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Sample records for williams mountain arizona

  1. 76 FR 22363 - Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain Restoration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... best available science, the Forest Supervisor will decide: Whether to select the proposed action or one... Forest Service Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact...

  2. Aquarious Mountain Area, Arizona: APossible HDR Prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, F.G.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1979-05-01

    Exploration for Hot Dry Rock (HDR) requires the ability to delineate areas of thermal enhancement. It is likely that some of these areas will exhibit various sorts of anomalous conditions such as seismic transmission delays, low seismic velocities, high attenuation of seismic waves, high electrical conductivity in the crust, and a relatively shallow depth to Curie point of Magnetization. The Aquarius Mountain area of northwest Arizona exhibits all of these anomalies. The area is also a regional Bouguer gravity low, which may indicate the presence of high silica type rocks that often have high rates of radioactive heat generation. The one deficiency of the area as a HDR prospect is the lack of a thermal insulating blanket.

  3. Arizona/New Mexico Mountains Ecoregion: Chapter 10 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlman, Jana; Gass, Leila; Middleton, Barry

    2012-01-01

    As the name suggests, the Arizona/New Mexico Mountains Ecoregion includes much of the mountainous regions of these two states, plus a very small part in the Guadalupe Mountains of northwestern Texas. Several isolated areas of higher terrain in Arizona and New Mexico are also included in the ecoregion, which occupies approximately 108,432 km2 (41,866 mi2) (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997). The ecoregion is bounded on the south by the Sonoran Basin and Range, Madrean Archipelago, and Chihuahuan Deserts Ecoregions; to the north, the ecoregion is both bounded and surrounded by the Arizona/New Mexico Plateau Ecoregion (fig. 1). The ecoregion encompasses the largest contiguous ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest in the United States (Strom and Fulé, 2007), which stretches from Williams, Arizona, along the Mogollon Rim, Arizona, into southwestern New Mexico, north and west of Silver City, New Mexico.

  4. Geothermal Potential of Marine Corps Air Station, Yuma, Arizona, and the Western Portion of Luke-Williams Gunnery Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Domes in the Northern Part of the Gulf of California," in Symposia on the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Baja California, Mexico, Comision Federal de...Laboratory, August 1979. LA-7953-MS. 22 pp. 10. J. de Boer. "Paleomagnetism of the Quaternary Cerro Prieto , Crater Elegante, and Salton Buttes Volcanic...NWC TP 6827 S Geothermal Potential of Marine Corps Air Station, Yuma, Arizona, and the Western Portion of Luke-Williams Gunnery Range by Steven C

  5. Changes in forest species composition and structure after stand-replacing wildfire in the mountains of southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald D. Quinn; Lin Wu

    2005-01-01

    A wildfire in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona apparently altered the long-term structure of the forest. The pre-fire canopy forest, which had not burned for 100 years, was an even mixture of Arizona pines and Rocky Mountain Douglas-firs. A decade later the new forest was numerically dominated by quaking aspen seedlings in clumps separated by persistent...

  6. Effects of experimental floods on riparian and aquatic ecosystems: Bill Williams River, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafroth, P. B.; Andersen, D. C.; Wilcox, A. C.; Kui, L.; Stella, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Development of flow prescriptions for environmental purposes along rivers is relatively common, but implementation of these 'environmental flows' occurs infrequently. Implementation is critical for testing hypotheses relating flow regime to biotic response, which ultimately can inform adaptive flow management. We describe the development of flow prescriptions and evaluate responses of riparian vegetation, beaver dams, and associated aquatic habitat to experimental floods and intervening base flows associated with an environmental flow program on the Bill Williams River (BWR), in semiarid Arizona. First, we assessed effects of flow releases between 1993 and 2009 designed to favor the establishment and maintenance of native riparian trees (Populus and Salix) and disfavor an invasive, nonnative shrub (Tamarix spp.) downstream of Alamo Dam on the BWR. Our data are multi-scaled and include a several-decade assessment of changes to major vegetation types based on a time series of aerial photography, an assessment of species composition and abundance sampled in permanent vegetation quadrats, and targeted seedling surveys following experimental floods. Between 1993 and 2009, we observed significant increases in Populus and Salix forests and essentially no change in Tamarix. Experimental floods in 2006 and 2007 resulted in higher mortality of Tamarix seedlings than Salix. These results illustrate the potential for managing streamflow to influence riparian vegetation dynamics, including management of nonnative species. Second, we examined the role of beaver as ecosystem engineers in the BWR and linkages to flow releases between 2004 and 2013. Beaver convert lotic stream habitat to lentic through dam construction and maintenance during low flow periods, and the process is reversed when a flood or other event causes dam failure. We estimated the extent of lotic and beaver-created lentic (beaver pond) habitat along the BWR and related the likelihood of damage or destruction of

  7. Environmental Impact Statement, Auxiliary Airfield for Williams Air Force Base, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Barbara Hollway U.S. Department of the Interior Sen. Dennis DeConcini Bureau of Land Management 700 E. Jefferson, Room 200 5050 N. 19th Avenue, Suite...Helicopters OCTOBER 1989 C-4 TABLE OF CONTENTS AIRSPACE STUDY, WILLIAMS AIR FORCE BASE 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Objective of Report 1.2 History of Williams AFB...Designated Federal Airway VR Visual Route ZAB Three letter indentifier for Albuquerque Center G-6 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Objective of Report In 1986 Williams AFB

  8. Tectonic controls on large landslide complex: Williams Fork Mountains near Dillon, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    An extensive (~ 25 km2) landslide complex covers a large area on the west side of the Williams Fork Mountains in central Colorado. The complex is deeply weathered and incised, and in most places geomorphic evidence of sliding (breakaways, hummocky topography, transverse ridges, and lobate distal zones) are no longer visible, indicating that the main mass of the slide has long been inactive. However, localized Holocene reactivation of the landslide deposits is common above the timberline (at about 3300 m) and locally at lower elevations. Clasts within the complex, as long as several tens of meters, are entirely of crystalline basement (Proterozoic gneiss and granitic rocks) from the hanging wall of the Laramide (Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary), west-directed Williams Range thrust, which forms the western structural boundary of the Colorado Front Range. Late Cretaceous shale and sandstone compose most footwall rocks. The crystalline hanging-wall rocks are pervasively fractured or shattered, and alteration to clay minerals is locally well developed. Sackung structures (trenches or small-scale grabens and upslope-facing scarps) are common near the rounded crest of the range, suggesting gravitational spreading of the fractured rocks and oversteepening of the mountain flanks. Late Tertiary and Quaternary incision of the Blue River Valley, just west of the Williams Fork Mountains, contributed to the oversteepening. Major landslide movement is suspected during periods of deglaciation when abundant meltwater increased pore-water pressure in bedrock fractures. A fault-flexure model for the development of the widespread fracturing and weakening of the Proterozoic basement proposes that the surface of the Williams Range thrust contains a concave-downward flexure, the axis of which coincides approximately with the contact in the footwall between Proterozoic basement and mostly Cretaceous rocks. Movement of brittle, hanging-wall rocks through the flexure during Laramide

  9. Quaking aspen reproduce from seed after wildfire in the mountains of southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald D. Quinn; Lin Wu

    2001-01-01

    Quaking aspen regenerated from seed after a stand replacement wildfire in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona. The wildfire had created gaps in the canopy so that aspen were able to establish from seed. Seedlings were found at a mean density of 0.17 m-2, 30 m or more from the nearest potential seed trees. Six clumps of aspen seedlings contained 18-186...

  10. Sediment Transport in the Bill Williams River and Turbidity in Lake Havasu During and Following Two High Releases from Alamo Dam, Arizona, in 2005 and 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiele, Stephen M.; Hart, Robert J.; Darling, Hugh L.; Hautzinger, Andrew B.

    2009-01-01

    Discharges higher than are typically released from Alamo Dam in west-central Arizona were planned and released in 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 to study the effects of these releases on the Bill Williams River and Lake Havasu, into which the river debouches. Sediment concentrations and water discharges were measured in the Bill Williams River, and turbidity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen were measured in Lake Havasu during and after experimental releases in 2005 and 2006 from Alamo Dam. Data from such releases will support ongoing ecological studies, improve environmentally sensitive management of the river corridor, and support the development of a predictive relationship between the operation of Alamo Dam and downstream flows and their impact on Lake Havasu and the Colorado River. Elevated discharges in the Bill Williams River mobilize more sediment than during more typical dam operation and can generate a turbidity plume in Lake Havasu. The intakes for the Central Arizona Project, which transfers Colorado River water to central and southern Arizona, are near the mouth of the Bill Williams River. Measurement of the turbidity and the development of the plume over time consequently were important components of the study. In this report, the measurements of suspended sediment concentration and discharges in the Bill Williams River and of turbidity in Lake Havasu are presented along with calculations of silt and sand loads in the Bill Williams River. Sediment concentrations were varied and likely dependent on a variable supply. Sediment loads were calculated at the mouth of the river and near Planet, about 10 km upstream from the mouth for the 2005 release, and they indicate that a net increase in transport of silt and a net decrease in the transport of sand occurred in the reach between the two sites.

  11. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data report for Williams NTMS quadrangle, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.L.

    1979-02-01

    Wet and dry sediments were collected throughout the 18,500-km/sup 2/arid-to-semiarid region and water samples at available streams, springs, and wells. Samples were collected between August 1977 and January 1978. Results of neutron activation analyses of uranium and trace elements and other field and laboratory analyses are presented in tabular hardcopy and microfiche format. The report includes six full-size overlays for use with the Williams NTMS 1:250,000 quadrangle. Sediment samples are divided into five general groups according to the source rock from which the sediment was derived. Background uranium concentrations for the quadrangle are relatively low, ranging from 1.91 to 2.40 ppM, with the highest associated with the Precambrian igneous and metamorphic complexes of the Basin and Range province. Uranium correlates best with the rare-earth elements and iron, scandium, titanium, and manganese. Known uranium occurrences are not readily identified by the stream sediment data.

  12. Late Holocene geomorphic record of fire in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests, Kendrick Mountain, northern Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara E. Jenkins; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Diana E. Anderson; Darrell S. Kaufman; Philip A. Pearthree

    2011-01-01

    Long-term fire history reconstructions enhance our understanding of fire behaviour and associated geomorphic hazards in forested ecosystems. We used 14C ages on charcoal from fire-induced debris-flow deposits to date prehistoric fires on Kendrick Mountain, northern Arizona, USA. Fire-related debris-flow sedimentation dominates Holocene fan deposition in the study area...

  13. The Relationship Between Lithology and Slope Morphology in the Tucson Mountains, Arizona.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Khanchoul

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between lithology and slope morphology is investigated at eight sites on granitic, andesitic, andsedimentary hillslopes in the Tucson Mountains, Arizona. Several methods are used in the study. Topographic profi lesare constructed. Skewness indices, slope length, and mean slope angles of the different slope profi les are computed andcompared with each other. Debris size analysis has permitted for some profi les, the determination of hillfront/piedmontjunctions. The nature and structural characteristics of the bedrock are the ones that determine the hillslope morphologyin this semi-arid region. There are, as a matter of fact, variations in profi les on the same bedrock nature but differentlyexposed. More precise morphologic studies have been also done in comparing the different lithologic pairs. They havepermitted to show some similarities in shapes. The granitic-andesitic slopes and andesiic-sedimentary slopes are thebest comparisons which show the relationship between lithology and slope morphology. The granitic-sedimentary sloperelationship is shown in the hillfront concavities, mountain front and piedmont mean slope angles.

  14. Reconnaissance of beryl-bearing pegmatites in the Ruby Mountains, other areas in Nevada, and northwestern Mohave County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jerry Chipman; Hinrichs, E. Neal

    1957-01-01

    Pegmatite occurs widely in Nevada and northwestern Arizona, but little mining has been done for such pegmatite minerals as mica, feldspar, beryl, and lepidolite.  Reconnaissance for beryl-bearing pegmatite in Nevada and in part of Mohave County, Ariz., and detailed studies in the Dawley Canyon area, Elko County, Nev., have shown that beryl occurs in at least 11 districts in the region.  Muscovite has been prospected or mined in the Ruby Mountains and the Virgin Mountains, Nevada, and in Mohave County, Ariz.  Feldspar has been mined in the southern part of the region near Kingman, Ariz., and in Clark County, Nev.

  15. Medical and Indirect Costs Associated with a Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Epidemic in Arizona, 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Naomi A; Traeger, Marc S; McQuiston, Jennifer H; Williams, Velda; Hamilton, Charlene; Regan, Joanna J

    2015-09-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an emerging public health issue on some American Indian reservations in Arizona. RMSF causes an acute febrile illness that, if untreated, can cause severe illness, permanent sequelae requiring lifelong medical support, and death. We describe costs associated with medical care, loss of productivity, and death among cases of RMSF on two American Indian reservations (estimated population 20,000) between 2002 and 2011. Acute medical costs totaled more than $1.3 million. This study further estimated $181,100 in acute productivity lost due to illness, and $11.6 million in lifetime productivity lost from premature death. Aggregate costs of RMSF cases in Arizona 2002-2011 amounted to $13.2 million. We believe this to be a significant underestimate of the cost of the epidemic, but it underlines the severity of the disease and need for a more comprehensive study. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. Beryl-bearing pegmatites in the Ruby Mountains and other areas in Nevada and northwestern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jerry C.; Hinrichs, E. Neal

    1960-01-01

    Pegmatite occurs widely in Nevada and northwestern Arizona, but little mining has been done for such pegmatite minerals as mica, feldspar, beryl, and lepidolite. Reconnaissance for beryl-bearing pegmatite in Nevada and in part of Mohave County, Ariz., and detailed studies in the Dawley Canyon area, Elko County, Nev., have shown that beryl occurs in at least 11 districts in the region. Muscovite has been prospected or mined in the Ruby and Virgin Mountains, Nev., and in Mohave County, Ariz. Feldspar has been mined in the southern part of the region near Kingman, Ariz., and in Clark County, Nev. The pegmatites in the region range in age from Precambrian to late Mesozoic or Tertiary. Among the pegmatite minerals found or reported in the districts studied are beryl, chrysoberyl, scheelite, wolframite, garnet, tourmaline, fluorite, apatite, sphene, allanite, samarskite, euxenite, gadolinite, monazite, autunite, columbite-tantalite, lepidolite, molybdenite, and pyrite and other sulflde minerals. The principal beryl-bearing pegmatites examined are in the Oreana and Lakeview (Humboldt Canyon) areas, Pershing County; the Dawley Canyon area in the Ruby Mountains, Elko County, Nev.; and on the Hummingbird claims in the Virgin Mountains, Mohave County, Ariz. Beryl has also been reported in the Marietta district, Mineral County; the Sylvania district, Esmeralda County; near Crescent Peak and near Searchlight, Clark County, Nev.; and in the Painted Desert near Hoover Dam, Mohave County, Ariz. Pegmatites are abundant in the Ruby Mountains, chiefly north of the granite stock at Harrison Pass. In the Dawley Canyon area of 2.6 square miles at least 350 pegmatite dikes more than 1 foot thick were mapped, and beryl was found in small quantities in at least 100 of these dikes. Four of these dikes exceed 20 feet in thickness, and 1 is 55 feet thick. A few pegmatites were also examined in the Corral Creek, Gilbert Canyon, and Hankins Canyon areas in the Ruby Mountains.The pegmatite dikes

  17. Kaljujooniste keskus Arizonas / Andres Kurg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurg, Andres, 1975-

    1998-01-01

    Arhitekt William Bruderi projekteeritud kaljujooniste uurimis- ja eksponeerimiskeskus Phoenixis, Arizonas säilitab kivijooniseid, mille autoriteks olid sealset piirkonda kuni 16. sajandini asustanud hohokamid

  18. Proceedings of the 1977 Image Conference Held at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona on 17-18 May 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    unlimited. n -4 r ;nnin 2. 4; i um mm m mm i ’II 7b4b WILLIAMS CINEMA or WELCOM~E* THE 1977 IWElii ,~CONFERENCE U 18 MAY 17 (Vj pka NO UE BLN Colonel Carl...defining the front edges of each object. The vertices labeled VA ana VR are fixed, so a particular field-of-view utilizing this hood woul require...Williamston, North Carolina on April 18, 1931. He received the AB degree in Journalism from the University of North Carolina in 1953, the BS degree

  19. William L. Baker: Fire ecology in Rocky Mountain landscapes [book review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel. Yaussy

    2010-01-01

    Every so often, we need something to make us question our beliefs and views of the natural order of things, to open our minds to different versions of reality so that we become better informed and open to new avenues of thought. The author comes across as slightly antagonistic in his attempt to set the record straight concerning fires in the Rocky Mountains.

  20. Rocky mountain spotted fever characterization and comparison to similar illnesses in a highly endemic area-Arizona, 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger, Marc S; Regan, Joanna J; Humpherys, Dwight; Mahoney, Dianna L; Martinez, Michelle; Emerson, Ginny L; Tack, Danielle M; Geissler, Aimee; Yasmin, Seema; Lawson, Regina; Hamilton, Charlene; Williams, Velda; Levy, Craig; Komatsu, Kenneth; McQuiston, Jennifer H; Yost, David A

    2015-06-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) has emerged as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality since 2002 on tribal lands in Arizona. The explosive nature of this outbreak and the recognition of an unexpected tick vector, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, prompted an investigation to characterize RMSF in this unique setting and compare RMSF cases to similar illnesses. We compared medical records of 205 patients with RMSF and 175 with non-RMSF illnesses that prompted RMSF testing during 2002-2011 from 2 Indian reservations in Arizona. RMSF cases in Arizona occurred year-round and peaked later (July-September) than RMSF cases reported from other US regions. Cases were younger (median age, 11 years) and reported fever and rash less frequently, compared to cases from other US regions. Fever was present in 81% of cases but not significantly different from that in patients with non-RMSF illnesses. Classic laboratory abnormalities such as low sodium and platelet counts had small and subtle differences between cases and patients with non-RMSF illnesses. Imaging studies reflected the variability and complexity of the illness but proved unhelpful in clarifying the early diagnosis. RMSF epidemiology in this region appears different than RMSF elsewhere in the United States. No specific pattern of signs, symptoms, or laboratory findings occurred with enough frequency to consistently differentiate RMSF from other illnesses. Due to the nonspecific and variable nature of RMSF presentations, clinicians in this region should aggressively treat febrile illnesses and sepsis with doxycycline for suspected RMSF. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Terrestrial laser scanner data from the 2011 Horseshoe Two fire, Chiricahua Mountains, southeastern Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Point cloud data collected on a steep, severely burned hillslope below Barfoot Peak near Rustler Park in the Chiricahua Mountains, AZ. The data were collected June...

  2. Risk factors for fatal outcome from rocky mountain spotted Fever in a highly endemic area-Arizona, 2002-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Joanna J; Traeger, Marc S; Humpherys, Dwight; Mahoney, Dianna L; Martinez, Michelle; Emerson, Ginny L; Tack, Danielle M; Geissler, Aimee; Yasmin, Seema; Lawson, Regina; Williams, Velda; Hamilton, Charlene; Levy, Craig; Komatsu, Ken; Yost, David A; McQuiston, Jennifer H

    2015-06-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a disease that now causes significant morbidity and mortality on several American Indian reservations in Arizona. Although the disease is treatable, reported RMSF case fatality rates from this region are high (7%) compared to the rest of the nation (<1%), suggesting a need to identify clinical points for intervention. The first 205 cases from this region were reviewed and fatal RMSF cases were compared to nonfatal cases to determine clinical risk factors for fatal outcome. Doxycycline was initiated significantly later in fatal cases (median, day 7) than nonfatal cases (median, day 3), although both groups of case patients presented for care early (median, day 2). Multiple factors increased the risk of doxycycline delay and fatal outcome, such as early symptoms of nausea and diarrhea, history of alcoholism or chronic lung disease, and abnormal laboratory results such as elevated liver aminotransferases. Rash, history of tick bite, thrombocytopenia, and hyponatremia were often absent at initial presentation. Earlier treatment with doxycycline can decrease morbidity and mortality from RMSF in this region. Recognition of risk factors associated with doxycycline delay and fatal outcome, such as early gastrointestinal symptoms and a history of alcoholism or chronic lung disease, may be useful in guiding early treatment decisions. Healthcare providers should have a low threshold for initiating doxycycline whenever treating febrile or potentially septic patients from tribal lands in Arizona, even if an alternative diagnosis seems more likely and classic findings of RMSF are absent. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Late quaternary brown bear (Ursidae: Ursus cf. arctos) from a cave in the Huachuca Mountains, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas J. Czaplewski; Steve Willsey

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, Steve Willsey discovered the fragmentary cranium of a bear loose on the floor of a cave at about 2270 m elevation near the crest of the Huachuca Mountains. In 2009, we revisited the cave to examine the specimen with the intention of identifying the species. We photographed and measured the main pieces and left them in the cave. The skull is from an adult,...

  4. Geometry and kinematics of the eastern Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains, Nevada and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Sue; Campagna, David J.; Anderson, R. Ernest

    2010-01-01

    The Lake Mead fault system is a northeast-striking, 130-km-long zone of left-slip in the southeast Great Basin, active from before 16 Ma to Quaternary time. The northeast end of the Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains of southeast Nevada and northwest Arizona forms a partitioned strain field comprising kinematically linked northeast-striking left-lateral faults, north-striking normal faults, and northwest-striking right-lateral faults. Major faults bound large structural blocks whose internal strain reflects their position within a left step-over of the left-lateral faults. Two north-striking large-displacement normal faults, the Lakeside Mine segment of the South Virgin–White Hills detachment fault and the Piedmont fault, intersect the left step-over from the southwest and northeast, respectively. The left step-over in the Lake Mead fault system therefore corresponds to a right-step in the regional normal fault system.Within the left step-over, displacement transfer between the left-lateral faults and linked normal faults occurs near their junctions, where the left-lateral faults become oblique and normal fault displacement decreases away from the junction. Southward from the center of the step-over in the Virgin Mountains, down-to-the-west normal faults splay northward from left-lateral faults, whereas north and east of the center, down-to-the-east normal faults splay southward from left-lateral faults. Minimum slip is thus in the central part of the left step-over, between east-directed slip to the north and west-directed slip to the south. Attenuation faults parallel or subparallel to bedding cut Lower Paleozoic rocks and are inferred to be early structures that accommodated footwall uplift during the initial stages of extension.Fault-slip data indicate oblique extensional strain within the left step-over in the South Virgin Mountains, manifested as east-west extension; shortening is partitioned between vertical for extension-dominated structural

  5. Constraints on the tectonics of the Mule Mountains thrust system, southeast California and southwest Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosdal, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Mule Mountains thrust system crops out discontinuously over a 100-km-strike length in this Blythe-Quartzsite region. Along the thrust system, middle and upper crustal metamorphic and plutonic rocks of Proterozoic and Mesozoic age are thrust N-NE (015??-035??) over a lower plate metamorphic terrane. Stratigraphic, petrologic, and Pb isotopic ties for Jurassic granitoids and for Jurassic(?) and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks across the various parts of the thrust system indicate that related crustal blocks are superposed and preclude it from having large displacements. Deformation occurred under low greenschist facies metamorphic conditions in the upper crust. Movement along the thrust system was probably limited to no more than a few tens of kilometers and occurred between 79??2 Ma and 70??4 Ma. Results suggest that the thrust system forms the southern boundary of the narow zone of Cretaceous intracratonic deformation, and it is one of the last tectonic events in the zone prior to regional cooling. -from Author

  6. Migration of recharge waters downgradient from the Santa Catalina Mountains into the Tucson basin aquifer, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Erin E. B.; Long, Austin; Eastoe, Chris; Bassett, R. L.

    Aquifers in the arid alluvial basins of the southwestern U.S. are recharged predominantly by infiltration from streams and playas within the basins and by water entering along the margins of the basins. The Tucson basin of southeastern Arizona is such a basin. The Santa Catalina Mountains form the northern boundary of this basin and receive more than twice as much precipitation (ca. 700mm/year) as does the basin itself (ca. 300mm/year). In this study environmental isotopes were employed to investigate the migration of precipitation basinward through shallow joints and fractures. Water samples were obtained from springs and runoff in the Santa Catalina Mountains and from wells in the foothills of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Stable isotopes (δD and δ18O) and thermonuclear-bomb-produced tritium enabled qualitative characterization of flow paths and flow velocities. Stable-isotope measurements show no direct altitude effect. Tritium values indicate that although a few springs and wells discharge pre-bomb water, most springs discharge waters from the 1960s or later. Résumé La recharge des aquifères des bassins alluviaux arides du sud-ouest des États-Unis est assurée surtout à partir des lits des cours d'eau et des playas dans les bassins, ainsi que par l'eau entrant à la bordure de ces bassins. Le bassin du Tucson, dans le sud-est de l'Arizona, est l'un de ceux-ci. La chaîne montagneuse de Santa Catalina constitue la limite nord de ce bassin et reçoit plus de deux fois plus de précipitations (environ 700mm/an) que le bassin (environ 300mm/an). Dans cette étude, les isotopes du milieu ont été utilisés pour analyser le déplacement de l'eau de pluie vers le bassin au travers des fissures et des fractures proches de la surface. Des échantillons d'eau ont été prélevés dans les sources et dans l'écoulement de surface de la chaîne montagneuse et dans des puits au pied de la chaîne. Les isotopes stables (δD et δ18O) et le tritium d

  7. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A support group can be helpful for emotional support and for giving and receiving practical advice. The following organization provides additional information about Williams Syndrome: Williams Syndrome Association -- www.williams-syndrome.org

  8. Using LiDAR to evaluate forest landscapes and health factors and their relationship to habitat of the endangered Mount Graham red squirrel on the Coronado National Forest, Pinaleno Mountains, Arizona [Chap. 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Anhold; Brent Mitchell; Craig Wilcox; Tom Mellin; Melissa Merrick; Ann Lynch; Mike Walterman; Donald Falk; John Koprowski; Denise Laes; Don Evans; Haans. Fisk

    2015-01-01

    The Pinaleno Mountains in southeastern Arizona represent a Madrean sky island ecosystem that contains the southernmost expanse of spruce-fir forest type in North America. This ecosystem is also the last remaining habitat for the Mt. Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamenis), a federally listed endangered species. Due to a general shift in...

  9. Urban and community forests of the Mountain region: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Eric J. Greenfield

    2010-01-01

    This report details how land cover and urbanization vary within the states of Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming by community (incorporated and census designated places), county subdivision, and county. Specifically this report provides critical urban and community forestry information for each state including human population...

  10. Developing a monitoring program for bird populations in the Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona, using citizen observers: Initial stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph L Ganey; Jose M. Iniguez; Jamie S. Sanderlin; William M. Block

    2017-01-01

    The Madrean Sky Island region is an ecologically important area harboring exceptional biodiversity, including a unique avifauna that supports a thriving ecotourism industry in southeastern Arizona. This area has been impacted by several large wildfires in recent decades. These wildfires have altered vegetation composition and structure in forests and woodlands, and the...

  11. Chapter I: Geology of a Middle Tertiary Clay Deposit in thePatagonia Mountains near Harshaw, Santa Cruz County, Southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Brenda B.

    2005-01-01

    A middle Tertiary rhyolite tuff on the northeast side of the Patagonia Mountains in Santa Cruz County, southeastern Arizona contains lenses of calcareous low-swelling montmorillonite clay, as much as 10 to 15 m thick. The presence of the tuff has been known for years, but the clay has not been described previously. The clay lenses, which are virtually silt- and sand-free, were probably formed by diagenetic alteration of fairly clean ash-fall-tuff beds. In preliminary tests, the clay exhibited only about 9 percent shrinkage on drying and about 1 percent shrinkage on firing. Cracking and distortion were minimal in both drying and firing. Further testing needs to be done on the clay to determine its suitability as a specialty clay or as an additive to other clays.

  12. Ground-Dwelling Arthropod Communities of a Sky Island Mountain Range in Southeastern Arizona, USA: Obtaining a Baseline for Assessing the Effects of Climate Change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace M Meyer

    Full Text Available The few studies that have addressed past effects of climate change on species distributions have mostly focused on plants due to the rarity of historical faunal baselines. However, hyperdiverse groups like Arthropoda are vital to monitor in order to understand climate change impacts on biodiversity. This is the first investigation of ground-dwelling arthropod (GDA assemblages along the full elevation gradient of a mountain range in the Madrean Sky Island Region, establishing a baseline for monitoring future changes in GDA biodiversity. To determine how GDA assemblages relate to elevation, season, abiotic variables, and corresponding biomes, GDA were collected for two weeks in both spring (May and summer (September 2011 in the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona, using pitfall traps at 66 sites in six distinct upland (non-riparian/non-wet canyon biomes. Four arthropod taxa: (1 beetles (Coleoptera, (2 spiders (Araneae, (3 grasshoppers and crickets (Orthoptera, and (4 millipedes and centipedes (Myriapoda were assessed together and separately to determine if there are similar patterns across taxonomic groups. We collected 335 species of GDA: 192/3793 (species/specimens Coleoptera, 102/1329 Araneae, 25/523 Orthoptera, and 16/697 Myriapoda. GDA assemblages differed among all biomes and between seasons. Fifty-three percent (178 species and 76% (254 species of all GDA species were found in only one biome and during only one season, respectively. While composition of arthropod assemblages is tied to biome and season, individual groups do not show fully concordant patterns. Seventeen percent of the GDA species occurred only in the two highest-elevation biomes (Pine and Mixed Conifer Forests. Because these high elevation biomes are most threatened by climate change and they harbor a large percentage of unique arthropod species (11-25% depending on taxon, significant loss in arthropod diversity is likely in the Santa Catalina Mountains and other isolated

  13. Ground-Dwelling Arthropod Communities of a Sky Island Mountain Range in Southeastern Arizona, USA: Obtaining a Baseline for Assessing the Effects of Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Wallace M; Eble, Jeffrey A; Franklin, Kimberly; McManus, Reilly B; Brantley, Sandra L; Henkel, Jeff; Marek, Paul E; Hall, W Eugene; Olson, Carl A; McInroy, Ryan; Bernal Loaiza, Emmanuel M; Brusca, Richard C; Moore, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The few studies that have addressed past effects of climate change on species distributions have mostly focused on plants due to the rarity of historical faunal baselines. However, hyperdiverse groups like Arthropoda are vital to monitor in order to understand climate change impacts on biodiversity. This is the first investigation of ground-dwelling arthropod (GDA) assemblages along the full elevation gradient of a mountain range in the Madrean Sky Island Region, establishing a baseline for monitoring future changes in GDA biodiversity. To determine how GDA assemblages relate to elevation, season, abiotic variables, and corresponding biomes, GDA were collected for two weeks in both spring (May) and summer (September) 2011 in the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona, using pitfall traps at 66 sites in six distinct upland (non-riparian/non-wet canyon) biomes. Four arthropod taxa: (1) beetles (Coleoptera), (2) spiders (Araneae), (3) grasshoppers and crickets (Orthoptera), and (4) millipedes and centipedes (Myriapoda) were assessed together and separately to determine if there are similar patterns across taxonomic groups. We collected 335 species of GDA: 192/3793 (species/specimens) Coleoptera, 102/1329 Araneae, 25/523 Orthoptera, and 16/697 Myriapoda. GDA assemblages differed among all biomes and between seasons. Fifty-three percent (178 species) and 76% (254 species) of all GDA species were found in only one biome and during only one season, respectively. While composition of arthropod assemblages is tied to biome and season, individual groups do not show fully concordant patterns. Seventeen percent of the GDA species occurred only in the two highest-elevation biomes (Pine and Mixed Conifer Forests). Because these high elevation biomes are most threatened by climate change and they harbor a large percentage of unique arthropod species (11-25% depending on taxon), significant loss in arthropod diversity is likely in the Santa Catalina Mountains and other isolated

  14. Spruce aphid, Elatobium abietinum (Walker): Life history and damage to Engelmann spruce in the Pinaleno Mountains, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann M. Lynch

    2009-01-01

    Spruce aphid is an exotic insect recently introduced to the Pinaleno Mountains. It feeds on dormant Engelmann spruce, and possible effects include tree-growth suppression, tree mortality, and reduction in seed and cone production. Potential longer-term effects include changes in forest structure and species composition - primarily through reduction in Engelmann spruce...

  15. Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina M. Rochefort; Laurie L. Kurth; Tara W. Carolin; Robert R. Mierendorf; Kimberly Frappier; David L. Steenson

    2006-01-01

    This chapter concentrates on subalpine parklands and alpine meadows of southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and western Montana. These areas lie on the flanks of several mountain ranges including the Olympics, the Cascades of Oregon and Washington, and the Coast Mountains in British Columbia.

  16. The white-margined penstemon (Penstemon albomarginatus Jones), a rare Mohave Desert species, and the Hualapai Mountains land exchange in Mohave County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Anderson

    2001-01-01

    The white-margined penstemon (Penstemon albomarginatus Jones) is a rare Mohave Desert species with an unusual tripartite distribution with disjunct localities in Arizona, California, and Nevada. The Arizona population is the largest single population occurring with a range of 15 miles by 5 miles in Dutch Flat near Yucca, Arizona in Mohave County. The land ownership...

  17. Fire severity, size, and climate associations diverge from historical precedent along an ecological gradient in the Pinaleno Mountains, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher D. O' Connor; Donald A. Falk; Ann M. Lynch; Thomas W. Swetnam

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades fire size and severity have been increasing in high elevation forests of the American Southwest. Ecological outcomes of these increases are difficult to gauge without an historical context for the role of fire in these systems prior to interruption by Euro-American land uses. Across the gradient of forest types in the Pinaleño Mountains, a Sky Island...

  18. Post-wildfire landscape change and erosional processes from repeat terrestrial lidar in a steep headwater catchment, Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Youberg, Ann M.; DeLong, Whitney M.; Murphy, Brendan P.

    2018-01-01

    Flooding and erosion after wildfires present increasing hazard as climate warms, semi-arid lands become drier, population increases, and the urban interface encroaches farther into wildlands. We quantify post-wildfire erosion in a steep, initially unchannelized, 7.5 ha headwater catchment following the 2011 Horseshoe 2 Fire in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona. Using time-lapse cameras, rain gauges, and repeat surveys by terrestrial laser scanner, we quantify the response of a burned landscape to subsequent precipitation events. Repeat surveys provide detailed pre-and post-rainfall measurements of landscape form associated with a range of weather events. The first post-fire precipitation led to sediment delivery equivalent to 0.017 m of erosion from hillslopes and 0.12 m of erosion from colluvial hollows. Volumetrically, 69% of sediment yield was generated from hillslope erosion and 31% was generated from gully channel establishment in colluvial hollows. Processes on hillslopes included erosion by extensive shallow overland flow, formation of rills and gullies, and generation of sediment-laden flows and possibly debris flows. Subsequent smaller rain events caused ongoing hillslope erosion and local deposition and erosion in gullies. Winter freeze-thaw led to soil expansion, likely related to frost-heaving, causing a net centimeter-scale elevation increase across soil-mantled slopes. By characterizing landscape form, the properties of near-surface materials, and measuring both precipitation and landscape change, we can improve our empirical understanding of landscape response to environmental forcing. This detailed approach to studying landscape response to wildfires may be useful in the improvement of predictive models of flood, debris flow and sedimentation hazards used in post-wildfire response assessments and land management, and may help improve process-based models of landscape evolution.

  19. Post-wildfire landscape change and erosional processes from repeat terrestrial lidar in a steep headwater catchment, Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Youberg, Ann M.; DeLong, Whitney M.; Murphy, Brendan P.

    2018-01-01

    Flooding and erosion after wildfires present increasing hazard as climate warms, semi-arid lands become drier, population increases, and the urban interface encroaches farther into wildlands. We quantify post-wildfire erosion in a steep, initially unchannelized, 7.5 ha headwater catchment following the 2011 Horseshoe 2 Fire in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona. Using time-lapse cameras, rain gauges, and repeat surveys by terrestrial laser scanner, we quantify the response of a burned landscape to subsequent precipitation events. Repeat surveys provide detailed pre-and post-rainfall measurements of landscape form associated with a range of weather events. The first post-fire precipitation led to sediment delivery equivalent to 0.017 m of erosion from hillslopes and 0.12 m of erosion from colluvial hollows. Volumetrically, 69% of sediment yield was generated from hillslope erosion and 31% was generated from gully channel establishment in colluvial hollows. Processes on hillslopes included erosion by extensive shallow overland flow, formation of rills and gullies, and generation of sediment-laden flows and possibly debris flows. Subsequent smaller rain events caused ongoing hillslope erosion and local deposition and erosion in gullies. Winter freeze-thaw led to soil expansion, likely related to frost-heaving, causing a net centimeter-scale elevation increase across soil-mantled slopes. By characterizing landscape form, the properties of near-surface materials, and measuring both precipitation and landscape change, we can improve our empirical understanding of landscape response to environmental forcing. This detailed approach to studying landscape response to wildfires may be useful in the improvement of predictive models of flood, debris flow and sedimentation hazards used in post-wildfire response assessments and land management, and may help improve process-based models of landscape evolution.

  20. Temporal and spatial distribution of alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusions in the transitional high-sulfidation epithermal-porphyry copper system at Red Mountain, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar; Newton, M. Claiborne; Westman, Erik C.; Kamilli, Robert J.; Canby, Vertrees M.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Red Mountain, Arizona, is a Laramide porphyry Cu system (PCD) that has experienced only a modest level of erosion compared to most other similar deposits in the southwestern United States. As a result, the upper portion of the magmatic–hydrothermal system, which represents the transition from shallower high-sulfidation epithermal mineralization to deeper porphyry Cu mineralization, is well preserved. Within the Red Mountain system, alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusion assemblages show a systematic distribution in both time and space. Early-potassic alteration (characterized by the minerals biotite and magnetite) is paragenetically earlier than late-potassic alteration (K-feldspar–anhydrite) and both are followed by later phyllic (sericite–pyrite) alteration. Advanced argillic alteration (pyrophyllite–alunite–other clay minerals) is thought to be coeval with or postdate phyllic alteration. Minerals characteristic of advanced argillic alteration are present in the near surface. Phyllic alteration extends to greater depths compared to advanced argillic alteration. Early-potassic and late-potassic alteration are only observed in the deepest part of the system. Considerable overlap of phyllic alteration with both early-potassic and late-potassic alteration zones is observed. The hypogene mineralization contains 0.4–1.2% Cu and is spatially and temporally related to the late-potassic alteration event. Molybdenum concentration is typically In the deepest part of the system, an early generation of low-to-moderate density and salinity liquid + vapor inclusions with opaque daughter minerals is followed in time by halite-bearing inclusions that also contain opaque daughter minerals indicating that an early intermediate-density magmatic fluid evolved to a high-density, high-salinity mineralizing fluid. The increase in density and salinity of fluids with time observed in the deeper parts of the system may be the result of immiscibility (“boiling”) of

  1. Assessment of planetary geologic mapping techniques for Mars using terrestrial analogs: The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.L.; Skinner, J.A.; Crumpler, L.S.; Dohm, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We photogeologically mapped the SP Mountain region of the San Francisco Volcanic Field in northern Arizona, USA to evaluate and improve the fidelity of approaches used in geologic mapping of Mars. This test site, which was previously mapped in the field, is chiefly composed of Late Cenozoic cinder cones, lava flows, and alluvium perched on Permian limestone of the Kaibab Formation. Faulting and folding has deformed the older rocks and some of the volcanic materials, and fluvial erosion has carved drainage systems and deposited alluvium. These geologic materials and their formational and modificational histories are similar to those for regions of the Martian surface. We independently prepared four geologic maps using topographic and image data at resolutions that mimic those that are commonly used to map the geology of Mars (where consideration was included for the fact that Martian features such as lava flows are commonly much larger than their terrestrial counterparts). We primarily based our map units and stratigraphic relations on geomorphology, color contrasts, and cross-cutting relationships. Afterward, we compared our results with previously published field-based mapping results, including detailed analyses of the stratigraphy and of the spatial overlap and proximity of the field-based vs. remote-based (photogeologic) map units, contacts, and structures. Results of these analyses provide insights into how to optimize the photogeologic mapping of Mars (and, by extension, other remotely observed planetary surfaces). We recommend the following: (1) photogeologic mapping as an excellent approach to recovering the general geology of a region, along with examination of local, high-resolution datasets to gain insights into the complexity of the geology at outcrop scales; (2) delineating volcanic vents and lava-flow sequences conservatively and understanding that flow abutment and flow overlap are difficult to distinguish in remote data sets; (3) taking care to

  2. Arizona transportation history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The Arizona transportation history project was conceived in anticipation of Arizonas centennial, which will be : celebrated in 2012. Following approval of the Arizona Centennial Plan in 2007, the Arizona Department of : Transportation (ADOT) recog...

  3. Scallopleaf sage (salvia vaseyi: Lamiaceae) discovered in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, J.W.; Felger, R.S.; Jansen, B.D.; Krausman, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    During the course of field work in Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge, southwestern Arizona, in 2003, James Cain and Brian Jansen collected Salvia vaseyi, previously known only from the western edge of the Sonoran Desert in California and Baja California. Our findings indicate this shrub might be more widespread in southwestern Arizona mountains. Salvia vaseyi in Arizona seems to represent a relict population. There are other shrubby Salvia in Arizona, but S. vaseyi is the most xeric-mhabiting species and has the narrowest ecological and geographical range.

  4. Return of the Tarahumara frog to Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    James C. Rorabaugh; Stephen F. Hale; Michael J. Sredl; Craig Ivanyi

    2005-01-01

    The last wild Tarahumara frog (Rana tarahumarae) in Arizona was found dead in Big Casa Blanca Canyon, Santa Rita Mountains, in May 1983. However, the species is still well represented in the majority of its range in the northern Sierra Madre Occidental and adjacent Sky Islands of Sonora and Chihuahua. Plans to re-establish R. tarahumarae...

  5. Laramide alteration of proterozoic diabase: A likely contributor of copper to porphyry systems in the dripping spring mountains area, Southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    Proterozoic diabase of the Dripping Spring range occurs as sills in the Proterozoic Apache Group and the Troy Quartzite and as intrusive sheets in basement rocks. The aggregate thickness of the diabase sills and intrusive sheets averages about 450 m in the part of the range showing little mid-Tertiary extension. Laramide alteration is of two types, dominated by chlorite and actinolite, respectively, and formed mostly from clinopyroxene. Actinolite-dominated assemblages are higher in Na and Ca. Hydrothermal biotite is common in the central areas of both alteration types. Laramide alteration forms two distribution patterns: a subequant pattern centered on Laramide intrusions and small porphyry deposits, characterized by actinolitic alteration, and a more extensive branching linear pattern that follows Laramide structures, centered on the larger Ray porphyry deposit, extending toward other Laramide districts and showing both alteration types. Alteration has apparently mobilized copper and other metals from diabase. The freshest diabase samples average about 120 ppm copper with little variation. In chloritic alteration, about 100 ppm of this copper is expelled in the most completely altered rocks. In actinolitic alteration, diabase may either gain or lose copper during alteration. Chloritic alteration constitutes roughly 70 percent of the diabase alteration in the study area, where alteration averages 41 percent complete. This implies liberation of about 9 ?? 106 tons (t) copper from diabase alteration, significantly less than the 16 ?? 106 t copper in Laramide mineral deposits of the superdistrict (Ray, Superior, Chilito, Christmas). However, diabase alteration may have been a significant component of the supply of copper to the Laramide mineral districts of the area. Synmineral magmatic sources of copper are not documented in this area. The distribution of Proterozoic diabase coincides with the central part of the southeastern Arizona copper province, which may thus

  6. The San Franciscan volcanic field, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Henry Hollister

    1913-01-01

    LOCATION OF AREAThe San Franciscan volcanic field, which takes its name from San Francisco Mountain, the largest volcano of the group, covers about 3,000 square miles in the north-central part of Arizona, as shown by the shaded space on the index map forming figure 1. The center of the field lies about 50 miles south of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado and the southern boundary is in part coterminous with that of the San Francisco Plateau, which forms the southwestern division of the great Colorado Plateau.The region is easily reached, for the main line of the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe Railway traverses it from east to west for more than 60 miles. Flagstaff, a town of 1,500 inhabitants 10 miles south of the summit of San Francisco Mountain, is on the railroad, amid a branch line runs from Williams, 34 miles farther west, to the Grand Canyon. All the more important points of interest in the field may be reached without difficulty by wagon, and outfits may be obtained at Flagstaff.OUTLINE OF THE REPORTThis report deals primarily with the volcanic phenomena of the region as determined in the field and laboratory. Chapter I contains a brief description of the geography of the field and Chapter II is devoted largely to the sedimentary formations and structure. The rest of the report Chapters III to VI—treats entirely of the various features of the volcanoes and igneous rocks, both individually and collectively. Detailed descriptions of the volcanoes and lava fields are given in Chapter III; the volcanic history of the region and its correlation with the general history of the surrounding country are presented in Chapter IV. These two chapters will presumably suffice for the general reader who may desire to become acquainted with the broader volcanic features of the region. Chapter V (Petrography) is devoted entirely to the detailed description of the individual igneous rocks of the region, as represented by a selected set of type specimens. In Chapter VI (Petrology

  7. Ecoregions of Arizona (poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Glenn E.; Omernik, James M.; Johnson, Colleen Burch; Turner, Dale S.

    2014-01-01

    Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources; they are designed to serve as a spatial framework for the research, assessment, management, and monitoring of ecosystems and ecosystem components. By recognizing the spatial differences in the capacities and potentials of ecosystems, ecoregions stratify the environment by its probable response to disturbance. These general purpose regions are critical for structuring and implementing ecosystem management strategies across federal agencies, state agencies, and nongovernment organizations that are responsible for different types of resources within the same geographical areas. The Arizona ecoregion map was compiled at a scale of 1:250,000. It revises and subdivides an earlier national ecoregion map that was originally compiled at a smaller scale. The approach used to compile this map is based on the premise that ecological regions can be identified through the analysis of the spatial patterns and the composition of biotic and abiotic phenomena that affect or reflect differences in ecosystem quality and integrity. These phenomena include geology, physiography, vegetation, climate, soils, land use, wildlife, and hydrology. The relative importance of each characteristic varies from one ecological region to another regardless of the hierarchical level. A Roman numeral hierarchical scheme has been adopted for different levels of ecological regions. Level I is the coarsest level, dividing North America into 15 ecological regions. Level II divides the continent into 50 regions. At level III, the continental United States contains 105 ecoregions and the conterminous United States has 85 ecoregions. Level IV is a further subdivision of level III ecoregions. Arizona contains arid deserts and canyonlands, semiarid shrub- and grass-covered plains, woodland- and shrubland-covered hills, lava fields and volcanic plateaus, forested mountains, glaciated

  8. william dejong-lambert

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. WILLIAM DEJONG-LAMBERT. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 96 Issue 5 November 2017 pp 837-844 HALDANE AT 125. J. B. S. Haldane and LyseHkOvwiHa (Lysenkovschina) · WILLIAM DEJONG-LAMBERT · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF ...

  9. William Brickman, Master Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swing, Elizabeth Sherman

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her encounter and relationship with William Brickman as her master teacher. William Brickman was her professor, her dissertation advisor, her mentor, and her friend. Her pursuit of a Ph.D. in late middle age may have seemed strange to friends, family, and some of her professors, but not to Brickman. She enrolled…

  10. William Henry Perkin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. William Henry Perkin. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 15 Issue 9 September 2010 pp 856-859 Classics. Dyeing Fabrics · William Henry Perkin · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  11. D F Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. D F Williams. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 28 Issue 3-4 June-August 2003 pp 563-574. Biomaterials and tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery · D F Williams · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. This paper provides an account of the rationale for the development of implantable ...

  12. Conversations with John Williams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jack

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the views of John Williams, Hollywood's premier composer, who has written more than 300 scores, about the future of classical and film music. A gregarious person in a field requiring monklike isolation, Williams values the "association with the soloists, and the wonderful inspiration from players." His…

  13. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1: Records Search, Williams AFB, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    activities. Project Manager/Engineer for over 25 industrial projects including iron and steel, industrial coke, distillery, tannery , poultry, meat...Review 4-2 Industrial Operations (Shops) 4-3 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) SECTION 4 Hazardous Waste Storage 4-12 (Continued) Waste Oil Management 4...LIST - INDUSTRIAL SHOPS E-1 APPENDIX F PHOTOGRAPHS F-i APPENDIX G USAF INSTALLATION RESTORATION PROGRAM HAZARD G-1 ASSESSMENT RATING METHODOLOGY 4u

  14. Habitat associations of birds and herpetofauna in southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    William M. Block; Kieth E. Severson

    1992-01-01

    The mountains of southeastern Arizona support a large diversity of vegetative plant communities ranging from grassland and desert scrub to spruce-fir forests. These vegetation types provide appropriate conditions for a number of species of vertebrates. Although vertebrates have been the subject of numerous studies in this region, most studies were restricted to one...

  15. Bragg, Prof. William Henry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1935 Honorary. Bragg, Prof. William Henry Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1915. Date of birth: 2 July 1862. Date of death: 10 March 1972 ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  16. Bridgman, Prof. Percy Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bridgman, Prof. Percy Williams Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1946. Date of birth: 21 April 1882. Date of death: 20 August 1961. YouTube; Twitter ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  17. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1964 Honorary. Anderson, Prof. Basil Williams. Date of birth: 3 July 1901. Date of death: 24 February 1984. YouTube ... Posted on 21 December 2017. ASTROPHYSICS: An Observational View of the Universe. Math Art and Design: MAD about Math, Math Education and Outreach. Math and Finance ...

  18. William Donald Hamilton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Page 1. CPMGlKAlBGE-34OI2001. Licenced to post WPP(E) No.6. Resonance - April 2001. William Donald Hamilton. (1936 - 2000). Registered with Registrar of Newspapers in India vide Regn. No. 66273/96. ISSN 0971-8044.

  19. Bako, William Gwari

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bako, William Gwari. Vol 5, No 2 (2016) - Articles Woven sculptural piece as added dimension to textile design. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2346-7126. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use ...

  20. Florence Jessie Mac Williams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CPMGIKAlBGE-340/2003-05. Resonance - January 2005. Licenced to post WPP No.6 RT Nagar Postoffice. Florence Jessie Mac Williams. (1917 - 1990). Registered with Registrar of Newspapers in India vide Regn. No. 66273/96. ISSN 0971-8044. Price per copy: Rs 40.

  1. MacWilliams Identities?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. MacWilliams Identities? Madhu Sudan. Classroom Volume 10 Issue 1 January ... Author Affiliations. Madhu Sudan1. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachussetts Institute of Technology, MA 02139-4307, USA ...

  2. David Owen WILLIAMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Lidy Williams-Oonk and her children Mark & Marietta, being unable to thank everybody individually, would like to express their sincere thanks to friends and colleagues at CERN and abroad for their great help and support, their messages and flowers, as well as their donations to the Ligue Genevoise contre le Cancer, on the death of their beloved husband and father.

  3. Preliminary assessment of species richness and avian community dynamics in the Madrean Sky Islands, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamie S. Sanderlin; William M. Block; Joseph L. Ganey; Jose M. Iniguez

    2013-01-01

    The Sky Island mountain ranges of southeastern Arizona contain a unique and rich avifaunal community, including many Neotropical migratory species whose northern breeding range extends to these mountains along with many species typical of similar habitats throughout western North America. Understanding ecological factors that influence species richness and biological...

  4. William Henry Bragg (1862-1942) William Lawrence Bragg (1890 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 12. William Henry Bragg (1862-1942) William Lawrence Bragg (1890-1971). Featured Scientist Volume 19 Issue 12 December 2014 pp 1210-1210. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. First report of the white pine blister rust pathogen, Cronartium ribicola, in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. L. Fairweather; Brian Geils

    2011-01-01

    White pine blister rust, caused by Cronartium ribicola J.C. Fisch., was found on southwestern white pine (Pinus flexilis James var. reflexa Engelm., synonym P. strobiformis Engelm.) near Hawley Lake, Arizona (Apache County, White Mountains, 34.024°N, 109.776°W, elevation 2,357 m) in April 2009. Although white pines in the Southwest (Arizona and New Mexico) have been...

  6. Baboquivari Mountain plants: Identification, ecology, and ethnobotany [Book Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemary L. Pendleton

    2011-01-01

    The Sky Islands of southern Arizona and northwestern Mexico make up a region that is rich, both biologically and culturally. These isolated mountain ranges, separated by desert "seas," contain a unique and diverse flora and have long been home to indigenous peoples of the southwestern US. This book, Baboquivari Mountain Plants: Identification, Ecology, and...

  7. Entrevista com William Uricchio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uricchio, William

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available William Uricchio é professor e diretor do Programa de Mídias Comparadas do Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT e professor de História das Mídias Comparadas da Universidade de Utrecht. O pesquisador, referência em estudos sobre mídia e cultura, participou como conferencista no XI Seminário Internacional da Comunicação da PUCRS, quando concedeu uma entrevista exclusiva a Sessões do Imaginário. O evento abordava os cem anos de Marshall McLuhan, assim, aproveitamos a ocasião para abordar algumas questões sobre as idéias deste teórico dos meios de comunicação, além de outros temas que são referencia nos estudos do professor Uricchio

  8. William Herschel and Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Woodruff

    2018-01-01

    I examine the observational and theoretical researches of William Herschel on 21 comets that he observed over the period 1781 to 1812. Herschel's focus, unlike most contemporaries, was on their physical structure, not their orbits. He forged a strong connection between comets and his nebulae with a scheme of cometary "maturation" (1812) involved a comet traveling from star to star after its central "planetary body'; was born from gravitational collapse of a nebula. During close passages of a star, the comet brightened and lost mass from its atmosphere; at other times, when between stars, it encountered nebulae and was rejuvenated by picking up more mass. Laplace soon adopted these ideas to improve his nebula hypothesis for solar system formation.

  9. The Virtual Arizona Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.; Davis, R.; Conway, F. M.; Bellasai, R.

    2012-12-01

    To commemorate the once-in-a-lifetime event of Arizona's hundredth birthday, the Centennial Commission and the Governor of Arizona envisioned a museum and companion website that would capture the state's history, celebrate its people, and embrace its future. Working with world-renowned museum designers, the state began to seek ideas from across Arizona to create plans for a journey of discovery through science and the humanities. The museum would introduce visitors to some of the people who nurtured the state through its early years and others who are innovating its tomorrows. Showcases would include the resources and experiences that shaped the state's history and are transforming its present day, highlighting the ingenuity that tamed the wild frontier and is envisioning Arizona's next frontiers through science and technology. The Arizona Experience (www.arizonaexperience.org) was initially intended to serve as the web presence for the physical museum, but as delays occurred with the physical museum, the site has quickly developed an identify of its own as an interactive, multimedia experience, reaching a wider audience with functions that would be difficult or expensive to produce in a museum. As leaders in scientific and technological innovation in the state, the Arizona Geological Survey was tasked with designing and creating the Arizona Experience site. The general themes remain the same; however, the site has added content and applications that are better suited to the online environment in order to create a rich, dynamic supplement to a physical museum experience. The website offers the features and displays of the future museum with the interactive nature and learning environment of the web. This provides an encyclopedic overview of the State of Arizona by subject matter experts in a manner that is free and open to the public and erases socio-economic, political, and physical boundaries. Over the Centennial Year of 2012 the site will release a new theme and

  10. Introduction to the Arizona Sky Island Arthropod Project (ASAP): Systematics, biogeography, ecology, and population genetics of arthropods of the Madrean Sky Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy Moore; Wallace M. Meyer; Jeffrey A. Eble; Kimberly Franklin; John F. Wiens; Richard C. Brusca

    2013-01-01

    The Arizona Sky Island Arthropod Project (ASAP) is a new multi-disciplinary research program at the University of Arizona that combines systematics, biogeography, ecology, and population genetics to study origins and patterns of arthropod diversity along elevation gradients and among mountain ranges in the Madrean Sky Island Region. Arthropods represent taxonomically...

  11. Arizona motor vehicle crash facts, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-22

    This publication is an annual statistical review of the motor vehicle crashes in the State of Arizona for the calendar year 2010. The results are compiled from Arizona Traffic Accident Reports submitted to the Arizona Department of Transportation by ...

  12. Arizona motor vehicle crash facts, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-25

    This publication is an annual statistical review of the motor vehicle crashes in the State of Arizona for the calendar year 2008. : The results are compiled from Arizona Traffic Accident Reports submitted to the Arizona Department of Transportation b...

  13. Arizona motor vehicle crash facts, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-17

    This publication is an annual statistical review of the motor vehicle crashes in the State of Arizona for the calendar year 2007. : The results are compiled from Arizona Traffic Accident Reports submitted to the Arizona Department of Transportation b...

  14. Arizona motor vehicle crash facts, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This publication is an annual statistical review of the motor vehicle crashes in the State of Arizona for the calendar year 2014. The : results are compiled from Arizona Traffic Accident Reports submitted to the Arizona Department of Transportation b...

  15. Arizona motor vehicle crash facts, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-29

    This publication is a statistical review of the motor vehicle crashes in the State of Arizona for calendar year 2009. The results are compiled from Arizona Traffic Accident Reports submitted to the Arizona Department of Transportation by state, count...

  16. [William Harvey revisited ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood is often described as a product of the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century. Modern research has, however, shown thatHarvey followed the Aristotelian research tradition and thus tried to reveal the purpose of the organs through examination of various animals. His publication of 1628 has to be read as an argument of natural philosophy, or, more precisely, as a series of linked observations, experiments and philosophical reasonings from which the existence of circulation has to be deduced as a logical consequence. Harvey did not consider experiments as superior to philosophical reasoning nor intended he to create a new system of medicine. He believed in the vitality of the heart and the blood and rejected Francis Bacon's empirism and the mechanistic rationalism of Descartes. Harvey's contribution and originality lied less in his single observations and experiments but in the manner how he linked them with critical reasoning and how he accepted, presented and defended the ensuing radical findings.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... small, widely spaced, crooked, or missing. In older children and adults, the face appears longer and more gaunt. A form of cardiovascular disease called supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) occurs frequently in people with Williams syndrome . ...

  18. Community, Labour and Raymond Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, John

    1993-01-01

    Raymond Williams, a British adult educator, believed that community must be at the heart of education and that education must involve the primary organizations of the working class, such as trade unions, to be effective. (SK)

  19. Arizona Conserve Water Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This award-winning, 350-page, full-color book provides a thorough study of Arizona water resources from a water conservation perspective. Its background section contains maps, graphs, diagrams and photos that facilitate the teaching of 15 interactive, multi-disciplinary lessons to K-12 students. In addition, 10 Arizona case studies are highlighted…

  20. A new species of Clepsis Guenee, 1845 (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) from the Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clepsis sangreyana, new species, is described and illustrated from the “sky islands” (i.e., Chiricahua, Huachuca, and Santa Rita mountains) of southeastern Arizona, U.S.A. Superficially, it is most similar to Argyrotaenia dorsalana (Dyar, 1903), but it is assigned unambiguously to Clepsis Guenée on ...

  1. Debye, Prof. Peter Joseph William

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1938 Honorary. Debye, Prof. Peter Joseph William Nobel Laureate (Chemistry) - 1936. Date of birth: 24 March 1884. Date of death: 2 November 1966. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement ...

  2. Aderemi-Williams, R I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aderemi-Williams, R I. Vol 17, No 4 (2007) - Articles Community Pharmacies As Possible Centres For Routine Immunization Abstract. ISSN: 0189-2657. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  3. William Faulkner as History Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. Ben

    1976-01-01

    William Faulkner's novel "Absalom, Absalom!" is described as a valuable teaching resource for an introduction to the philosophy of history. At least six ways of viewing history are presented in the book, which is useful and motivating in helping students understand the complex nature of history. (AV)

  4. William Harvey and his gout.

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, F D

    1984-01-01

    In William Harvey's day almost any or every arthropathy was termed gout. This is evident in the case histories of some of his patients and in his own case, where his own cold water therapy would suggest the correct diagnosis was not gout but erythromelalgia (Weir Mitchell's disease).

  5. 33 CFR 167.1702 - In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1702 Section 167.1702 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... SEPARATION SCHEMES Description of Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1702 In Prince William Sound: Prince William Sound Traffic Separation Scheme. The Prince William Sound...

  6. Williams syndrome: a neuropsychological profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, G W; Roy, D L

    1988-03-01

    Seven children with Williams syndrome were seen for neuropsychological assessment. Their performances were compared with those obtained from a clinical control group matched for age, sex, and Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test Standard Score. The results support the view that children with Williams syndrome suffer from a severe impairment in visual-motor integration. No child in the Experimental Group outperformed his/her matched control on either subtest assessing visual-motor integration skills, while no significant differences were noted between the groups on tests for simple motor skills (e.g., finger oscillation). Significant differences were also found on the subtests of the Wide Range Achievement Test. No significant differences between the groups were noted on tests for general language skills. The remedial educational, and neuropsychological implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  8. Flagstaff, Arizona seen in Earth Resources Experiments package

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A spectacular winter view of the Flagstaff, Arizona area is seen in this Skylab 4 Earth Resources Experiments package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. Included in the scene are the San Francisco Mountains, Oak Creek Canyon, Painted Desert and Meteor Crater. The infrared picture depicts in red living vegetation, in white the snow, and in bright blue the water. Major features identified in this photograph are Humphrey's peak, top center, Flagstaff at foot of the peak, Sunset Crater volcanic field with numerous vents and craters right of Flagstaff and Meteor Crater (right center). Within the mountainous areas several clear areas generally rectangular are visible and represent the areas where lumbering has removed the forest. The thin white line extending from left corner to Sunset Crater fields is the power transmission line cleared area. Roads are subdued and are not easily visible.

  9. Libraries in Arizona: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/arizona.html Libraries in Arizona To use the sharing features on ... Medical Center John B. Jamison, M.D. Memorial Library 1200 N. Beaver St. Flagstaff, AZ 86001 928- ...

  10. Estrella Mountain Plan for Institutional Effectiveness, 1997-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella Mountain Community Coll., Avondale, AZ.

    This plan provides information on the efforts of Arizona's Estrella Mountain Community College (EMCC) to evaluate its effectiveness in achieving organizational mission and purpose. The plan contains the following information: (1) a discussion of EMCC's institutional effectiveness efforts to date, indicating that the college's Plan for…

  11. Field guide to geologic excursions in southwestern Utah and adjacent areas of Arizona and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, William R.; Lund, William R.

    2002-01-01

    This field guide contains road logs for field trips planned in conjunction with the 2002 Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the Geological Society of America held at Southern Utah University in Cedar City, Utah. There are a total of eight field trips, covering various locations and topics in southwestern Utah and adjacent areas of Arizona and Nevada. In addition, the field guide contains a road log for a set of Geological Engineering Field Camp Exercises run annually by the University of Missouri at Rolla in and around Cedar City. Two of the field trips address structural aspects of the geology in southwestern Utah and northwestern Arizona; two trips deal with ground water in the region; and along with the Field Camp Exercises, one trip, to the Grand Staircase, is designed specifically for educators. The remaining trips examine the volcanology and mineral resources of a large area in and around the Tusher Mountains in Utah; marine and brackish water strata in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument; and the Pine Valley Mountains, which are cored by what may be the largest known laccolith in the world. The "Three Corners" area of Utah, Arizona, and Nevada is home to truly world-class geology, and I am confident that all of the 2002 Rocky Mountain Section meeting attendees will find a field trip suited to their interests.

  12. The Arizona striped whiptail: past and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian K. Sullivan; Paul S. Hamilton; Matthew A. Kwiatkowski

    2005-01-01

    We surveyed historic and nearby collecting localities for Aspidoscelis (= Cnemidophorus) arizonae in Cochise and Graham Counties, Arizona, during spring and summer, 2000-2003. Aspidoscelis arizonae was present at or nearby all but one of the historic sites (seven of eight) that we surveyed located near Willcox (...

  13. The Uneven Performance of Arizona's Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingos, Matthew M.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Arizona enrolls a larger share of its students in charter schools than any other state in the country, but no comprehensive examination exists of the impact of those schools on student achievement. Using student-level data covering all Arizona students from 2006 to 2012, we find that the performance of charter schools in Arizona in improving…

  14. Simulation of groundwater withdrawal scenarios for the Redwall-Muav and Coconino Aquifer Systems of northern and central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, D.R.

    2016-09-23

    The Northern Arizona Regional Groundwater Flow Model was used to estimate the hydrologic changes, including water-level change and groundwater discharge to streams and springs, that may result from future changes in groundwater withdrawals in and near the Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council study area, Coconino and Navajo Counties, Arizona. Three future groundwater withdrawal scenarios for tribal and nontribal uses were developed by the Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council and were simulated for the period representing the years from 2006 through 2105. Scenario 1 assumes no major changes in groundwater use except for increased demand based on population projections. Scenario 2 assumes that a pipeline will provide a source of surface water from Lake Powell to areas near Cameron and Moenkopi that would replace local groundwater withdrawals. Scenario 3 assumes that the pipeline extends to the Flagstaff and Williams areas, and would replace groundwater demands for water in the area.The Coconino Plateau Water Advisory Council withdrawal scenarios primarily influence water levels and groundwater discharge in the Coconino Plateau basin, near the western margin of the Little Colorado River Plateau basin, and the Verde Valley subbasin. Simulated effects of the withdrawal scenarios are superimposed on effects of previous variations in groundwater withdrawals and artificial and incidental recharge. Pre-scenario variations include changes in water-levels in wells; groundwater storage; discharge to streams and springs; and evapotranspiration by plants that use groundwater. Future variations in groundwater discharge and water-levels in wells will continue to occur as a result of both the past and any future changes.Water-level variations resulting from post-2005 stresses, including groundwater withdrawals and incidental and artificial recharge, in the area of the withdrawal scenarios are primarily localized and superimposed on the regional changes caused by variations in

  15. Northern Arizona Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Northern Arizona is best known for the Grand Canyon. Less widely known are the hundreds of geologically young volcanoes, at least one of which buried the homes of local residents. San Francisco Mtn., a truncated stratovolcano at 3887 meters, was once a much taller structure (about 4900 meters) before it exploded some 400,000 years ago a la Mt. St. Helens. The young cinder cone field to its east includes Sunset Crater, that erupted in 1064 and buried Native American homes. This ASTER perspective was created by draping ASTER image data over topographic data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Data. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Size: 20.4 by 24.6 kilometers (12.6 by 15.2 miles) Location: 35.3 degrees North latitude, 111.5 degrees West longitude

  16. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-16

    Energy used by Arizona single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  17. A Melioidosis Case in Arizona

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-03

    David Blaney, Medical Officer, Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch, discusses an unusual melioidosis case in Arizona.  Created: 10/3/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/5/2011.

  18. Boots on the Ground: Arizona

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-26

    In this podcast, we talk to CDC public health advisor Lisa Speissegger about her response efforts during the 2013 Arizona wildfires.  Created: 12/26/2013 by Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHPR).   Date Released: 12/26/2013.

  19. Stretching Exercises: Range of Motion and Emotion in Four Poems by William Carlos Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Discusses four poems by William Carlos Williams used to teach creative writing to college students. Uses "Portrait of a Woman in Red" and "The Last Words of My English Grandmother" because they contain speakers who are clearly not the poet, which gives undergraduate students opportunities to discuss details Williams uses to…

  20. Tidens Rytmik. Dante Alighieri, William Carlos Williams' Prosodi og Michel Serres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard-Nielsen, Jakob

    2006-01-01

      Artiklen diskuterer William Carlos Williams' poetik og hans lyriske eksperimenter i tilknytning til begreberne 'den variable fod' og 'det triadiske vers'. Den argumenterer for, at Williams' poetik kan opfattes både som et forsøg på at vitalisere et typografisk styret poetisk  sprog og som del a...

  1. Williams Syndrome with a “Twist”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina Maritsi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome is a rare genetic condition with multisystemic involvement, caused by a microscopic deletion in the chromosome band 7q11.23. We describe the first case of a toddler with Williams syndrome who developed Benign Paroxysmal Torticollis (BPT, a benign dystonic disorder of unknown aetiology.

  2. Williams syndrome starts making sense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkenas, J.

    1996-10-01

    1996 may be marked as a transitional year in the study of Williams syndrome (WS), when the causes of this complex condition and a practical way to investigate began to come into focus. WS presents a remarkable collection of symptoms that affect blood vessels, growth, intelligence, and behavior. WS commonly leads to infantile hypercalcemia, retardation of growth, prematurely wrinkled skin, supraventricular aortic stenosis (SVAS), and sensitivity to loud noise. Children with this condition are often mentally retarded, with distinctive {open_quotes}elfin{close_quotes} facial features, a hoarse voice, and an {open_quotes}engaging{close_quotes} personality. Their cognitive deficits may be minimal or profound but typically involve a specific pattern of strengths and weaknesses, with better-than-average face recognition but little ability to recognize how parts of patterns that they see fit into a whole. 36 refs.

  3. Impaired Water 303(d) Polygons, Arizona, 2004, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Arizona 303(d) waterbodies for 2004. These include lakes, reservoirs, ponds, etc. The 303(d) list is a related table to the feature class AZ_303d_04_area. Arizona's...

  4. Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of Williams Air Force Base, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    sidewinder (Crotalus cerestes). Washes and rocky areas provide suitable habitat for the side- blotched lizard (Uta stansburiana), lesser earless lizard...Thoteforcum shwteicessI utility limed associated With each altterntI*ive1 the This ha? rs hn the estinated Unader of yea? 201). Far manle. with the proposed... blotched lizard Uta stansburiana Arid and semi-arid areas Sidewinder Crotalus cerastes Creosote bush, desert S!,ckled rattlesnake Crotalus mitchell/i

  5. 76 FR 28079 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of... intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona... determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has...

  6. William Friedman, Geneticist Turned Cryptographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Irwin L

    2017-05-01

    William Friedman (1891-1969), trained as a plant geneticist at Cornell University, was employed at Riverbank Laboratories by the eccentric millionaire George Fabyan to work on wheat breeding. Friedman, however, soon became intrigued by and started working on a pet project of Fabyan's involving the conjecture that Francis Bacon, a polymath known for the study of ciphers, was the real author of Shakespeare's plays. Thus, beginning in ∼1916, Friedman turned his attention to the so called "Baconian cipher," and developed decryption techniques that bore similarity to approaches for solving problems in population genetics. His most significant, indeed pathbreaking, work used ideas from genetics and statistics, focusing on analysis of the frequencies of letters in language use. Although he had transitioned from being a geneticist to a cryptographer, his earlier work had resonance in his later pursuits. He soon began working directly for the United States government and produced solutions used to solve complex military ciphers, in particular to break the Japanese Purple code during World War II. Another important legacy of his work was the establishment of the Signal Intelligence Service and eventually the National Security Agency. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. William Paley's lost "intelligent design".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam R

    2009-01-01

    William Paley's Natural Theology has experienced a resurgence in popularity in recent decades with the continuing controversies over the teaching of evolution and the emergence of a new "intelligent design" movement. But while both the movement's supporters and detractors agree that Paley is an intellectual forefather of the present-day movement, this agreement is forged at the expense of historical accuracy. Paley's intelligent design has almost nothing in common with the present day movement and, in fact, suggests theological arguments against the type of reasoning used by the modern movement. Paley wrote in reaction to Hume and in response to the evolutionary theories of Buffon and Erasmus Darwin. In this light, the Natural Theology suggests a different reading than it is usually given. Paley's narrowly-argued theology relies upon the ability to detect the presence of "purpose" in nature without relying upon knowing what those purposes are. His empirically-argued theology leads him to a God who operates through natural law, not in its contravention, and his concern goes far beyond proving the existence of a deity to undertaking the theological project of determining the attributes and characteristics of the deity. Though not himself an evolutionist, Paley put forth a theological worldview consistent with evolution. In fact, given his arguments that the observation of great contrivance increases the testimony of nature to God's power, Paley's philosophy might be more consistent with a theistic Darwinian evolution than with special creation.

  8. David Owen Williams (1944 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Many people, not only at CERN but also throughout the world, were saddened to learn that their friend and colleague David Williams had passed away in the early hours of Tuesday 24 October. His death came after a year of fighting cancer with all of his usual determination and optimism. Even days before the end he was still welcoming to visitors, and was alert and interested in all their news. Born in 1944, David came to CERN from the University of Cambridge in 1966, with a degree in Physics and Computer Science. Joining what at the time was called the Documents and Data (DD) Division, in the earlier part his career he worked first on software for analysis of bubble chamber photographs, subsequently leading the group that supported experiments with 'hybrids' of bubble chambers and electronic detectors and then the group supporting online computing in experiments. He thus witnessed all of the enormous changes that took place in particle physics as the era of bubble chambers came to an end and the availability ...

  9. William Harvey, Aristotle and astrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm-microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to Aristotle's views in this area and is quite restricted and attenuated relative to some contemporary beliefs in astrology. This suggests a more general thesis. While Harvey was amenable to ideas which we associate with the natural magic tradition, those ideas had a very broad range of formulation and there was a limit to how far he would accept them. This limit was largely determined by Harvey's adherence to Aristotle's natural philosophy and his Christian beliefs. I argue that this is also the case in relation to Harvey's use of the macrocosm-microcosm analogy and of alchemical terminology, and, as far as we can rely on the evidence, this informs his attitudes towards witches as well. Understanding Harvey's influences and motives here is important in placing him properly in the context of early seventeenth-century thought.

  10. Hydrogeology of the Mogollon Highlands, central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John T.C.; Steinkampf, William C.; Flynn, Marilyn E.

    2005-01-01

    The Mogollon Highlands, 4,855 square miles of rugged, mountainous terrain at the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau in central Arizona, is characterized by a bedrock-dominated hydrologic system that results in an incompletely integrated regional ground-water system, flashy streamflow, and various local water-bearing zones that are sensitive to drought. Increased demand on the water resources of the area as a result of recreational activities and population growth have made necessary an increased understanding of the hydrogeology of the region. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of the geology and hydrology of the region in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources under the auspices of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative, a program launched in 1998 to assist rural areas in dealing with water-resources issues. The study involved the analysis of geologic maps, surface-water and ground-water flow, and water and rock chemical data and spatial relationships to characterize the hydrogeologic framework. The study area includes the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau and the Mogollon Rim, which is the eroded edge of the plateau. A 3,000- to 4,000-foot sequence of early to late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks forms the generally south-facing scarp of the Mogollon Rim. The area adjacent to the edge of the Mogollon Rim is an erosional landscape of rolling, step-like terrain exposing Proterozoic metamorphic and granitic rocks. Farther south, the Sierra Ancha and Mazatzal Mountain ranges, which are composed of various Proterozoic rocks, flank an alluvial basin filled with late Cenozoic sediments and volcanic flows. Eight streams with perennial to intermittent to ephemeral flow drain upland regions of the Mogollon Rim and flow into the Salt River on the southern boundary or the Verde River on the western boundary. Ground-water flow paths generally are controlled by large-scale fracture systems or by karst features in carbonate rocks. Stream

  11. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  12. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland.

  13. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INVERT (Invertebrates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  14. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: BIRDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  15. AMS DAYs 2015 - Interview William H. Gerstenmaier

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    William H. Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Directorate at NASA, tells about the science aat the International Space Station and the tasks to be performed to make sure the AMS detector, installed on the main

  16. William of Palerne, an alternative romance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1985-01-01

    Het boek heeft ten doel een betrouwbare editie te bieden van de veertiendeeeuwse Engelse roman in allitererende verzen William of Palerne, voorzien van een inleiding, een commentaar en een volledig glossarium. ... Zie: Samenvatting

  17. Codes on graphs: MacWilliams identities

    CERN Document Server

    Forney, G David

    2009-01-01

    The MacWilliams identity for linear time-invariant convolutional codes that has recently been found by Gluesing-Luerssen and Schneider is proved concisely, and generalized to arbitrary group codes on graphs and more general weights. Further MacWilliams identities are developed for terminated convolutional codes. An analogous development yields a short, transparent proof of the dual sum-product update rule.

  18. Biogeography of amphibians and reptiles in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric W. Stitt; Theresa M. Mau-Crimmins; Don E. Swann

    2005-01-01

    We examined patterns of species richness for amphibians and reptiles in Arizona and evaluated patterns in species distribution between ecoregions based on species range size. In Arizona, the Sonoran Desert has the highest herpetofauna diversity, and the southern ecoregions are more similar than other regions. There appear to be distinct low- and mid-elevational...

  19. 21 CFR 808.53 - Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.53 Arizona. The following Arizona medical device requirements are preempted...

  20. Managing water and riparian habitats on the Bill Williams River with scientific benefit for other desert river systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Hickey,; Woodrow Fields,; Andrew Hautzinger,; Steven Sesnie,; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Dick Gilbert,

    2016-01-01

    This report details modeling to: 1) codify flow-ecology relationships for riparian species of the Bill Williams River as operational guidance for water managers, 2) test the guidance under different climate scenarios, and 3) revise the operational guidance as needed to address the effects of climate change. Model applications detailed herein include the River Analysis System  (HEC-RAS) and the Ecosystem Functions Model  (HEC-EFM), which was used to generate more than three million estimates of local seedling recruitment areas. Areas were aggregated and compared to determine which scenarios generated the most seedling area per unit volume of water. Scenarios that maximized seedling area were grouped into a family of curves that serve as guidance for water managers. This work has direct connections to water management decision-making and builds upon and adds to the rich history of science-based management for the Bill Williams River, Arizona, USA. 

  1. Genetic analysis of scats reveals minimum number and sex of recently documented mountain lions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Ashwin; Smythe, Lindsay A.; Thompson, Ron W.; Culver, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Recent records of mountain lions Puma concolor and concurrent declines in desert bighorn sheep Ovis canadensis mexicana on Kofa National Wildlife Refuge in Arizona, United States, have prompted investigations to estimate the number of mountain lions occurring there. We performed noninvasive genetic analyses and identified species, individuals, and sex from scat samples collected from the Kofa and Castle Dome Mountains. From 105 scats collected, we identified a minimum of 11 individual mountain lions. These individuals consisted of six males, two females and three of unknown sex. Three of the 11 mountain lions were identified multiple times over the study period. These estimates supplement previously recorded information on mountain lions in an area where they were historically considered only transient. We demonstrate that noninvasive genetic techniques, especially when used in conjunction with camera-trap and radiocollaring methods, can provide additional and reliable information to wildlife managers, particularly on secretive species like the mountain lion.

  2. Arizona black rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis cerberus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    The Arizona black rattlesnake makes its home at higher elevations in Arizona and far western New Mexico. The snake's use of high-altitude habitat and its black coloration as an adult distinguishes it from other subspecies of the western rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis), which prefer lower elevations and range from tan to reddish in color as adults. These physical and habitat differences are also reflected in genetic differences that suggest that the Arizona black rattlesnake may be a new species of rattlesnake. Despite the species's limited range, basic biological information needed to make management decisions is lacking for most Arizona black rattlesnake populations. To address this need, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists conducted research on the species in Arizona national park units from 2003 to 2005. The research examined relative population abundance, movement patterns, range requirements, dietary habits, and winter and summer habitat. Research in Arizona national parks was made possible through the support of the Western National Parks Association, Tonto National Monument, and the USGS Science Internships for Workforce Diversity Program. Importantly, the park-based research was used to augment a long-term mark-recapture study of the species that has been conducted by USGS biologists at sites near Flagstaff, Arizona, since 1999. USGS researchers were the first to conduct extensive studies of this species in the wild.

  3. Robin Williams' suicide: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassaan Tohid

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The world renowned comedian and four-time Oscar nominated actor Robin Williams died on August 11, 2014. From the outset, the news indicated that his death was believed to be a suicide and this was later confirmed to be true by the autopsy reports. Williams had been suffering from severe depression, which is believed to be the leading contributor to his suicide. In this case study, I will highlight the event of the actor's suicide and the main risk factors along with depression leading to his tragic death. As of the end of 2015, no other case study seemed to have addressed or explored the links between the cause (or causes and events leading to Robin Williams' suicide. Case description: Robin Williams was suffering from relationship problems, financial problems, drug addiction, and major depression. All of these factors led to his suicide. Comments: The chances of committing suicide drastically increase in the presence of any of the key risk factors. Unfortunately, the actor Robin Williams was dealing with four of the major risk factors all together, which put him at a high risk of committing suicide and eventually led to his tragic death.

  4. Mountain medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Hjuler, Kasper Fjellhaugen

    2016-01-01

    Travelling to high altitudes is an increasingly popular form of recreational holiday. Individual medical advice may be essential for certain groups of individuals such as patients with chronic disorders, pregnant women or children. This is the second part in a series of two articles on mountain...... medicine. The first part covered high-altitude physiology and medical aspects of objective alpine dangers and the increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This part covers altitude sickness, fluid balance, nutrition, and precautions for patients with pre-existing medical conditions, pregnant women...

  5. Spatial distribution and frequency of precipitation during an extreme event: July 2006 mesoscale convective complexes and floods in southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, P.G.; Magirl, C.S.; Webb, R.H.; Pytlak, E.; Troch, Peter A.; Lyon, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    An extreme, multiday rainfall event over southeastern Arizona during 27-31 July 2006 caused record flooding and a historically unprecedented number of slope failures and debris flows in the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. An unusual synoptic weather pattern induced repeated nocturnal mesoscale convective systems over southeastern Arizona for five continuous days, generating multiday rainfall totals up to 360 mm. Analysis of point rainfall and weather radar data yielded storm totals for the southern Santa Catalina Mountains at 754 grid cells approximately 1 km ?? 1 km in size. Precipitation intensity for the 31 July storms was not unusual for typical monsoonal precipitation in this region (recurrence interval (RI) 50 years and individual grid cells had RI exceeding 1000 years. The 31 July storms caused the watersheds to be essentially saturated following 4 days of rainfall. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. A Season on the Reservation: My Sojourn with the White Mountain Apache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Jabbar, Kareem; Singular, Stephen

    In this book, basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar tells of one basketball season when he coached a high school team on the White Mountain Apache Reservation (Arizona). Tired of life in Los Angeles, disillusioned with pro basketball, and devastated by the death of his mother, Abdul-Jabbar accepted an invitation to coach the team at Alchesay High…

  7. Mapping vegetation structure in the Pinaleno Mountains using lidar-phase 3: Forest inventory modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent Mitchell; Mike Walterman; Tom Mellin; Craig Wilcox; Ann M. Lynch; John Anhold; Donald A. Falk; John Koprowski; Denise Laes; Don Evans; Haans Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Understanding forest structure and how it is affected by management practices and natural events is a critical part of managing natural resources within the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Pinaleno Mountains of southeastern Arizona represent a Madrean sky island ecosystem and the last remaining habitat for the Mt. Graham red squirrel. This unique...

  8. Patterns of resistance to Cronartium ribicola in Pinus aristata, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. W. Schoettle; R. A. Sniezko; A. Kegley; R. Danchok; K. S. Burns

    2012-01-01

    The core distribution of Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine, Pinus aristata Engelm., extends from central Colorado into northern New Mexico, with a disjunct population on the San Francisco Peaks in northern Arizona. Populations are primarily at high elevations and often define the alpine treeline; however, the species can also be found in open mixed conifer stands with...

  9. Floods of October 1977 in southern Arizona and March 1978 in central Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Byron Neil; Eychaner, James H.

    1984-01-01

    Major floods occurred in October 1977 and March 1978 in Arizona. As much as 14 inches of rain fell during October 6-9, 1977, over the mountains of southern Arizona and northern Mexico resulting in the highest discharge since at least 1892 on the Santa Cruz River upstream from Tucson. The flood inundated areas as much as 4 miles wide, covered at least 16,000 acres of farmland, and caused $15.2 million in damage. Residential losses occurred at Nogales, Amado, Green Valley, and Sahuarita. Severe erosional damage occurred along the Santa Cruz River, Agua Fria Canyon, Potrero Creek, and many small drainages in the Sonoita Creek basin. The peak discharge in Agua Fria Canyon was the highest since before 1900. Less severe flooding occurred along the San Pedro River and the Gila River downstream from the San Pedro. Widespread rainfall of 3 to 6 inches and 9 to 14 inches in some areas in the central mountains during February 27 to March 3, 1978, caused the highest discharge since 1920 on the Salt River in Phoenix and resulted in three deaths. Flooding along the Salt and Gila Rivers and several lesser streams caused statewide damage totaling $65.9 million, of which about $37 million occurred in Maricopa County. Nine counties were declared disaster areas. During the flood of March 1978, moderate peak discharges and unusually high volumes of runoff occurred on tributaries to the Salt and Verde Rivers upstream from a system of reservoirs. Flood magnitudes were greater at the main-stem gaging stations than on the tributaries. The peak discharge into Theodore Roosevelt Lake, which was 21 percent full at the start of the flood, was about 155,000 cubic feet per second, the largest known from 1890 to 1978. The reservoirs stored large quantities of water and greatly reduced the magnitude of the flood. The peak discharge of the Salt River was 125,000 cubic feet per second below Granite Reef Dam and 122,000 cubic feet per second at Phoenix. Discharges in excess of 100,000 cubic feet per

  10. SMEX04 ENVISAT ASAR Data: Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is comprised of browse images acquired over the regional study area of Arizona, USA for the 2004 Soil Moisture Experiment (SMEX04). The experiment was...

  11. July 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins RA

    2013-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The first Arizona Thoracic Society meeting in Tucson was held on Wednesday, 7/24/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 36 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Dinner was sponsored by Accredo Health Group. A brief discussion was held of plans to have the December 2013 meeting in Tucson on a weekend as p...

  12. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland (left) with R. Cashmore. Photos 02, 03: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland signing the CERN guest book with R. Cashmore.

  13. Understanding Williams Syndrome: Behavioral Patterns and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semel, Eleanor; Rosner, Sue R.

    This guide to Williams syndrome (WS), a congenital disorder characterized by developmental/cognitive limitations but relatively high verbal and social skills, explains the strengths, difficulties and variations found among individuals with the condition and offers guidelines for intervention in the unusual properties of the WS behavioral profile.…

  14. MRI Amygdala Volume in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Sampaio, Cassandra; Vasconcelos, Cristiana; Fernandez, Montse; Garayzabal, Elena; Shenton, Martha E.; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most intriguing characteristics of Williams Syndrome individuals is their hypersociability. The amygdala has been consistently implicated in the etiology of this social profile, particularly given its role in emotional and social behavior. This study examined amygdala volume and symmetry in WS individuals and in age and sex matched…

  15. The world in eighteen lessons: Christopher Williams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrebi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual photographer Christopher Williams is a real artist's artist. Ever since he moved to Germany, his measured work, which both reveres and examines the art of photography, has more and more easily found its way into European art institutes, such as this spring at Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens in

  16. Outpatient management of adult alcoholism | Williams | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 104, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Outpatient management of adult alcoholism. MF Williams. Abstract.

  17. Who Was the Real William Shakespeare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael Todd

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights a project that encourages students to connect reading and mathematics instruction by using a data analysis approach. Students analyze sonnets from statistical, literary, and historical points of view in an effort to uncover the true identity of William Shakespeare. (Contains 10 figures.)

  18. March 1964 Prince William Sound, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Prince William Sound magnitude 9.2 Mw earthquake on March 28, 1964 at 03:36 GMT (March 27 at 5:36 pm local time), was the largest U.S. earthquake ever recorded...

  19. Stranger Danger Awareness in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, D. M.; Kirk, H.; Hanley, M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is characterised by a distinctive cognitive profile and an intriguing social phenotype. Individuals with the disorder are often highly social engaging with familiar and unfamiliar people and once in an interaction they often show subtle abnormalities of social behaviour. Atypically…

  20. Florence Jessie Mac Williams (1917-1990)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Florence Jessie Mac Williams (1917-1990). Featured Scientist Volume 10 Issue 1 January 2005 pp 98-98. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/010/01/0098-0098. Resonance ...

  1. William Hayes and His Pallanza Bomb Shell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 10. William Hayes and His Pallanza Bomb Shell. R Jayaraman. General Article Volume 16 Issue 10 October 2011 pp 911-921. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/10/0911-0921 ...

  2. Psycholinguistic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia F.; Heinze, Elena Garayzabal; Giacheti, Celia M.; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psycholinguistic abilities of children with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA). Performance on the ITPA was analysed in a group with WS (N=20, mean age=8.5 years, SD=1.62) and two typically developing groups,…

  3. WILLIAM GOLDING'S NOVEL--THE BACKWARD LOOK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PECK, CAROL FAULKNER

    THE "SURPRISE ENDINGS" IN EACH OF WILLIAM GOLDING'S FIRST FOUR NOVELS OCCUR WHEN THE POINT OF VIEW SHIFTS FROM THE LIMITED WORLD OF THE NOVEL TO THE UNLIMITED WORLD OF REALITY. THE BOYS' RESCUE BY THE UNCOMPREHENDING OFFICER IN "LORD OF THE FLIES," REFOCUSES AND REINFORCES ALL THAT PRECEDES IT, AND THE FABLE, SUPERIMPOSED UPON REAL LIFE, BECOMES…

  4. William Faulkner: A Guide to Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, for the study of 20th-century American author William Faulkner. The guide is intended to help readers find critical and biographical information on Faulkner. It explains important reference sources in the Atkins library…

  5. Denigrating Carl Rogers: William Coulson's Last Crusade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Reviews William Coulson's assertions that Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and he initiated the humanistic education field, that Rogers repudiated his philosophy late in life, and that they owe the nation's parents an apology. Argues that these charges are groundless and provides examples and quotations from Rogers' later writings to show how Rogers…

  6. William Pitt and the Rhetoric of Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measell, James S.

    Attempts by governmental powers to suspend the right to Habeas Corpus have occurred from time to time throughout English and American history. This study discusses one such successful attempt, engineered by William Pitt the Younger, then prime minister, in 1794. Pitt's success in gaining suspension of this writ and passage of the Habeas Corpus…

  7. 78 FR 28953 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... May 16, 2013 Part II Department of Education 34 CFR Part 685 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan... Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 685 RIN 1840-AD13 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Secretary amends the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program...

  8. Views from Inside a Pediatric Clinic: How Arizona's Political Climate Has Impacted Arizona's Youngest Latino Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Cheatham, Gregory A.; Gomez, Laura

    2013-01-01

    It is critical that we examine impacts that recent immigration policies such as SB1070 are having on Arizona's youngest Latino learners.The large number of Latinos under the age of five, and the impact that this upcoming generation of Latinos will have on all aspects of life in Arizona merits a closer look. In this qualitative study, we examined…

  9. 77 FR 25741 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... Gila Pueblo Foundation closed and the collections were donated to the Arizona State Museum. No known... types, and other items of material culture are consistent with the Hohokam archeological tradition and... Gila Pueblo Foundation closed and the collections were donated to the Arizona State Museum. No known...

  10. Water-quality assessment of the Central Arizona Basins, Arizona and northern Mexico; environmental setting and overview of water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordy, Gail E.; Rees, Julie A.; Edmonds, Robert J.; Gebler, Joseph B.; Wirt, Laurie; Gellenbeck, Dorinda J.; Anning, David W.

    1998-01-01

    The Central Arizona Basins study area in central and southern Arizona and northern Mexico is one of 60 study units that are part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program. The purpose of this report is to describe the physical, chemical, and environmental characteristics that may affect water quality in the Central Arizona Basins study area and present an overview of water quality. Covering 34,700 square miles, the study area is characterized by generally north to northwestward-trending mountain ranges separated by broad, gently sloping alluvial valleys. Most of the perennial rivers and streams are in the northern part of the study area. Rivers and streams in the south are predominantly intermittent or ephemeral and flow in response to precipitation such as summer thunderstorms. Effluent-dependent streams do provide perennial flow in some reaches. The major aquifers in the study area are in the basin-fill deposits that may be as much as 12,000 feet thick. The 1990 population in the study area was about 3.45 million, and about 61 percent of the total was in Maricopa County (Phoenix and surrounding cities). Extensive population growth over the past decade has resulted in a twofold increase in urban land areas and increased municipal water use; however, agriculture remains the major water use. Seventy-three percent of all water with drawn in the study area during 1990 was used for agricultural purposes. The largest rivers in the study area-the Gila, Salt, and Verde-are perennial near their headwaters but become intermittent downstream because of impoundments and artificial diversions. As a result, the Central Arizona Basins study area is unique compared to less arid basins because the mean surface-water outflow is only 528 cubic feet per second from a total drainage area of 49,650 square miles. Peak flows in the northern part of the study area are the result of snowmelt runoff; whereas, summer thunderstorms account for the peak flows in

  11. Optics education through the Arizona Galileoscope program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2012-10-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory, in collaboration with Science Foundation Arizona and the Arizona public schools, has initiated a program of optics education that has been implemented in the Arizona cities of Flagstaff, Yuma, and Safford. A program is planned for Globe, Arizona and several other locations. The program is aimed at 5th grade teachers and students. It relies on NOAO-developed optics teaching kits designed around the Galileoscope student telescope kits. The program is designed to reach every 5th grade teacher and every 5th grade student in each city. Professional development is provided for the teachers using the NOAO-developed "Teaching with Telescopes" optics teaching kits which are given to each teacher. Each 5th grade student is part of a team building a Galileoscope and receives additional training on how to use the Galileoscope during the day or night. At the end of the training period a large star party is held for all of the students, their families, and their friends. The program is evaluated through the University of Arizona. This model has been successfully implemented during the past two years and we are exploring national replication. This program provides a cost-effective way to inject optics into the schools in an attractive, citywide program model. The talk will discuss the model in detail and some of the mistakes we have made as we have tested the model.

  12. The impact of Arizona Highways Magazine's facebook page.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    This project examined the relationship between use of the Arizona Highways magazine (AHM) Facebook Page and the decision to : travel to or within Arizona. Key purposes were to: (1) provide a thorough understanding of AHM Facebook Page users, includin...

  13. Rorty, Williams, and Davidson: Skepticism and Metaepistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ranalli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit an important exchange on the problem of radical skepticism between Richard Rorty and Michael Williams. In his contribution to this exchange, Rorty defended the kind of transcendental approach to radical skepticism that is offered by Donald Davidson, in contrast to Williams’s Wittgenstein-inspired view. It is argued that the key to evaluating this debate is to understand the particular conception of the radical skeptical problem that is offered in influential work by Barry Stroud, a conception of the skeptical problem which generates metaepistemological ramifications for anti-skeptical theories. In particular, we argue that, contra Williams, Rorty’s view that Davidson was offering a theoretical diagnosis of radical skepticism can be consistently maintained with his transcendental approach.

  14. SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning (David) Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

    2005-09-30

    The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

  15. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Francesca; Menghini, Deny; Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  16. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Foti

    Full Text Available Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for

  17. William Cobbett's correspondence, 1800-1835

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of William Cobbett’s personal letters have never been published. This thesis examines these manuscripts alongside the ‘open letter’ form that dominated his published writings, using correspondence to illuminate the hybrid and highly idiosyncratic form of Cobbett’s radicalism. It shows how he responded to continued persecution from the government through a series of innovative epistolary strategies, creating a popular journalism that incorporated many of the tropes usually as...

  18. Sydafrikanske William S. Mazwis Lebenslauf (ca. 1928)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Anne Folke

    2008-01-01

    Gennem teoretiske indsigter lånt fra psykologi, pædagogik, filosofi, lingvistik og litteraturvidenskab reflekteres over de metodologiske udfordringer, der kan møde forskeren i analyser af tekster produceret af den 'Anden'. I artiklen fokuseres på den herrnhutiske missionskirke i Sydafrika i begyn...... begyndelsen af det 20. århundrede, og den sorte herrnhuterpræst William S. Mazwis levnedsbeskrivelse analyseres som et eksempel på autoetnografisk selv-subjektivering. Udgivelsesdato: December...

  19. Learning by Observation: Insights from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer’s acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  20. Sustainable socialism: William Morris on waste

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, EC

    2011-01-01

    While William Morris has long been recognized for his radical approach to the problem of labor, which built on the ideas of John Ruskin and informed his contributions to the Arts and Crafts philosophy, his ideas about waste have received much less attention. This article suggests that the Kelmscott Press, which Morris founded in 1891, was designed to embody the values of durability and sustainability in sharp contrast to the neophilia, disposability, and planned obsolescence of capitalist pro...

  1. The White Mountain Recreational Enterprise: Bio-Political Foundations for White Mountain Apache Natural Resource Control, 1945–1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Tomblin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Among American Indian nations, the White Mountain Apache Tribe has been at the forefront of a struggle to control natural resource management within reservation boundaries. In 1952, they developed the first comprehensive tribal natural resource management program, the White Mountain Recreational Enterprise (WMRE, which became a cornerstone for fighting legal battles over the tribe’s right to manage cultural and natural resources on the reservation for the benefit of the tribal community rather than outside interests. This article examines how White Mountain Apaches used the WMRE, while embracing both Euro-American and Apache traditions, as an institutional foundation for resistance and exchange with Euro-American society so as to reassert control over tribal eco-cultural resources in east-central Arizona.

  2. March 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was a special meeting. In conjunction with the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and the Arizona Respiratory Center the Eighteenth Annual Farness Lecture was held in the Sonntag Pavilion at St. Joseph's Hospital at 6 PM on Friday, April 4, 2014. The guest speaker was Antonio "Tony" Catanzaro, MD from the University of California San Diego and current president of the Cocci Study Group. There were 57 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and infectious disease communities. After opening remarks by Arizona Thoracic Society president, Lewis Wesselius (a former fellow under Dr. Catanzaro at UCSD, John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, gave a brief history of the Farness lecture before introducing Dr. Catanzaro. The lecture is named for Orin J. Farness, a Tucson physician, who was the first to report culture positive coccidioidomycosis (cocci or Valley Fever. ...

  3. Helping Students Enter the Health Professions in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Aleena; Parker, Myra; Lewis, John; Roubideaux, Yvette

    2003-01-01

    The University of Arizona and the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona collaborate on a program to increase the number of American Indian students who enter the health professions and eventually serve communities in Arizona. The council conducts outreach, needs assessments, and health career forums. The university provides students with counseling;…

  4. Report list Arizona's oil, gas potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzi, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    This article is a summary of Arizona geological survey circular 29, which addresses the petroleum geology of Arizona, USA. Eight areas have been identified with fair to excellent oil and gas potential, and some Tertiary basins have evidence of source or reservoir rocks. The following are considered here: production history, lands status and services, regulation and permitting, petroleum geology, hydrocarbon indications, and areas with hydrocarbon potential and their petroleum geology and characteristics. The full report contains detailed figures of each of these basin areas, a descriptive tabulation of seeps and petroliferous rocks and extensive references.

  5. Analysis of landscape fragmentation in the Peloncillo Mountains in relation to wildfire, prescribed burning, and cattle grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Rogan; Kelley O' Neal; Stephen Yool

    2005-01-01

    This paper examined the application of state-of-the-art remote sensing image enhancement and classification techniques for mapping land cover change in the Peloncillo Mountains of Arizona and New Mexico. Spectrally enhanced images acquired August 1985, 1991, 1996, and 2000 were combined with environmental variables such as slope and aspect to map land cover...

  6. First records of two species of mammals in the Huachuca Mountains: results of ecological stewardship at Fort Huachuca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnie Sidner; H. Sheridan Stone

    2005-01-01

    We report the first voucher of the cliff chipmunk (Neotamias dorsalis) and observations of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) from the Huachuca Mountains, Arizona, where these species had not been documented. While presence of T. brasiliensis was expected on Fort Huachuca, N. dorsalis was a surprise after a century...

  7. 78 FR 21412 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of... Museum, University of Arizona, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian... the Arizona State Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural...

  8. Amphibian acoustic data from the Arizona 1, Pinenut, and Canyon breccia pipe uranium mines in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Jo E.; Hossack, Blake R.; Honeycutt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The data consists of a summary of amphibian acoustic recordings at Canyon, Arizona 1, and Pinenut mines near the Grand Canyon. USGS is currently conducting biological surveys associated with uranium mines on federal lands in Arizona. These surveys include determining the composition of the local amphibian community. Original raw acoustic recordings used to create this summary data table are archived at Columbia Environmental Research Center.

  9. Late Neogene deformation of the Chocolate Mountains Anticlinorium: Implications for deposition of the Bouse Formation and early evolution of the Lower Colorado River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Sue; Haxel, Gordon B.; Dorsey, Rebecca J.; McDougall, Kristin A.; Jacobsen, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Deformation related to late Neogene dextral shear can explain a shift from an estuarine to lacustrine depositional environment in the southern Bouse Formation north of Yuma, Arizona. We infer that late Neogene deformation in the Chocolate Mountain Anticlinorium (CMA) created a barrier that blocked an estuary inlet, and that pre-existing and possibly active structures subsequently controlled the local course of the lower Colorado River. Structural patterns summarized below suggest that the CMA absorbed transpressional strain caused by left-stepping segments of dextral faults of the San Andreas fault system and/or the eastern California shear zone and Gulf of California shear zone. For this hypothesis to be correct, about 200-250 m of post-6 Ma, pre- ~5.3 Ma uplift along the CMA crest would be required to cut off a marine inlet. The 220-km-long CMA, cored by the early Paleogene Orocopia Schist subduction complex, extends from the Orocopia Mountains (Calif.) southeastward through the Chocolate Mountains (parallel to the southern San Andreas fault). Where Highway 78 crosses the Chocolate Mountains (Fig. 1), the CMA turns eastward through the Black Mountain-Picacho area (Calif.) and Trigo Mountains (Ariz.) into southwest Arizona. It separates southernmost Bouse Formation outcrops of the Blythe basin from subsurface Bouse outcrops to the south in the Yuma area. South of Blythe basin the CMA is transected by the lower Colorado River along a circuitous path. Here we focus on the geology of an area between the central Chocolate Mountains and the Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona. Specific landmarks include the southeast Chocolate Mountains, Midway Mountains, Peter Kane Mountain, Black Mountain, Picacho Peak, and Gavilan Hills. For simplicity, we refer to this as the eastern Chocolate Mountains.

  10. 40 CFR 131.31 - Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arizona. 131.31 Section 131.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS..., 3033 North Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85012): COLORADO MAIN STEM RIVER BASIN: Hualapai Wash MIDDLE GILA...

  11. The Political Spectacle of Arizona's Proposition 203

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Wayne E.

    2005-01-01

    Arizona's Proposition 203 places restrictions on bilingual and English-as-a-second-language programs and essentiality mandates English-only education for English language learners (ELLs). This article provides an analysis of this initiative and the wide variations in its interpretation and implementation. Data sources include official policy and…

  12. Smoking Policies of Secondary Schools in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashak, Nancy E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Smoking policies and programs of accredited secondary schools in Arizona were analyzed to discover the existence of written smoking policies, how students, faculty, and visitors were informed of the policy, the extent to which smoking was permitted on school grounds, availability of smoking cessation programs and the inclusion of health education…

  13. Tracking rare orchids (Orchidaceae) in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald A. Coleman

    2001-01-01

    Twenty-six native orchid species occur in Arizona, and 14 are considered rare with fewer than 100 occurrences in the state. The author is conducting three studies covering four of the wild orchids: Stenorrhynchos michuacanum, Hexalectris revoluta, Malaxis porphyry, and M. tenuis. The studies are ongoing so only interim results are available. Interim results indicate...

  14. August 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The August 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/27/14 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A presentation was given by Julie Reid of the American Lung Association in Arizona on their Lung Force initiative. This is an initiative to make women more aware that lung cancer is the number 1 cause of cancer deaths in women. There will be a fund raising Lung Force Walk on November 15, 2014 in Phoenix. More information can be found at http://www.lungforce.org/walk-events or http://www.lung.org/associations/states/arizona/local-offices/phoenix/ or contact Julie Reid at JReid@Lung Arizona.org or (602 258-7505. A discussion was instigated by Dr. Parides on whether there is an increased risk of clinical Valley Fever in patients previously treated who begin therapy with biological therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. The ...

  15. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome…

  16. April 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/24/2013 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, infectious disease, and radiology communities. Drs. Gotway and August, thoracic radiologists, were both unable to attend. Dr. Tilman Kolesch from Maricopa more than capably filled in as our radiologist. The meeting was preceded by a discussion on Pharma and the availability of physicians who accept money, including dinners, from pharmaceutical companies. The Arizona Thoracic Society is sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. Ken Knox asked if Arizona Thoracic Society meetings could be held in Tucson during July and December, the two months meetings have not been scheduled. The attendees enthusiastically endorsed this expansion of the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. In addition, Dr. Knox wishes to sponsor a winter symposium in Tucson in collaboration with the Arizona Thoracic Society. The attendees also enthusiastically endorsed this meeting. Four …

  17. Coccidiodomycosis in Arizona 2007-2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-13

    This podcast looks at the impact of Coccidioidomycosis, or Valley Fever, in Arizona in 2007 and early 2008. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Tom Chiller discusses what researchers learned about this fungal disease.  Created: 10/13/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/27/2010.

  18. Debris Flows and Floods in Southeastern Arizona from Extreme Precipitation in July 2006 - Magnitude, Frequency, and Sediment Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert H.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Griffiths, Peter G.; Boyer, Diane E.

    2008-01-01

    From July 31 to August 1, 2006, an unusual set of atmospheric conditions aligned to produce record floods and an unprecedented number of slope failures and debris flows in southeastern Arizona. During the week leading up to the event, an upper-level low-pressure system centered over New Mexico generated widespread and locally heavy rainfall in southeastern Arizona, culminating in a series of strong, mesoscale convective systems that affected the region in the early morning hours of July 31 and August 1. Rainfall from July 27 through 30 provided sufficient antecedent moisture that the storms of July 31 through August 1 resulted in record streamflow flooding in northeastern Pima County and eastern Pinal County. The rainfall caused at least 623 slope failures in four mountain ranges, including more than 30 near Bowie Mountain in the northern Chiracahua Mountains, and 113 at the southern end of the Huachuca Mountains within and adjacent to Coronado National Memorial. In the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson, 435 slope failures spawned debris flows on July 31 that, together with flood runoff, damaged structures and roads, affecting infrastructure within Tucson's urban boundary. Heavy, localized rainfall in the Galiuro Mountains on August 1, 2006, resulted in at least 45 slope failures and an unknown number of debris flows in Aravaipa Canyon. In the southern Santa Catalina Mountains, the maximum 3-day precipitation measured at a climate station for July 29-31 was 12.04 in., which has a 1,200-year recurrence interval. Other rainfall totals from late July to August 1 in southeastern Arizona also exceeded 1,000-year recurrence intervals. The storms produced floods of record along six watercourses, and these floods had recurrence intervals of 100-500 years. Repeat photography suggests that the spate of slope failures was historically unprecedented, and geologic mapping and cosmogenic dating of ancient debris-flow deposits indicate that debris flows reaching alluvial

  19. TENNESSEE WILLIAMS E O TEATRO MARGINAL GAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Falqueto Lemos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work developed in this text aims to read the dramatist Tennnessee Williams in a play in two scenes “E Contar Tristes Histórias das Mortes das Bonecas” which was published in Brazil in the book “Mister Paradise e outras peças em um ato” (2011. The intention is to reflect upon one of his recurring themes, the marginalization. In order to perform the analysis, the theoretical support was grounded in “Literatura e Sociedade” by Antonio Candido (2006, concerning the participation of society and authorship in a piece of literature.

  20. William Whiston, suur veeuputus ja kohutav spektaakel

    OpenAIRE

    Roomet Jakapi

    2005-01-01

    William Whiston (1667-1752) was an English divine, mathematician and astronomer. His works nicely reveal the close relationship between science and religion in the early modern period. The paper aims to characterize Whiston's way of thinking in the light of his Astronomical Principles of Religion, Natural and Reveal'd (1717). In the 17th and early 18th century cosmologies, the location of Hell in the universe was a major issue. This horrible place of punishment could be located beneath the ea...

  1. William Gibson's cyberpunk: From simulation to reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakovljević Mladen M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The works of William Gibson, one of the most prominent writers of the cyberpunk subgenre, show how the cyberpunk vision of the interaction of real and virtual spaces has become part of the ofyective reality. Its integration into the contemporary technological and consumer society is most obvious in the tendencies of the technological development and the pace of technological changes. Gibson’s novels Neuromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive and Pattern Recognition demonstrate cyberpunk’s potentials to reflect the dilemmas referring to the integration of ofyective and virtual realities.

  2. Enough room for Williams and IMF? / Paul Beckman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Beckman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Lõppesid Leedu ja USA energeetikakompanii Williams International läbirääkimised Leedu naftakompleksis osaluse omandamise asjus. IMF uurib Leedu majanduslikku arengut, mida tehing Williamsiga komplitseerib

  3. Rock Uplift above the Yakutat Megathrust on Montague Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, K.; Armstrong, P. A.; Haeussler, P. J.; Arkle, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Yakutat microplate is subducting shallowly (~6°) beneath the North American Plate at a rate of approximately 53 mm/yr to the northwest. Deformation from this flat- slab subduction extends >600 km inland and has resulted in regions of focused rock uplift and exhumation in the Alaska Range, central Chugach Mountains, and St. Elias Mountains. Many questions still remain about how strain is partitioned between these regions of focused uplift, particularly in the Prince William Sound (southern Chugach Mountains) on Montague Island. Montague Island (and adjacent Hinchinbrook Island) are ~20 km above the megathrust where there is a large degree of coupling between the subducting Yakutat microplate and overriding North American Plate. Montague Island is of particular interest because it lies between two areas of rapid rock uplift focused in the St. Elias/eastern Chugach Mountains and the western Chugach Mountains. In the St. Elias/eastern Chugach Mountains, faulting related to collisional processes and bending of fault systems causes rapid rock uplift. About 200 km farther northwest in the western Chugach Mountains, recent rock uplift is caused by underplating along the megathrust that is focused within a syntaxial bend of major fault systems and mountain ranges. Montague Island bounds the southern margin of Prince William Sound, and is steep, narrow, and elongate (81 km long and ~15 km wide). The maximum relief is 914 m, making for very steep, mountainous topography considering the narrow width of the island. During the Mw 9.2 earthquake in 1964, the Patton Bay and Hanning Bay reverse faults were reactivated, with 7 and 5 m of vertical offset, respectively. Both faults dip ~60° NW and strike NE-SW parallel to the long-axis of the island and parallel to geomorphic features including lineaments, elongate valleys, and escarpments. Prominent ~450 m high escarpments are present along the SE-facing side of the island, which suggests rapid and sustained uplift. New apatite

  4. The scientific legacy of William Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book presents a modern scholarly analysis of issues associated with England’s most famous astronomer, William Herschel. The world’s leading experts on Herschel, discoverer of the planet Uranus, here offer their combined wisdom on many aspects of his life and astronomical research. Solar system topics include comets, Earth’s Moon, and the spurious moons of Uranus, all objects whose observation was pioneered by Herschel.  The contributors examine his study of the structure of the Milky Way and an in-depth look at the development of the front view telescopes he built. The popular subject of extraterrestrial life is looked at from the point of view of both William Herschel and his son John, both of whom had an interest in the topic. William’s personal development through the educational system of the late eighteenth-century is also explored, and the wide range of verse and satire in various languages associated with his discoveries is collected here for the first time. Hershel worked at a time of i...

  5. Colour discrimination and categorisation in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Emily K; Cranwell, Matthew B; Alvarez, James; Franklin, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) present with impaired functioning of the dorsal visual stream relative to the ventral visual stream. As such, little attention has been given to ventral stream functions in WS. We investigated colour processing, a predominantly ventral stream function, for the first time in nineteen individuals with Williams syndrome. Colour discrimination was assessed using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test. Colour categorisation was assessed using a match-to-sample test and a colour naming task. A visual search task was also included as a measure of sensitivity to the size of perceptual colour difference. Results showed that individuals with WS have reduced colour discrimination relative to typically developing participants matched for chronological age; performance was commensurate with a typically developing group matched for non-verbal ability. In contrast, categorisation was typical in WS, although there was some evidence that sensitivity to the size of perceptual colour differences was reduced in this group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Introduction to the Arizona Sky Island Arthropod Project (ASAP): Systematics, Biogeography, Ecology, and Population Genetics of Arthropods of the Madrean Sky Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wendy; Meyer, Wallace M; Eble, Jeffrey A; Franklin, Kimberly; Wiens, John F; Brusca, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    The Arizona Sky Island Arthropod Project (ASAP) is a new multi-disciplinary research program at the University of Arizona that combines systematics, biogeography, ecology, and population genetics to study origins and patterns of arthropod diversity along elevation gradients and among mountain ranges in the Madrean Sky Island Region. Arthropods represent taxonomically and ecologically diverse organisms that drive key ecosystem processes in this mountain archipelago. Using data from museum specimens and specimens we obtain during long-term collecting and monitoring programs, ASAP will document arthropod species across Arizona's Sky Islands to address a number of fundamental questions about arthropods of this region. Baseline data will be used to determine climatic boundaries for target species, which will then be integrated with climatological models to predict future changes in arthropod communities and distributions in the wake of rapid climate change. ASAP also makes use of the natural laboratory provided by the Sky Islands to investigate ecological and genetic factors that influence diversification and patterns of community assembly. Here, we introduce the project, outline overarching goals, and describe preliminary data from the first year of sampling ground-dwelling beetles and ants in the Santa Catalina Mountains.

  7. Introduction to the Arizona Sky Island Arthropod Project (ASAP): Systematics, Biogeography, Ecology, and Population Genetics of Arthropods of the Madrean Sky Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wendy; Meyer, Wallace M.; Eble, Jeffrey A.; Franklin, Kimberly; Wiens, John F.; Brusca, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The Arizona Sky Island Arthropod Project (ASAP) is a new multi-disciplinary research program at the University of Arizona that combines systematics, biogeography, ecology, and population genetics to study origins and patterns of arthropod diversity along elevation gradients and among mountain ranges in the Madrean Sky Island Region. Arthropods represent taxonomically and ecologically diverse organisms that drive key ecosystem processes in this mountain archipelago. Using data from museum specimens and specimens we obtain during long-term collecting and monitoring programs, ASAP will document arthropod species across Arizona's Sky Islands to address a number of fundamental questions about arthropods of this region. Baseline data will be used to determine climatic boundaries for target species, which will then be integrated with climatological models to predict future changes in arthropod communities and distributions in the wake of rapid climate change. ASAP also makes use of the natural laboratory provided by the Sky Islands to investigate ecological and genetic factors that influence diversification and patterns of community assembly. Here, we introduce the project, outline overarching goals, and describe preliminary data from the first year of sampling ground-dwelling beetles and ants in the Santa Catalina Mountains. PMID:25505938

  8. Mental Health Problems in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Elison, Sarah; Howlin, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Although many researchers have investigated emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals with Williams syndrome, few have used standardized diagnostic assessments. We examined mental health problems in 92 adults with Williams syndrome using the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities--PAS-ADD (Moss,…

  9. Sir William Henry Perkin: The Man and his 'Mauve'

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    student endowed with musical talent, and skills in drawing, painting and photography. His first photograph ... William with the intention, in addition to using his drawing skill, to influence William to take up architecture as ..... industry and a leader not only in making dyes and their applica- tion, but also in chemical engineering.

  10. Longitudinal Course of Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einfeld, Stewart L.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Rees, Vaughan W.

    2001-01-01

    A follow-up study of behavior and emotional problems in 53 young people with Williams syndrome 5 years after first assessment found substantial persistence in the overall level of behavior and emotional problems. Comparison with young people with mental retardation due to other causes found Williams subjects had significantly higher overall…

  11. Pursuing the Panderer: An Analysis of "United States v. Williams"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrain, Patrick N.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2008, the Supreme Court addressed whether the government can regulate the ownership and distribution of virtual child pornography. "U.S. v. Williams" marked the first time the Court directly addressed the concept of pandering virtual child pornography. This article examines the Court's decision in "U.S. v. Williams" and…

  12. 77 FR 72960 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 685 RIN 1840-AD05 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary... of William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) program regulations that establish a new income...

  13. March 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, March 22, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There 11 attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, thoracic surgery and radiology communities. There was a discussion of supporting the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced into the Arizona State Legislature. The bill was assigned to the House Commerce Committee but was not scheduled for a hearing by the Chair-Representative, Jeff Wininger from Chandler. It seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced in the future and the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Three cases were presented: 1. Dr. Bridgett Ronan presented a 57-year-old man with cough and shortness of breath. His physical examination and spirometry were unremarkable. A thoracic CT scan showed large calcified and noncalcified pleural plaques and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. …

  14. December 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Robbins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A breakfast meeting of the Arizona Thoracic Society and the Tucson winter lung series was held on Saturday, 12/14/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center Campus beginning at 8:30 AM. There were 31 in attendance. A lecture was presented by Joe G. N. "Skip" Garcia, MD, the senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. The title of Garcia’s talk was “Personalizing Medicine in Cardiopulmonary Disorders: The Post ACA Landscape”. Garcia began with reiterating that the Affordable Care Act (ACA, Obamacare is fact and could pose a threat to academic medical centers. However, he views the ACA as an opportunity to develop personalized medicine which grew from the human genome project. Examples cited included the genetic variability among patients in determining the dose of warfarin and bronchodilator response to beta agonists in asthma (1,2. Garcia’s laboratory has studied predominately 6 diseases including the …

  15. July 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The first Arizona Thoracic Society meeting in Tucson was held on Wednesday, 7/24/2013 at Kiewit Auditorium on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 36 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Dinner was sponsored by Accredo Health Group. A brief discussion was held of plans to have the December 2013 meeting in Tucson on a weekend as part of the University of Arizona winter pulmonary meeting. There were 4 cases presented: 1.Mohammad Dalabih presented a case of a 48 yo woman with respiratory failure cared for by Gordon Carr, Linda Snyder, and himself. Radiology findings were discussed by Isabel Oliva. Lung biopsy showed acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia rather than ARDS and was presented by Richard Sobonya. 2.Franz Rischard presented a case of a 61 year old with progressive dyspnea and moderate COPD with evidence of

  16. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  17. September 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There was a discussion of the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced the last session in the Arizona State Legislature. Since it seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced, the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Dr. Rick Robbins announced that the SWJPCC has applied to be included in PubMed. In addition, Dr. Robbins was assigned the task of tracking down the campaign contributions to congressional members from the tobacco PAC before the next election. There were 7 case presentations: 1.\tAshley L. Garrett, MD, pulmonary fellow at Mayo, presented an elderly man with insulin-dependent diabetes who felt he …

  18. University of Arizona Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Joseph [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Muralidharan, Krishna [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2012-12-31

    Boiled down to its essentials, the grant’s purpose was to develop and demonstrate the viability of compressed air energy storage (CAES) for use in renewable energy development. While everyone agrees that energy storage is the key component to enable widespread adoption of renewable energy sources, the development of a viable scalable technology has been missing. The Department of Energy has focused on expanded battery research and improved forecasting, and the utilities have deployed renewable energy resources only to the extent of satisfying Renewable Portfolio Standards. The lack of dispatchability of solar and wind-based electricity generation has drastically increased the cost of operation with these components. It is now clear that energy storage coupled with accurate solar and wind forecasting make up the only combination that can succeed in dispatchable renewable energy resources. Conventional batteries scale linearly in size, so the price becomes a barrier for large systems. Flow batteries scale sub-linearly and promise to be useful if their performance can be shown to provide sufficient support for solar and wind-base electricity generation resources. Compressed air energy storage provides the most desirable answer in terms of scalability and performance in all areas except efficiency. With the support of the DOE, Tucson Electric Power and Science Foundation Arizona, the Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy (AzRISE) at the University of Arizona has had the opportunity to investigate CAES as a potential energy storage resource.

  19. Sir William Ramsay and the noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Ramsay was one of the world's leading scientists at the end of the 19th century, and in a spectacular period of research between 1894 and 1898, he discovered five new elements. These were the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon; they added a whole new group to the Periodic Table of the elements, and provided the keystone to our understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, and the way those electrons bind the atoms together into molecules. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904, the first such prize to come to a British subject. He was also a man of great charm, a good linguist, and a composer and performer of music, poetry and song. This review will trace his career, describe his character and give and account of the chemistry which led to the award of the Nobel Prize.

  20. William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. McCracken

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available William Keit was born in Saxony in 1841 and in early life travelled across Europe working in many famous nurseries and gardens. In 1872 on the recommendation of the director of Kew Gardens, Keit emigrated to Natal to become curator of the Durban Botanic Garden. So dilapidated was this garden that Keit was faced with the task of virtually re-establishing it.Though he was largely successful in this endeavour, as he was in fortifying the link between Natal and Kew, Keit could not solve the problems of a severe drought,a labour shortage and a scarcity of funds. In 1881 he resigned his position leaving a solid foundation on which the renowned botanist, John Medley Wood was to build. Keit in later Ufe ran a successful nursery in Durban and for 30 years was curator of the Parks and Gardens Department,in which capacity he did more than anyone else to beautify Durban.

  1. [William W. Cadbury and canton hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze-Sheng; Liu, Ze-En

    2004-01-01

    William W. Cadbury M.D. was born in Philadelphia, USA and graduated from the Medical College of Pennsylvania University. It was nearly 40 years since he arrived in Canton (Guangzhou) in 1909 and left at retirement age. He taught western medicine in Canton Christian College and worked as a medical doctor in Canton Hospital, the oldest western medical hospital in the Orient. He was regarded as a famous foreign doctor and an excellent professor in internal medicine in the Republic of China. He wrote At the point of Lancet: 100 years of Canton Hospital 1835 - 1935, which recorded the achievement made by American missionary doctors, particularly the pioneers such as Peter Parker M.D. and John G. Kerr. M.D. So far the book is still an important reference for the studies on history of western medicine in China and the history of modern medical exchange between China and other countries.

  2. A Mystic in English Literature: William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fahri DOĞAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have never been satisfied with this ephemeral world. Perhaps, yearning and desire of rejoining −stemming from the descent from the heaven to the earth− are the emotions felt by the members of both celestial and non-celestial religions. Mysticism, having started with the zeal of people who weren‘t satisfied with this ephemeral world towards the eternal world, aimed at the love of God in the religions where there is a belief of single God. In this article, glancing at the life of a Christian mystic William Blake, we will try to shed light into his mystic thoughts. While studying Blake‘s mystic thoughts, there will be common points with Sufism. Nevertheless, analysis of these common points has been assigned to other studies.

  3. Random Thoughts on William Shakespeare and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicine and literature have always been connected over the ages. William Shakespeare (1564-1616 is no exception. There are plenty of references to medicine and diseases in the works of Shakespeare. The knowledge which Shakespeare has of medical conditions is much more than is expected of a common man. This is attributed to his association with practitioners of his time and reading of contemporary texts in medicine. Also his son in law Dr. John Hall who married Susanna, Shakespeare's eldest daughter would have contributed substantially to the knowledge of medicine in Shakespeare's compositions. Surgery at the Elizabethan times was well known and is reflected to a large extent in his plays.

  4. William Bateson, human genetics and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter S

    2005-10-01

    The importance of human genetics in the work of William Bateson (1861-1926) and in his promotion of Mendelism in the decade following the 1900 rediscovery of Mendel's work is described. Bateson had close contacts with clinicians interested in inherited disorders, notably Archibald Garrod, to whom he suggested the recessive inheritance of alkaptonuria, and the ophthalmologist Edward Nettleship, and he lectured extensively to medical groups. Bateson's views on human inheritance were far sighted and cautious. Not only should he be regarded as one of the founders of human genetics, but human genetics itself should be seen as a key element of the foundations of mendelian inheritance, not simply a later development from knowledge gained by study of other species.

  5. Lorraine Williams Greene (1950-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Guy; Bradford, Adrienne

    2017-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Lorraine Williams Greene who died on February 25, 2016. Lorraine started her professional career as a school psychologist for the Atlanta Public Schools. For the rest of her life, she was involved in her community through her church, her sorority, the Coalition of One Hundred Black Women, and other national and local service organizations. Within the American Psychological Association (APA), Lorraine was active in Division 18, Psychologists in Public Service, first as Chair of the Police and Public Safety Section, then as the division's representative to APA Council, and, in 2016, as President-elect of the Division. She was also active in Divisions 45 and 56. In 2014, she received a Presidential Citation from APA President Nadine J. Kaslow for her dedicated service to law enforcement. In 2015, she received the Harold Hildreth Award for Distinguished Public Service, the highest award from the division. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Mountain Plover [ds109

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Point locations representing observations of mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) feeding and roosting flocks (and occasional individuals) documented during an...

  7. Geologic map of the Fredonia 30' x 60' quadrangle, Mohave and Coconino counties, northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, George H.; Priest, Susan S.; Felger, Tracey J.

    2008-01-01

    This geologic map is the result of a cooperative effort of the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Park Service, the U.S. Forest Service, and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Kaibab-Paiute Tribe to provide a regional geologic database for resource management officials of all government and agencies, city municipalities, private enterprises, and individuals of this part of the Arizona Strip. The Arizona Strip is part of northwestern Arizona north of the Colorado River and bounded by the States of Nevada and Utah. Field work on the Kaibab-Paiute Indian Reservation was conducted from 2002 to 2005 with permission from the Kaibab-Paiute Tribal Government of that administration and permission was granted to publish a geologic map of 4 quadrangles online (Billingsley and others, 2004). The Kaibab-Paiute Tribal government of 2006 to 2008 requested that all geologic information within the Kaibab-Paiute Indian Reservation not be published as part of the Fredonia 30' x 60' quadrangle (this publication). For further information, contact the Kaibab-Paiute Tribal government at HC 65 Box 2, Fredonia, Arizona, 86022, telephone # (928) 643-7245. Visitors to the Kaibab-Paiute Indian Reservation are required to obtain a permit and permission for access from the Tribal Offices at the junction of State Highway 389 and the paved road leading to Pipe Spring National Monument. The Fredonia 30' x 60' quadrangle encompasses approximately 5,018 km2 (1,960 mi2) within Mohave and Coconino Counties, northern Arizona and is bounded by longitude 112 deg to 113 deg W., and latitude 36 deg 30' to 37 deg N. The map area lies within the southern Colorado Plateaus geologic province (herein Colorado Plateau). The map area is locally subdivided into seven physiographic parts: the Grand Canyon (Kanab Canyon and its tributaries), Kanab Plateau, Uinkaret Plateau, Kaibab Plateau, Paria Plateau, House Rock Valley, and Moccasin Mountains as defined by Billingsley and others, 1997, (fig. 1

  8. Cardiovascular Spectrum in Williams-Beuren Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubens Figueroa, Jesús; Rodríguez, Luz María Olivares; Hach, José Luis Pablos; Del Castillo Ruíz, Victoria; Martínez, Héctor Osnaya

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have identified and evaluated the cardiovascular anomalies associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome in children. In a retrospective, lineal, and observational study, we reviewed the files of children who were seen from 1980 through 2005 (25 years) after a clinical diagnosis of Williams-Beuren syndrome. Forty children were diagnosed with this syndrome at the National Institute of Pediatrics in Mexico City. Of these, 32 (80%) were found to have congenital heart defects. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3:1 and ages ranged from 6 months to 15 years (mean, 4.4 years) at the time of diagnosis. All of the patients had morphologic and genetic characteristics typical of the syndrome. We emphasize the cardiovascular aspects from a clinical point of view. Supravalvular aortic stenosis was our most frequent finding, in 18 of 32 patients (56%); gradient differences in these patients ranged from 14 to 81 mmHg. Five patients showed combined lesions, the most frequent being supravalvular aortic stenosis in combination with pulmonary artery brachial stenosis, or with atrial and ventricular defects. Patients with incomplete atrioventricular defect and bicuspid aortic valve, as were seen at our hospital, have not to our knowledge been reported in other studies. One of the patients was scheduled for balloon dilation; another was scheduled for surgery; a 3rd patient was operated on twice for the placement of an aorto-aortic bridge; another underwent ventricular septal defect closure; and yet another underwent aortoplasty, this last dying shortly after surgery. PMID:18941598

  9. A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; González-Canche, Manuel; Moll, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Part 1 of the Arizona Educational Equity Project. Overall findings show that most of these Arizona teachers have a great deal of faith in their ELL students' ability to achieve at grade level but that the 4 hour ELD block to which they are assigned is not helping them to catch up with their English speaking peers. Related Documents A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners Abstract: In this study a representative sample of 880 elementar...

  10. Rock uplift above the subduction megathrust at Montague and Hinchinbrook Islands, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly M.

    Deformation related to the transition from strike-slip to convergent slip during flat-slab subduction of the Yakutat microplate has resulted in regions of focused rock uplift and exhumation. In the St. Elias and Chugach Mountains, faulting related to transpressional processes and bending of fault systems coupled with enhanced glacial erosion causes rapid exhumation. Underplating below the syntaxial bend farther west in the Chugach Mountains and central Prince William Sound causes focused, but less rapid, exhumation. Farther south in the Prince William Sound, plate boundary deformation transitions from strike-slip to nearly full convergence in the Montague Island and Hinchinbrook Island region, which is ˜20 km above the megathrust between the Yakutat microplate and overriding North American Plate. Montague and Hinchinbrook Islands are narrow, elongate, and steep, with a structural grain formed by several megathrust fault splays, some of which slipped during the 1964 M9.2 earthquake. Presented here are 32 new apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 28 new apatite fission-track (AFT) ages from the Montague and Hinchinbrook Island regions. Most AHe ages are Hanning Bay and Patton Bay faults during the 1964 earthquake. AFT ages range from ˜5 Ma to ˜20 Ma and are also younger at the SW end of Montague Island. These ages and corresponding exhumation rates indicate that the Montague and Hinchinbrook Island region is a narrow zone of intense deformation probably related to duplex thrusting along one or more megathrust fault splays. I interpret the rates of rock uplift and exhumation to have increased in the last ˜5 My, especially at the southwest end of the island system and farthest from the region dominated by strike-slip and transpressional deformation to the northeast. The narrow band of deformation along these islands likely represents the northwestern edge of a broader swath of plate boundary deformation between the Montague-Hinchinbrook Island region and the Kayak Island

  11. Investigation of the geology and hydrology of the Coconino Plateau of northern Arizona: a project of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Marilyn E.; Bills, Donald J.

    2002-01-01

    The water resources of the Coconino Plateau in northern Arizona are under increasing demand as a result of development. The population of this arid region continues to grow, and the number of visitors to the many national and state parks and monuments in the region has increased annually. The sustainability, protection, and maintenance of springs and seeps and associated riparian habitat on the Coconino Plateau are major issues that have broad public and governmental support. Regional stakeholders agree that an improved understanding of the regional hydrogeologic system is needed to address the concerns of water supply and ground-water sustainability. The base of information required to adequately describe the hydrogeology of the Coconino Plateau currently does not exist. Hydrogeologic data is most abundant for large population centers like Flagstaff and Sedona, but is sparse for less populated areas like Williams, Tusayan, Valle, and Cameron. There are still large parts of the Coconino Plateau for which there is no basic geologic or hydrologic information available. In order to develop a hydrogeologic framework for the Coconino Plateau, a comprehensive effort is needs to compile existent data and collect additional data to fill in data gaps and reinforce limited information. In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began an assessment of the hydrogeology of the Coconino Plateau in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR) as part of the Rural Watershed Initiative, a program established by the State of Arizona and managed by the ADWR. Assessments also are underway in the upper-middle Verde River watershed (Woodhouse and others, 2002) to the south and in the Mogollon Highlands to the southeast (Parker and Flynn, 2000). Each study has as its objectives: (1) the collection, compilation, and evaluation of all existing geologic, hydrologic, and related data pertaining to the study area and the creation of a database that is readily accessible

  12. Life history attributes data for Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus) in Arizona 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Janet M.

    2017-01-01

    Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus (commonly referred to as the Arizona Grasshopper Sparrow) occurs in the desert and plains grasslands of southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico, and northern Sonora, Mexico. Although a subspecies of conservation concern, this data was produced as part of the first intensive study of its life history and breeding ecology, providing baseline data and facilitating comparisons with other North American Grasshopper Sparrow subspecies. This study is described in the publication listed in the larger work citation of this metadata record. 

  13. Beaver dams, hydrological thresholds, and controlled floods as a management tool in a desert riverine ecosystem, Bill Williams River, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, D.C.; Shafroth, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Beaver convert lotic stream habitat to lentic through dam construction, and the process is reversed when a flood or other event causes dam failure. We investigated both processes on a regulated Sonoran Desert stream, using the criterion that average current velocity is control the probability of major damage at low (attenuated) flood magnitude. We conclude that environmental flows prescribed to sustain desert riparian forest will also reduce beaver-created lentic habitat in a non-linear manner determined by both beaver dam and flood attributes. Consideration of both desirable and undesirable consequences of ecological engineering by beaver is important when optimizing environmental flows to meet ecological and socioeconomic goals. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification. Stage 1 Report for Williams Air Force Base, Chandler, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-24

    The Gilman- Estrella -Avondale Association covers the southern half of the base. This soil association consists of clay loam, sandy loam and loam with... Estrella -Avondale Association. This association of very fine sands, silts, and clayey sands is evident to a depth of 38 to 50 feet in all seven of the test...Area The soil at the fire protection training area is listed by the Soil Conservation Service as being of the Gilman- Estrella -Avondale Association

  15. Comprehension of metaphor and metonymy in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Van Herwegen, Jo; Thomas, Michael; Fishman, Roza; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Figurative language, such as metaphor and metonymy, is very common in daily language use. Its underlying cognitive processes are sometimes viewed as lying at the interface of language and thought. Williams syndrome, which is a rare genetic developmental disorder, provides an opportunity to study this interface because individuals with this disorder have relative strengths in vocabulary and syntax against a background of low general cognitive ability. Few studies have investigated metaphor comprehension in Williams syndrome and none has investigated metonymy. This is the first study to investigate metaphor and metonymy comprehension in Williams syndrome and to compare their performance with a group of typically developing children. Ten children with Williams syndrome were compared with eleven typically developing children in a novel metaphor-metonymy comprehension task. Cross-sectional trajectory analyses were used to compare the development of metaphor and metonymy using a child-friendly story picture task. Trajectories were constructed linking task performance either to chronological age or to measures of mental age (receptive vocabulary, visuospatial construction). The performance of children with Williams syndrome was significantly poorer than the typically developing group. The comprehension of metonyms was in line with receptive vocabulary, but comprehension of metaphors fell below this level. Metonyms may be part of vocabulary and treated as synonyms in Williams syndrome, while metaphor engages additional cognitive mechanisms outside language that develop atypically in this disorder. Despite earlier reports that emphasize good language skills, the Williams syndrome language system shows anomalies compared with typical development.

  16. Post-fire forest dynamics and climate variability affect spatial and temporal properties of spruce beetle outbreaks on a Sky Island mountain range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher D. O' Connor; Ann M. Lynch; Donald A. Falk; Thomas W. Swetnam

    2014-01-01

    The spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) is known for extensive outbreaks resulting in high spruce mortality, but several recent outbreaks in the western United States have been among the largest and most severe in the documentary record. In the Pinaleño Mountains of southeast Arizona, U.S.A., an outbreak in the mid-1990s resulted in 85% mortality of Engelmann...

  17. Geologic Map of Wupatki National Monument and Vicinity, Coconino County, Northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, George H.; Priest, Susan S.; Felger, Tracey J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The geologic map of Wupatki National Monument is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Park Service, and the Navajo Nation to provide geologic information for resource management officials of the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Navajo Indian Reservation (herein the Navajo Nation), and visitor information services at Wupatki National Monument, Arizona. Funding for the map was provided in part by the Water Rights Branch of the Water Resources Division of the National Park Service. Field work on the Navajo Nation was conducted under a permit from the Navajo Nation Minerals Department. Any persons wishing to conduct geologic investigations on the Navajo Nation must first apply for, and receive, a permit from the Navajo Nation Minerals Department, P.O. Box 1910, Window Rock, Arizona 86515, telephone (928)-871-6587. Wupatki National Monument lies within the USGS 1:24,000-scale Wupatki NE, Wupatki SE, Wupatki SW, Gray Mountain, East of SP Mountain, and Campbell Francis Wash quadrangles in northern Arizona. The map is bounded approximately by longitudes 111? 16' to 111? 32' 30' W. and latitudes 35? 30' to 35? 37' 40' N. The map area is in Coconino County on the southern part of the Colorado Plateaus geologic province (herein Colorado Plateau). The map area is locally subdivided into three physiographic parts, the Coconino Plateau, the Little Colorado River Valley, and the San Francisco Volcanic Field as defined by Billingsley and others (1997) [fig. 1]. Elevations range from 4,220 ft (1,286 m) at the Little Colorado River near the northeast corner of the map area to about 6,100 ft (1,859 m) at the southwest corner of the map area. The small community of Gray Mountain is about 16 mi (26 km) northwest of Wupatki National Monument Visitor Center, and Flagstaff, Arizona, the nearest metropolitan area, is about 24 mi (38 km) southwest of the Visitor Center (fig. 1). U.S. Highway 89 provides access to the west entrance of

  18. Mountain Pine Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene D. Amman; Mark D. McGregor; Robert E. Jr. Dolph

    1989-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a member of a group of beetles known as bark beetles: Except when adults emerge and attack new trees, the mountain pine beetle completes its life cycle under the bark. The beetle attacks and kills lodgepole, ponderosa, sugar, and western white pines. Outbreaks frequently develop in lodgepole pine stands that...

  19. Discoverers of the universe William and Caroline Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Discoverers of the Universe tells the gripping story of William Herschel, the brilliant, fiercely ambitious, emotionally complex musician and composer who became court astronomer to Britain's King George III, and of William's sister, Caroline, who assisted him in his observations of the night sky and became an accomplished astronomer in her own right. Together, they transformed our view of the universe from the unchanging, mechanical creation of Newton's clockmaker god to the ever-evolving, incredibly dynamic cosmos that it truly is. William was in his forties when his amateur observations usi

  20. Osler usque ad mare: the SS William Osler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, C S; Fransiszyn, M

    1999-10-05

    William Osler's connections with the sea included a strong family history of seafaring, his own transatlantic crossings (of which there were at least 32) and the occasional use of nautical imagery in his inspirational writings. An unusual Oslerian connection with the sea emerged after his death in the form of a World War II Liberty ship. Through the SS William Osler and its sister ships, Osler was symbolically reunited with colleagues associated with the early days of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The William Osler circumnavigated the globe in 1943 without engaging the enemy. She was then converted into an army hospital ship and renamed the USHS Wisteria.

  1. MacWilliams Identity for Codes with the Rank Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Yan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The MacWilliams identity, which relates the weight distribution of a code to the weight distribution of its dual code, is useful in determining the weight distribution of codes. In this paper, we derive the MacWilliams identity for linear codes with the rank metric, and our identity has a different form than that by Delsarte. Using our MacWilliams identity, we also derive related identities for rank metric codes. These identities parallel the binomial and power moment identities derived for codes with the Hamming metric.

  2. MacWilliams Identity for Codes with the Rank Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadouleau Maximilien

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The MacWilliams identity, which relates the weight distribution of a code to the weight distribution of its dual code, is useful in determining the weight distribution of codes. In this paper, we derive the MacWilliams identity for linear codes with the rank metric, and our identity has a different form than that by Delsarte. Using our MacWilliams identity, we also derive related identities for rank metric codes. These identities parallel the binomial and power moment identities derived for codes with the Hamming metric.

  3. 77 FR 25737 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... present in the collections. In December 1950, the Gila Pueblo Foundation closed and the collections were... material culture are consistent with the Hohokam archeological tradition and indicate occupation between... Pueblo Foundation closed and the collections were donated to the Arizona State Museum. The one...

  4. How Arizona's Dropout Crisis Affects Communities, Creates Economic Losses for the State of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    WestEd, 2014

    2014-01-01

    One-in-five of Arizona's youth did not complete high school and a similarly large proportion of the state's youth is disconnected from either work or education. These youth face higher risks of unemployment and economic insecurity and are more reliant on government supports. This situation, which fails to ensure that the state's youth are…

  5. William Blake: escritura y lectura iluminadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Picón

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerando que la fuerza divina es un poder propiamente humano, que permite trascender desde la mera visualización y percepción sensorial del mundo finito y terrenal hacia el reino eterno y verdadero de la imaginación, el poeta, artista y visionario inglés William Blake (1757-1827 identificó a dios con dicha facultad humana. En su lucha contra la ‘religión de la razón’, bajo cuyo poder el hombre se había limitado a la ‘vacía’ percepción exterior, Blake buscará recobrar la ‘religión de la imaginación’. Desde esta perspectiva, este estudio pretende dilucidar el modo en que la materialidad de lo escrito (Roger Chartier y la utilización de un método de escritura particular por parte del visionario -distinto al que su propio tiempo le ofrecía- afecta el circuito de la comunicación visionaria de comienzo a fin, relacionándose directamente con la finalidad que Blake otorgó a sus poemas proféticos iluminados: despertar en los lectores esa capacidad visionaria y verdadera que ‘reside en el pecho de todos los hombres’.Considering the ‘divine force’ as a human power that allows humans to transcend from the mere sensory visualization and perception of the finite and earthly world to the true and eternal realm of imagination, William Blake, the english poet, artist and visionary (1757-1827 identified god with this human faculty. In his struggle against the ‘religion of reason’, under which humans had been reduced to an ‘empty’ outward perception, Blake wants to recover the ‘religion of imagination’. From this perspective, I expect to elucidate the ways in which the material aspects of writing (Roger Chartier and the visionary use of a specific method of writing -different from the methods available to Blake in his own time- affect the visionary circuit of communication. This complete transformation is directly connected with the purpose of Blake’s illuminated prophetic poems: he intends to awake in his

  6. Arizona Lesson Observation and Evaluation (ALOE): Design Test Edition, 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargo, J. Steven; And Others

    The Arizona Lesson Observation and Evaluation (ALOE) system of evaluating teaching is presented. ALOE was developed from Arizona adaptations of the Georgia Teacher Performance Assessment Instruments and, with G. Taylor's "Functional Elements Analysis of Teaching Skills" (FEATS), forms an integrated observation package which allows…

  7. Transformational Leadership and Teacher Motivation in Southwestern Arizona High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and teacher motivation in Southwestern Arizona high schools. Teachers in a school district in Southwestern Arizona comprised of high schools were surveyed using two instruments, Leithwood and Jantzi's (1998) The Leadership and Management of Schools in…

  8. Applying Water-Level Difference Control to Central Arizona Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) has been supplying Colorado River water to Central Arizona for roughly 25 years. The CAP canal is operated remotely with a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) System. Gate position changes are made either manually or through the use of automatic control...

  9. 7 CFR 1131.2 - Arizona marketing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Arizona marketing area. 1131.2 Section 1131.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating...

  10. Innovations in Arizona's Accountability Policies and Frameworks for Alternative Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessman, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This study presents Arizona's innovations in academic accountability policy and academic accountability frameworks for alternative schools. A timeline of statutes and regulations including the State Board of Education approved alternative school definition provides Arizona's context for alternative school accountability policy and frameworks.…

  11. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1983 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Intended to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, the 1983 annual report reflects the Commission's continued efforts to improve communications and understanding, and especially to strengthen working relationships between Arizona tribes and state government. The report…

  12. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1974-75 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    The Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1974-75 Annual Report is issued to inform the Governor, State Legislature, and tribal governments of the proceedings, transactions, findings, and recommendations made by the commission. Included are: (1) a list of commission members, (2) a map showing the Indian reservations in Arizona, (3) a table listing…

  13. The impact of Arizona Highways Magazine on tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to: 1) examine the effect of Arizona Highways Magazine (AHM) on tourism, 2) determine trip : characteristics of AHM subscribers traveling in Arizona, and 3) calculate a benefit/cost ratio for AHM based on the : magazine...

  14. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  15. William Cheselden: anatomist, surgeon, and medical illustrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M A

    1999-11-01

    William Cheselden was Great Britain's foremost surgeon/scientist in the first half of the 18th century. Cheselden directly challenged the Company of Barber-Surgeons' exclusive right to control dissection in London by being the first to conduct a regular series of anatomy lectures and demonstrations outside of the Company's Hall. He incorporated his lecture syllabus into a handbook of anatomy, The Anatomy of the Humane Body, which was used by students for nearly 100 years. Cheselden also wrote the text and drew the illustrations for a majestic atlas of comparative osteology, the Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones. Cheselden used his superior knowledge of anatomy to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with perineal lithotomy, one of the few operations possible in his era. Sagacious and pragmatic, Cheselden recognized that the enlightened practice of surgery beginning to take root in 18th-century London could flourish only under an autonomous body of surgeons. Cheselden used his personal funds and political skills to urge Parliament to pass legislation for the dissolution of the combined Company of Barber-Surgeons and the establishment of separate and distinct Surgeons' and Barbers' Companies. After disjoinder of the two groups on May 2, 1745, Cheselden served as one of the Wardens of the new Company of Surgeons--a predecessor of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In 1746, Cheselden, who helped design the first Surgeons' Hall, served as the Company's Master.

  16. Sir William Mitchell (1925-2002)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Sir William (Bill) Mitchell, former President of the CERN Council, died on 30th October 2002 at the age of 77. Mitchell was professor of Physics at Oxford University from 1978 to 1989, having previously been Professor of Physics, Dean of Science and Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Reading University. From 1985 to 1990 he was Chairman of the UK's Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC), which at the time was the funding agency for the UK's participation in the CERN programme. As Chairman, Mitchell was one of the UK representatives on the CERN Council, and in 1991 he was elected President, a position he held for three years. This was a difficult period for CERN. Financial problems were being faced in many member states, notably in Germany as a result of unification. This led to calls for reductions in the CERN budget and, more significantly, to requests for delays in consderation of future programmes. On the other hand for the future of CERN and the progress of elementary particle physics, it was necessary...

  17. Analysis of speech fluency in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Natalia Freitas; Sampaio, Adriana; Gonçalves, Oscar F; Giacheti, Célia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder, often referred as being characterized by dissociation between verbal and non-verbal abilities, although the number of studies disputing this proposal is emerging. Indeed, although they have been traditionally reported as displaying increased speech fluency, this topic has not been fully addressed in research. In previous studies carried out with a small group of individuals with WS, we reported speech breakdowns during conversational and autobiographical narratives suggestive of language difficulties. In the current study, we characterized the speech fluency profile using an ecologically based measure--a narrative task (story generation) was collected from a group of individuals with WS (n = 30) and typically developing group (n = 39) matched in mental age. Oral narratives were elicited using a picture stimulus--the cookie theft picture from Boston Diagnosis Aphasia Test. All narratives were analyzed according to typology and frequency of fluency breakdowns (non-stuttered and stuttered disfluencies). Oral narratives in WS group differed from typically developing group, mainly due to a significant increase in the frequency of disfluencies, particularly in terms of hesitations, repetitions and pauses. This is the first evidence of disfluencies in WS using an ecologically based task (oral narrative task), suggesting that these speech disfluencies may represent a significant marker of language problems in WS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Space perception and William James's metaphysical presuppositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Martin J

    2011-05-01

    William James's overtly philosophical work may be more continuous with his psychological work than is sometimes thought. His Essays in Radical Empiricism can be understood as an explicit statement of the absolute presupposition that formed the basis of Jamesian psychology: that direct experience is primary and has to be taken at face value. An examination of James's theory of space perception suggests that, even in his early work, he presupposed the primacy of direct experience, and that later changes in his account of space perception can be understood as making his view more consistent with this presupposition. In his earlier view of space perception, James argued that sensations were directly experienced as spatial, though he accepted that spatial relations between sensations may be constructed by higher order thought. In his later view, however, James argued that spatial relations were just as directly experienced as sensations. The work of T. H. Green may have prompted James to recognize the full consequence of his ideas and to realize that taking experience at face value required that spatial relations be thought of as intrinsic to experience rather than the result of intellectual construction.

  19. William Pendry Bidelman (1918-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2017-01-01

    William P. Bidelman—Editor of these Publications from 1956 to 1961—passed away on 2011 May 3, at the age of 92. He was one of the last of the masters of visual stellar spectral classification and the identification of peculiar stars. I review his contributions to these subjects, including the discoveries of barium stars, hydrogen-deficient stars, high-galactic-latitude supergiants, stars with anomalous carbon content, and exotic chemical abundances in peculiar A and B stars. Bidelman was legendary for his encyclopedic knowledge of the stellar literature. He had a profound and inspirational influence on many colleagues and students. Some of the bizarre stellar phenomena he discovered remain unexplained to the present day. Material for this article was contributed by several family members, colleagues, and former students, including: Billie Bidelman Little, Joseph Little, James Caplinger, D. Jack MacConnell, Wayne Osborn, George W. Preston, Nancy G. Roman, and Nolan Walborn. Any opinions stated are those of the author.

  20. Slovene reactions to William Faulkner's writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Intihar Klančar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Slovene reactions to William Faulkner's writing: a lot of critical attention was given to the author twice, namely after he won the Nobel Prize for Literature  in 1949 and after his death in 1962. The articles and reviews published  in Slovene magazines  and newspapers focused on themes, characterization, style and structure of his novels. Thus the Slovene reading public got the chance to get to know one of the greatest novelists of 20th century, his troubled, decaying, socially, racially, religiously and historically challenged American South and through it themselves and their attitude toward the world and its problems. Faulkner also had a strong influence on some of the Slovene writers of 1950s and 1960s: they adopted his themes and writing techniques, namely a cyclic structure of the novel and stream-of-consciousness technique,  thus forging the new Slovene modernist fiction that started to emerge from the late 1960s onwards.

  1. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  2. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: NESTS (Bird Nests)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  3. Marine bird populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Marine bird populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska, were censused in the winter and summer of 1972 and 1973 to assess the potential impact of oil transport...

  4. Abundance of Black Oystercatchers in Northwestern Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — On 28 May 1999, Kent Wohl and I conducted a survey for breeding black oystercatchers in northwestern Prince William Sound, Alaska. We started at Pt. Pigot and...

  5. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  6. Malformations vasculaires au cours du syndrome de Williams-Beuren

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malformations vasculaires au cours du syndrome de Williams-Beuren: à propos de trois nouvelles observations. Hicham Sator, Fatima Ezzahra Rhouni, Ibitihale Benjouad, Fatima Ezzahra Rhouni, Ibitihale Benjouad, Rachida Dafiri, Latifa Chat ...

  7. Dental management of patient with Williams Syndrome - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome is a multisystemic rare genetic disorder caused by deletion of 26-28 genes in the long arm of chromosome 7. It is characterized by developmental and physical abnormalities including congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, mental retardation, neurological features, growth deficiency, genitourinary manifestations, gastrointestinal problems, musculoskeletal problems, unique behavioral characteristics, and dental problems. Dental abnormalities include malocclusion, hypodontia, malformed teeth, taurodontism, pulp stones, increased space between teeth, enamel hypoplasia, and high prevalence of dental caries. Authors report a 17-year-old female patient with underlying Williams syndrome. Oral features and problems seen in the patient are listed. Malocclusion and screwdriver shaped teeth were noticed. Generalized widening of the periodontal ligament space with vital teeth was seen. This finding has not been reported in cases of Williams syndrome earlier. Precautions taken during dental treatment in patients with Williams syndrome are also discussed.

  8. A BRITISH TOUCH ON TANZIMAT: ARCHITECT WILLIAM JAMES SMITH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma İgüs

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the life and works of British architect William James Smith and outlines his contributions to nineteenth century Ottoman architecture and presents his prominence as an architectural historian of nineteenth century British architectural work.

  9. William L Finley - Slender False-brome Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — William L. Finley NWR contains some of the largest and best examples of remaining Oregon white oak woodland, oak savanna, and prairie habitats remaining in the...

  10. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  11. 34 CFR 685.100 - The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. 685...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM Purpose and Scope § 685.100 The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. (a) Under the William D. Ford...

  12. 76 FR 14048 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ..., ] Tucson, AZ, that meets the definition of sacred object and object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C... the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony and the Navajo Nation of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah.../object of cultural patrimony should contact John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, Arizona State Museum...

  13. November 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 19, 2014 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 30 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Jud Tillinghast was nominated as the Arizona Thoracic Society physician of the year. Three cases were presented: 1. George Parides presented a case of a 70-year-old woman with a 3 areas of ground glass picked up incidentally on CT scan. She had some wheezing. A needle biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. The biopsy and radiologic pattern were consistent with adenocarcinoma in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma. Discussion centered around treatment. Most felt that if the areas could be removed that surgical resection was indicated (1. 2. Lewis Wesselius presented a 60-year-old man with Marfan's syndrome and a history of an aortic valve replacement on chronic ...

  14. June 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The June 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 6/25/14 at the Bio5 building on the University of Arizona Medical Center campus in Tucson beginning at 5:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were about 33 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. Four cases were presented: Eric Chase presented a 68 year old incarcerated man shortness of breath, chest pain and productive cough. The patient was a poor historian. He was supposed to be receiving morphine for back pain but this had been held. He also had a 45 pound weight loss over the past year. His PMH was positive for COPD, hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic back pain and hepatitis C. Past surgical history included a back operation and some sort of chest operation. On physical examination he was tachypneic, tachycardic and multiple scars over his neck ...

  15. November 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with a lecture followed by case presentations. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, allergy, infectious disease and radiology communities. At the beginning of the meeting several issues were discussed: 1. CME offered by the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (SWJPCC is currently offered to only the Southwest state thoracic societies and the Mayo Clinic. After discussion it was felt that this restriction of access was no longer appropriate and CME credits should be available to all. 2. Efforts continue to obtain CME for the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. Our Chapter Representative, Dr. Gerry Schwartzberg, is approaching this with the American Thoracic Society. Locally, HonorHealth sent out a survey on CME needs. Members were encouraged …

  16. 'Road rage' in Arizona: armed and dangerous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah; Hemenway, David; Solop, Frederic I

    2002-11-01

    Little is known about the relationship between firearm carrying and hostile behavior on the roadway. To explore a possible association between firearm carrying by drivers and hostile driving behavior we conducted a random-digit-dial survey of 790 licensed drivers in Arizona. In addition to demographic questions, we asked whether respondents had carried a gun while driving in the 12 months prior to the survey. Respondents were also asked if they, in anger, had personally made obscene gestures, cursed or shouted at other drivers, impeded another drivers progress with their vehicle, aggressively 'followed another driver too closely', or brandished a gun at another driver. We used multivariable logistic regression to explore correlates of hostile driving behavior while taking into account several demographic and behavioral characteristics. Overall 11% of drivers always (4%) or sometimes (7%) carried a gun with them in their vehicle; 34% report having made obscene gestures/cursed/shouted angrily; 28% report aggressively following or blocking other drivers with their vehicle. In both crude and multivariate adjusted analyses, self-report of engaging in hostile behavior while driving was significantly more common among men, young adults, and individuals who carried a firearm in their car. Our findings suggest that, at least among Arizona motorists, having a gun in the car is a strong marker for aggressive and illegal behavior behind the wheel.

  17. Garcia resigns as Arizona university VP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Dr. Joe G.N. "Skip" Garcia resigned his administrative duties as senior vice president for health sciences at the University of Arizona. Garcia said he would devote his full attention as a professor at the UA College of Medicine-Tucson according to the Arizona Republic (1. "After much thought and reflection, I have decided that the time is right for me to take a step back and focus on my continually growing research commitments," Garcia said. "Please know that this decision was an exceptionally difficult one and not reached lightly, and that I am humbled by all of your support during my time as senior vice president." Garcia was hired in 2013 to oversee the university's medical schools in Phoenix and Tucson, as well as the schools of nursing, pharmacy and public health. Shortly after Garcia was hired, he reorganized UA health sciences, recruited a roster of academics and tightened oversight of …

  18. May 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The May 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 5/28/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep and radiology communities. A discussion was held regarding the Arizona Thoracic Society relationship with the American Lung Association. Several members volunteered to talk to the lung association regarding common ground to strengthen the relationship. The wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting was a big success. There were about 55 at the meeting. The tasting will probably be held again next year. At the ATS meeting data was presented that pirfenidone was effective in reducing the progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. The data was published in the New England Journal of Medicine on 8/29/14 (1. Lewis Wesselius is one of the investigators enrolling patients in a phase ...

  19. September 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/25/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. After a brief discussion, Gerry Swartzberg was selected as Arizona’s 2014 nominee for Clinician of the Year. There was 1 case presented: Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 67 year old woman with multiple pulmonary nodules. The largest was 1.2 cm CT scan. She had a fine needle aspiration of one of the nodules. The pathology revealed spindle-shaped cells which were synaptophysin + (also known as the major synaptic vesicle protein p38. Synaptophysin marks neuroendocrine tissue and on this basis the patient was diagnosed with multiple carcinoid tumors. Aguayo et al. (1 described six patients with diffuse hyperplasia and dysplasia of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, multiple carcinoid tumorlets, and peribronchiolar fibrosis …

  20. August 2013 Arizona Thoracic Society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The August Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 8/28/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. A brief discussion was held about the audio-visual aids available. It was generally agreed that our current projector is inadequate. Judd Tillinghast will inquire about using a hospital overhead projector. If that is not possible, it was agreed to purchase a new projector. Plans for telecasting the meeting between Phoenix and Tucson continue. A trial of a link between Shea and the University in Tucson failed. Once the link is successfully established, it is hoped that the meeting can be telecasted. There were 6 cases presented: 1. Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 10 year old boy with chronic dyspnea for > 4 yrs. He had growth retardation since age …

  1. The evolution and age of populations of Scaphinotus petersi Roeschke on Arizona Sky Islands (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Cychrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ober

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Populations of the ground beetle Scaphinotus petersi are isolated in subalpine conifer forest habitats on mountain ranges or Sky Islands in southeastern Arizona. Previous work on this species has suggested these populations have been isolated since the last post-glacial maximum times as warming caused this cool adapted species to retreat to high elevations. To test this hypothesis, we inferred the phylogeny from mitochondrial DNA sequence data from several Arizona Sky Island populations of S. petersi and estimated the divergence time of the currently isolated populations. We found two major clades of S. petersi, an eastern clade and a western group. Our results indicated most mountain ranges form clades except the Huachucas, which are polyphyletic and the Santa Catalinas, which are paraphyletic. We estimated the Pinaleño population is much older than the last glacial maximum, but the Huachuca and Pinal populations may have been fragmented from the Santa Catalina population since the post-glacial maximum times.

  2. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Timeline

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document details all of the major events having occurred at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal from it's establishment on May 2, 1942 up through the document's release...

  3. Diurnal variation of mountain waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Mountain waves could be modified as the boundary layer varies between stable and convective. However case studies show mountain waves day and night, and above e.g. convective rolls with precipitation lines over mountains. VHF radar measurements of vertical wind (1990–2006 confirm a seasonal variation of mountain-wave amplitude, yet there is little diurnal variation of amplitude. Mountain-wave azimuth shows possible diurnal variation compared to wind rotation across the boundary layer.

  4. William James, Gustav Fechner, and Early Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Hawkins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available American psychologist and philosopher William James devoted the entirety of his career to exploring the nature of volition, as expressed by such phenomena as will, attention, and belief. As part of that endeavor, James's unorthodox scientific pursuits, from his experiments with nitrous oxide and hallucinogenic drugs to his investigation of spiritualist mediums, represent his attempt to address the "hard problems" of consciousness for which his training in brain physiology and experimental psychology could not entirely account. As a student, James's reading in chemistry and physics had sparked his interest in the concepts of energy and force, terms that he later deployed in his writing about consciousness and in his arguments against philosophical monism and scientific materialism, as he developed his radically empiricist ideas privileging discontinuity and plurality. Despite James's long campaign against scientific materialism, he was, however, convinced of the existence of a naturalistic explanation for the more "wayward and fitful" aspects of mind, including transcendent experiences associated with hysteria, genius, and religious ecstasy. In this paper, I examine aspects of James's thought that are still important for contemporary debates in psychology and neuroscience: his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and, finally, the related concept of "the compounding of consciousness," which postulates the theoretical possibility for individual entities within a conscious system of thought to "know" the thoughts of others within the system. Taken together, these ideas suggest that James, in spite of, or perhaps because of, his forays into metaphysics, was working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness, what I will term a "distributive model," based on his understanding of consciousness as an "awareness" that interacts dynamically within, and in relation to, its environment.

  5. William Byrd: Political and Recusant Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Foshay Bacon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amidst the pendulum of political and religious upheaval that pervaded England throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth century, William Byrd stands as one of the best loved and lauded composers. Byrd succeeded in the secular and sacred realms, contributing great works to the Anglican Church, popularizing the English madrigal and producing prolific amounts of sacred music. However, in a time where one’s religious beliefs were often linked with political loyalty, Byrd defied his monarch’s established and enforced Protestant religion, composing politically charged music for recusant use in clandestine Catholic Church services. His themes were aligned with the Jesuit mission and his texts were often drawn from the lips of martyred Catholics at the gallows; their last words forever immortalized by Byrd for the furthering of the Jesuit cause and the Counter-Reformation. The examination of sources by prominent Byrd scholars, an analyses of Byrd’s ‘political’ compositions and a study of the social and historical background are used to place Byrd within the appropriate context, prove his recusant and political leanings, and analyze his precarious relationship with the English monarch, Elizabeth I. It is shown that Byrd could not have proceeded with his recusant practices, personally or musically, had it not been for his status as a composer, as well as Byrd’s shrewdness in procuring diplomatic relationships with high persons at court and with Queen Elizabeth I through the Chapel Royal. Finally, Byrd’s success at writing for the Anglican Church service and popular secular music showcased his ability to take a moderate stance in situations that benefitted his status with the crown

  6. Obituary: William A. Rense (1914-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Glen

    2009-12-01

    On March 28, 2008, the space research community lost another of its pioneers. William A. Rense, professor emeritus of physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder, who died in Estes Park, Colorado, following complications from cancer. He was 94. Bill, as he was widely known, was born in 1914 in Massillon, Ohio, the son of German immigrants. His was a large family - five brothers and one sister. His father, Joseph Rense, worked for the city of Cleveland while his mother, Rosalia (Luther) Rense was a housewife. As a child, Bill developed a love of astronomy which led him to earn a bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, followed by master's and PhD degrees in physics at Ohio State University. He held teaching positions at Rutgers, University of Miami (Florida), Texas A & M, and Louisiana State University before taking his final appointment at CU in 1949. While teaching at LSU, he met and in 1942 married Wanda (Childs) Rense. In addition to teaching physics at CU, Bill did research in CU's Upper Air Laboratory. His early work there included studies of polarized light and its implications for the analysis of zodiacal light. He and his co-workers also began developing instrumentation to be flown above the Earth's atmosphere in sounding rockets. In 1952 he obtained the first photographic spectrogram of the solar Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen (121.6nm). This work was followed in 1956 by the first full disk spectroheliogram in Lyman-alpha. These results could not have been possible without the use of pointing control systems for sounding rockets. These "sun trackers" kept the payloads pointed at the sun long enough for the measurements to be made, and CU was a pioneer in their development. The expanding research venue led the Upper Air Laboratory to be renamed the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), and Bill Rense was its first director. He continued his research into the properties of the solar

  7. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  8. Mapping ecological systems in southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim Malusa; Donald Falk; Larry Laing; Brooke Gebow

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in 2007 in and around the Huachuca Mountains, the Coronado National Forest and other partners have been mapping ecosystems at multiple scales. The approach has focused on identifying land type associations (LTA), which represent the sum of bedrock and superficial geology, topography, elevation, potential and existing vegetation, soil properties, and local...

  9. Solar energy system performance evaluation: Seasonal report for Elcam Tempe Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system, Elcam-Tempe, was designed by Elcam Incorporated, Santa Barbara, California, to supply commercial domestic hot water heating systems to the Agriculture Department residence at Arizona State University. The building is a single story residence located at the agriculture experiment farm of the Arizona State University. The energy system's four modes of operation are described. Electrical energy savings at the site was a net of 5.54 million Btu after the 0.17 million Btu of operating energy required to operate collector loop circulating pump were subtracted. The energy savings due to solar was less than the system's potential. On an average, twice as much hot water could have been used with significant solar energy contribution. The system corrosion and deposits caused by using dissimilar metals in the collector loop was the only problem noted with the Elcam-Tempe system.

  10. Climate Variation at Flagstaff, Arizona - 1950 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereford, Richard

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Much scientific research demonstrates the existence of recent climate variation, particularly global warming. Climate prediction models forecast that climate will change; it will become warmer, droughts will increase in number and severity, and extreme climate events will recur often?desiccating aridity, extremely wet, unusually warm, or even frigid at times. However, the global models apply to average conditions in large grids approximately 150 miles on an edge (Thorpe, 2005), and how or whether specific areas within a grid are affected is unclear. Flagstaff's climate is mentioned in the context of global change, but information is lacking on the amount and trend of changes in precipitation, snowfall, and temperature. The purpose of this report is to understand what may be happening to Flagstaff's climate by reviewing local climate history. Flagstaff is in north-central Arizona south of San Francisco Mountain, which reaches 12,633 feet, the highest in Arizona (fig. 1). At 6,900 feet, surrounded by ponderosa pine forest, Flagstaff enjoys a four-season climate; winter-daytime temperatures are cool, averaging 45 degrees (Fahrenheit). Summer-daytime temperatures are comfortable, averaging 80 degrees, which is pleasant compared with nearby low-elevation deserts. Flagstaff?s precipitation averages 22-inches per year with a range of 9 to 39 inches. Snowfall occurs each season, averaging 97 inches annually. This report, written for the non-technical reader, interprets climate variation at Flagstaff as observed at the National Weather Service (NWS) station at Pulliam Field (or Airport), a first-order weather station staffed by meteorologists (Staudenmaier and others, 2007). The station is on a flat-topped ridge surrounded by forest 5-miles south of Flagstaff at an elevation of 7,003 feet. Data used in this analysis are daily measurements of precipitation (including snowfall) and temperature (maximum and minimum) covering the period from 1950, when the station

  11. Investigation of the geology and hydrology of the Mogollon Highlands of central Arizona: a project of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John T.C.; Flynn, Marilyn E.

    2000-01-01

    The Mogollon Highlands of east central Arizona is a region of forested plateau and mountains, deep, sheerwalled canyons, and desert valleys. Known for its scenic beauty and characterized by a generally mild climate, the area, though still sparsely populated, attracts an increasing number of tourists and summer residents. Furthermore, the permanent population is expected to nearly double over the next 50 years. Consequently, there is increased pressure on the water resources of this area for several sometimes conflicting uses. Rational management of water resources is necessary to meet increased domestic requirements while ensuring an adequate supply of water for commercial and agricultural use, for Indian lands, and for preservation of valued environmental elements, including surface waters, riparian woodlands, forest and grassland areas, and wildlife and aquatic habitat. Such management requires an understanding of the relations among different components of the hydrologic system—recharge areas, surface flows, shallow aquifers, deep aquifers, discharge areas, and the regional ground-water flow system—and how each is affected by geology, climate, topography, and human use. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an assessment of the hydrogeology of the Mogollon Highlands in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources. The study, funded through the State’s Rural Watershed Initiative program, is one of three assessments being conducted by the USGS. Assessments also are underway in the Upper-Middle Verde River watershed and on the Coconino Plateau. Each study has as its objectives: (1) the collection, compilation, and evaluation of all existing geologic, hydrologic, and related data pertaining to the study area and the creation of a data base that is readily accessible to the public and (2) developing an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework, which is the relation between geologic and hydrologic properties, that can be used for

  12. Investigation of geology and hydrology of the upper and middle Verde River watershed of central Arizona: a project of the Arizona Rural Watershed Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Betsy; Flynn, Marilyn E.; Parker, John T.C.; Hoffmann, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The upper and middle Verde River watershed in west-central Arizona is an area rich in natural beauty and cultural history and is an increasingly popular destination for tourists, recreationists, and permanent residents seeking its temperate climate. The diverse terrain of the region includes broad desert valleys, upland plains, forested mountain ranges, narrow canyons, and riparian areas along perennial stream reaches. The area is predominantly in Yavapai County, which in 1999 was the fastest-growing rural county in the United States (Woods and Poole Economics, Inc., 1999); by 2050, the population is projected to more than double. Such growth will increase demands on water resources. The domestic, industrial, and recreational interests of the population will need to be balanced against protection of riparian, woodland, and other natural areas and their associated wildlife and aquatic habitats. Sound management decisions will be required that are based on an understanding of the interactions between local and regional aquifers, surface-water bodies, and recharge and discharge areas. This understanding must include the influence of climate, geology, topography, and cultural development on those components of the hydrologic system. In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR), initiated a regional investigation of the hydrogeology of the upper and middle Verde River watershed. The project is part of the Rural Watershed Initiative (RWI), a program established by the State of Arizona and managed by the ADWR that addresses water supply issues in rural areas while encouraging participation from stakeholder groups in affected communities. The USGS is performing similar RWI investigations on the Colorado Plateau to the north and in the Mogollon Highlands to the east of the Verde River study area (Parker and Flynn, 2000). The objectives of the RWI investigations are to develop: (1) a single database

  13. Medical marijuana wins in California and Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J S

    1996-11-15

    Both California and Arizona have passed State legislation allowing medical use of marijuana, however, the law may now be unenforceable because of Federal laws against marijuana use for any reason. It is believed that some middle ground between allowing limited use of marijuana and outright banning is necessary considering today's medical needs. Among the demographic breakdowns on support of Proposition 215, allowing medicinal use of marijuana, was the observation that parents with children under 18 showed almost as much support for its passage as other adults, indicating no fear of it becoming abused by youth. Despite polls repeatedly showing support for the right to use marijuana for medical purposes, 44.3 percent still voted against it. The reasons are not known, but it is suggested that if the objections could be found and responded to, the initiative may work well enough to be an effective national model.

  14. State geothermal commercialization programs in ten Rocky Mountain states. Semi-annual progress report, July-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, J.L. (comp.)

    1980-08-01

    The activities and findings of the ten state teams participating in the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Regional Hydrothermal Commercialization Program for the period are described. A summary of the state projects, compilation of project accomplishments, summary of findings, and a description of the major conclusions and recommendations are presented. Also included are chapters on the commercialization activities carried out by individual teams in each state: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New-Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming. (MHR)

  15. Satellite data-relay activities in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boner, F.C.; Blee, J.W.; Shope, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Arizona District collects data from automated streamflow stations for a wide variety of uses. Data from these stations are provided to Federal, State, and local agencies that have a responsibility to issue flood warnings; to generate forecasts of water availability; to monitor flow to insure compliance with treaties and other legal mandates; and to manage reservoirs for hydropower, flood abatement, and municipal and irrigation water supply. In the mid-1970's, the escalation of data collection costs and a need for more timely data led the Arizona District to examine alternatives for remote data acquisition. On the basis of successful data communications experiments with NASA 's Landsat satellite, an operational system for satellite-data relay was developed in 1976 using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations 's (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). A total of 62 data collection platforms (DCP's) was operated in 1983. Satellite telemetry operations are controlled at the remote data-collection stations by small battery-operated data collection platforms. The DCP 's periodically collect data from the sensors, store the data in computer memory, and at preset times transmit the data to the GOES satellite. The satellite retransmits the data to Earth where a ground-receive station transmits or transfers the data by land communications to the USGS computer in Reston, Virginia, for processing. The satellite relay transfers the data from sensor to computer in minutes; therefore, the data are available to users on a near real-time basis. (Author 's abstract)

  16. A short history of the William H. Welch Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Barbara M; Roderer, Nancy K; Ruggere, Christine

    2004-02-01

    The William H. Welch Medical Library was founded in 1929 with the merger of three libraries, namely, the library of the School of Medicine, the library of the School of Hygiene and Public Health, and the library of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Engendered by the dreams of Johns Hopkins University bibliophiles, such as founding Hopkins physicians William Osler, William Stewart Halsted, Howard Kelly, and William Henry Welch, the library flourished and expanded. At the same time as the founding of the central medical library, the Institute of the History of Medicine collection was established in the Welch Library building, with William H. Welch as its first director. Innovative leadership led to many exciting projects, such as the Welch Indexing Project, which was a prototype for the National Library of Medicine's medical subject headings, and the establishment of a laboratory for research into the application of information technologies to knowledge management. The Welch Library enters the 21st century as a dynamic library committed to the continuing delivery of information services, as well as ongoing research into the development of library services for the coming 100 years.

  17. Recent paleoseismicity record in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Steven A.; Miller, Eric J.; Marshall, Nicole R.; Dellapenna, Timothy M.

    2017-12-01

    Sedimentological and geochemical investigation of sediment cores collected in the deep (>400 m) central basin of Prince William Sound, along with geochemical fingerprinting of sediment source areas, are used to identify earthquake-generated sediment gravity flows. Prince William Sound receives sediment from two distinct sources: from offshore (primarily Copper River) through Hinchinbrook Inlet, and from sources within the Sound (primarily Columbia Glacier). These sources are found to have diagnostic elemental ratios indicative of provenance; Copper River Basin sediments were significantly higher in Sr/Pb and Cu/Pb, whereas Prince William Sound sediments were significantly higher in K/Ca and Rb/Sr. Within the past century, sediment gravity flows deposited within the deep central channel of Prince William Sound have robust geochemical (provenance) signatures that can be correlated with known moderate to large earthquakes in the region. Given the thick Holocene sequence in the Sound ( 200 m) and correspondingly high sedimentation rates (>1 cm year-1), this relationship suggests that sediments within the central basin of Prince William Sound may contain an extraordinary high-resolution record of paleoseismicity in the region.

  18. Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W. Dechert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation. Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation.

  19. Obituary: William K. Rose (1935-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    Stellar astrophysicist William Kenneth Rose died near his home in Potomac, Maryland, on September 30, 2010, after an extended illness. Rose was the son of pharmacist Kenneth William Rose and Shirley Near Rose and was born in Ossining, New York, on August 10, 1935. He received an AB from Columbia College in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Columbia University in 1963, with a thesis on "measurements of linear polarization in discrete radio sources using a 9.4 cm maser," under the direction of Charles H. Townes. Rose played a major role in designing and constructing the maser and used it at a radio telescope at Maryland Point that belonged to the Naval Research Lab. He observed Jupiter and Saturn and a number of extra-solar-system sources, and also diffuse centimeter emission (see appendix). The thesis was not published in an archival journal, but can be found under Library of Congress code QB 475.R67. While in graduate School, Bill married Sheila Tuchman, whose primary scientific interests were biological. None of their three children chose to be scientists, but two are CPAs. Bill moved successfully through the academic hurdles) from a research position at Princeton (1963-67), where a collaboration with Nick Woolf and Martin Schwarzchild on the infrared spectra of giant stars became one of his most-cited papers, to assistant and associate professorships at MIT (1967-71), and then associate and full professorships at the University of Maryland (1971 to retirement in 2005). His most innovative work was probably that on nova explosions arising from degenerate ignition of hydrogen accreted on white dwarfs in close binary systems, published in 1968. The same idea occurred to others at about the same time, and Bill did not, perhaps, get quite his fair share of the credit. I first met Sheila and Bill in summer 1969 at the Stony Brook summer school on stellar evolution (not published until 1972). He lectured on the nature of nova explosions and on nuclear burning in thin

  20. Forest bioenergy system to reduce the hazard of wildfires: White Mountains, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neary, Daniel G. [USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, 2500 South Pine Knoll Drive, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Zieroth, Elaine J. [USDA Forest Service, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest, Box 640, Springerville, AZ 85938 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    In an innovative effort, the USDA Forest Service is planning to reduce the long-term threat of catastrophic wildfires by inaugurating a series of forest thinnings for bioenergy. The start-up project is in the Nutrioso area of the Alpine Ranger District, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. ''The Nutrioso Wildland/Urban Interface Fuels Reduction Project'', under the authority of the Healthy Forest Restoration Act of 2003, addresses the existing condition of the forest, defines the desired condition of the forest, and proposes actions that will result in a healthier forest and a reduced risk from wildfire. This project is part of larger-scale, small-diameter tree thinning covering an area of 607 km{sup 2} over a 10-yr period. Although the Nutrioso Project encompasses 213 km{sup 2} of mixed ownerships, only National Forest lands (79%) will be treated. A variety of thinning and fire prescriptions have been established depending on slopes, road access, and distance from private land. The mostly small-diameter (<12 cm) trees in ponderosa pine and mixed conifer stands are being removed under a ''Stewardship Contract'' for utilization in small power plants (<3 MW), and a wood-heating pellet manufacturing facility. The outlet for the wood fuel pellets is the growing market for house and business heating, and co-generation fuel in a 615 MW coal-fired power station. This paper examines the scope, costs, and environmental trade-offs of this pioneering and remarkably successful effort in forest bioenergy in the southwestern USA. (author)

  1. Contaminants in fish and wildlife of Lynx Lake, Arizona

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water, crayfish, and fish were collected at Lynx Creek and Lynx Lake, Arizona in 2004 and 2005. Granite Basin Lake was used as a reference site. Both sites...

  2. Ignition interlock : an investigation into rural Arizona judges’ perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    This study sought to answer several questions regarding 2007 Arizona legislation requiring ignition interlock for all offenders convicted of Driving-Under-the-Influence (DUI), including first time DUI offenders. At the time the law was passed, Arizon...

  3. The Tree Lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (treeline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 7 arcs representing the tree lines at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The tree lines were collected by a Trimble...

  4. 76 FR 18777 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ...) recreation fee proposals in Arizona. The RRAC will not review any recreation fee proposals at this meeting... meeting. Under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, the RAC has been designated as the Recreation...

  5. Pursuing the panderer: an analysis of United States v. Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrain, Patrick N; Moore, Jennifer L

    2010-03-01

    In May 2008, the Supreme Court addressed whether the government can regulate the ownership and distribution of virtual child pornography. U.S. v. Williams marked the first time the Court directly addressed the concept of pandering virtual child pornography. This article examines the Court's decision in U.S. v. Williams and the relative importance of its holding. In U.S. v. Williams, the Supreme Court upheld an act of Congress targeting the business people behind the child pornography market. Restricting the sale of both real and virtual child pornography is essential to combat the various problems surrounding its existence, which include policing its creation and distribution on the Internet as well as the connection between child pornography and subsequent sexual offenses against children.

  6. Energy in the Mountain West: Colonialism and Independence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Piet; Lloyd Brown; Robert Cherry; Craig Cooper; Harold Heydt; Richard Holman; Travis McLing

    2007-08-01

    In many ways, the mountain west (Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming) is an energy colony for the rest of the United States: it is rich in energy resources that are extracted to fuel economic growth in the wealthier and more populous coastal regions. Federal agencies and global corporations often behave as if the mountain west is a place to be exploited or managed for the benefit of customers and consumers elsewhere. Yet, the area. is not vast empty space with a limitless supply of natural resources, but rather a fast-growing region with a diverse economic base dependent on a limited supply of water. New decision processes and collaborations are slowly changing this situation, but in a piecemeal fashion that places local communities at odds with powerful external interests. Proper planning of major development is needed to insure that the west has a strong economic and cultural future after the fossil energy resources decline, even if that might be a century from now. To encourage the necessary public discussions, this paper identifies key differences between the mountain west and the rest of the United States and suggests some holistic approaches that could improve our future. This paper is designed to provoke thought and discussion; it does not report new analyses on energy resources or usage. It is a summary of a large group effort.

  7. The migration response to the Legal Arizona Workers Act

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Mark; Wright, Richard; Townley, Matthew; Copeland, Kristy

    2014-01-01

    The 2008 Legal Arizona Workers Act (LAWA) requires all public and private employers to authenticate the legal status of their workers using the federal employment verification system known as E-Verify. With LAWA, Arizona became the first state to have a universal mandate for employment verification. While LAWA targets unauthorized workers, most of whom are Latino immigrants, other groups could experience LAWA’s effects, such as those who share households with undocumented workers. In addition...

  8. Arizona law enforcement biometrics identification and information sharing technology framework

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaf, William M.

    2010-01-01

    CHDS State/Local Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Since 9/11, Arizona and federal law enforcement agencies understand the need to improve subject identification capabilities and integrate criminal information across jurisdictions. Agencies still collect information based on a subject's name and demographics for identification. Using a subject's name and demographics as keys to identifying information is a weakness. In 2012, Arizona will upgrade the state's strat...

  9. DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillerup, Joseph M.

    1980-09-08

    The DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project on Energy successfully completed a faculty development program. There were three phases of the program consisting of: a three week energy workshop for teachers, participation and cooperation with Students for Safe Energy in presentation of an Alternative Energy Festival at the University of Arizona, and workshops for teachers conducted at Flowing Wells School District. Each of these is described. Attendees are listed and a director's evaluation of the workshop is given.

  10. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  11. Sir William Osler's speech at Troy: a Trojan horse?

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Troy, New York, is a city of 55,000 people in upstate New York located along the Hudson River. A city of surprisingly rich cultural heritage, it was the home of New York state's first hospital outside New York City. The 50th anniversary celebration of Troy's hospital brought William Osler to the city as the keynote speaker. This speech, delivered on November 28, 1900, is one of Sir William's less well known addresses. Osler began his comments with Sir Thomas More's Utopia and talked at length...

  12. Williams syndrome in a child with a multiple organ pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Mihajlova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the clinical case of Williams syndrome with the combined pathology of many systems and organs: mental retardation, congenital heart disease (supravalvular aortic stenosis, arterial hypertension, hypercalcemia, hypercalciuria complicated by nephrocalcinosis, gastrointestinal tract injury, facial and eye anomalies, hernia of anterior abdominal wall, kyphoscoliosis. Microsatellite analysis of the loci of the critical region of chromosome 7 revealed a deletion of the investigated loci (D7S1870, D7S613, D7S2476, D7SEln, which led to the diagnosis of Williams syndrome.

  13. The Microcosm within: An interview with William B. Miller, Jr., on the Extended Hologenome theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Tam

    2015-01-01

    There is a singular unifying reality underlying every biologic interaction on our planet. In immunology, that which does not kill you makes you different. -William B. Miller, Jr. We are experiencing a revolution in our understanding of inner space on a par with our exponentially increasing understanding of outer space. In biology, we are learning that the genetic and epigenetic complexity within organisms is far deeper than suspected. This is a key theme in William B. Miller Jr.'s book, The Microcosm Within: Evolution and Extinction in the Hologenome. We are learning also that a focus on the human genome alone is misleading when it comes to who we really are as biological entities, and in terms of how we and other creatures have evolved. Rather than being defined by the human genome alone, we are instead defined by the "hologenome," the sum of the human genome and the far larger genetic endowment of the microbiome and symbiotic communities that reside within and around us. Miller is a medical doctor previously in private practice in Pennsylvania and Phoenix, Arizona. This book is his first foray into evolutionary theory. His book could have been titled "The Origin of Variation" because this is his primary focus. He accepts that natural selection plays a role in evolution, but he demotes this mechanism to a less important role than the Modern Synthesis suggests. His main gripe, however, concerns random variation. He argues that random variation is unable to explain the origin and evolution of biological forms that we see in the world around us and in the historical record. Miller suggests that, rather than random variation as the engine of novelty, there is a creative impulse at the heart of cellular life, and even at the level of the genetic aggregate, that generates novelty on a regular basis. I probe this assertion in the interview below. He also highlights the strong role of "exogenous genetic assault" in variation and in his immunological model of evolution.

  14. Rocky Mountain Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jody Steiner, Ed.

    This publication features articles detailing the state of educational programs in the Rocky Mountain area. The articles address: 1) the impact of physical geography on culture, education, and lifestyle; 2) the education of migrant and/or agricultural workers and their children; 3) educational needs of children in rural areas; 4) outdoor education;…

  15. Rocky Mountain High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David

    2001-01-01

    Describes Colorado's Eagle Rock School, which offers troubled teens a fresh start by transporting them to a tuition- free campus high in the mountains. The program encourages spiritual development as well as academic growth. The atmosphere is warm, loving, structured, and nonthreatening. The article profiles several students' experiences at the…

  16. Comparison of the acute effects of Tulbaghia violacea William Henry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the effect of the crude methanol leaf extracts of Tulbaghia violacea William Henry Harvey (Alliaceae) on blood pressure (BP) and heart rate in ageing normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY), and compare the results obtained with those for adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods: T.

  17. Experiences of Bullying for Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H.; Lough, Emma; Griffin, Megan M.; Lane, Laurel A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disability experience high rates of bullying, but it is not known how people with specific syndromes, such as Williams syndrome (WS), experience and respond to bullying. Given their behavioral profile, including hypersociability and heightened anxiety, and their risk for experiencing other forms of…

  18. Atypical Sleep Architecture and Altered EEG Spectra in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, F.; Bodizs, R.; Kovacs, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods: In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants…

  19. Florence Jessie MacWilliams (1917-1990)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Florence Jessie MacWilliams (1917-1990). Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 10 Issue 1 January ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  20. Examining Reports of Mental Health in Adults with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Chris; Tomlinson, Katie; Estes, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have a disposition towards anxiety. Information regarding this is typically derived from parents and carers. The perspectives of the individuals with WS are rarely included in research of this nature. We examined the mental health of 19 adults with WS using explicit (psychiatric…

  1. Physics Demonstration Experiments at William Jewell College. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Wallace A.

    Presented are descriptions (with photographs) of demonstration equipment purchased, assembled, developed, and used at William Jewell College (Missouri) during the past 25 years. The descriptions are organized into the following topic areas: (1) mechanics; (2) heat; (3) waves, sound, and acoustics; (4) electricity; (5) optics; and (6) atomic and…

  2. Discourse Analysis of Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliveettil, George Mathew; Gadallah, Mahmoud Sobhi Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    "The Glass Menagerie" is one of the Tennessee Williams' most famous plays which won the New York Drama Critics' Circle award. It elevated him to be one of the greatest playwrights of his generation. As a playwright, he is skilful to make the readers conscious of the unconscious habits and attitudes in everyday life. In "The Glass…

  3. Edward Christopher Williams and His Impact on Librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Carlos

    Edward Christopher Williams had a major impact on librarianship, not only as the first documented African American to graduate from a library school, but also as a developer of education for librarians and as an active member of the American Library Association (ALA) and the Ohio Library Association. This study used the historical methodology…

  4. Mapping the Milky Way: William Herschel's Star Gages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, Todd

    2013-01-01

    William Herschel (Fig. 1) is rightfully known as one of the greatest astronomers of all time. Born in Hanover (in modern Germany) in 1738, Herschel immigrated to England in 1757 and began a successful career as a professional musician. Later in life Herschel developed a strong interest in astronomy. He began making his own reflecting telescopes in…

  5. William Morris and John Dewey: Imagining Utopian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2012-01-01

    With strikingly resonance William Morris and John Dewey independently imagined what utopian education might plausibly be. Neither remotely thought of utopia as a perfectly ordered society, but rather as a process. Each understood education functionally in terms of how it fits with art, work, and democracy within a holistic conception of utopia.…

  6. Exploring the Limits of Entitlement: Williams v. State of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In August 2000, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a class-action lawsuit on behalf of school children against the state of California. The suit, Williams v. State of California, alleged that the state failed to exercise its constitutional obligation to provide equal access to education for all students in the state by allowing deficient…

  7. The Poetics of "Pattern Recognition": William Gibson's Shifting Technological Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Alex

    2007-01-01

    William Gibson's 1984 cyberpunk novel "Neuromancer" continues to be a touchstone in cultural representations of the impact of new information and communication technologies on the self. As critics have noted, the posthumanist, capital-driven, urban landscape of "Neuromancer" resembles a Foucaultian vision of a panoptically engineered social space…

  8. Potential Beneficial Effects of Tulbaghia violacea William Henry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tulbaghia violacea William Henry Harvey (Harv. Alliaceae) is a small bulbous herb belonging to the family Alliaceae. It is used in South Africa to treat fever, colds, asthma, paralysis, and hypertension. Meanwhile, cardiovascular disease accounts for about 30 % of total global death, with most of these deaths occurring in low ...

  9. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  10. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  11. William Whiston, the Universal Deluge, and a Terrible Spectacle

    OpenAIRE

    Roomet Jakapi

    2005-01-01

    William Whiston (1667–1752) was an English divine, mathematician andastronomer. His works nicely reveal the close relationship between sci-ence and religion in the Early Modern period. The paper aims to characteriseWhiston’s way of thinking in the light of his Astronomical Principles of Reli-gion, Natural and Reveal’d (1717).

  12. Florence Jessie MacWilliams (1917-1990)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Preeti Shankar

    Florence Jessie MacWilliams, one of the first women to publish in coding theory was born in 1917 in Stoke-on-Trent, England. Her early college education was at ... December 1981 and the May 1983 issue of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory was dedicated to her. Eminent coding theorists and mathematicians ...

  13. Biographical sketch: William John Little, FRCS (1810-1894).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Richard A

    2012-05-01

    This biographical sketch on William Little corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Hospital for the Cure of Deformities: Course of Lectures on the Deformities of the Human Frame (1843), available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-012-2302-y .

  14. Adaptive Functioning in Williams Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawn, Gabrielle; Porter, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    Literature on the level of adaptive functioning and relative strengths and weaknesses in functioning of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) was reviewed. The electronic databases PsycINFO, PubMed, Expanded Academic, Web of Science, Scopus and ProQuest were searched electronically for relevant articles and dissertations using the search terms…

  15. William Stern: An Historical Model of a Generalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Dean; Wesley, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Describes William Stern's professional accomplishments, including pioneering work in educational counseling and contributions to general systems such as Gestalt psychology. Argues that Stern's example supports conclusion that no one scientific method provides single best approach to all questions of psychology, and that interaction between…

  16. Great Alaska Earthquake, Prince William Sound, March 28, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Prince William Sound magnitude 8.4 earthquake at 03:36 UT on March 28, 1964, was one of the largest shocks ever recorded on the North American Continent. The...

  17. Beyond Behaviour: Is Social Anxiety Low in Williams Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Helen F.; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) exhibit striking social behaviour that may be indicative of abnormally low social anxiety. The present research aimed to determine whether social anxiety is unusually low in WS and to replicate previous findings of increased generalised anxiety in WS using both parent and self report. Fifteen individuals…

  18. Perceptual Speech and Paralinguistic Skills of Adolescents with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Patricia M.; Pittelko, Stephen; Fillingane, Evan; Rustman, Emily; Lund, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare selected speech and paralinguistic skills of speakers with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing peers and to demonstrate the feasibility of providing preexisting databases to students to facilitate graduate research. In a series of three studies, conversational samples of 12 adolescents with…

  19. Comprehension of Sarcasm, Metaphor and Simile in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although people with Williams syndrome (WS) are often characterized as friendly and sociable with relatively good general language abilities, there is emerging evidence of pragmatic difficulties and trouble comprehending aspects of non-literal language. Aims: The main aim was to investigate the comprehension of sarcasm, metaphor and…

  20. William Knocke receives 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    William R. Knocke, W.C. English Professor and head of the Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech, was awarded the 2008 Virginia Outstanding Civil Engineer Award at the Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers' (ASCE) banquet, held recently in Williamsburg, Va.

  1. Alias Robert Pagan: William Plomer and the Promotion of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is twofold: to examine a neglected aspect of the otherwise well-documented career of William Plomer (1903–73), and then to draw attention to his role as a backstage negotiator on behalf of our literary figures, in Britain as well as in his country of birth, South Africa. Both these sides of his otherwise ...

  2. War & Conflict in Africa | Williams | Scientia Militaria: South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 42, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. War & Conflict in Africa. PD Williams. Abstract.

  3. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  4. A Surge of Interest in Uganda's Art Deco | Craddock Williams ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Surge of Interest in Uganda's Art Deco. Vivian Craddock Williams. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/uj.v46i1.23038 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  5. William Faulkner: No Friend of Brown v. Board of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Carol

    2001-01-01

    In the years following the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision to integrate America's public schools, William Faulkner, Norman Mailer, Hannah Arendt, Robert Penn Warren, and, to a lesser extent, C. Vann Woodward, provided intellectual sustenance to southern efforts to resist racial integration. Focuses on Faulkner's political…

  6. Sir William Henry Perkin: The Man and his 'Mauve'

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 9. Sir William Henry Perkin: The Man and his 'Mauve'. G Nagendrappa. General Article Volume 15 Issue 9 September 2010 pp 779-793. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Gender Attribution and Gender Agreement in French Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boloh, Yves; Ibernon, Laure; Royer, Stephanie; Escudier, Frederique; Danillon, Aurelia

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies on grammatical gender in French individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have led to conflicting findings and interpretations regarding keys abilities--gender attribution and gender agreement. New production data from a larger SW sample (N = 24) showed that gender attribution scores in SW participants exactly mirrored those of…

  8. The attempts of William Dean and Wentzel van Huyssteen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dationalism and an arbitrary form of relativism. William Dean's historicist radical empiricism and Wentzel van Huyssteen's critical realism are two that merit atten tion. They differ in theological roots (the 'Chicago School' of theology vs Pannen- berg, Bartley and Sauter) and philosophical resources (James and Whitehead vs.

  9. November 2015 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2015 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There were 3 case presentations: 1. Dr. Gerald Schwartzberg presented a case of a 56-year-old man with a history of diabetes, alcoholism and tobacco abuse who has a history of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI with a residual thin-walled cavity in his right upper lobe (RUL. After quitting drinking and smoking and years of being asymptomatic, he presented with hemoptysis. Chest x-ray showed increasing density in the RUL. CT scan showed an intracavitary density in his previous cavity presumably a fungus ball. Sputum cultures are pending. Discussion followed on management of fungus balls. Bronchoscopy was recommended to view the bronchial anatomy to exclude other diagnosis as well ...

  10. Presymptomatic Parkinson's disease: the Arizona experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviness, John N

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing interest in presymptomatic diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the best and most practical method to screen and confirm asymptomatic individuals for PD needs further study. The Banner-Sun Health Brain and Body Donation program in Sun City, Arizona has studied primarily PD and Alzheimer's disease. Enrollees receive annual prospective standardized evaluation that includes clinical, biomarker testing, and at autopsy, neuropathological examination is performed followed by a consensus conference that determines final diagnosis. Since numerous Controls receive these assessments, these subjects become an excellent cohort to study presymptomatic PD. We found that Controls with partial diagnostic criteria for PD (1 of either rest tremor or bradykinesia) had a 6.6 relative risk for eventually developing full diagnostic criteria for PD. Neuropathologic examination has uncovered cases of "incidental Lewy body disease" (ILBD). We have shown that ILBD cases during life demonstrated no significant differences in clinical assessment versus similarly assessed controls. However, electrophysiological assessment showed subclinical low frequency rest discharges in some ILBD cases. Electroencephalography spectral frequency of ILBD cases was lower than for controls but not as low as for PD cases. The longitudinal assessments of this brain bank offer significant opportunities for the study of presymptomatic PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. July 2016 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. The July 2016 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 at the Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 14 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. Prior to the case presentations, a discussion was held on 4 issues. First, Dr. Rick Robbins gave a summary of ATS Hill Day. During Hill Day a presentation was given by a representative from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Their web site lists tobacco company contributions to members of Congress on their web site. Dr. Gary Ewart from the ATS office in Washington gave a presentation on the Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act before Congress (aka the Cigar Bill which the ATS opposes. He noted that cosponsors for the bill included several Congressmen from Southwestern states. Dr. Robbins combined the two ...

  12. October 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The October Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 10/23/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 21 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and thoracic surgery communities. A proposal was made to decrease the number of meetings from 10 to 8 per year. After a brief discussion, this was adopted. Dr. Parides will try and coordinate these changes with Tucson. Meetings were announced for December in Tucson, January in Carmel, February in Albuquerque, and April in Phoenix. A suggestion was made to have a separate area for meetings on the SWJPCC website. There were 2 cases presented-both by Nick Sparacino, a first year fellow at Good Samaritan/VA. 1. The first case was a 48 year old man admitted to podiatry for chronic diabetic foot ulcers. His preoperative chest x-ray revealed multiple pulmonary nodules. Importantly, he had a history of working in a brake pad …

  13. Geothermal development plan: northern Arizona counties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The Northern Counties Area Development Plan evaluated the regional market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. This study identified five potential geothermal resource areas, four of which have low temperature (<90{sup 0}C, 194{sup 0}F) potential and one possible igneous system. The average population growth rate in the Northern Counties is expected to be five percent per year over the next 40 years, with Mohave and Yavapai Counties growing the fastest. Rapid growth is anticipated in all major employment sectors, including trade, service, manufacturing, mining and utilities. A regional energy use analysis is included, containing information on current energy use patterns for all user classes. Water supplies are expected to be adequate for expected growth generally, though Yavapai and Gila Counties will experience water deficiencies. A preliminary district heating analysis is included for the towns of Alpine and Springerville. Both communities are believed located on geothermal resource sites. The study also contains a section identifying potential geothermal resource users in northern Arizona.

  14. MAZATZAL WILDERNESS AND CONTIGUOUS ROADLESS AREAS, ARIZONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrucke, Chester T.; Ellis, Clarence E.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey has shown that the Mazatzal Wilderness, Arizona has demonstrated resources of silver, gold, lead and mercury, small areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential for silver and copper, and areas of probable resource potential for resources of silver, copper, lead, mercury, and molybdenum. Gold, silver, and copper resources occur in small deposits in the north-central, eastern, and southern parts of the wilderness. A small demonstrated mercury resource is located at the Sunflower mine near the southeastern corner of the wilderness adjacent to the well-known Sunflower mining district. Molybdenum mineralization found during this study in the Tangle Creek area west of the Verde River may extend eastward into the roadless area and the wilderness. Tin occurrences not previously known in the Mazatzal region were found in the central part of the wilderness, and uranium was found near Horseshoe Reservoir, but there is little promise for the occurrence of tin and uranium resources. No potential for fossil fuel resources was identified in this study.

  15. September 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 9/26//2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 18 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology, and radiology communities.A discussion was held on Pending Premium Cigar Legislation HR. 1639 and S.1461, the "Traditional Cigar Manufacturing and Small Business Jobs Preservation Act of 2011”. This bill would exempt "premium cigars" from FDA oversight. The definition of premium cigars is so broad that candy flavored cigars, cigarillos and blunts would be exempted from FDA regulation. Teenage cigar smoking is increasing and this legislation may result in a further increase. The Arizona Thoracic Society is opposed to this bill. Dr. Robbins is to put a link on the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care website linking to the ATS website. This will enable members to contact their Congressmen opposing this legislation. A discussion was also held on a proposed combined Tucson/Phoenix …

  16. Uranium potential in Precambrian conglomerates of the Central Arizona Arch. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, P.; Wirth, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates in a 9500 km/sup 2/ area of central Arizona between the Mazatzal and Sierra Ancha Mountains were investigated for the presence of significant uranium concentrations or environments favorable for uranium concentration. Abundant conglomerates are found in either the 1740 to 1720 m.y.-old Alder Group, the 1700 m.y.-old Mazatzal Group, or the 1300 to 1250 m.y.-old Apache Group. Supplementing detailed geologic study of the conglomerates is a systematic analysis of major-element, trace-element, and uranium-geochemical data for over 300 rock samples. This analysis provides a relationship between scintillometer data and uranium content for different rock types and gives correlation coefficients between uranium and related metals in the heavy-mineral assemblage. A radiometric variance plot of averages for the various conglomerate types shows that Apache Group conglomerates are Th-rich and too evolved, marine Mazatzal and Alder conglomerates are U-poor, whereas only high-energy fluvial environments in basal Deadman and Mazatzal conglomerates strongly concentrated uranium values. Reevaluation of accepted criteria for uranium concentration in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates in light of new data on uranium-mineral stability under nonreducing conditions and new observations on major world deposits leads to the conclusion that the presence of a U-rich source terrain is singularly the most important factor in finding a conglomeratic uranium deposit. Most Precambrian conglomerates of the world contain depositional environments and heavy mineral concentrates conducive to uranium concentration, but insufficient uranium is present in the source. The reason pyritic, carbonaceous siltstones in the Apache Group of central Arizona contain stratabound uranium deposits is that a nearby U-rich source of high K/sub 2/O rhyolitic volcanism was available during deposition of the siltstones.

  17. Word-Preserving Arts: Material Inscription, Ekphrasis, and Spatial Form in the Later Work of William Wordsworth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Peter

    William Wordsworth, posterity, reading, material inscription, ekphrasis, description, sonnet, portraiture......William Wordsworth, posterity, reading, material inscription, ekphrasis, description, sonnet, portraiture...

  18. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound... Cape Hinchinbrook Light to Schooner Rock Light, comprising that portion of Prince William Sound between...

  19. 77 FR 47374 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct... William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) and Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Programs may... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program/Federal Family Loan (FFEL...

  20. 78 FR 11857 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (DL) Regulations. OMB Control Number: 1845... Annual Burden Hours: 535,998. Abstract: The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program regulations cover...

  1. Water availability and use pilot; methods development for a regional assessment of groundwater availability, southwest alluvial basins, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Fred D; Cordova, Jeffrey T.; Leake, Stanley A.; Thomas, Blakemore E.; Callegary, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary: Arizona is located in an arid to semiarid region in the southwestern United States and is one of the fastest growing States in the country. Population in Arizona surpassed 6.5 million people in 2008, an increase of 140 percent since 1980, when the last regional U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) groundwater study was done as part of the Regional Aquifer System Analysis (RASA) program. The alluvial basins of Arizona are part of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province and cover more than 73,000 mi2, 65 percent of the State's total land area. More than 85 percent of the State's population resides within this area, accounting for more than 95 percent of the State's groundwater use. Groundwater supplies in the area are expected to undergo further stress as an increasing population vies with the State's important agricultural sector for access to these limited resources. To provide updated information to stakeholders addressing issues surrounding limited groundwater supplies and projected increases in groundwater use, the USGS Groundwater Resources Program instituted the Southwest Alluvial Basins Groundwater Availability and Use Pilot Program to evaluate the availability of groundwater resources in the alluvial basins of Arizona. The principal products of this evaluation of groundwater resources are updated groundwater budget information for the study area and a proof-of-concept groundwater-flow model incorporating several interconnected groundwater basins. This effort builds on previous research on the assessment and mapping of groundwater conditions in the alluvial basins of Arizona, also supported by the USGS Groundwater Resources Program. Regional Groundwater Budget: The Southwest Alluvial Basins-Regional Aquifer System Analysis (SWAB-RASA) study produced semiquantitative groundwater budgets for each of the alluvial basins in the SWAB-RASA study area. The pilot program documented in this report developed new quantitative estimates of groundwater

  2. Potential of utilization of geothermal energy in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. H.; Goldstone, L. A.

    1982-08-01

    Arizona is one of the fastest growing states in the United States. It is in the midst of the movement of the population of the United States from its cold regions to the warm Southwest. Being a hot, arid region, its electrical demand is nearly 50% higher in the peak hot summer months than that of the other 7 months. The major uncertainty of utilizing geothermal energy in Arizona is that very little exploration and development have occurred to date. The potential for utilizing geothermal energy in Arizona is good based on the fat thatthere are over 3000 thermal wells in Arizona out of a total of about 30,000 shallow irrigation wells that were examined. There is much young volcanic rock in Arizona. The combination of data from thermal wells, young volcanic rock, water geochemistry and other geological tools, indicate that there is a large geothermal resource throughout the southern half of the state. It is suggested that most of this resource is in the range of 500 to 1500 C, limiting its uses to direct heat utilization rather than for electric power generation.

  3. The Galileoscope project: community-based technology education in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Fine, Leonard W.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dugan, Charles L.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2014-07-01

    A program model has been developed and implemented over the last three years to provide a robust optical technologybased science education program to students aged 9-11 years (5th grade), a formative time in the development of a student's interest in science and engineering. We have created well-tested and evaluated teaching kits for the classroom to teach about the basics of image formation and telescopes. In addition we provide professional development to the teachers of these students on principles of optics and on using the teaching kits. The program model is to reach every teacher and every student in a number of mid-sized rural communities across the state of Arizona. The Galileoscope telescope kit is a key part of this program to explore optics and the nature of science. The program grew out of Module 3 of the NSF-Supported Hands-On Optics project (SPIE, OSA, and NOAO) and from the Science Foundation Arizona-supported Hands-On Optics Arizona program. NOAO has conducted this program in Flagstaff, Yuma, Globe, and Safford, Arizona and is being expanded to sites across the entire state of Arizona (295,254 square kilometers). We describe the educational goals, evaluations, and logistical issues connected to the program. In particular, we proposed that this model can be adapted for any rural or urban locations in order to encourage interest in science, astronomy and optics.-

  4. Installation of a Rudist Biostrome after the Late Aptian - Early Albian OAE1B (mural Formation, Southeastern Arizona)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, A.; Helfrich-Dennis, M. M.; Suarez, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic climate change has been extensively studied in the Tethys, while their expression in the proto Gulf of Mexico can still be precised, especially for the time period straddling the Aptian-Albian boundary. During this time period, significant climatic events may correlate between the proto-Atlantic and the Tethys, amongst which the Oceanic Anoxic Event 1b that corresponds to a period of marine anoxia across this stage boundary. We hypothesized that this event may have impacted the shallow-marine carbonate factory that is now preserved near the town of Bisbee (Mule Mountains, southern Arizona). This sedimentary succession has been chosen because it documents a switch from a siliclastic- to carbonate-dominated sedimentation during the targeted time interval. Using carbon isotope chemostratigraphy, we were able to refine the stratigraphic framework of the Mural Formation, which was previously based on benthic organisms such as rudist bivalves and orbitolinids, such as Mesorbitolina texana. The OAE1b has been identified based on its peculiar δ13C signature supported by biostratigraphic data. Concurrently, microfacies analysis helped in reconstructing variations in sea levels. In southern Arizona, the OAE1b equivalent belongs to a third-order transgressive systems tract, and extends into the following highstand systems track. The maximum flooding surface is defined within a thick rudist biostrome with chondrodonts. It thus seems that the OAE1b did not strongly affected the carbonate factory in this region of the proto Gulf of Mexico. As a conclusion, limestone rocks now preserved in southeastern Arizona were deposited during the Late Aptian to Early Albian time period, during which the OAE1b developed. This paleoceanographic perturbation is expressed in the sedimentary record by its unique carbon isotope signature, with no significant impact on benthic ecosystems.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Arizona. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Arizona.

  6. Public Land Survey (Township, Range, and Section) for northern Arizona, including Grand Canyon National Park.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This ALRIS (Arizona Land Resource Information System) coverage contains Public Land Survey gridding and labels for Townships, Ranges, and Sections for Northern Arizona

  7. Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) accuracy assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajgin, John; Pettinger, L.R.; Linden, D.S.; Ohlen, D.O.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative accuracy assessment was performed for the vegetation classification map produced as part of the Arizona Vegetation Resource Inventory (AVRI) project. This project was a cooperative effort between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center. The objective of the accuracy assessment was to estimate (with a precision of ?10 percent at the 90 percent confidence level) the comission error in each of the eight level II hierarchical vegetation cover types. A stratified two-phase (double) cluster sample was used. Phase I consisted of 160 photointerpreted plots representing clusters of Landsat pixels, and phase II consisted of ground data collection at 80 of the phase I cluster sites. Ground data were used to refine the phase I error estimates by means of a linear regression model. The classified image was stratified by assigning each 15-pixel cluster to the stratum corresponding to the dominant cover type within each cluster. This method is known as stratified plurality sampling. Overall error was estimated to be 36 percent with a standard error of 2 percent. Estimated error for individual vegetation classes ranged from a low of 10 percent ?6 percent for evergreen woodland to 81 percent ?7 percent for cropland and pasture. Total cost of the accuracy assessment was $106,950 for the one-million-hectare study area. The combination of the stratified plurality sampling (SPS) method of sample allocation with double sampling provided the desired estimates within the required precision levels. The overall accuracy results confirmed that highly accurate digital classification of vegetation is difficult to perform in semiarid environments, due largely to the sparse vegetation cover. Nevertheless, these techniques show promise for providing more accurate information than is presently available for many BLM-administered lands.

  8. Integrated solid waste management of Scottsdale, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the city of Scottsdale, Arizona, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. The document reports actual data from records kept by participants. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may per-form manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption, for a 1-year period, of an operating IMSWM system. The report is organized into two main parts. The first part is the executive summary and case study portion of the report. The executive summary provides a basic description of the study area and selected economic and energy information. Within the case study are detailed descriptions of each component operating during the study period; the quantities of solid waste collected, processed, and marketed within the study boundaries; the cost of MSW in Scottsdale; an energy usage analysis; a review of federal, state, and local environmental requirement compliance; a reference section; and a glossary of terms. The second part of the report focuses on a more detailed discourse on the above topics. In addition, the methodology used to determine the economic costs and energy consumption of the system components is found in the second portion of this report. The methodology created for this project will be helpful for those professionals who wish to break out the costs of their own integrated systems.

  9. Snowy Mountains. Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri, B.

    1959-02-01

    Full Text Available El gran macizo de Snowy Mountains sigue la dirección norte-sur en una extensión de unos 160 km, alcanzando una altitud de 2.225 metros en su pico más alto. A esta región se la llama los Alpes australianos, que están cubiertos de nieve durante casi seis meses del año.

  10. Yucca Mountain Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Rod

    1997-06-09

    The Department of Energy project to determine if the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is suitable for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste reached a major milestone in late April when a 25-foot-diameter tunnel boring machine ``holed through'' completing a five-mile-long, horseshoe-shaped excavation through the mountain. When the cutting-head of the giant machine broke through to daylight at the tunnel's south portal, it ended a 2 1/2-year excavation through the mountain that was completed ahead of schedule and with an outstanding safety record. Video of the event was transmitted live by satellite to Washington, DC, where it was watched by Secretary of Energy Frederico Pena and other high-level DOE officials, signifying the importance of the project's mission to find a repository for high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel produced by nuclear power plants. This critical undertaking is being performed by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The tunnel is the major feature of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), which serves as an underground laboratory for engineers and scientists to help determine if Yucca Mountain is suitable to serve as a repository for the safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Morrison Knudsen's Environmental/Government Group is providing design and construction-management services on the project. The MK team is performing final design for the ESF and viability assessment design for the underground waste repository that will be built only if the site is found suitable for such a mission. In fact, if at anytime during the ESF phase, the site is found unsuitable, the studies will be stopped and the site restored to its natural state.

  11. Causes of sinks near Tucson, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, John P.; Pool, Donald R.; Konieczki, A. D.; Carpenter, Michael C.

    Land subsidence in the form of sinks has occurred on and near farmlands near Tucson, Pima County, Arizona, USA. The sinks occur in alluvial deposits along the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River, and have made farmlands dangerous and unsuitable for farming. More than 1700 sinks are confined to the flood plain of the Santa Cruz River and are grouped along two north-northwestward-trending bands that are approximately parallel to the river and other flood-plain drainages. An estimated 17,000m3 of sediment have been removed in the formation of the sinks. Thirteen trenches were dug to depths of 4-6m to characterize near-surface sediments in sink and nonsink areas. Sediments below about 2m included a large percentage of dispersive clays in sink areas. Sediments in nonsink areas contain a large component of medium- to coarse-grained, moderately to well sorted sand that probably fills a paleochannel. Electromagnetic surveys support the association of silts and clays in sink areas that are highly electrically conductive relative to sand in nonsink areas. Sinks probably are caused by the near-surface process of subsurface erosion of dispersive sediments along pre-existing cracks in predominantly silt and clay sediments. The pre-existing cracks probably result from desiccation or tension that developed during periods of water-table decline and channel incision during the past 100 years or in earlier periods. Résumé Des effondrements en forme d'entonnoir se sont produits sur et près d'exploitations agricoles de Pima (Arizona). Ces entonnoirs apparaissent dans les alluvions le long de la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz ; ils ont rendu ces terrains dangereux et inexploitables pour l'agriculture. Plus de 1700 entonnoirs existent dans la plaine d'inondation de la rivière Santa Cruz et sont groupés en deux bandes orientées nord-nord-ouest, approximativement parallèles à la rivière et aux autres chenaux de la plaine d'inondation. Un volume de sédiments estim

  12. Evaluating the ecological economic success of riparian restoration projects in Arizona (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary B. Snider

    2000-01-01

    The past 4 years the Arizona Water Protection Fund provided more than $25 million to individuals and organizations for stream and riparian restoration projects in Arizona. Information which increases the awareness of the value of Arizona's riparian systems is crucial to the incorporation of ecosystem services into decision-making frameworks, which are largely...

  13. Native Americans and Yucca Mountain: A revised and updated summary report on research undertaken between 1987 and 1991; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, C.S. [Cultural Resources Consultants Ltd., Reno, NV (United States)

    1991-10-15

    This report consists of Yucca Mountain Project bibliographies. It is the appendix to a report that summarizes data collected between September 1986 and September 1988 relative to Native American concerns involving the potential siting of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The data were collected from Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute people upon whose aboriginal lands the repository potentially is to be located. Western Shoshone people involved in the study were those resident or affiliated with reservation communities at Yomba and Duckwater, Nevada, and Death Valley, California. Southern Paiute people were at reservation communities at Moapa and Las Vegas. Additional persons of Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute descent were interviewed at Beatty, Tonopah, Caliente, Pahrump, and Las Vegas, Nevada. The work was part of a larger project of socioeconomic studies for the State of Nevada`s Nuclear Waste Projects office, conducted by Mountain West of Phoenix, Arizona.

  14. Independent Confirmatory Survey Report for the University of Arizona Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick A. Altic

    2011-11-11

    The University of Arizona (University) research reactor is a TRIGA swimming pool type reactor designed by General Atomics and constructed at the University in 1958. The reactor first went into operation in December of 1958 under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license R-52 until final shut down on May 18, 2010. Initial site characterization activities were conducted in February 2009 during ongoing reactor operations to assess the radiological status of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) excluding the reactor tank, associated components, and operating systems. Additional post-shutdown characterization activities were performed to complete characterization activities as well as verify assumptions made in the Decommissioning Plan (DP) that were based on a separate activation analysis (ESI 2009 and WMG 2009). Final status survey (FSS) activities began shortly after the issuance of the FSS plan in May 2011. The contractor completed measurement and sampling activities during the week of August 29, 2011.

  15. Ischemic Stroke in Williams-Beuren Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Der Lee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A 15-year-old girl was admitted because of an acute onset of facial palsy and right hemiparesis. The patient had a history of moderate mental retardation and developmental delay. On admission, her vital signs were stable, except for high blood pressure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an infarct involving the left internal capsule and putamen. Because of the patient's young age, an extensive stroke survey was performed. Williams-Beuren syndrome was finally confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Compared with the previously reported cases, no evidence of cerebral arterial stenosis or cardiac abnormalities was found by noninvasive imaging techniques. Because Williams-Beuren syndrome is a complex, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with prominent cardiovascular features, regular assessment and antihypertensive treatment are necessary to minimize the lifelong cardiovascular risk in patients with this syndrome.

  16. MacWilliams Identities for $m$-tuple Weight Enumerators

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Since MacWilliams proved the original identity relating the Hamming weight enumerator of a linear code to the weight enumerator of its dual code there have been many different generalizations, leading to the development of $m$-tuple support enumerators. We prove a generalization of a theorem of Britz, which builds on earlier work of Kl{\\o}ve, Shiromoto, and others. We then give illustrations of this new weight enumerator.

  17. Wilde?s worlds: Sir William Wilde in Victorian Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    McGeachie, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Other contributors to this collection have evoked the disparate worlds inhabited by Sir William Wilde. Aims To provide an overall assessment of his career. Materials and methods Looking at the historical conditions that made possible such a career spanning such disparate worlds. Deploying methodologies developed by historians of medicine and sociologists of science, the article brings together Wilde the nineteenth century clinician and Dublin man of science, the Wilde of the Cens...

  18. Experiencing educational inclusion: children with Williams syndrome in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Tynan, Fionnuala

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the educational inclusion experiences of children with Williams syndrome (WS) in Irish primary schools from the perspectives of the children, their parents and teachers. Almost equal numbers of parents chose mainstream and special-education placements for their child with WS, although this choice was complex. Parents were very satisfied with their child’s education regardless of setting. Parental and teacher perceptions of the WS educational profile differed little. Teach...

  19. William Morris, cultural leadership, and the dynamics of taste

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Charles; Press, Jon; Maclean, Mairi

    2011-01-01

    This examination of the social processes that inform cultural production asks how tastes are formed, transmitted, embedded, and reproduced across generations. These questions are explored through a study of William Morris, his working methods and products, and their impact on the decorative arts in Victorian Britain and beyond. Through the exercise of cultural leadership, Morris gave physical expression to the ideals and sentiments of Romanticism, and this in turn gave rise to a community of ...

  20. OBITUARY: Sir William Mitchell Physicist and enthusiast for science

    CERN Multimedia

    Cowley, R

    2002-01-01

    "William Mitchell was successively head of Physics at Reading and Oxford universities, and Chairman of the Science and Engineering Research Council from 1985 to 1990. He is largely responsible for the excellent neutron and X-ray facilities that are available for research by scientists in the UK. He was one of the first to realise that these uniquely powerful facilities would be essential tools not only for physicists but also for chemists, biologists, materials scientists and engineers" (1 page).

  1. Astronaut William Gregory practices with PILOT laptop computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut William G. Gregory, pilot for STS-67 mission, moves a control stick with his hands and monitors a landing scenario on his computer screen aboard the Earth orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. This activity measures the effects of space flight on pilot proficiency and is supported by the Portable Inflight Landing Operations Trainer (PILOT). The control stick is positioned near the primary stick which controls the Orbiter's maneuvers.

  2. Fissured and geographic tongue in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a rare, most often sporadic, genetic disease caused by a chromosomal microdeletion at locus 7q11.23 involving 28 genes. It is characterized by congenital heart defects, neonatal hypercalcemia, skeletal and renal abnormalities, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder, and dysmorphic facies. A number of clinical findings has been reported, but none of the studies evaluated this syndrome considering oral cavity. We here report a fissured and geographic tongue in association with WBS.

  3. William F. Grimes: The Making of a Prehistorian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. J. Gill

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Professor William Frances ('Peter' Grimes (1905-1988, Director of the Institute of Archaeology in London, is often associated with Roman archaeology. Although his roots were in the classical world, he made a significant contribution to the study of pre-Roman Wales, and was in the vanguard of field ar­chaeologists in Britain considering prehistory (Gill in press; Hall and Macdonald 1988; Merrifield 1990; Miles 1989.

  4. Environmental mutagenesis and radiation biology: The legacy of William Morgan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L

    2017-12-01

    A symposium entitled Environmental Mutagenesis and Radiation Biology was held on September 27, 2016 to honor the memory of Dr. William F. Morgan who passed away unexpectedly on November 13, 2015. The speakers presented the latest reviews on homologous recombination repair, induced genetic instability, bystander effects, and risk estimate development. Their presentations are presented following the introduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Slides showing aeromagnetic and gravity data for regional mineral exploration in Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Douglas P.

    1983-01-01

    Examples of aeromagnetic and gravity data over 1? x 2? areas are presented for regions near the Cripple Creek mining area, Colorado, and the Lordsburg-Tyrone-Silver City mining areas, southern New Mexico and Arizona. These data indicate broad crustal structures and compositional variations that are marked by magnetization and density contrasts. The focus is on anomalies that may signal large-dimension controlling structures for the emplacement of economic mineral deposits. An example is a continuous, quasi-linear, north-trending gradient in both gravity and magnetic data located west of Cripple Creek area along long. 105? 30? W. This trend correlates with two mineral deposits of the Southern Rocky Mountains Front Range. It also correlates in part with an area of volcanic rock and with a mapped fault complex (Elkhorn-Currant Creek-Else-Westcliffe). The trend is interpreted to indicate a continuous crustal fault system, although exposures of this system are discontinuous between areas of alluvium and volcanic-rock cover. Similar geophysical trends exist in the Silver City to Tyrone area, where northeast-and northwest-trending anomalies appear to be marked by intrusion and mineralization. In this area, northwest-trending alluvial basins favor the use of geophysics to infer economically accessible but hidden bedrock whose association with exposed mineralization seems possible. An example of an inferred broad and relatively shallow, but hidden bedrock complex in association with more areally-limited mineralization is the Victorio Mountains area about 34 mi (55 km) south-southeast of Tyrone, New Mexico. The mineralization is within faulted sediments whose outcrop covers a small portion of the geophysical anomaly-complex.

  6. Key issues for mountain areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Price, Martin F; Jansky, Libor; Iatsenia, Andrei A

    2004-01-01

    ... and livelihood opportunities . . . ... Safdar Parvez and Stephen F. Rasmussen 86 6 Mountain tourism and the conservation of biological and cultural diversity... Wendy Brewer Lama and Nikhat Sattar 11...

  7. Torn Between the Real and the Illusion: Tennessee Williams' Protagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A.N. Aldalabeeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tennessee Williams is regarded as one of the most famous and important American playwrights in the twentieth century. His writing career spanned more than forty-five years, and his achievements have been recognized and appreciated by many critics and readers in the world. Williams' literary work was also under many critical controversies. During his life, he was awarded two times  Pulitzer Prizes for his work 'A Streetcar Named Desire' in 1947 and 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof' in 1955. He was also awarded New York Drama Critics' Circle Award for ''The Glass Menagerie''. His southern roots play an important role to shape the theme of his work where thematically attached to twentieth-century southern fiction writers more than any other dramatist of his period. Williams concerned much with absconders and isolated people who were treated badly and trapped in their inappropriate circumstances, and this was the outcome of the impact of the social protest in the 1930s. His plays are concerned with large individual issues rather than the social issues that differentiate him from his contemporaries by the lyrical language he used too. The paper takes up the dialogue between the real and the illusion, especially in the way his protagonist relates to their social milieu.

  8. MacWilliams Identity for M-Spotty Weight Enumerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuyoshi; Fujiwara, Eiji

    M-spotty byte error control codes are very effective for correcting/detecting errors in semiconductor memory systems that employ recent high-density RAM chips with wide I/O data (e.g., 8, 16, or 32bits). In this case, the width of the I/O data is one byte. A spotty byte error is defined as random t-bit errors within a byte of length b bits, where 1 le t ≤ b. Then, an error is called an m-spotty byte error if at least one spotty byte error is present in a byte. M-spotty byte error control codes are characterized by the m-spotty distance, which includes the Hamming distance as a special case for t =1 or t = b. The MacWilliams identity provides the relationship between the weight distribution of a code and that of its dual code. The present paper presents the MacWilliams identity for the m-spotty weight enumerator of m-spotty byte error control codes. In addition, the present paper clarifies that the indicated identity includes the MacWilliams identity for the Hamming weight enumerator as a special case.

  9. 3D View of Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Grand Canyon is one of North America's most spectacular geologic features. Carved primarily by the Colorado River over the past six million years, the canyon sports vertical drops of 5,000 feet and spans a 445-kilometer-long stretch of Arizona desert. The strata along the steep walls of the canyon form a record of geologic time from the Paleozoic Era (250 million years ago) to the Precambrian (1.7 billion years ago).The above view was acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard the Terra spacecraft. Visible and near infrared data were combined to form an image that simulates the natural colors of water and vegetation. Rock colors, however, are not accurate. The image data were combined with elevation data to produce this perspective view, with no vertical exaggeration, looking from above the South Rim up Bright Angel Canyon towards the North Rim. The light lines on the plateau at lower right are the roads around the Canyon View Information Plaza. The Bright Angel Trail, which reaches the Colorado in 11.3 kilometers, can be seen dropping into the canyon over Plateau Point at bottom center. The blue and black areas on the North Rim indicate a forest fire that was smoldering as the data were acquired on May 12, 2000.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as

  10. In memoriam - William Toshio (Tosh) Yasutake, 1922-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Diane G.; Winton, James R.

    2017-01-01

    William Toshio (Tosh) Yasutake, 1922-2016 passed away peacefully at home on December 12, 2016, at the age of 94. He is survived by Fumi, his wife of 66 years, as well as four children and six grandchildren. With his death, the fish health community has lost an outstanding scientist as well as a kind, unassuming, and wonderful human being. Tosh was born on June 10, 1922, in Seattle, Washington, to Jack and Hide Yasutake. He was in his first year of studies at the University of Washington when Pearl Harbor was attacked by Imperial Japan on December 7, 1941. Following the attack, Tosh and his family (father, mother, sister, and two brothers) were among the 110,000–120,000 people of Japanese ancestry who were forced from their homes on the Pacific coast and incarcerated in internment camps in the interior. In June 1942, Tosh enlisted in the U.S. Army, serving as an unarmed combat medic in the famed 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the history of American warfare. Wounded in October 1944 during the Vosges Mountains campaign near Bruyères, France, Tosh was evacuated and missed the ensuing battle to rescue the “Lost Battalion,” at which his replacement was killed. Tosh returned to action in Italy in February 1945 and served until the end of the war in Europe, earning both a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star for bravery. In October 2010, the Congressional Gold Medal was awarded to the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, and in 2012 the surviving members were made chevaliers of the French Légion d’Honneur for actions contributing to the liberation of France in World War II.After the war, Tosh returned to the University of Washington on the GI Bill and received a B.S. degree in zoology in 1951. In 1953 he began his research career at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Western Fish Nutrition Laboratory at Cook, Washington, where he conducted pioneering research on nutritional fish diseases with John Halver. Tosh

  11. The landfall and inland penetration of a flood-producing atmospheric river in Arizona. Part I: observed synoptic-scale, orographic, and hydrometeorological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Paul J.; Ralph, F. Martin; Moore, Benjamin J.; Hughes, Mimi; Mahoney, Kelly M.; Cordeira, Jason M.; Dettinger, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are a dominant mechanism for generating intense wintertime precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. While studies over the past 10 years have explored the impact of ARs in, and west of, California’s Sierra Nevada and the Pacific Northwest’s Cascade Mountains, their influence on the weather across the intermountain west remains an open question. This study utilizes gridded atmospheric datasets, satellite imagery, rawinsonde soundings, a 449-MHz wind profiler and global positioning system (GPS) receiver, and operational hydrometeorological observing networks to explore the dynamics and inland impacts of a landfalling, flood-producing AR across Arizona in January 2010. Plan-view, cross-section, and back-trajectory analyses quantify the synoptic and mesoscale forcing that led to widespread precipitation across the state. The analyses show that a strong AR formed in the lower midlatitudes over the northeastern Pacific Ocean via frontogenetic processes and sea surface latent-heat fluxes but without tapping into the adjacent tropical water vapor reservoir to the south. The wind profiler, GPS, and rawinsonde observations document strong orographic forcing in a moist neutral environment within the AR that led to extreme, orographically enhanced precipitation. The AR was oriented nearly orthogonal to the Mogollon Rim, a major escarpment crossing much of central Arizona, and was positioned between the high mountain ranges of northern Mexico. High melting levels during the heaviest precipitation contributed to region-wide flooding, while the high-altitude snowpack increased substantially. The characteristics of the AR that impacted Arizona in January 2010, and the resulting heavy orographic precipitation, are comparable to those of landfalling ARs and their impacts along the west coasts of midlatitude continents.

  12. Dreamers in dialogue: evolution, sex and gender in the utopian visions of William Morris and William Henry Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Novák

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the parallels between two late-nineteenth-century utopias,William Henry Hudsons A Crystal Age (1882 and William Morriss News from Nowhere (1891. Itaims to explore how these two works respond to the transition from a kinetic to a static conception ofutopia that under pressure from evolutionary and feminist discourses took place during the period.Particular focus lies on the way in which this is negotiated through the depiction of evolution, sexuality,and gender roles in the respective novels, and how the depiction of these disruptive elements may workas a means of ensuring the readers active engagement in political, intellectual and emotional terms.

  13. On Reading Poems: Visual & Verbal Icons in William Carlos Williams' «Landscape With The Fall Of Icarus»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene R. Fairley

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Williams' admiration for Brueghel's landscape is coded in structural and stylistic correspondences between the poem and the painting. Structures in the poem have effects analogous to the use of devices of color, line, foregrounding in the painting. The poem, like the painting, presents a «neutral» scene but subtly insures the reader's involvement. Further, Williams draws a visual statement so that graphic features suggest a global image isomorphic with the motif of descent. Features of the poem, such as line and clause length, syntactic construction, semantic coherence, are discussed as factors that contribute to rapid glancing and increase readability. A study of readers shows their sensitivity to graphic features including the poem's shape, and corroborates the importance of stylistic features.

  14. A thousand mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Lindenberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In creating a series of short dances and presenting them in a variety of informal settings, my Thesis Project examines the encounter of emotion to body movement and the transfer of feeling that occurs when movement is witnessed by a live audience. In making the dances in this series I have borrowed performance practices and structures from song-writing traditions in order to frame this body of trans-performance work. The performance of A Thousand Mountains serves as an archive of my artistic ...

  15. Tracking acid mine-drainage in Southeast Arizona using GIS and sediment delivery models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, L.M.; Gray, F.; Guertin, D.P.; Wissler, C.; Bliss, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the application of models traditionally used to estimate erosion and sediment deposition to assess the potential risk of water quality impairment resulting from metal-bearing materials related to mining and mineralization. An integrated watershed analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based tools was undertaken to examine erosion and sediment transport characteristics within the watersheds. Estimates of stream deposits of sediment from mine tailings were related to the chemistry of surface water to assess the effectiveness of the methodology to assess the risk of acid mine-drainage being dispersed downstream of abandoned tailings and waste rock piles. A watershed analysis was preformed in the Patagonia Mountains in southeastern Arizona which has seen substantial mining and where recent water quality samples have reported acidic surface waters. This research demonstrates an improvement of the ability to predict streams that are likely to have severely degraded water quality as a result of past mining activities. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  16. Aeromagnetic map of the West Clear Creek roadless area, Coconino and Yavapai Counties, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Willard E.; Ulrich, George E.

    1983-01-01

    The West Clear Creek Roadless Area lies within the Coconino National Forest in central Arizona (fig. 1) and includes parts of Yavapai and Coconino Counties. Camp Verde, the nearest population center, is approximately 7 miles (11 km) west of the area. West Clear Creek canyon begins on the east at the confluence of the incised gorges of Willow Valley and of Clover Creek and is joined toward the west by Black Mountain Canyon. The canyon of West Clear Creek is very rugged; in several places it is more than 1,900 ft (580 m) deep. Creek elevation ranges from 6,100 ft (1,860 m) near the junction with Clover Creek to 3,200 ft (975 m) at the mouth of the canyon. The elevation of peaks and ridges near the canyon range from 4,000 ft (1,220 m) to 7,000 ft (2,135 m). Uplands at the head of Willow Valley and Clover Creek reach elevations up to 7,100 ft (2,165 m) above sea level.

  17. Arizona State's Origins Project Starts with a Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    For 12 hours at Arizona State University, a sold-out crowd of 3,000 people gave a group of famous scientists a pop-star welcome, cheering their remarks and lining up for autographs after a day full of discussion about black holes, string theory, and evolutionary biology. At a time when program cuts and faculty layoffs dominate the headlines of…

  18. Language Ideologies of Arizona Voters, Language Managers, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons-Doolan, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Arizona is the site of many explicit language policies as well as ongoing scholarly discussions of related language ideologies--beliefs about the role of language in society. This study adds a critical piece to the investigation of the role of ideologies in language policy processes by thoroughly documenting language ideologies expressed by a…

  19. Defoliation effects on resource allocation in Arizona cottontop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stems plus sheaths from which leaf blades have been removed may be important to Lehmann lovegrass because this tissue is photosynthetically active and contains nitrogen and phosphorus reserves. After defoliation, Arizona cottontop re-established a canopy more quickly than Lehmann lovegrass but differences were ...

  20. Food habits of Bald Eagles breeding in the Arizona desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryl G. Grubb

    1995-01-01

    Of 1814 foraging attempts, prey captures, or nest deliveries by Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in 14 Arizona breeding areas during 1983-1985, 1471 observations were identifiable to at least class: fish (76%), mammal (18%), bird (4%), and reptile/amphibian (2%). Forty-five species were recorded: catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, Pylodictis olivaris), suckers (...

  1. Food habits of bald eagles wintering in northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryl G. Grubb; Roy G. Lopez

    2000-01-01

    We used pellets collected from roosts to supplement incidental foraging observations to identify prey species of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucoughalus) and to evaluate spatial and temporal trends in their food habits while wintering in northern Arizona between 1994-96. We analyzed 1057 pellets collected from 14 roosts, and identified five mammal and...

  2. Timing of hummingbird migration in southeastern Arizona: implications for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan M. Wethington; Stephen M. Russell; George C. West

    2005-01-01

    We examined the distribution and abundance of hummingbirds at three study sites in southeastern Arizona, where over 8,000 individuals of twelve species were banded. Banding occurred at two sites in the early 1990s and is currently active at the third. Anna’s (Calype anna), Black-chinned (Archilochus alexandri), and...

  3. Lowland riparian herpetofaunas: the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip C. Rosen

    2005-01-01

    Previous work has shown that southeastern Arizona has a characteristic, high diversity lowland riparian herpetofauna with 62-68 or more species along major stream corridors, and 46-54 species in shorter reaches within single biomes, based on intensive fieldwork and museum record surveys. The San Pedro River supports this characteristic herpetofauna, at least some of...

  4. 75 FR 3694 - Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services, Peach Springs, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... procedures for comments, see 47 CFR 1.4125 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Communications Commission proposes to...

  5. Implementing Structured English Immersion in Arizona: Benefits, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez Canche, Manuel S.; Moll, Luis C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Arizona's most recent English Language Learner (ELL) legislation, starting in the school year 2008-2009, requires all such students be educated through a specific Structured English Immersion (SEI) model: the 4-hour English Language Development (ELD) block. The basic premise behind this particular model is that ELL students…

  6. 75 FR 7518 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Green Valley, Arizona. The FS is proposing to make this property available to the public as an overnight rental for $150 per night. The Kent Springs Cabin with its six rooms can accommodate up to eight people... will be available for overnight use with a maximum capacity of six people. Management of the cabin may...

  7. The Rugged Frontier: A Decade of Charter Schooling in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bryan C.; Terrell, Michelle Godard

    2004-01-01

    Arizona's charter experience over the past decade has clearly shown the power of a relatively open chartering system. Schools have sprung up in all corners of the state; parents and teachers have flocked to them in great numbers. Interesting new approaches have emerged. Quite a few of the schools have been strikingly successful. In many places,…

  8. 78 FR 25861 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Peach Springs, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications....S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal...--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 0 1. The authority citation for Part 73 continues to read as follows: Authority...

  9. 78 FR 26739 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, Arizona AGENCY: Federal Communications... Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Nazifa Sawez... filed by S and H Broadcasting, LLC, proposing the substitution of Channel 228C2 for vacant Channel 286C2...

  10. Language Policy and Bilingual Education in Arizona and Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric J.; Johnson, David Cassels

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the bilingual/language education policies of Arizona and Washington to show that state-level language policy plays a critical role in shaping the appropriation of federal language policy [No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), Title III] and how different state-level language policies impact the district level of policy…

  11. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Arizona's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Arizona is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  12. Comparison studies of ozone precursors in Phoenix, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Guyton, J.; Lee, C.P. [Arizona Dept. of Environmental Quality, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Parmar, S. [Atmospheric Analysis and Consulting Co., Ventura, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper will present the comparison of the ozone precursors monitoring program for Phoenix, Arizona during 1992 and 1993. Specific details and methodologies will be presented involving collection of air samples and analysis of speciated measurements for reactive VOC and carbonyl precursors responsible for ozone formation. Quality control and quality assurance techniques will also be discussed.

  13. Aspen fencing in northern Arizona: A 15-year perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Rolf

    2001-01-01

    Aspen clearcuts in the 1960s and 1970s on the Peaks Ranger District of the Coconino National Forest in northern Arizona failed to regenerate successfully because of browsing primarily by elk. Since 1985, over 400 acres have been successfully regenerated using fencing of various designs to exclude elk. The expense and visual impact of establishing and maintaining over...

  14. A Study of Arizona's Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Gonzalez-Canche, Manuel; Moll, Luis C.

    2010-01-01

    In this study a representative sample of 880 elementary and secondary teachers currently teaching in 33 schools across the state of Arizona were asked about their perceptions of how their ELL students were faring under current instructional policies for ELL students. Teachers were surveyed during the Spring of 2010. Overall findings show that most…

  15. Western yellow pine in Arizona and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore S. Woolsey

    1911-01-01

    Western yellow pine is to the Southwest what white pine is to the Northeast, or longleaf pine to the Southeast. The commercial forests of Arizona and New Mexico are three-fourths western yellow pine, which furnishes by far the greater part of the lumber used locally as well as that shipped to outside markets. To describe the characteristics of the species and to...

  16. 75 FR 51840 - State of Arizona Resource Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ...; Presentation on water processes, issues and strategies affecting public lands in Arizona; State Director Update... Strategy and RAC discussion and recommendations on factors BLM should consider as these strategies are... public who wish to address the Council on BLM programs and business. Under the Federal Lands Recreation...

  17. Prevalence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in desert bighorn sheep in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice-Allen, Anne E.; Luedtke, Clint J.; Overstreet, Matthew; Cain, James W.; Stephenson, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the potential for an epizootic of pneumonia to result from either natural immigration or translocation, we compared the seroprevalence to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in several populations of desert bighorn sheep in Arizona. We collected blood samples and nasal or oropharyngeal swabs from 124 desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) from 6 populations in Arizona in 2009 and 2010. M. ovipneumoniae organisms were detected by PCR in 22%, whereas antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae were detected in 47% of tested bighorn sheep. Mycoplasma antibodies were not found in 2 of 6 populations, indicating some bighorn sheep populations in Arizona are naïve to this bacterium. In contrast, others had seroprevalence rates up to 80%. We were able to compare seroprevalence rates and titers over time in 9 individuals (7 individuals included in the 124 bighorn sheep sampled in 2009 and 2010, and 2 individuals originally captured in 2006). Antibody titers persisted for 12 months in individuals from the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge (n = 7) while antibody titers appeared to decline in the Kanab Creek population (n = 2). M. ovipneumoniae is present or has been present in several, but not all, populations of bighorn sheep in Arizona. The results demonstrate the importance of routine health testing for future translocation efforts to reduce disease risk for naive populations.

  18. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1979-1980 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Designed to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, this 1979-80 annual report reflects the Commission's efforts to act in a liaison capacity between tribes and state government and to provide tribes with technical assistance. The report describes 17 projects completed during…

  19. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1975-76 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    The Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs' annual report is issued to inform the Governor, State Legislature, and tribal governments of the proceedings, transactions, findings, and recommendations made by the Commission, and this 1975-76 report presents the following: (1) Commission membership; (2) a map of the American Indian reservation areas in…

  20. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1982 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Designed to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, this 1981-82 annual report reflects the Commission's efforts to improve communications, understanding and working relationships between tribes and state government to provide tribes with technical assistance. The report…

  1. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1976-1977 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Issued to inform the Governor, State Legislature, and tribal governments of the proceedings, transactions, findings, and recommendations made by the Commission, this 1976-77 annual report includes the following: the Commission's membership; population and acreage of Arizona reservations; commission meetings during the year; projects completed;…

  2. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1981 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Designed to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, this 1980-81 annual report reflects the commission's efforts to act in a liaison capacity between tribes and state government to provide tribes with technical assistance. The report describes 18 projects completed during the…

  3. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1984 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Designed to provide insight into the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs' proceedings, transactions, and findings, the 1984 annual report describes the year's efforts to improve communications, understanding, and working relationships between all concerned. After reviewing Commission meeting attendance and the attendance of related meetings, the…

  4. Arizona State University: Student Tracking in a University System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John D.; Gebel, Melinda A.

    1995-01-01

    Arizona State University has created longitudinal student files capable of tracking each student's curricular and financial aid history from entry until graduation. The structure of the files, their creation and maintenance, and their evolution over the years are described. Uses of the files to conduct different kinds of studies to inform…

  5. Protected areas in mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton, L. S.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The importance of a global Protected Areas Network in sustaining appropriate mountain development is presented in this paper. Present status of the world’s “official” Protected Areas in the UN List, and the proportion that are in mountain areas, and including international designations (World Heritage and Biosphere Reserves. Current and future challenges in the management of these special areas are also commented.



    El autor destaca la importancia de una Red Mundial de Espacios Protegidos para el desarrollo sostenible de las montañas. Comenta luego el estatus actual de las Áreas Protegidas “oficiales” del Mundo en la Lista de las Naciones Unidas y qué proporción de ellas forma parte de las montañas, sin olvidar las figuras internacionales de protección como Patrimonio de la Humanidad y Reservas de Biosfera. Para terminar, se discuten los problemas de gestión actuales y futuros de estas áreas tan especiales

  6. Artificial Snowfall from Mountain Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Ludlam, F. H.

    2011-01-01

    A tentative theory of provoking snowfall from simple orographic clouds is composed, using simplifying assumptions, and it is shown reasonable to suppose that winter snowfall on Central Swedish mountains might be substantially increased by skillful seeding of supercooled mountain clouds.DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1955.tb01164.x

  7. Judicial Performance Review in Arizona: A Critical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca White Berch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Judicial performance evaluations are a relatively new tool for assessing judges and providing information to voters to help them determine whether to retain judges in contested or retention elections. Arizona implemented its judicial evaluation program about 20 years ago, and since that time, the state has continually strived to improve its process. The result is that today Arizona has one of the most progressive and comprehensive judicial performance evaluation programs in the United States. This article takes a critical look at the strengths and weaknesses of Arizona’s program, keeping in mind two key values that the system seeks to protect: judicial accountability and judicial independence. Las evaluaciones del rendimiento judicial son una herramienta relativamente nueva para evaluar a los jueces y ofrecer información a los votantes, que les ayude a decidir si quieren reelegir a los jueces en las elecciones. Arizona implementó su programa de evaluación judicial hace unos 20 años, y desde ese momento, el Estado se ha esforzado continuamente en mejorar el proceso. El resultado es que hoy en día, Arizona tiene uno de los programas de evaluación del rendimiento judicial más progresistas e integrales de los Estados Unidos. Este artículo ofrece una mirada crítica a las fortalezas y debilidades del programa de Arizona, teniendo en cuenta dos valores clave que el sistema trata de proteger: la responsabilidad judicial y la independencia judicial. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2533868

  8. Microclimatic Influences on Hillslope Geomorphology, Northeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, B. N.; Meyer, G. A.; McFadden, L. D.

    2003-12-01

    Climate is commonly assumed to be an important factor influencing weathering, erosion and landscape evolution, but few studies have quantitatively assessed differences in geomorphology associated with minor but persistently different moisture and temperature conditions. In northeastern Arizona, we have studied several small ( ˜0.5 km2), semi-arid eastward-draining basins where topography has induced different microclimates on north- and south-facing canyon slopes. These 60-100 m deep canyons expose lenticular silty sandstones and mudstones of the Jurassic Morrison formation; sandstones, shales, and coals of the Cretaceous Dakota formation; and shales of the Mancos formation. Over one annual cycle (beginning 17 August 2002), we monitored air, surface, and subsurface temperatures as well as soil moisture at four locations at 0.5 h intervals. The annual average air temperature (at ˜10 cm above the surface) was 1.3° C warmer on a south-facing colluvial slope and 2.1° C warmer on a south-facing exposure of weathered sandstone than on north-facing slopes of the same type. Annual average surface temperature was 3.0-3.8° C warmer on south-facing slopes and the temperature at ˜10 cm depth in the sandstone was 5.7° C warmer on the south-facing slope. Soil moisture tension averaged at least 78-100 kPa lower on north-facing slopes at 10 cm depth but only 36 kPa lower at 30 cm depth. Morrison formation sandstones weather primarily by granular disintegration and form a disaggregated mantle on some slopes where weathering exceeds erosion, but also form little-weathered vertical cliffs (dominantly on southerly aspects). Rock strength was estimated at over 400 sites using a Schmidt hammer. Slope angle and aspect, as well as vegetation type and % cover were also recorded at each location. Vegetation covers about 4 times as much area on northeast-facing slopes as on southwest facing slopes. Young's modulus values derived from Schmidt hammer rebound for southwest-facing points

  9. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2003-08-05

    This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

  10. Diversity of Frankia populations in root nodules of geographically isolated Arizona alder trees in central Arizona (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allana K. Welsh; Jeffrey O. Dawson; Gerald J. Gottfried; Dittmar Hahn

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of uncultured Frankia populations in root nodules of Alnus oblongifolia trees geographically isolated on mountaintops of central Arizona was analyzed by comparative sequence analyses of nifH gene fragments. Sequences were retrieved from Frankia populations in nodules of four trees from each of...

  11. Structural evidence for northeastward movement on the Chocolate Mountains Thrust, southeasternmost California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J.T.; Haxel, G.B.; Tosdal, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous Chocolate Mountains Thrust of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona places a block of Proterozoic and Mesozoic continental crust over the late Mesozoic continental margin oceanic sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the Orocopia Schist. The Chocolate Mountains Thrust is interpreted as a thrust (burial, subduction) fault rather than a low-angle normal fault. An important parameter required to understand the tectonic significance of the Chocolate Mountains and related thrusts is their sense of movement. The only sense of movement consistent with collective asymmetry of the thrust zone folds is top to the northeast. Asymmetric microstructures studied at several localities also indicate top to the northeast movement. Paleomagnetic data suggest that the original sense of thrusting, prior to Neogene vertical axis tectonic rotation related to the San Andreas fault system, was northward. Movement of the upper plate of the chocolate Mountains thrust evidently was continentward. Continentward thrusting suggests a tectonic scenario in which an insular or peninsular microcontinental fragment collided with mainland southern California. -from Authors

  12. Using InSAR Remote Sensing Technology to Analyze 3 Basin Aquifer Recharge Areas in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilovsky, D.; Rucker, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Land subsidence due to pumping-induced groundwater decline has been well documented in alluviual basins in southern Arizona. Beginning in 2002, satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) began to document post-1992 subsidence across these basins. Several basin aquifer recharge projects using water delivered by the Central Arizona Project (CAP) also began in the early 2000s. Reversal of land subsidence (elastic rebound) associated with recharge is evident in InSAR results across these basins. Projects with rebound documented using InSAR include the Tonopah Desert Recharge Project (permitted 150,000 [ac-ft/yr] starting in 2006) located 40 miles west of Phoenix, and the Hieroglyphic Mountains Recharge Project (permitted 35,000 ac-ft/yr starting in 2003) located several miles north of McMicken Dam in the West Salt River Valley. The Superstition Mountains Recharge Project (ultimate permitting of 85,000 ac-ft/yr, completed in 2011), located at Queen Creek in the East Salt River Valley, has also begun to develop a clear InSAR signature feature. Groundwater level index wells up to several miles downstream from these recharge facilities have indicated groundwater level recoveries of about 70 to 200 feet in the time corresponding to the InSAR studies. Resulting elastic rebound of ground surface elevations due to reduction of effective stresses in the compressible basin alluvium is a function of the effective stress change, the basin alluvium elastic moduli, and the thickness of the effected compressible basin alluvium. The areas and magnitudes of effective stress unloading are indicated from the rebound documented using InSAR. The volumes of aquifer recharge are anticipated to be related to the volumes of InSAR-derived rebound. It is also anticipated that estimates of large-scale horizontal hydraulic conductivity may be approximately verified by areas of ground surface rebound, and gradients driving groundwater flow may be inferred from magnitudes of

  13. Seguridad social, empleo y propiedad privada en William Beveridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Llanos Reyes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to approach the economic and political notions of William Beveridge, which proposed the construction of the British Welfare State immediately after WWII. A form of State which sought to overcome the crisis of capitalism by proposing control over the system. We attempt to demonstrate the relation that should exist, according to Beveridge, the "father" of this model of capitalist State, between the development of a social security system, employment, and the situation of private property, while simultaneously pointing out the specifics and complexity of his ideas in the relation observed between full occupation and private property as basic elements for the construction of a Social Security system.

  14. Reverend Doctor William Pearson in South Kilworth, Leicestershire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    William Pearson (1767-1847) was a 19th-century astronomer, renowned for his work in positional astronomy and the design of astronomical instruments, both practical and instructional. He was a co-founder in 1820 of the Astronomical Society of London, which later became the Royal Astronomical Society, where his portrait hangs. For 30 years of his astronomical career he was the Rector of South Kilworth, a village in Leicestershire, England, where he erected several observatory buildings, as well as extending the village church and building the village schoolroom. This paper documents his activities in South Kilworth.

  15. Unravelling starlight: William and Margaret Huggins and the rise of the new astronomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Becker, Barbara J

    2011-01-01

    ...). A pioneer in adapting the spectroscope to new astronomical purposes, William Huggins rose to scientific prominence in London and transformed professional astronomy to become a principal founder...

  16. Glacial effects limiting mountain height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egholm, D L; Nielsen, S B; Pedersen, V K; Lesemann, J-E

    2009-08-13

    The height of mountain ranges reflects the balance between tectonic rock uplift, crustal strength and surface denudation. Tectonic deformation and surface denudation are interdependent, however, and feedback mechanisms-in particular, the potential link to climate-are subjects of intense debate. Spatial variations in fluvial denudation rate caused by precipitation gradients are known to provide first-order controls on mountain range width, crustal deformation rates and rock uplift. Moreover, limits to crustal strength are thought to constrain the maximum elevation of large continental plateaus, such as those in Tibet and the central Andes. There are indications that the general height of mountain ranges is also directly influenced by the extent of glaciation through an efficient denudation mechanism known as the glacial buzzsaw. Here we use a global analysis of topography and show that variations in maximum mountain height correlate closely with climate-controlled gradients in snowline altitude for many high mountain ranges across orogenic ages and tectonic styles. With the aid of a numerical model, we further demonstrate how a combination of erosional destruction of topography above the snowline by glacier-sliding and commensurate isostatic landscape uplift caused by erosional unloading can explain observations of maximum mountain height by driving elevations towards an altitude window just below the snowline. The model thereby self-consistently produces the hypsometric signature of the glacial buzzsaw, and suggests that differences in the height of mountain ranges mainly reflect variations in local climate rather than tectonic forces.

  17. Proposal for definition of mountain and under-mountain areas

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Navrátil

    2005-01-01

    Spatial definitions of study areas for specific projects are of crucial importance for these projects. It is necessary to come out from the aims of the project for spatial definition of mountain and under-mountain areas in South- Bohemian Region. There are many ways of solution and the definition should be strictly connected with the structured goals of this project. The methods and usage of criteria for definition of study areas will depend on aim identification. There are several possibilit...

  18. Sir William Osler's speech at Troy: a Trojan horse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Troy, New York, is a city of 55,000 people in upstate New York located along the Hudson River. A city of surprisingly rich cultural heritage, it was the home of New York state's first hospital outside New York City. The 50th anniversary celebration of Troy's hospital brought William Osler to the city as the keynote speaker. This speech, delivered on November 28, 1900, is one of Sir William's less well known addresses. Osler began his comments with Sir Thomas More's Utopia and talked at length about the hospital, its obligations, the influences it has upon the community, and the role of physicians and surgeons. He broached one of his old saws, the salary of attending physicians and their needed role in hospital management. His words were published in the diamond jubilee's records, but the hospital did not outlive its prominent guest professor, and it closed its doors in 1914. Just like the great historical city of Troy, New York's own Troy was on the brink of decline, and its hospital would be the first fatality. Therefore, it is almost prescient that the words of Osler, taken into historical context juxtaposed against the socioeconomic forces at work, are akin to the Greek's offering of a wooden edifice to end the Trojan War.

  19. [Williams syndrome: its clinical aspects and molecular bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonell, A; Del Campo, M; Flores, R; Campuzano, V; Perez-Jurado, L A

    2006-01-07

    Williams syndrome is a developmental disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 7,500 newborns. Its phenotype is characterized by distinctive facial features, mild to moderate mental retardation and general cognitive deficits with a non-uniform profile, having problems in some areas (psychomotricity, visuospatial integration) and relative preservation of others (language, musicality), friendly personality, occasional hypercalcemia of infancy, and a vasculopathy with supravalvular aortic stenosis. Williams syndrome is caused by a submicroscopic deletion of 1.55 Mb in the chromosome band 7q11.23, which includes 26-28 genes. The mutational mechanism consists in a misalignment between regions of almost identical sequence and the subsequent unequal recombination. The reciprocal product of this rearrangement is the duplication of this region, causing a language specific disorder. Clinical-molecular correlations establishment through a good phenotypic characterization and the precise analysis of breakpoints in patients with atypical and typical deletions, altogether with the design of animal models and functional studies in vitro for the genes of the interval will be important to be able to determine the exact contribution of the genes to the phenotype, to know their pathogenesis and physiopathology, and to identify therapeutic methods.

  20. La voix prophétique de William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Menneteau

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available En revendiquant le statut de barde-prophète, William Blake prend une position marginale et critique vis-à-vis de la société britannique du XVIIIe siècle. Cependant, par ses liens avec le gnosticisme, sa poésie anticipe nombre de concepts phénoménologiques centrés sur l’expérience intérieure du sujet et sur son regard constituant. Par son rapport au mysticisme, enfin, Blake intègre une problématique du langage propre à remettre en question notre conception de la littérature : de même, sa vision interroge la définition de la nature humaine.As he claimed the status of a bard-prophet, William Blake took a marginal and critical stance towards eighteenth century British society. Thanks to its links with Gnosticism, his poetry anticipates a number of phenomenological concepts focusing on the subject’s inner experience and his constituting outlook. By reference to mysticism, Blake’s consideration of the limits of language leads to the questioning of our own idea of literature, just as his vision leads to the redefinition of human nature.

  1. Assessment of Vulnerability to Coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriber, Jennifer; Conlon, Kathryn C; Benedict, Kaitlin; McCotter, Orion Z; Bell, Jesse E

    2017-06-23

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection endemic to the southwestern United States, particularly Arizona and California. Its incidence has increased, potentially due in part to the effects of changing climatic variables on fungal growth and spore dissemination. This study aims to quantify the county-level vulnerability to coccidioidomycosis in Arizona and California and to assess the relationships between population vulnerability and climate variability. The variables representing exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity were combined to calculate county level vulnerability indices. Three methods were used: (1) principal components analysis; (2) quartile weighting; and (3) percentile weighting. Two sets of indices, "unsupervised" and "supervised", were created. Each index was correlated with coccidioidomycosis incidence data from 2000-2014. The supervised percentile index had the highest correlation; it was then correlated with variability measures for temperature, precipitation, and drought. The supervised percentile index was significantly correlated ( p vulnerable counties and provides support for the hypothesis that population vulnerability to coccidioidomycosis is associated with climate variability.

  2. Ice fishing by wintering Bald Eagles in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryl G. Grubb; Roy G. Lopez

    1997-01-01

    Northern Arizona winters vary within and between years with occasional heavy snows (up to 0.6 m) and extreme cold (overnight lows -18 to -29°C) interspersed with dry periods, mild temperatures (daytime highs reaching 10°C), and general loss of snow cover at all but highest elevations. Lakes in the area may freeze and thaw partially or totally several times during a...

  3. Wintering bald eagle trends in northern Arizona, 1975-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryl G. Grubb

    2003-01-01

    Between 1975 and 2000, 4,525 sightings of wintering bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were recorded at Mormon Lake in northern Arizona. Numbers of wintering eagles fluctuated little in the 20 years from 1975 through 1994 (5.5 ± 3.0 mean sightings per day). However, during the winters of 1995 through 1997 local record highs of 59 to 118 eagles...

  4. How Arizona Community College Teachers Go About Learning to Teach

    OpenAIRE

    Hamblin, Carolyn J.

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-method study used a survey and semistructured interviews to learn how new Arizona community college teachers learned to teach, how available certain learning experiences and effective professional development activities were, how valuable teachers perceived those learning experiences and activities to be, and if there were any factors that underlie how new community college teachers learned to teach. The survey questioned whether 26 learning experiences were available to new commun...

  5. A Comprehensive Fusion Liaison Officer Program: The Arizona Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Arizona’s Community Liaison Officer Program ( CLP ). The mission of the CLP is to: provide a direct link between the state Counter Terrorism Center and...means available will make Arizona the safest and most prepared state in the nation.135 The Community Liaison Program ( CLP ) provides a link between...information gathering and dissemination.136 The ACTIC has a fulltime community liaison program ( CLP ) officer, assigned from one of the ACTIC partner

  6. Student research in criticality safety at the University of Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief progress report on four University of Arizona student projects is given. Improvements were made in simulations of power pulses in aqueous solutions, including the TWODANT model. TWODANT calculations were performed to investigate the effect of assembly shape on the expansion coefficient of reactivity for solutions. Preliminary calculations were made of critical heights for the Los Alamos SHEBA assembly. Calculations to support French experiments to measure temperature coefficients of dilute plutonium solutions confirmed feasibility.

  7. A mountain of millipedes IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Two species of the genus Prionopetalum Attems, 1909, are recorded from the Udzungwa Mountains: P. asperginis sp. nov. and P. kraepelini (Attems, 1896). Prionopetalum stuhlmanni Attems, 1914, is synonymized under P. kraepelini. Odontopyge fasciata Attems, 1896, is transferred from Prionopetalum...

  8. Rocky Mountain Arsenal NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit CO-0035009, the U.S. Department of Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service is authorized to discharge from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal recycled water pipeline to Lower Derby Lake in Adams County, Colo.

  9. The Table Mountain Field Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Table Mountain Field Site, located north of Boulder, Colorado, is designated as an area where the magnitude of strong, external signals is restricted (by State...

  10. Professional Development Through The University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Nieberding, Megan N.; Austin, Carmen; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club creates a unique environment for undergraduates to accomplish goals early in their academic career. The club provides research opportunities with advisors, graduate students, and projects organized by fellow undergraduates. Undergraduates that work side-by-side develop strong working relationships which keeps students interested in astronomy and enables them to thrive in their studies and research. Club members are encouraged to attend and present their research at professional conferences where they are exposed early to the scientific research community, learn about internship and REU opportunities, and get information about graduate programs. In addition to preparing undergraduates to thrive in their academic career, the club also offers outreach opportunities for members to actively educate the southern Arizona community. Members of the club design and create many of their outreach materials including 3D models of our local stellar neighborhood and astronomical objects. Astronomy Club has had a positive impact on its members, the Department of Astronomy, and the southern Arizona community for the past seven years. The club continues to strive to improve undergraduate retention and prepare students for their future careers.

  11. Camera Geolocation From Mountain Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    be reliably extracted from query images. However, in real-life scenarios the skyline in a query image may be blurred or invisible , due to occlusions...extracted from multiple mountain ridges is critical to reliably geolocating challenging real-world query images with blurred or invisible mountain skylines...Buddemeier, A. Bissacco, F. Brucher, T. Chua, H. Neven, and J. Yagnik, “Tour the world: building a web -scale landmark recognition engine,” in Proc. of

  12. Yucca Mountain Project public interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, B.E.

    1990-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to keeping the citizens of Nevada informed about activities that relate to the high-level nuclear waste repository program. This paper presents an overview of the Yucca Mountain Project`s public interaction philosophy, objectives, activities and experiences during the two years since Congress directed the DOE to conduct site characterization activities only for the Yucca Mountain site.

  13. Stratigraphy and paleogeographic significance of the Pennsylvanian-Permian Bird Spring Formation in the Ship Mountains, southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Paul; Stevens, Calvin H.; Howard, Keith A.; Hoisch, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    A thick sequence of limestone, dolomite, and minor sandstone assigned to the Pennsylvanian and lower Permian Bird Spring Formation is exposed in the Ship Mountains about 85 kilometers (km) southwest of Needles, California, in the eastern Mojave Desert. These strata provide a valuable reference section of the Bird Spring Formation in a region where rocks of this age are not extensively exposed. This section, which is about 900 meters (m) thick, is divided into five informal members. Strata of the Bird Spring Formation in the Ship Mountains originated as shallow-water marine deposits on the broad, southwest-trending continental shelf of western North America. Perpendicular to the shelf, the paleogeographic position of the Ship Mountains section is intermediate between those of the thicker, less terrigenous, more seaward section of the Bird Spring Formation in the Providence Mountains, 55 km to the northwest, and the thinner, more terrigenous, more landward sections of the Supai Group near Blythe, 100 km to the southeast. Parallel to the shelf, the Ship Mountains section is comparable in lithofacies and inferred paleogeographic position to sections assigned to the Callville Limestone and overlying Pakoon Limestone in northwestern Arizona and southeastern Nevada, 250 km to the northeast. Deposition of the Bird Spring Formation followed a major rise in eustatic sea level at about the Mississippian- Pennsylvanian boundary. The subsequent depositional history was controlled by episodic changes in eustatic sea level, shelf subsidence rates, and sediment supply. Subsidence rates could have been influenced by coeval continental-margin tectonism to the northwest.

  14. Mountain Child: Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audsley, Annie; Wallace, Rebecca M M; Price, Martin F

    2016-12-01

    Objectives This systematic review identifies and reviews both peer-reviewed and 'grey' literature, across a range of disciplines and from diverse sources, relating to the condition of children living in mountain communities in low- and middle-income countries. Findings The literature on poverty in these communities does not generally focus on the particular vulnerabilities of children or the impact of intersecting vulnerabilities on the most marginalised members of communities. However, this literature does contribute analyses of the broader context and variety of factors impacting on human development in mountainous areas. The literature on other areas of children's lives-health, nutrition, child mortality, education, and child labour-focuses more specifically on children's particular vulnerabilities or experiences. However, it sometimes lacks the broader analysis of the many interrelated characteristics of a mountainous environment which impact on children's situations. Themes Nevertheless, certain themes recur across many disciplines and types of literature, and point to some general conclusions: mountain poverty is influenced by the very local specificities of the physical environment; mountain communities are often politically and economically marginalised, particularly for the most vulnerable within these communities, including children; and mountain communities themselves are an important locus for challenging and interrupting cycles of increasing inequality and disadvantage. While this broad-scale review represents a modest first step, its findings provide the basis for further investigation.

  15. Inversion of the Williams syndrome region is a common polymorphism found more frequently in parents of children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobart, Holly H; Morris, Colleen A; Mervis, Carolyn B; Pani, Ariel M; Kistler, Doris J; Rios, Cecilia M; Kimberley, Kendra W; Gregg, Ronald G; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-05-15

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a multisystem disorder caused by deletion of about 1.55 Mb of DNA (including 26 genes) on chromosome 7q11.23, a region predisposed to recombination due to its genomic structure. Deletion of the Williams syndrome chromosome region (WSCR) occurs sporadically. To better define chance for familial recurrence and to investigate the prevalence of genomic rearrangements of the region, 257 children with WS and their parents were studied. We determined deletion size in probands by metaphase FISH, parent-of-origin of the deleted chromosome by molecular genetic methods, and inversion status of the WSCR in both parents by interphase FISH. The frequency of WSCR inversion in the transmitting parent group was 24.9%. In contrast, the rate of inversion in the non-transmitting parent group (a reasonable estimate of the rate in the general population) was 5.8%. There were no significant gender differences with respect to parent-of-origin for the deleted chromosome or the incidence of the inversion polymorphism. There was no difference in the rate of spontaneous abortion for mothers heterozygous for the WSCR inversion relative to mothers without the inversion. We calculate that for a parent heterozygous for a WSCR inversion, the chance to have a child with WS is about 1 in 1,750, in contrast to the 1 in 9,500 chance for a parent without an inversion.

  16. Auditory Attraction: Activation of Visual Cortex by Music and Sound in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype, including cognitive-linguistic features, nonsocial anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with Williams syndrome and typically…

  17. 33 CFR 167.1703 - In Prince William Sound: Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In Prince William Sound: Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme. 167.1703 Section 167.1703 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... William Sound: Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme. The Valdez Arm Traffic Separation Scheme consists of...

  18. Inventing Orientation and Mobility Techniques and Teaching Methods: A Conversation with Russell Williams (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Rachard L.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final part of the adaptation from my on-stage conversation with Russell Williams at the 1998 International Mobility conference in Atlanta, GA, which attempted to highlight Williams's contributions to the progression of orientation and mobility from the Army's immediate response to the service men and women who lost their sight during…

  19. 34 CFR 663.22 - How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? 663.22 Section 663.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Scholarship Board select fellows? The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board selects fellows on the...

  20. 34 CFR 662.22 - How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? 662.22 Section 662.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? (a) The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board selects...

  1. Brief Report: Developing Spatial Frequency Biases for Face Recognition in Autism and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Hayley C.; Annaz, Dagmara; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated whether contrasting face recognition abilities in autism and Williams syndrome could be explained by different spatial frequency biases over developmental time. Typically-developing children and groups with Williams syndrome and autism were asked to recognise faces in which low, middle and high spatial frequency…

  2. A MacWilliams Identity for Convolutional Codes : The General Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gluesing-Luerssen, Heide; Schneider, Gert

    A MacWilliams Identity for convolutional codes will be established. It makes use of the weight adjacency matrices of the code and its dual, based on state space realizations (the controller canonical form) of the codes in question. The MacWilliams Identity applies to various notions of duality

  3. 33 CFR 164.43 - Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment-Prince William Sound. 164.43 Section 164.43 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Automatic Identification System Shipborne Equipment—Prince William Sound. (a) Until December 31, 2004, each...

  4. 77 FR 43276 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct.... Ford Federal Direct Loan Program will use this form to request forbearance on their loans when they are... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program General Forbearance Request. OMB Control...

  5. 77 FR 58818 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

  6. 78 FR 45515 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct...

  7. 78 FR 52169 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program Federal Direct PLUS Loan...

  8. Foraging and reproductive behavior of Arizona gray squirrels (Sciurus arizonensis): impacts of climatic variation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nichole L. Cudworth; John L. Koprowski

    2013-01-01

    ...; however, no data are available on diet or reproduction. We investigated annual variation in foraging and reproductive habits of Arizona gray squirrels to assess responses to extreme seasonality...

  9. A new case of keratoconus associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Melissa Machado; Frasson, Maria; Leão, Letícia Lima; Stofanko, Martin; Gonçalves-Dornelas, Higgor; Cunha, Pricila da Silva; de Aguiar, Marcos José Burle

    2013-09-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a multisystemic genetic disorder caused by a contiguous gene deletion at 7q11.23. Keratoconus is a complex disease and it is suspected to have a genetic origin, although the specific gene responsible for keratoconus has not been identified. Although there are several ocular features in Williams-Beuren syndrome, keratoconus is not regularly described as part of this syndrome. To report a new patient with keratoconus and Williams-Beuren syndrome. This is the third case of an association between Williams-Beuren syndrome and keratoconus. The authors believe that the Williams-Beuren syndrome chromosome region can be a possible target for further investigation as the genetic basis of keratoconus.

  10. The origins of mountain geoecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ives, Jack D.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mountain geoecology, as a sub-discipline of Geography, stems from the life and work of Carl Troll who, in turn, was inspired by the philosophy and mountain travels of Alexander von Humboldt. As founding chair of the IGU Commission on High-Altitude Geoecology (1968, Troll laid the foundations for inter-disciplinary and international mountain research. The paper traces the evolution of the Commission and its close links with the UNESCO Man and Biosphere Programme (1972- and the United Nations University’s mountain Project (1978-. This facilitated the formation of a major force for inclusion of a mountain chapter in AGENDA 21 during the 1992 Rio de Janeiro Herat Summit (UNCED and the related designation by the United Nations of 2002 as the International Year of Mountains. In this way, mountain geoecology not only contributed to worldwide mountain research but also entered the political arena in the struggle for sustainable mountain development and the well-being of mountain people.La geoecología de montaña, como sub-disciplina de la Geografía, entronca con la vida y trabajo de Carl Troll, quien, a su vez, fue inspirado por la filosofía y viajes de Alexander von Humboldt. Como presidente fundador de la comisión de la UGI sobre High Altitude Geoecology (1968, Troll colocó las bases para la investigación interdisciplinar e internacional de las montañas. Este trabajo presenta la evolución de la Comisión y sus estrechas relaciones con el Programa Hombre y Biosfera de UNESCO (1972- y con el Proyecto de montaña de la Universidad de Naciones Unidas (1978-. Esto facilitó la inclusión de un capítulo sobre la montaña en AGENDA 21 durante la Cumbre de la Tierra de Río de Janeiro (UNCED, y la consiguiente designación de 2002 como el Año Internacional de las Montañas por parte de Naciones Unidas. En este sentido, la geoecología de montaña no sólo contribuyó a la investigación de las montañas del mundo sino que también empujó a la pol

  11. Herbal diuretics revisited: from "wise women" to William Withering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne-Saffran, Eva; Kinne, Rolf K H

    2002-07-01

    This contribution summarizes the use of herbal diuretics over the period of two thousand years. After describing the role of herbs in the framework of the theory of the balance of humors for well-being, it details the contributions of Pliny the Elder (23-79), Dioscorides (40-90), Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179), Pietro Andrea Matthioli (1500-1577), and Leonard Fuchs (1501-1566) in providing increasingly more precise descriptions and illustrations of medicinal plants. Then, William Withering's (1741-1799) scientific analysis of the use of foxglove for the treatment of dropsy is presented, taking into account the role peasant "wise women" played in his discoveries and the role of "folklore medicine" before him. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. The Values of Masculinity in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafruha Ferdous

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The theme of gender plays a vital role in William Shakespeare’s famous political play Macbeth. From the very beginning of the play the dramatist focuses on the importance of masculinity in gaining power and authority. Lady Macbeth along with the three witches are as important characters as Macbeth. Because they influence Macbeth profoundly. And Shakespeare very carefully draws the character of Lady Macbeth who being a female sometimes exhibits more masculinity than Macbeth. Similarly is the case of the three witches. Though they look like women they are also bearded which prove the presence of masculinity in their nature. Throughout the play several times the exposition of masculinity is demanded from the character of Macbeth. So the value of masculinity plays an important part in the drama.

  13. Charles William Lacaillade. Biologist, Parasitologist, Educator, and Mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James

    2017-02-01

    Charles William Lacaillade (1904-1978) was an eminent biologist in the middle decades of the twentieth century. He was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts of parents whose ancestors were French Canadians. His father, also named Charles William Lacaillade, was a dentist who graduated from Tufts University School of Dentistry in 1898. His mother, Elodia Eno, came from a family of very successful businessmen. Lacaillade was the third of six children. His two older brothers, Harold Carleton and Hector Eno, both graduated from the University of Louisville, School of Dentistry, while his younger brother, Lawrence, became a businessman. His sister, Luemma, married Dr. Henry Steadman, a veterinarian, while his youngest sister, Gloria, married a U.S. Army officer, Lieutenant Colonel Victor Anido. Lacaillade received his MS and PhD degrees in biology and zoology from Harvard University. He then became a fellow at The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. At both institutions, he studied under some of the most eminent biological scientists of the time. These included Rudolf W. Glaser, George Howard Parker, Theobald Smith, Carl TenBroeck, and William Morton Wheeler. At the Rockefeller Institute, he co-discovered the vector and mode of transmission of Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis. This discovery, and the research he conducted with Rudolf W. Glaser, quickly established him as an outstanding biological researcher. However, a change in leadership at the Rockefeller Institute resulted in research priorities being given to the disciplines of general physiology, physical chemistry, and nutrition. This shift in the research agenda away from the biological sciences precluded career advancement at the Rockefeller Institute for post-doctoral fellows like Lacaillade. It was the height of the Great Depression, and even biologists with terminal doctoral degrees found it difficult to find positions. In 1935, Lacaillade accepted a position as an assistant in biology at St. John

  14. William Bateson: a biologist ahead of his time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Patrick

    2002-08-01

    William Bateson coined the term genetics and, more than anybody else, championed the principles of heredity discovered by Gregor Mendel. Nevertheless, his reputation is soured by the positions he took about the discontinuities in inheritance that might precede formation of a new species and by his reluctance to accept, in its full-blooded form, the view of chromosomes as the controllers of individual development. Growing evidence suggests that both of these positions have been vindicated. New species are now thought to arise as the result of genetic interactions, chromosomal rearrangements, or both, that render hybrids less viable or sterile. Chromosomes are the sites of genes but genes move between chromosomes much more readily than had been previously believed and chromosomes are not causal in individual development. Development, like speciation, requires an understanding of the interactions between genes and the interplay between the individual and its environment.

  15. Cardiac arrest related to anaesthesia in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena Delgado, J; Sanabria Carretero, P; Durán la Fuente, P; Gónzalez Rocafort, A; Castro Parga, L; Reinoso Barbero, F

    2017-12-12

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is the clinical manifestation of a congenital genetic disorder in the elastin gene, among others. There is a history of cardiac arrest refractory to resuscitation manoeuvres in anaesthesia. The incidence of myocardial ischaemia is high during anaesthetic induction, but there are patients who do not have this condition yet also have had very serious cardiac events, and issues that are still to be resolved. Case descriptions will enable the common pathophysiological factors to be defined, and decrease morbidity and mortality. We report the case of a 3-year-old boy with cardiac arrest at induction, rescued with circulatory assistance with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hypothermia induced for cerebral protection. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The foxglove, "The old woman from Shropshire" and William Withering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikler, D M

    1985-05-01

    Though he received his medical education in Edinburgh, William Withering was born and bred, and conducted his practice, in the Midlands of England, where he collaborated closely with medical and nonmedical colleagues who were pioneers of intellectual thought during the industrial revolution. Because of his profound botanical knowledge, he was able to identify Digitalis purpurea as the essential ingredient in a prescription dispensed by a herbalist, and systematically proceeded to show its value in patients with cardiac failure. He identified the cardinal symptoms of digitalis intoxication and worked out effective rules for the prescription of an infusion of digitalis. Withering's careful observations were also extended to botany and geology, and he was a key figure in the intellectual and scientific life of his area, a man whose legacy is not only the agent he identified but also the scrupulous way in which he evaluated it.

  17. Implicit learning in children and adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don, Audrey J; Schellenberg, E Glenn; Reber, Arthur S; DiGirolamo, Kristen M; Wang, Paul P

    2003-01-01

    In comparison to explicit learning, implicit learning is hypothesized to be a phylogenetically older form of learning that is important in early developmental processes (e.g., natural language acquisition, socialization)and relatively impervious to individual differences in age and IQ. We examined implicit learning in a group of children and adults (9.49 years of age)with Williams syndrome (WS)and in a comparison group of typically developing individuals matched for chronological age. Participants were tested in an artificial-grammar learning paradigm and in a rotor-pursuit task. For both groups, implicit learning was largely independent of age. Both groups showed evidence of implicit learning but the comparison group outperformed the WS group on both tasks. Performance advantages for the comparison group were no longer significant when group differences in working memory or nonverbal intelligence were held constant.

  18. William E. Edmonston, Jr.: Editor, 1968-1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihlstrom, John F; Frischholz, Edward J

    2010-10-01

    This article is part of an occasional series profiling editors of the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis (AJCH). William E. Edmonston was the second editor, succeeding Milton H. Erickson. His research focused on the use of conditioning paradigms and psychophysiological measures to explore a wide variety of hypnotic phenomena, leading to a "neo-Pavlovian" theory of neutral hypnosis as physiological relaxation (anesis). A longtime professor of psychology at Colgate University, he created an interdisciplinary undergraduate major in neuroscience, and was named New York State College Professor of the Year in 1988. He gave the Journal a new look, and a greater balance of clinical and experimental papers. The article also provides background on George Barton Cutten, George H. Estabrooks, and Frank A. Pattie, pioneers of hypnosis who were linked to Edmonston.

  19. Richard Godden, William Faulkner, An Economy of Complex Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Spill

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available En guise de préambule, Richard Godden s’empresse de préciser que le lien entre économie et langage qui est stipulé dans le titre de son dernier ouvrage critique sur l’œuvre de William Faulkner ne doit pas être compris de manière métaphorique : c’est bien en fonction de leur rapport avec un contexte économique et social spécifique que sont analysées les complexités de l’écriture faulknérienne. Sa démonstration repose sur trois présupposés qui sont clairement exposés dans son introduction : les...

  20. Dissociating intuitive physics from intuitive psychology: Evidence from Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Frederik S; Julian, Joshua B; Battaglia, Peter; Landau, Barbara; Kanwisher, Nancy; Dilks, Daniel D

    2017-11-01

    Prior work suggests that our understanding of how things work ("intuitive physics") and how people work ("intuitive psychology") are distinct domains of human cognition. Here we directly test the dissociability of these two domains by investigating knowledge of intuitive physics and intuitive psychology in adults with Williams syndrome (WS) - a genetic developmental disorder characterized by severely impaired spatial cognition, but relatively spared social cognition. WS adults and mental-age matched (MA) controls completed an intuitive physics task and an intuitive psychology task. If intuitive physics is a distinct domain (from intuitive psychology), then we should observe differential impairment on the physics task for individuals with WS compared to MA controls. Indeed, adults with WS performed significantly worse on the intuitive physics than the intuitive psychology task, relative to controls. These results support the hypothesis that knowledge of the physical world can be disrupted independently from knowledge of the social world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment near Tassi and Pakoon Springs, western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truini, Margot

    2013-01-01

    Tassi and Pakoon Springs are both in the Grand Wash Trough in the western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument on the Arizona Strip. The monument is jointly managed by the National Park Service (NPS) and the Bureau of Land Management. This study was in response to NPS’s need to better understand the influence from regional increases in groundwater withdrawals near Grand Canyon-Parashant on the groundwater discharge from Tassi and Pakoon Springs. The climate of the Arizona Strip is generally semiarid to arid, and springs in the monument provide the water for the fragile ecosystems that are commonly separated by large areas of dry washes in canyons with pinyon and juniper. Available hydrogeologic data from previous investigations included water levels from the few existing wells, location information for springs, water chemistry from springs, and geologic maps. Available groundwater-elevation data from the wells and springs in the monument indicate that groundwater in the Grand Wash Trough is moving from north to south, discharging to springs and into the Colorado River. Groundwater may also be moving from east to west from Paleozoic rocks in the Grand Wash Cliffs into sedimentary deposits in the Grand Wash Trough. Finally, groundwater may be moving from the northwest in the Mesoproterozoic crystalline rocks of the Virgin Mountains into the northern part of the Grand Wash Trough. Water discharging from Tassi and Pakoon Springs has a major-ion chemistry similar to that of other springs in the western part of Grand Canyon-Parashant. Stable-isotopic signatures for oxygen-18 and hydrogen-2 are depleted in the water from both Tassi and Pakoon Springs in comparison to other springs on the Arizona Strip. Tassi Spring discharges from multiple seeps along the Wheeler Fault, and the depleted isotopic signatures suggest that water may be flowing from multiple places into Lake Mead and seems to have a higher elevation or an older climate source. Elevated water

  2. Demonstrating the Alaska Ocean Observing System in Prince William Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, G. Carl; McCammon, Molly

    2013-07-01

    The Alaska Ocean Observing System and the Oil Spill Recovery Institute developed a demonstration project over a 5 year period in Prince William Sound. The primary goal was to develop a quasi-operational system that delivers weather and ocean information in near real time to diverse user communities. This observing system now consists of atmospheric and oceanic sensors, and a new generation of computer models to numerically simulate and forecast weather, waves, and ocean circulation. A state of the art data management system provides access to these products from one internet portal at http://www.aoos.org. The project culminated in a 2009 field experiment that evaluated the observing system and performance of the model forecasts. Observations from terrestrial weather stations and weather buoys validated atmospheric circulation forecasts. Observations from wave gages on weather buoys validated forecasts of significant wave heights and periods. There was an emphasis on validation of surface currents forecasted by the ocean circulation model for oil spill response and search and rescue applications. During the 18 day field experiment a radar array mapped surface currents and drifting buoys were deployed. Hydrographic profiles at fixed stations, and by autonomous vehicles along transects, were made to acquire measurements through the water column. Terrestrial weather stations were the most reliable and least costly to operate, and in situ ocean sensors were more costly and considerably less reliable. The radar surface current mappers were the least reliable and most costly but provided the assimilation and validation data that most improved ocean circulation forecasts. We describe the setting of Prince William Sound and the various observational platforms and forecast models of the observing system, and discuss recommendations for future development.

  3. Sir William Stirling Maxwell : scholar of Spanish Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Macartney

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo tiene el propósito de aumentar la escasa información ya publicada sobre Sir William Stirling Maxwell (1808-1878, y de considerar si son justas las opiniones que sobre el se han expresado. Estudia las traducciones de sus obras al castellano incluso el proyecto para una versión española de los Annals of the Artists of Spain. Se enfoca en algunos aspectos de sus primeras visitas a España, especialmente su romanticismo al principio y su pronto rechazo del mito orientalista de España que promulgaban muchos escritores británicos, como Richard Ford. No obstante, Stirling y Ford terminaron por ser grandes amigos durante las últimas etapas de la preparación de los Annals. A partir de 1847, Stirling podía libremente satisfacer su afición al coleccionismo de arte y libros.The aims of this article are to add to the little information already published on Sir William Stirling Maxwell (1808- 1878 and to examine whether common views of him are fair. It discusses Spanish translations of his works, including the project for a Spanish edition of the Annals of the Artists of Spain. Some aspects of Stirling's early visits to Spain are highlighted, particularly his initial romanticism and early rejection of the Orientalist view of Spain popular in Britain amongst writers such as Richard Ford. Stirling's friendship with Ford, however, developed during the final stages of preparing the Annals. After his father's death in 1847, Stirling could indulge his love of books and art. Many of the paintings he collected reflected his art historical interests in royal patronage and the status of artists in Spain.

  4. Introduction for "Reiki at University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, a magnet hospital": Mega R. Mease is interviewed by William Lee Rand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Anne

    2011-01-01

    There is a sustained interest in the use of Reiki among US consumers and health care providers and lay practitioners alike. As a result, hospitals and other health care institutions are incorporating Reiki into patient care services toward the promotion of caring-healing environments. Variations in hospital-based program structures with Reiki are possible and can enhance the use of Reiki into traditional care settings.

  5. Measurement of airborne particle concentrations near the Sunset Crater volcano, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Roland R; Hooper, Donald M; Durham, James S; Bannon, Donald R; Compton, Keith L; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald N

    2009-02-01

    Direct measurements of airborne particle mass concentrations or mass loads are often used to estimate health effects from the inhalation of resuspended contaminated soil. Airborne particle mass concentrations were measured using a personal sampler under a variety of surface-disturbing activities within different depositional environments at both volcanic and nonvolcanic sites near the Sunset Crater volcano in northern Arizona. Focused field investigations were performed at this analog site to improve the understanding of natural and human-induced processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The level of surface-disturbing activity was found to be the most influential factor affecting the measured airborne particle concentrations, which increased over three orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. As the surface-disturbing activity level increased, the particle size distribution and the majority of airborne particle mass shifted from particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 mum (0.00039 in) to particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 mum (0.00039 in). Under ambient conditions, above average wind speeds tended to increase airborne particle concentrations. In contrast, stronger winds tended to decrease airborne particle concentrations in the breathing zone during light and heavy surface-disturbing conditions. A slight increase in the average airborne particle concentration during ambient conditions was found above older nonvolcanic deposits, which tended to be finer grained than the Sunset Crater tephra deposits. An increased airborne particle concentration was realized when walking on an extremely fine-grained deposit, but the sensitivity of airborne particle concentrations to the resuspendible fraction of near-surface grain mass was not conclusive in the field setting when human activities disturbed the bulk of near-surface material. Although the limited sample size precluded detailed statistical analysis, the differences in airborne particle

  6. Remote assessment of forest health in southern Arizona, USA: evidence for ozone-induced foliar injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, Jeremy E

    2002-03-01

    This paper examines possible ozone-induced foliar injury to ponderosa pine areas in the Rincon Mountains of southern Arizona from 1972 to 1992. Spatiotemporal differences in a satellite-derived vegetation index (VI) are examined with respect to antecedent moisture conditions, temporal variations in ozone exposure levels, and measured foliar injury values from 1985. Seasonal ozone exposure levels (SUM60 and W126) increased from 1982 to 1998 and were significantly correlated (r = 0.49 and 0.53, alpha = 0.05) with annual population totals in the Tucson area. Extensive masking of satellite images from 1972, 1986, and 1992 resulted in two optimal change detection areas, with one site, TVWMica, exposed mostly to the Tucson air pollution plume, while the other site, EMica, was more protected from Tucson-derived pollution. An overall increase in VI from 1972 to 1992 at both sites appears to have been caused by an increase in moisture availability. Larger foliar injury values in 1985 were associated with a smaller increase in VI (i.e., a smaller increase in green leaf biomass) from 1972 to 1986. From 1972 to 1986 and from 1986 to 1992, VI values at TV/WMica increased at a slower rate compared to those at EMica. The reduced increase in "green-up" may have been caused partially by ozone-induced foliar injury and resulting decreases in green leaf biomass. However, these spatial differences in VI values may have also been caused by a number of other factors. Results nevertheless reveal the strong possibility of distinct, topographically based, spatial variations in ozone-induced foliar injury within the Rincons.

  7. Native Americans and Yucca Mountain: A revised and updated summary report on research undertaken between 1987 and 1991; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, C.S. [Cultural Resources Consultants Ltd., Reno, NV (United States)

    1991-10-15

    This report summarizes data collected between September 1986 and September 1988 relative to Native American concerns involving the potential siting of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The data were collected from Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute people upon whose aboriginal lands the repository potentially is to be located. Western Shoshone people involved in the study were those resident or affiliated with reservation communities at Yomba and Duckwater, Nevada, and Death Valley, California. Southern Paiute people were at reservation communities at Moapa and Las Vegas. Additional persons of Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute descent were interviewed at Beatty, Tonopah, Caliente, Pahrump, and Las Vegas, Nevada. The work was part of a larger project of socioeconomic studies for the State of Nevada`s Nuclear Waste Projects office, conducted by Mountain West of Phoenix, Arizona.

  8. 77 FR 17568 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G Trailers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... Nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G Trailers Are Eligible for Importation AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... petitioned NHTSA to decide whether nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G trailers are eligible for... petitioner contends that the nonconforming 2005 Ifor Williams LM85G trailers are capable of being readily...

  9. 77 FR 58819 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program General Forbearance Request SUMMARY: Borrowers who receive loans through the William D. Ford Federal... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct...

  10. 77 FR 29988 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Federal Student Aid; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program Deferment Request Forms SUMMARY: These forms serve as the means by which borrowers in the William D. Ford... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct...

  11. Jurassic ash-flow sheets, calderas, and related intrusions of the Cordilleran volcanic arc in southeastern Arizona: implications for regional tectonics and ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P.W.; Hagstrum, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanologic, petrologic, and paleomagnetic studies of widespread Jurassic ash-flow sheets in the Huachuca-southern Dragoon Mountains area have led to identification of four large source calderas and associated comagnetic intracaldera intrusions. Stratigraphic, facies, and contact features of the caldera-related tuffs also provide constraints on the locations, lateral displacements, and very existence for some major northwest-trending faults and inferred regional thrusts in southeastern Arizona. Silicic alkalic compositions of the Jurassic caldera-related, ash-flow tuffs; bimodal associated mafic magmatism; and interstratified coarse sedimentary deposits provide evidence for synvolcanic extension and rifting within the Cordilleran magmatic arc. Gold-copper mineralization is associated with subvolcanic intrusions at several of the Jurassic calderas. -from Authors

  12. The Olympic Mountains Experiment (OLYMPEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houze, Robert A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; McMurdie, Lynn A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Petersen, Walter A. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama; Schwaller, Mathew R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; Baccus, William [Olympic National Park, Port Angeles, Washington; Lundquist, Jessica D. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Mass, Clifford F. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Nijssen, Bart [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Rutledge, Steven A. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; Hudak, David R. [Environment and Climate Change Canada, King City, Ontario, Canada; Tanelli, Simone [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California; Mace, Gerald G. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Poellot, Michael R. [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota; Lettenmaier, Dennis P. [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Zagrodnik, Joseph P. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Rowe, Angela K. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; DeHart, Jennifer C. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Madaus, Luke E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; Barnes, Hannah C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2017-10-01

    the Olympic Mountains Experiment (OLYMPEX) took place during the 2015-2016 fall-winter season in the vicinity of the mountainous Olympic Peninsula of Washington State. The goals of OLYMPEX were to provide physical and hydrologic ground validation for the U.S./Japan Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite mission and, more specifically, to study how precipitation in Pacific frontal systems is modified by passage over coastal mountains. Four transportable scanning dual-polarization Doppler radars of various wavelengths were installed. Surface stations were placed at various altitudes to measure precipitation rates, particle size distributions, and fall velocities. Autonomous recording cameras monitored and recorded snow accumulation. Four research aircraft supplied by NASA investigated precipitation processes and snow cover, and supplemental rawinsondes and dropsondes were deployed during precipitation events. Numerous Pacific frontal systems were sampled, including several reaching "atmospheric river" status, warm and cold frontal systems, and postfrontal convection

  13. A componential view of theory of mind: evidence from Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tager-Flusberg, H; Sullivan, K

    2000-07-14

    In this paper we argue that there are two distinct components of a theory of mind: a social-cognitive and a social-perceptual component. Evidence for this proposal is presented from various sources, including studies of children with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorder. Earlier work has demonstrated that people with Williams syndrome appear to be spared in the social-perceptual component of a theory of mind. In this paper we present evidence that they are not spared in the social-cognitive component of theory of mind. Three experiments with young children with Williams syndrome were conducted. In each experiment the children with Williams syndrome were compared to age-, IQ-, and language-matched children with Prader-Willi syndrome, and children with non-specific mental retardation. The experiments used different measures of theory of mind ability, including false belief (Experiment 1), explanation of action (Experiment 2), and recognition of emotional expressions (Experiment 3). In none of these experiments did the children with Williams syndrome evidence superior performance compared to the control groups. The results from this and other studies on Williams syndrome support the view that the social-cognitive and social-perceptual components of a theory of mind are dissociable. In Williams syndrome only the latter components, which are linked to distinct neurobiological substrates, are spared.

  14. Geologic map of the west half of the Blythe 30' by 60' quadrangle, Riverside County, California and La Paz County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The Blythe 30' by 60' quadrangle is located along the Colorado River between southeastern California and western Arizona. This map depicts the geology of the west half of the Blythe quadrangle, which is mostly in California. The map area is a desert terrain consisting of mountain ranges surrounded by extensive alluvial fans and plains, including the flood plain of the Colorado River which covers the easternmost part of the area. Mountainous parts of the area, including the Big Maria, Little Maria, Riverside, McCoy, and Mule Mountains, consist of structurally complex rocks that range in age from Proterozoic to Miocene. Proterozoic gneiss and granite are overlain by Paleozoic to Early Jurassic metasedimentary rocks (mostly marble, quartzite, and schist) that are lithostratigraphically similar to coeval formations of the Colorado Plateau region to the east. The Paleozoic to Jurassic strata were deposited on the tectonically stable North American craton. These rocks are overlain by metamorphosed Jurassic volcanic rocks and are intruded by Jurassic plutonic rocks that represent part of a regionally extensive, northwest-trending magmatic arc. The overlying McCoy Mountains Formation, a very thick sequence of weakly metamorphosed sandstone and conglomerate of Jurassic(?) and Cretaceous age, accumulated in a rapidly subsiding depositional basin south of an east-trending belt of deformation and east of the north-trending Cretaceous Cordilleran magmatic arc. The McCoy Mountains Formation and older rocks were deformed, metamorphosed, and locally intruded by plutonic rocks in the Late Cretaceous. In Oligocene(?) to Miocene time, sedimentary and minor volcanic deposits accumulated locally, and the area was deformed by faulting. Tertiary rocks and their Proterozoic basement in the Riverside and northeastern Big Maria Mountains are in the upper plate of a low-angle normal (detachment) fault that lies within a region of major Early to Middle Miocene crustal extension. Surficial

  15. The migration response to the Legal Arizona Workers Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mark; Wright, Richard; Townley, Matthew; Copeland, Kristy

    2014-08-01

    The 2008 Legal Arizona Workers Act (LAWA) requires all public and private employers to authenticate the legal status of their workers using the federal employment verification system known as E-Verify. With LAWA, Arizona became the first state to have a universal mandate for employment verification. While LAWA targets unauthorized workers, most of whom are Latino immigrants, other groups could experience LAWA's effects, such as those who share households with undocumented workers. In addition, employers may seek to minimize their risk of LAWA penalties by not hiring those who appear to them as more likely to be unauthorized, such as naturalized Latino immigrants and US-born Latinos. Existing research has found a reduction in foreign-born Latino employment and population in response to LAWA. This paper asks a different question: have groups that are most likely to be affected by the law migrated to other states? We find a significant and sustained increase in the internal outmigration rate from Arizona of foreign-born, noncitizen Latinos - the group most likely to include the unauthorized - after the passage of LAWA. There was no significant LAWA internal migration response by foreign-born Latino citizens. US-born Latinos showed some signs of a LAWA-induced internal migration response after the law went into effect, but it is not sustained. The results indicate that local and state immigration policy can alter the settlement geography of the foreign born. This leads us to speculate about how immigrant settlement may adjust in the coming years to the intersecting geographies of post-recession economic opportunity and tiered immigration policies.

  16. Research Projects and Undergraduate Retention at the University of Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-LaFollette, Amanda; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Towner, A. P.; McGraw, A. M.; Biddle, L. I.; Robertson, A.; Turner, J.; Smith, C.

    2013-06-01

    The University of Arizona’s Astronomy Club utilizes its access to the many telescopes in and around Tucson, Arizona, to allow students to fully participate in a variety of research projects. Three current projects - the exoplanet project, the radio astronomy project, and the Kepler project - all work to give undergraduates who are interested in astronomy the opportunity to explore practical astronomy outside the classroom and in a peer-supported environment. The exoplanet project strives to teach students about the research process, including observing exoplanet transits on the Steward Observatory 61” Kuiper telescope on Mt. Bigelow in Tucson, AZ, reducing the data into lightcurves with the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF), modeling the lightcurves using the Interactive Data Language (IDL), and writing and publishing a professional paper, and does it all with no faculty involvement. The radio astronomy project is designed to provide students with an opportunity to work with a professor on a radio astronomy research project, and to learn about the research process, including observing molecules in molecular clouds using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12-meter radio telescope on Kitt Peak in Arizona. The Kepler project is a new project designed in part to facilitate graduate-undergraduate interaction in the Astronomy Department, and in part to allow students (both graduate and undergraduate) to participate in star-spot cycle research using data from the Kepler Mission. All of these research projects and structures provide students with unique access to telescopes, peer mentoring, networking, and understanding the entire process of astronomical research.

  17. The Origin and Development of an Interdisciplinary Humanities Program at Arizona State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Robert Carter

    The purpose of this case study was to examine the origin and development of the Center for the Humanities at Arizona State University in Tempe. An attempt was made to explicate why and how the interdisciplinary humanities program began at Arizona State University, to describe the expansion of and changes in the program as it evolved into the…

  18. High School Equivalency Testing in Arizona. Forum: Responding to Changes in High School Equivalency Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the state of Arizona has used the General Educational Development (GED) Test to award the Arizona High School Equivalency (HSE) Diploma, as the GED Test was the only test available, recognized and accepted in the United States as the measure by which adults could demonstrate the educational attainment equivalent to high school…

  19. 76 FR 37853 - Arizona Public Service Company; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... COMMISSION Arizona Public Service Company; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility... to Arizona Public Service (the licensee) for operation of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station... to this notice using the following methods: NRC's Public Document Room (PDR): The public may examine...

  20. 75 FR 52045 - Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 3; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 3; Environmental... Operating License No. NPF-74, issued to Arizona Public Service Company (APS, the licensee), for operation of... the public health and safety. The NRC-approved Westinghouse Electric Company LLC (Westinghouse...

  1. Consequences of Arizona's Immigration Policy on Social Capital among Mexican Mothers with Unauthorized Immigration Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Padilla, Brian; Valentine, Jessa Lewis

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the consequences of increasingly restrictive immigration policies on social capital among Mexican mothers with unauthorized immigrant status in Arizona. Three focus groups conducted in Arizona explore how mothers' experiences with immigration policies have affected their neighborhood, community, and family ties. Focus group…

  2. Exploring Arizona K-12 Virtual Educator Experiences and Perspectives Developing Collaborative Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Deborah Iyron

    2015-01-01

    Arizona Online Instruction (AOI) provided an instructional alternative to nearly fifty thousand K-12 students in Arizona during the 2012-2013 school year. Growth in online education underscores the importance of evolving the role of the K-12 virtual teacher as the human agent (Turvey, 2008) demonstrating social learning theory (Bandura, 1977) by…

  3. The Achievement Progress of English Learner Students in Arizona. REL 2015-098

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Eric; Tran, Loan; Huang, Min; Yu, Airong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the learning trajectories of the growing numbers of English learner students in Arizona, especially those who struggle to pass state English language arts and math content tests. This study followed three cohorts of English learner students in Arizona (kindergarten, grade 3, and grade 6) over six school…

  4. Arizona Indian Tribes: Historical Notes. Sharing Ideas, Volume 7, Number 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Mamie, Comp.

    In 1971, 24 teachers attending summer school at Northern Arizona University reviewed hundreds of books on the history and culture of Southwestern American Indians. Since no one publication that dealt specifically with the historical and cultural background of Arizona Indian tribes could be found, they consolidated their notes into this resource…

  5. Bark beetle-caused mortality in a drought-affected ponderosa pine landscape in Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose F. Negron; Joel D. McMillin; John A. Anhold; Dave Coulson

    2009-01-01

    Extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) mortality associated with a widespread severe drought and increased bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) populations occurred in Arizona from 2001 to 2004. A complex of Ips beetles including: the Arizona fivespined ips, Ips lecontei Swaine...

  6. Influence of elevation on bark beetle community structure in ponderosa pine stands of northern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Miller; Kelly Barton; Joel McMillin; Tom DeGomez; Karen Clancy; John Anhold

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) Bark beetles killed more than 20 million ponderosa pine trees in Arizona during 2002-2004. Historically, bark beetle populations remained endemic and ponderosa pine mortality was limited to localized areas in Arizona. Consequently, there is a lack of information on bark beetle community structure in ponderosa pine stands of...

  7. 77 FR 65875 - Adequacy of Arizona Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... AGENCY Adequacy of Arizona Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection... determination to approve a modification to Arizona's municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) permit program to... amending the municipal solid waste landfill criteria at 40 CFR 258.4 to allow for Research, Development...

  8. Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Donna E.

    2006-01-01

    "Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators" presents a set of baseline measurements that gauge how well a statewide system of school readiness supports is addressing issues that affect Arizona children's readiness for school. The Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measure the system, rather…

  9. Separate and Not Equal: The Implementation of Structured English Immersion in Arizona's Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Karen E.; Markos, Amy; Arias, M. Beatriz; Wiley, Terrence G.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Over the last ten years, a convergence of laws and decrees has impacted the development and implementation of Arizona's current program for English language learners (ELLs): the four-hour Structured English Immersion (SEI) model. Arizona's new model, while being touted by some as the most effective program for ELLs (Clark,…

  10. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Trial Demonstration of Area Lighting Retrofit, Yuma Border Patrol, Yuma, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkerson, A. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCullough, J. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Along the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona, the GATEWAY program conducted a trial demonstration in which the incumbent quartz metal halide area lighting was replaced with LED at three pole locations at the Yuma Sector Border Patrol Area in Yuma, Arizona. The retrofit was documented to better understand LED technology performance in high-temperature environments.

  11. A Cultural Resources Site Inventory at Painted Rock Reservoir, Maricopa County, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    sherds" present (Teague and Baldwin 1978:31). It was postulated that site PRS-5 may represent residual artifactual material from site AZ Z:2:2. The... Agua Fria River Valley, Arizona. Arizona State University Anthropological Researach Paper, No. 7. Tempe. -88- 70-I3772 A CULTURAL RESOURCES SITE

  12. A Return to the "Mexican Room": The Segregation of Arizona's English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Patricia; Orfield, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the research on the impact of segregation on Latino and English Language Learner (ELL) students, including new empirical research conducted in Arizona. It also reviews court decisions regarding students' rights to be integrated with their mainstream peers, and provides data on the increasing segregation of Arizona's Latino and…

  13. Arizona-Based Special Education Paraeducators and Their Perceptions of Professional Developmental Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldivar-Parra, Maria Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents the findings of a descriptive, survey-based study of special education paraeducators and their self-reported perceptions about the adequacy of their ongoing professional development training in Arizona school districts. The results show that school districts in Arizona are not spending adequate time in preparing special…

  14. Public perceptions of health care problems. An analysis from Arizona.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkman-Liff, B. L.

    1991-01-01

    Public perception of 17 health problems was assessed by telephone and in-person interviews in Arizona. Drug abuse (64.7%), the costs of health care (62.8%), and drunk driving (60.6%) were considered the most serious health care problems. Elderly and rural residents tended to view drug abuse, drunk driving, teenage pregnancy, and economic aspects of health care as less serious than did the younger and urban respondents, while the poor thought these problems were more serious. Respondents in th...

  15. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Elastic simulations and Arizona mine test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic seismic simulations and field data tests are used to validate the theory of a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM). For nearfield elastic simulation, the SSTM results show superresolution to be better than λ/8 if the only scattered data are used as input data. If the direct P and S waves are muted then the resolution of the scatterer locations are within about λ/5. Seismic data collected in an Arizona tunnel showed a superresolution limit of at least λ/19. These test results are consistent with the theory of the SSTM and suggest that the SSTM can be a tool used by geophysicists as a probe for near-field scatterers.

  16. Arizona Geology Trip - February 25-28, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gretchen A.; Ross, Amy J.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of hardware developers, crew, mission planners, and headquarters personnel traveled to Gila Bend, Arizona, in February 2008 for a CxP Lunar Surface Systems Team geology experience. Participating in this field trip were the CxP Space Suit System (EC5) leads: Thomas (PLSS) and Ross (PGS), who presented the activities and findings learned from being in the field during this KC. As for the design of a new spacesuit system, this allowed the engineers to understand the demands this type of activity will have on NASA's hardware, systems, and planning efforts. The engineers also experienced the methods and tools required for lunar surface activity.

  17. High-Risk Populations: The Pimas of Arizona and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Leslie O; Chaudhari, Lisa S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this review is first, to broadly summarize the long-term commitment that began in 1965 to studying type 2 diabetes and obesity through the cooperation of the Pima Indians of Arizona, and second, to discuss the investigations with the Pima Indians of Mexico that started in 1991. The later studies emphasize gene-environment interactions in the pathogenesis of these metabolic disorders. Through the participation of both groups of Pimas, the researchers made key findings with regard to the epidemiology, physiology, clinical assessment and genetics of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  18. Unsupported inferences of high-severity fire in historical dry forests of the western United States: response to Williams and Baker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulé, Peter Z.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Brown, Peter M.; Falk, Donald A.; Peterson, David L.; Allen, Craig D.; Aplet, Gregory H.; Battaglia, Mike A.; Binkley, Dan; Farris, Calvin; Keane, Robert E.; Margolis, Ellis Q.; Grissino-Mayer, Henri; Miller, Carol; Sieg, Carolyn Hull; Skinner, Carl; Stephens, Scott L.; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructions of dry western US forests in the late 19th century in Arizona, Colorado and Oregon based on General Land Office records were used by Williams & Baker (2012; Global Ecology and Biogeography, 21, 1042–1052; hereafter W&B) to infer past fire regimes with substantial moderate and high-severity burning. The authors concluded that present-day large, high-severity fires are not distinguishable from historical patterns. We present evidence of important errors in their study. First, the use of tree size distributions to reconstruct past fire severity and extent is not supported by empirical age–size relationships nor by studies that directly quantified disturbance history in these forests. Second, the fire severity classification of W&B is qualitatively different from most modern classification schemes, and is based on different types of data, leading to an inappropriate comparison. Third, we note that while W&B asserted ‘surprising’ heterogeneity in their reconstructions of stand density and species composition, their data are not substantially different from many previous studies which reached very different conclusions about subsequent forest and fire behaviour changes. Contrary to the conclusions of W&B, the preponderance of scientific evidence indicates that conservation of dry forest ecosystems in the western United States and their ecological, social and economic value is not consistent with a present-day disturbance regime of large, high-severity fires, especially under changing climate

  19. WHITE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey the White Mountain Wilderness, which constitutes much of the western and northern White Mountains, New Mexico, is appraised to have six areas of probable mineral potential for base and precious metals. If mineral deposits exist in the wilderness, the potential is for small deposits of base and precious metals in veins and breccia pipes or, more significanlty, the possibility for large low-grade disseminated porphyry-type molybdenum deposits. There is little promise for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources in the area.

  20. Yearly report, Yucca Mountain project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, J.N.

    1992-09-30

    We proposed to (1) Develop our data logging and analysis equipment and techniques for analyzing seismic data from the Southern Great Basin Seismic Network (SGBSN), (2) Investigate the SGBSN data for evidence of seismicity patterns, depth distribution patterns, and correlations with geologic features (3) Repair and maintain our three broad band downhole digital seismograph stations at Nelson, nevada, Troy Canyon, Nevada, and Deep Springs, California (4) Install, operate, and log data from a super sensitive microearthquake array at Yucca Mountain (5) Analyze data from micro-earthquakes relative to seismic hazard at Yucca Mountain.