants close follow-up. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Recognition of Emotional and Nonemotional Facial Expressions: A Comparison between Williams Syndrome and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Agnes; Guidetti, Michele; Roge, Bernadette; Reilly, Judy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to compare two neurodevelopmental disorders (Williams syndrome and autism) in terms of the ability to recognize emotional and nonemotional facial expressions. The comparison of these two disorders is particularly relevant to the investigation of face processing and should contribute to a better understanding of social…

  3. False Belief Attribution in Children with Williams Syndrome: The Answer Is in The Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, R.; Martínez-Castilla, P.; Sotillo, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) show difficulties in attributing false beliefs, whereas they are better at attributing emotions. This study examines whether being asked about the emotion linked to a false belief, instead of explicitly about the belief, facilitates performance on theory of mind (ToM) tasks. Method: Thirty…

  4. Prosodic Abilities in Spanish and English Children with Williams Syndrome: A Cross-Linguistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Castilla, Pastora; Stojanovik, Vesna; Setter, Jane; Sotillo, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prosodic profiles of English- and Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS), examining cross-linguistic differences. Two groups of children with WS, English and Spanish, of similar chronological and nonverbal mental age, were compared on performance in expressive and receptive prosodic tasks…

  5. Attention to novelty versus repetition: Contrasting habituation profiles in Autism and Williams syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Vivanti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormalities in habituation have been documented in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD and Williams syndrome (WS. Such abnormalities have been proposed to underlie the distinctive social and non-social difficulties that define ASD, including sensory features and repetitive behaviours, and the distinctive social phenotype characterizing WS. Methods: We measured habituation in 39 preschoolers with ASD, 20 peers with WS and 19 typically developing (TD children using an eye-tracking protocol that measured participants’ duration of attention in response to a repeating stimulus and a novel stimulus presented side by side across multiple trials. Results: Participants in the TD group and the WS group decreased their attention toward the repeating stimulus and increased their attention to the novel stimulus over time. Conversely, the ASD group showed a similar attentional response to the novel and repeating stimuli. Habituation was correlated with social functioning in the WS but not in the ASD group. Contrary to predictions, slower habituation in ASD was associated with lower severity of repetitive behaviours. Conclusions: Habituation appears to be intact in WS and impaired in ASD. More research is needed to clarify the nature of the syndrome-specific patterns of correlations between habituation and social and non-social functioning in these neurodevelopmental disorders. Keywords: Habituation, Learning, Eye-tracking, Repetitive behaviours, Social cognition, Autism, Williams syndrome

  6. [Architecture of the X chromosome, expression of LIM kinase 1, and recombination in the agnostic mutants of Drosophila: a model of human Williams syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvateeva-Popova, E V; Peresleni, A I; Sharagina, L M; Medvedeva, A V; Korochkina, S E; Grigor'eva, I V; Diuzhikova, N A; Popov, A V; Baricheva, E M; Karagodin, D; Heisenberg, M

    2004-06-01

    As the Human Genome and Drosophila Genome Projects were completed, it became clear that functions of human disease-associated genes may be elucidated by studying the phenotypic expression of mutations affecting their structural or functional homologs in Drosophila. Genomic diseases were identified as a new class of human disorders. Their cause is recombination, which takes place at gene-flanking duplicons to generate chromosome aberrations such as deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations. The resulting imbalance of the dosage of developmentally important genes arises at a frequency of 10(-3) (higher than the mutation rate of individual genes) and leads to syndromes with multiple manifestations, including cognitive defects. Genomic DNA fragments were cloned from the Drosophila melanogaster agnostic locus, whose mutations impair learning ability and memory. As a result, the locus was exactly localized in X-chromosome region 11A containing the LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) gene (CG1848), which is conserved among many species. Hemizygosity for the LIMK1 gene, which is caused by recombination at neighboring extended repeats, underlies cognitive disorders in human Williams syndrome. LIMK1 is a component of the integrin signaling cascade, which regulates the functions of the actin cytoskeleton, synaptogenesis, and morphogenesis in the developing brain. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed LIMK1 in all subdomains of the central complex and the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster. Like in the human genome, the D. melanogaster region is flanked by numerous repeats, which were detected by molecular genetic methods and analysis of ectopic chromosome pairing. The repeats determined a higher rate of spontaneous and induced recombination. including unequal crossing over, in the agnostic gene region. Hence, the agnostic locus was considered as the first D. melanogaster model suitable for studying the genetic defect associated with Williams syndrome in human.

  7. Syntax in Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Burraco, Antonio; Garayzábal, Elena; Cuetos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The syntactic skills of Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) were assessed in different areas (phrase structure, recursion, and bound anaphora). Children were compared to typically-developing peers matched either in chronological age (CA-TD) or in verbal age (VA-TD). In all tasks children with WS performed significantly worse than CA-TD children, but similarly to VA-TD children. However, significant differences were observed in specific domains, particularly regarding sentences with cross-serial dependencies. At the same time, children with WS were less sensitive to syntactic constraints and exhibited a poorer knowledge of some functional words (specifically, of nonreflexive pronouns). A processing bottleneck or a computational constraint may account for this outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  9. The Importance of Sleep: Attentional Problems in School-Aged Children With Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Anna; Hill, Catherine M; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Dimitriou, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    In typically developing (TD) children, sleep problems have been associated with day-time attentional difficulties. Children with developmental disabilities often suffer with sleep and attention problems, yet their relationship is poorly understood. The present study investigated this association in school-aged children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS). Actigraphy and pulse oximetry assessed sleep and sleep-disordered breathing respectively, and attention was tested using a novel visual Continuous Performance Task (CPT).Attentional deficits were evident in both disorder groups. In the TD group, higher scores on the CPT were related to better sleep quality, higher oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), and fewer desaturation events. Sleep quality, duration, and SpO2 variables were not related to CPT performance for children with DS and WS.

  10. Mapping Cortical Morphology in Youth with Velocardiofacial (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, Wendy R.; Bansal, Ravi; Fremont, Wanda; Antshel, Kevin M.; Hao, Xuejun; Higgins, Anne Marie; Liu, Jun; Shprintzen, Robert J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS; 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) represents one of the highest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Insofar as up to 30% of individuals with this genetic disorder develop schizophrenia, VCFS constitutes a unique, etiologically homogeneous model for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Method:…

  11. Anxiety Disorders in Williams Syndrome Contrasted with Intellectual Disability and the General Population: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, R.; Howlin, P.; Waite, J.; Oliver, C.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with specific genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability (ID), such as Williams syndrome (WS), are at increased risk for developing anxiety disorders. A systematic literature review identified sixteen WS papers that could generate pooled prevalence estimates of anxiety disorders for WS. A meta-analysis compared these…

  12. Prevalence and Nature of Hearing Loss in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eynde, Charlotte; Swillen, Ann; Lambeens, Elien; Verhaert, Nicolas; Desloovere, Christian; Luts, Heleen; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Devriendt, Koenraad; Hens, Greet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence, type, severity, and age-dependency of hearing loss in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Method: Extensive audiological measurements were conducted in 40 persons with proven 22q11.2 deletion (aged 6-36 years). Besides air and bone conduction thresholds in the frequency range between 0.125…

  13. Association between Speech-Language, General Cognitive Functioning and Behaviour Problems in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, N. F.; Giacheti, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) phenotype is described as unique and intriguing. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between speech-language abilities, general cognitive functioning and behavioural problems in individuals with WS, considering age effects and speech-language characteristics of WS sub-groups. Methods: The…

  14. Caregiver Survey of Pharmacotherapy to Treat Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A.; Seyfer, Daisha L.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Foster, Jessica E. A.; McClure, Kelsey E.; Coury, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by a unique neurocognitive and behavioral profile, including increased incidence of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of the present study was to examine the perceived helpfulness and side effects of medications used to treat ADHD (methylphenidate class,…

  15. Lexical-Semantic Reading in a Shallow Orthography: Evidence from a Girl with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Laura; Bello, Arianna; Volterra, Virginia; Burani, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    The reading skills of a girl with Williams Syndrome are assessed by a timed word-naming task. To test the efficiency of lexical and nonlexical reading, we considered four marker effects: Lexicality (better reading of words than nonwords), frequency (better reading of high than low frequency words), length (better reading of short than long words),…

  16. Development of Novel Metaphor and Metonymy Comprehension in Typically Developing Children and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Dimitriou, Dagmara; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the development of novel metaphor and metonymy comprehension in both typically developing (TD) children and individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Thirty-one TD children between the ages of 3;09 and 17;01 and thirty-four individuals with WS between the ages of 7;01 and 44 years old were administered a newly developed task…

  17. Diagnosis and fine localization of deletion region in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tao-Yun; Chia, David; Wang, Jing-Min; Wu, Ye; Li, Jie; Xiao, Jing; Jiang, Yu-Wu

    2010-07-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) results from the partial deletion of 4p. This study aimed to identify and fine map the chromosome deletion regions of Chinese children with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome among the developmental delay/mental retardation (DD/MR) patients. We analyzed the relationship of phenotype and genotype. Inclusion criteria were: moderate to severe DD/MR, no definite perinatal brain injury, and no trauma, toxication, hypoxia, infection of central nervous system; routine karyotyping was normal, no evidence of typical inherited metabolic disorder or specific neurodegenerative disorders from cranial neuro-imaging and blood/urinary metabolic diseases screening; no mutation of FMR1 in male patients, no typical clinical manifestation of Rett syndrome in female patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 assays were applied to accurately define the exact size of subtelomeric aberration region of four WHS patients. All four WHS patients presented with severe DD, hypotonia and microcephaly, failure to thrive, 3/4 patients with typical facial features and seizures, 2/4 patients with congenital heart defects and cleft lip/palate, 1/4 patients with other malformations. The length of the deletions ranged from 3.3 Mb to 9.8 Mb. Two of four patients had "classic" WHS, 1/4 patients had "mild"-to-"classic" WHS, and 1/4 patients had "mild" WHS. WHS patients in China appear to be consistent with those previously reported. The prevalence of signs and symptoms, distribution of cases between "mild" and "classic" WHS, and the correlation between length of deletion and severity of disease of these patients were all similar to those of the patients from other populations.

  18. 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Is Associated With Impaired Auditory Steady-State Gamma Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kit Melissa; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Birknow, Michelle Rosgaard

    2017-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome confers a markedly increased risk for schizophrenia. 22q11.2 deletion carriers without manifest psychotic disorder offer the possibility to identify functional abnormalities that precede clinical onset. Since schizophrenia is associated with a reduced cortical gamma...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M. [Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  20. Neuro-behavioral profile and brain imaging study of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippe, A.; Malan, V.; De Blois, M.C.; Colleaux, L.; Munnich, A.; Philippe, A.; De Blois, M.C.; Colleaux, L.; Munnich, A.; Boddaert, N.; Vaivre-Douret, L.; Robel, L.; Golse, B.; Vaivre-Douret, L.; Vaivre-Douret, L.; Danon-Boileau, L.; Heron, D.

    2008-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man No. 606232) is a neuro-developmental disorder that includes hypotonia, severely impaired development of speech and language, autistic-like behavior, and minor dysmorphic features. Although the number of reported cases is increasing, the 22q13.3 deletion remains under-diagnosed because of failure in recognizing the clinical phenotype and detecting the 22qter deletion by routine chromosome analyses. Our goal is to contribute to the description of the neuro-behavioral phenotype and brain abnormalities of this micro-deletional syndrome. We assessed neuro-motor, sensory, language, communication, and social development and performed cerebral MRI and study of regional cerebral blood flow measured by positron emission tomography in 8 children carrying the 22q13.3 deletion. Despite variability in expression and severity, the children shared a common developmental profile characterized by hypotonia, sleep disorders, and poor response to their environment in early infancy; expressive language deficit contrasting with emergence of social reciprocity from ages similar to 3 to 5 years; sensory processing dysfunction; and neuro-motor disorders. Brain MRI findings were normal or showed a thin or morphologically atypical corpus callosum. Positron emission tomography study detected a localized dysfunction of the left temporal polar lobe and amygdala hypoperfusion. The developmental course of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome belongs to pervasive developmental disorders but is distinct from autism. An improved description of the natural history of this syndrome should help in recognizing this largely under-diagnosed condition. (authors)

  1. Neuro-behavioral profile and brain imaging study of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, A; Malan, V; De Blois, M C; Colleaux, L; Munnich, A [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Natl Inst Hlth and Med Res, Paris (France); Philippe, A; De Blois, M C; Colleaux, L; Munnich, A [HopNecker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Genet, Paris (France); Boddaert, N [Natl Inst Hlth and Med Res, Mixed Unit Res 0205, Orsay (France); Vaivre-Douret, L; Robel, L; Golse, B [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Psychiat, Paris (France); Vaivre-Douret, L [Univ Paris 10, Mixed Unit Res S0669, Univ Paris 05, Univ Paris 11, Paris 10 (France); Vaivre-Douret, L [Assistance Publ Hop Paris, Dept Obstet et Gynaecol, Paris (France); Danon-Boileau, L [Natl Ctr Sci Res, Mixed Unit Res 7114, Paris (France); Heron, D [Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Assistance Publ HopParis, Dept Genet, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man No. 606232) is a neuro-developmental disorder that includes hypotonia, severely impaired development of speech and language, autistic-like behavior, and minor dysmorphic features. Although the number of reported cases is increasing, the 22q13.3 deletion remains under-diagnosed because of failure in recognizing the clinical phenotype and detecting the 22qter deletion by routine chromosome analyses. Our goal is to contribute to the description of the neuro-behavioral phenotype and brain abnormalities of this micro-deletional syndrome. We assessed neuro-motor, sensory, language, communication, and social development and performed cerebral MRI and study of regional cerebral blood flow measured by positron emission tomography in 8 children carrying the 22q13.3 deletion. Despite variability in expression and severity, the children shared a common developmental profile characterized by hypotonia, sleep disorders, and poor response to their environment in early infancy; expressive language deficit contrasting with emergence of social reciprocity from ages similar to 3 to 5 years; sensory processing dysfunction; and neuro-motor disorders. Brain MRI findings were normal or showed a thin or morphologically atypical corpus callosum. Positron emission tomography study detected a localized dysfunction of the left temporal polar lobe and amygdala hypoperfusion. The developmental course of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome belongs to pervasive developmental disorders but is distinct from autism. An improved description of the natural history of this syndrome should help in recognizing this largely under-diagnosed condition. (authors)

  2. Speech and language abilities of children with the familial form of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakonjac Marijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS, which encompasses Shprintzen syndrome, DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome, is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans with an estimated incidence of approximately 1/4000 per live births. After Down syndrome, it is the second most common genetic syndrome associated with congenital heart malformations. The mode of inheritance of the 22q11.2DS is autosomal dominant. In approximately 72 - 94% of the cases the deletion has occurred de novo, while in 6 to 28% of patients deletion was inherited from a parent. As a part of a multidisciplinary study we examined the speech and language abilities of members of two families with inherited form of 22q11.2DS. The presence of 22q11.2 microdeletion was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. In one family we detected 1.5 Mb 22q11.2 microdeletion, while in the other family we found 3Mb microdeletion. Patients from both families showed delays in cognitive, socio-emotional, speech and language development. Furthermore, we found considerable variability in the phenotypic characteristics of 22q11.2DS and the degree of speech-language pathology not only between different families with 22q11.2 deletion, but also among members of the same family. In addition, we detected no correlation between the phenotype and the size of 22q11.2 microdeletion.

  3. Common and distinct neural correlates of facial emotion processing in social anxiety disorder and Williams syndrome: A systematic review and voxel-based meta-analysis of functional resonance imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binelli, C; Subirà, S; Batalla, A; Muñiz, A; Sugranyés, G; Crippa, J A; Farré, M; Pérez-Jurado, L; Martín-Santos, R

    2014-11-01

    Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WS) are two conditions which seem to be at opposite ends in the continuum of social fear but show compromised abilities in some overlapping areas, including some social interactions, gaze contact and processing of facial emotional cues. The increase in the number of neuroimaging studies has greatly expanded our knowledge of the neural bases of facial emotion processing in both conditions. However, to date, SAD and WS have not been compared. We conducted a systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies comparing SAD and WS cases to healthy control participants (HC) using facial emotion processing paradigms. Two researchers conducted comprehensive PubMed/Medline searches to identify all fMRI studies of facial emotion processing in SAD and WS. The following search key-words were used: "emotion processing"; "facial emotion"; "social anxiety"; "social phobia"; "Williams syndrome"; "neuroimaging"; "functional magnetic resonance"; "fMRI" and their combinations, as well as terms specifying individual facial emotions. We extracted spatial coordinates from each study and conducted two separate voxel-wise activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses, one for SAD and one for WS. Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria: 17 studies of SAD and five of WS. We found evidence for both common and distinct patterns of neural activation. Limbic engagement was common to SAD and WS during facial emotion processing, although we observed opposite patterns of activation for each disorder. Compared to HC, SAD cases showed hyperactivation of the amygdala, the parahippocampal gyrus and the globus pallidus. Compared to controls, participants with WS showed hypoactivation of these regions. Differential activation in a number of regions specific to either condition was also identified: SAD cases exhibited greater activation of the insula, putamen, the superior temporal gyrus, medial frontal regions and

  4. Hematological abnormalities and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano Machado Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is a common genetic disease characterized by broad phenotypic variability. Despite the small number of studies describing hematological alterations in individuals with 22q11DS, it appears that these abnormalities are more frequent than previously imagined. Thus, the objective of our study was to report on a patient with 22q11DS presenting thrombocytopenia and large platelets and to review the literature. The patient, a 13-year-old boy, was originally evaluated due to craniofacial dysmorphia and speech delay. He also had a history of behavioral changes, neuropsychomotor delay and recurrent otitis/sinusitis. The identification of a 22q11.2 microdeletion by fluorescent in situ hybridization diagnosed the syndrome. Despite his hematological alterations, he only had a history of epistaxis and bruising of the upper and lower limbs. Assessments of the prothrombin time, thrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, fibrinogen levels and platelet aggregation (including the ristocetin induced platelet aggregation test were all normal. Hematological alterations observed in 22q11DS are directly related to the genetic disorder itself (especially in respect to deletion of the GPIb gene and secondary to some clinical findings, such as immunodeficiency. Macrothrombocytopenia is increasingly being considered a feature of the broad spectrum of 22q11DS and may potentially be a clinical marker for the syndrome.

  5. Auditory cortical volumes and musical ability in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A; Reutens, David C; Wilson, Sarah J

    2010-07-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have been shown to have atypical morphology in the auditory cortex, an area associated with aspects of musicality. Some individuals with WS have demonstrated specific musical abilities, despite intellectual delays. Primary auditory cortex and planum temporale volumes were manually segmented in 25 individuals with WS and 25 control participants, and the participants also underwent testing of musical abilities. Left and right planum temporale volumes were significantly larger in the participants with WS than in controls, with no significant difference noted between groups in planum temporale asymmetry or primary auditory cortical volumes. Left planum temporale volume was significantly increased in a subgroup of the participants with WS who demonstrated specific musical strengths, as compared to the remaining WS participants, and was highly correlated with scores on a musical task. These findings suggest that differences in musical ability within WS may be in part associated with variability in the left auditory cortical region, providing further evidence of cognitive and neuroanatomical heterogeneity within this syndrome. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An interictal schizophrenia-like psychosis in an adult patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yasutaka Tastuzawa; Kanako Sekinaka; Tetsufumi Suda; Hiroshi Matsumoto; Hiroyuki Otabe; Shigeaki Nonoyama; Aihide Yoshino

    2015-01-01

    In addition to causing polymalformative syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion can lead to various neuropsychiatric disorders including mental retardation, psychosis, and epilepsy. However, few reports regarding epilepsy-related psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) exist. We describe the clinical characteristics and course of 22q11.2DS in a Japanese patient with comorbid mild mental retardation, childhood-onset localization-related epilepsy, and adult-onset, interictal schizophrenia-like ps...

  7. Imaging of cardiovascular malformations in Williams syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shiguo; Zhao Shihua; Jiang Shiliang; Huang Lianjun; Xu Zhongying; Ling Jian; Zheng Hong; Yan Chaowu; Lu Jinguo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging methods for cardiovascular malformations in Williams syndrome(WS). Methods: Thirteen cases of WS (7 males and 6 females) aged 10 months to 13 years were involved in this study. All patients underwent chest X-ray radiography, electrocardiography, echocardiography and physical examination. 3 cases underwent electronic beam computed tomography (EBCT), cardiac catheterization and angiography were performed in 8 cases. Results: Twelve patients were referred to our hospital for cardiac murmur and 1 case for cyanosis after birth. 7 patients were found with 'elfin-like' facial features, 6 patients with pulmonary arterial stenosis, 2 cases with patent ductus arteriosus, 2 cases with severe pulmonary hypertension and 1 case with total endocardial cushion defect. Sudden death occurred in 2 patients during and after catheterization, respectively. Conclusions: Conventional angiography is the golden standard for the diagnosis of cardiovascular malformations in WS. Noninvasive methods such as MSCT and MRI should be suggested because of the risk of sudden death in conventional angiography. (authors)

  8. Hypertensive Cerebral Hemorrhage in a Patient with Turner Syndrome Caused by Deletion in the Short Arm of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yusuke S; Ohkura, Takahiro; Ebisudani, Yuki; Umakoshi, Michiari; Ishi, Masato; Oda, Kazunori; Aoi, Mizuho; Inoue, Takushi; Furujo, Mahoko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Fukuhara, Toru

    2018-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal disorder usually caused by complete deletion of an X chromosome, with deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome being a rare cause of the condition. Patients with Turner syndrome commonly develop hypertension, and associated vascular complications such as aortic dissection or cerebral hemorrhage have been reported. Cerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is a rare complication, and only a few reports have been published. In these reports, all patients have XO karyotypes or a mosaic type as the cause of Turner syndrome, while no other Turner syndrome types have been documented. In this report, we present for the first time a patient with Turner syndrome caused by deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome who experienced hypertensive hemorrhage as a late complication. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. THE SYNTACTICAL ABILITY OF A YOUNG GIRL WITH WILLIAMS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana ARAPOVIKJ

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out on a young girl with Williams syndrome, whose syntactical ability was tested longitudinally over a period of 22 months, from age 9 years and 3 months to 11 years and 1 month. The assumption was that the girl with Wil­liams syndrome would have poorer syntactical ability than children with regular development, but similar to children with specific language impair­ment (SLI and that in all tasks she would achieve better results in the final testing. Syntax was ana­lyzed on the basis of the fundamental variable of repeating sentences, which consisted of five sub-variables: literal repetition of sentences, sentences repeated with omissions, ungrammatical repetition of sentences, sentences with altered content, sen­tences not repeated. A statistical difference was found between the syntactical ability of the girl with Williams’ syndrome and children with normal development in all tested sub-variables, and her results were the same as in children with specific language impairment. Moreover, in the final test­ing the girl achieved better results than in the ini­tial test.

  10. Problem Behaviour and Psychosocial Functioning in Young Children with Williams Syndrome: Parent and Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Tasman, B. P.; Lee, K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is sparse literature about problem behaviour in young children with Williams syndrome (WS) and little consideration of the perspectives of multiple respondents. Methods: Problem behaviour of 35 children with WS ages 2 to 6 was examined based on both parent and teacher report using the Achenbach preschool forms. Results: The most…

  11. A novel growth hormone receptor gene deletion mutation in a patient with primary growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (Laron syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kouhara, Haruhiko; Iida, Keiji; Chihara, Kazuo; Kasayama, Soji

    2008-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (Laron syndrome) is known to be caused by genetic disorders of the GH-IGF-1 axis. Although many mutations in the GH receptor have been identified, there have been only a few reports of deletions of the GH receptor gene. A Japanese adult female patient with Laron syndrome was subjected to chromosome analysis with basic G-banding and also with a high accuracy technique. Each exon of the GH receptor gene was amplified by means of PCR. Since this patient was diagnosed with osteoporosis, the effects of alendronate on bone mineral density (BMD) were also examined. The chromosome analysis with the high accuracy technique demonstrated a large deletion of the short arm in one allele of chromosome 5 from p11 to p13.1 [46, XX, del (5) (p11-p13.1)]. PCR amplification of exons of the GH receptor gene showed that only exons 2 and 3 were amplified. Low-dose IGF-1 administration (30microg/kg body weight) failed to increase her BMD, whereas alendronate administration resulted in an increase associated with a decrease in urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) and serum osteocalcin concentrations. The GH receptor gene of the patient was shown to lack exons 4-10. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case report of Laron syndrome with large GH receptor deletion. Alendronate was effective for the enhancement of BMD.

  12. Clinical variability of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome in patients with proximal 13q deletion syndrome including the endothelin-B receptor locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Collin, Anna; Arapoğlu, Müjde; Suyugül, Nezir

    2009-10-01

    Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (Waardenburg syndrome type IV-WS4) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that combines clinical features of pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, hair and irides, sensorineural hearing loss, and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB) gene on 13q22 have been found to cause this syndrome. Mutations in both alleles cause the full phenotype, while heterozygous mutations cause isolated HSCR or HSCR with minor pigmentary anomalies and/or sensorineural deafness. We investigated the status of the EDNRB gene, by FISH analysis, in three patients with de novo proximal 13q deletions detected at cytogenetic analysis and examined the clinical variability of WS4 among these patients. Chromosome 13q was screened with locus specific FISH probes and breakpoints were determined at 13q22.1q31.3 in Patients 1 and 3, and at 13q21.1q31.3 in Patient 2. An EDNRB specific FISH probe was deleted in all three patients. All patients had common facial features seen in proximal 13q deletion syndrome and mild mental retardation. However, findings related to WS4 were variable; Patient 1 had hypopigmentation of the irides and HSCR, Patient 2 had prominent bicolored irides and mild bilateral hearing loss, and Patient 3 had only mild unilateral hearing loss. These data contribute new insights into the pathogenesis of WS4.

  13. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Marino, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Scambler, Peter J.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common chromosomal microdeletion disorder, estimated to result mainly from de novo non-homologous meiotic recombination events occurring in approximately 1 in every 1,000 fetuses. The first description in the English language of the constellation of findings now known to be due to this chromosomal difference was made in the 1960s in children with DiGeorge syndrome, who presented with the clinical triad of immunodeficiency, hypoparathyroidism and congenital heart disease. The syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous presentation that includes multiple additional congenital anomalies and later-onset conditions, such as palatal, gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities, autoimmune disease, variable cognitive delays, behavioural phenotypes and psychiatric illness — all far extending the original description of DiGeorge syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach involving paediatrics, general medicine, surgery, psychiatry, psychology, interventional therapies (physical, occupational, speech, language and behavioural) and genetic counselling. Although common, lack of recognition of the condition and/or lack of familiarity with genetic testing methods, together with the wide variability of clinical presentation, delays diagnosis. Early diagnosis, preferably prenatally or neonatally, could improve outcomes, thus stressing the importance of universal screening. Equally important, 22q11.2DS has become a model for understanding rare and frequent congenital anomalies, medical conditions, psychiatric and developmental disorders, and may provide a platform to better understand these disorders while affording opportunities for translational strategies across the lifespan for both patients with 22q11.2DS and those with these associated features in the general population. PMID:27189754

  14. Heart defects and other features of the 22q11 distal deletion syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Christina Ringmann; Graakjaer, Jesper; Heinl, Ulrike D

    2013-01-01

    patients with 22q11 distal deletions, of whom two have complex congenital heart malformation, thus broadening the phenotypic spectrum. We compare cardiac malformations reported in 22q11 distal deletion to those reported in the common 22q11 deletion syndrome. We also review the literature for patients...... with 22q11 distal deletions, and discuss the possible roles of haploinsufficiency of the MAPK1 gene. We find the most frequent features in 22q11 distal deletion to be developmental delay or learning disability, short stature, microcephalus, premature birth with low birth weight, and congenital heart...... malformation ranging from minor anomalies to complex malformations. Behavioral problems are also seen in a substantial portion of patients. The following dysmorphic features are relatively common: smooth philtrum, abnormally structured ears, cleft palate/bifid uvula, micro-/retrognathia, upslanting palpebral...

  15. Maladaptive Behavior Differences in Prader-Willi Syndrome Due to Paternal Deletion versus Maternal Uniparental Disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; King, Bryan H.; Cassidy, Suzanne B.

    1999-01-01

    This study compared maladaptive behavior in 23 people with Prader-Willi syndrome due to paternal deletion and in 23 age- and gender-matched subjects with maternal uniparental disomy. Controlling for IQs, the deletion cases showed significantly higher maladaptive ratings, more symptom-related distress, and more behavior problems. Findings suggest a…

  16. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), a...

  17. Performance on verbal and low-verbal false belief tasks: evidence from children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Dimitriou, Dagmara; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies that have investigated the relationship between performance on theory of mind (ToM) tasks and verbal abilities in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have reported contradictory findings with some showing that language abilities aid performance on ToM tasks while others have found that participants with WS fail these tasks because of their verbal demands. The current study investigated this relationship again comparing performance on a classical change-location task to two newly developed low-verbal tasks, one change-location task and one unexpected content task. Thirty children with WS (aged 5-17;01 years) and 30 typically developing (TD) children (aged between 2;10 years and 9;09 years), who were matched for vocabulary comprehension scores were included in the study. Although performance in the WS group was significantly poorer compared to the TD group on all three tasks, performance was not predicted by their receptive vocabulary or grammatical ability scores. In addition, ToM abilities in both groups depended on the cognitive demands of the task at hand. This finding shows that performance on ToM tasks in WS is not necessarily hindered by their delayed language abilities but rather by the task administered. This could potentially affect the diagnosis of developmental disorders, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders, and comparison of ToM abilities across developmental disorders. Readers of this article should be able to (1) describe the current state of theory of mind research in Williams syndrome, (2) identify which cognitive abilities might explain performance on theory of mind tasks in both typically developing children and in children with Williams syndrome, and (3) interpret the importance of task demands when assessing children's theory of mind abilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Small mosaic deletion encompassing the snoRNAs and SNURF-SNRPN results in an atypical Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Lundin, Johanna; Malmgren, Helena; Lehtihet, Mikael; Nordgren, Ann

    2014-02-01

    Genetic analyses were performed in a male patient with suspected Prader-Willi syndrome who presented with hypogonadism, excessive eating, central obesity, small hands and feet and cognition within the low normal range. However, he had no neonatal hypotonia or feeding problems during infancy. Chromosome analysis showed a normal male karyotype. Further analysis with array-CGH identified a mosaic 847 kb deletion in 15q11-q13, including SNURF-SNRPN, the snoRNA gene clusters SNORD116 (HBII-85), SNORD115, (HBII-52), SNORD109 A and B (HBII-438A and B), SNORD64 (HBII-13), and NPAP1 (C15ORF2). MLPA confirmed the deletion and the results were compatible with a paternal origin. Metaphase-FISH verified the mosaicism with the deletion present in 58% of leukocytes analyzed. Three smaller deletions in this region have previously been reported in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype. All three deletions included SNORD116, but only two encompassed parts of SNURF-SNRPN, implicating SNORD116 as the major contributor to the Prader-Willi phenotype. Our case adds further information about genotype-phenotype correlation and supports the hypothesis that SNORD116 plays a major role in the pathogenesis of Prader-Willi syndrome. Furthermore, it examplifies diagnostic difficulties in atypical cases and illustrates the need for additional testing methods when Prader-Willi syndrome is suspected. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Anxiety in Williams Syndrome: The Role of Social Behaviour, Executive Functions and Change over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng-Cordell, Elise; Hanley, Mary; Kelly, Alyssa; Riby, Deborah M.

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety is a prevalent mental health issue for individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Relatively little is known about the developmental course of anxiety, or how it links with core features of WS, namely social and executive functioning (EF). In this study, parent-reports of anxiety were compared across a 4-year period (N = 17), and links…

  20. Deletion of short arm of chromosome 18, Del(18p syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Babaji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 is a rare syndrome clinically presenting with variable mental retardation, growth retardation, low height, pectus excavatum, craniofacial malformations including long ear, ptosis, microcephaly and short neck. This case report presents with characteristic features along with rare feature of single nostril.

  1. Anesthesiological Management of a Patient with Williams Syndrome Undergoing Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Boncagni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams Syndrome (WS is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder associated with a mutation on chromosome 7. Patients with WS usually display dysmorphic facial and musculoskeletal features, congenital heart diseases, metabolic disturbances and cognitive impairment. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are present in the majority of the children and may provide a substrate for perioperative Sudden Cardiac Death, as presented by several reports, something that creates a great challenge to the anesthetic conduct. We present the case of a 12-year old girl who required anesthetic care for surgical correction of an acquired kyphoscoliosis. Potential anesthesiological implications of WS are subsequently reviewed.

  2. Intranasal insulin to improve developmental delay in children with 22q13 deletion syndrome: an exploratory clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H; Kern, W; Giese, R; Hallschmid, M; Enders, A

    2009-04-01

    The 22q13 deletion syndrome (Phelan-McDermid syndrome) is characterised by a global developmental delay, absent or delayed speech, generalised hypotonia, autistic behaviour and characteristic phenotypic features. Intranasal insulin has been shown to improve declarative memory in healthy adult subjects and in patients with Alzheimer disease. To assess if intranasal insulin is also able to improve the developmental delay in children with 22q13 deletion syndrome. We performed exploratory clinical trials in six children with 22q13 deletion syndrome who received intranasal insulin over a period of 1 year. Short-term (during the first 6 weeks) and long-term effects (after 12 months of treatment) on motor skills, cognitive functions, or autonomous functions, speech and communication, emotional state, social behaviour, behavioural disorders, independence in daily living and education were assessed. The children showed marked short-term improvements in gross and fine motor activities, cognitive functions and educational level. Positive long-term effects were found for fine and gross motor activities, nonverbal communication, cognitive functions and autonomy. Possible side effects were found in one patient who displayed changes in balance, extreme sensitivity to touch and general loss of interest. One patient complained of intermittent nose bleeding. We conclude that long-term administration of intranasal insulin may benefit motor development, cognitive functions and spontaneous activity in children with 22q13 deletion syndrome.

  3. New recurrent deletions in the PPARgamma and TP53 genes are associated with childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Cássia G T; Oliveira, Fábio M; Valera, Elvis T

    2009-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a rare hematological malignancy in children. It was performed FISH analysis in 19 pediatric MDS patients to investigate deletions involving the PPARgamma and TP53 genes. Significant losses in the PPARgamma gene and deletions in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 were...

  4. Behavioral Profiles of Children With Williams Syndrome From Spain and the United States: Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Débora; Brun-Gasca, Carme; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Mervis, Carolyn B

    2017-03-01

    To identify similarities and differences in the behavioral profile of children with Williams syndrome from Spain (n = 53) and the United States (n = 145), we asked parents of 6- to 14-year-olds with Williams syndrome to complete the Child Behavior Checklist 6-18. The distribution of raw scores was significantly higher for the Spanish sample than the American sample for all of the higher-order factors and half of both the empirically based and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-oriented scales. In contrast, analyses based on country-specific T-scores indicated that the distribution for the Spanish sample was significantly higher than for the American sample only on the Social Problems scale. No gender differences were found. Genetic and cultural influences on children's behavior and cultural influences on parental ratings of behavior are discussed.

  5. Intranasal insulin to improve developmental delay in children with 22q13 deletion syndrome: an exploratory clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Heinrich; Giese, Renate; Enders, Angelika; Kern, W.; Hallschmid, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The 22q13 deletion syndrome (Phelan– McDermid syndrome) is characterised by a global developmental delay, absent or delayed speech, generalised hypotonia, autistic behaviour and characteristic phenotypic features. Intranasal insulin has been shown to improve declarative memory in healthy adult subjects and in patients with Alzheimer disease. Aims: To assess if intranasal insulin is also able to improve the developmental delay in children with 22q13 delet...

  6. Deeper processing is beneficial during episodic memory encoding for adults with Williams syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, J.; Hamilton, C.; Riby, D. M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research exploring declarative memory in Williams syndrome (WS) has revealed impairment in the processing of episodic information accompanied by a relative strength in semantic ability. The aim of the current study was to extend this literature by examining how relatively spared semantic memory may support episodic remembering. Using a level of processing paradigm, older adults with WS (aged 35–61 years) were compared to typical adults of the same chronological age and typically deve...

  7. A case of 18p deletion syndrome after blepharoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu LJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Li-juan Xu,1 Lv-xian Wu,2 Qing Yuan,3 Zhi-gang Lv,1 Xue-yan Jiang2 1Department of Opthalmology, 2Department of Pediatrics, 3Department of Clinical Laboratory, Jinhua Central Hospital, Jinhua, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Objective: The deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 is thought to be one of the rare chromosomal aberrations. Here, we report a case to review this disease.Case report: The proband is a five-and-a-half-year-old girl who has had phenotypes manifested mainly by ptosis, broad face, broad neck with low posterior hairline, mental retardation, short stature, and other malformations. Chromosomal analysis for her mother showed a normal karyotype. Her father and younger brother were phenotypically normal.Result: Phenotypical features were quite similar throughout other cases and in accordance with the usual phenotype of del(18p suggested within the same cases and among the del(18p cases described. She underwent blepharoplasty, which improved her appearance.Conclusion: 18p deletion syndrome is diagnosed by gene analysis. Plastic surgeries for improving the appearance might be an option for these patients. Keywords: chromosome, deletion, blepharoplasty

  8. Novel features of 3q29 deletion syndrome: Results from the 3q29 registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Megan R.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Freedman, Alexa A.; Zwick, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    3q29 deletion syndrome is caused by a recurrent, typically de novo heterozygous 1.6 Mb deletion, but because incidence of the deletion is rare (1 in 30,000 births) the phenotype is not well described. To characterize the range of phenotypic manifestations associated with 3q29 deletion syndrome, we have developed an online registry (3q29deletion.org) for ascertainment of study subjects and phenotypic data collection via Internet‐based survey instruments. We report here on data collected during the first 18 months of registry operation, from 44 patients. This is the largest cohort of 3q29 deletion carriers ever assembled and surveyed in a systematic way. Our data reveal that 28% of registry participants report neuropsychiatric phenotypes, including anxiety disorder, panic attacks, depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Other novel findings include a high prevalence (64%) of feeding problems in infancy and reduced weight at birth for 3q29 deletion carriers (average reduction 13.9 oz (394 g), adjusted for gestational age and sex, P = 6.5e‐07). We further report on the frequency of heart defects, autism, recurrent ear infections, gastrointestinal phenotypes, and dental phenotypes, among others. We also report on the expected timing of delayed developmental milestones. This is the most comprehensive description of the 3q29 deletion phenotype to date. These results are clinically actionable toward improving patient care for 3q29 deletion carriers, and can guide the expectations of physicians and parents. These data also demonstrate the value of patient‐reported outcomes to reveal the full phenotypic spectrum of rare genomic disorders. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26738761

  9. Neural correlates of amusia in williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D; Dankner, Nathan; Pryweller, Jennifer R; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2014-11-21

    Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD) populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia). Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

  10. Brain and behaviour in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: a volumetric and voxel-based morphometry MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, Linda E.; Daly, Eileen; Toal, Fiona; Stevens, Angela; Azuma, Rayna; Catani, Marco; Ng, Virginia; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Chitnis, Xavier; Cutter, William; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2006-01-01

    In people with velo-cardio-facial syndrome [or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS)], a single interstitial deletion of chromosome 22q11.2 causes a wide spectrum of cognitive deficits ranging from global learning difficulties to specific cognitive deficits. People with 22qDS are also at high risk of

  11. Small deletions of SATB2 cause some of the clinical features of the 2q33.1 microdeletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available Recurrent deletions of 2q32q33 have recently been reported as a new microdeletion syndrome. Clinical features of this syndrome include severe mental retardation, growth retardation, dysmorphic features, thin and sparse hair, feeding difficulties and cleft or high palate. The commonly deleted region contains at least seven genes. Haploinsufficiency of one of these genes, SATB2, a DNA-binding protein that regulates gene expression, has been implicated as causative in the cleft or high palate of individuals with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome. In this study we describe three individuals with smaller microdeletions of this region, within 2q33.1. The deletions ranged in size from 173.1 kb to 185.2 kb and spanned part of SATB2. Review of clinical records showed similar clinical features among these individuals, including severe developmental delay and tooth abnormalities. Two of the individuals had behavioral problems. Only one of the subjects presented here had a cleft palate, suggesting reduced penetrance for this feature. Our results suggest that deletion of SATB2 is responsible for several of the clinical features associated with 2q32q33 microdeletion syndrome.

  12. Interpretation of Ambiguous Situations: Evidence for a Dissociation between Social and Physical Threat in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Helen F.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with an unusual profile of anxiety, characterised by increased rates of non-social anxiety but not social anxiety (Dodd and Porter, J Ment Health Res Intellect Disabil 2(2):89-109, "2009"). The present research examines whether this profile of anxiety is associated with an interpretation bias for ambiguous…

  13. Neuron density is decreased in the prefrontal cortex in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Caroline Horton; Brown, Chelsea; Bellugi, Ursula; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with a hemideletion in chromosome 7, which manifests a distinct behavioral phenotype characterized by a hyperaffiliative social drive, in striking contrast to the social avoidance behaviors that are common in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). MRI studies have observed structural and functional abnormalities in WS cortex, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a region implicated in social cognition. This study utilizes the Bellugi Williams Syndrome Brain Collection, a unique resource that comprises the largest WS postmortem brain collection in existence, and is the first to quantitatively examine WS PFC cytoarchitecture. We measured neuron density in layers II/III and V/VI of five cortical areas: PFC areas BA 10 and BA 11, primary motor BA 4, primary somatosensory BA 3, and visual area BA 18 in six matched pairs of WS and typically developing (TD) controls. Neuron density in PFC was lower in WS relative to TD, with layers V/VI demonstrating the largest decrease in density, reaching statistical significance in BA 10. In contrast, BA 3 and BA 18 demonstrated a higher density in WS compared to TD, although this difference was not statistically significant. Neuron density in BA 4 was similar in WS and TD. While other cortical areas were altered in WS, prefrontal areas appeared to be most affected. Neuron density is also altered in the PFC of individuals with ASD. Together these findings suggest that the PFC is targeted in neurodevelopmental disorders associated with sociobehavioral alterations. Autism Res 2017, 10: 99-112. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Risk of colorectal and endometrial cancers in EPCAM deletion-positive Lynch syndrome : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempers, Marlies J. E.; Kuiper, Roland P.; Ockeloen, Charlotte W.; Chappuis, Pierre O.; Hutter, Pierre; Rahner, Nils; Schackert, Hans K.; Steinke, Verena; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Buettner, Reinhard; Verwiel, Eugene T. P.; van Krieken, J. Han; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Goossens, Monique; van der Post, Rachel S.; Niessen, Renee C.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Kluijt, Irma; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Leter, Edward M.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.; Hes, Frederik J.; Tops, Carli M. J.; van Nesselrooij, Bernadette P. M.; van Gijn, Marielle E.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Eccles, Diana M.; Bunyan, David J.; Syngal, Sapna; Stoffel, Elena M.; Culver, Julie O.; Palomares, Melanie R.; Graham, Tracy; Velsher, Lea; Papp, Janos; Olah, Edith; Chan, Tsun L.; Leung, Suet Y.; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    Background Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations in MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2 mismatch-repair genes and leads to a high risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer. We previously showed that constitutional 3' end deletions of EPCAM can cause Lynch syndrome through epigenetic silencing of

  15. Social phenotypes of autism spectrum disorders and Williams syndrome: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke eAsada

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD and Williams syndrome (WS both are neurodevelopmental disorders, each with a unique social phenotypic pattern. This review article aims to define the similarities and differences between the social phenotypes of ASD and WS. We review studies that have examined individuals with WS using diagnostic assessments such as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS, cross-syndrome direct comparison studies, and studies that have individually examined either disorder. We conclude that (1 Individuals with these disorders show quite contrasting phenotypes for face processing (i.e., preference to faces and eyes and sociability (i.e., interest in and motivation to interact with others, and (2 Although the ADOS and a direct comparison study on pragmatic language ability suggest more deficits in ASD, individuals with WS are similarly impaired on social cognition and communicative skills. In light of these results, we discuss how cross-syndrome comparisons between ASD and WS can contribute to developmental theory, cognitive neuroscience, and the development and choice of clinical treatments.

  16. Study protocol for The Emory 3q29 Project: evaluation of neurodevelopmental, psychiatric, and medical symptoms in 3q29 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Melissa M; Lindsey Burrell, T; Cubells, Joseph F; España, Roberto Antonio; Gambello, Michael J; Goines, Katrina C B; Klaiman, Cheryl; Li, Longchuan; Novacek, Derek M; Papetti, Ava; Sanchez Russo, Rossana Lucia; Saulnier, Celine A; Shultz, Sarah; Walker, Elaine; Mulle, Jennifer Gladys

    2018-06-08

    3q29 deletion syndrome is caused by a recurrent hemizygous 1.6 Mb deletion on the long arm of chromosome 3. The syndrome is rare (1 in 30,000 individuals) and is associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability, increased risk for autism and anxiety, and a 40-fold increased risk for schizophrenia, along with a host of physical manifestations. However, the disorder is poorly characterized, the range of manifestations is not well described, and the underlying molecular mechanism is not understood. We designed the Emory 3q29 Project to document the range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric manifestations associated with 3q29 deletion syndrome. We will also create a biobank of samples from our 3q29 deletion carriers for mechanistic studies, which will be a publicly-available resource for qualified investigators. The ultimate goals of our study are three-fold: first, to improve management and treatment of 3q29 deletion syndrome. Second, to uncover the molecular mechanism of the disorder. Third, to enable cross-disorder comparison with other rare genetic syndromes associated with neuropsychiatric phenotypes. We will ascertain study subjects, age 6 and older, from our existing registry ( 3q29deletion.org ). Participants and their families will travel to Atlanta, GA for phenotypic assessments, with particular emphasis on evaluation of anxiety, cognitive ability, autism symptomatology, and risk for psychosis via prodromal symptoms and syndromes. Evaluations will be performed using standardized instruments. Structural, diffusion, and resting-state functional MRI data will be collected from eligible study participants. We will also collect blood from the 3q29 deletion carrier and participating family members, to be banked at the NIMH Repository and Genomics Resource (NRGR). The study of 3q29 deletion has the potential to transform our understanding of complex disease. Study of individuals with the deletion may provide insights into long term care and management of

  17. Cardiac anomalies in individuals with the 18q deletion syndrome; report of a child with Ebstein anomaly and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trier, D.C. van; Feenstra, I.; Bot, P.; Leeuw, N. de; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with the 18q deletion syndrome are presented with various clinical characteristics, including cardiac anomalies in 24-36% of the reported cases. Nonetheless, genotype-phenotype correlations for cardiac anomalies in the 18q deletion syndrome have rarely been reported. We report on two

  18. Do Faces Capture the Attention of Individuals with Williams Syndrome or Autism? Evidence from Tracking Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Hancock, Peter J. B.

    2009-01-01

    The neuro-developmental disorders of Williams syndrome (WS) and autism can reveal key components of social cognition. Eye-tracking techniques were applied in two tasks exploring attention to pictures containing faces. Images were (i) scrambled pictures containing faces or (ii) pictures of scenes with embedded faces. Compared to individuals who…

  19. Parent and Self-Report Ratings on the Perceived Levels of Social Vulnerability of Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Emma; Fisher, Marisa H.

    2016-01-01

    The current study took a multi-informant approach to compare parent to self-report ratings of social vulnerability of adults with Williams syndrome (WS). Participants included 102 pairs of adults with WS and their parents. Parents completed the "Social Vulnerability Questionnaire" and adults with WS completed an adapted version of the…

  20. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  1. Syndrome of proximal interstitial deletion 4p15: Report of three cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitayat, D.; Babul, R.; Teshima, I.E. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-01-16

    We report on two boys and a girl with interstitial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 4 including the segment p15.2p15.33. All had normal growth with psychomotor retardation, multiple minor congenital anomalies, and a characteristic face distinct from that of the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. One of the patients had congenitally enlarged penis. These patients resemble some of the previously reported patients with similar cytogenetic abnormalities and suggests the recognition of a specific clinical chromosome deletion syndrome. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. An interictal schizophrenia-like psychosis in an adult patient with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutaka Tastuzawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to causing polymalformative syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion can lead to various neuropsychiatric disorders including mental retardation, psychosis, and epilepsy. However, few reports regarding epilepsy-related psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS exist. We describe the clinical characteristics and course of 22q11.2DS in a Japanese patient with comorbid mild mental retardation, childhood-onset localization-related epilepsy, and adult-onset, interictal schizophrenia-like psychosis. From a diagnostic viewpoint, early detection of impaired intellectual functioning and hyperprolinemia in patients with epilepsy with 22q11.2DS may be helpful in predicting the developmental timing of interictal psychosis. From a therapeutic viewpoint, special attention needs to be paid to phenytoin-induced hypocalcemia in this syndrome.

  3. Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in a Danish 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Cohort Compared to the Total Danish Population-A Nationwide Register Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangkilde, Anders; Olsen, Line; Hoeffding, Louise K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cross-sectional studies have shown associations between 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and schizophrenia. However, large-scale prospective studies have been lacking. We, therefore, conducted the first large-scale population based study on the risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia...... in persons identified with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. METHODS: Danish nationwide registers were linked to establish a cohort consisting of all Danish citizens born during 1955-2004 and the cohort was followed from January 1, 1994 until December 31, 2013. Data were analyzed using survival analyses...... and adjusted for calendar year, age, sex, and parental mental health history. RESULTS: A total of 156 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were identified, out of which 6 individuals were diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders following identification with 22q11 deletion syndrome. Identified...

  4. Musical learning in children and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, M; Dykens, E

    2013-09-01

    There is recent interest in using music making as an empirically supported intervention for various neurodevelopmental disorders due to music's engagement of perceptual-motor mapping processes. However, little is known about music learning in populations with developmental disabilities. Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder whose characteristic auditory strengths and visual-spatial weaknesses map onto the processes used to learn to play a musical instrument. We identified correlates of novel musical instrument learning in WS by teaching 46 children and adults (7-49 years) with WS to play the Appalachian dulcimer. Obtained dulcimer skill was associated with prior musical abilities (r = 0.634, P learning strategies, but not visual or instructional strategies, predicted greater dulcimer skill beyond individual musical and visual-motor integration abilities (β = 0.285, sr(2) = 0.06, P = 0.019). These findings map onto behavioural and emerging neural evidence for greater auditory-motor mapping processes in WS. Results suggest that explicit awareness of task-specific learning approaches is important when learning a new skill. Implications for using music with populations with syndrome-specific strengths and weakness will be discussed. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  5. Route-Learning Strategies in Typical and Atypical Development; Eye Tracking Reveals Atypical Landmark Selection in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, E. K.; Formby, S.; Daniyal, F.; Holmes, T.; Van Herwegen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Successful navigation is crucial to everyday life. Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impaired spatial abilities. This includes a deficit in spatial navigation abilities such as learning the route from A to B. To-date, to determine whether participants attend to landmarks when learning a route, landmark recall tasks have been…

  6. Effect of Musical Experience on Verbal Memory in Williams Syndrome: Evidence from a Novel Word Learning Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A.; Jungers, Melissa K.; Steele, Anita L.

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by an increased affinity for music, deficits in verbal memory, and atypical brain development. Music has been shown to improve verbal memory in typical individuals as well as those with learning difficulties, but no studies have examined this relationship in WS. The aim…

  7. Neonatal hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in a patient with 9p deletion syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, Allan; Kirchhoff, Maria; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel

    2018-01-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological findings in a young boy harboring the 9p deletion syndrome including the novel findings of thalamic infarction and germinal matrix haemorrhage and neonatal hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Both the hypoglycemic events and the ventriculomegaly found...... in this patient have previously only been reported in two patients, while the thalamic infarction and germinal matrix haemorrhage are novel features....

  8. Decreased DGCR8 expression and miRNA dysregulation in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Sellier

    Full Text Available Deletion of the 1.5-3 Mb region of chromosome 22 at locus 11.2 gives rise to the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, also known as DiGeorge and Velocardiofacial Syndromes. It is the most common micro-deletion disorder in humans and one of the most common multiple malformation syndromes. The syndrome is characterized by a broad phenotype, whose characterization has expanded considerably within the last decade and includes many associated findings such as craniofacial anomalies (40%, conotruncal defects of the heart (CHD; 70-80%, hypocalcemia (20-60%, and a range of neurocognitive anomalies with high risk of schizophrenia, all with a broad phenotypic variability. These phenotypic features are believed to be the result of a change in the copy number or dosage of the genes located in the deleted region. Despite this relatively clear genetic etiology, very little is known about which genes modulate phenotypic variations in humans or if they are due to combinatorial effects of reduced dosage of multiple genes acting in concert. Here, we report on decreased expression levels of genes within the deletion region of chromosome 22, including DGCR8, in peripheral leukocytes derived from individuals with 22q11DS compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, we found dysregulated miRNA expression in individuals with 22q11DS, including miR-150, miR-194 and miR-185. We postulate this to be related to DGCR8 haploinsufficiency as DGCR8 regulates miRNA biogenesis. Importantly we demonstrate that the level of some miRNAs correlates with brain measures, CHD and thyroid abnormalities, suggesting that the dysregulated miRNAs may contribute to these phenotypes and/or represent relevant blood biomarkers of the disease in individuals with 22q11DS.

  9. Alu-mediated deletion of SOX10 regulatory elements in Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurand, Nadége; Fouquet, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Lecerf, Laure; Loundon, Natalie; Goossens, Michel; Duriez, Benedicte; Labrune, Philippe; Pingault, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a rare neural crest disorder defined by the combination of Waardenburg syndrome (sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects) and Hirschsprung disease (intestinal aganglionosis). Three genes are known to be involved in this syndrome, that is, EDN3 (endothelin-3), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), and SOX10. However, 15-35% of WS4 remains unexplained at the molecular level, suggesting that other genes could be involved and/or that mutations within known genes may have escaped previous screenings. Here, we searched for deletions within recently identified SOX10 regulatory sequences and describe the first characterization of a WS4 patient presenting with a large deletion encompassing three of these enhancers. Analysis of the breakpoint region suggests a complex rearrangement involving three Alu sequences that could be mediated by a FosTes/MMBIR replication mechanism. Taken together with recent reports, our results demonstrate that the disruption of highly conserved non-coding elements located within or at a long distance from the coding sequences of key genes can result in several neurocristopathies. This opens up new routes to the molecular dissection of neural crest disorders.

  10. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam D. Lense

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS, a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia. Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF. The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

  11. Overlapping Numerical Cognition Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion or Turner Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. J.; Takarae, Y.; DeBoer, T.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Ross, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with one of two genetic disorders (chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Turner syndrome) as well typically developing controls, participated in three cognitive processing experiments. Two experiments were designed to test cognitive processes involved in basic aspects numerical cognition. The third was a test of simple manual motor…

  12. Williams Sendromu Olan Bireylerin Ailelerinin Deneyimlerinin ve Karşılaştıkları Güçlüklerin Belirlenmesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Tekin Ersan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Williams Sendromu, belirli bir kromozomda silinme meydana gelmesi ile oluşan nörogelişimsel bir bozukluktur. Görülme sıklığı düşük olan Williams Sendromu ile ilgili yapılmış çalışmalar hem ülkemizde hem de dünyada son derece sınırlıdır. Bu araştırma ile Williams Sendromu olan bireylerin ailelerinin yaşadığı deneyimlerin ve güçlüklerin belirlenmesi amaçlanmaktadır. Araştırmanın modeli nitel araştırma yöntemidir. Araştırmaya beş Williams Sendromu olan bireyin ailesi katılmıştır. Araştırmada veriler, yarı yapılandırılmış görüşme yöntemi ile ve telefon aracılığı ile toplanmıştır. Veriler betimsel analiz ile analiz edilmiştir. Araştırma bulgularına göre; katılımcıların tümünün Williams Sendromu olan bir çocuğa sahip olmayı zor bir deneyim olarak değerlendirdikleri, çocuklarının geleceğine yönelik kaygı taşıdıkları gözlenmiştir. Ailelerin yaşadıkları güçlüklere bakıldığında özellikle çocuklarının davranış problemlerine dair yaşanan güçlükler öne çıkmaktadır. Bunun yanında eğitim ve sağlık alanında uzmanların konu ile ilgili bilgisinin yetersizliği, sahip oldukları olumsuz tutumlar ve aynı zamanda verilen hizmetlerin yetersizliği ile ilgili görüşler öne çıkmaktadır. Ek olarak, kaynakların azlığı ve bilgiye ulaşmanın zorluğuna ilişkin bulgular da elde edilmiştir. Williams Syndrome is a neuro-developmental disorder, which is caused by a deletion in a certain chromosome. Prevalence of Williams Syndrome is low and there is limited number of studies on Williams Syndrome both in our country and abroad. The purpose of this study is to determine experiences and difficulties of parents who have children with Williams Syndrome. It is a qualitative study. Five parents of children with Williams Syndrome were participated in the study. Data collected through semi structured interview via phone calls. Data were analyzed

  13. Multi-exon deletions of the FBN1 gene in Marfan syndrome

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    Schrijver Iris

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the fibrillin -1 gene (FBN1 cause Marfan syndrome (MFS, an autosomal dominant multi-system connective tissue disorder. The 200 different mutations reported in the 235 kb, 65 exon-containing gene include only one family with a genomic multi-exon deletion. Methods We used long-range RT-PCR for mutation detection and long-range genomic PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of deletion breakpoints, allele-specific transcript analyses to determine stability of the mutant RNA, and pulse-chase studies to quantitate fibrillin synthesis and extracellular matrix deposition in cultured fibroblasts. Southern blots of genomic DNA were probed with three overlapping fragments covering the FBN1 coding exons Results Two novel multi-exon FBN1 deletions were discovered. Identical nucleotide pentamers were found at or near the intronic breakpoints. In a Case with classic MFS, an in-frame deletion of exons 42 and 43 removed the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the 5th LTBP (8-cysteine domain and the adjacent 25th calcium-binding EGF-like (6-cysteine domain. The mutant mRNA was stable, but fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition were significantly reduced. A Case with severe childhood-onset MFS has a de novo deletion of exons 44–46 that removed three EGF-like domains. Fibrillin protein synthesis was normal, but matrix deposition was strikingly reduced. No genomic rearrangements were detected by Southern analysis of 18 unrelated MFS samples negative for FBN1 mutation screening. Conclusions Two novel deletion cases expand knowledge of mutational mechanisms and genotype/phenotype correlations of fibrillinopathies. Deletions or mutations affecting an LTBP domain may result in unstable mutant protein cleavage products that interfere with microfibril assembly.

  14. Contribution of Large Genomic Rearrangements in Italian Lynch Syndrome Patients: Characterization of a Novel Alu-Mediated Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Duraturo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is associated with germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2. Most of the mutations reported in these genes to date are point mutations, small deletions, and insertions. Large genomic rearrangements in the MMR genes predisposing to Lynch syndrome also occur, but the frequency varies depending on the population studied on average from 5 to 20%. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of large rearrangements in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a well-characterised series of 63 unrelated Southern Italian Lynch syndrome patients who were negative for pathogenic point mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. We identified a large novel deletion in the MSH2 gene, including exon 6 in one of the patients analysed (1.6% frequency. This deletion was confirmed and localised by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of this rearrangement were characterised by sequencing. Further analysis of the breakpoints revealed that this rearrangement was a product of Alu-mediated recombination. Our findings identified a novel Alu-mediated rearrangement within MSH2 gene and showed that large deletions or duplications in MLH1 and MSH2 genes are low-frequency mutational events in Southern Italian patients with an inherited predisposition to colon cancer.

  15. Neuropsychological function in a child with 18p deletion syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Brian L; Favero, Marcus; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Braaten, Ellen B

    2014-09-01

    We report the neuropsychological profile of a 4-year-old boy with the rare 18p deletion syndrome. We used a battery of standardized tests to assess his development in intellect, language, visuomotor integration, academic readiness, socialization, and emotional and behavioral health. The results showed borderline intellectual function except for low average nonverbal reasoning skills. He had stronger receptive than expressive language skills, although both were well below his age group. He had impaired visuomotor integration and pre-academic skills such as letter identification. Emotional and behavioral findings indicated mild aggressiveness, anxiety, low frustration tolerance, and executive function weaknesses, especially at home. Interestingly, he showed social strengths, responding to joint attention and sharing enjoyment with his examiner. With its assessment of development in many domains, this case report is among the first to characterize the neuropsychological and psychiatric function of a young child with 18p deletion syndrome. We discuss the implications of our findings for clinical practice.

  16. Differential DNA methylation at birth associated with mental disorder in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starnawska, A; Hansen, C S; Sparsø, T

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of comorbid mental disorders including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, as well as intellectual disability. Although most 22q11.2 deletion carriers have the long 3-Mb form of the hemizygous...... deletion, there remains a large variation in the development and progression of psychiatric disorders, which suggests that alternative factors contribute to the pathogenesis. In this study we investigated whether neonatal DNA methylation signatures in individuals with the 22q11.2 deletion associate...

  17. MAOA/B deletion syndrome in male siblings with severe developmental delay and sudden loss of muscle tonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mari; Yamagata, Takanori; Matsumoto, Ayumi; Shiba, Yusuke; Nagashima, Masako; Taniguchi, Shuhei; Jimbo, Eriko; Momoi, Mariko Y

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A and MAO-B was detected in two male siblings and in their mother. The approximately 800-kb deletion, extending from about 43.0MB to 43.8MB, was detected by array comparative genomic hybridization analysis. The MAOA and MAOB genes were included in the deletion, but the adjacent Norrie disease gene, NDP, was not deleted. The boys had short stature, hypotonia, severe developmental delays, episodes of sudden loss of muscle tone, exiting behavior, lip-smacking and autistic features. The serotonin levels in their cerebrospinal fluid were extremely elevated. Another set of siblings with this deletion was reported previously. We propose recognition of MAOA/B deletion syndrome as a distinct disorder. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The cognitive development of children with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijff, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a genetic disorder associated with palatal abnormalities, cardiac defects and characteristic facial features. On a behavioural/ psychiatric level, children with 22q11DS are at an increased risk for various psychiatric problems, including Autism

  19. Severe visual impairment and retinal changes in a boy with a deletion of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, R; Deconinck, H; Keymolen, K; Jansen, A; Van Esch, H

    2007-01-01

    We present the ophthalmologic findings in a boy with a deletion of Xp22 comprising the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome. Different mechanisms underlying the visual impairment in Nance-Horan syndrome are discussed.

  20. Genotype-Phenotype Analysis, Neuropsychological Assessment, and Growth Hormone Response in a Patient with 18p Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huihui; Wan, Naijun; Wang, Xinli; Chang, Liang; Cheng, Dazhi

    2018-01-01

    18p deletion syndrome is a rare chromosomal disease caused by deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18. By using cytogenetic and SNP array analysis, we identified a girl with 18p deletion syndrome exhibiting craniofacial anomalies, intellectual disability, and short stature. G-banding analysis of metaphase cells revealed an abnormal karyotype 46,XX,del(18)(p10). Further, SNP array detected a 15.3-Mb deletion at 18p11.21p11.32 (chr18:12842-15375878) including 61 OMIM genes. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis showed that clinical manifestations of the patient were correlated with LAMA1, TWSG1, and GNAL deletions. Her neuropsychological assessment test demonstrated delay in most cognitive functions including impaired mathematics, linguistic skills, visual motor perception, respond speed, and executive function. Meanwhile, her integrated visual and auditory continuous performance test (IVA-CPT) indicated a severe comprehensive attention deficit. At age 7 and 1/12 years, her height was 110.8 cm (-2.5 SD height for age). Growth hormone (GH) treatment was initiated. After 27 months treatment, her height was increased to 129.6 cm (-1.0 SD height for age) at 9 and 4/12 years, indicating an effective response to GH treatment. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-02-05

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), and 2 female carriers were heterozygous for the same variant. All 3 affected males presented with typical Nance-Horan syndrome features. One female carrier displayed lens opacities centered on the posterior Y-suture in both eyes, as well as mild dental abnormalities. We recorded the clinical features of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome family and broadened the spectrum of mutations in the NHS gene.

  2. Developmental delays in phonological recoding among children and adolescents with Down syndrome and Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Henrik; Henry, Lucy; Messer, David; Carney, Daniel P J; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the development of phonological recoding in short-term memory (STM) span tasks among two clinical groups with contrasting STM and language profiles: those with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS). Phonological recoding was assessed by comparing: (1) performance on phonologically similar and dissimilar items (phonological similarity effects, PSE); and (2) items with short and long names (word length effects, WLE). Participant groups included children and adolescents with DS (n=29), WS (n=25) and typical development (n=51), all with average mental ages around 6 years. The group with WS, contrary to predictions based on their relatively strong verbal STM and language abilities, showed no evidence for phonological recoding. Those in the group with DS, with weaker verbal STM and language abilities, showed positive evidence for phonological recoding (PSE), but to a lesser degree than the typical group (who showed PSE and WLE). These findings provide new information about the memory systems of these groups of children and adolescents, and suggest that STM processes involving phonological recoding do not fit with the usual expectations of the abilities of children and adolescents with WS and DS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Facial emotion recognition in Williams syndrome and Down syndrome: A matching and developmental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Castilla, Pastora; Burt, Michael; Borgatti, Renato; Gagliardi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    In this study both the matching and developmental trajectories approaches were used to clarify questions that remain open in the literature on facial emotion recognition in Williams syndrome (WS) and Down syndrome (DS). The matching approach showed that individuals with WS or DS exhibit neither proficiency for the expression of happiness nor specific impairments for negative emotions. Instead, they present the same pattern of emotion recognition as typically developing (TD) individuals. Thus, the better performance on the recognition of positive compared to negative emotions usually reported in WS and DS is not specific of these populations but seems to represent a typical pattern. Prior studies based on the matching approach suggested that the development of facial emotion recognition is delayed in WS and atypical in DS. Nevertheless, and even though performance levels were lower in DS than in WS, the developmental trajectories approach used in this study evidenced that not only individuals with DS but also those with WS present atypical development in facial emotion recognition. Unlike in the TD participants, where developmental changes were observed along with age, in the WS and DS groups, the development of facial emotion recognition was static. Both individuals with WS and those with DS reached an early maximum developmental level due to cognitive constraints.

  4. Lynch syndrome-associated extracolonic tumors are rare in two extended families with the same EPCAM deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L; Snyder, Carrie; Lynch, Jane F; Hagenkord, Jill; Boland, C Richard; Rhees, Jennifer; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Boardman, Lisa A; Davies, Janine; Kuiper, Roland P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L

    2011-10-01

    The Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited cancer syndrome showing a preponderance of colorectal cancer (CRC) in context with endometrial cancer and several other extracolonic cancers, which is due to pathogenic mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Some families were found to show a LS phenotype without an identified MMR mutation, although there was microsatellite instability and absence of MSH2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Studies of a subset of these families found a deletion at the 3' end of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM) gene, causing transcription read-through resulting in silencing of MSH2 through hypermethylation of its promoter. The tumor spectrum of such families appears to differ from classical LS. Our study of two large families (USA Family R and Dutch Family A) with an EPCAM deletion was carried out using each institution's standard family study protocol. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and EPCAM deletion analysis was performed. Both families were found to harbor the same deletion at the 3' end of EPCAM. Analysis showed that the deletion originated from a common ancestor. Family R and Family A members showed segregation of CRC with the presence of this EPCAM mutation. Compared with classic LS, there were almost no extracolonic cancers. Members of Family R and Family A, all with the same EPCAM deletion, predominantly presented with CRC but no LS-associated endometrial cancer, confirming findings seen in other, smaller, LS families with EPCAM mutations. In these EPCAM mutation carriers, cancer surveillance should be focused on CRC.

  5. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R; Groth, Camilla; Glenthøj, Birte; Rizzo, Renata; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Paschou, Peristera; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Tümer, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying environmental and genetic factors are largely unknown. IMMP2L (inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase, subunit 2) located on chromosome 7q31 is one of the genes suggested as a susceptibility factor in disease pathogenesis. Through screening of a Danish cohort comprising 188 unrelated Tourette syndrome patients for copy number variations, we identified seven patients with intragenic IMMP2L deletions (3.7%), and this frequency was significantly higher (P=0.0447) compared with a Danish control cohort (0.9%). Four of the seven deletions identified did not include any known exons of IMMP2L, but were within intron 3. These deletions were found to affect a shorter IMMP2L mRNA species with two alternative 5′-exons (one including the ATG start codon). We showed that both transcripts (long and short) were expressed in several brain regions, with a particularly high expression in cerebellum and hippocampus. The current findings give further evidence for the role of IMMP2L as a susceptibility factor in Tourette syndrome and suggest that intronic changes in disease susceptibility genes should be investigated further for presence of alternatively spliced exons. PMID:24549057

  6. Eye Gaze During Face Processing in Children and Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Bronwyn; Debbane, Martin; Ottet, Marie-Christine; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Zesiger, Pascal; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Eliez, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a neurogenetic syndrome with high risk for the development of psychiatric disorder. There is interest in identifying reliable markers for measuring and monitoring socio-emotional impairments in 22q11DS during development. The current study investigated eye gaze as a potential marker during a…

  7. Peri-procedural risk stratification and management of patients with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins Ii, R Thomas; Collins, Margaret G; Schmitz, Michael L; Hamrick, Justin T

    2017-03-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a congenital, multisystem disorder affecting the cardiovascular, connective tissue, and central nervous systems in 1 in 10 000 live births. Cardiovascular involvement is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with WS, and noninvasive and invasive procedures are common. Sudden cardiovascular collapse in patients with WS is a well-known phenomenon, especially in the peri-procedural period. Detailed guidelines for peri-procedural management of patients with WS are limited. The goal of this review is to provide thoughtful, safe and effective management strategies for the peri-procedural care of patients with WS with careful consideration of hemodynamic impacts of anesthetic strategies. In addition, an expanded risk stratification system for anesthetic administration is provided. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Periventricular nodular heterotopia and bilateral intraventricular xanthogranulomas in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moogeh Baharnoori

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS is the most common pathogenic copy number variant in humans. Neuropsychiatric phenotypes, including schizophrenia, are prominent. Imaging studies of individuals with this syndrome show a variety of abnormalities that may indicate abnormal neuronal migration. Here we present the neuroimaging and neuropathologic features of a 22q11DS patient with bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopias (PNH and intraventricular xanthogranulomas that were identified by post-mortem examination.

  9. Syndrome of proximal interstitial deletion 4p15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryns, J.P. [Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)

    1995-09-11

    In this journal, Chitayat et al. reported on 2 boys and a girl with interstitial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 4, including p15.2p15.33. All 3 patients had a characteristic face distinct from that of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and multiple minor congenital anomalies. One patient had a congenitally enlarged penis. The authors noted that all had normal growth, and all had moderate psychomotor retardation (patient 1, developmental age of 4-6 years at age 9 years; patient 2, mental age 6 years at age 25 years; and patient 3, global delay with hypotonia, difficulties in both gross and fine motor development, and persistent delay in language skills). 5 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Submicroscopic interstitial deletion of the X chromosome explains a complex genetic syndrome dominated by Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, A; Wieringa, B; Smeets, D F; Bleeker-Wagemakers, L; Ropers, H H

    1986-01-01

    Norrie disease (ND), an X-linked recessive disorder, is characterized by congenital blindness followed by bulbar atrophy. We have examined a three-generation family in which ND is part of a complex X-linked syndrome with severe mental retardation, hypogonadism, growth disturbances, and increased susceptibility to infections as additional features. This syndrome is apparently due to an interstitial deletion, as evidenced by the failure of the L1.28 DNA probe (DXS7 locus, Xp11.3) to detect complementary DNA sequences on the defective X chromosome of an affected male and of several obligatory heterozygotes. Attempts to further define this deletion with other DNA probes from the proximal short arm of the X chromosome or by prometaphase chromosome analysis were unsuccessful.

  11. On two patients with and without the classical Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) sharing the same chromosome 4p16.3 specific probe deletion: evidence of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, P; Schmit, J; Van den Berghe, H; Fryns, J P

    1996-07-01

    We report here on phenotype-karyotype correlations in two patients with and without complete features of the WHS but sharing the lack of a specific cosmic probe (D4S96/D4Z1) from 4p16.3. These findings indicate that WHS is true a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in nature and expression.

  12. De novo deletion of chromosome 11q12.3 in monozygotic twins affected by Poland Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, Carlotta Maria; Romanini, Maria Victoria; Musante, Ilaria; Tassano, Elisa; Gimelli, Stefania; Divizia, Maria Teresa; Torre, Michele; Morovic, Carmen Gloria; Lerone, Margherita; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Puliti, Aldamaria

    2014-05-30

    Poland Syndrome (PS) is a rare disorder characterized by hypoplasia/aplasia of the pectoralis major muscle, variably associated with thoracic and upper limb anomalies. Familial recurrence has been reported indicating that PS could have a genetic basis, though the genetic mechanisms underlying PS development are still unknown. Here we describe a couple of monozygotic (MZ) twin girls, both presenting with Poland Syndrome. They carry a de novo heterozygous 126 Kbp deletion at chromosome 11q12.3 involving 5 genes, four of which, namely HRASLS5, RARRES3, HRASLS2, and PLA2G16, encode proteins that regulate cellular growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, mainly through Ras-mediated signaling pathways. Phenotype concordance between the monozygotic twin probands provides evidence supporting the genetic control of PS. As genes controlling cell growth and differentiation may be related to morphological defects originating during development, we postulate that the observed chromosome deletion could be causative of the phenotype observed in the twin girls and the deleted genes could play a role in PS development.

  13. Negative subthreshold psychotic symptoms distinguish 22q11.2 deletion syndrome from other neurodevelopmental disorders: A two-site study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekori-Domachevsky, Ehud; Guri, Yael; Yi, James; Weisman, Omri; Calkins, Monica E; Tang, Sunny X; Gross, Raz; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Emanuel, Beverly S; Zackai, Elaine H; Zalsman, Gil; Weizman, Abraham; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Gothelf, Doron

    2017-10-01

    About one third of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) develop schizophrenia. Notably, a full-blown psychotic disorder is usually preceded by subthreshold symptoms. Therefore, it is important to identify early signs of psychosis in this population, a task that is complicated by the intellectual disabilities typically seen in 22q11.2DS. We aimed to identify subthreshold psychotic symptoms that distinguish 22q11.2DS from other neurodevelopmental disorders. The study included two independent cohorts from Tel Aviv and Philadelphia. 22q11.2DS (N=171) and typically developing (TD; N=832) individuals were enrolled at both sites and further compared to two groups with intellectual disabilities: Williams syndrome (WS; N=21) in the Tel Aviv cohort and idiopathic developmental disabilities (IDD; N=129) in the Philadelphia cohort. Participants and their primary caregivers were interviewed with the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS) and psychopathologies were assessed using standardized tools; general cognitive abilities were assessed with the Computerized Neurocognitive Battery. Negative/disorganized subthreshold syndrome was significantly more common in the 22q11.2DS group than in the WS (OR=3.90, 95% CI=1.34-11.34) or IDD (OR=5.05, 95% CI=3.01-10.08) groups. The 22q11.2DS group had higher scores than the two intellectual disabilities groups on several SIPS negative items, including avolition and decreased expression of emotion. Overall, there were few significant correlations between level of cognitive deficits and severity of negative symptoms in 22q11.2DS and only in the Tel Aviv cohort. Our findings suggest that 22q11.2DS individuals at the age of risk for developing psychosis should be closely monitored for negative symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Deletions at the SOX10 gene locus cause Waardenburg syndrome types 2 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurand, Nadege; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Stanchina, Laure; Collot, Nathalie; Baral, Viviane; Marlin, Sandrine; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Giurgea, Irina; Skopinski, Laurent; Reardon, William; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Echaieb, Anis; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marilyn; Touraine, Renaud; Amiel, Jeanne; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Veronique

    2007-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair and skin. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four subtypes, WS1-WS4. Absence of additional features characterizes WS2. The association of facial dysmorphic features defines WS1 and WS3, whereas the association with Hirschsprung disease (aganglionic megacolon) characterizes WS4, also called "Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease." Mutations within the genes MITF and SNAI2 have been identified in WS2, whereas mutations of EDN3, EDNRB, and SOX10 have been observed in patients with WS4. However, not all cases are explained at the molecular level, which raises the possibility that other genes are involved or that some mutations within the known genes are not detected by commonly used genotyping methods. We used a combination of semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization to search for SOX10 heterozygous deletions. We describe the first characterization of SOX10 deletions in patients presenting with WS4. We also found SOX10 deletions in WS2 cases, making SOX10 a new gene of WS2. Interestingly, neurological phenotypes reminiscent of that observed in WS4 (PCWH syndrome [peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, WS, and Hirschsprung disease]) were observed in some WS2-affected patients with SOX10 deletions. This study further characterizes the molecular complexity and the close relationship that links the different subtypes of WS.

  15. Violations of Personal Space in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: Insights from the Social Responsiveness Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Emma; Hanley, Mary; Rodgers, Jacqui; South, Mikle; Kirk, Hannah; Kennedy, Daniel P.; Riby, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal distance regulation is crucial for successful social interactions. We investigated personal space awareness in Williams syndrome (WS) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to typical development. Parents reported that individuals with WS and ASD were significantly more likely than those developing typically to invade the…

  16. Juvenile Moyamoya and Craniosynostosis in a Child with Deletion 1p32p31: Expanding the Clinical Spectrum of 1p32p31 Deletion Syndrome and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Prontera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya angiopathy (MA is a rare cerebrovascular disorder characterised by the progressive occlusion of the internal carotid artery. Its aetiology is uncertain, but a genetic background seems likely, given the high MA familial rate. To investigate the aetiology of craniosynostosis and juvenile moyamoya in a 14-year-old male patient, we performed an array-comparative genomic hybridisation revealing a de novo interstitial deletion of 8.5 Mb in chromosome region 1p32p31. The deletion involved 34 protein coding genes, including NF1A, whose haploinsufficiency is indicated as being mainly responsible for the 1p32-p31 chromosome deletion syndrome phenotype (OMIM 613735. Our patient also has a deleted FOXD3 of the FOX gene family of transcription factors, which plays an important role in neural crest cell growth and differentiation. As the murine FOXD3−/− model shows craniofacial anomalies and abnormal common carotid artery morphology, it can be hypothesised that FOXD3 is involved in the pathogenesis of the craniofacial and vascular defects observed in our patient. In support of our assumption, we found in the literature another patient with a syndromic form of MA who had a deletion involving another FOX gene (FOXC1. In addition to describing the clinical history of our patient, we have reviewed all of the available literature concerning other patients with a 1p32p31 deletion, including cases from the Decipher database, and we have also reviewed the genetic disorders associated with MA, which is a useful guide for the diagnosis of syndromic form of MA.

  17. Further case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to a deletion in EP300.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foley, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a heterogeneous disorder with approximately 45-55% of patients showing mutations in the CREB binding protein and a further 3% of patients having mutations in EP300. We report a male child with a deletion of exons 3-8 of the EP300 gene who has RSTS. He has a milder skeletal phenotype, a finding that has been described in other cases with EP300 mutations. The mother suffered from pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome in the pregnancy. She subsequently developed a mullerian tumor of her cervix 6 years after the birth of her son.

  18. Atypical right diaphragmatic hernia (hernia of Morgagni, spigelian hernia and epigastric hernia in a patient with Williams syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Farhan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Williams syndrome is rare genetic disorder resulting in neurodevelopmental problems. Hernias of the foramen of Morgagni are rare diaphragmatic hernias and they mostly present on the right side, in the anterior mediastinum. They are usually asymptomatic and are difficult to diagnose, especially in patients with learning disabilities. Case presentation This 49-year-old woman with Williams syndrome, cognitive impairment and aortic stenosis presented to physicians with right-sided chest pain. She had previously undergone repair of her right spigelian and epigastric hernia. Her abdominal examination was unremarkable. Chest X-ray suggested right-sided diaphragmatic hernia and pleural effusion for which she received treatment. The computed tomography scan showed a diaphragmatic hernia with some collapse/consolidation of the adjacent lung. Furthermore, the patient had aortic stenosis and was high risk for anaesthesia (ASA grade 3. She underwent successful laparoscopic repair of her congenital diaphragmatic hernia leading to a quick and uneventful postoperative recovery. Conclusion These multiple hernias suggest that patients with Williams syndrome may have some connective tissue disorder which makes them prone to develop hernias especially associated with those parts of the body which may have intracavity pressure variations like the abdomen. Diaphragmatic hernia may be the cause of chest pain in these patients. A computed tomography scan helps in early diagnosis, and laparoscopic repair helps in prevention of further complications, and leads to quick recovery especially in patients with learning disabilities. In the presence of significant comorbidities, a less invasive operative procedure with quick recovery becomes advisable.

  19. Diagnosis of a terminal deletion of 4p with duplication of Xp22.31 in a patient with findings of Opitz G/BBB syndrome and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Joyce; Müller, Ines; Kunath, Melanie; Herrmann, Susanne; Ullmann, Reinhard; Schweiger, Susann

    2008-01-01

    Opitz G/BBB syndrome (OS) is a congenital midline malformation syndrome characterized by hypertelorism, hypospadias, cleft lip/palate, laryngotracheoesophageal abnormalities, imperforate anus, developmental delay and cardiac defects. The X-linked form is caused by mutations in the MID1 gene, while no gene has yet been identified for the autosomal dominant form. Here, we report on a 15-year-old boy who was referred for MID1 mutation analysis with findings typical of OS, including apparent hypertelorism, hypospadias, a history of feeding difficulties, dysphagia secondary to esophageal arteria lusoria, growth retardation and developmental delay. No MID1 mutation was found, but subsequent sub-megabase resolution array CGH unexpectedly documented a 2.34 Mb terminal 4p deletion, suggesting a diagnosis of WHS, and a duplication in Xp22.31. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving terminal chromosome 4p deletions, in particular 4p16.3. WHS is characterized by typical facial appearance ("Greek helmet facies"), mental retardation, congenital hypotonia, and growth retardation. While the severity of developmental delay in this patient supports the diagnosis of WHS rather than OS, this case illustrates the striking similarities of clinical findings in seemingly unrelated syndromes, suggesting common or interacting pathways at the molecular and pathogenetic level. This is the first report of arteria lusoria (esophageal vascular ring) in a patient with WHS. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The Extent of Working Memory Deficits Associated with Williams Syndrome: Exploration of Verbal and Spatial Domains and Executively Controlled Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Sinead M.; Riby, Deborah M.; Fraser, Emma; Campbell, Lorna Elise

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated verbal and spatial working memory (WM) functioning in individuals with the neuro-developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) using WM component tasks. While there is strong evidence of WM impairments in WS, previous research has focused on short-term memory and has neglected assessment of executive components of…

  1. Narrative competence in Spanish-speaking adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Itza, Eliseo; Martínez, Verónica; Antón, Aránzazu

    2016-08-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder associated with intellectual disability and characterised by displaying an atypical neuropsychological profile, with peaks and valleys, where language skills seem better preserved than non-verbal intelligence. This study researches the narrative competence of nine Spanish-speaking adults with WS. Oral narratives were elicited from a silent film, and narrative coherence was analysed as a function of sequential order of the events narrated at three structure levels, while narrative cohesion was assessed through the frequency of use and type of discourse markers. WS subjects were able to remember a significant proportion of the events from the film, but coherence of narratives, i.e., sequential order of events, was more impaired. Consistently with their linguistic abilities, cohesion of narratives was better preserved, as they used discourse markers to introduce a high proportion of events. Construction of mental models of the narratives may be constrained in WS by non-verbal cognitive abilities, but narrative competence is also determined by textual pragmatic abilities to organize discourse, which should be addressed by specific intervention in narrative competence.

  2. 3D PATTERN OF BRAIN ABNORMALITIES IN WILLIAMS SYNDROME VISUALIZED USING TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Reiss, Allan L.; Lee, Agatha D.; Bellugi, Ursula; Galaburda, Albert M.; Korenberg, Julie R.; Mills, Debra L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with deletion of ~20 contiguous genes in chromosome band 7q11.23. Individuals with WS exhibit mild to moderate mental retardation, but are relatively more proficient in specific language and musical abilities. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to visualize the complex pattern of gray/white matter reductions in WS, based on fluid registration of structural brain images. Methods 3D T1-weighted brain MRIs of 41 WS subjects (age: 29.2±9.2SD years; 23F/18M) and 39 age-matched healthy controls (age: 27.5±7.4 years; 23F/16M) were fluidly registered to a minimum deformation target. Fine-scale volumetric differences were mapped between diagnostic groups. Local regions were identified where regional structure volumes were associated with diagnosis, and with intelligence quotient (IQ) scores. Brain asymmetry was also mapped and compared between diagnostic groups. Results WS subjects exhibited widely distributed brain volume reductions (~10–15% reduction; P < 0.0002, permutation test). After adjusting for total brain volume, the frontal lobes, anterior cingulate, superior temporal gyrus, amygdala, fusiform gyrus and cerebellum were found to be relatively preserved in WS, but parietal and occipital lobes, thalamus and basal ganglia, and midbrain were disproportionally decreased in volume (P < 0.0002). These regional volumes also correlated positively with performance IQ in adult WS subjects (age ≥ 30 years, P = 0.038). Conclusion TBM facilitates 3D visualization of brain volume reductions in WS. Reduced parietal/occipital volumes may be associated with visuospatial deficits in WS. By contrast, frontal lobes, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus are relatively preserved or even enlarged, consistent with unusual affect regulation and language production in WS. PMID:17512756

  3. Subtypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Associated with Behaviour and Neurofacial Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinderberry, Brooke; Brown, Scott; Hammond, Peter; Stevens, Angela F.; Schall, Ulrich; Murphy, Declan G. M.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Campbell, Linda E.

    2013-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) has a complex phenotype with more than 180 characteristics, including cardiac anomalies, cleft palate, intellectual disabilities, a typical facial morphology, and mental health problems. However, the variable phenotype makes it difficult to predict clinical outcome, such as the high prevalence of psychosis among…

  4. What does Williams Syndrome Reveal about the Determinants of Social Behavior?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maaria Järvinen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence on autonomic nervous system (ANS function in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS has begun to highlight aberrancies that may have important implications for the social profile characterized by enhanced social motivation and approach. In parallel, neurobiological investigations have identified alterations in the structure, function, and connectivity of the amygdala, as well as prosocial neuropeptide dysregulation, as some of the key neurogenetic features of WS. A recent social approach/withdrawal hypothesis (Kemp and Guastella, 2011 suggests that autonomic cardiac control may play a key role in regulating the relationship between oxytocin and social behavior. This article discusses evidence from these critical, new strands of research into social behavior in WS, to consider the extent to which data on WS may provide novel insight into the determinants of social behavior. Future research directions are suggested.

  5. Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Exhibit Impaired Spatial Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ling M.; Riggins, Tracy; Harvey, Danielle; Cabaral, Margarita; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been shown to have impairments in processing spatiotemporal information. The authors examined whether children with 22q11.2DS exhibit impairments in spatial working memory performance due to these weaknesses, even when controlling for maintenance of attention. Children with…

  6. Patterns of Sensitivity to Emotion in Children with Williams Syndrome and Autism: Relations between Autonomic Nervous System Reactivity and Social Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Anna; Ng, Rowena; Crivelli, Davide; Neumann, Dirk; Grichanik, Mark; Arnold, Andrew J.; Lai, Philip; Trauner, Doris; Bellugi, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are associated with atypical social-emotional functioning. Affective visual stimuli were used to assess autonomic reactivity and emotion identification, and the social responsiveness scale was used to determine the level social functioning in children with WS and ASD contrasted with typical…

  7. Developmental phenotype in Phelan-McDermid (22q13.3 deletion) syndrome : A systematic and prospective study in 34 children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwanenburg, Renée J; Ruiter, Selma A J; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Flapper, Boudien C T; Van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Phelan- McDermid syndrome (PMS) or 22q13.3 deletion syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay, cognitive deficits, and behaviour in the autism spectrum. Knowledge about developmental and behavioural characteristics of this rare chromosomal disorder is still limited despite

  8. Developmental phenotype in Phelan- McDermid (22q13.3 deletion) syndrome : a systematic and prospective study in 34 children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwanenburg, R.J.; Ruiter, S.A.J.; Van Den Heuvel, E.R.; Flapper, B.C.T.; Van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Phelan-McDermid syndrome (PMS) or 22q13.3 deletion syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay, cognitive deficits, and behaviour in the autism spectrum. Knowledge about developmental and behavioural characteristics of this rare chromosomal disorder is still limited despite a

  9. Rare deletions at 16p13.11 predispose to a diverse spectrum of sporadic epilepsy syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, Erin L; Radtke, Rodney A; Urban, Thomas J; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Depondt, Chantal; Need, Anna C; Walley, Nicole M; Nicoletti, Paola; Ge, Dongliang; Catarino, Claudia B; Duncan, John S; Kasperaviciūte, Dalia; Tate, Sarah K; Caboclo, Luis O; Sander, Josemir W; Clayton, Lisa; Linney, Kristen N; Shianna, Kevin V; Gumbs, Curtis E; Smith, Jason; Cronin, Kenneth D; Maia, Jessica M; Doherty, Colin P; Pandolfo, Massimo; Leppert, David; Middleton, Lefkos T; Gibson, Rachel A; Johnson, Michael R; Matthews, Paul M; Hosford, David; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Eriksson, Kai; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Dorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jörg; Krämer, Günter; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Wieser, Heinz-Gregor; Zumsteg, Dominik; Ortega, Marcos; Wood, Nicholas W; Huxley-Jones, Julie; Mikati, Mohamad; Gallentine, William B; Husain, Aatif M; Buckley, Patrick G; Stallings, Ray L; Podgoreanu, Mihai V; Delanty, Norman; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Goldstein, David B

    2010-05-14

    Deletions at 16p13.11 are associated with schizophrenia, mental retardation, and most recently idiopathic generalized epilepsy. To evaluate the role of 16p13.11 deletions, as well as other structural variation, in epilepsy disorders, we used genome-wide screens to identify copy number variation in 3812 patients with a diverse spectrum of epilepsy syndromes and in 1299 neurologically-normal controls. Large deletions (> 100 kb) at 16p13.11 were observed in 23 patients, whereas no control had a deletion greater than 16 kb. Patients, even those with identically sized 16p13.11 deletions, presented with highly variable epilepsy phenotypes. For a subset of patients with a 16p13.11 deletion, we show a consistent reduction of expression for included genes, suggesting that haploinsufficiency might contribute to pathogenicity. We also investigated another possible mechanism of pathogenicity by using hybridization-based capture and next-generation sequencing of the homologous chromosome for ten 16p13.11-deletion patients to look for unmasked recessive mutations. Follow-up genotyping of suggestive polymorphisms failed to identify any convincing recessive-acting mutations in the homologous interval corresponding to the deletion. The observation that two of the 16p13.11 deletions were larger than 2 Mb in size led us to screen for other large deletions. We found 12 additional genomic regions harboring deletions > 2 Mb in epilepsy patients, and none in controls. Additional evaluation is needed to characterize the role of these exceedingly large, non-locus-specific deletions in epilepsy. Collectively, these data implicate 16p13.11 and possibly other large deletions as risk factors for a wide range of epilepsy disorders, and they appear to point toward haploinsufficiency as a contributor to the pathogenicity of deletions. Copyright (c) 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, Najla [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Mnif, Mouna [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, Nozha [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Salem, Ikhlass Haj [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. {yields} We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). {yields} Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. {yields} The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  11. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Kallel, Nozha; Salem, Ikhlass Haj; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. → We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). → Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. → The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  12. Malan syndrome: Sotos-like overgrowth with de novo NFIX sequence variants and deletions in six new patients and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassens, Merel; Morrogh, Deborah; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Jaffer, Fatima; Vreeburg, Maaike; Bok, Levinus A; Segboer, Tim; van Belzen, Martine; Quinlivan, Ros M; Kumar, Ajith; Hurst, Jane A; Scott, Richard H

    2015-05-01

    De novo monoallelic variants in NFIX cause two distinct syndromes. Whole gene deletions, nonsense variants and missense variants affecting the DNA-binding domain have been seen in association with a Sotos-like phenotype that we propose is referred to as Malan syndrome. Frameshift and splice-site variants thought to avoid nonsense-mediated RNA decay have been seen in Marshall-Smith syndrome. We report six additional patients with Malan syndrome and de novo NFIX deletions or sequence variants and review the 20 patients now reported. The phenotype is characterised by moderate postnatal overgrowth and macrocephaly. Median height and head circumference in childhood are 2.0 and 2.3 standard deviations (SD) above the mean, respectively. There is overlap of the facial phenotype with NSD1-positive Sotos syndrome in some cases including a prominent forehead, high anterior hairline, downslanting palpebral fissures and prominent chin. Neonatal feeding difficulties and/or hypotonia have been reported in 30% of patients. Developmental delay/learning disability have been reported in all cases and are typically moderate. Ocular phenotypes are common, including strabismus (65%), nystagmus (25% ) and optic disc pallor/hypoplasia (25%). Other recurrent features include pectus excavatum (40%) and scoliosis (25%). Eight reported patients have a deletion also encompassing CACNA1A, haploinsufficiency of which causes episodic ataxia type 2 or familial hemiplegic migraine. One previous case had episodic ataxia and one case we report has had cyclical vomiting responsive to pizotifen. In individuals with this contiguous gene deletion syndrome, awareness of possible later neurological manifestations is important, although their penetrance is not yet clear.

  13. Germline Hypermethylation of MLH1 and EPCAM Deletions Are a Frequent Cause of Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Renee C.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Westers, Helga; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Kooi, Krista; Jager, Paul O. J.; de Groote, Marloes L.; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Olderode-Berends, Maran J. W.; Hollema, Harry; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Sijmons, Rolf H.

    It was shown that Lynch syndrome can be caused by germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 and MSH2 promoters. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated very recently that germline deletions of the 3' region of EPCAM cause transcriptional read-through which results in silencing of MSH2 by hypermethylation.

  14. Germline hypermethylation of MLH1 and EPCAM deletions are a frequent cause of Lynch syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R.C.; Hofstra, R.M.; Westers, H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kooi, K.; Jager, P.O.; Groote, M.L. de; Dijkhuizen, T.; Olderode-Berends, M.J.; Hollema, H.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Sijmons, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    It was shown that Lynch syndrome can be caused by germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 and MSH2 promoters. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated very recently that germline deletions of the 3' region of EPCAM cause transcriptional read-through which results in silencing of MSH2 by hypermethylation.

  15. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Pragmatic Language Assessment in Williams Syndrome: A Comparison of the Test of Pragmatic Language--2 and the Children's Communication Checklist--2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Anne; Martens, Marilee A.; Fox, Robert; Rabidoux, Paula; Andridge, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are recognized as having a strong desire for social relationships, yet many of them have difficulty forming and maintaining peer relationships. One cause may be impairments in pragmatic language. The current study compared the assessment of pragmatic language skills in individuals with WS using the…

  17. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exome-first approach identified a novel gloss deletion associated with Lowe syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Miki; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Suga, Ken-Ichi; Goji, Aya; Horikawa, Hideaki; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kagami, Shoji; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Lowe syndrome (LS) is an X-linked disorder affecting the eyes, nervous system and kidneys, typically caused by missense or nonsense/frameshift OCRL mutations. We report a 6-month-old male clinically suspected to have LS, but without the Fanconi-type renal dysfunction. Using a targeted-exome sequencing-first approach, LS was diagnosed by the identification of a deletion involving 1.7 Mb at Xq25-q26.1, encompassing the entire OCRL gene and neighboring loci.

  19. The interaction between neurocognitive functioning, subthreshold psychotic symptoms and pharmacotherapy in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A longitudinal comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, R; Weisman, O; Guri, Y; Harel, T; Weizman, A; Gothelf, D

    2018-02-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common genetic syndrome associated with schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to evaluate longitudinally the interaction between neurocognitive functioning, the presence of subthreshold psychotic symptoms (SPS) and conversion to psychosis in individuals with 22q11DS. In addition, we attempted to identify the specific neurocognitive domains that predict the longitudinal evolution of positive and negative SPS, as well as the effect of psychiatric medications on 22q11DS psychiatric and cognitive developmental trajectories. Forty-four participants with 22q11DS, 19 with Williams syndrome (WS) and 30 typically developing (TD) controls, age range 12-35years, were assessed at two time points (15.2±2.1months apart). Evaluation included the Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms (SIPS), structured psychiatric evaluation and the Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (CNB). 22q11DS individuals with SPS had a yearly conversion rate to psychotic disorders of 8.8%, compared to none in both WS and TD controls. Baseline levels of negative SPS were associated with global neurocognitive performance (GNP), executive function and social cognition deficits, in individuals with 22q11DS, but not in WS. Deficits in GNP predicted negative SPS in 22q11DS and the emergence or persistence of negative SPS. 22q11DS individuals treated with psychiatric medications showed significant improvement in GNP score between baseline and follow-up assessments, an improvement that was not seen in untreated 22q11DS. Our results highlight the time-dependent interplay among positive and negative SPS symptoms, neurocognition and pharmacotherapy in the prediction of the evolution of psychosis in 22q11DS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 region is implicated in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieth, Eric; Eddiry, Sanaa; Gaston, Véronique; Lorenzini, Françoise; Buffet, Alexandre; Conte Auriol, Françoise; Molinas, Catherine; Cailley, Dorothée; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoit; Cavaillé, Jérome; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maïthé

    2015-02-01

    The SNORD116 locus lies in the 15q11-13 region of paternally expressed genes implicated in Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a complex disease accompanied by obesity and severe neurobehavioural disturbances. Cases of PWS patients with a deletion encompassing the SNORD116 gene cluster, but preserving the expression of flanking genes, have been described. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented clinical criteria of PWS, including the behavioural and nutritional features, obesity, developmental delay and endocrine dysfunctions with hyperghrelinemia. We found a paternally transmitted highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 gene cluster, the shortest described to date (118 kb). This deletion was also present in the father. This finding in a human case strongly supports the current hypothesis that lack of the paternal SNORD116 gene cluster has a determinant role in the pathogenesis of PWS. Moreover, targeted analysis of the SNORD116 gene cluster, complementary to SNRPN methylation analysis, should be carried out in subjects with a phenotype suggestive of PWS.

  1. Memory in Intellectually Matched Groups of Young Participants with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and Those with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravariti, Eugenia; Jacobson, Clare; Morris, Robin; Frangou, Sophia; Murray, Robin M.; Tsakanikos, Elias; Habel, Alex; Shearer, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS) and schizophrenia have genetic and neuropsychological similarities, but are likely to differ in memory profile. Confirming differences in memory function between the two disorders, and identifying their genetic determinants, can help to define genetic subtypes in both syndromes, identify genetic risk factors…

  2. Stress, Locus of Control, and Family Cohesion and Adaptability in Parents of Children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Silvia; Vianello, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzes differences in parental stress in families of children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi syndromes, exploring factors that influence parental stress, such as child's characteristics, parental locus of control, and family cohesion and adaptability. Differences between mothers and fathers are also…

  3. Assessment of the Influence of Background Noise on Escape-Maintained Problem Behavior and Pain Behavior in a Child with Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lacey, Claire; Lancioni, Giulio E.

    2000-01-01

    A study examined the influence of background noise on levels of problem behavior and pain behavior under functional analysis conditions for a 5-year-old with Williams syndrome and hyperacusis. When the child was fitted with earplugs, there were substantial decreases in both problem and pain behavior under the background noise condition. (Contains…

  4. Writing abilities in intellectual disabilities: a comparison between Down and Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varuzza, Cristiana; De Rose, Paola; Vicari, Stefano; Menghini, Deny

    2015-02-01

    Writing is a complex task that requires the integration of multiple cognitive, linguistic, and motor abilities. Until now, only a few studies investigated writing abilities in individuals with Intellectual Disability (ID). The aim of the present exploratory study was to provide knowledge on the organization of writing in two populations with ID, Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS), trying to disentangle different components of the process. A battery tapping diverse writing demands as low-level transcription skills as well as high-level writing skills was proposed to 13 individuals with WS, 12 individuals with DS and 11 mental-age-matched typically developing (TD) children. Results showed that the two groups with genetic syndromes did not differ from TD in writing a list of objects placed in bedroom, in the number of errors in the text composition, in a text copying task and in kind of errors made. However, in a word dictation task, individuals with DS made more errors than individuals with WS and TD children. In a pseudoword dictation task, both individuals with DS and WS showed more errors than TD children. Our results showed good abilities in individuals with ID in different aspects of writing, involving not only low-level transcription skills but also high-level composition skills. Contrary to the pessimistic view, considering individuals with ID vulnerable for failure, our results indicate that the presence of ID does not prevent the achievement of writing skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genomic profiling in Down syndrome acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies histone gene deletions associated with altered methylation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, Michael G.; Wang, Jinhua; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Gurusiddappa, Sivashankarappa; Meyer, Julia; Condos, Gregory; Morrison, Debra; Tsimelzon, Anna; Devidas, Meenakshi; Heerema, Nyla A.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Plon, Sharon E.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Rabin, Karen R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have distinct clinical and biological features. Whereas most DS-ALL cases lack the sentinel cytogenetic lesions that guide risk assignment in childhood ALL, JAK2 mutations and CRLF2 overexpression are highly enriched. To further characterize the unique biology of DS-ALL, we performed genome-wide profiling of 58 DS-ALL and 68 non-Down syndrome (NDS) ALL cases by DNA copy number, loss of heterozygosity, gene expression, and methylation analyses. We report a novel deletion within the 6p22 histone gene cluster as significantly more frequent in DS-ALL, occurring in 11 DS (22%) and only two NDS cases (3.1%) (Fisher’s exact p = 0.002). Homozygous deletions yielded significantly lower histone expression levels, and were associated with higher methylation levels, distinct spatial localization of methylated promoters, and enrichment of highly methylated genes for specific pathways and transcription factor binding motifs. Gene expression profiling demonstrated heterogeneity of DS-ALL cases overall, with supervised analysis defining a 45-transcript signature associated with CRLF2 overexpression. Further characterization of pathways associated with histone deletions may identify opportunities for novel targeted interventions. PMID:21647151

  6. Capacity to improve fine motor skills in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berencsi, A; Gombos, F; Kovács, I

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are known to have difficulties in carrying out fine motor movements; however, a detailed behavioural profile of WS in this domain is still missing. It is also unknown how great the capacity to improve these skills with focused and extensive practice is. We studied initial performance and learning capacity in a sequential finger tapping (FT) task in WS and in typical development. Improvement in the FT task has been shown to be sleep dependent. WS subjects participating in the current study have also participated in earlier polysomnography studies, although not directly related to learning. WS participants presented with great individual variability. In addition to generally poor initial performance, learning capacity was also greatly limited in WS. We found indications that reduced sleep efficiency might contribute to this limitation. Estimating motor learning capacity and the depth of sleep disorder in a larger sample of WS individuals might reveal important relationships between sleep and learning, and contribute to efficient intervention methods improving skill acquisition in WS. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research published by MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Unmasking of a hemizygous WFS1 gene mutation by a chromosome 4p deletion of 8.3 Mb in a patient with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipsen-ten Berg, Klara; van Hasselt, Peter M; Eleveld, Marc J; van der Wijst, Suzanne E; Hol, Frans A; de Vroede, Monique A M; Beemer, Frits A; Hochstenbach, P F Ron; Poot, Martin

    2007-11-01

    The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS (MIM 194190)), which is characterized by growth delay, mental retardation, epilepsy, facial dysmorphisms, and midline fusion defects, shows extensive phenotypic variability. Several of the proposed mutational and epigenetic mechanisms in this and other chromosomal deletion syndromes fail to explain the observed phenotypic variability. To explain the complex phenotype of a patient with WHS and features reminiscent of Wolfram syndrome (WFS (MIM 222300)), we performed extensive clinical evaluation and classical and molecular cytogenetic (GTG banding, FISH and array-CGH) and WFS1 gene mutation analyses. We detected an 8.3 Mb terminal deletion and an adjacent 2.6 Mb inverted duplication in the short arm of chromosome 4, which encompasses a gene associated with WFS (WFS1). In addition, a nonsense mutation in exon 8 of the WFS1 gene was found on the structurally normal chromosome 4. The combination of the 4p deletion with the WFS1 point mutation explains the complex phenotype presented by our patient. This case further illustrates that unmasking of hemizygous recessive mutations by chromosomal deletions represents an additional explanation for the phenotypic variability observed in chromosomal deletion disorders.

  8. Longitudinal Assessment of Intellectual Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: Multilevel Modeling of Performance on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test--Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Kistler, Doris J.; John, Angela E.; Morris, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was used to address the longitudinal stability of standard scores (SSs) measuring intellectual ability for children with Williams syndrome (WS). Participants were 40 children with genetically confirmed WS who completed the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test--Second Edition (KBIT-2; A. S. Kaufman & N. L. Kaufman, 2004) 4-7…

  9. Facilitating complex shape drawing in Williams syndrome and typical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Kerry D; Farran, Emily K

    2013-07-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) produce drawings that are disorganised, likely due to an inability to replicate numerous spatial relations between parts. This study attempted to circumvent these drawing deficits in WS when copying complex combinations of one, two and three shapes. Drawing decisions were reduced by introducing a number of facilitators, for example, by using distinct colours and including facilitatory cues on the response sheet. Overall, facilitation improved drawing in the WS group to a comparable level of accuracy as typically developing participants (matched for non-verbal ability). Drawing accuracy was greatest in both groups when planning demands (e.g. starting location, line lengths and changes in direction) were reduced by use of coloured figures and providing easily distinguished and clearly grouped facilitatory cues to form each shape. This study provides the first encouraging evidence to suggest that drawing of complex shapes in WS can be facilitated; individuals with WS might be receptive to remediation programmes for drawing and handwriting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical characterization and proposed mechanism of juvenile glaucoma--a patient with a chromosome 4p deletion, Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Jeremy; Moloney, Greg; Grigg, John; Sharota Franzco, Dorian

    2010-09-01

    The case presented is that of a 22-year-old male with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome who was referred with glaucoma refractory to medical treatment. Six other patients have been described with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) and glaucoma, most being congenital glaucoma with diagnosis in infancy. We describe the first case of juvenile onset glaucoma in this syndrome. Our patient had narrow angles on gonioscopy, with ultrasound biomicroscopy revealing ciliary body cysts. We alert others to the possibility of this mechanism of secondary narrow angle glaucoma associated with this chromosomal deletion syndrome.

  11. Constitutional 11q14-q22 chromosome deletion syndrome in a child with neuroblastoma MYCN single copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passariello, Annalisa; De Brasi, Daniele; Defferrari, Raffaella; Genesio, Rita; Tufano, Maria; Mazzocco, Katia; Capasso, Maria; Migliorati, Roberta; Martinsson, Tommy; Siani, Paolo; Nitsch, Lucio; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Constitutional 11q deletion is a chromosome imbalance possibly found in MCA/MR patients analyzed for chromosomal anomalies. Its role in determining the phenotype depends on extension and position of deleted region. Loss of heterozygosity of 11q (region 11q23) is also associated with neuroblastoma, the most frequent extra cranial cancer in children. It represents one of the most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities observed in the tumor of patients with high-risk disease even if germline deletion of 11q in neuroblastoma is rare. Hereby, we describe a 18 months old girl presenting with trigonocephaly and dysmorphic facial features, including hypotelorism, broad depressed nasal bridge, micrognathia, synophrys, epicanthal folds, and with a stage 4 neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification, carrying a germline 11q deletion (11q14.1-q22.3), outside from Jacobsen syndrome and from neuroblastoma 11q critical regions. The role of 11q deletion in determining the clinical phenotype and its association with neuroblastoma development in the patient are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The 7q11.23 Microduplication Syndrome: A Clinical Report with Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Elham; Cox, Devin M.; Smith, Teri; Butler, Merlin G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a 14-year-old adolescent girl with selective mutism (SM) and a 7q11.23 microduplication detected by chromosomal microarray (CMA) analysis and reviewed the literature from 18 published clinical reports. Our patient had specific phobias, SM, extreme anxiety, obesity, cutis marmorata, and a round appearing face with a short neck and over folded ears. We reviewed the published clinical, cognitive, behavioral, and cytogenetic findings grouped by speech and language delay, growth and development, craniofacial, clinical, and behavior and cognitive features due to the 7q11.23 microduplication. This microduplication syndrome is characterized by speech delay (91%), social anxiety (42%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, 37%), autism spectrum disorder (29%), and separation anxiety (13%). Other findings include abnormal brain imaging (80%), congenital heart and vascular defects (54%), and mild intellectual disability (38%). We then compared the phenotype with Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) which is due to a deletion of the same chromosome region. Both syndromes have abnormal brain imaging, hypotonia, delayed motor development, joint laxity, mild intellectual disability, ADHD, autism, and poor visuospatial skills but opposite or dissimilar findings regarding speech and behavioral patterns, cardiovascular problems, and social interaction. Those with WBS are prone to have hyperverbal speech, lack of stranger anxiety, and supravalvular aortic stenosis while those with the 7q11.23 microduplication have speech delay, SM, social anxiety, and are prone to aortic dilatation. PMID:27617154

  13. Perceptual learning in Williams syndrome: looking beyond averages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Gervan

    Full Text Available Williams Syndrome is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uneven cognitive profile and surprisingly large neurobehavioral differences among individuals. Previous studies have already shown different forms of memory deficiencies and learning difficulties in WS. Here we studied the capacity of WS subjects to improve their performance in a basic visual task. We employed a contour integration paradigm that addresses occipital visual function, and analyzed the initial (i.e. baseline and after-learning performance of WS individuals. Instead of pooling the very inhomogeneous results of WS subjects together, we evaluated individual performance by expressing it in terms of the deviation from the average performance of the group of typically developing subjects of similar age. This approach helped us to reveal information about the possible origins of poor performance of WS subjects in contour integration. Although the majority of WS individuals showed both reduced baseline and reduced learning performance, individual analysis also revealed a dissociation between baseline and learning capacity in several WS subjects. In spite of impaired initial contour integration performance, some WS individuals presented learning capacity comparable to learning in the typically developing population, and vice versa, poor learning was also observed in subjects with high initial performance levels. These data indicate a dissociation between factors determining initial performance and perceptual learning.

  14. Exclusion of 22q11 deletion in Noonan syndrome with Tetralogy of Fallot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digilio, M.C.; Marino, B.; Giannotti, A. [Bambino Gesu Hospital, Rome (Italy); Dallapiccola, B. [Univ. of Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)]|[Casa Sollievo Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy)

    1996-04-24

    We read with interest the report of Robin et al. [1995] published in recent issue of the Journal. The authors described 6 patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) who underwent molecular evaluation for submicroscopic deletion of chromosome band 22q11. None of those patients presented with conotruncal heart defects. Evidence for 22q11 hemizygosity was demonstrated in only one patient. This patient had NS-like manifestations without clinical manifestations of DiGeorge (DG) or velo-cardio-facial (VCF) syndromes. The molecular results obtained in the other 5 patients led the authors to conclude that classical NS is not due to del(22)(q11), even if some patients with del(22)(q11) may present NS-like manifestations. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Neurocranial morphology and growth in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Stefan; Kjaer, Inger; Heiberg, Arvid; Bjørnland, Tore; Storhaug, Kari

    2005-02-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital neurodevelopmental disorder with distinctive facial features, cardiovascular abnormalities, short stature, mental retardation, and behaviour and cognitive characteristics. The aim of this study was to describe the neurocranial morphology and growth in a group of 62 individuals with WS. The neurocranium was analysed on lateral cephalograms and comparisons were made with neurocranial standards from longitudinal data derived from the Oslo University Craniofacial Growth Archive. The size and morphology of the neurocranium in WS subjects differed from controls. Females as a group showed greater differences than males. The posterior cranial base length was shorter in both WS males and females, and the anterior cranial base length was shorter in WS females whereas it was close to normal in the WS male group. The cranial base angle was, however, not different from the control groups. A flattening was seen in the superior aspect of the parietal bone in both WS males and females. In the posterior part of the neurocranium, the prominence of the occipital bone was larger than in the control groups, which was also reflected in a larger total length of the neurocranium. The thickness of the frontal and occipital bones was considerably greater than in the control group. The deviant size and morphology of the neurocranium in WS subjects was already established in the youngest age group and maintained throughout the observation period. The growth pattern of the neurocranium in WS subjects seemed to be similar to that of the control groups, except in a few individuals.

  16. Cognitive decline preceding the onset of psychosis in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorstman, Jacob A S; Breetvelt, Elemi J.; Duijff, Sasja N.; Eliez, Stephan; Schneider, Maude; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano; Shashi, Vandana; Hooper, Stephen R.; Chow, Eva W C; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Butcher, Nancy J.; Young, Donald A.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Vogels, Annick; Van Amelsvoort, Therese; Gothelf, Doron; Weinberger, Ronnie; Weizman, Abraham; Klaassen, Petra W J; Koops, Sanne; Kates, Wendy R.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Simon, Tony J.; Ousley, Opal Y.; Swillen, Ann; Gur, Raquel E.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Kahn, René S.; Bassett, Anne S.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Kushan, Leila; Fremont, Wanda; Schoch, Kelly; Stoddard, Joel; Cubells, Joseph; Fu, Fiona; Campbell, Linda E.; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Vergaelen, Elfi; Neeleman, Marjolein; Boot, Erik; Debbané, Martin; Philip, Nicole; Green, Tamar; Van DenBree, Marianne B M; Murphy, Declan; Canyelles, Jaume Morey; Arango, Celso; Murphy, Kieran C.; Pontillo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Importance: Patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) have an elevated (25%) risk of developing schizophrenia. Recent reports have suggested that a subgroup of children with 22q11DS display a substantial decline in cognitive abilities starting at a young age.Objective: To determine whether

  17. Highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 region is implicated in Prader–Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieth, Eric; Eddiry, Sanaa; Gaston, Véronique; Lorenzini, Françoise; Buffet, Alexandre; Conte Auriol, Françoise; Molinas, Catherine; Cailley, Dorothée; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoit; Cavaillé, Jérome; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maïthé

    2015-01-01

    The SNORD116 locus lies in the 15q11-13 region of paternally expressed genes implicated in Prader–Willi Syndrome (PWS), a complex disease accompanied by obesity and severe neurobehavioural disturbances. Cases of PWS patients with a deletion encompassing the SNORD116 gene cluster, but preserving the expression of flanking genes, have been described. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented clinical criteria of PWS, including the behavioural and nutritional features, obesity, developmental delay and endocrine dysfunctions with hyperghrelinemia. We found a paternally transmitted highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 gene cluster, the shortest described to date (118 kb). This deletion was also present in the father. This finding in a human case strongly supports the current hypothesis that lack of the paternal SNORD116 gene cluster has a determinant role in the pathogenesis of PWS. Moreover, targeted analysis of the SNORD116 gene cluster, complementary to SNRPN methylation analysis, should be carried out in subjects with a phenotype suggestive of PWS. PMID:24916642

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH screening for the 22q11.2 deletion in patients with clinical features of velocardiofacial syndrome but without cardiac anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sandrin-Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, a condition associated with 22q11.2 deletions, is characterized by a typical facies, palatal anomalies, learning disabilities, behavioral disturbances and cardiac defects. We investigated the frequency of these chromosomal deletions in 16 individuals with VCFS features who presented no cardiac anomalies, one of the main characteristics of VCFS. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with the N25 (D22S75; 22q11.2 probe revealed deletions in ten individuals (62%. Therefore, even in the absence of cardiac anomalies testing for the 22q11.2 microdeletions in individuals showing other clinical features of this syndrome is recommended.

  19. Early Manifestation of Supravalvular Aortic and Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in a Patient with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Uk Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a developmental disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities such as thickening of the vascular media layer in medium- and large-sized arteries. Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS are common vascular abnormalities in WS. The natural course of SVAS and PPAS is variable, and the timing of surgery or intervention is determined according to the progression of vascular stenosis. In our patient, SVAS and PPAS showed rapid concurrent progression within two weeks after birth. We report the early manifestation of SVAS and PPAS in the neonatal period and describe the surgical treatment for stenosis relief.

  20. Incontinence in children, adolescents and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gontard, Alexander; Niemczyk, Justine; Borggrefe-Moussavian, Sorina; Wagner, Catharina; Curfs, Leopold; Equit, Monika

    2016-11-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a microdeletion syndrome (chromosome 7q11.23) characterized by typical facial features, cardiovascular disease, behavioural symptoms, and mild intellectual disability (ID). The aim of this study was to assess the rates of incontinence and psychological problems in persons with WS. 231 individuals with WS were recruited through the German parent support group (52.0% male, mean age 19.4 years). Faecal incontinence (FI) was diagnosed from the age of 4 years and nocturnal enuresis (NE) and daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) of 5 years onwards. The Parental Questionnaire: Enuresis/Urinary Incontinence, the International-Consultation-on-Incontinence-Questionnaire-Pediatric LUTS (ICIQ-CLUTS), as well as the Developmental Behavior Checklist for parents (DBC-P) or for adults (DBC-A) were filled out by parents or caregivers. 17.8% of the sample had NE, 5.9% DUI and 7.6% FI. NE was present in 44.9% of children (4-12 years), 13.5% of teens (13-17y), 3.3% of young adults (18-30y) and in 3.6% of adults (> 30y). DUI (and FI) decreased from 17.9% (21.4%) in children to 0% in adults. 3.5% of the sample had an ICIQ-CLUTS score in the clinical range. 30.5% of children and 22.1% of adults had a clinical DBC score. Children and teens with clinically relevant DBC-P-scores had significantly higher DUI rates. Children with WS have high rates of incontinence and LUTS, which decrease with age. Most adults are continent. NE is the most common subtype. Except for DUI in children, incontinence is not associated with behavioural problems. Screening, assessment and treatment of incontinence in individuals with WS is recommended. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:1000-1005, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Velocardiofacial syndrome in father and daughter: What is the mechanism for the deletion 22(q11.2q11.2) in only the daughter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magenis, R.E.; Gunter, K.; Toth-Fejel, S. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    E.G. had marked feeding difficulty noted at birth; the cause was determined to be a paralyzed palate. In 1992 chromosome studies were performed because of the provisional diagnosis of velocardiofacial syndrome, and a small interstitial deletion of chromosome 22 was found. Recently the family was seen in our Genetics Clinic. The father had unusual facial features shared by his daughter, a paralyzed upper lip and a history of repaired Tetralogy of Fallot. His chromosomes appeared normal. FISH studies were performed on the child`s peripheral blood using the ONCOR DiGeorge region probe (D22S75) and the deletion verified. However, the father`s chromosomes were not deleted for the ONCOR probe (D22S75) and probe DO832 sent to us by Peter Scambler. Skin cells were then obtained and no deletion was detected in a total of 66 cells examined using both probes. Several questions arise from these data: does the father have velocardiofacial syndrome? Does he have occult mosaicism? Does he have a molecular deletion not detected by the probes used? And was this deletion somehow {open_quotes}amplified{close_quotes} in his daughter?

  2. Does cerebellar neuronal integrity relate to cognitive ability?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, C.; Lee, M.; Dixon, R.M.; Blamire, A.; Thompson, C.; Styles, P.; Radda, G.K.; University of Sydney, NSW; Karmiloff-Smith, A.; Grant, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows the non-invasive measurement of metabolite levels in the brain. One of these is N-acetylaspartate (NA), a molecule found solely in neurones, synthesised there by mitochondria. This compound can be considered as a marker of 1) neuronal density and 2) neuronal mitochondria function. We recently completed a joint MRS and neuropsychological investigation of Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare (1/20,000) autosomal dominant disorder caused by a deletion which includes the elastin locus and LIM-kinase. The syndrome has an associated behavioural and cognitive profile which includes hyperactivity, hyperacusis and excessive sociability. Spatial skills are severely affected, while verbal skills are left relatively intact Our investigation showed loss of NA from the cerebellum in WBS compared with normal controls, with the subject population as a whole displaying a continuum of cerebellar NA concentration. Ability at cognitive tests, including the Weschler IQ scale and various verbal and spatial tests, was shown to correlate significantly and positively with the concentration of NA in the cerebellum. This finding can be interpreted in one of two ways: 1. Our sampling of cerebellar metabolite levels represents a 'global' sampling of total brain neuronal density and, as such, is independent of cerebellar integrity. 2. Cerebellar neuronal integrity is associated with performance at cognitive tests. If the latter interpretation is shown to be the case, it will have important implications for our current understanding of cerebellar function. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  3. Velo-Cardio-Facial syndrome and DiGeorge sequence with meningomyelocele and deletions of the 22q11 region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, R.E.; Pillers, D.M.; Merkens, M.; Magenis, R.E.; Zonana, J. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States); Driscoll, D.A.; Emanuel, B.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Approximately 5% of children with neural tube defects (NTDs) have a congenital heart defect and/or cleft lip and palate. The cause of isolated meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, or cleft lip and palate has been largely thought to be multifactorial. However, chromosomal, teratogenic, and single gene causes of combinations of NTDs with congenital heart defects and/or cleft lip and palate have been reported. We report on 3 patients with meningomyelocele, congenital heart defects, and 22q11 deletions. Two of the children had the clinical diagnosis of velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS); both have bifid uvula. The third child had DiGeorge sequence (DGS). The association of NTDs with 22q11 deletion has not been reported previously. An accurate diagnosis of the 22q11 deletion is critical as this micro-deletion and its associated clinical problems is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait due to the inheritance of the deletion-bearing chromosome. We recommend that all children with NTDs and congenital heart defects, with or without cleft palate, have cytogenetic and molecular studies performed to detect 22q11 deletions. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Analysis of 22q11.2 deletions by FISH in a series of velocardiofacial syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravnan, J.B.; Golabi, M.; Lebo, R.V. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Deletions in chromosome 22 band q11.2 have been associated with velocardiofacial (VCF or Shprintzen) syndrome and the DiGeorge anomaly. A study of VCF patients evaluated at the UCSF Medical Center was undertaken to correlate disease phenotype with presence or absence of a deletion. Patients referred for this study had at least two of the following: dysmorphic facial features, frequent ear infections or hearing loss, palate abnormalities, thymic hypoplasia, hypocalcemia, congenital heart defect, hypotonia, and growth or language delay. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the DiGeorge critical region probe N25 was used to classify patients according to the presence or absence of a deletion in 22q11.2, and the results were compared to clinical characteristics. We have completed studies on 58 patients with features of VCF. Twenty-one patients (36%) were found to have a deletion in 22q11.2 by FISH. A retrospective study of archived slides from 14 patients originally studied only by prometaphase GTG banding found six patients had a deletion detected by FISH; of these, only two had a microscopically visible chromosome deletion. Our study of 11 sets of parents of children with the deletion found two clinically affected mothers with the deletion, including one with three of three children clinically affected. A few patients who did not fit the classical VCF description had a 22q11.2 deletion detected by FISH. These included one patient with both cleft lip and palate, and another with developmental delay and typical facial features but no cardiac or palate abnormalities. Both patients with the DiGeorge anomaly as part of VCF had the deletion. On the other hand, a number of patients diagnosed clinically with classical VCF did not have a detectable deletion. This raises the question whether they represent a subset of patients with a defect of 22q11.2 not detected by the N25 probe, or whether they represent a phenocopy of VCF.

  5. Temporal lobe pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma and acquired BRAF mutation in an adolescent with the constitutional 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jeffrey C; Donahue, David J; Malik, Saleem I; Dzurik, Yvette B; Braly, Emily Z; Dougherty, Margaret J; Eaton, Katherine W; Biegel, Jaclyn A

    2011-05-01

    DiGeorge syndrome, or velocardiofacial syndrome (DGS/VCFS), is a rare and usually sporadic congenital genetic disorder resulting from a constitutional microdeletion at chromosome 22q11.2. While rare cases of malignancy have been described, likely due to underlying immunodeficiency, central nervous system tumors have not yet been reported. We describe an adolescent boy with DGS/VCFS who developed a temporal lobe pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array studies of the tumor confirmed a constitutional 22q11.21 deletion, and revealed acquired gains, losses and copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity of several chromosomal regions, including a homozygous deletion of the CDKN2A/B locus. The tumor also demonstrated a common V600E mutation in the BRAF oncogene. This is the first reported case of a patient with DiGeorge syndrome developing a CNS tumor of any histology and expands our knowledge about low-grade CNS tumor molecular genetics.

  6. Rare genome-wide copy number variation and expression of schizophrenia in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassett, Anne S.; Lowther, Chelsea; Merico, Daniele; Costain, Gregory; Chow, Eva W C; Van Amelsvoort, Therese; McDonald-Mcginn, Donna M.; Gur, Raquel E.; Swillen, Ann; van den Bree, Marianne B M; Murphy, Kieran C.; Gothelf, Doron; Bearden, Carrie E.; Eliez, Stephan; Kates, Wendy R.; Philip, Nicole; Sashi, Vandana; Campbell, Linda E.; Vorstman, Jacob; Cubells, Joseph; Repetto, Gabriela M.; Simon, Tony J.; Boot, Erik; Heung, Tracy; Evers, Rens; Vingerhoets, Claudia; Van Duin, Esther; Zackai, Elaine; Vergaelen, Elfi; Devriendt, Koen; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Owen, Michael J; Murphy, Clodagh M.; Michaelovosky, Elena; Kushan, Leila; Schneider, Maude; Fremont, Wanda; Busa, Tiffany; Hooper, Stephen R.; McCabe, Kathryn; Duijff, Sasja; Isaev, Karin; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Wei, John; Gazzellone, Matthew J.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Guo, Tingwei; Morrow, Bernice E.; Marshall, Christian R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is associated with a more than 20-fold increased risk for developing schizophrenia. The aim of this studywas to identify additional genetic factors (i.e., "second hits") that may contribute to schizophrenia expression. Method: Through an

  7. A 590 kb deletion caused by non-allelic homologous recombination between two LINE-1 elements in a patient with mesomelia-synostosis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Watanabe, Miki; Fujita, Yuji; Ujiro, Sae; Okamoto, Nana; Horikawa, Hideaki; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2017-04-01

    Mesomelia-synostoses syndrome (MSS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant, syndromal osteochondrodysplasia characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, acral synostoses, and multiple congenital malformations due to a non-recurrent deletion at 8q13 that always encompasses two coding-genes, SULF1 and SLCO5A1. To date, five unrelated patients have been reported worldwide, and MMS was previously proposed to not be a genomic disorder associated with deletions recurring from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) in at least two analyzed cases. We conducted targeted gene panel sequencing and subsequent array-based copy number analysis in an 11-year-old undiagnosed Japanese female patient with multiple congenital anomalies that included mesomelic limb shortening and detected a novel 590 Kb deletion at 8q13 encompassing the same gene set as reported previously, resulting in the diagnosis of MSS. Breakpoint sequences of the deleted region in our case demonstrated the first LINE-1s (L1s)-mediated unequal NAHR event utilizing two distant L1 elements as homology substrates in this disease, which may represent a novel causative mechanism of the 8q13 deletion, expanding the range of mechanisms involved in the chromosomal rearrangements responsible for MSS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Addressing the Educational Needs of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Rather Neglected Area of Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palikara, Olympia; Ashworth, Maria; Van Herwegen, Jo

    2018-04-13

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with physical health problems, limitations in cognitive abilities and increased risk of mental health difficulties. This profile of complex needs may make it challenging to support children with WS in schools. Surprisingly, in the current international move for inclusion, limited research exists on the educational provision and academic achievements of children with WS, including the non-existing literature on their voices and the perspectives of key stakeholders. This letter calls for additional research on the risk and protective factors associated with the educational outcomes of these children, the perspectives of the children themselves and the development of the evidence-base about the effectiveness of education intervention programs.

  9. Multimodal MRI reveals structural connectivity differences in 22q11 deletion syndrome related to impaired spatial working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Hanlon, Erik; Howley, Sarah; Prasad, Sarah; McGrath, Jane; Leemans, Alexander; McDonald, Colm; Garavan, Hugh; Murphy, Kieran C

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Impaired spatial working memory is a core cognitive deficit observed in people with 22q11 Deletion syndrome (22q11DS) and has been suggested as a candidate endophenotype for schizophrenia. However, to date, the neuroanatomical mechanisms describing its structural and functional

  10. Social Cognition Dysfunction in Adolescents with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome): Relationship with Executive Functioning and Social Competence/Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, L. E.; McCabe, K. L.; Melville, J. L.; Strutt, P. A.; Schall, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Social difficulties are often noted among people with intellectual disabilities. Children and adults with 22q.11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) often have poorer social competence as well as poorer performance on measures of executive and social-cognitive skills compared with typically developing young people. However, the relationship…

  11. Patients Carrying 9q31.1-q32 Deletion Share Common Features with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixue Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS is a rare but severe clinically heterogeneous developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphia, growth and cognitive retardation, and abnormalities of limb development. Objectives: To determine the pathogenesis of a patient with CdLS. Methods: We studied a patient with CdLS by whole exome sequencing, karyotyping and Agilent CGH Array. The results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the patient and her parents. Further comparison of our patient and cases with partially overlapping deletions retrieved from the literature and databases was undertaken. Results: Whole exome sequencing had excluded the mutation of cohesion genes such as NIPBL,SMC1A and SMC3. The result of karyotyping showed a deletion of chromosome 9q31.1-q32 and the result of Agilent CGH Array further displayed a 12.01-Mb region of deletion at chromosome bands 9q31.1-q32. Reported cases with the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 share similar features with our CdLS patient. One of the genes in the deleted region, SMC2, belongs to the Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC family and regulates gene expression and DNA repair. Conclusions: Patients carrying the deletion of 9q31.1-q32 showed similar phenotypes with CdLS.

  12. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  13. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a patient with L1 syndrome: a new report of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome including L1CAM and AVPR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knops, Noël B B; Bos, Krista K; Kerstjens, Mieke; van Dael, Karin; Vos, Yvonne J

    2008-07-15

    We report on an infant boy with congenital hydrocephalus due to L1 syndrome and polyuria due to diabetes insipidus. We initially believed his excessive urine loss was from central diabetes insipidus and that the cerebral malformation caused a secondary insufficient pituitary vasopressin release. However, he failed to respond to treatment with a vasopressin analogue, which pointed to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). L1 syndrome and X-linked NDI are distinct clinical disorders caused by mutations in the L1CAM and AVPR2 genes, respectively, located in adjacent positions in Xq28. In this boy we found a deletion of 61,577 basepairs encompassing the entire L1CAM and AVPR2 genes and extending into intron 7 of the ARHGAP4 gene. To our knowledge this is the first description of a patient with a deletion of these three genes. He is the second patient to be described with L1 syndrome and NDI. During follow-up he manifested complications from the hydrocephalus and NDI including global developmental delay and growth failure with low IGF-1 and hypothyroidism. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. 9q22 Deletion - First Familial Case

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    Yamamoto Toshiyuki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only 29 cases of constitutional 9q22 deletions have been published and all have been sporadic. Most associate with Gorlin syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, MIM #109400 due to haploinsufficiency of the PTCH1 gene (MIM *601309. Methods and Results We report two mentally retarded female siblings and their cognitively normal father, all carrying a similar 5.3 Mb microdeletion at 9q22.2q22.32, detected by array CGH (244 K. The deletion does not involve the PTCH1 gene, but instead 30 other gene,s including the ROR2 gene (MIM *602337 which causing both brachydactyly type 1 (MIM #113000 and Robinow syndrome (MIM #268310, and the immunologically active SYK gene (MIM *600085. The deletion in the father was de novo and FISH analysis of blood lymphocytes did not suggest mosaicism. All three patients share similar mild dysmorphic features with downslanting palpebral fissures, narrow, high bridged nose with small nares, long, deeply grooved philtrum, ears with broad helix and uplifted lobuli, and small toenails. All have significant dysarthria and suffer from continuous middle ear and upper respiratory infections. The father also has a funnel chest and unilateral hypoplastic kidney but the daughters have no malformations. Conclusions This is the first report of a familial constitutional 9q22 deletion and the first deletion studied by array-CGH which does not involve the PTCH1 gene. The phenotype and penetrance are variable and the deletion found in the cognitively normal normal father poses a challenge in genetic counseling.

  15. Addressing social skills deficits in adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H; Morin, Lindsay

    2017-12-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) are hypersocial; yet, they experience social difficulties and trouble with relationships. This report summarizes findings from three studies examining the social functioning of adults with WS and the feasibility of a social skills training program for adults with WS (SSTP-WS) through the examination of performance on initial lesson plans. Study 1: 114 parents of adults with WS completed the Social Responsiveness Scale-2. Study 2: 10 adults with WS and 12 of their parents participated in focus groups to further describe the deficits identified in Study 1 and to discuss a SSTP-WS. Study 3: 30 adults with WS were randomly assigned to 2 lessons on either conversations or relationships and pre-post change in social skills knowledge was assessed. Study 1 indicates adults with WS experience severe social impairments in social cognition, and mild-moderate impairments in social awareness and social communication. Qualitative results in Study 2 indicate a SSTP-WS should address conversation skills and relationships. In Study 3, participants showed gains in social skills knowledge following completion of lessons. A SSTP-WS may be beneficial for adults with WS. Future research should describe the social needs of individuals with WS at different ages and should further develop a SSTP-WS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Unusual presentation of Kallmannn syndrome with contiguous gene deletion in three siblings of a family

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    Sri Venkat Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of 3 brothers aged 34, 24, and 22 years, unmarried, who presented to our endocrinology clinic with absence of secondary sexual characters. There was no such history in other siblings, but their maternal uncle had similar complaints. On examination, all 3 had pre-pubertal appearance, voice, and genitalia along with anosmia and bimanual synkinesia. Cryptorchidism was noticed in 2 while third person had small hypoplastic testes. It was also noted that all 3 patients had icthyosis mainly involving trunk, back, and limbs. The hormonal assays were consistent with isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. IQ testing revealed mental retardation in the 2 patients. Ultrasound showed ectopic right kidney in one patient, atrophic right kidney in the second patient while the third patient had normal kidneys. MRI brain of all the patients showed poorly visualized olfactory tract and bulb. Kallmann syndrome (KS was diagnosed based on hormonal evaluation and MRI results. Of the four types of KS: Synkinesia, renal anomaly, and X-linked pedigree pattern in our patients pointed towards X-linked type 1 KS as the possible cause. But, icthyosis and mental retardation are not usual presentation of type 1 KS. They are usually seen as a result of contiguous gene deletion of KAL1, steroid sulfatase (STS, and mental retardation (MRX gene on X chromosome. Hence, the possible gene defect in our cases is inherited defect in contiguous gene deletion. The contiguous gene deletion as the cause of KS in 3 patients of same family is very rare and worth reporting. Also, the significance of phenotype-genotypic association in Kallmann syndrome is discussed

  17. A 7666-bp genomic deletion is frequent in Chinese Han deaf patients with non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct but without bi-allelic SLC26A4 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiuhong; Chai, Yongchuan; He, Longxia; Chen, Penghui; Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Lei; Jia, Huan; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the genetic cause of the patients with non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) but without bi-allelic SLC26A4 mutations. Presence of a homozygous genomic deletion was detected in a Chinese Han deaf patient (D1467-1) who failed to amplify the first three exons of SLC26A4. The breakpoints of the deletion were fine-mapped and revealed by PCR amplification and sequencing. This deletion was subsequently screened in 22 Chinese Han EVA probands with mono-allelic SLC26A4 mutations. The possible founder effect of the newly identified genomic deletion was evaluated by haplotype analysis. A homozygous c.-2071_307+3801del7666 deletion of SLC26A4 was identified in patient D1467-1. This novel genomic deletion was subsequently identified in 18% (4/22) of the Chinese Han EVA probands with mono-allelic SLC26A4 mutations. Haplotype analysis showed that this genomic deletion is likely a founder mutation in Chinese Hans. Our results suggested that the cryptic c.-2071_307+3801del7666 deletion of SLC26A4 is relatively frequent in Chinese Han non-syndromic EVA patients without bi-allelic SLC26A4 mutations. Screening of this genomic deletion should be incorporated into the routine DNA testing of SLC26A4 in Chinese Hans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome with Epibulbar Dermoid: An Unusual Association in a Patient with 4p Deletion and Functional Xp Disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragagnolo, Silvia; Colovati, Mileny E S; Guilherme, Roberta S; Dantas, Anelisa G; de Souza, Malú Zamariolli; de Soares, Maria F; Melaragno, Maria I; Perez, Ana B

    2016-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene and multiple malformation syndrome that results from a deletion in the 4p16.3 region. We describe here a 6-month-old girl that presented with WHS features but also displayed unusual findings, such as epibulbar dermoid in the left eye, ear tags, and left microtia. Although on G-banding her karyotype appeared to be normal, chromosomal microarray analysis revealed an ∼13-Mb 4p16.3p15.33 deletion and an ∼9-Mb Xp22.33p22.31 duplication, resulting from a balanced maternal t(X;4)(p22.31;p15.33) translocation. The patient presented with functional Xp disomy due to an unbalanced X-autosome translocation, a rare cytogenetic finding in females with unbalanced rearrangements. Sequencing of both chromosome breakpoints detected no gene disruption. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient described in the literature with WHS and epibulbar dermoid, a typical characteristic of the oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS). Our data suggest that possible candidate genes for OAVS may have been deleted along with the WHS critical region. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Nonalcoholic fatty liver in patients with Laron syndrome and GH gene deletion - preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi; Ginsberg, Shira; Webb, Muriel

    2008-10-01

    There is little information on the relationship between growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) deficiency or IGF-I treatment on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) a disorder linked to obesity and insulin resistance. To find out whether the markedly obese patients with Laron syndrome (LS) and GH gene deletion have fatty livers. We studied 11 untreated adult patients with LS (5M, 6F), five girls with LS treated by IGF-I and five adult patients with GH gene deletion (3M, 3F), four previously treated by hGH in childhood. Fatty liver was quantitatively evaluated by ultrasonography using a phase array US system (HITACHI 6500, Japan). Body adiposity was determined by DEXA, and insulin resistance was estimated by HOMA-IR using the fasting serum glucose and insulin values. Six out of 11 adult patients with LS, two out of the five IGF-I treated girls with LS and three out of five adult hGH gene deletion patients were found to have NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). NAFLD is a frequent complication in untreated and treated congenital IGF-I deficiency. No correlation between NAFLD and age, sex, degree of obesity, blood lipids, or degree of insulin resistance was observed.

  20. Variation in the Williams syndrome GTF2I gene and anxiety proneness interactively affect prefrontal cortical response to aversive stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbi, M; Chen, Q; Turner, N; Kohn, P; White, M; Kippenhan, J S; Dickinson, D; Kolachana, B; Mattay, V; Weinberger, D R; Berman, K F

    2015-08-18

    Characterizing the molecular mechanisms underlying the heritability of complex behavioral traits such as human anxiety remains a challenging endeavor for behavioral neuroscience. Copy-number variation (CNV) in the general transcription factor gene, GTF2I, located in the 7q11.23 chromosomal region that is hemideleted in Williams syndrome and duplicated in the 7q11.23 duplication syndrome (Dup7), is associated with gene-dose-dependent anxiety in mouse models and in both Williams syndrome and Dup7. Because of this recent preclinical and clinical identification of a genetic influence on anxiety, we examined whether sequence variation in GTF2I, specifically the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2527367, interacts with trait and state anxiety to collectively impact neural response to anxiety-laden social stimuli. Two hundred and sixty healthy adults completed the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire Harm Avoidance (HA) subscale, a trait measure of anxiety proneness, and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while matching aversive (fearful or angry) facial identity. We found an interaction between GTF2I allelic variations and HA that affects brain response: in individuals homozygous for the major allele, there was no correlation between HA and whole-brain response to aversive cues, whereas in heterozygotes and individuals homozygous for the minor allele, there was a positive correlation between HA sub-scores and a selective dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) responsivity during the processing of aversive stimuli. These results demonstrate that sequence variation in the GTF2I gene influences the relationship between trait anxiety and brain response to aversive social cues in healthy individuals, supporting a role for this neurogenetic mechanism in anxiety.

  1. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused by homozygous genomic deletion in the PSORS1 region encompassing the CDSN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Furio, Laetitia; Igawa, Satomi; Honma, Masaru; Tron, Elodie; Malan, Valerie; Murakami, Masamoto; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) type B is a rare recessive genodermatosis characterized by lifelong widespread, reddish peeling of the skin with pruritus. The disease is caused by small-scale mutations in the Corneodesmosin gene (CDSN) leading to premature termination codons. We report for the first time a Japanese case resulting from complete deletion of CDSN. Corneodesmosin was undetectable in the epidermis, and CDSN was unamplifiable by PCR. QMPSF analysis demonstrated deletion of CDSN exons inherited from each parent. Deletion mapping using microsatellite haplotyping, CGH array and PCR analysis established that the genomic deletion spanned 49-72 kb between HCG22 and TCF19, removing CDSN as well as five other genes within the psoriasis susceptibility region 1 (PSORS1) on 6p21.33. This observation widens the spectrum of molecular defects underlying PSS type B and shows that loss of these five genes from the PSORS1 region does not result in an additional cutaneous phenotype. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome associated with a large BRCA1 intragenic deletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amanda Gonçalves; Achatz, Maria Isabel W; Rosenberg, Carla; Krepischi, Ana C V; Ewald, Ingrid Petroni; Sapienza, Marina; Pinheiro, Manuela; Peixoto, Ana; Nóbrega, Amanda França de; Carraro, Dirce M; Teixeira, Manuel R; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni (LFS) and Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) syndromes are associated to germline TP53 mutations, and are characterized by the development of central nervous system tumors, sarcomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and other early-onset tumors. Due to the high frequency of breast cancer in LFS/LFL families, these syndromes clinically overlap with hereditary breast cancer (HBC). Germline point mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 genes are associated with high risk of breast cancer. Large rearrangements involving these genes are also implicated in the HBC phenotype. We have screened DNA copy number changes by MLPA on BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53 genes in 23 breast cancer patients with a clinical diagnosis consistent with LFS/LFL; most of these families also met the clinical criteria for other HBC syndromes. We found no DNA copy number alterations in the BRCA2 and TP53 genes, but we detected in one patient a 36.4 Kb BRCA1 microdeletion, confirmed and further mapped by array-CGH, encompassing exons 9–19. Breakpoints sequencing analysis suggests that this rearrangement was mediated by flanking Alu sequences. This is the first description of a germline intragenic BRCA1 deletion in a breast cancer patient with a family history consistent with both LFL and HBC syndromes. Our results show that large rearrangements in these known cancer predisposition genes occur, but are not a frequent cause of cancer susceptibility

  3. Familial co-segregation of Coffin-Lowry syndrome inherited from the mother and autosomal dominant Waardenburg type IV syndrome due to deletion of EDNRB inherited from the father.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupe, Jacob; Sampath, Srirangan; Lacassie, Yves

    2014-10-01

    We report an African-American family that was identified after the proposita was referred for diagnostic evaluation at 4½ months with a history of Hirschsprung and dysmorphic features typical of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Family evaluation revealed that the father had heterochromidia irides and hypertelorism supporting the clinical diagnosis of WS; however, examination of the mother revealed characteristic facial and digital features of Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS). Molecular testing of the mother identified a novel 2 bp deletion (c.865_866delCA) in codon 289 of RPS6KA3 leading to a frame-shift and premature termination of translation 5 codons downstream (NM_004586.2:p.Gln289ValfsX5). This deletion also was identified in the proposita and her three sisters with a clinical suspicion of CLS, all of whom as carriers for this X-linked disorder had very subtle manifestations. The molecular confirmation of WS type 4 (Shah-Waardenburg; WS4) was not as straightforward. To evaluate WS types 1-4, multiple sequential molecular tests were requested, including Sanger sequencing of all exons, and deletion/duplication analysis using MLPA for PAX3, MITF, SOX10, EDN3 and EDNRB. Although sequencing did not identify any disease causing variants, MLPA identified a heterozygous deletion of the entire EDNRB in the father. This deletion was also found in the proposita and the oldest child. Since the heterozygous deletion was the only change identified in EDNRB, this family represents one of the few cases of an autosomal dominant inheritance of WS4 involving the endothelin pathway. Altogether, clinical evaluation of the family revealed one child to be positive for WS4 and two positive for CLS, while two children were positive for both diseases simultaneously (including the proposita) while another pair test negative for either disease. This kinship is an example of the coincidence of two conditions co-segregating in one family, with variable phenotypes requiring molecular testing to

  4. The Drosophila agnostic Locus: Involvement in the Formation of Cognitive Defects in Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E A; Medvedeva, A V; Zakharov, G A; Savvateeva-Popova, E V

    2014-04-01

    The molecular basis of the pathological processes that lead to genome disorders is similar both in invertebrates and mammals. Since cognitive impairments in Williams syndrome are caused by LIMK1 hemizygosity, could the spontaneous and mutant variants of the Drosophila limk1 gene serve as a model for studying two diagnostic features from three distinct cognitive defects of the syndrome? These two symptoms are the disturbance of visuospatial orientation and an unusualy strong fixation on the faces of other people during pairwise interaction with a stranger. An experimental approach to the first cognitive manifestation might be an analysis of the locomotor behavior of Drosophila larvae involving visuospatial orientation during the exploration of the surrounding environment. An approach to tackle the second manifestation might be an analysis of the most natural ways of contact between a male and a female during courtship (the first stage of this ritual is the orientation of a male towards a female and following the female with constant fixation on the female's image). The present study of locomotor activity and cognitive repertoire in spontaneous and mutant variants of the Drosophila agnostic locus allows one to bridge alterations in the structure of the limk1 gene and behavior.

  5. Working Memory Impairments in Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: The Roles of Anxiety and Stress Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ashley F.; Hobbs, Diana A.; Stephenson, David D.; Laird, Robert D.; Beaton, Elliott A.

    2017-01-01

    Stress and anxiety have a negative impact on working memory systems by competing for executive resources and attention. Broad memory deficits, anxiety, and elevated stress have been reported in individuals with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). We investigated anxiety and physiological stress reactivity in relation to visuospatial…

  6. Altered auditory processing and effective connectivity in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kit Melissa; Mørup, Morten; Birknow, Michelle Rosgaard; Fischer, Elvira; Hulme, Oliver; Vangkilde, Anders; Schmock, Henriette; Baaré, William Frans Christiaan; Didriksen, Michael; Olsen, Line; Werge, Thomas; Siebner, Hartwig R; Garrido, Marta I

    2018-01-30

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is one of the most common copy number variants and confers a markedly increased risk for schizophrenia. As such, 22q11.2DS is a homogeneous genetic liability model which enables studies to delineate functional abnormalities that may precede disease onset. Mismatch negativity (MMN), a brain marker of change detection, is reduced in people with schizophrenia compared to healthy controls. Using dynamic causal modelling (DCM), previous studies showed that top-down effective connectivity linking the frontal and temporal cortex is reduced in schizophrenia relative to healthy controls in MMN tasks. In the search for early risk-markers for schizophrenia we investigated the neural basis of change detection in a group with 22q11.2DS. We recorded high-density EEG from 19 young non-psychotic 22q11.2 deletion carriers, as well as from 27 healthy non-carriers with comparable age distribution and sex ratio, while they listened to a sequence of sounds arranged in a roving oddball paradigm. Despite finding no significant reduction in the MMN responses, whole-scalp spatiotemporal analysis of responses to the tones revealed a greater fronto-temporal N1 component in the 22q11.2 deletion carriers. DCM showed reduced intrinsic connection within right primary auditory cortex as well as in the top-down, connection from the right inferior frontal gyrus to right superior temporal gyrus for 22q11.2 deletion carriers although not surviving correction for multiple comparison. We discuss these findings in terms of reduced adaptation and a general increased sensitivity to tones in 22q11.2DS. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Seizures as the first manifestation of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in a 40-year old man: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonelli Adriano R

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2 is the most common human deletion syndrome. It typically presents early in life and is rarely considered in adult patients. As part of the manifestations of this condition, patients can have parathyroid glandular involvement ranging from hypocalcemic hypoparathyroidism to normocalcemia with normal parathryroid hormone levels. The first manifestation of the syndrome might be seizures due to profound hypocalcemia. Case presentation A 40-year-old man without significant past medical history presented with a new-onset generalized tonic-clonic seizure. He had no personal history of hypocalcemia or seizures. Physical examination was remarkable for short stature, hypertelorism, prominent forehead and nasal voice. His initial laboratory examination showed hypocalcemia (Calcium 5.2 mg/dl and Calcium ionized 0.69 mmol/l with hypoparathyroidism (Parathyroid hormone intact Conclusion Microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2 is among the most clinically variable syndromes, with more than 180 features associated with the deletion. It has a variable phenotypical expression, requiring a high level of awareness for its early diagnosis. Seizures, related to marked hypocalcemia due to idiopathic hypoparathyroidism, might be the presenting feature in an adult patient with this syndrome.

  8. High proportion of large genomic deletions and a genotype phenotype update in 80 unrelated families with juvenile polyposis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aretz, S; Stienen, D; Uhlhaas, S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) the frequency of large genomic deletions in the SMAD4 and BMPR1A genes was unknown. METHODS: Mutation and phenotype analysis was used in 80 unrelated patients of whom 65 met the clinical criteria for JPS (typical JPS) and 15 were susp...

  9. Confirmation that the conotruncal anomaly face syndrome is associated with a deletion within 22q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Rumiko; Takao, Atsuyoshi; Kimura, Misa; Kondo, Chisato; Ando, Masahiko; Momma, Kazuo; Imamura, Shin-ichiro [Heart Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Joh-o, Kunitaka [Welfare Pension Hospital, Kyushu (Japan); Ikeda, Kazuo [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan); Nishibatake, Makoto [Kagoshima Seikyo Hospital (Japan)

    1994-11-15

    The so-called {open_quotes}conotruncal anomaly face syndrome{close_quotes} (CTAFS) is characterized by a peculiar facial appearance associated with congenital heart disease (CHD), especially cardiac outflow tract defects such as tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), double outlet ring ventricle (DORV), and truncus arteriosus (TAC). CTAFS and the DiGeorge anomaly (DGA) have many similar phenotypic characteristics, suggesting that they share a common cause. In many cases DGA is known to be associated with monosomy for a region of chromosome 22q11.2. Fifty CTAFS patients and 10 DGA patients, 11 parents couples and 10 mothers of CTAFS patients, and 3 parents couples and 2 mothers of DGA patients were examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using the N25 (D22S75) DGCR probe (Oncor). Monosomy for a region of 22q11.2 was found in 42 CTAFS, 9 DGA, 4 mothers, and 1 father who had CTAF without CHD. The remaining 8 CTAFS patients, 1 DGA patient and 1 mother who had questionable CTAF without CHD, showed no such chromosome abnormality. For the control, 60 patients who had CHD without CTAF or other know malformation syndromes were examined and had no deletion of 22q11.2. Therefore, we conclude that CTAFS is a part of the CATCH 22 syndrome; cardiac defects, abnormal faces, thymic hypoplasia, cleft palate, and hypocalcemia (CATCH) resulting from 22q11.2 deletions. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis of 17q12 deletion syndrome: from fetal hyperechogenic kidneys to high risk for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Yinon; Perlman, Sharon; Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Shrim, Alon; Azaria-Lahav, Einat; Dekel, Benjamin; Yonath, Hagith; Berkenstadt, Michal; Achiron, Reuven

    2016-11-01

    The linkage between 17q12 microdeletions, renal anomalies, and higher risk for neurodevelopmental disorders is well described in the literature. The current study presents prenatal diagnosis of normal-sized fetal hyperechogenic kidneys leading to the diagnosis of 17q12 deletion syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. Over a period of 9 years in a single referral center, seven fetuses were diagnosed with hyperechogenic renal parenchyma and were followed up prospectively. Amniocentesis for molecular diagnosis was performed in all cases, and subsequently, five fetuses were found to harbor a 17q12 deletion by chromosomal microarray analysis. Postnatal evaluation was carried out by a developmental neurologist. Five of the seven fetuses had molecular diagnosis of 17q12 deletion. One patient elected termination of pregnancy. On long-term follow-up, all of the four children showed symptoms consistent with neurodevelopmental disorders. The two fetuses with no deletion have a normal follow-up with regression of the renal hyperechogenicity. We report a strikingly high correlation between prenatal hyperechogenic kidneys, 17q12 microdeletion, and autism spectrum disorder with the advantage of optimal prenatal counseling as well as early diagnosis and intervention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [Grave's disease in children with 22q11 deletion. Report of three cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, J; Lebon-Labich, B; Lucron, H; Marçon, F; Leheup, B

    2004-12-01

    Hypothyroidism is a well recognized complication of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Auto-immune hyperthyroidism is less common. We report three patients with a 22q11.2 deletion and Graves' disease diagnosed at age 17, 14 and 11 years, respectively. The clinical and biological presentation was typical for auto-immune hyperthyroidism. Graves' disease should be periodically sought during the follow-up program of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

  12. Indel-II region deletion sizes in the white spot syndrome virus genome correlate with shrimp disease outbreaks in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Tuyet, H.; Zwart, M.P.; Phuong, N.T.; Oanh, D.T.H.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sequence comparisons of the genomes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) strains have identified regions containing variable-length insertions/deletions (i.e. indels). Indel-I and Indel-II, positioned between open reading frames (ORFs) 14/15 and 23/24, respectively, are the largest and the most

  13. Individuals with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Are Impaired at Explicit, but Not Implicit, Discrimination of Local Forms Embedded in Global Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersch, Anne; Glaser, Bronwyn; Pasca, Catherine; Chabloz, Mélanie; Debbané, Martin; Eliez, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) are impaired at exploring visual information in space; however, not much is known about visual form discrimination in the syndrome. Thirty-five individuals with 22q11.2DS and 41 controls completed a form discrimination task with global forms made up of local elements. Affected individuals…

  14. Morphological differences in the mirror neuron system in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Brown, Timothy T; Erhart, Matthew; Järvinen, Anna M; Korenberg, Julie R; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic condition characterized by an overly gregarious personality, including high empathetic concern for others. Although seemingly disparate from the profile of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), both are associated with deficits in social communication/cognition. Notably, the mirror neuron system (MNS) has been implicated in social dysfunction for ASD; yet, the integrity of this network and its association with social functioning in WS remains unknown. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods were used to examine the structural integrity of the MNS of adults with WS versus typically developing (TD) individuals. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), a tool typically used to screen for social features of ASD, was also employed to assess the relationships between social functioning with the MNS morphology in WS participants. WS individuals showed reduced cortical surface area of MNS substrates yet relatively preserved cortical thickness as compared to TD adults. Increased cortical thickness of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) was associated with increased deficits in social communication, social awareness, social cognition, and autistic mannerisms. However, social motivation was not related to anatomical features of the MNS. Our findings indicate that social deficits typical to both ASD and WS may be attributed to an aberrant MNS, whereas the unusual social drive marked in WS is subserved by substrates distinct from this network.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: 1p36 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hoyme HE, Dallapiccola B, Zackai E, Hudgins L, McDonald-McGinn D, Bahi-Buisson N, Romano C, Williams ... 10 All Bulletins Features What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What are genome editing and CRISPR- ...

  16. The effect of visual arrangement on visuospatial short-term memory: Insights from children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attout, Lucie; Noël, Marie-Pascale; Rousselle, Laurence

    2018-04-11

    Recent models of visuospatial (VSSP) short-term memory postulate the existence of two dissociable mechanisms depending on whether VSSP information is presented simultaneously or sequentially. However, they do not specify to what extent VSSP short-term memory is under the influence of general VSSP processing. This issue was examined in people with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a genetic condition involving a VSSP deficit. The configuration of VSSP information was manipulated (structured vs. unstructured) to explore the impact of arrangement on VSSP short-term memory. Two presentation modes were used to see whether the VSSP arrangement has the same impact on simultaneous and sequential short-term memory. Compared to children matched on chronological age, children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome showed impaired performance only for structured arrangement, regardless of the presentation mode, suggesting an influence of VSSP processing on VSSP short-term memory abilities. A revised cognitive architecture for a model of VSSP short-term memory is proposed.

  17. Psychopathology and cognition in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niarchou, Maria; Zammit, Stanley; van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Thapar, Anita; Tierling, Hayley M.; Owen, Michael J.; van den Bree, Marianne B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have been reported to have high rates of cognitive and psychiatric problems. Aims To establish the nature and prevalence of psychiatric disorder and neurocognitive impairment in children with 22q11.2DS and test whether risk of psychopathology is mediated by the children’s intellectual impairment. Method Neurocognition and psychopathology were assessed in 80 children with 22q11.2DS (mean age 10.2 years, s.d. = 2.1) and 39 sibling controls (mean age 10.9 years, s.d. = 2.0). Results More than half (54%) of children with 22q11.2DS met diagnostic criteria for one or more DSM-IV-TR psychiatric disorder. These children had lower IQ (mean 76.8, s.d. = 13.0) than controls (mean 108.6, s.d. = 15.2) (Ppsychopathology was not mediated by intellectual impairment. Conclusions 22q11.2DS is not related to a specific psychiatric phenotype in children. Moreover, the deletion has largely independent effects on IQ and risk of psychopathology, indicating that psychopathology in 22q11.2DS is not a non-specific consequence of generalised cognitive impairment. PMID:24115343

  18. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Kallel, Nozha; Salem, Ikhlass Haj; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-07-29

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Essential role of the N-terminal region of TFII-I in viability and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Nuno

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GTF2I codes for a general intrinsic transcription factor and calcium channel regulator TFII-I, with high and ubiquitous expression, and a strong candidate for involvement in the morphological and neuro-developmental anomalies of the Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS. WBS is a genetic disorder due to a recurring deletion of about 1,55-1,83 Mb containing 25-28 genes in chromosome band 7q11.23 including GTF2I. Completed homozygous loss of either the Gtf2i or Gtf2ird1 function in mice provided additional evidence for the involvement of both genes in the craniofacial and cognitive phenotype. Unfortunately nothing is now about the behavioral characterization of heterozygous mice. Methods By gene targeting we have generated a mutant mice with a deletion of the first 140 amino-acids of TFII-I. mRNA and protein expression analysis were used to document the effect of the study deletion. We performed behavioral characterization of heterozygous mutant mice to document in vivo implications of TFII-I in the cognitive profile of WBS patients. Results Homozygous and heterozygous mutant mice exhibit craniofacial alterations, most clearly represented in homozygous condition. Behavioral test demonstrate that heterozygous mutant mice exhibit some neurobehavioral alterations and hyperacusis or odynacusis that could be associated with specific features of WBS phenotype. Homozygous mutant mice present highly compromised embryonic viability and fertility. Regarding cellular model, we documented a retarded growth in heterozygous MEFs respect to homozygous or wild-type MEFs. Conclusion Our data confirm that, although additive effects of haploinsufficiency at several genes may contribute to the full craniofacial or neurocognitive features of WBS, correct expression of GTF2I is one of the main players. In addition, these findings show that the deletion of the fist 140 amino-acids of TFII-I altered it correct function leading to a clear phenotype, at both

  20. 11p15 duplication and 13q34 deletion with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkiewicz, Dorota; Kugaudo, Monika; Tańska, Anna; Wawrzkiewicz-Witkowska, Angelika; Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Kucharczyk, Marzena; Cieślikowska, Agata; Ciara, Elżbieta; Krajewska-Walasek, Małgorzata

    2015-06-01

    Here we report a patient with 11p15.4p15.5 duplication and 13q34 deletion presenting with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and moderate deficiency of factor VII (FVII). The duplication was initially diagnosed on methylation-sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Array comparative genome hybridization confirmed its presence and indicated a 13q34 distal deletion. The patient's clinical symptoms, including developmental delay and facial dysmorphism, were typical of BWS with paternal 11p15 trisomy. Partial 13q monosomy in this patient is associated with moderate deficiency of FVII and may also overlap with a few symptoms of paternal 11p15 trisomy such as developmental delay and some facial features. To our knowledge this is the first report of 11p15.4p15.5 duplication associated with deletion of 13q34 and FVII deficiency. Moreover, this report emphasizes the importance of detailed clinical as well as molecular examinations in patients with BWS features and developmental delay. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. Two deletion variants of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus found in a patient with characteristic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qian; Cao, Yujuan; Su, Juan; Wu, Jie; Wu, Xianbo; Wan, Chengsong; He, Mingliang; Ke, Changwen; Zhang, Bao; Zhao, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Significant sequence variation of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS CoV) has never been detected since it was first reported in 2012. A MERS patient came from Korea to China in late May 2015. The patient was 44 years old and had symptoms including high fever, dry cough with a little phlegm, and shortness of breath, which are roughly consistent with those associated with MERS, and had had close contact with individuals with confirmed cases of MERS.After one month of therapy with antiviral, anti-infection, and immune-enhancing agents, the patient recovered in the hospital and was discharged. A nasopharyngeal swab sample was collected for direct sequencing, which revealed two deletion variants of MERS CoV. Deletions of 414 and 419 nt occurred between ORF5 and the E protein, resulting in a partial protein fusion or truncation of ORF5 and the E protein. Functional analysis by bioinformatics and comparison to previous studies implied that the two variants might be defective in their ability to package MERS CoV. However, the mechanism of how these deletions occurred and what effects they have need to be further investigated.

  2. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Gema; Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was identified. We detected six large deletions involving USH2A in six out of the 40 cases studied. Three of the patients were homozygous for the deletion, and the remaining three were compound heterozygous with a previously identified USH2A point mutation. In five of these cases, the patients displayed Usher type 2, and the remaining case displayed nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The exact breakpoint junctions of the deletions found in USH2A in four of these cases were characterized. Our study highlights the need to develop improved efficient strategies of mutation screening based upon next generation sequencing (NGS) that reduce cost, time, and complexity and allow simultaneous identification of all types of disease-causing mutations in diagnostic procedures.

  3. MELAS syndrome associated with both A3243G-tRNALeu mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Sharon; Traves, Teres A; Melamed, Eldad; Cohen, Sarit; Silver, Esther Leshinsky

    2010-09-15

    The syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) is characterized clinically by recurrent focal neurological deficits, epilepsy, and short stature. The phenotypic spectrum is extremely diverse, with multisystemic organ involvement leading to isolated diabetes, deafness, renal tubulopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is associated with an AG transmission mutation (A3243G) in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We describe a woman with a unique combination of the MELAS A3243G mutation and multiple mtDNA deletions with normal POLG sequence. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness, short stature, and mental disorientation. All her three children died in early adolescence. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Outcome of patients treated for myelodysplastic syndromes without deletion 5q after failure of lenalidomide therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Prebet, Thomas; Toma, Andrea; Cluzeau, Thomas; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Vey, Norbert; Park, Sophie; Al Ali, Najla; Sugrue, Marie M.; Komrokji, Rami; Fenaux, Pierre; Gore, Steven D.

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a key survival prognostic factor in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Lenalidomide (LEN) can correct anemia in 25% of MDS patients without deletion 5q (del5q). As this therapy will inevitably fail, understanding the outcome of these patients will facilitate development of subsequent treatment strategies. To answer this question, an international retrospective study focused on LEN-treated lower-risk, non-del5q, MDS patients was performed. We analyzed the overall survival af...

  5. Distinct phenotype of PHF6 deletions in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, N; Isidor, B; Lopez Cazaux, S; Le Caignec, C; Klink, B; Kraus, C; Schrock, E; Hackmann, K

    2014-02-01

    We report on two female patients carrying small overlapping Xq26.2 deletions of 100 kb and 270 kb involving the PHF6 gene. Mutations in PHF6 have been reported in individuals with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome, a condition present almost exclusively in males. Two very recent papers revealed de novo PHF6 defects in seven female patients with intellectual disability and a phenotype resembling Coffin-Siris syndrome (sparse hair, bitemporal narrowing, arched eyebrows, synophrys, high nasal root, bulbous nasal tip, marked clinodactyly with the hypoplastic terminal phalanges of the fifth fingers and cutaneous syndactyly of the toes, Blaschkoid linear skin hyperpigmentation, dental anomalies and occasional major malformations). The clinical presentation of these patients overlaps completely with our first patient, who carries a germline deletion involving PHF6. The second patient has a mosaic deletion and presented with a very mild phenotype of PHF6 loss in females. Our report confirms that PHF6 loss in females results in a recognizable phenotype overlapping with Coffin-Siris syndrome and distinct from Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome. We expand the clinical spectrum and provide the first summary of the recommended medical evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Screening for single nucleotide variants, small indels and exon deletions with a next-generation sequencing based gene panel approach for Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawitz, Peter M; Schiska, Daniela; Krüger, Ulrike; Appelt, Sandra; Heinrich, Verena; Parkhomchuk, Dmitri; Timmermann, Bernd; Millan, Jose M; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Hecht, Jochen; Gross, Manfred

    2014-09-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized both by deafness and blindness. For the three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome causal mutations in altogether 12 genes and a modifier gene have been identified. Due to the genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome, the molecular analysis is predestined for a comprehensive and parallelized analysis of all known genes by next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches. We describe here the targeted enrichment and deep sequencing for exons of Usher genes and compare the costs and workload of this approach compared to Sanger sequencing. We also present a bioinformatics analysis pipeline that allows us to detect single-nucleotide variants, short insertions and deletions, as well as copy number variations of one or more exons on the same sequence data. Additionally, we present a flexible in silico gene panel for the analysis of sequence variants, in which newly identified genes can easily be included. We applied this approach to a cohort of 44 Usher patients and detected biallelic pathogenic mutations in 35 individuals and monoallelic mutations in eight individuals of our cohort. Thirty-nine of the sequence variants, including two heterozygous deletions comprising several exons of USH2A, have not been reported so far. Our NGS-based approach allowed us to assess single-nucleotide variants, small indels, and whole exon deletions in a single test. The described diagnostic approach is fast and cost-effective with a high molecular diagnostic yield.

  7. Predictors of specific phobia in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, C H; Klein-Tasman, B P; Osborne, J W; Mervis, C B

    2016-10-01

    Specific phobia (SP) is the most common anxiety disorder among children with Williams syndrome (WS); prevalence rates derived from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-based diagnostic interviews range from 37% to 56%. We evaluated the effects of gender, age, intellectual abilities and/or behaviour regulation difficulties on the likelihood that a child with WS would be diagnosed with SP. A total of 194 6-17 year-olds with WS were evaluated. To best characterise the relations between the predictors and the probability of a SP diagnosis, we explored not only possible linear effects but also curvilinear effects. No gender differences were detected. As age increased, the likelihood of receiving a SP diagnosis decreased. As IQ increased, the probability of receiving a SP diagnosis also decreased. Behaviour regulation difficulties were the strongest predictor of a positive diagnosis. A quadratic relation was detected: The probability of receiving a SP diagnosis gradually rose as behaviour regulation difficulties increased. However, once behaviour regulation difficulties approached the clinical range, the probability of receiving a SP diagnosis asymptoted at a high level. Children with behaviour regulation difficulties in or just below the clinical range were at the greatest risk of developing SP. These findings highlight the value of large samples and the importance of evaluating for nonlinear effects to provide accurate model specification when characterising relations among a dependent variable and possible predictors. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Emotion Recognition as a Real Strength in Williams Syndrome: Evidence From a Dynamic Non-verbal Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Ibernon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The hypersocial profile characterizing individuals with Williams syndrome (WS, and particularly their attraction to human faces and their desire to form relationships with other people, could favor the development of their emotion recognition capacities. This study seeks to better understand the development of emotion recognition capacities in WS. The ability to recognize six emotions was assessed in 15 participants with WS. Their performance was compared to that of 15 participants with Down syndrome (DS and 15 typically developing (TD children of the same non-verbal developmental age, as assessed with Raven’s Colored Progressive Matrices (RCPM; Raven et al., 1998. The analysis of the three groups’ results revealed that the participants with WS performed better than the participants with DS and also than the TD children. Individuals with WS performed at a similar level to TD participants in terms of recognizing different types of emotions. The study of development trajectories confirmed that the participants with WS presented the same development profile as the TD participants. These results seem to indicate that the recognition of emotional facial expressions constitutes a real strength in people with WS.

  9. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: behaviour problems of children and adolescents and parental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briegel, W; Schneider, M; Schwab, K Otfried

    2008-11-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome can be associated with a variety of somatic symptoms, developmental delays and psychiatric disorders. At present, there is little information on behaviour problems, parental stress and possible relations between these factors. Therefore, this study investigates behaviour problems of children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS, and their primary caregivers' stress. Parents of 4-17 year old subjects known to the German 22q11.2 deletion syndrome foundation were anonymously asked to fill out several questionnaires, e.g. the Child Behavior Checklist 4-18 (CBCL/4-18). The primary caregivers of 77/126 children [43 males, 34 females, mean age: 8;0 (4;0-16;11) years] sent back filled-out questionnaires. Forty-six of 76 subjects were rated as clinical on at least one of the CBCL-scales. Males had significantly higher scores on the total problems scale and the internalizing problems scale than females. The patients' age correlated with several CBCL-scales. Eleven of 49 subjects were suspicious of an autism spectrum disorder. Compared with the general population, but not with other parents of mentally and/or physically handicapped children, the primary caregivers experienced higher levels of stress, but showed normal life satisfaction. In spite of high rates of clinical behaviour problems among children and adolescents with 22q11.2DS and despite increased parental stress, most primary caregivers seem to have effective coping strategies, e.g. partnership support, to sustain normal levels of life satisfaction.

  10. Utility of the Hebb-Williams Maze Paradigm for Translational Research in Fragile X Syndrome: A Direct Comparison of Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Isabelle; Collin, Charles A; MacLeod, Lindsey S; Messier, Claude; Holahan, Matthew R; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Gandhi, Reno M; Kogan, Cary S

    2018-01-01

    To generate meaningful information, translational research must employ paradigms that allow extrapolation from animal models to humans. However, few studies have evaluated translational paradigms on the basis of defined validation criteria. We outline three criteria for validating translational paradigms. We then evaluate the Hebb-Williams maze paradigm (Hebb and Williams, 1946; Rabinovitch and Rosvold, 1951) on the basis of these criteria using Fragile X syndrome (FXS) as model disease. We focused on this paradigm because it allows direct comparison of humans and animals on tasks that are behaviorally equivalent (criterion #1) and because it measures spatial information processing, a cognitive domain for which FXS individuals and mice show impairments as compared to controls (criterion #2). We directly compared the performance of affected humans and mice across different experimental conditions and measures of behavior to identify which conditions produce comparable patterns of results in both species. Species differences were negligible for Mazes 2, 4, and 5 irrespective of the presence of visual cues, suggesting that these mazes could be used to measure spatial learning in both species. With regards to performance on the first trial, which reflects visuo-spatial problem solving, Mazes 5 and 9 without visual cues produced the most consistent results. We conclude that the Hebb-Williams mazes paradigm has the potential to be utilized in translational research to measure comparable cognitive functions in FXS humans and animals (criterion #3).

  11. Anterior Pituitary Aplasia in an Infant with Ring Chromosome 18p Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Bellfield

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the first reported case of an infant with 18p deletion syndrome with anterior pituitary aplasia secondary to a ring chromosome. Endocrine workup soon after birth was reassuring; however, repeat testing months later confirmed central hypopituitarism. While MRI reading initially indicated no midline defects, subsequent review of the images confirmed anterior pituitary aplasia with ectopic posterior pituitary. This case demonstrates how deletion of genetic material, even if resulting in a chromosomal ring, still results in a severe syndromic phenotype. Furthermore, it demonstrates the necessity of close follow-up in the first year of life for children with 18p deletion syndrome and emphasizes the need to verify radiology impressions if there is any doubt as to the radiologic findings.

  12. HOXA genes cluster: clinical implications of the smallest deletion

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzani, Lidia; Milani, Donatella; Manzoni, Francesca; Baccarin, Marco; Silipigni, Rosamaria; Guerneri, Silvana; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Background HOXA genes cluster plays a fundamental role in embryologic development. Deletion of the entire cluster is known to cause a clinically recognizable syndrome with mild developmental delay, characteristic facies, small feet with unusually short and big halluces, abnormal thumbs, and urogenital malformations. The clinical manifestations may vary with different ranges of deletions of HOXA cluster and flanking regions. Case presentation We report a girl with the smallest deletion reporte...

  13. Seizures as the first manifestation of chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in a 40-year old man: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, Adriano R; Kosuri, Kalyan; Wei, Sainan; Chick, Davoren

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2 is the most common human deletion syndrome. It typically presents early in life and is rarely considered in adult patients. As part of the manifestations of this condition, patients can have parathyroid glandular involvement ranging from hypocalcemic hypoparathyroidism to normocalcemia with normal parathryroid hormone levels. The first manifestation of the syndrome might be seizures due to profound hypocalcemia. Case presentation A 4...

  14. Associations between neurodevelopmental genes, neuroanatomy, and ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carlie A; Karelis, Jason; Middleton, Frank A; Gentile, Karen; Coman, Ioana L; Radoeva, Petya D; Mehta, Rashi; Fremont, Wanda P; Antshel, Kevin M; Faraone, Stephen V; Kates, Wendy R

    2017-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder resulting in the deletion of over 40 genes. Up to 40% of individuals with 22q11.2DS develop schizophrenia, though little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesized that allelic variation in functional polymorphisms in seven genes unique to the deleted region would affect lobar brain volumes, which would predict risk for psychosis in youth with 22q11.2DS. Participants included 56 individuals (30 males) with 22q11.2DS. Anatomic MR images were collected and processed using Freesurfer. Participants were genotyped for 10 SNPs in the COMT, DGCR8, GNB1L, PIK4CA, PRODH, RTN4R, and ZDHHC8 genes. All subjects were assessed for ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis. Allelic variation of the rs701428 SNP of RTN4R was significantly associated with volumetric differences in gray matter of the lingual gyrus and cuneus of the occipital lobe. Moreover, occipital gray matter volumes were robustly associated with ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in the presence of the G allele of rs701428. Our results suggest that RTN4R, a relatively under-studied gene at the 22q11 locus, constitutes a susceptibility gene for psychosis in individuals with this syndrome through its alteration of the architecture of the brain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Prader-Willi syndrome and atypical submicroscopic 15q11-q13 deletions with or without imprinting defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Maaz; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-11-01

    We report a 20 year follow up on a Caucasian female, now 26 years of age, with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) harboring an atypical 15q11-q13 submicroscopic deletion of 100-200 kb in size first detected in 1996 involving the imprinting center, SNRPN gene and surrounding region. PWS is a rare complex disorder caused by the loss of paternally expressed genes in the 15q11-q13 region. With high resolution chromosomal microarray and methylation - specific MLPA analysis, we updated the genetic findings on our patient and found a 209,819bp deletion including the SNURF-SNRPN gene complex which includes the imprinting center and the SNORD116 region. We compared with four other similarly reported individuals in the literature with atypical submicroscopic deletions within this region but without imprinting center involvement to better characterize the specific genetic lesions causing PWS clinical findings. Clinically, our patient met the diagnostic criteria of PWS including infantile hypotonia, a poor suck with feeding difficulties, global developmental delays and later food foraging, childhood obesity, small hands and skin picking. Small atypical deletions of comparable sizes were seen in the 15q11-q13 region in all five cases and similar behavioral/physical characteristics were found despite an imprinting defect in our patient. These results further support an overlapping critical deletion region involving the non-coding snoRNA SNORD116 in common in the five individuals playing a key role in contributing to the PWS phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Familial DiGeorge/velocardiofacial syndrome with deletions of chromosome area 22q11.2: Report of five families with a review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J.; Pangkanon, Suthipong; Eanet, K.R. [Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-11

    The DiGeorge (DG), velocardiofacial (VCF), and conotruncal anomaly-face (CTAF) syndromes were originally described as distinct disorders, although overlapping phenotypes have been recognized. It is now clear that all three syndromes result from apparently similar or identical 22q11.2 deletions, suggesting that they represent phenotypic variability of a single genetic syndrome. We report on 12 individuals in five families with del(22)(q11.2) by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and define the frequency of phenotypic abnormalities in those cases and in 70 individuals from 27 del(22)(q11.2) families from the literature. Common manifestations include mental impairment (97%), abnormal face (93%), cardiac malformations (681%), thymic (64%) and parathyroid (63%) abnormalities, and cleft palate or velopharyngeal insufficiency (48%). Familial DG, VCF, and CTAF syndromes due to del(22)(q11.2) show significant inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability consistent with the hypothesis that a single gene or group of tightly linked genes is the common cause of these syndromes. Up to 25% of 22q deletions are inherited, indicating that parents of affected children warrant molecular cytogenetic evaluation. We propose use of the compound term {open_quotes}DiGeorge/velocardiofacial (DGNCF) syndrome{close_quotes} in referring to this condition, as it calls attention to the phenotypic spectrum using historically familiar names. 41 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Outcome of patients treated for myelodysplastic syndromes with 5q deletion after failure of lenalidomide therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Prebet, Thomas; Cluzeau, Thomas; Park, Sophie; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Germing, Ulrich; Ades, Lionel; Platzbecker, Uwe; Gotze, Katharina; Vey, Norbert; Oliva, Esther; Sugrue, Mary M.; Bally, Cecile; Kelaidi, Charikleia; Al Ali, Najla; Fenaux, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    While lenalidomide (LEN) is the standard of care for the lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients with deletion 5q, 35% will not respond to or do not tolerate the drug. Moreover, most of the patients will lose their response after a few years. Defining the outcome of patients with LEN failure and determining the impact of subsequent therapies is therefore important to develop alternative strategies. Based on an international collaboration, we were able to compile a total of 392 pat...

  18. Basal Dendritic Morphology of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons in Williams Syndrome: Prefrontal Cortex and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Hanson, Kari L; Lew, Caroline H; Stefanacci, Lisa; Jacobs, Bob; Bellugi, Ursula; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a unique neurodevelopmental disorder with a specific behavioral and cognitive profile, which includes hyperaffiliative behavior, poor social judgment, and lack of social inhibition. Here we examined the morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons in the cortex of two rare adult subjects with WS. Specifically, we examined two areas in the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-the frontal pole (Brodmann area 10) and the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11)-and three areas in the motor, sensory, and visual cortex (BA 4, BA 3-1-2, BA 18). The findings suggest that the morphology of basal dendrites on the pyramidal neurons is altered in the cortex of WS, with differences that were layer-specific, more prominent in PFC areas, and displayed an overall pattern of dendritic organization that differentiates WS from other disorders. In particular, and unlike what was expected based on typically developing brains, basal dendrites in the two PFC areas did not display longer and more branched dendrites compared to motor, sensory and visual areas. Moreover, dendritic branching, dendritic length, and the number of dendritic spines differed little within PFC and between the central executive region (BA 10) and BA 11 that is part of the orbitofrontal region involved into emotional processing. In contrast, the relationship between the degree of neuronal branching in supra- versus infra-granular layers was spared in WS. Although this study utilized tissue held in formalin for a prolonged period of time and the number of neurons available for analysis was limited, our findings indicate that WS cortex, similar to that in other neurodevelopmental disorders such as Down syndrome, Rett syndrome, Fragile X, and idiopathic autism, has altered morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons, which appears more prominent in selected areas of the PFC. Results were examined from developmental perspectives and discussed in the context of other neurodevelopmental disorders

  19. Basal Dendritic Morphology of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons in Williams Syndrome: Prefrontal Cortex and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branka Hrvoj-Mihic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a unique neurodevelopmental disorder with a specific behavioral and cognitive profile, which includes hyperaffiliative behavior, poor social judgment, and lack of social inhibition. Here we examined the morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons in the cortex of two rare adult subjects with WS. Specifically, we examined two areas in the prefrontal cortex (PFC—the frontal pole (Brodmann area 10 and the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11—and three areas in the motor, sensory, and visual cortex (BA 4, BA 3-1-2, BA 18. The findings suggest that the morphology of basal dendrites on the pyramidal neurons is altered in the cortex of WS, with differences that were layer-specific, more prominent in PFC areas, and displayed an overall pattern of dendritic organization that differentiates WS from other disorders. In particular, and unlike what was expected based on typically developing brains, basal dendrites in the two PFC areas did not display longer and more branched dendrites compared to motor, sensory and visual areas. Moreover, dendritic branching, dendritic length, and the number of dendritic spines differed little within PFC and between the central executive region (BA 10 and BA 11 that is part of the orbitofrontal region involved into emotional processing. In contrast, the relationship between the degree of neuronal branching in supra- versus infra-granular layers was spared in WS. Although this study utilized tissue held in formalin for a prolonged period of time and the number of neurons available for analysis was limited, our findings indicate that WS cortex, similar to that in other neurodevelopmental disorders such as Down syndrome, Rett syndrome, Fragile X, and idiopathic autism, has altered morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons, which appears more prominent in selected areas of the PFC. Results were examined from developmental perspectives and discussed in the context of other

  20. Characteristic face: a key indicator for direct diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletions in Chinese velocardiofacial syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dandan; Chen, Yang; Xu, Chen; Wang, Ke; Wang, Huijun; Zheng, Fengyun; Ma, Duan; Wang, Guomin

    2013-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is a disease in human with an expansive phenotypic spectrum and diverse genetic mechanisms mainly associated with copy number variations (CNVs) on 22q11.2 or other chromosomes. However, the correlations between CNVs and phenotypes remain ambiguous. This study aims to analyze the types and sizes of CNVs in VCFS patients, to define whether correlations exist between CNVs and clinical manifestations in Chinese VCFS patients. In total, 55 clinically suspected Chinese VCFS patients and 100 normal controls were detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). The data from MLPA and all the detailed clinical features of the objects were documented and analyzed. A total of 44 patients (80.0%) were diagnosed with CNVs on 22q11.2. Among them, 43 (78.2%) presented with 22q11.2 heterozygous deletions, of whom 40 (93.0%) had typical 3-Mb deletion, and 3 (7.0%) exhibited proximal 1.5-Mb deletion; no patient was found with atypical deletion on 22q11.2. One patient (1.8%) presented with a 3-Mb duplication mapping to the typical 3-Mb region on 22q11.2, while none of the chromosomal abnormalities in the MLPA kit were found in the other 11 patients and 100 normal controls. All the 43 patients with 22q11.2 deletions displayed characteristic face and palatal anomalies; 37 of them (86.0%) had cognitive or behavioral disorders, and 23 (53.5%) suffered from immune deficiencies; 10 patients (23.3%) manifested congenital heart diseases. Interestingly, all patients with the characteristic face had 22q11.2 heterozygous deletions, but no difference in phenotypic spectrum was observed between 3-Mb and 1.5-Mb deletions. Our data suggest that the characteristic face can be used as a key indicator for direct diagnosis of 22q11.2 deletions in Chinese VCFS patients.

  1. A case of an atypically large proximal 15q deletion as cause for Prader-Willi syndrome arising from a de novo unbalanced translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Scott E; Thrush, Devon Lamb; Walters-Sen, Lauren; Reshmi, Shalini C; Astbury, Caroline; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Atkin, Joan

    2013-09-01

    We describe an 11 month old female with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) resulting from an atypically large deletion of proximal 15q due to a de novo 3;15 unbalanced translocation. The 10.6 Mb deletion extends from the chromosome 15 short arm and is not situated in a region previously reported as a common distal breakpoint for unbalanced translocations. There was no deletion of the reciprocal chromosome 3q subtelomeric region detected by either chromosomal microarray or FISH. The patient has hypotonia, failure to thrive, and typical dysmorphic facial features for PWS. The patient also has profound global developmental delay consistent with an expanded, more severe, phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Expansion of the clinical phenotype of the distal 10q26.3 deletion syndrome to include ataxia and hyperemia of the hands and feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaria, Melanie; Srour, Myriam; Michaud, Jacques L; Doja, Asif; Miller, Elka; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Goldsmith, Claire; Majewski, Jacek; Boycott, Kym M

    2017-06-01

    Distal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 10 is associated with a dysmorphic craniofacial appearance, microcephaly, behavioral issues, developmental delay, intellectual disability, and ocular, urogenital, and limb abnormalities. Herein, we present clinical, molecular, and cytogenetic investigations of four patients, including two siblings, with nearly identical terminal deletions of 10q26.3, all of whom have an atypical presentation of this syndrome. Their prominent features include ataxia, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, and hyperemia of the hands and feet, and they do not display many of the other features commonly associated with deletions of this region. These results point to a novel gene locus associated with ataxia and highlight the variability of the clinical presentation of patients with deletions of this region. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Self-Reported Speech Problems in Adolescents and Young Adults with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study

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    Nicole E Spruijt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSpeech problems are a common clinical feature of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. The objectives of this study were to inventory the speech history and current self-reported speech rating of adolescents and young adults, and examine the possible variables influencing the current speech ratings, including cleft palate, surgery, speech and language therapy, intelligence quotient, and age at assessment.MethodsIn this cross-sectional cohort study, 50 adolescents and young adults with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (ages, 12-26 years, 67% female filled out questionnaires. A neuropsychologist administered an age-appropriate intelligence quotient test. The demographics, histories, and intelligence of patients with normal speech (speech rating=1 were compared to those of patients with different speech (speech rating>1.ResultsOf the 50 patients, a minority (26% had a cleft palate, nearly half (46% underwent a pharyngoplasty, and all (100% had speech and language therapy. Poorer speech ratings were correlated with more years of speech and language therapy (Spearman's correlation= 0.418, P=0.004; 95% confidence interval, 0.145-0.632. Only 34% had normal speech ratings. The groups with normal and different speech were not significantly different with respect to the demographic variables; a history of cleft palate, surgery, or speech and language therapy; and the intelligence quotient.ConclusionsAll adolescents and young adults with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome had undergone speech and language therapy, and nearly half of them underwent pharyngoplasty. Only 34% attained normal speech ratings. Those with poorer speech ratings had speech and language therapy for more years.

  4. The regulatory function of social referencing in preschoolers with Down syndrome or Williams syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurman Angela John

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important developmental task is to learn to recognize another person as a source of information and to utilize this information as a method of learning about the surrounding world. This socially guided form of learning, referred to as social referencing, is critical for the development of children’s understanding of other people, themselves and their surrounding world. In the present project, the regulatory function of social referencing was examined in two genetic disorders that are characterized by differing patterns of socio-cognitive development: Down syndrome (DS and Williams syndrome (WS. Methods Participants were 20 children with DS and 20 children with WS aged 42 to 71 months, matched on chronological age and gender. Each child participated in four studies: one study in which we examined performance in a social referencing paradigm and three studies in which we considered performance on tasks designed to tap each of three component abilities (initiating eye contact, gaze following and emotional responsivity important for success in social referencing. Results The majority of children in both groups demonstrated positive behavioral responses regarding the stimulus in the Social Referencing task when the adult communicated a joyful message but did not regulate their own behavior in accordance with the adult’s expression of fear. Between-group differences were observed in both conditions, with most differences indicating more advanced socio-communicative competence for children with DS than for children with WS even though the overall intellectual abilities and receptive language abilities of the children with WS were significantly higher than were those of the children with DS. The results of follow-up studies indicated that children with DS were more likely to initiate eye contact (unsolicited and to follow another person’s gaze in triadic situations than were children with WS. Neither group regulated their

  5. Spontaneous 8bp Deletion in Nbeal2 Recapitulates the Gray Platelet Syndrome in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberg, Kärt; Khoriaty, Rami; Westrick, Randal J.; Fairfield, Heather E.; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Brodsky, Gary L.; Davizon-Castillo, Pavel; Ginsburg, David; Di Paola, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    During the analysis of a whole genome ENU mutagenesis screen for thrombosis modifiers, a spontaneous 8 base pair (bp) deletion causing a frameshift in exon 27 of the Nbeal2 gene was identified. Though initially considered as a plausible thrombosis modifier, this Nbeal2 mutation failed to suppress the synthetic lethal thrombosis on which the original ENU screen was based. Mutations in NBEAL2 cause Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS), an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and gray-appearing platelets due to lack of platelet alpha granules. Mice homozygous for the Nbeal2 8 bp deletion (Nbeal2gps/gps) exhibit a phenotype similar to human GPS, with significantly reduced platelet counts compared to littermate controls (p = 1.63 x 10−7). Nbeal2gps/gps mice also have markedly reduced numbers of platelet alpha granules and an increased level of emperipolesis, consistent with previously characterized mice carrying targeted Nbeal2 null alleles. These findings confirm previous reports, provide an additional mouse model for GPS, and highlight the potentially confounding effect of background spontaneous mutation events in well-characterized mouse strains. PMID:26950939

  6. Spontaneous 8bp Deletion in Nbeal2 Recapitulates the Gray Platelet Syndrome in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kärt Tomberg

    Full Text Available During the analysis of a whole genome ENU mutagenesis screen for thrombosis modifiers, a spontaneous 8 base pair (bp deletion causing a frameshift in exon 27 of the Nbeal2 gene was identified. Though initially considered as a plausible thrombosis modifier, this Nbeal2 mutation failed to suppress the synthetic lethal thrombosis on which the original ENU screen was based. Mutations in NBEAL2 cause Gray Platelet Syndrome (GPS, an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and gray-appearing platelets due to lack of platelet alpha granules. Mice homozygous for the Nbeal2 8 bp deletion (Nbeal2gps/gps exhibit a phenotype similar to human GPS, with significantly reduced platelet counts compared to littermate controls (p = 1.63 x 10-7. Nbeal2gps/gps mice also have markedly reduced numbers of platelet alpha granules and an increased level of emperipolesis, consistent with previously characterized mice carrying targeted Nbeal2 null alleles. These findings confirm previous reports, provide an additional mouse model for GPS, and highlight the potentially confounding effect of background spontaneous mutation events in well-characterized mouse strains.

  7. Oral health and 22q11 deletion syndrome: thoughts and experiences from the parents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingberg, Gunilla; Hallberg, Ulrika; Oskarsdóttir, Sólveig

    2010-07-01

    22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is one of the most common multiple anomaly syndromes, and many dentists are likely to meet patients with the syndrome. Odontological research has focused on describing and analysing conditions/concepts based on the current state of knowledge within the dental profession. Yet, these research topics are not necessarily the most important issues for the patients. To explore and describe, by use of Grounded theory, parents' experiences of oral health issues and needs for dental care in their children with 22q11DS. Twelve parents from different regions in Sweden were interviewed. Analyses were carried out according to Grounded theory. Parents recognised good oral health as important for the wellbeing of their children. Oral health was a concern and the parents described the fight for this as struggling in vain for good oral health in their child. Parents not only described their children's oral health as important but also hard to gain. Thus, it is important that all patients with disabilities, regardless of whether there is a defined medical diagnosis or not, are identified and well taken care of in the dental care system.

  8. Adaptive Behavior and Development of Infants and Toddlers with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Kirchner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes deficits in adaptive behavior, difficulties eating and sleeping, cognitive delays, and delayed development. Although researchers have conducted characterizations of children and adults with WS, less is known about young children with this disorder. This study characterizes the developmental and adaptive behavior features of 16 infants and toddlers with WS aged 3 months - 5 years. Data for this project was obtained from 2007-2014, and includes parent report data and standardized developmental testing. Thirty-one percent (31.3% of parents reported that their infant/toddler with WS had sleeping problems and 58.3% reported feeding difficulties. Levels of adaptive behavior were in the Mildly Delayed range as measured by the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second Edition. Self care skills such as feeding or dressing oneself were significantly weaker than skills needed to function in the community, such as recognizing his/her home or throwing away trash. The difficulty with self-care skills is hypothesized to be related to the reported difficulties with eating and sleeping. Motor skills were significantly lower than both cognitive and language skills on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition. The current study highlights the need for early intervention in these young children across all areas of development, particularly in self-care skills.

  9. Clinical and genetic characterization of chanarin-dorfman syndrome patients: first report of large deletions in the ABHD5 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prati Daniele

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NCIE and an intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerol (TG droplets in most tissues. The clinical phenotype involves multiple organs and systems, including liver, eyes, ears, skeletal muscle and central nervous system (CNS. Mutations in ABHD5/CGI58 gene are associated with CDS. Methods Eight CDS patients belonging to six different families from Mediterranean countries were enrolled for genetic study. Molecular analysis of the ABHD5 gene included the sequencing of the 7 coding exons and of the putative 5' regulatory regions, as well as reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction analysis and sequencing of normal and aberrant ABHD5 cDNAs. Results Five different mutations were identified, four of which were novel, including two splice-site mutations (c.47+1G>A and c.960+5G>A and two large deletions (c.898_*320del and c.662-1330_773+46del. All the reported mutations are predicted to be pathogenic because they lead to an early stop codon or a frameshift producing a premature termination of translation. While nonsense, missense, frameshift and splice-site mutations have been identified in CDS patients, large genomic deletions have not previously been described. Conclusions These results emphasize the need for an efficient approach for genomic deletion screening to ensure an accurate molecular diagnosis of CDS. Moreover, in spite of intensive molecular screening, no mutations were identified in one patient with a confirmed clinical diagnosis of CDS, appointing to genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome.

  10. Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Individuals with Down Syndrome and Williams Syndrome Compared with Typically Developing Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jennifer N; Hohman, Timothy J; Pryweller, Jennifer R; Dykens, Elisabeth M; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis, which examines temporal correlations of low-frequency (syndrome (DS) compared with another neurodevelopmental disorder, Williams syndrome (WS), and TD. Ten subjects with DS, 18 subjects with WS, and 40 subjects with TD each participated in a 3-Tesla MRI scan. We tested for group differences (DS vs. TD, DS vs. WS, and WS vs. TD) in between- and within-network rsFC connectivity for seven functional networks. For the DS group, we also examined associations between rsFC and other cognitive and genetic risk factors. In DS compared with TD, we observed higher levels of between-network connectivity in 6 out 21 network pairs but no differences in within-network connectivity. Participants with WS showed lower levels of within-network connectivity and no significant differences in between-network connectivity relative to DS. Finally, our comparison between WS and TD controls revealed lower within-network connectivity in multiple networks and higher between-network connectivity in one network pair relative to TD controls. While preliminary due to modest sample sizes, our findings suggest a global difference in between-network connectivity in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders compared with controls and that such a difference is exacerbated across many brain regions in DS. However, this alteration in DS does not appear to extend to within-network connections, and therefore, the altered between-network connectivity must be interpreted within the framework of an intact intra-network pattern of activity. In contrast, WS shows markedly lower levels of within-network connectivity in the default mode network and somatomotor network relative to controls. These findings warrant further investigation using a task-based procedure that may help disentangle the relationship between brain function and cognitive performance across the spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  11. Deletions and de novo mutations of SOX11 are associated with a neurodevelopmental disorder with features of Coffin–Siris syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Annmarie; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Blyth, Moira; Mansour, Sahar; McConnell, Vivienne; Kou, Ikuyo; Ikegawa, Shiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Lo-Castro, Adriana; Plessis, Ghislaine; Albrecht, Beate; Battaglia, Agatino; Taylor, Jenny C; Howard, Malcolm F; Keays, David; Sohal, Aman Singh; Kühl, Susanne J; Kini, Usha; McNeill, Alisdair

    2016-01-01

    Background SOX11 is a transcription factor proposed to play a role in brain development. The relevance of SOX11 to human developmental disorders was suggested by a recent report of SOX11 mutations in two patients with Coffin–Siris syndrome. Here we further investigate the role of SOX11 variants in neurodevelopmental disorders. Methods We used array based comparative genomic hybridisation and trio exome sequencing to identify children with intellectual disability who have deletions or de novo point mutations disrupting SOX11. The pathogenicity of the SOX11 mutations was assessed using an in vitro gene expression reporter system. Loss-of-function experiments were performed in xenopus by knockdown of Sox11 expression. Results We identified seven individuals with chromosome 2p25 deletions involving SOX11. Trio exome sequencing identified three de novo SOX11 variants, two missense (p.K50N; p.P120H) and one nonsense (p.C29*). The biological consequences of the missense mutations were assessed using an in vitro gene expression system. These individuals had microcephaly, developmental delay and shared dysmorphic features compatible with mild Coffin–Siris syndrome. To further investigate the function of SOX11, we knocked down the orthologous gene in xenopus. Morphants had significant reduction in head size compared with controls. This suggests that SOX11 loss of function can be associated with microcephaly. Conclusions We thus propose that SOX11 deletion or mutation can present with a Coffin–Siris phenotype. PMID:26543203

  12. Distribution of segmental duplications in the context of higher order chromatin organisation of human chromosome 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, Grit; Steininger, Anne; Weißmann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    of the Williams-Beuren syndrome locus we demonstrate by cross-species comparison that these SDs have inserted at the borders of a topological domain and that they flank regions with distinct DNA conformation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests a link of nuclear architecture and the propagation of SDs across......BACKGROUND: Segmental duplications (SDs) are not evenly distributed along chromosomes. The reasons for this biased susceptibility to SD insertion are poorly understood. Accumulation of SDs is associated with increased genomic instability, which can lead to structural variants and genomic disorders...... chromosome 7, either by promoting regional SD insertion or by contributing to the establishment of higher order chromatin organisation themselves. The latter could compensate for the high risk of structural rearrangements and thus may have contributed to their evolutionary fixation in the human genome....

  13. Deletion of UBE3A in brothers with Angelman syndrome at the breakpoint with an inversion at 15q11.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Ida, Kazumi; Naruto, Takuya; Wada, Takahito; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by severe intellectual disability with ataxia, epilepsy, and behavioral uniqueness. The underlining molecular deficit is the absence of the maternal copy of the imprinted UBE3A gene due to maternal deletions, which is observed in 70-75% of cases, and can be detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of the UBE3A region. Only a few familial AS cases have been reported with a complete deletion of UBE3A. Here, we report on siblings with AS caused by a microdeletion of 15q11.2-q12 encompassing UBE3A at the breakpoint of an inversion at 15q11.2 and 15q26.1. Karyotyping revealed an inversion of 15q, and FISH revealed the deletion of the UBE3A region. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) demonstrated a 467 kb deletion at 15q11.2-q12, encompassing only UBE3A, SNORD115, and PAR1, and a 53 kb deletion at 15q26.1, encompassing a part of SLCO3A1. Their mother had a normal karyotype and array CGH detected no deletion of 15q11.2-q12, so we assumed gonadal mosaicism. This report describes a rare type of familial AS detected using the D15S10 FISH test. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Utility of the Hebb–Williams Maze Paradigm for Translational Research in Fragile X Syndrome: A Direct Comparison of Mice and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Isabelle; Collin, Charles A.; MacLeod, Lindsey S.; Messier, Claude; Holahan, Matthew R.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Gandhi, Reno M.; Kogan, Cary S.

    2018-01-01

    To generate meaningful information, translational research must employ paradigms that allow extrapolation from animal models to humans. However, few studies have evaluated translational paradigms on the basis of defined validation criteria. We outline three criteria for validating translational paradigms. We then evaluate the Hebb–Williams maze paradigm (Hebb and Williams, 1946; Rabinovitch and Rosvold, 1951) on the basis of these criteria using Fragile X syndrome (FXS) as model disease. We focused on this paradigm because it allows direct comparison of humans and animals on tasks that are behaviorally equivalent (criterion #1) and because it measures spatial information processing, a cognitive domain for which FXS individuals and mice show impairments as compared to controls (criterion #2). We directly compared the performance of affected humans and mice across different experimental conditions and measures of behavior to identify which conditions produce comparable patterns of results in both species. Species differences were negligible for Mazes 2, 4, and 5 irrespective of the presence of visual cues, suggesting that these mazes could be used to measure spatial learning in both species. With regards to performance on the first trial, which reflects visuo-spatial problem solving, Mazes 5 and 9 without visual cues produced the most consistent results. We conclude that the Hebb–Williams mazes paradigm has the potential to be utilized in translational research to measure comparable cognitive functions in FXS humans and animals (criterion #3). PMID:29643767

  15. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

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    Natália Duarte Linhares

    Full Text Available Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS, we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients.

  16. Chromosomal deletion unmasking a recessive disease: 22q13 deletion syndrome and metachromatic leukodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, A-M; Kirchhoff, M; Nielsen, J E

    2008-01-01

    A deletion on one chromosome and a mutant allele on the other may cause an autosomal recessive disease. We report on two patients with mental retardation, dysmorphic features and low catalytic activity of arylsulfatase A. One patient had a pathogenic mutation in the arylsulfatase A gene (ARSA......) and succumbed to metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD). The other patient had a pseudoallele, which does not lead to MLD. The presenting clinical features and low arylsulfatase A activity were explained, in each patients, by a deletion of 22q13 and, thereby, of one allele of ARSA....

  17. Association of promoter methylation and 32-bp deletion of the PTEN gene with susceptibility to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Rezaei, Hamzeh; Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Kaykhaei, Mahmoud-Ali; Taheri, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MeS), a cluster of several metabolic disorders, is increasingly being recognized as a risk factor for type II diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease. Genetic and epigenetic alteration of the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) has been associated with components of MeS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of a 32-bp deletion polymorphism and promoter methylation of the PTEN gene with MeS. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of 151 subjects with and 149 subjects without MeS. The 32-bp deletion variant of PTEN was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PTEN promoter methylation was defined by a nested methylation‑specific PCR (MSP) method. No significant differences were found in the allelic and genotypic frequencies of the 32-bp deletion variant of PTEN between the groups [odds ratio (OR), 0.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.41-1.45; P=0.431]. However, patients with MeS were identified to have lower levels of PTEN promoter hypermethylation than subjects without MeS. Promoter methylation may be a protective factor against susceptibility to MeS (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29-0.92; P=0.029). Our findings suggest that PTEN promoter methylation may be a mechanism for PTEN downregulation or silencing in MeS, which remains to be fully clarified.

  18. Referential communication abilities in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Heuvel, Ellen; ReuterskiöLd, Christina; Solot, Cynthia; Manders, Eric; Swillen, Ann; Zink, Inge

    2017-10-01

    This study describes the performance on a perspective- and role-taking task in 27 children, ages 6-13 years, with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). A cross-cultural design comparing Dutch- and English-speaking children with 22q11.2DS explored the possibility of cultural differences. Chronologically age-matched and younger typically developing (TD) children matched for receptive vocabulary served as control groups to identify challenges in referential communication. The utterances of children with 22q11.2DS were characterised as short and simple in lexical and grammatical terms. However, from a language use perspective, their utterances were verbose, ambiguous and irrelevant given the pictured scenes. They tended to elaborate on visual details and conveyed off-topic, extraneous information when participating in a barrier-game procedure. Both types of aberrant utterances forced a listener to consistently infer the intended message. Moreover, children with 22q11.2DS demonstrated difficulty selecting correct speech acts in accordance with contextual cues during a role-taking task. Both English- and Dutch-speaking children with 22q11.2DS showed impoverished information transfer and an increased number of elaborations, suggesting a cross-cultural syndrome-specific feature.

  19. Otitis Media in a New Mouse Model for CHARGE Syndrome with a Deletion in the Chd7 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cong; Yu, Heping; Yang, Bin; Han, Fengchan; Zheng, Ye; Bartels, Cynthia F.; Schelling, Deborah; Arnold, James E.; Scacheri, Peter C.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2012-01-01

    Otitis media is a middle ear disease common in children under three years old. Otitis media can occur in normal individuals with no other symptoms or syndromes, but it is often seen in individuals clinically diagnosed with genetic diseases such as CHARGE syndrome, a complex genetic disease caused by mutation in the Chd7 gene and characterized by multiple birth defects. Although otitis media is common in human CHARGE syndrome patients, it has not been reported in mouse models of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we report a mouse model with a spontaneous deletion mutation in the Chd7 gene and with chronic otitis media of early onset age accompanied by hearing loss. These mice also exhibit morphological alteration in the Eustachian tubes, dysregulation of epithelial proliferation, and decreased density of middle ear cilia. Gene expression profiling revealed up-regulation of Muc5ac, Muc5b and Tgf-β1 transcripts, the products of which are involved in mucin production and TGF pathway regulation. This is the first mouse model of CHARGE syndrome reported to show otitis media with effusion and it will be valuable for studying the etiology of otitis media and other symptoms in CHARGE syndrome. PMID:22539951

  20. Periventricular heterotopia in a boy with interstitial deletion of chromosome 4p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik-Kuklinska, Katarzyna; Wierzba, Jolanta; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Iliszko, Mariola; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Dubaniewicz-Wybieralska, Miroslawa; Limon, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    We report on a 4-year-old boy with a proximal interstitial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 4p with the karyotype 46,XY,del(4)(p14p15.32),inv(9)(p13q13). For a precise delineation of the deleted region, an array-based comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) analysis was performed. The proband's phenotype and cytogenetic findings are compared with previously reported cases with proximal 4p deletion syndrome. The syndrome is associated with normal growth, varying degrees of mental retardation, characteristic facial appearance and minor dysmorphic features. Additionally, our patient developed a seizure disorder due to abnormal neuronal migration, i.e., periventricular heterotopia.