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Sample records for wild-type yeast rna

  1. Unexpected expansion of tRNA substrate recognition by the yeast m1G9 methyltransferase Trm10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinehart, William E; Henderson, Jeremy C; Jackman, Jane E

    2013-08-01

    N-1 Methylation of the nearly invariant purine residue found at position 9 of tRNA is a nucleotide modification found in multiple tRNA species throughout Eukarya and Archaea. First discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the tRNA methyltransferase Trm10 is a highly conserved protein both necessary and sufficient to catalyze all known instances of m1G9 modification in yeast. Although there are 19 unique tRNA species that contain a G at position 9 in yeast, and whose fully modified sequence is known, only 9 of these tRNA species are modified with m1G9 in wild-type cells. The elements that allow Trm10 to distinguish between structurally similar tRNA species are not known, and sequences that are shared between all substrate or all nonsubstrate tRNAs have not been identified. Here, we demonstrate that the in vitro methylation activity of yeast Trm10 is not sufficient to explain the observed pattern of modification in vivo, as additional tRNA species are substrates for Trm10 m1G9 methyltransferase activity. Similarly, overexpression of Trm10 in yeast yields m1G9 containing tRNA species that are ordinarily unmodified in vivo. Thus, yeast Trm10 has a significantly broader tRNA substrate specificity than is suggested by the observed pattern of modification in wild-type yeast. These results may shed light onto the suggested involvement of Trm10 in other pathways in other organisms, particularly in higher eukaryotes that contain up to three different genes with sequence similarity to the single TRM10 gene in yeast, and where these other enzymes have been implicated in pathways beyond tRNA processing.

  2. Heavy ion effects on yeast: Inhibition of ribosomal RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, K.J.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.; Kraft, G.

    1990-01-01

    Diploid wild-type yeast cells were exposed to beams of heavy ions covering a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) (43-13,700 keV/microns). Synthesis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was assessed as a functional measure of damage produced by particle radiation. An exponential decrease of relative rRNA synthesis with particle fluence was demonstrated in all cases. The inactivation cross sections derived were found to increase with LET over the entire range of LET studied. The corresponding values for relative biological effectiveness were slightly less than unity. Maximum cross sections measured were close to 1 micron 2, implying that some larger structure within the yeast nucleus (e.g., the nucleolus) might represent the target for an impairment of synthetic activity by very heavy ions rather than the genes coding for rRNA. Where tested, an oxygen effect for rRNA synthesis could not be demonstrated

  3. Annotating and quantifying pri-miRNA transcripts using RNA-Seq data of wild type and serrate-1 globular stage embryos of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lepe-Soltero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The genome annotation for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana does not include the primary transcripts from which MIRNAs are processed. Here we present and analyze the raw mRNA sequencing data from wild type and serrate-1 globular stage embryos of A. thaliana, ecotype Columbia. Because SERRATE is required for pri-miRNA processing, these precursors accumulate in serrate-1 mutants, facilitating their detection using standard RNA-Seq protocols. We first use the mapping of the RNA-Seq reads to the reference genome to annotate the potential primary transcripts of MIRNAs expressed in the embryo. We then quantify these pri-miRNAs in wild type and serrate-1 mutants. Finally, we use differential expression analysis to determine which are up-regulated in serrate-1 compared to wild type, to select the best candidates for bona fide pri-miRNAs expressed in the globular stage embryos. In addition, we analyze a previously published RNA-Seq dataset of wild type and dicer-like 1 mutant embryos at the globular stage [1]. Our data are interpreted and discussed in a separate article [2].

  4. Annotating and quantifying pri-miRNA transcripts using RNA-Seq data of wild type and serrate-1 globular stage embryos of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepe-Soltero, Daniel; Armenta-Medina, Alma; Xiang, Daoquan; Datla, Raju; Gillmor, C Stewart; Abreu-Goodger, Cei

    2017-12-01

    The genome annotation for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana does not include the primary transcripts from which MIRNAs are processed. Here we present and analyze the raw mRNA sequencing data from wild type and serrate-1 globular stage embryos of A. thaliana , ecotype Columbia. Because SERRATE is required for pri-miRNA processing, these precursors accumulate in serrate-1 mutants, facilitating their detection using standard RNA-Seq protocols. We first use the mapping of the RNA-Seq reads to the reference genome to annotate the potential primary transcripts of MIRNAs expressed in the embryo. We then quantify these pri-miRNAs in wild type and serrate-1 mutants. Finally, we use differential expression analysis to determine which are up-regulated in serrate-1 compared to wild type, to select the best candidates for bona fide pri-miRNAs expressed in the globular stage embryos. In addition, we analyze a previously published RNA-Seq dataset of wild type and dicer-like 1 mutant embryos at the globular stage [1]. Our data are interpreted and discussed in a separate article [2].

  5. Comparison of the proteomes of three yeast wild type strains: CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, A.; Mose Larsen, P.; Blomberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    Yeast deletion strains created during gene function analysis projects very often show drastic phenotypic differences depending on the genetic background used. These results indicate the existence of important molecular differences between the CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 wild type strains...

  6. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of grapefruit with the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes of Citrus tristeza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus paradisi Macf. cv. Duncan was transformed with constructs coding for the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) for exploring replicase-mediated pathogen-derived resistance (RM-PDR). The RdRp gene was amplified from CTV genome and used to gener...

  7. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wenjun; Qian Qinfang; Hou Xiaolin; Feng Weiyue; Chai Zhifang

    2000-01-01

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  8. mRNA processing in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory center on basic enzymatic reactions of RNA. Still undefined are reactions involved in the conversion of precursors of mRA (pre-mRNA) to mRNA in eukaryotes. The pre-mRNA is called heterogeneous nuclear RNA and is 2 to 6 times larger than mRNA. The conversion, called splicing, involves a removal of internal sequences called introns by endoribonuclease action followed by a rejoining of the 3'- and 5'-end fragments, called exons, by ligating activity. It has not been possible yet to study the enzymes involved in vitro. Also undefined are reactions involved in the turnover or discarding of certain of the pre-mRNA molecules. Yeast is a simple eukaryote and may be expected to have the same, but perhaps simpler, processing reactions as the higher eukaryotes. Two enzymes involved in the processing of pre-mRNA and mRNA in yeast are under investigation. Both enzymes have been partially purified from ribonucleoprotein particles of yeast. The first is a unique decapping enzyme which cleaves [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp [ 14 C]RNA-poly (A) of yeast, yielding [ 3 H]m 7 GDP and is suggested by the finding that the diphosphate product, m 7 GpppA(G), and UDP-glucose are not hydrolyzed. The second enzyme is an endoribonuclease which converts both the [ 3 H] and [ 14 C] labels of [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) from an oligo(dT)-cellulose bound form to an unbound, acid-insoluble form. Results show that the stimulation involves an interaction of the labeled RNA with the small nuclear RNA. The inhibition of the enzyme by ethidium bromide and its stimulation by small nuclear RNA suggest that it may be a processing ribonuclease, requiring specific double-stranded features in its substrate. The characterization of the unique decapping enzyme and endoribonuclease may help to understand reactions involved in the processing of pre-mRNA and mRNA in eukaryotes

  9. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.J.; Qian, Q.F.; Hou, X.L.; Feng, W.Y.; Chai, Z.F.

    2000-01-01

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  10. Principles of mRNA transport in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heym, Roland Gerhard; Niessing, Dierk

    2012-06-01

    mRNA localization and localized translation is a common mechanism by which cellular asymmetry is achieved. In higher eukaryotes the mRNA transport machinery is required for such diverse processes as stem cell division and neuronal plasticity. Because mRNA localization in metazoans is highly complex, studies at the molecular level have proven to be cumbersome. However, active mRNA transport has also been reported in fungi including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ustilago maydis and Candida albicans, in which these events are less difficult to study. Amongst them, budding yeast S. cerevisiae has yielded mechanistic insights that exceed our understanding of other mRNA localization events to date. In contrast to most reviews, we refrain here from summarizing mRNA localization events from different organisms. Instead we give an in-depth account of ASH1 mRNA localization in budding yeast. This approach is particularly suited to providing a more holistic view of the interconnection between the individual steps of mRNA localization, from transcriptional events to cytoplasmic mRNA transport and localized translation. Because of our advanced mechanistic understanding of mRNA localization in yeast, the present review may also be informative for scientists working, for example, on mRNA localization in embryogenesis or in neurons.

  11. Mutant allele of rna14 in fission yeast affects pre-mRNA splicing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transcript. Rna14 protein in budding yeast has been implicated in cleavage and ... Subsequently, genetic interaction of Rna14 with prp1 and physical .... molecular yeast techniques as described by Moreno et al. ..... To elucidate the role of Rna14 in splicing, RT-PCR analysis ..... design principles of a dynamic RNP machine.

  12. Yeast tRNAPhe expressed in human cells can be selected by HIV-1 for use as a reverse transcription primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Nathan J.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2003-01-01

    All naturally occurring human immune deficiency viruses (HIV-1) select and use tRNA Lys,3 as the primer for reverse transcription. Studies to elucidate the mechanism of tRNA selection from the intracellular milieu have been hampered due to the difficulties in manipulating the endogenous levels of tRNA Lys,3 . We have previously described a mutant HIV-1 with a primer binding site (PBS) complementary to yeast tRNA Phe (psHIV-Phe) that relies on transfection of yeast tRNA Phe for infectivity. To more accurately recapitulate the selection process, a cDNA was designed for the intracellular expression of the yeast tRNA Phe . Increasing amounts of the plasmid encoding tRNA Phe resulted in a corresponding increase in levels of yeast tRNA Phe in the cell. The yeast tRNA Phe isolated from cells transfected with the cDNA for yeast tRNA Phe , or in the cell lines expressing yeast tRNA Phe , were aminoacylated, indicating that the expressed yeast tRNA Phe was incorporated into tRNA biogenesis pathways and translation. Increasing the cytoplasmic levels of tRNA Phe resulted in increased encapsidation of tRNA Phe in viruses with a PBS complementary to tRNA Phe (psHIV-Phe) or tRNA Lys,3 (wild-type HIV-1). Production of infectious psHIV-Phe was dependent on the amount of cotransfected tRNA Phe cDNA. Increasing amounts of plasmids encoding yeast tRNA Phe produced an increase of infectious psHIV-Phe that plateaued at a level lower than that from the transfection of the wild-type genome, which uses tRNA Lys,3 as the primer for reverse transcription. Cell lines were generated that expressed yeast tRNA Phe at levels approximately 0.1% of that for tRNA Lys,3 . Even with this reduced level of yeast tRNA Phe , the cell lines complemented psHIV-Phe over background levels. The results of these studies demonstrate that intracellular levels of primer tRNA can have a direct effect on HIV-1 infectivity and further support the role for PBS-tRNA complementarity in the primer selection process

  13. Use of tissue-specific microRNA to control pathology of wild-type adenovirus without attenuation of its ability to kill cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawood, Ryan; Chen, Hannah H; Carroll, Fionnadh; Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; van Rooijen, Nico; Seymour, Leonard W

    2009-05-01

    Replicating viruses have broad applications in biomedicine, notably in cancer virotherapy and in the design of attenuated vaccines; however, uncontrolled virus replication in vulnerable tissues can give pathology and often restricts the use of potent strains. Increased knowledge of tissue-selective microRNA expression now affords the possibility of engineering replicating viruses that are attenuated at the RNA level in sites of potential pathology, but retain wild-type replication activity at sites not expressing the relevant microRNA. To assess the usefulness of this approach for the DNA virus adenovirus, we have engineered a hepatocyte-safe wild-type adenovirus 5 (Ad5), which normally mediates significant toxicity and is potentially lethal in mice. To do this, we have included binding sites for hepatocyte-selective microRNA mir-122 within the 3' UTR of the E1A transcription cassette. Imaging versions of these viruses, produced by fusing E1A with luciferase, showed that inclusion of mir-122 binding sites caused up to 80-fold decreased hepatic expression of E1A following intravenous delivery to mice. Animals administered a ten-times lethal dose of wild-type Ad5 (5x10(10) viral particles/mouse) showed substantial hepatic genome replication and extensive liver pathology, while inclusion of 4 microRNA binding sites decreased replication 50-fold and virtually abrogated liver toxicity. This modified wild-type virus retained full activity within cancer cells and provided a potent, liver-safe oncolytic virus. In addition to providing many potent new viruses for cancer virotherapy, microRNA control of virus replication should provide a new strategy for designing safe attenuated vaccines applied across a broad range of viral diseases.

  14. Sustained miRNA-mediated Knockdown of Mutant AAT With Simultaneous Augmentation of Wild-type AAT Has Minimal Effect on Global Liver miRNA Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency can exhibit two pathologic states: a lung disease that is primarily due to the loss of AAT's antiprotease function, and a liver disease resulting from a toxic gain-of-function of the PiZ-AAT (Z-AAT) mutant protein. We have developed several recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors that incorporate microRNA (miRNA) sequences targeting the AAT gene while also driving the expression of miRNA-resistant wild-type AAT-PiM (M-AAT) gene, thus achieving concom...

  15. Functional conservation of RNA polymerase II in fission and budding yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakovski, G V; Gadal, O; Labarre-Mariotte, S; Lebedenko, E N; Miklos, I; Sakurai, H; Proshkin, S A; Van Mullem, V; Ishihama, A; Thuriaux, P

    2000-02-04

    The complementary DNAs of the 12 subunits of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) RNA polymerase II were expressed from strong promoters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and tested for heterospecific complementation by monitoring their ability to replace in vivo the null mutants of the corresponding host genes. Rpb1 and Rpb2, the two largest subunits and Rpb8, a small subunit shared by all three polymerases, failed to support growth in S. cerevisiae. The remaining nine subunits were all proficient for heterospecific complementation and led in most cases to a wild-type level of growth. The two alpha-like subunits (Rpb3 and Rpb11), however, did not support growth at high (37 degrees C) or low (25 degrees C) temperatures. In the case of Rpb3, growth was restored by increasing the gene dosage of the host Rpb11 or Rpb10 subunits, confirming previous evidence of a close genetic interaction between these three subunits. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: The comparison of two quantitative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative proteomic analysis of complex protein mixtures is emerging as a technically challenging but viable systems-level approach for studying cellular function. This study presents a large-scale comparative analysis of protein abundances from yeast protein lysates derived from both wild......-type yeast and yeast strains lacking key components of the Snf1 kinase complex. Four different strains were grown under well-controlled chemostat conditions. Multidimensional protein identification technology followed by quantitation using either spectral counting or stable isotope labeling approaches...... labeling strategy. The stable isotope labeling based quantitative approach was found to be highly reproducible among biological replicates when complex protein mixtures containing small expression changes were analyzed. Where poor correlation between stable isotope labeling and spectral counting was found...

  17. Analysis of RNA metabolism in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wise, Jo Ann; Nielsen, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Here we focus on the biogenesis and function of messenger RNA (mRNA) in fission yeast cells. Following a general introduction that also briefly touches on other classes of RNA, we provide an overview of methods used to analyze mRNAs throughout their life cycles....

  18. Purification of ribonucleoproteins by a novel approach: isolation of the SSB1 ribonucleoprotein from yeast and demonstration that it has no role in mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, M E

    1992-12-29

    A novel approach is described to purify potential ribonucleoproteins (RNP) of yeast. The method assays a yeast RNP complex, assembled in vitro on actin pre-mRNA, by low-ionic strength acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The minimal protein components of this RNP complex were three proteins, one of 30 kDa and two at 42-44 kDa, defined by formation of the complex on biotinylated-RNA, binding of this complex to avidin-agarose, and salt elution of the protein in the biotinylated-RNP complex. Using the assay for RNP complex formation, an RNP protein was purified to homogeneity on the basis of its affinity towards single-stranded DNA and RNA. This RNP protein turned out to be identical to a known RNP protein, the single-stranded binding protein 1 (ssb1) of yeast, on the basis of identical gel electrophoretic migration, antibody cross-reactivity, and identical properties on the gel complex formation assay. In vitro mRNA splicing was normal in extracts made from a yeast strain missing ssb1 (ssb1- strain). Addition of anti-ssb1 antibody to splicing extracts made from a wild type strain did not inhibit or diminish splicing. Instead, mRNA splicing was reproducibly stimulated several fold, indicating competition between ssb1 and splicing factors for binding to single-stranded RNA in the extracts. RNP complexes still formed in the ssb1- strain, demonstrating that it would be possible to purify other RNP proteins from this strain using the gel complex formation assay.

  19. Genome-wide association of mediator and RNA polymerase II in wild-type and mediator mutant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Emily; Zhu, Z Iris; Landsman, David; Morse, Randall H

    2015-01-01

    Mediator is a large, multisubunit complex that is required for essentially all mRNA transcription in eukaryotes. In spite of the importance of Mediator, the range of its targets and how it is recruited to these is not well understood. Previous work showed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator contributes to transcriptional activation by two distinct mechanisms, one depending on the tail module triad and favoring SAGA-regulated genes, and the second occurring independently of the tail module and favoring TFIID-regulated genes. Here, we use chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) to show that dependence on tail module subunits for Mediator recruitment and polymerase II (Pol II) association occurs preferentially at SAGA-regulated over TFIID-regulated genes on a genome-wide scale. We also show that recruitment of tail module subunits to active gene promoters continues genome-wide when Mediator integrity is compromised in med17 temperature-sensitive (ts) yeast, demonstrating the modular nature of the Mediator complex in vivo. In addition, our data indicate that promoters exhibiting strong and stable occupancy by Mediator have a wide range of activity and are enriched for targets of the Tup1-Cyc8 repressor complex. We also identify a number of strong Mediator occupancy peaks that overlap dubious open reading frames (ORFs) and are likely to include previously unrecognized upstream activator sequences. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Yeast screens identify the RNA polymerase II CTD and SPT5 as relevant targets of BRCA1 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Bennett

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 has been implicated in numerous DNA repair pathways that maintain genome integrity, however the function responsible for its tumor suppressor activity in breast cancer remains obscure. To identify the most highly conserved of the many BRCA1 functions, we screened the evolutionarily distant eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae for mutants that suppressed the G1 checkpoint arrest and lethality induced following heterologous BRCA1 expression. A genome-wide screen in the diploid deletion collection combined with a screen of ionizing radiation sensitive gene deletions identified mutants that permit growth in the presence of BRCA1. These genes delineate a metabolic mRNA pathway that temporally links transcription elongation (SPT4, SPT5, CTK1, DEF1 to nucleopore-mediated mRNA export (ASM4, MLP1, MLP2, NUP2, NUP53, NUP120, NUP133, NUP170, NUP188, POM34 and cytoplasmic mRNA decay at P-bodies (CCR4, DHH1. Strikingly, BRCA1 interacted with the phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (RNAPII carboxy terminal domain (P-CTD, phosphorylated in the pattern specified by the CTDK-I kinase, to induce DEF1-dependent cleavage and accumulation of a RNAPII fragment containing the P-CTD. Significantly, breast cancer associated BRCT domain defects in BRCA1 that suppressed P-CTD cleavage and lethality in yeast also suppressed the physical interaction of BRCA1 with human SPT5 in breast epithelial cells, thus confirming SPT5 as a relevant target of BRCA1 interaction. Furthermore, enhanced P-CTD cleavage was observed in both yeast and human breast cells following UV-irradiation indicating a conserved eukaryotic damage response. Moreover, P-CTD cleavage in breast epithelial cells was BRCA1-dependent since damage-induced P-CTD cleavage was only observed in the mutant BRCA1 cell line HCC1937 following ectopic expression of wild type BRCA1. Finally, BRCA1, SPT5 and hyperphosphorylated RPB1 form a complex that was rapidly degraded following MMS treatment in wild type but not BRCA1

  1. Inhibition of ribosomal RNA synthesis in yeast by ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, K; Kiefer, J [Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Strahlenzentrum

    1984-12-01

    Synthesis of ribosomal RNA(r-RNA) was measured for 1 h after exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ..gamma..-rays, X-rays or ..cap alpha.. particles. ..gamma..- or X-ray induced transcription inhibition was always found to decrease exponentially with dose. D/sub 0/ values of 2150 or 1950 Gy were determined in wild-type cells, corresponding to a mean energy of about 60 eV per r-RNA gene. The finding of differential sensitivities of the two high molecular-weight r-RNA species which are cotranscribed from r-DNA is compatible with the existence of a transcription terminating mechanism. Cells from a mutant strain (rad-9), radiation sensitive to colony forming ability, showed an approximately equal sensitivity for transcription inhibition compared to the wild-type (D/sub 0/ (2095) = 2400 Gy). Inactivation of r-RNA synthesis in cells exposed to ..cap alpha..-particles at room-temperature showed a decreased sensitivity with higher particle fluences ('resistant tail'). This phenomenon was drastically reduced if the temperature during irradiation was lowered to 4/sup 0/C and completely abolished when dried cells were used. An inactivation cross-section for ..cap alpha..-particle induced transcription inhibition of about 0.02 ..mu..m/sup 2/ can be derived from the experimental data.

  2. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  3. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A

    2011-01-01

    do not support the cis-packaging hypothesis but instead indicate that trans packaging is the major mechanism of HIV-2 RNA packaging. To further characterize the mechanisms of HIV-2 RNA packaging, we visualized HIV-2 RNA in individual particles by using fluorescent protein-tagged RNA-binding proteins......Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...... proviruses, one with a wild-type gag/gag-pol and the other with a mutant gag that cannot express functional Gag/Gag-Pol. Viral titers and RNA analyses revealed that mutant viral RNAs can be packaged at efficiencies comparable to that of viral RNA from which wild-type Gag/Gag-Pol is translated. These results...

  4. Biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanotes in wildtype yeasts | Desuoky ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biosynthesis of the biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanotes (PHAs) are studied extensively in wild type and genetically modified prokaryotic cells, however the content and structure of PHA in wild type yeasts are not well documented. The purpose of this study was to screen forty yeast isolates collected from different ...

  5. Divergence of iron metabolism in wild Malaysian yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hana N; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Chang, Amanda H; Brem, Rachel B

    2013-12-09

    Comparative genomic studies have reported widespread variation in levels of gene expression within and between species. Using these data to infer organism-level trait divergence has proven to be a key challenge in the field. We have used a wild Malaysian population of S. cerevisiae as a test bed in the search to predict and validate trait differences based on observations of regulatory variation. Malaysian yeast, when cultured in standard medium, activated regulatory programs that protect cells from the toxic effects of high iron. Malaysian yeast also showed a hyperactive regulatory response during culture in the presence of excess iron and had a unique growth defect in conditions of high iron. Molecular validation experiments pinpointed the iron metabolism factors AFT1, CCC1, and YAP5 as contributors to these molecular and cellular phenotypes; in genome-scale sequence analyses, a suite of iron toxicity response genes showed evidence for rapid protein evolution in Malaysian yeast. Our findings support a model in which iron metabolism has diverged in Malaysian yeast as a consequence of a change in selective pressure, with Malaysian alleles shifting the dynamic range of iron response to low-iron concentrations and weakening resistance to extreme iron toxicity. By dissecting the iron scarcity specialist behavior of Malaysian yeast, our work highlights the power of expression divergence as a signpost for biologically and evolutionarily relevant variation at the organismal level. Interpreting the phenotypic relevance of gene expression variation is one of the primary challenges of modern genomics.

  6. Preparation of Total RNA from Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähler, Jürg; Wise, Jo Ann

    2017-04-03

    Treatment with hot phenol breaks open fission yeast cells and begins to strip away bound proteins from RNA. Deproteinization is completed by multiple extractions with chloroform/isoamyl alcohol and separation of the aqueous and organic phases using MaXtract gel, an inert material that acts as a physical barrier between the phases. The final step is concentration of the RNA by ethanol precipitation. The protocol can be used to prepare RNA from several cultures grown in parallel, but it is important not to process too many samples at once because delays can be detrimental to RNA quality. A reasonable number of samples to process at once would be three to four for microarray or RNA sequencing analyses and six for preliminary investigations of mutants implicated in RNA metabolism. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Yeast species associated with the spontaneous fermentation of cider.

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez, Belén; Pando, Rosa; Fernández, Norman; Querol, Amparo; Rodríguez, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of cider-making technology (pneumatic and traditional pressing) on the dynamics of wild yeast populations. Yeast colonies isolated from apple juice before and throughout fermentation at a cider cellar of Asturias (Spain), during two consecutive years were studied. The yeast strains were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two flanking internal transcribed sequences (ITS). The musts obtained by ...

  8. The RNA-binding protein Spo5 promotes meiosis II by regulating cyclin Cdc13 in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Mayumi; Sato, Masamitsu; Yamashita, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2014-03-01

    Meiosis comprises two consecutive nuclear divisions, meiosis I and II. Despite this unique progression through the cell cycle, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the sequential divisions. In this study, we carried out a genetic screen to identify factors that regulate the initiation of meiosis II in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We identified mutants deficient in meiosis II progression and repeatedly isolated mutants defective in spo5, which encodes an RNA-binding protein. Using fluorescence microscopy to visualize YFP-tagged protein, we found that spo5 mutant cells precociously lost Cdc13, the major B-type cyclin in fission yeast, before meiosis II. Importantly, the defect in meiosis II was rescued by increasing CDK activity. In wild-type cells, cdc13 transcripts increased during meiosis II, but this increase in cdc13 expression was weaker in spo5 mutants. Thus, Spo5 is a novel regulator of meiosis II that controls the level of cdc13 expression and promotes de novo synthesis of Cdc13. We previously reported that inhibition of Cdc13 degradation is necessary to initiate meiosis II; together with the previous information, the current findings indicate that the dual control of Cdc13 by de novo synthesis and suppression of proteolysis ensures the progression of meiosis II. © 2014 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2014 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Analysis of ribosomal RNA stability in dead cells of wine yeast by quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyer-Figueres, Merce; Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert

    2018-04-02

    During wine production, some yeasts enter a Viable But Not Culturable (VBNC) state, which may influence the quality and stability of the final wine through remnant metabolic activity or by resuscitation. Culture-independent techniques are used for obtaining an accurate estimation of the number of live cells, and quantitative PCR could be the most accurate technique. As a marker of cell viability, rRNA was evaluated by analyzing its stability in dead cells. The species-specific stability of rRNA was tested in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as in three species of non-Saccharomyces yeast (Hanseniaspora uvarum, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Starmerella bacillaris). High temperature and antimicrobial dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) treatments were efficient in lysing the yeast cells. rRNA gene and rRNA (as cDNA) were analyzed over 48 h after cell lysis by quantitative PCR. The results confirmed the stability of rRNA for 48 h after the cell lysis treatments. To sum up, rRNA may not be a good marker of cell viability in the wine yeasts that were tested. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of developmental stage and genotype on liver mRNA levels among wild, domesticated, and hybrid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Samantha L; Sakhrani, Dionne; Danzmann, Roy G; Devlin, Robert H

    2013-10-02

    Release of domesticated strains of fish into nature may pose a threat to wild populations with respect to their evolved genetic structure and fitness. Understanding alterations that have occurred in both physiology and genetics as a consequence of domestication can assist in evaluating the risks posed by introgression of domesticated genomes into wild genetic backgrounds, however the molecular causes of these consequences are currently poorly defined. The present study has examined levels of mRNA in fast-growing pure domesticated (D), slow-growing age-matched pure wild (Wa), slow-growing size-matched pure wild (Ws), and first generation hybrid cross (W/D) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to investigate the influence of genotype (domesticated vs. wild, and their interactions in hybrids) and developmental stage (age- or size-matched animals) on genetic responses (i.e. dominant vs. recessive) and specific physiological pathways. Highly significant differences in mRNA levels were found between domesticated and wild-type rainbow trout genotypes (321 mRNAs), with many mRNAs in the wild-domesticated hybrid progeny showing intermediate levels. Differences were also found between age-matched and size-matched wild-type trout groups (64 mRNAs), with unique mRNA differences for each of the wild-type groups when compared to domesticated trout (Wa: 114 mRNAs, Ws: 88 mRNAs), illustrating an influence of fish developmental stage affecting findings when used as comparator groups to other genotypes. Analysis of differentially expressed mRNAs (found for both wild-type trout to domesticated comparisons) among the genotypes indicates that 34.8% are regulated consistent with an additive genetic model, whereas 39.1% and 26.1% show a recessive or dominant mode of regulation, respectively. These molecular data are largely consistent with phenotypic data (growth and behavioural assessments) assessed in domesticated and wild trout strains. The present molecular data are concordant with

  11. A comparison of the radiosensitivity of stationary, exponential and G1 phase wild type and repair deficient yeast cultures: supporting evidence for stationary phase yeast cells being in G0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippins, R.S.; Parry, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The main points to emerge from this comparison of the radiosensitivity of stationary, exponential and G 1 phase yeast cultures were: (1) In wild type yeast cultures, G 1 cells were the most sensitive to the lethal effects of X-rays, exponential phase cells were the most resistant and stationary phase cells were intermediate in sensitivity. (2) With the excision-repair-defective strain D61-3 (rad 3) stationary phase cells were more resistant than exponential cells with G 1 cells again being most sensitive. (3) The rad 50 gene present in JD50 had a marked effect on the X-ray inactivation response of this strain. In the presence of the defective rad 50 allele, exponential phase cells were as sensitive as G 1 phase cells, with stationary phase cells being more resistant than either. (4) There were marked differences in sensitivity between stationary phase and G 1 phase cells. These differences, along with other physiological differences reported by other workers, lead the authors to suggest that stationary phase cells can be better described as being in G 0 phase, i.e. a stage which is outside the normal mitotic cell cycle of an exponential culture. (author)

  12. Yeast RNA viruses as indicators of exosome activity: human exosome hCsl4p participates in RNA degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Garrastacho, Manuel; Esteban, Rosa

    2011-12-01

    The exosome is an evolutionarily conserved 10-mer complex involved in RNA metabolism, located in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic exosome plays an important role in mRNA turnover through its 3'→5' exonucleolytic activity. The superkiller (SKI) phenotype of yeast was originally identified as an increase of killer toxin production due to elevated levels of the L-A double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) Totivirus and its satellite toxin-encoding M dsRNA. Most SKI genes were later shown to be either components of the exosome or modulators of its activity. Variations in the amount of Totivirus are, thus, good indicators of yeast exosome activity, and can be used to analyse its components. Furthermore, if exosome proteins of higher eukaryotes were functional in S. cerevisiae, these viruses would provide a simple tool to analyse their function. In this work, we have found that hCSL4, the human orthologue of SKI4 in the yeast exosome, rescues the null phenotype of the deletion mutant. hCsl4p shares with Ski4p conserved S1 RNA-binding domains, but lacks the N-terminal third of Ski4p. Nevertheless, it interacts with the Dis3p exonuclease of yeast exosome, and partially complements the superkiller phenotype of ski4-1 mutation. The elimination of the N-terminal third of Ski4p does not affect its activity, indicating that it is dispensable for RNA degradation. We have also identified the point mutation G152E in hCSL4, equivalent to the ski4-1 mutation G253E, which impairs the activity of the protein, thus validating our approach of using yeast RNA virus to analyse the exosome of higher eukaryotes. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Improved Ribosome-Footprint and mRNA Measurements Provide Insights into Dynamics and Regulation of Yeast Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-11

    unlimited. Improved Ribosome-Footprint and mRNA Measurements Provide Insights into Dynamics and Regulation of Yeast Translation The views, opinions and...into Dynamics and Regulation of Yeast Translation Report Title Ribosome-footprint profiling provides genome-wide snapshots of translation, but...tend to slow translation. With the improved mRNA measurements, the variation attributable to translational control in exponentially growing yeast was

  14. Structures of two exonucleases involved in controlled RNA turnover in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    divalent cations. The Pop2p structure reveals that the ability of this enzyme to degrade poly(A)/(U)/(C), but not poly(G) may be determined by structural hindrance of interaction with this specific nucleotide. In Rrp6p, mutations known to confer specific RNA degradation phenotypes in yeast nuclei can now...... rid of aberrant RNAs. Here we describe the structures of two 3'-5' exonucleases involved in controlled RNA decay in yeast, Pop2p and Rrp6p. Rrp6p is associated with the nuclear exosome where it participates in the degradation of improperly processed precursor mRNAs and trimming of stable RNAs [1]. Pop...

  15. Differential induction of Toll-like receptors & type 1 interferons by Sabin attenuated & wild type 1 polioviruses in human neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Madhu C; Deshpande, Jagadish M

    2013-01-01

    Polioviruses are the causative agent of paralytic poliomyelitis. Attenuated polioviruses (Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine strains) do not replicate efficiently in neurons as compared to the wild type polioviruses and therefore do not cause disease. This study was aimed to investigate the differential host immune response to wild type 1 poliovirus (wild PV) and Sabin attenuated type 1 poliovirus (Sabin PV) in cultured human neuronal cells. By using flow cytometry and real time PCR methods we examined host innate immune responses and compared the role of toll like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic RNA helicases in cultured human neuronal cells (SK-N-SH) infected with Sabin PV and wild PV. Human neuronal cells expressed very low levels of TLRs constitutively. Sabin PV infection induced significantly higher expression of TLR3, TLR7 and melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (MDA-5) m-RNA in neuronal cells at the beginning of infection (up to 4 h) as compared to wild PV. Further, Sabin PV also induced the expression of interferon α/β at early time point of infection. The induced expression of IFN α/β gene by Sabin PV in neuronal cells could be suppressed by inhibiting TLR7. Neuronal cell innate immune response to Sabin and wild polioviruses differ significantly for TLR3, TLR7, MDA5 and type 1 interferons. Effects of TLR7 activation and interferon production and Sabin virus replication in neuronal cells need to be actively investigated in future studies.

  16. Sustained miRNA-mediated knockdown of mutant AAT with simultaneous augmentation of wild-type AAT has minimal effect on global liver miRNA profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christian; Tang, Qiushi; Gruntman, Alisha; Blomenkamp, Keith; Teckman, Jeffery; Song, Lina; Zamore, Phillip D; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-03-01

    α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency can exhibit two pathologic states: a lung disease that is primarily due to the loss of AAT's antiprotease function, and a liver disease resulting from a toxic gain-of-function of the PiZ-AAT (Z-AAT) mutant protein. We have developed several recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors that incorporate microRNA (miRNA) sequences targeting the AAT gene while also driving the expression of miRNA-resistant wild-type AAT-PiM (M-AAT) gene, thus achieving concomitant Z-AAT knockdown in the liver and increased expression of M-AAT. Transgenic mice expressing the human PiZ allele treated with dual-function rAAV9 vectors showed that serum PiZ was stably and persistently reduced by an average of 80%. Treated animals showed knockdown of Z-AAT in liver and serum with concomitant increased serum M-AAT as determined by allele-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). In addition, decreased globular accumulation of misfolded Z-AAT in hepatocytes and a reduction in inflammatory infiltrates in the liver was observed. Results from microarray studies demonstrate that endogenous miRNAs were minimally affected by this treatment. These data suggests that miRNA mediated knockdown does not saturate the miRNA pathway as has been seen with viral vector expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). This safe dual-therapy approach can be applied to other disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington disease, cerebral ataxia, and optic atrophies.

  17. Yeast as a model host to study replication and recombination of defective interfering RNA of Tomato bushy stunt virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panavas, Tadas; Nagy, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) RNA associated with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), which is a plus-strand RNA virus, requires p33 and p92 proteins of TBSV or the related Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV), for replication in plants. To test if DI RNA can replicate in a model host, we coexpressed TBSV DI RNA and p33/p92 of CNV in yeast. We show evidence for replication of DI RNA in yeast, including (i) dependence on p33 and p92 for DI replication; (ii) presence of active CNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in isolated membrane-containing preparations; (iii) increasing amount of DI RNA(+) over time; (iv) accumulation of (-)stranded DI RNA; (v) presence of correct 5' and 3' ends in DI RNA; (vi) inhibition of replication by mutations in the replication enhancer; and (vii) evolution of DI RNA over time, as shown by sequence heterogeneity. We also produced evidence supporting the occurrence of DI RNA recombinants in yeast. In summary, development of yeast as a host for replication of TBSV DI RNA will facilitate studies on the roles of viral and host proteins in replication/recombination

  18. Aminoacyl-tRNA quality control is required for efficient activation of the TOR pathway regulator Gln3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Kyle; Mann, Rebecca; Kyle, Amanda; Reynolds, Noah; Ibba, Michael

    2017-09-14

    The aminoacylation status of the cellular tRNA pool regulates both general amino acid control (GAAC) and target of rapamycin (TOR) stress response pathways in yeast. Consequently, fidelity of translation at the level of aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining accuracy and sensitivity of stress responses. To investigate effects of translational quality control (QC) on cell physiology under stress conditions, phenotypic microarray analyses were used to identify changes in QC deficient cells. Nitrogen source growth assays showed QC deficient yeast grew differently compared to WT. The QC deficient strain was more tolerant to caffeine treatment than wild type through altered interactions with the TOR and GAAC pathways. Increased caffeine tolerance of the QC deficient strain was consistent with the observation that the activity of Gln3p, a transcription factor controlled by the TOR pathway, is decreased in the QC deficient strain compared to WT. GCN4 translation, which is typically repressed in the absence of nutritional stress, was enhanced in the QC deficient strain through TOR inhibition. QC did not impact cell cycle regulation; however, the chronological lifespan of QC deficient yeast strains decreased compared to wild type, likely due to translational errors and alteration of the TOR-associated regulon. These findings support the idea that changes in translational fidelity provide a mechanism of cellular adaptation by modulating TOR activity. This, in turn, supports a central role for aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis QC in the integrated stress response by maintaining the proper aa-tRNA pools necessary to coordinate the GAAC and TOR.

  19. Use of sugarcane molasses "B" as an alternative for ethanol production with wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITV-01 at high sugar concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-López, C L; Torrestiana-Sánchez, B; Salgado-Cervantes, M A; García, P G Mendoza; Aguilar-Uscanga, M G

    2012-05-01

    Molasses "B" is a rich co-product of the sugarcane process. It is obtained from the second step of crystallization and is richer in fermentable sugars (50-65%) than the final molasses, with a lower non-sugar solid content (18-33%); this co-product also contains good vitamin and mineral levels. The use of molasses "B" for ethanol production could be a good option for the sugarcane industry when cane sugar prices diminish in the market. In a complex medium like molasses, osmotolerance is a desirable characteristic for ethanol producing strains. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of molasses "B" for ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae ITV-01 (a wild-type yeast isolated from sugarcane molasses) using different initial sugar concentrations (70-291 g L(-1)), two inoculum sizes and the addition of nutrients such as yeast extract, urea, and ammonium sulphate to the culture medium. The results obtained showed that the strain was able to grow at 291 g L(-1) total sugars in molasses "B" medium; the addition of nutrients to the culture medium did not produce a statistically significant difference. This yeast exhibits high osmotolerance in this medium, producing high ethanol yields (0.41 g g(-1)). The best conditions for ethanol production were 220 g L(-1) initial total sugars in molasses "B" medium, pH 5.5, using an inoculum size of 6 × 10(6) cell mL(-1); ethanol production was 85 g L(-1), productivity 3.8 g L(-1 )h(-1) with 90% preserved cell viability.

  20. Hepcidin regulation in wild-type and Hfe knockout mice in response to alcohol consumption: evidence for an alcohol-induced hypoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Mandy L; Murphy, Therese L; Bridle, Kim R; Anderson, Gregory J; Crawford, Darrell H G; Fletcher, Linda M

    2009-08-01

    Expression of Hamp1, the gene encoding the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin, is inappropriately low in HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis and Hfe knockout mice (Hfe(-/-)). Since chronic alcohol consumption is also associated with disturbances in iron metabolism, we investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on hepcidin mRNA expression in Hfe(-/-) mice. Hfe(-/-) and C57BL/6 (wild-type) mice were pair-fed either an alcohol liquid diet or control diet for up to 8 weeks. The mRNA levels of hepcidin and ferroportin were measured at the mRNA level by RT-PCR and protein expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) was measured by western blot. Hamp1 mRNA expression was significantly decreased and duodenal ferroportin expression was increased in alcohol-fed wild-type mice at 8 weeks. Time course experiments showed that the decrease in hepcidin mRNA was not immediate, but was significant by 4 weeks. Consistent with the genetic defect, Hamp1 mRNA was decreased and duodenal ferroportin mRNA expression was increased in Hfe(-/-) mice fed on the control diet compared with wild-type animals and alcohol further exacerbated these effects. HIF-1alpha protein levels were elevated in alcohol-fed wild-type animals compared with controls. Alcohol may decrease Hamp1 gene expression independently of the HFE pathway possibly via alcohol-induced hypoxia.

  1. Differential induction of Toll-like receptors & type 1 interferons by Sabin attenuated & wild type 1 polioviruses in human neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhu C Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Polioviruses are the causative agent of paralytic poliomyelitis. Attenuated polioviruses (Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine strains do not replicate efficiently in neurons as compared to the wild type polioviruses and therefore do not cause disease. This study was aimed to investigate the differential host immune response to wild type 1 poliovirus (wild PV and Sabin attenuated type 1 poliovirus (Sabin PV in cultured human neuronal cells. Methods: By using flow cytometry and real time PCR methods we examined host innate immune responses and compared the role of toll like receptors (TLRs and cytoplasmic RNA helicases in cultured human neuronal cells (SK-N-SH infected with Sabin PV and wild PV. Results: Human neuronal cells expressed very low levels of TLRs constitutively. Sabin PV infection induced significantly higher expression of TLR3, TLR7 and melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (MDA-5 m-RNA in neuronal cells at the beginning of infection (up to 4 h as compared to wild PV. Further, Sabin PV also induced the expression of interferon α/β at early time point of infection. The induced expression of IFN α/β gene by Sabin PV in neuronal cells could be suppressed by inhibiting TLR7. Interpretation & conclusions: Neuronal cell innate immune response to Sabin and wild polioviruses differ significantly for TLR3, TLR7, MDA5 and type 1 interferons. Effects of TLR7 activation and interferon production and Sabin virus replication in neuronal cells need to be actively investigated in future studies.

  2. Influence of quantities of brewer yeast on the performance of Anastrepha obliqua wild females (Diptera, Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cresoni-Pereira Carla

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Using artificial solid diets, experiments were performed with Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart, 1835 wild females in order to verify the influence of different quantities of brewer yeast on the performance and compensation behavior to unbalanced diets ingestion. The observed parameters were egg production, ingestion, diet efficiency and survival in the reproductive phase. Results indicated that there was no compensatory ingestion to different quantities of yeast and that the diet with 12.5g of yeast provided the best performance. The absence of compensatory ingestion is discussed based on the yeast phagostimulation and on the costs involved in solid diets ingestion. The relation between the analyzed parameters and the protein quantities in the diet were discussed.

  3. Influence of quantities of brewer yeast on the performance of Anastrepha obliqua wild females (Diptera, Tephritidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cresoni-Pereira, Carla; Zucoloto, Fernando Sergio

    2001-01-01

    Using artificial solid diets, experiments were performed with Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart, 1835) wild females in order to verify the influence of different quantities of brewer yeast on the performance and compensation behavior to unbalanced diets ingestion. The observed parameters were egg production, ingestion, diet efficiency and survival in the reproductive phase. Results indicated that there was no compensatory ingestion to different quantities of yeast and that the diet with 12.5g of yeast provided the best performance. The absence of compensatory ingestion is discussed based on the yeast phagostimulation and on the costs involved in solid diets ingestion. The relation between the analyzed parameters and the protein quantities in the diet were discussed. (author)

  4. Influence of quantities of brewer yeast on the performance of Anastrepha obliqua wild females (Diptera, Tephritidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cresoni-Pereira, Carla; Zucoloto, Fernando Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Biologia

    2001-11-15

    Using artificial solid diets, experiments were performed with Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart, 1835) wild females in order to verify the influence of different quantities of brewer yeast on the performance and compensation behavior to unbalanced diets ingestion. The observed parameters were egg production, ingestion, diet efficiency and survival in the reproductive phase. Results indicated that there was no compensatory ingestion to different quantities of yeast and that the diet with 12.5g of yeast provided the best performance. The absence of compensatory ingestion is discussed based on the yeast phagostimulation and on the costs involved in solid diets ingestion. The relation between the analyzed parameters and the protein quantities in the diet were discussed. (author)

  5. Phenotypic silencing of cytoplasmic genes using sequence-specific double-stranded short interfering RNA and its application in the reverse genetics of wild type negative-strand RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS by short interfering RNA has opened up new directions in the phenotypic mutation of cellular genes. However, its efficacy on non-nuclear genes and its effect on the interferon pathway remain unexplored. Since directed mutation of RNA genomes is not possible through conventional mutagenesis, we have tested sequence-specific 21-nucleotide long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs for their ability to silence cytoplasmic RNA genomes. Results Short dsRNAs were generated against specific mRNAs of respiratory syncytial virus, a nonsegmented negative-stranded RNA virus with a cytoplasmic life cycle. At nanomolar concentrations, the dsRNAs specifically abrogated expression of the corresponding viral proteins, and produced the expected mutant phenotype ex vivo. The dsRNAs did not induce an interferon response, and did not inhibit cellular gene expression. The ablation of the viral proteins correlated with the loss of the specific mRNAs. In contrast, viral genomic and antigenomic RNA, which are encapsidated, were not directly affected. Conclusions Synthetic inhibitory dsRNAs are effective in specific silencing of RNA genomes that are exclusively cytoplasmic and transcribed by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. RNA-directed RNA gene silencing does not require cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of viral cDNA, and thus, will allow the generation of phenotypic null mutants of specific RNA viral genes under normal infection conditions and at any point in the infection cycle. This will, for the first time, permit functional genomic studies, attenuated infections, reverse genetic analysis, and studies of host-virus signaling pathways using a wild type RNA virus, unencumbered by any superinfecting virus.

  6. Complex Ancestries of Lager-Brewing Hybrids Were Shaped by Standing Variation in the Wild Yeast Saccharomyces eubayanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris, David; Langdon, Quinn K; Moriarty, Ryan V; Sylvester, Kayla; Bontrager, Martin; Charron, Guillaume; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Landry, Christian R; Libkind, Diego; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-07-01

    Lager-style beers constitute the vast majority of the beer market, and yet, the genetic origin of the yeast strains that brew them has been shrouded in mystery and controversy. Unlike ale-style beers, which are generally brewed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lagers are brewed at colder temperatures with allopolyploid hybrids of Saccharomyces eubayanus x S. cerevisiae. Since the discovery of S. eubayanus in 2011, additional strains have been isolated from South America, North America, Australasia, and Asia, but only interspecies hybrids have been isolated in Europe. Here, using genome sequence data, we examine the relationships of these wild S. eubayanus strains to each other and to domesticated lager strains. Our results support the existence of a relatively low-diversity (π = 0.00197) lineage of S. eubayanus whose distribution stretches across the Holarctic ecozone and includes wild isolates from Tibet, new wild isolates from North America, and the S. eubayanus parents of lager yeasts. This Holarctic lineage is closely related to a population with higher diversity (π = 0.00275) that has been found primarily in South America but includes some widely distributed isolates. A second diverse South American population (π = 0.00354) and two early-diverging Asian subspecies are more distantly related. We further show that no single wild strain from the Holarctic lineage is the sole closest relative of lager yeasts. Instead, different parts of the genome portray different phylogenetic signals and ancestry, likely due to outcrossing and incomplete lineage sorting. Indeed, standing genetic variation within this wild Holarctic lineage of S. eubayanus is responsible for genetic variation still segregating among modern lager-brewing hybrids. We conclude that the relationships among wild strains of S. eubayanus and their domesticated hybrids reflect complex biogeographical and genetic processes.

  7. Cth2 Protein Mediates Early Adaptation of Yeast Cells to Oxidative Stress Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available Cth2 is an mRNA-binding protein that participates in remodeling yeast cell metabolism in iron starvation conditions by promoting decay of the targeted molecules, in order to avoid excess iron consumption. This study shows that in the absence of Cth2 immediate upregulation of expression of several of the iron regulon genes (involved in high affinity iron uptake and intracellular iron redistribution upon oxidative stress by hydroperoxide is more intense than in wild type conditions where Cth2 is present. The oxidative stress provokes a temporary increase in the levels of Cth2 (itself a member of the iron regulon. In such conditions Cth2 molecules accumulate at P bodies-like structures when the constitutive mRNA decay machinery is compromised. In addition, a null Δcth2 mutant shows defects, in comparison to CTH2 wild type cells, in exit from α factor-induced arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when hydroperoxide treatment is applied. The cell cycle defects are rescued in conditions that compromise uptake of external iron into the cytosol. The observations support a role of Cth2 in modulating expression of diverse iron regulon genes, excluding those specifically involved in the reductive branch of the high-affinity transport. This would result in immediate adaptation of the yeast cells to an oxidative stress, by controlling uptake of oxidant-promoting iron cations.

  8. Hydrogen bond indices and tertiary structure of yeast tRNA sup(Phe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.; Esquivel, D.M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The rigidity and stability of the tertiary structure of yeast tRNA sup(Phe) is related to a bond index employed in an IEHT calculation. The index permits a quantitative estimate of the electronic cloud along the hydrogen bond, having thus an appealing physical meaning. The results indicate that Hoogsteen-type bonds have, as expected, greater electronic population than Watson-Crick type ones. Other non-Watson-Crick pairings, the wobble pair and G 15 -C 48 , exhibit high values of the index for the NH...O bond. In the triples, the electronic density of the hydrogen bridges does not weaken, comparing it with the one of the pairs involved. Contour density maps are shown and dipolar moments of pairs and triples are qualitatively discussed. (Author) [pt

  9. Expression profiles of mRNA after exposure yeast and rice to heavy-ion radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Satomi; Nojima, Kumie

    2005-01-01

    We have studied expression profiles of mRNA after exposure yeast cells to heavy-ion radiation. Yeast cells was exposed by heavy-ion radiation with the levels of 6, 12, 25, 50, and 100 Gy. We could confirm the reproducibility of physiological state of yeast cells under the experimental conditions by DNA microarray. We could also confirm the reproducibility of viability of yeast cells after exposure to heavy-ion radiation. We thus applied yeast cells exposed with 25 Gy was applied to DNA microarray analysis. The strongly induced genes were HUG1 RAR4 RNR2 for DNA repairing genes and GLC3 GSY1 for energy metabolism genes. (author)

  10. Off-target effects of psychoactive drugs revealed by genome-wide assays in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Ericson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 compounds that inhibited wild-type yeast growth and were thus selected for genome-wide fitness profiling. Many of these drugs had a propensity to affect multiple cellular functions. The sensitivity profiles of half of the analyzed drugs were enriched for core cellular processes such as secretion, protein folding, RNA processing, and chromatin structure. Interestingly, fluoxetine (Prozac interfered with establishment of cell polarity, cyproheptadine (Periactin targeted essential genes with chromatin-remodeling roles, while paroxetine (Paxil interfered with essential RNA metabolism genes, suggesting potential secondary drug targets. We also found that the more recently developed atypical antipsychotic clozapine (Clozaril had no fewer off-target effects in yeast than the typical antipsychotics haloperidol (Haldol and pimozide (Orap. Our results suggest that model organism pharmacogenetic studies provide a rational foundation for understanding the off-target effects of clinically important psychoactive agents and suggest a rational means both for devising compound derivatives with fewer side effects and for tailoring drug treatment to individual patient genotypes.

  11. The genomics of wild yeast populations sheds light on the domestication of man's best (micro) friend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Chris; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Landry, Christian R

    2015-11-01

    The domestication of plants, animals and microbes by humans are the longest artificial evolution experiments ever performed. The study of these long-term experiments can teach us about the genomics of adaptation through the identification of the genetic bases underlying the traits favoured by humans. In laboratory evolution, the characterization of the molecular changes that evolved specifically in some lineages is straightforward because the ancestors are readily available, for instance in the freezer. However, in the case of domesticated species, the ancestor is often missing, which leads to the necessity of going back to nature in order to infer the most likely ancestral state. Significant and relatively recent examples of this approach include wolves as the closest wild relative to domestic dogs (Axelsson et al. 2013) and teosinte as the closest relative to maize (reviewed in Hake & Ross-Ibarra 2015). In both cases, the joint analysis of domesticated lineages and their wild cousins has been key in reconstructing the molecular history of their domestication. While the identification of closest wild relatives has been done for many plants and animals, these comparisons represent challenges for micro-organisms. This has been the case for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whose natural ecological niche is particularly challenging to define. For centuries, this unicellular fungus has been the cellular factory for wine, beer and bread crafting, and currently for bioethanol and drug production. While the recent development of genomics has lead to the identification of many genetic elements associated with important wine characteristics, the historical origin of some of the domesticated wine strains has remained elusive due to the lack of knowledge of their close wild relatives. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Almeida et al. (2015) identified what is to date the closest known wild population of the wine yeast. This population is found associated with

  12. Porphyrin Interactions with Wild Type and Mutant Mouse Ferrochelatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Gloria C.; Franco, Ricardo; Lu, Yi; Ma, Jian-Guo; Shelnutt, John A.

    1999-05-19

    Ferrochelatase (EC 4.99.1.1), the terminal enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes Fe2+ chelation into protoporphyrin IX. Resonance Raman and W-visible absorbance spectroscopes of wild type and engineered variants of murine ferrochelatase were used to examine the proposed structural mechanism for iron insertion into protoporphyrin by ferrochelatase. The recombinant variants (i.e., H207N and E287Q) are enzymes in which the conserved amino acids histidine-207 and glutamate-287 of murine ferrochelatase were substituted with asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Both of these residues are at the active site of the enzyme as deduced from the Bacillus subtilis ferrochelatase three-dimensional structure. Addition of free base or metalated porphyrins to wild type ferrochelatase and H207N variant yields a quasi 1:1 complex, possibly a monomeric protein-bound species. In contrast, the addition of porphyrin (either free base or metalated) to E287Q is sub-stoichiometric, as this variant retains bound porphyrin in the active site during isolation and purification. The specificity of porphyrin binding is confirmed by the narrowing of the structure-sensitive resonance Raman lines and the vinyl vibrational mode. Resonance Raman spectra of free base and metalated porphyrins bound to the wild type ferrochelatase indicate a nonplanar distortion of the porphyrin macrocycle, although the magnitude of the distortion cannot be determined without first defining the specific type of deformation. Significantly, the extent of the nonplanar distortion varies in the case of H207N- and E287Q-bound porphyrins. In fact, resonance Raman spectral decomposition indicates a homogeneous ruffled distortion for the nickel protoporphyrin bound to the wild type ferrochelatase, whereas both a planar and ruffled conformations are present for the H207N-bound porphyrin. Perhaps more revealing is the unusual resonance , 3 Raman spectrum of the endogenous E287Q-bound porphyrin, which has

  13. Mutations induced by X-radiation in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loprieno, N.; Barale, R.; Baroncelli, S.; Cammellini, A.; Melani, M.; Nieri, R.; Nozzolini, M.; Rossi, A.M.; Pisa Univ.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments on strains of yeast with different genetic backgrounds were done to evaluate the kinetics of inactivation and mutation induction by X-radiation. A system of forward mutation induction in five loci was used and a specific mutation rate was evaluated for the wild type. From a comparison of observations with wild type and radiation-sensitive strains, it may be assumed that in this yeast, mutations are mainly the result of a repair-active process. The range of genotypic and phenotypic influence upon the specific locus mutation rate was evaluated with appropriate biological material and experiments

  14. Checkpoint independence of most DNA replication origins in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Katie L; Ramanathan, Sunita; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Chaudari, Amna; Yompakdee, Chulee; Scott, Donna; Leatherwood, Janet; Huberman, Joel A

    2007-12-19

    In budding yeast, the replication checkpoint slows progress through S phase by inhibiting replication origin firing. In mammals, the replication checkpoint inhibits both origin firing and replication fork movement. To find out which strategy is employed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we used microarrays to investigate the use of origins by wild-type and checkpoint-mutant strains in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which limits the pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and activates the replication checkpoint. The checkpoint-mutant cells carried deletions either of rad3 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of ATR) or cds1 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of Chk2). Our microarray results proved to be largely consistent with those independently obtained and recently published by three other laboratories. However, we were able to reconcile differences between the previous studies regarding the extent to which fission yeast replication origins are affected by the replication checkpoint. We found (consistent with the three previous studies after appropriate interpretation) that, in surprising contrast to budding yeast, most fission yeast origins, including both early- and late-firing origins, are not significantly affected by checkpoint mutations during replication in the presence of HU. A few origins (approximately 3%) behaved like those in budding yeast: they replicated earlier in the checkpoint mutants than in wild type. These were located primarily in the heterochromatic subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 1 and 2. Indeed, the subtelomeric regions defined by the strongest checkpoint restraint correspond precisely to previously mapped subtelomeric heterochromatin. This observation implies that subtelomeric heterochromatin in fission yeast differs from heterochromatin at centromeres, in the mating type region, and in ribosomal DNA, since these regions replicated at least as efficiently in wild-type cells as in checkpoint

  15. Checkpoint independence of most DNA replication origins in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Katie L; Ramanathan, Sunita; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Chaudari, Amna; Yompakdee, Chulee; Scott, Donna; Leatherwood, Janet; Huberman, Joel A

    2007-01-01

    Background In budding yeast, the replication checkpoint slows progress through S phase by inhibiting replication origin firing. In mammals, the replication checkpoint inhibits both origin firing and replication fork movement. To find out which strategy is employed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we used microarrays to investigate the use of origins by wild-type and checkpoint-mutant strains in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which limits the pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and activates the replication checkpoint. The checkpoint-mutant cells carried deletions either of rad3 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of ATR) or cds1 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of Chk2). Results Our microarray results proved to be largely consistent with those independently obtained and recently published by three other laboratories. However, we were able to reconcile differences between the previous studies regarding the extent to which fission yeast replication origins are affected by the replication checkpoint. We found (consistent with the three previous studies after appropriate interpretation) that, in surprising contrast to budding yeast, most fission yeast origins, including both early- and late-firing origins, are not significantly affected by checkpoint mutations during replication in the presence of HU. A few origins (~3%) behaved like those in budding yeast: they replicated earlier in the checkpoint mutants than in wild type. These were located primarily in the heterochromatic subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 1 and 2. Indeed, the subtelomeric regions defined by the strongest checkpoint restraint correspond precisely to previously mapped subtelomeric heterochromatin. This observation implies that subtelomeric heterochromatin in fission yeast differs from heterochromatin at centromeres, in the mating type region, and in ribosomal DNA, since these regions replicated at least as efficiently in wild-type cells as in

  16. Checkpoint independence of most DNA replication origins in fission yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Donna

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In budding yeast, the replication checkpoint slows progress through S phase by inhibiting replication origin firing. In mammals, the replication checkpoint inhibits both origin firing and replication fork movement. To find out which strategy is employed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we used microarrays to investigate the use of origins by wild-type and checkpoint-mutant strains in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU, which limits the pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs and activates the replication checkpoint. The checkpoint-mutant cells carried deletions either of rad3 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of ATR or cds1 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of Chk2. Results Our microarray results proved to be largely consistent with those independently obtained and recently published by three other laboratories. However, we were able to reconcile differences between the previous studies regarding the extent to which fission yeast replication origins are affected by the replication checkpoint. We found (consistent with the three previous studies after appropriate interpretation that, in surprising contrast to budding yeast, most fission yeast origins, including both early- and late-firing origins, are not significantly affected by checkpoint mutations during replication in the presence of HU. A few origins (~3% behaved like those in budding yeast: they replicated earlier in the checkpoint mutants than in wild type. These were located primarily in the heterochromatic subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 1 and 2. Indeed, the subtelomeric regions defined by the strongest checkpoint restraint correspond precisely to previously mapped subtelomeric heterochromatin. This observation implies that subtelomeric heterochromatin in fission yeast differs from heterochromatin at centromeres, in the mating type region, and in ribosomal DNA, since these regions replicated at least as efficiently in wild-type

  17. A chemical genetic screen for modulators of asymmetrical 2,2'-dimeric naphthoquinones cytotoxicity in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Emadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dimeric naphthoquinones (BiQ were originally synthesized as a new class of HIV integrase inhibitors but have shown integrase-independent cytotoxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines suggesting their use as potential anti-neoplastic agents. The mechanism of this cytotoxicity is unknown. In order to gain insight into the mode of action of binaphthoquinones we performed a systematic high-throughput screen in a yeast isogenic deletion mutant array for enhanced or suppressed growth in the presence of binaphthoquinones. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exposure of wild type yeast strains to various BiQs demonstrated inhibition of yeast growth with IC(50s in the microM range. Drug sensitivity and resistance screens were performed by exposing arrays of a haploid yeast deletion mutant library to BiQs at concentrations near their IC(50. Sensitivity screens identified yeast with deletions affecting mitochondrial function and cellular respiration as having increased sensitivity to BiQs. Corresponding to this, wild type yeast grown in the absence of a fermentable carbon source were particularly sensitive to BiQs, and treatment with BiQs was shown to disrupt the mitochondrial membrane potential and lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, baseline ROS production in BiQ sensitive mutant strains was increased compared to wild type and could be further augmented by the presence of BiQ. Screens for resistance to BiQ action identified the mitochondrial external NAD(PH dehydrogenase, NDE1, as critical to BiQ toxicity and over-expression of this gene resulted in increased ROS production and increased sensitivity of wild type yeast to BiQ. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In yeast, binaphthoquinone cytotoxicity is likely mediated through NAD(PH:quonine oxidoreductases leading to ROS production and dysfunctional mitochondria. Further studies are required to validate this mechanism in mammalian cells.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of the wild type and two mutants of the CP1 hydrolytic domain from Aquifex aeolicus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cura, Vincent; Olieric, Natacha; Guichard, Alexandre [Département de Biologie et Génomique Structurales, UMR 7104, Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/ULP Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Wang, En-Duo [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, 320 Yue Yang Road, Shanghai 200031 (China); Moras, Dino [Département de Biologie et Génomique Structurales, UMR 7104, Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/ULP Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Eriani, Gilbert [Architecture et Réactivité de l’ARN, UPR 9002, Institut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 Rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Cavarelli, Jean, E-mail: cava@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Département de Biologie et Génomique Structurales, UMR 7104, Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/ULP Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2005-10-01

    The wild-type editing CP1 domain of A. aeolicus leucyl-tRNA synthetase and two mutant CP1 domains have been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å, which has enabled determination of the structures by molecular replacement. The editing or hydrolytic CP1 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) hydrolyses several misactivated amino acids. The CP1 domain of Aquifex aeolicus LeuRS was expressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.8, b = 98.4, c = 116.7 Å. Crystals diffract to beyond 1.8 Å resolution and contain two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Two CP1 mutants in which a conserved threonine residue essential for the fidelity of the hydrolytic pathway is mutated to alanine or glutamic acid have also been expressed and crystallized. Crystals of the two CP1 mutants are isomorphs of the wild type and diffract to beyond 1.9 Å resolution. All structures were solved by molecular-replacement techniques.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of the wild type and two mutants of the CP1 hydrolytic domain from Aquifex aeolicus leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cura, Vincent; Olieric, Natacha; Guichard, Alexandre; Wang, En-Duo; Moras, Dino; Eriani, Gilbert; Cavarelli, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The wild-type editing CP1 domain of A. aeolicus leucyl-tRNA synthetase and two mutant CP1 domains have been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å, which has enabled determination of the structures by molecular replacement. The editing or hydrolytic CP1 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) hydrolyses several misactivated amino acids. The CP1 domain of Aquifex aeolicus LeuRS was expressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 38.8, b = 98.4, c = 116.7 Å. Crystals diffract to beyond 1.8 Å resolution and contain two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Two CP1 mutants in which a conserved threonine residue essential for the fidelity of the hydrolytic pathway is mutated to alanine or glutamic acid have also been expressed and crystallized. Crystals of the two CP1 mutants are isomorphs of the wild type and diffract to beyond 1.9 Å resolution. All structures were solved by molecular-replacement techniques

  20. RNA polymerase of the killer virus of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgopoulos, D.E.; Leibowitz, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The L/sub A/ and M double-stranded (ds) RNA segments of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encapsidated in virions that contain a DNA-independent transcriptase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of full-length (+) stranded copies of the genomic dsRNA segments, denoted l/sub A/ and m. The L/sub A/ dsRNA segment appears to encode the major capsid protein in which both dsRNA molecules are encapsidated, while M dsRNA encodes products responsible for the two killer phenotypes of toxin production and resistance to toxin. Proteins extracted from transcriptionally active virions fail to cross-react with antibody to yeast DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, suggesting that none of the subunits of the host cell polymerases are active in viral transcription. Sequence analysis of the in vitro transcripts reveals neither to be 3'-terminally polyadenylated, although m contains an apparent internal polyA-like tract. In the presence of any three ribonucleoside triphosphates (0.5 mM), the fourth ribonucleoside triphosphate shows an optimal rate of incorporation into transcript at a concentration of 20 μM. However, in a 3-hour reaction, the yield of a product RNA increases with the concentration of the limiting ribonucleotide up to 0.5 mM. Gel electrophoresis of the reaction products reveals that increasing the substrate concentration accelerates the appearance of radioactivity in full-length l/sub A/ and m transcripts

  1. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  2. Endogenous ribosomal frameshift signals operate as mRNA destabilizing elements through at least two molecular pathways in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belew, Ashton T; Advani, Vivek M; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2011-04-01

    Although first discovered in viruses, previous studies have identified operational -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 RF) signals in eukaryotic genomic sequences, and suggested a role in mRNA stability. Here, four yeast -1 RF signals are shown to promote significant mRNA destabilization through the nonsense mediated mRNA decay pathway (NMD), and genetic evidence is presented suggesting that they may also operate through the no-go decay pathway (NGD) as well. Yeast EST2 mRNA is highly unstable and contains up to five -1 RF signals. Ablation of the -1 RF signals or of NMD stabilizes this mRNA, and changes in -1 RF efficiency have opposing effects on the steady-state abundance of the EST2 mRNA. These results demonstrate that endogenous -1 RF signals function as mRNA destabilizing elements through at least two molecular pathways in yeast. Consistent with current evolutionary theory, phylogenetic analyses suggest that -1 RF signals are rapidly evolving cis-acting regulatory elements. Identification of high confidence -1 RF signals in ∼10% of genes in all eukaryotic genomes surveyed suggests that -1 RF is a broadly used post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression.

  3. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Azhar, Siti Hajar; Abdulla, Rahmath; Jambo, Siti Azmah; Marbawi, Hartinie; Gansau, Jualang Azlan; Mohd Faik, Ainol Azifa; Rodrigues, Kenneth Francis

    2017-07-01

    Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  4. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hajar Mohd Azhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  5. Active Yeast Telomerase Shares Subunits with Ribonucleoproteins RNase P and RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Bruno; Laterreur, Nancy; Perederina, Anna; Noël, Jean-François; Dubois, Marie-Line; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2016-05-19

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that replenishes telomeric DNA and maintains genome integrity. Minimally, telomerase activity requires a templating RNA and a catalytic protein. Additional proteins are required for activity on telomeres in vivo. Here, we report that the Pop1, Pop6, and Pop7 proteins, known components of RNase P and RNase MRP, bind to yeast telomerase RNA and are essential constituents of the telomerase holoenzyme. Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 binding is specific and involves an RNA domain highly similar to a protein-binding domain in the RNAs of RNase P/MRP. The results also show that Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 function to maintain the essential components Est1 and Est2 on the RNA in vivo. Consistently, addition of Pop1 allows for telomerase activity reconstitution with wild-type telomerase RNA in vitro. Thus, the same chaperoning module has allowed the evolution of functionally and, remarkably, structurally distinct RNPs, telomerase, and RNases P/MRP from unrelated progenitor RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Liquid holding recovery kinetics in wild-type and radiosensitive mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces exposed to low- and high-LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petin, Vladislav G. [Biophysical Laboratory, Medical Radiological Research Center, 249036 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jkkim@kaeri.re.kr

    2005-02-15

    Three wild-type diploid yeast strains Saccharomyces ellipsoideus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and five radiosensitive mutants of S. cerevisiae in the diploid state were irradiated with {gamma}-rays from {sup 60}Co and {alpha}-particles from {sup 239}Pu in the stationary phase of growth. Survival curves and the kinetics of the liquid holding recovery were measured. It was shown that the irreversible component was enhanced for the densely ionizing radiation in comparison to the low-LET radiation while the probability of the recovery was identical for both the low- and high-LET radiations for all the strains investigated. It means that the recovery process itself is not damaged after densely ionizing radiation and the enhanced RBE of the high-LET radiation may be caused by the increased yield of the irreversible damage. A parent diploid strain and all its radiosensitive mutants showed the same probability for recovery from radiation damage. Thus, the mechanism of the enhanced radiosensitivity of the mutant cells might not be related to the damage of the repair systems themselves but with the production of some kind of radiation damage from which cells are incapable to recover.

  7. Mitochondrial and cytoplasmic isoleucyl-, glutamyl- and arginyl-tRNA synthetases of yeast are encoded by separate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzagoloff, A; Shtanko, A

    1995-06-01

    Three complementation groups of a pet mutant collection have been found to be composed of respiratory-deficient deficient mutants with lesions in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Recombinant plasmids capable of restoring respiration were cloned by transformation of representatives of each complementation group with a yeast genomic library. The plasmids were used to characterize the complementing genes and to institute disruption of the chromosomal copies of each gene in respiratory-proficient yeast. The sequences of the cloned genes indicate that they code for isoleucyl-, arginyl- and glutamyl-tRNA synthetases. The properties of the mutants used to obtain the genes and of strains with the disrupted genes indicate that all three aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases function exclusively in mitochondrial proteins synthesis. The ISM1 gene for mitochondrial isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase has been localized to chromosome XVI next to UME5. The MSR1 gene for the arginyl-tRNA synthetase was previously located on yeast chromosome VIII. The third gene MSE1 for the mitochondrial glutamyl-tRNA synthetase has not been localized. The identification of three new genes coding for mitochondrial-specific aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases indicates that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at least 11 members of this protein family are encoded by genes distinct from those coding for the homologous cytoplasmic enzymes.

  8. rRNA fragmentation induced by a yeast killer toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Alene; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    Virus like dsDNA elements (VLE) in yeast were previously shown to encode the killer toxins PaT and zymocin, which target distinct tRNA species via specific anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activities. Here, we characterize a third member of the VLE-encoded toxins, PiT from Pichia inositovora, and identify PiOrf4 as the cytotoxic subunit by conditional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the tRNA targeting toxins, however, neither a change of the wobble uridine modification status by introduction of elp3 or trm9 mutations nor tRNA overexpression rescued from PiOrf4 toxicity. Consistent with a distinct RNA target, expression of PiOrf4 causes specific fragmentation of the 25S and 18S rRNA. A stable cleavage product comprising the first ∼ 130 nucleotides of the 18S rRNA was purified and characterized by linker ligation and subsequent reverse transcription; 3'-termini were mapped to nucleotide 131 and 132 of the 18S rRNA sequence, a region showing some similarity to the anticodon loop of tRNA(Glu)(UUC), the zymocin target. PiOrf4 residues Glu9 and His214, corresponding to catalytic sites Glu9 and His209 in the ACNase subunit of zymocin are essential for in vivo toxicity and rRNA fragmentation, raising the possibility of functionally conserved RNase modules in both proteins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Lariat capping as a tool to manipulate the 5' end of individual yeast mRNA species in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Nicolai; Pietschmann, Max; Schmid, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    The 5' cap structure of eukaryotic mRNA is critical for its processing, transport, translation, and stability. The many functions of the cap and the fact that most, if not all, mRNA carries the same type of cap makes it difficult to analyze cap function in vivo at individual steps of gene...... in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae presumably without cofactors and that lariat capping occurs cotranscriptionally. The lariat-capped reporter mRNA is efficiently exported to the cytoplasm where it is found to be oligoadenylated and evenly distributed. Both the oligoadenylated form and a lariat......-capped mRNA with a templated poly(A) tail translates poorly, underlining the critical importance of the m(7)G cap in translation. Finally, the lariat-capped RNA exhibits a threefold longer half-life compared to its m(7)G-capped counterpart, consistent with a key role for the m(7)G cap in mRNA turnover. Our...

  10. DNA vaccines encoding proteins from wild-type and attenuated canine distemper virus protect equally well against wild-type virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Line; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Kristensen, Birte; Jensen, Tove Dannemann; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Lund, Morten; Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2012-10-01

    Immunity induced by DNA vaccines containing the hemagglutinin (H) and nucleoprotein (N) genes of wild-type and attenuated canine distemper virus (CDV) was investigated in mink (Mustela vison), a highly susceptible natural host of CDV. All DNA-immunized mink seroconverted, and significant levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies were present on the day of challenge with wild-type CDV. The DNA vaccines also primed the cell-mediated memory responses, as indicated by an early increase in the number of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-producing lymphocytes after challenge. Importantly, the wild-type and attenuated CDV DNA vaccines had a long-term protective effect against wild-type CDV challenge. The vaccine-induced immunity induced by the H and N genes from wild-type CDV and those from attenuated CDV was comparable. Because these two DNA vaccines were shown to protect equally well against wild-type virus challenge, it is suggested that the genetic/antigenic heterogeneity between vaccine strains and contemporary wild-type strains are unlikely to cause vaccine failure.

  11. RNA quality control in yeast - what is good and what is bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    positions in the tRNA molecules [2]. We believe that in such cases, the tRNAs are recognized by a common structural alteration that causes part of the molecule to unfold and thereby mark the tRNA as defect. We therefore want to isolate and crystallize the RNA binding proteins Air1p or Air2p in complex...... with aberrant tRNA analogous to gain knowledge of how the cell determines which RNAs are good and bad and use this as a model system for how the cell in general recognizes aberrant RNAs. So far, Air1p and Air2p have been cloned from different yeast organisms and the first expression tests of the proteins have...

  12. Evaluation of Caspofungin Susceptibility Testing by the New Vitek 2 AST-YS06 Yeast Card Using a Unique Collection of FKS Wild-Type and Hot Spot Mutant Isolates, Including the Five Most Common Candida Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, Karen M; Perlin, David S; Johansen, Helle K

    2013-01-01

    FKS mutant isolates associated with breakthrough or failure cases are emerging in clinical settings. Discrimination of these from wild-type (wt) isolates in a routine laboratory setting is complicated. We evaluated the ability of caspofungin MIC determination using the new Vitek 2 AST-Y06 yeast...... susceptibility card to correctly identify the fks mutants from wt isolates and compared the performance to those of the CLSI and EUCAST reference methods. A collection of 98 Candida isolates, including 31 fks hot spot mutants, were included. Performance was evaluated using the FKS genotype as the "gold standard...

  13. Transcriptional reprogramming in yeast using dCas9 and combinatorial gRNA strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard Jensen, Emil; Ferreira, Raphael; Jakociunas, Tadas

    2017-01-01

    on developing synthetic biology tools for orthogonal control of transcription. Most recently, the nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) has emerged as a flexible tool for controlling activation and repression of target genes, by the simple RNA-guided positioning of dCas9 in the vicinity of the target gene...... transcription start site. In this study we compared two different systems of dCas9-mediated transcriptional reprogramming, and applied them to genes controlling two biosynthetic pathways for biobased production of isoprenoids and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By testing 101...... production and increases in TAG. Taken together, we show similar performance for a constitutive and an inducible dCas9 approach, and identify multiplex gRNA designs that can significantly perturb isoprenoid production and TAG profiles in yeast without editing the genomic context of the target genes. We also...

  14. Isolation of baker's yeast mutants with proline accumulation that showed enhanced tolerance to baking-associated stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolmonbaatar, Ariunzaya; Hashida, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Yukiko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Furukawa, Shuhei; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-05

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to baking-associated stresses such as freeze-thaw, air-drying, and high-sucrose concentrations. Previously, we reported that self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strains that accumulate proline retained higher-level fermentation abilities in both frozen and sweet doughs than the wild-type strain. Although self-cloning yeasts do not have to be treated as genetically modified yeasts, the conventional methods for breeding baker's yeasts are more acceptable to consumers than the use of self-cloning yeasts. In this study, we isolated mutants resistant to the proline analogue azetidine-2-carboxylate (AZC) derived from diploid baker's yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some of the mutants accumulated a greater amount of intracellular proline, and among them, 5 mutants showed higher cell viability than that observed in the parent wild-type strain under freezing or high-sucrose stress conditions. Two of them carried novel mutations in the PRO1 gene encoding the Pro247Ser or Glu415Lys variant of γ-glutamyl kinase (GK), which is a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, we found that these mutations resulted in AZC resistance of yeast cells and desensitization to proline feedback inhibition of GK, leading to intracellular proline accumulation. Moreover, baker's yeast cells expressing the PRO1 P247S and PRO1 E415K gene were more tolerant to freezing stress than cells expressing the wild-type PRO1 gene. The approach described here could be a practical method for the breeding of proline-accumulating baker's yeasts with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Binding interactions between yeast tRNA ligase and a precursor transfer ribonucleic acid containing two photoreactive uridine analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, N.K.; Hanna, M.M.; Abelson, J.

    1988-01-01

    Yeast tRNA ligase, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is one of the protein components that is involved in the splicing reaction of intron-containing yeast precursor tRNAs. It is an unusual protein because it has three distinct catalytic activities. It functions as a polynucleotide kinase, as a cyclic phosphodiesterase, and as an RNA ligase. We have studied the binding interactions between ligase and precursor tRNAs containing two photoreactive uridine analogues, 4-thiouridine and 5-bromouridine. When irradiated with long ultraviolet light, RNA containing these analogues can form specific covalent bonds with associated proteins. In this paper, we show that 4-thiouridine triphosphate and 5-bromouridine triphosphate were readily incorporated into a precursor tRNA(Phe) that was synthesized, in vitro, with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. The analogue-containing precursor tRNAs were authentic substrates for the two splicing enzymes that were tested (endonuclease and ligase), and they formed specific covalent bonds with ligase when they were irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. We have determined the position of three major cross-links and one minor cross-link on precursor tRNA(Phe) that were located within the intron and near the 3' splice site. On the basis of these data, we present a model for the in vivo splicing reaction of yeast precursor tRNAs

  16. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  17. Construction of a novel selection system for endoglucanases exhibiting carbohydrate-binding modules optimized for biomass using yeast cell-surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Akihito; Bae, Jungu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-10-23

    To permit direct cellulose degradation and ethanol fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 (Δsed1) codisplaying 3 cellulases (Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II [EG], T. reesei cellobiohydrolase II [CBH], and Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase I [BG]) was constructed by yeast cell-surface engineering. The EG used in this study consists of a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and a catalytic module. A comparison with family 1 CBMs revealed conserved amino acid residues and flexible amino acid residues. The flexible amino acid residues were at positions 18, 23, 26, and 27, through which the degrading activity for various cellulose structures in each biomass may have been optimized. To select the optimal combination of CBMs of EGs, a yeast mixture with comprehensively mutated CBM was constructed. The mixture consisted of yeasts codisplaying EG with mutated CBMs, in which 4 flexible residues were comprehensively mutated, CBH, and BG. The yeast mixture was inoculated in selection medium with newspaper as the sole carbon source. The surviving yeast consisted of RTSH yeast (the mutant sequence of CBM: N18R, S23T, S26S, and T27H) and wild-type yeast (CBM was the original) in a ratio of 1:46. The mixture (1 RTSH yeast and 46 wild-type yeasts) had a fermentation activity that was 1.5-fold higher than that of wild-type yeast alone in the early phase of saccharification and fermentation, which indicates that the yeast mixture with comprehensively mutated CBM could be used to select the optimal combination of CBMs suitable for the cellulose of each biomass.

  18. Characterization of two second-site mutations preventing wild type protein aggregation caused by a dominant negative PMA1 mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Eraso

    Full Text Available The correct biogenesis and localization of Pma1 at the plasma membrane is essential for yeast growth. A subset of PMA1 mutations behave as dominant negative because they produce aberrantly folded proteins that form protein aggregates, which in turn provoke the aggregation of the wild type protein. One approach to understand this dominant negative effect is to identify second-site mutations able to suppress the dominant lethal phenotype caused by those mutant alleles. We isolated and characterized two intragenic second-site suppressors of the PMA1-D378T dominant negative mutation. We present here the analysis of these new mutations that are located along the amino-terminal half of the protein and include a missense mutation, L151F, and an in-frame 12bp deletion that eliminates four residues from Cys409 to Ala412. The results show that the suppressor mutations disrupt the interaction between the mutant and wild type enzymes, and this enables the wild type Pma1 to reach the plasma membrane.

  19. RNA integrity as a quality indicator during the first steps of RNP purifications : A comparison of yeast lysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Ralf-Peter

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of several genome-sequencing projects has increased our need to assign functions to newly identified genes. The presence of a specific protein domain has been used as the determinant for suggesting a function for these new genes. In the case of proteins that are predicted to interact with mRNA, most RNAs bound by these proteins are still unknown. In yeast, several protocols for the identification of protein-protein interactions in high-throughput analyses have been developed during the last years leading to an increased understanding of cellular proteomics. If any of these protocols or similar approaches shall be used for the identification of mRNA-protein complexes, the integrity of mRNA is a critical factor. Results We compared the effect of different lysis protocols on RNA integrity. We report dramatic differences in RNA stability depending on the method used for yeast cell lysis. Glass bead milling and French Press lead to degraded mRNAs even in the presence of RNase inhibitors. Thus, they are not suitable to purify intact mRNP complexes or to identify specific mRNAs bound to proteins. Conclusion We suggest a novel protocol, grinding deep-frozen cells, for the preparation of protein extracts that contain intact RNAs, as lysis method for the purification of mRNA-protein complexes from yeast cells.

  20. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA-protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes.

  1. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debashis; Ball, David A; Peccoud, Jean; Tyson, John J

    2016-12-01

    The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  2. A Stochastic Model of the Yeast Cell Cycle Reveals Roles for Feedback Regulation in Limiting Cellular Variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Barik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell division cycle of eukaryotes is governed by a complex network of cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs and auxiliary proteins that govern CDK activities. The control system must function reliably in the context of molecular noise that is inevitable in tiny yeast cells, because mistakes in sequencing cell cycle events are detrimental or fatal to the cell or its progeny. To assess the effects of noise on cell cycle progression requires not only extensive, quantitative, experimental measurements of cellular heterogeneity but also comprehensive, accurate, mathematical models of stochastic fluctuations in the CDK control system. In this paper we provide a stochastic model of the budding yeast cell cycle that accurately accounts for the variable phenotypes of wild-type cells and more than 20 mutant yeast strains simulated in different growth conditions. We specifically tested the role of feedback regulations mediated by G1- and SG2M-phase cyclins to minimize the noise in cell cycle progression. Details of the model are informed and tested by quantitative measurements (by fluorescence in situ hybridization of the joint distributions of mRNA populations in yeast cells. We use the model to predict the phenotypes of ~30 mutant yeast strains that have not yet been characterized experimentally.

  3. Fission yeast mating-type switching: programmed damage and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast follows similar rules as in budding yeast, but the underlying mechanisms are entirely different. Whilst the initiating double-strand cut in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires recombinational repair for survival, the initial damage in Schizosaccharomyces pombe...

  4. RNA interference regulates the cell cycle checkpoint through the RNA export factor, Ptr1, in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Tetsushi, E-mail: tiida@nig.ac.jp [Division of Cytogenetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Iida, Naoko [Division of Mutagenesis, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Tsutsui, Yasuhiro [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yamao, Fumiaki [Division of Mutagenesis, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Kobayashi, Takehiko [Division of Cytogenetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNAi is linked to the cell cycle checkpoint in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr1 co-purifies with Ago1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr1-1 mutation impairs the checkpoint but does not affect gene silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} regulate the cell cycle checkpoint via the same pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations in ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} lead to the nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs. -- Abstract: Ago1, an effector protein of RNA interference (RNAi), regulates heterochromatin silencing and cell cycle arrest in fission yeast. However, the mechanism by which Ago1 controls cell cycle checkpoint following hydroxyurea (HU) treatment has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that Ago1 and other RNAi factors control cell cycle checkpoint following HU treatment via a mechanism independent of silencing. While silencing requires dcr1{sup +}, the overexpression of ago1{sup +} alleviated the cell cycle defect in dcr1{Delta}. Ago1 interacted with the mRNA export factor, Ptr1. The ptr1-1 mutation impaired cell cycle checkpoint but gene silencing was unaffected. Genetic analysis revealed that the regulation of cell cycle checkpoint by ago1{sup +} is dependent on ptr1{sup +}. Nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs was detected in mutants of ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +}, suggesting there is a functional link between the cell cycle checkpoint and RNAi-mediated RNA quality control.

  5. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Shang-jin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV. A pair of primers (P1 and P4 specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV, canine parvovirus (CPV, canine coronavirus (CCV, rabies virus (RV, or canine adenovirus (CAV. The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  6. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV). A pair of primers (P1 and P4) specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), canine coronavirus (CCV), rabies virus (RV), or canine adenovirus (CAV). The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:20433759

  7. Yeast species associated with the spontaneous fermentation of cider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, Belén Suárez; Bedriñana, Rosa Pando; Tascón, Norman Fernández; Simón, Amparo Querol; Madrera, Roberto Rodríguez

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports the influence of cider-making technology (pneumatic and traditional pressing) on the dynamics of wild yeast populations. Yeast colonies isolated from apple juice before and throughout fermentation at a cider cellar of Asturias (Spain), during two consecutive years were studied. The yeast strains were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two flanking internal transcribed sequences (ITS). The musts obtained by pneumatic pressing were dominated by non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Hanseniaspora genus and Metschnikowia pulcherrima) whereas in the apple juices obtained by traditional pressing Saccharomyces together with non-Saccharomyces, were always present. The species Saccharomyces present were S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus. Apparently S. bayanus, was the predominant species at the beginning and the middle fermentation steps of the fermentation process, reaching a percentage of isolation between 33% and 41%, whereas S. cerevisiae took over the process in the final stages of fermentation. During the 2001 harvest, with independence of cider-making technology, the species Hanseniaspora valbyensis was always isolated at the end of fermentations.

  8. Morpholino spin-labeling for base-pair sequencing of a 3'-terminal RNA stem by proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements: yeast ribosomal 5S RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Marshall, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Base-pair sequences for 5S and 5.8S RNAs are not readily extracted from proton homonuclear nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) connectivity experiments alone, due to extensive peak overlap in the downfield (11-15 ppm) proton NMR spectrum. In this paper, we introduce a new method for base-pair proton peak assignment for ribosomal RNAs, based upon the distance-dependent broadening of the resonances of base-pair protons spatially proximal to a paramagnetic group. Introduction of a nitroxide spin-label covalently attached to the 3'-terminal ribose provides an unequivocal starting point for base-pair hydrogen-bond proton NMR assignment. Subsequent NOE connectivities then establish the base-pair sequence for the terminal stem of a 5S RNA. Periodate oxidation of yeast 5S RNA, followed by reaction with 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxy (TEMPO-NH2) and sodium borohydride reduction, produces yeast 5S RNA specifically labeled with a paramagnetic nitroxide group at the 3'-terminal ribose. Comparison of the 500-MHz 1H NMR spectra of native and 3'-terminal spin-labeled yeast 5S RNA serves to identify the terminal base pair (G1 . C120) and its adjacent base pair (G2 . U119) on the basis of their proximity to the 3'-terminal spin-label. From that starting point, we have then identified (G . C, A . U, or G . U) and sequenced eight of the nine base pairs in the terminal helix via primary and secondary NOE's

  9. Identification of the yeast gene encoding the tRNA m1G methyltransferase responsible for modification at position 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Jane E; Montange, Rebecca K; Malik, Harmit S; Phizicky, Eric M

    2003-05-01

    Methylation of tRNA at the N-1 position of guanosine to form m(1)G occurs widely in nature. It occurs at position 37 in tRNAs from all three kingdoms, and the methyltransferase that catalyzes this reaction is known from previous work of others to be critically important for cell growth in Escherichia coli and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. m(1)G is also widely found at position 9 in eukaryotic tRNAs, but the corresponding methyltransferase was unknown. We have used a biochemical genomics approach with a collection of purified yeast GST-ORF fusion proteins to show that m(1)G(9) formation of yeast tRNA(Gly) is associated with ORF YOL093w, named TRM10. Extracts lacking Trm10p have undetectable levels of m(1)G(9) methyltransferase activity but retain normal m(1)G(37) methyltransferase activity. Yeast Trm10p purified from E. coli quantitatively modifies the G(9) position of tRNA(Gly) in an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent fashion. Trm10p is responsible in vivo for most if not all m(1)G(9) modification of tRNAs, based on two results: tRNA(Gly) purified from a trm10-Delta/trm10-Delta strain is lacking detectable m(1)G; and a primer extension block occurring at m(1)G(9) is removed in trm10-Delta/trm10-Delta-derived tRNAs for all 9 m(1)G(9)-containing species that were testable by this method. There is no obvious growth defect of trm10-Delta/trm10-Delta strains. Trm10p bears no detectable resemblance to the yeast m(1)G(37) methyltransferase, Trm5p, or its orthologs. Trm10p homologs are found widely in eukaryotes and many archaea, with multiple homologs in several metazoans, including at least three in humans.

  10. Small, synthetic, GC-rich mRNA stem-loop modules 5' proximal to the AUG start-codon predictably tune gene expression in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamping, Erwin; Niimi, Masakazu; Cannon, Richard D

    2013-07-29

    A large range of genetic tools has been developed for the optimal design and regulation of complex metabolic pathways in bacteria. However, fewer tools exist in yeast that can precisely tune the expression of individual enzymes in novel metabolic pathways suitable for industrial-scale production of non-natural compounds. Tuning expression levels is critical for reducing the metabolic burden of over-expressed proteins, the accumulation of toxic intermediates, and for redirecting metabolic flux from native pathways involving essential enzymes without negatively affecting the viability of the host. We have developed a yeast membrane protein hyper-expression system with critical advantages over conventional, plasmid-based, expression systems. However, expression levels are sometimes so high that they adversely affect protein targeting/folding or the growth and/or phenotype of the host. Here we describe the use of small synthetic mRNA control modules that allowed us to predictably tune protein expression levels to any desired level. Down-regulation of expression was achieved by engineering small GC-rich mRNA stem-loops into the 5' UTR that inhibited translation initiation of the yeast ribosomal 43S preinitiation complex (PIC). Exploiting the fact that the yeast 43S PIC has great difficulty scanning through GC-rich mRNA stem-loops, we created yeast strains containing 17 different RNA stem-loop modules in the 5' UTR that expressed varying amounts of the fungal multidrug efflux pump reporter Cdr1p from Candida albicans. Increasing the length of mRNA stem-loops (that contained only GC-pairs) near the AUG start-codon led to a surprisingly large decrease in Cdr1p expression; ~2.7-fold for every additional GC-pair added to the stem, while the mRNA levels remained largely unaffected. An mRNA stem-loop of seven GC-pairs (∆G = -15.8 kcal/mol) reduced Cdr1p expression levels by >99%, and even the smallest possible stem-loop of only three GC-pairs (∆G = -4.4 kcal/mol) inhibited

  11. Checkpoint independence of most DNA replication origins in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Mickle, Katie L; Ramanathan, Sunita; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Chaudari, Amna; Yompakdee, Chulee; Scott, Donna; Leatherwood, Janet; Huberman, Joel A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In budding yeast, the replication checkpoint slows progress through S phase by inhibiting replication origin firing. In mammals, the replication checkpoint inhibits both origin firing and replication fork movement. To find out which strategy is employed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we used microarrays to investigate the use of origins by wild-type and checkpoint-mutant strains in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which limits the pool of deoxyribonucleo...

  12. The phytopathogenic virulent effector protein RipI induces apoptosis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng-Ying; Sun, Yun-Hao; Li, Pai; Fu, Bei; Shen, Dong; Lu, Yong-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Virulent protein toxins secreted by the bacterial pathogens can cause cytotoxicity by various molecular mechanisms to combat host cell defense. On the other hand, these proteins can also be used as probes to investigate the defense pathway of host innate immunity. Ralstonia solanacearum, one of the most virulent bacterial phytopathogens, translocates more than 70 effector proteins via type III secretion system during infection. Here, we characterized the cytotoxicity of effector RipI in budding yeast Saccharomyce scerevisiae, an alternative host model. We found that over-expression of RipI resulted in severe growth defect and arginine (R) 117 within the predicted integrase motif was required for inhibition of yeast growth. The phenotype of death manifested the hallmarks of apoptosis. Our data also revealed that RipI-induced apoptosis was independent of Yca1 and mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathways because Δyca1 and Δaif1 were both sensitive to RipI as compared with the wild type. We further demonstrated that RipI was localized in the yeast nucleus and the N-terminal 1-174aa was required for the localization. High-throughput RNA sequencing analysis showed that upon RipI over-expression, 101 unigenes of yeast ribosome presented lower expression level, and 42 GO classes related to the nucleus or recombination were enriched with differential expression levels. Taken together, our data showed that a nuclear-targeting effector RipI triggers yeast apoptosis, potentially dependent on its integrase function. Our results also provided an alternative strategy to dissect the signaling pathway of cytotoxicity induced by the protein toxins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Defective quiescence entry promotes the fermentation performance of bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomuro, Mayu; Kato, Taku; Zhou, Yan; Watanabe, Daisuke; Motoyama, Yasuo; Yamagishi, Hiromi; Akao, Takeshi; Aizawa, Masayuki

    2016-11-01

    One of the key processes in making beer is fermentation. In the fermentation process, brewer's yeast plays an essential role in both the production of ethanol and the flavor profile of beer. Therefore, the mechanism of ethanol fermentation by of brewer's yeast is attracting much attention. The high ethanol productivity of sake yeast has provided a good basis from which to investigate the factors that regulate the fermentation rates of brewer's yeast. Recent studies found that the elevated fermentation rate of sake Saccharomyces cerevisiae species is closely related to a defective transition from vegetative growth to the quiescent (G 0 ) state. In the present study, to clarify the relationship between the fermentation rate of brewer's yeast and entry into G 0 , we constructed two types of mutant of the bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus Weihenstephan 34/70: a RIM15 gene disruptant that was defective in entry into G 0 ; and a CLN3ΔPEST mutant, in which the G 1 cyclin Cln3p accumulated at high levels. Both strains exhibited higher fermentation rates under high-maltose medium or high-gravity wort conditions (20° Plato) as compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, G 1 arrest and/or G 0 entry were defective in both the RIM15 disruptant and the CLN3ΔPEST mutant as compared with the wild-type strain. Taken together, these results indicate that regulation of the G 0 /G 1 transition might govern the fermentation rate of bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast in high-gravity wort. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Two portable recombination enhancers direct donor choice in fission yeast heterochromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Holm, Lærke Rebekka; Hansen, Janne Verhein

    2013-01-01

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast results from gene conversions of the active mat1 locus by heterochromatic donors. mat1 is preferentially converted by mat2-P in M cells and by mat3-M in P cells. Here, we report that donor choice is governed by two portable recombination enhancers capable...... transposed together with the cassette contents switched like wild type. Trans-acting mutations that impair directionality affected the wild-type and swapped cassettes in identical ways when the recombination enhancers were transposed together with their cognate cassette, showing essential regulatory steps...

  15. Characterization of the ptr5+ gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka; Tani, Tokio

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We cloned the ptr5 + gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast. ► The ptr5 + gene was found to encode nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). ► Seh1p and Mlo3p are multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5 mutation. ► Ptr5p/Nup85p functions in nuclear mRNA export through the mRNA export factor Rae1p. ► Ptr5p/Nup85p interacts genetically with pre-mRNA splicing factors. -- Abstract: To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A) + RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A) + RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5–1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A) + RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5 + gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5–1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5–1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5–1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5–1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  16. Microarray data analyses of yeast RNA Pol I subunit RPA12 deletion strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Kumar Yadav

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ribosomal RNA (rRNA biosynthesis is the most energy consuming process in all living cells and the majority of total transcription activity is dedicated for synthesizing rRNA. The cells may adjust the synthesis of rRNA with the availability of resources. rRNA is mainly synthesized by RNA polymerase I that is composed of 14 subunits. Deletion of RPA12, 14, 39 and 49 are viable. RPA12 is a very small protein (13.6 kDa, and the amount of protein in the cells is very high (12,000 molecules per cell, but the role of this protein is unknown in other cellular metabolic processes (Kulak et al., 2014 [1]. RPA12 consists of two zinc-binding domains and it is required for the termination of rRNA synthesis (Mullem et al., 2002 [2]. Deletions of RPA12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe cause a conditional growth defect (Nogi et al., 1993 [3]. In S. pombe, C-terminal deletion behaves like wild-type (Imazawa et al., 2001 [4]. This prompted us to investigate in detail the physiological role of RPA12 in S. cerevisiae, we performed the microarray of rpa12∆ strain and deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under GSE68731. The analysis of microarray data revealed that the expression of major cellular metabolism genes is high. The amino acid biosynthesis, nonpolar lipid biosynthesis and glucose metabolic genes are highly expressed. The analyses also revealed that the rpa12∆ cells have an uncontrolled synthesis of cell metabolites, so RPA12 could be a master regulator for whole cellular metabolism.

  17. Genetical control of mitotic crossing over in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorova, I.V.; Marfin, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    Lethal effect of 8 methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and long-wave ultraviolet radiation (LUR) on diploid and haploid radiosensitive strains of yeast LSaccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. It is shown that wild type diploids and homozygous with respect to locus rad 2 is considerably more stable than corresponding haploids, while diploid homozygous with respect to rad 54 locus is more sensitive than haploid. Use of the method of repeated irradiation permitted to study capability of radiosensitive diploids to remove 8 MOP-induced DNA photodamages-monoadducts. This process proceeds effectively in the wild type strain and rad 54 rad 54 diploid and was absent in rad 2 rad 2 diploid. Very strong recombinogenous effect of 8-MOP and LUR was discovered when studying mitotic segregation and crossing-over. It is also shown that rad 2 mutation increases slightly and rad 54 mutation decreases sharply frequency of recombination events in yeast cells. It is established by means of the repeated irradiation method that the main contribution to the 8 MOP and LUR recombinogenous effect is made with DNA sutures induced with these agents. Possible participation of different repair systems in the recombination processes induced with 8 MOP and LUR in yeast cells is discussed

  18. Cadmium, ATPase-P, yeast. From transport to toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardarin, Aurelie

    2007-01-01

    Two projects has been developed during my PhD. One consisting in the functional study of CadA, the Cd 2+ -ATPase from Listeria monocytogenes, the other one was focused on the toxicity of cadmium and the associated response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This two studies used a a phenotype of sensitivity to cadmium induced by CadA expression in yeast. This phenotype was used as a screening tool to identify essential amino acids of Cd transport by CadA and to study cadmium toxicity and the corresponding yeast cellular response. CadA actively transports Cd using ATP hydrolysis as energy source. Directed mutagenesis of the membranous polar, sulphur and charged amino-acids revealed that Cd transport pathway implied four transmembrane segments (Tm) and more precisely the cysteine C 354 , C 356 and proline P 355 of the CPC motif located in Tm6, aspartate D 692 in Tm8, glutamate E 164 in Tm4 and methionine M 149 in Tm5. From our studies, 2 Cd ions would be translocated for each hydrolysis ATP. Expression of CadA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces an hypersensitivity to Cd. A wild type cell can grow up to 100 μm cadmium whereas CadA expressing yeast cannot grow with 1 μm cadmium in the culture medium. This cadmium sensitivity was due to the localisation of CadA in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Transport of cadmium in this compartment produces an accumulation of mis-folded proteins that induces the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). As UPR also occurs in a wild type yeast exposed to low Cd concentration, one can point out endoplasmic reticulum as a extremely sensitive cellular compartment. UPR also appears as an early response to Cd as it happens far before any visible signs of toxicity. (author) [fr

  19. Global identification of new substrates for the yeast endoribonuclease, RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulds, Jason; Wierzbicki, Sara; McNairn, Adrian; Schmitt, Mark E

    2012-10-26

    RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP) is an essential, evolutionarily conserved endoribonuclease composed of 10 different protein subunits and a single RNA. RNase MRP has established roles in multiple pathways including ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and mitochondrial DNA replication. Although each of these functions is important to cell growth, additional functions may exist given the essential nature of the complex. To identify novel RNase MRP substrates, we utilized RNA immunoprecipitation and microarray chip analysis to identify RNA that physically associates with RNase MRP. We identified several new potential substrates for RNase MRP including a cell cycle-regulated transcript, CTS1; the yeast homolog of the mammalian p27(Kip1), SIC1; and the U2 RNA component of the spliceosome. In addition, we found RNase MRP to be involved in the regulation of the Ty1 transposon RNA. These results reinforce and broaden the role of RNase MRP in cell cycle regulation and help to identify new roles of this endoribonuclease.

  20. Global Identification of New Substrates for the Yeast Endoribonuclease, RNase Mitochondrial RNA Processing (MRP)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulds, Jason; Wierzbicki, Sara; McNairn, Adrian; Schmitt, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP) is an essential, evolutionarily conserved endoribonuclease composed of 10 different protein subunits and a single RNA. RNase MRP has established roles in multiple pathways including ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and mitochondrial DNA replication. Although each of these functions is important to cell growth, additional functions may exist given the essential nature of the complex. To identify novel RNase MRP substrates, we utilized RNA immunoprecipitation and microarray chip analysis to identify RNA that physically associates with RNase MRP. We identified several new potential substrates for RNase MRP including a cell cycle-regulated transcript, CTS1; the yeast homolog of the mammalian p27Kip1, SIC1; and the U2 RNA component of the spliceosome. In addition, we found RNase MRP to be involved in the regulation of the Ty1 transposon RNA. These results reinforce and broaden the role of RNase MRP in cell cycle regulation and help to identify new roles of this endoribonuclease. PMID:22977255

  1. Sensitive voltammetric detection of yeast RNA based on its interaction with Victoria Blue B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI SUN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Voltammetric studies of the interaction of yeast RNA (y-RNA with Victoria Blue B (VBB are described in this paper. Furthermore, a linear sweep voltammetric method for the detection of y-RNA was established. The reaction conditions, such as acidity and amount of buffer solution, the concentration of VBB, the reaction time and temperature, etc., were carefully investigated by second order derivative linear sweep voltammetry. Under the optimal conditions, the reduction peak current of VBB at –0.75 V decreased greatly after the addition of y-RNA to the solution without any shift of the reduction peak potential. Based on the decrease of the peak current, a new quantitative method for the determination of y-RNA was developed. The effects of co-existing substances on the determination were carefully investigated and three synthetic samples were determined with satisfactory results. The stoichiometry of the VBB–y-RNA complex was calculated by linear sweep voltammetry and the interaction mechanism is discussed.

  2. Small, synthetic, GC-rich mRNA stem-loop modules 5′ proximal to the AUG start-codon predictably tune gene expression in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A large range of genetic tools has been developed for the optimal design and regulation of complex metabolic pathways in bacteria. However, fewer tools exist in yeast that can precisely tune the expression of individual enzymes in novel metabolic pathways suitable for industrial-scale production of non-natural compounds. Tuning expression levels is critical for reducing the metabolic burden of over-expressed proteins, the accumulation of toxic intermediates, and for redirecting metabolic flux from native pathways involving essential enzymes without negatively affecting the viability of the host. We have developed a yeast membrane protein hyper-expression system with critical advantages over conventional, plasmid-based, expression systems. However, expression levels are sometimes so high that they adversely affect protein targeting/folding or the growth and/or phenotype of the host. Here we describe the use of small synthetic mRNA control modules that allowed us to predictably tune protein expression levels to any desired level. Down-regulation of expression was achieved by engineering small GC-rich mRNA stem-loops into the 5′ UTR that inhibited translation initiation of the yeast ribosomal 43S preinitiation complex (PIC). Results Exploiting the fact that the yeast 43S PIC has great difficulty scanning through GC-rich mRNA stem-loops, we created yeast strains containing 17 different RNA stem-loop modules in the 5′ UTR that expressed varying amounts of the fungal multidrug efflux pump reporter Cdr1p from Candida albicans. Increasing the length of mRNA stem-loops (that contained only GC-pairs) near the AUG start-codon led to a surprisingly large decrease in Cdr1p expression; ~2.7-fold for every additional GC-pair added to the stem, while the mRNA levels remained largely unaffected. An mRNA stem-loop of seven GC-pairs (∆G = −15.8 kcal/mol) reduced Cdr1p expression levels by >99%, and even the smallest possible stem-loop of only three GC-pairs (

  3. Reconstruction of the yeast Snf1 kinase regulatory network reveals its role as a global energy regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usaite, Renata; Jewett, Michael C; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Yates, John R; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Highly conserved among eukaryotic cells, the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of carbon metabolism. To map the complete network of interactions around AMPK in yeast (Snf1) and to evaluate the role of its regulatory subunit Snf4, we measured global mRNA, protein and metabolite levels in wild type, Δsnf1, Δsnf4, and Δsnf1Δsnf4 knockout strains. Using four newly developed computational tools, including novel DOGMA sub-network analysis, we showed the benefits of three-level ome-data integration to uncover the global Snf1 kinase role in yeast. We for the first time identified Snf1's global regulation on gene and protein expression levels, and showed that yeast Snf1 has a far more extensive function in controlling energy metabolism than reported earlier. Additionally, we identified complementary roles of Snf1 and Snf4. Similar to the function of AMPK in humans, our findings showed that Snf1 is a low-energy checkpoint and that yeast can be used more extensively as a model system for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying the global regulation of AMPK in mammals, failure of which leads to metabolic diseases. PMID:19888214

  4. Proline metabolism in the wild-type and in a salt-tolerant mutant of nicotiana plumbaginifolia studied by (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosens; Willem; Li; Verbruggen; Biesemans; Jacobs

    1999-12-01

    To obtain insight into the link between proline (Pro) accumulation and the increase in osmotolerance in higher plants, we investigated the biochemical basis for the NaCl tolerance of a Nicotiana plumbaginifolia mutant (RNa) that accumulates Pro. Pro biosynthesis and catabolism were investigated in both wild-type and mutant lines. (13)C-Nuclear magnetic resonance with [5-(13)C]glutamate (Glu) as the Pro precursor was used to provide insight into the mechanism of Pro accumulation via the Glu pathway. After 24 h under 200 mM NaCl stress in the presence of [5-(13)C]Glu, a significant enrichment in [5-(13)C]Pro was observed compared with non-stress conditions in both the wild type (P2) and the mutant (RNa). Moreover, under the same conditions, [5-(13)C]Pro was clearly synthesized in higher amounts in RNa than in P2. On the other hand, measurements of enzyme activities indicate that neither the biosynthesis via the ornithine pathway, nor the catabolism via the Pro oxidation pathway were affected in the RNa mutant. Finally, the regulatory effect exerted by Pro on its biosynthesis was evaluated. In P2 plantlets, exogenous Pro markedly reduced the conversion of [5-(13)C]Glu into [5-(13)C]Pro, whereas Pro feedback inhibition was not detected in the RNa plantlets. It is proposed that the origin of tolerance in the RNa mutant is due to a mutation leading to a substantial reduction of the feedback inhibition normally exerted in a wild-type (P2) plant by Pro at the level of the Delta-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme.

  5. [Overexpression of FKS1 to improve yeast autolysis-stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Jinjing; Li, Qi

    2015-09-01

    With the development of high gravity brewing, yeast cells are exposed to multiple brewing-associated stresses, such as increased osmotic pressure, enhanced alcohol concentration and nutritional imbalance. These will speed up yeast autolysis, which seriously influence beer flavor and quality. To increase yeast anti-autolytic ability, FKS1 overexpression strain was constructed by 18S rDNA. The concentration of β-1,3-glucan of overexpression strain was 62% higher than that of wild type strain. Meantime, FKS1 overexpression strain increased anti-stress ability at 8% ethanol, 0.4 mol/L NaCl and starvation stress. Under simulated autolysis, FKS1 showed good anti-autolytic ability by slower autolysis. These results confirms the potential of FKS1 overexpression to tackle yeast autolysis in high-gravity brewing.

  6. Motif III in superfamily 2 "helicases" helps convert the binding energy of ATP into a high-affinity RNA binding site in the yeast DEAD-box protein Ded1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banroques, Josette; Doère, Monique; Dreyfus, Marc; Linder, Patrick; Tanner, N Kyle

    2010-03-05

    Motif III in the putative helicases of superfamily 2 is highly conserved in both its sequence and its structural context. It typically consists of the sequence alcohol-alanine-alcohol (S/T-A-S/T). Historically, it was thought to link ATPase activity with a "helicase" strand displacement activity that disrupts RNA or DNA duplexes. DEAD-box proteins constitute the largest family of superfamily 2; they are RNA-dependent ATPases and ATP-dependent RNA binding proteins that, in some cases, are able to disrupt short RNA duplexes. We made mutations of motif III (S-A-T) in the yeast DEAD-box protein Ded1 and analyzed in vivo phenotypes and in vitro properties. Moreover, we made a tertiary model of Ded1 based on the solved structure of Vasa. We used Ded1 because it has relatively high ATPase and RNA binding activities; it is able to displace moderately stable duplexes at a large excess of substrate. We find that the alanine and the threonine in the second and third positions of motif III are more important than the serine, but that mutations of all three residues have strong phenotypes. We purified the wild-type and various mutants expressed in Escherichia coli. We found that motif III mutations affect the RNA-dependent hydrolysis of ATP (k(cat)), but not the affinity for ATP (K(m)). Moreover, mutations alter and reduce the affinity for single-stranded RNA and subsequently reduce the ability to disrupt duplexes. We obtained intragenic suppressors of the S-A-C mutant that compensate for the mutation by enhancing the affinity for ATP and RNA. We conclude that motif III and the binding energy of gamma-PO(4) of ATP are used to coordinate motifs I, II, and VI and the two RecA-like domains to create a high-affinity single-stranded RNA binding site. It also may help activate the beta,gamma-phosphoanhydride bond of ATP. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mutations in the Atp1p and Atp3p subunits of yeast ATP synthase differentially affect respiration and fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Brian R; White, Karen H; Thorsness, Peter E

    2007-04-01

    ATP1-111, a suppressor of the slow-growth phenotype of yme1Delta lacking mitochondrial DNA is due to the substitution of phenylalanine for valine at position 111 of the alpha-subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase (Atp1p in yeast). The suppressing activity of ATP1-111 requires intact beta (Atp2p) and gamma (Atp3p) subunits of mitochondrial ATP synthase, but not the stator stalk subunits b (Atp4p) and OSCP (Atp5p). ATP1-111 and other similarly suppressing mutations in ATP1 and ATP3 increase the growth rate of wild-type strains lacking mitochondrial DNA. These suppressing mutations decrease the growth rate of yeast containing an intact mitochondrial chromosome on media requiring oxidative phosphorylation, but not when grown on fermentable media. Measurement of chronological aging of yeast in culture reveals that ATP1 and ATP3 suppressor alleles in strains that contain mitochondrial DNA are longer lived than the isogenic wild-type strain. In contrast, the chronological life span of yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA and containing these mutations is shorter than that of the isogenic wild-type strain. Spore viability of strains bearing ATP1-111 is reduced compared to wild type, although ATP1-111 enhances the survival of spores that lacked mitochondrial DNA.

  8. Gene expression profiling in wild-type and metallothionein mutant fibroblast cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÁNGELA D ARMENDÁRIZ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of metallothioneins (MT in copper homeostasis is of great interest, as it appears to be partially responsible for the regulation of intracellular copper levels during adaptation to extracellular excess of the metal. To further investigate a possible role of MTs in copper metabolism, a genomics approach was utilized to evaluate the role of MT on gene expression. Microarray analysis was used to examine the effects of copper overload in fibroblast cells from normal and MT I and II double knock-out mice (MT-/-. As a first step, we compared genes that were significantly upregulated in wild-type and MT-/- cells exposed to copper. Even though wild-type and mutant cells are undistinguishable in terms of their morphological features and rates of growth, our results show that MT-/- cells do not respond with induction of typical markers of cellular stress under copper excess conditions, as observed in the wild-type cell line, suggesting that the transcription initiation rate or the mRNA stability of stress genes is affected when there is an alteration in the copper store capacity. The functional classification of other up-regulated genes in both cell lines indicates that a large proportion (>80% belong to two major categories: 1 metabolism; and 2 cellular physiological processes, suggesting that at the transcriptional level copper overload induces the expression of genes associated with diverse molecular functions. These results open the possibility to understand how copper homeostasis is being coordinated with other metabolic pathways.

  9. Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Producing Yeasts in the Phyllosphere of the Carnivorous Plant Drosera indica L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Li-Ying; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Fu, Shih-Feng; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are widely distributed in nature and exist in association with other microorganisms as normal inhabitants of soil, vegetation, and aqueous environments. In this study, 12 yeast strains were enriched and isolated from leaf samples of the carnivorous plant Drosera indica L., which is currently threatened because of restricted habitats and use in herbal industries. According to similarities in large subunit and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we identified 2 yeast species in 2 genera of the phylum Ascomycota, and 5 yeast species in 5 genera of the phylum Basidiomycota. All of the isolated yeasts produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) when cultivated in YPD broth supplemented with 0.1% L-tryptophan. Growth conditions, such as the pH and temperature of the medium, influenced yeast IAA production. Our results also suggested the existence of a tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthetic pathway. We evaluated the effects of various concentrations of exogenous IAA on yeast growth and observed that IAA produced by wild yeasts modifies auxin-inducible gene expression in Arabidopsis. Our data suggest that yeasts can promote plant growth and support ongoing prospecting of yeast strains for inclusion into biofertilizer for sustainable agriculture. PMID:25464336

  10. Content of endogenous thiols and radioresistance of gemmating cells of Saccharomyces ellipsoideus and Saccharomyces cerevisiale yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonyan, N.V.; Avakyan, Ts.M.; Dzhanpoladyan, N.L.; Stepanyan, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    It has been shown that gemmating cells of ''wild type'' yeasts are more radioresistant and contain more endogenous thiols, than resting cells. Gemmating cells of Saccharomyces cerevisial yeasts, carrying the mutation rad 51, as to radioresistance and content of SH groups do not differ from resting cells. The results obtained testify to a connec-- tion between increased radioresistance of the yeast gemmating cells and increased content of endogenous thiols in them

  11. Peroxisomal catalase deficiency modulates yeast lifespan depending on growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawalek, Adam; Lefevre, Sophie D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    We studied the role of peroxisomal catalase in chronological aging of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha in relation to various growth substrates. Catalase-deficient (cat) cells showed a similar chronological life span (CLS) relative to the wild-type control upon growth on carbon and nitrogen sources

  12. Reconstitution of the yeast RNA polymerase III transcription system with all recombinant factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Cécile; Lefebvre, Olivier; Landrieux, Emilie; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Sentenac, André; Acker, Joel

    2006-04-28

    Transcription factor TFIIIC is a multisubunit complex required for promoter recognition and transcriptional activation of class III genes. We describe here the reconstitution of complete recombinant yeast TFIIIC and the molecular characterization of its two DNA-binding domains, tauA and tauB, using the baculovirus expression system. The B block-binding module, rtauB, was reconstituted with rtau138, rtau91, and rtau60 subunits. rtau131, rtau95, and rtau55 formed also a stable complex, rtauA, that displayed nonspecific DNA binding activity. Recombinant rTFIIIC was functionally equivalent to purified yeast TFIIIC, suggesting that the six recombinant subunits are necessary and sufficient to reconstitute a transcriptionally active TFIIIC complex. The formation and the properties of rTFIIIC-DNA complexes were affected by dephosphorylation treatments. The combination of complete recombinant rTFIIIC and rTFIIIB directed a low level of basal transcription, much weaker than with the crude B'' fraction, suggesting the existence of auxiliary factors that could modulate the yeast RNA polymerase III transcription system.

  13. The effect of UVB on flavonoid biosynthesis in wild type and mutant petunia and arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, K.G.; Swinny, E.E.; Markham, K.R.; Winefield, C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Flavonoids may protect plants against damage by UVB radiation. Flavonoid composition and mRNA expression were determined following growth of plants under natural light, and under natural light with low UVB and with enhanced UVB. In wild-type Arabidopsis and Petunia, UVB induced an increase in total levels of flavonols and this was due to an up-regulation of, several genes coding for key enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway. In addition, UVB induced a higher rate of production of the di-hydroxylated si flavonol, quercetin glycoside than of the mono-hydroxylated equivalent, of kaempferol glycoside. Thus the ratio of quercetin to kaempferol increased with UVB treatment in wild type plants, and this suggests that the flavonoid r 3'hydroxylase (F3'H) enzyme, which converts dihydrokaempferol to dihydroquercetin, may play a key role in plant protection from UVB. Mutant plants of both species lacking this F3'H gene were grown under similar UV conditions. Leaves of the mutant Arabidopsis plant (tt7) did not contain quercetin, even under the enhanced UVB treatment. Under the low UVB treatment the total amount of flavonol was similar to the wild-type (Ler), but with increasing UVB, total flavonol (i.e. kaempferol) levels were significantly higher than in similarly treated wild type plants. In the Petunia F3'H mutant, low levels of quercetin were found even in the low UVB treatment, which indicates this variety may be producing some quercetin via an alternative pathway. Under UVB radiation, total flavonoids increased to levels significantly higher than in similarly treated wild type plants, and most of this material was kaempferol. These observations suggest that quercetin is the preferred protective flavonol in wild type plants, due perhaps to enhanced antioxidant or free radical scavenging activity. In mutant plants lacking the F3'H enzyme, the response is to produce a larger amount of a less effective photoprotectant

  14. Concerning RNA-guided gene drives for the alteration of wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esvelt, Kevin M; Smidler, Andrea L; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Church, George M

    2014-07-17

    Gene drives may be capable of addressing ecological problems by altering entire populations of wild organisms, but their use has remained largely theoretical due to technical constraints. Here we consider the potential for RNA-guided gene drives based on the CRISPR nuclease Cas9 to serve as a general method for spreading altered traits through wild populations over many generations. We detail likely capabilities, discuss limitations, and provide novel precautionary strategies to control the spread of gene drives and reverse genomic changes. The ability to edit populations of sexual species would offer substantial benefits to humanity and the environment. For example, RNA-guided gene drives could potentially prevent the spread of disease, support agriculture by reversing pesticide and herbicide resistance in insects and weeds, and control damaging invasive species. However, the possibility of unwanted ecological effects and near-certainty of spread across political borders demand careful assessment of each potential application. We call for thoughtful, inclusive, and well-informed public discussions to explore the responsible use of this currently theoretical technology.

  15. Brewer's Yeast Improves Glycemic Indices in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Payam; Javanbakht, Mohammad Hassan; Mostafavi, Seyed-Ali; Djalali, Mahmoud; Derakhshanian, Hoda; Hajianfar, Hossein; Bahonar, Ahmad; Djazayery, Abolghassem

    2013-10-01

    Brewer's yeast may have beneficial effects on insulin receptors because of itsglucose tolerance factor in diabetic patients. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of brewer's yeast supplementation on glycemic indices in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In a randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, 84 adults (21 men and 63 women) aged 46.3 ± 6.1 years old with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited and divided randomly into two groups: Supplement group receiving brewer's yeast (six 300mg tablets/day, total 1800 mg) and control group receiving placebo (six 300mg tablets/day) for 12 weeks. Body weight, height, body mass index, food consumption (based on 24h food record), fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin sensitivity, and insulin resistance were measured before and after the intervention. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 18.0). The changes in FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin, and insulin sensitivity were significantly different between the two groups during the study (respectively P brewer›s yeast besides the usual treatment of diabetes can ameliorate blood glucose variables in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  16. Taming wild yeast: potential of conventional and nonconventional yeasts in industrial fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are the main driving force behind several industrial food fermentation processes, including the production of beer, wine, sake, bread, and chocolate. Historically, these processes developed from uncontrolled, spontaneous fermentation reactions that rely on a complex mixture of microbes present in the environment. Because such spontaneous processes are generally inconsistent and inefficient and often lead to the formation of off-flavors, most of today's industrial production utilizes defined starter cultures, often consisting of a specific domesticated strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, or S. pastorianus. Although this practice greatly improved process consistency, efficiency, and overall quality, it also limited the sensorial complexity of the end product. In this review, we discuss how Saccharomyces yeasts were domesticated to become the main workhorse of food fermentations, and we investigate the potential and selection of nonconventional yeasts that are often found in spontaneous fermentations, such as Brettanomyces, Hanseniaspora, and Pichia spp.

  17. Proline Metabolism in the Wild-Type and in a Salt-Tolerant Mutant of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Studied by 13C-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosens, Nancy H.; Willem, Rudolph; Li, Yan; Verbruggen, Ingrid; Biesemans, Monique; Jacobs, Michel

    1999-01-01

    To obtain insight into the link between proline (Pro) accumulation and the increase in osmotolerance in higher plants, we investigated the biochemical basis for the NaCl tolerance of a Nicotiana plumbaginifolia mutant (RNa) that accumulates Pro. Pro biosynthesis and catabolism were investigated in both wild-type and mutant lines. 13C-Nuclear magnetic resonance with [5-13C]glutamate (Glu) as the Pro precursor was used to provide insight into the mechanism of Pro accumulation via the Glu pathway. After 24 h under 200 mm NaCl stress in the presence of [5-13C]Glu, a significant enrichment in [5-13C]Pro was observed compared with non-stress conditions in both the wild type (P2) and the mutant (RNa). Moreover, under the same conditions, [5-13C]Pro was clearly synthesized in higher amounts in RNa than in P2. On the other hand, measurements of enzyme activities indicate that neither the biosynthesis via the ornithine pathway, nor the catabolism via the Pro oxidation pathway were affected in the RNa mutant. Finally, the regulatory effect exerted by Pro on its biosynthesis was evaluated. In P2 plantlets, exogenous Pro markedly reduced the conversion of [5-13C]Glu into [5-13C]Pro, whereas Pro feedback inhibition was not detected in the RNa plantlets. It is proposed that the origin of tolerance in the RNa mutant is due to a mutation leading to a substantial reduction of the feedback inhibition normally exerted in a wild-type (P2) plant by Pro at the level of the Δ-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme. PMID:10594115

  18. dsRNA binding characterization of full length recombinant wild type and mutants Zaire ebolavirus VP35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzula, Luca; Esposito, Francesca; Pala, Daniela; Tramontano, Enzo

    2012-03-01

    The Ebola viruses (EBOVs) VP35 protein is a multifunctional major virulence factor involved in EBOVs replication and evasion of the host immune system. EBOV VP35 is an essential component of the viral RNA polymerase, it is a key participant of the nucleocapsid assembly and it inhibits the innate immune response by antagonizing RIG-I like receptors through its dsRNA binding function and, hence, by suppressing the host type I interferon (IFN) production. Insights into the VP35 dsRNA recognition have been recently revealed by structural and functional analysis performed on its C-terminus protein. We report the biochemical characterization of the Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) full-length recombinant VP35 (rVP35)-dsRNA binding function. We established a novel in vitro magnetic dsRNA binding pull down assay, determined the rVP35 optimal dsRNA binding parameters, measured the rVP35 equilibrium dissociation constant for heterologous in vitro transcribed dsRNA of different length and short synthetic dsRNA of 8bp, and validated the assay for compound screening by assessing the inhibitory ability of auryntricarboxylic acid (IC(50) value of 50μg/mL). Furthermore, we compared the dsRNA binding properties of full length wt rVP35 with those of R305A, K309A and R312A rVP35 mutants, which were previously reported to be defective in dsRNA binding-mediated IFN inhibition, showing that the latter have measurably increased K(d) values for dsRNA binding and modified migration patterns in mobility shift assays with respect to wt rVP35. Overall, these results provide the first characterization of the full-length wt and mutants VP35-dsRNA binding functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Arabidopsis IRE1 catalyses unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor

    KAUST Repository

    Nagashima, Yukihiro

    2011-07-01

    IRE1 plays an essential role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in yeast and mammals. We found that a double mutant of Arabidopsis IRE1A and IRE1B (ire1a/ire1b) is more sensitive to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin than the wild-type. Transcriptome analysis revealed that genes whose induction was reduced in ire1a/ire1b largely overlapped those in the bzip60 mutant. We observed that the active form of bZIP60 protein detected in the wild-type was missing in ire1a/ire1b. We further demonstrated that bZIP60 mRNA is spliced by ER stress, removing 23 ribonucleotides and therefore causing a frameshift that replaces the C-terminal region of bZIP60 including the transmembrane domain (TMD) with a shorter region without a TMD. This splicing was detected in ire1a and ire1b single mutants, but not in the ire1a/ire1b double mutant. We conclude that IRE1A and IRE1B catalyse unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor.

  20. Characterization of the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Tani, Tokio, E-mail: ttani@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr5{sup +} gene was found to encode nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Seh1p and Mlo3p are multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5 mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p functions in nuclear mRNA export through the mRNA export factor Rae1p. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p interacts genetically with pre-mRNA splicing factors. -- Abstract: To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A){sup +} RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5-1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5-1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5-1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5-1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5-1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  1. Genetic control of radiosensitivity modification of some yeast strons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Zhurakovskaya, I.P.

    1982-01-01

    The genetic determination of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of densely ionizing particles and cysteamine's radioprotective effect on irradiated cells, demonstrated earlier on yeast cells of different genotype, has been proved on diploid wild-type cells of Saccharomyces cerevisial yeasts, solitary mutants, homozygous with respect to rad 2 and rad 54, and double mutant containing both locuses in homozygous state. It is shown that RBE of α-particles and radioprotector's efficiency depend on repair system's activity. A possible mechanism of the participation of postirradiation recovery processes in the modification of cell radiosensitivity is discussed [ru

  2. Effects of feedstock and co-culture of Lactobacillus fermentum and wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain during fuel ethanol fermentation by the industrial yeast strain PE-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Vanda R; Bassi, Ana Paula G; Cerri, Bianca C; Almeida, Amanda R; Carvalho, Isis G B; Bastos, Reinaldo G; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra R

    2018-02-16

    Even though contamination by bacteria and wild yeasts are frequently observed during fuel ethanol fermentation, our knowledge regarding the effects of both contaminants together is very limited, especially considering that the must composition can vary from exclusively sugarcane juice to a mixture of molasses and juice, affecting the microbial development. Here we studied the effects of the feedstock (sugarcane juice and molasses) and the co-culture of Lactobacillus fermentum and a wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (rough colony and pseudohyphae) in single and multiple-batch fermentation trials with an industrial strain of S. cerevisiae (PE-2) as starter yeast. The results indicate that in multiple-cycle batch system, the feedstock had a minor impact on the fermentation than in single-cycle batch system, however the rough yeast contamination was more harmful than the bacterial contamination in multiple-cycle batch fermentation. The inoculation of both contaminants did not potentiate the detrimental effect in any substrate. The residual sugar concentration in the fermented broth had a higher concentration of fructose than glucose for all fermentations, but in the presence of the rough yeast, the discrepancy between fructose and glucose concentrations were markedly higher, especially in molasses. The biggest problem associated with incomplete fermentation seemed to be the lower consumption rate of sugar and the reduced fructose preference of the rough yeast rather than the lower invertase activity. Lower ethanol production, acetate production and higher residual sugar concentration are characteristics strongly associated with the rough yeast strain and they were not potentiated with the inoculation of L. fermentum.

  3. Mitochondrial Respiratory Thresholds Regulate Yeast Chronological Lifespan and its Extension by Caloric Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Liu, Jingjing; Schroeder, Elizabeth A.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the role of mitochondrial function in aging by genetically and pharmacologically modifying yeast cellular respiration production during the exponential and/or stationary growth phases, and determining how this affects chronological lifespan (CLS). Our results demonstrate that respiration is essential during both growth phases for standard CLS, but that yeast have a large respiratory capacity and only deficiencies below a threshold (~40% of wild-type) significantly curtail CLS...

  4. Identification of microRNA-like RNAs in mycelial and yeast phases of the thermal dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K P Lau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Penicillium marneffei is the most important thermal dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in China and Southeast Asia. While miRNAs are increasingly recognized for their roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in animals and plants, miRNAs in fungi were less well studied and their potential roles in fungal dimorphism were largely unknown. Based on P. marneffei genome sequence, we hypothesize that miRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs may be expressed in the dimorphic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We attempted to identify milRNAs in P. marneffei in both mycelial and yeast phase using high-throughput sequencing technology. Small RNAs were more abundantly expressed in mycelial than yeast phase. Sequence analysis revealed 24 potential milRNA candidates, including 17 candidates in mycelial and seven in yeast phase. Two genes, dcl-1 and dcl-2, encoding putative Dicer-like proteins and the gene, qde-2, encoding Argonaute-like protein, were identified in P. marneffei. Phylogenetic analysis showed that dcl-2 of P. marneffei was more closely related to the homologues in other thermal dimorphic pathogenic fungi than to Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus spp., suggesting the co-evolution of dcl-2 among the thermal dimorphic fungi. Moreover, dcl-2 demonstrated higher mRNA expression levels in mycelial than yeast phase by 7 folds (P<0.001. Northern blot analysis confirmed the expression of two milRNAs, PM-milR-M1 and PM-milR-M2, only in mycelial phase. Using dcl-1(KO, dcl-2(KO, dcl(DKO and qde-2(KO deletion mutants, we showed that the biogenesis of both milRNAs were dependent on dcl-2 but not dcl-1 or qde-2. The mRNA expression levels of three predicted targets of PM-milR-M1 were upregulated in knockdown strain PM-milR-M1 (KD, supporting regulatory function of milRNAs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provided the first evidence for differential expression of milRNAs in different growth phases of thermal dimorphic

  5. Identification of She3 as an SCF(Grr1 substrate in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiwen Wang

    Full Text Available The highly orchestrated progression of the cell cycle depends on the degradation of many regulatory proteins at different cell cycle stages. One of the key cell cycle ubiquitin ligases is the Skp1-cullin-F-box (SCF complex. Acting in concert with the substrate-binding F-box protein Grr1, SCF(Grr1 promotes the degradation of cell cycle regulators as well as various metabolic enzymes. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay with a Grr1 derivative as the bait, we identified She3, which is an adaptor protein in the asymmetric mRNA transport system, as a novel Grr1 substrate. We generated stabilized She3 mutants, which no longer bound to Grr1, and found that the degradation of She3 is not required for regulating asymmetric mRNA transport. However, She3 stabilization leads to slower growth compared to wild-type cells in a co-culture assay, demonstrating that the degradation of She3 by Grr1 is required for optimal cell growth.

  6. Investigating the effects of statins on cellular lipid metabolism using a yeast expression system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Leszczynska

    Full Text Available In humans, defects in lipid metabolism are associated with a number of severe diseases such as atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes. Hypercholesterolemia is a primary risk factor for coronary artery disease, the major cause of premature deaths in developed countries. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR, the key enzyme of the sterol synthesis pathway. Since yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbours many counterparts of mammalian enzymes involved in lipid-synthesizing pathways, conclusions drawn from research with this single cell eukaryotic organism can be readily applied to higher eukaryotes. Using a yeast strain with deletions of both HMG1 and HMG2 genes (i.e. completely devoid of HMGR activity with introduced wild-type or mutant form of human HMGR (hHMGR gene we investigated the effects of statins on the lipid metabolism of the cell. The relative quantification of mRNA demonstrated a different effect of simvastatin on the expression of the wild-type and mutated hHMGR gene. GC/MS analyses showed a significant decrease of sterols and enhanced conversion of squalene and sterol precursors into ergosterol. This was accompanied by the mobilization of ergosterol precursors localized in lipid particles in the form of steryl esters visualized by confocal microscopy. Changes in the level of ergosterol and its precursors in cells treated with simvastatin depend on the mutation in the hHMGR gene. HPLC/MS analyses indicated a reduced level of phospholipids not connected with the mevalonic acid pathway. We detected two significant phenomena. First, cells treated with simvastatin develop an adaptive response compensating the lower activity of HMGR. This includes enhanced conversion of sterol precursors into ergosterol, mobilization of steryl esters and increased expression of the hHMGR gene. Second, statins cause a substantial drop in the level of glycerophospholipids.

  7. Distribution of yeast complexes in the profiles of different soil types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushakova, A. M.; Kachalkin, A. V.; Tiunov, A. V.; Chernov, I. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    The number and taxonomic structure of the yeast complexes were investigated in the full profiles of the soddy-podzolic soil (Central Forest State Nature Biosphere Reserve), dark gray forest soil (Kaluzhskie Zaseki Reserve), and chernozem (Privolzhskaya Forest-Steppe Reserve). In all these soils, the number of yeasts was maximal (104 CFU/g) directly under the litter; it drastically decreased with the depth. However, at the depth of 120-160 cm, the number of yeasts significantly increased in all the soils; their maximum was found in the illuvial horizon of the soddy-podzolic soil. Such a statistically significant increase in the number of yeasts at a considerable depth was found for the first time. Different groups of yeasts were present in the yeast communities of different soils. The species structure of yeast communities changed little in each soil: the same species were isolated both from the soil surface and from the depth of more than 2 m. The results showed that yeasts could be used for soil bioindication on the basis of specific yeast complexes in the profiles of different soil types rather than individual indicative species.

  8. Effect of poly-A:U, dextran sulfate and yeast RNA on the bone marrow colony-forming ability in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyavskij, V.I.; Lysenko, A.I.; Kulakova, G.S.

    1977-01-01

    It has been shown, that poly-A:U, dextran sulfate and yeast RNA increased a number of endogenic colonies (COE) in the mouse spleen sublethally irradiated, as a result of, apparently, their mitogenic effect on proliferous COE. The preparations did not affect the number of exogenic colonies when introducting them together with transfer of syngenic cells of bone marrow, taken from the intact donors. Dextran sulfate increased 2.7 times the number of the endogenic colonies in the spleens of nonuniformly irradiated mice mainly due to the COE migration from protected bone marrow areas. The complex of poly-A:U and yest RNA in such experiment type were ineffective. One of the most important factors in the mechanism of the dextran sulfate adjuvant activity possibly is its ability to increase migration potencies of the stem blood-forming cells

  9. Genetic control of mitotic crossing over in yeast. 2. Influence of UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, I.A.; Marfin, S.V.; Koval'tsova, S.V.; Kasinova, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    UV-induced crossing-over and general mitotic segregation of the following strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts were studied: a wild-type diploid, diploids homozygous with respect to the radiosensitivity of rad 2, rad 15, rad 54, xrs 4, rad 2 rad 54, rad 15 rad 54. Wild-type diploids rad 2 and rad 15 have a high frequency of the induced mitotic crossing-over. Diploids rad 15, rad 54 can not cause UV-induced mitotic crossing-over. Reddish-pink and reddish-pink-white colonies ratio (the first appear if the crossing-over occurs during the first after the irradiation division, the second - during the second division) is 4.8:1 for the wild type, 1.6:1 for rad 2, and 1.1:1 for rad 15. Nonreciprocal mitotic segregation of high frequency was observed for the wild type rad 2, rad 15, xrs 4, and diploids rad 54, rad 2 rad 54, rad 15 rad 54 had a lower frequency. We suppose that after UV-irradiation there exist at least three types of repair in yeast diploid cells: excision repair, prereplication recombinating repair after the excision of dimers, and post-replication recombinating repair. Rad 2 and rad 15 mutations blow the first and second types, rad 54 mutation partially block the second and third parths. It seems that xrs 4 mutation does not block the recombinating capability but somehow changes the process of recombination in such a way that much nonreciprocal products recorded as seqregants are produced [ru

  10. Evidence for three types of x-ray damage repair in yeast and sensitivity of totally repair deficient strains to sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Game, J.C.; Schild, D.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mutants of yeast that confer sensitivity to x-rays are known to fall into two epistasis groups, called here the RAD51 and RAD18 groups, which are each thought to control a different type of x-ray repair. They examine here the role of genes in a third repair pathways in x-ray repair. RAD1 and RAD3 are known to be important in the repair of pyrimidine dimers after uv-irradiation. They find that these genes can also play an important role in x-ray repair, but that this role is only exposed when both the other pathways of x-ray repair are blocked. Double mutants blocked in the RAD51 and RAD18 pathways are significantly less x-ray sensitive than triple mutants blocked in these pathways but also mutant in either the RAD1 or RAD3 genes. In a related experiment, they tested the importance of DNA repair in nature by determining the sensitivity to natural unfiltered sunlight of a strain lacking all known DNA repair pathways. They constructed a quadruple mutant strain containing RAD1-1, RAD18-2, RAD51-1 and PHR1-1. The latter mutation blocks the cell's ability to photoreactivate uv damage. They found that this strain was so sensitive to sunlight that less than three seconds' exposure would cause an average of one lethal hit per cell, and survival was less than 2% after ten seconds' exposure. Wild type yeast at sea level showed no killing after thirty minutes. the quadruple mutant is approximately one thousand times more sensitive to sunlight than the related wild type

  11. Awa1p on the cell surface of sake yeast inhibits biofilm formation and the co-aggregation between sake yeasts and Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Satoru; Shimizu, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Furukawa, Soichi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    We examined mixed-species biofilm formation between Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 and both foaming and non-foaming mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeasts. Wild-type strains showed significantly lower levels of biofilm formation compared with the non-foaming mutants. Awa1p, a protein involved in foam formation during sake brewing, is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein and is associated with the cell wall of sake yeasts. The AWA1 gene of the non-foaming mutant strain Kyokai no. 701 (K701) has lost the C-terminal sequence that includes the GPI anchor signal. Mixed-species biofilm formation and co-aggregation of wild-type strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7) were significantly lower than K701 UT-1 (K701 ura3/ura3 trp1/trp1), while the levels of strain K701 UT-1 carrying the AWA1 on a plasmid were comparable to those of K7. The levels of biofilm formation and co-aggregation of the strain K701 UT-1 harboring AWA1 with a deleted GPI anchor signal were similar to those of K701 UT-1. These results clearly demonstrate that Awa1p present on the surface of sake yeast strain K7 inhibits adhesion between yeast cells and L. plantarum ML11-11, consequently impeding mixed-species biofilm formation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Brewer?s Yeast Improves Blood Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    HOSSEINZADEH, Payam; DJAZAYERY, Abolghassem; MOSTAFAVI, Seyed-Ali; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; DERAKHSHANIAN, Hoda; RAHIMIFOROUSHANI, Abbas; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to investigate the effects of Brewer?s yeast supplementation on serum lipoproteins and blood pressure in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: In a randomized double blind clinical trial, 90 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited, and divided randomly into 2 groups, trial group received brewer?s yeast (1800 mg/day) and control group received placebo for 12 weeks. Weight, BMI, food consumption (based on 24 hour food recall), fasting s...

  13. Global mRNA expression analysis in myosin II deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals an impairment of cell integrity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera-Molina Félix E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MYO1 gene encodes the myosin II heavy chain (Myo1p, a protein required for normal cytokinesis in budding yeast. Myo1p deficiency in yeast (myo1Δ causes a cell separation defect characterized by the formation of attached cells, yet it also causes abnormal budding patterns, formation of enlarged and elongated cells, increased osmotic sensitivity, delocalized chitin deposition, increased chitin synthesis, and hypersensitivity to the chitin synthase III inhibitor Nikkomycin Z. To determine how differential expression of genes is related to these diverse cell wall phenotypes, we analyzed the global mRNA expression profile of myo1Δ strains. Results Global mRNA expression profiles of myo1Δ strains and their corresponding wild type controls were obtained by hybridization to yeast oligonucleotide microarrays. Results for selected genes were confirmed by real time RT-PCR. A total of 547 differentially expressed genes (p ≤ 0.01 were identified with 263 up regulated and 284 down regulated genes in the myo1Δ strains. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed the significant over-representation of genes in the protein biosynthesis and stress response categories. The SLT2/MPK1 gene was up regulated in the microarray, and a myo1Δslt2Δ double mutant was non-viable. Overexpression of ribosomal protein genes RPL30 and RPS31 suppressed the hypersensitivity to Nikkomycin Z and increased the levels of phosphorylated Slt2p in myo1Δ strains. Increased levels of phosphorylated Slt2p were also observed in wild type strains under these conditions. Conclusion Following this analysis of global mRNA expression in yeast myo1Δ strains, we conclude that 547 genes were differentially regulated in myo1Δ strains and that the stress response and protein biosynthesis gene categories were coordinately regulated in this mutant. The SLT2/MPK1 gene was confirmed to be essential for myo1Δ strain viability, supporting that the up

  14. Proteolytic activities in yeast after UV irradiation. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwencke, J.; Moustacchi, E.

    1982-04-01

    When the levels of three common yeast proteinases in exponentially growing cells of mutants blocked in different repair pathways are compared to that of isogenic wild-type cells, it can be seen that the level of proteinase B is enhanced in the mutants whereas the levels of leucin aminopeptidase (Leu.AP) and lysine aminopeptidase (Lys.AP) are similar in all strains. As in its corresponding wild type, the level of proteinase B activity is further enhanced after UV-irradiation in a mutant blocked in excision-repair (rad1-3). In contrast, following the same treatment the level of proteinase B remains almost constant in a mutant blocked in a general error-prone repair system (rad6-1) and in a mutant defective in a more specific mutagenic repair pathway (pso2-1). Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, blocks the post-UV enhancement in proteinase B activity observed in rad1-3 indicating that, as in the wild-type cells, an inducible process is involved. The levels of Lys.AP and Leu.AP are, respectively, either unaffected or only moderately increased following UV-treatment of the repair defective mutants, as in wild-type strains.

  15. Influence of yeast macromolecules on sweetness in dry wines: role of the saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Hsp12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Axel; Marullo, Philippe; Moine, Virginie; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2011-03-09

    Yeast autolysis during lees contact influences the organoleptic properties of wines especially by increasing their sweet taste. Although observed by winemakers, this phenomenon is poorly explained in enology. Moreover, the compounds responsible for sweetness in wine remain unidentified. This work provides new insights in this way by combining sensorial, biochemical and genetic approaches. First, we verified by sensory analysis that yeast autolysis in red wine has a significant effect on sweetness. Moderate additions of ethanol or glycerol did not have the same effect. Second, a sapid fraction was isolated from lees extracts by successive ultrafiltrations and HPLC purifications. Using nano-LC-MS/MS, peptides released by the yeast heat shock protein Hsp12p were distinctly identified in this sample. Third, we confirmed the sweet contribution of this protein by sensorial comparison of red wines incubated with two kinds of yeast strains: a wild-type strain containing the native Hsp12p and a deletion mutant strain that lacks the Hsp12p protein (Δ°HSP12 strain). Red wines incubated with wild-type strain showed a significantly higher sweetness than control wines incubated with Δ°HSP12 strains. These results demonstrated the contribution of protein Hsp12p in the sweet perception consecutive to yeast autolysis in wine.

  16. Yeast β-1,6-glucan is a primary target for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K2 toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukša, Juliana; Podoliankaitė, Monika; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Strazdaitė-Žielienė, Živilė; Urbonavičius, Jaunius; Servienė, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Certain Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secrete different killer proteins of double-stranded-RNA origin. These proteins confer a growth advantage to their host by increasing its survival. K2 toxin affects the target cell by binding to the cell surface, disrupting the plasma membrane integrity, and inducing ion leakage. In this study, we determined that K2 toxin saturates the yeast cell surface receptors in 10 min. The apparent amount of K2 toxin, bound to a single cell of wild type yeast under saturating conditions, was estimated to be 435 to 460 molecules. It was found that an increased level of β-1,6-glucan directly correlates with the number of toxin molecules bound, thereby impacting the morphology and determining the fate of the yeast cell. We observed that the binding of K2 toxin to the yeast surface receptors proceeds in a similar manner as in case of the related K1 killer protein. It was demonstrated that the externally supplied pustulan, a poly-β-1,6-glucan, but not the glucans bearing other linkage types (such as laminarin, chitin, and pullulan) efficiently inhibits the K2 toxin killing activity. In addition, the analysis of toxin binding to the intact cells and spheroplasts confirmed that majority of K2 protein molecules attach to the β-1,6-glucan, rather than the plasma membrane-localized receptors. Taken together, our results reveal that β-1,6-glucan is a primary target of K2 toxin and is important for the execution of its killing property. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Role of cytochrome B in the processing of the subunits of complex III in the yeast mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The work described in this dissertation deals with the effect of cytochrome b on the biogenesis and assembly of the subunits of complex III in the mitochondrial membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cytochrome b-mutants (Box mutants of S. cerevisiae form an excellent system to study such a role of cytochome B. The amounts of cytochrome c 1 in the mitochrondria, as determined both spectroscopically and immunologically, were not affected by the absence of cytochrome b. Pulse labelling of the cells with ( 35 S) methionine in the presence of CCCP showed the accumulation of the precursors to the core protein I and the iron-sulfur protein in similar amounts in the mutant Box 6-2 and the wild type cells. Synthesis of the iron sulfur protein and the cytochrome c 1 by in vitro translation of mRNA isolated from wild type and mutant Box 6-2 in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, also confirmed that the synthesis of the nuclear encoded subunits was not affected in the mutants. Pulse labeling of the cells in the absence of CCCP and subsequent chase with cold methionine, however, showed much less of the mature subunits of core protein I and the iron-sulfur protein in the mitochrondria of the mutant cells relative to the wild type. These results indicate that cytochrome b is necessary for the proper processing of certain subunits of complex III

  18. The Usher Syndrome Type IIIB Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutation Confers Temperature Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Guth, Ethan; Kim, Cindy; Regan, Cathy; Siu, Victoria M; Rupar, C Anthony; Demeler, Borries; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2017-07-18

    Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) is a highly conserved translation factor that plays an essential role in protein synthesis. HARS has been implicated in the human syndromes Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Type 2W and Type IIIB Usher (USH3B). The USH3B mutation, which encodes a Y454S substitution in HARS, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and associated with childhood deafness, blindness, and episodic hallucinations during acute illness. The biochemical basis of the pathophysiologies linked to USH3B is currently unknown. Here, we present a detailed functional comparison of wild-type (WT) and Y454S HARS enzymes. Kinetic parameters for enzymes and canonical substrates were determined using both steady state and rapid kinetics. Enzyme stability was examined using differential scanning fluorimetry. Finally, enzyme functionality in a primary cell culture was assessed. Our results demonstrate that the Y454S substitution leaves HARS amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and tRNA His binding functions largely intact compared with those of WT HARS, and the mutant enzyme dimerizes like the wild type does. Interestingly, during our investigation, it was revealed that the kinetics of amino acid activation differs from that of the previously characterized bacterial HisRS. Despite the similar kinetics, differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that Y454S is less thermally stable than WT HARS, and cells from Y454S patients grown at elevated temperatures demonstrate diminished levels of protein synthesis compared to those of WT cells. The thermal sensitivity associated with the Y454S mutation represents a biochemical basis for understanding USH3B.

  19. Cell cycle-dependent transcription factors control the expression of yeast telomerase RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Isabelle; Larose, Stéphanie; Dandjinou, Alain T; Abou Elela, Sherif; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2013-07-01

    Telomerase is a specialized ribonucleoprotein that adds repeated DNA sequences to the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes to preserve genome integrity. Some secondary structure features of the telomerase RNA are very well conserved, and it serves as a central scaffold for the binding of associated proteins. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA, TLC1, is found in very low copy number in the cell and is the limiting component of the known telomerase holoenzyme constituents. The reasons for this low abundance are unclear, but given that the RNA is very stable, transcriptional control mechanisms must be extremely important. Here we define the sequences forming the TLC1 promoter and identify the elements required for its low expression level, including enhancer and repressor elements. Within an enhancer element, we found consensus sites for Mbp1/Swi4 association, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the binding of Mbp1 and Swi4 to these sites of the TLC1 promoter. Furthermore, the enhancer element conferred cell cycle-dependent regulation to a reporter gene, and mutations in the Mbp1/Swi4 binding sites affected the levels of telomerase RNA and telomere length. Finally, ChIP experiments using a TLC1 RNA-binding protein as target showed cell cycle-dependent transcription of the TLC1 gene. These results indicate that the budding yeast TLC1 RNA is transcribed in a cell cycle-dependent fashion late in G1 and may be part of the S phase-regulated group of genes involved in DNA replication.

  20. Functional heterologous protein expression by genetically engineered probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Hudson

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested the potential of probiotic organisms to be adapted for the synthesis and delivery of oral therapeutics. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii would be especially well suited for this purpose due to its ability, in contrast to probiotic prokaryotes, to perform eukaryotic post translational modifications. This probiotic yeast thus has the potential to express a broad array of therapeutic proteins. Currently, however, use of wild type (WT S. boulardii relies on antibiotic resistance for the selection of transformed yeast. Here we report the creation of auxotrophic mutant strains of S. boulardii that can be selected without antibiotics and demonstrate that these yeast can express functional recombinant protein even when recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues in mice. A UV mutagenesis approach was employed to generate three uracil auxotrophic S. boulardii mutants that show a low rate of reversion to wild type growth. These mutants can express recombinant protein and are resistant in vitro to low pH, bile acid salts, and anaerobic conditions. Critically, oral gavage experiments using C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that mutant S. boulardii survive and are taken up into gastrointestinal immune tissues on a similar level as WT S. boulardii. Mutant yeast recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues furthermore retain expression of functional recombinant protein. These data show that auxotrophic mutant S. boulardii can safely express recombinant protein without antibiotic selection and can deliver recombinant protein to gastrointestinal immune tissues. These auxotrophic mutants of S. boulardii pave the way for future experiments to test the ability of S. boulardii to deliver therapeutics and mediate protection against gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. Functional heterologous protein expression by genetically engineered probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lauren E; Fasken, Milo B; McDermott, Courtney D; McBride, Shonna M; Kuiper, Emily G; Guiliano, David B; Corbett, Anita H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the potential of probiotic organisms to be adapted for the synthesis and delivery of oral therapeutics. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii would be especially well suited for this purpose due to its ability, in contrast to probiotic prokaryotes, to perform eukaryotic post translational modifications. This probiotic yeast thus has the potential to express a broad array of therapeutic proteins. Currently, however, use of wild type (WT) S. boulardii relies on antibiotic resistance for the selection of transformed yeast. Here we report the creation of auxotrophic mutant strains of S. boulardii that can be selected without antibiotics and demonstrate that these yeast can express functional recombinant protein even when recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues in mice. A UV mutagenesis approach was employed to generate three uracil auxotrophic S. boulardii mutants that show a low rate of reversion to wild type growth. These mutants can express recombinant protein and are resistant in vitro to low pH, bile acid salts, and anaerobic conditions. Critically, oral gavage experiments using C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that mutant S. boulardii survive and are taken up into gastrointestinal immune tissues on a similar level as WT S. boulardii. Mutant yeast recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues furthermore retain expression of functional recombinant protein. These data show that auxotrophic mutant S. boulardii can safely express recombinant protein without antibiotic selection and can deliver recombinant protein to gastrointestinal immune tissues. These auxotrophic mutants of S. boulardii pave the way for future experiments to test the ability of S. boulardii to deliver therapeutics and mediate protection against gastrointestinal disorders.

  2. DNA watermarks in non-coding regulatory sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyka Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA watermarks can be applied to identify the unauthorized use of genetically modified organisms. It has been shown that coding regions can be used to encrypt information into living organisms by using the DNA-Crypt algorithm. Yet, if the sequence of interest presents a non-coding DNA sequence, either the function of a resulting functional RNA molecule or a regulatory sequence, such as a promoter, could be affected. For our studies we used the small cytoplasmic RNA 1 in yeast and the lac promoter region of Escherichia coli. Findings The lac promoter was deactivated by the integrated watermark. In addition, the RNA molecules displayed altered configurations after introducing a watermark, but surprisingly were functionally intact, which has been verified by analyzing the growth characteristics of both wild type and watermarked scR1 transformed yeast cells. In a third approach we introduced a second overlapping watermark into the lac promoter, which did not affect the promoter activity. Conclusion Even though the watermarked RNA and one of the watermarked promoters did not show any significant differences compared to the wild type RNA and wild type promoter region, respectively, it cannot be generalized that other RNA molecules or regulatory sequences behave accordingly. Therefore, we do not recommend integrating watermark sequences into regulatory regions.

  3. Changes in oil content of transgenic soybeans expressing the yeast SLC1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Suryadevara S; Hildebrand, David

    2009-10-01

    The wild type (Wt) and mutant form of yeast (sphingolipid compensation) genes, SLC1 and SLC1-1, have been shown to have lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT) activities (Nageic et al. in J Biol Chem 269:22156-22163, 1993). Expression of these LPAT genes was reported to increase oil content in transgenic Arabidopsis and Brassica napus. It is of interest to determine if the TAG content increase would also be seen in soybeans. Therefore, the wild type SLC1 was expressed in soybean somatic embryos under the control of seed specific phaseolin promoter. Some transgenic somatic embryos and in both T2 and T3 transgenic seeds showed higher oil contents. Compared to controls, the average increase in triglyceride values went up by 1.5% in transgenic somatic embryos. A maximum of 3.2% increase in seed oil content was observed in a T3 line. Expression of the yeast Wt LPAT gene did not alter the fatty acid composition of the seed oil.

  4. Role of RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and RNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaag, Hannah M; Lu, Qiasheng; Schmitt, Mark E; Nagy, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    RNA degradation, together with RNA synthesis, controls the steady-state level of viral RNAs in infected cells. The endoribonucleolytic cleavage of viral RNA is important not only for viral RNA degradation but for RNA recombination as well, due to the participation of some RNA degradation products in the RNA recombination process. To identify host endoribonucleases involved in degradation of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model host, we tested eight known endoribonucleases. Here we report that downregulation of SNM1, encoding a component of the RNase MRP, and a temperature-sensitive mutation in the NME1 gene, coding for the RNA component of RNase MRP, lead to reduced production of the endoribonucleolytically cleaved TBSV RNA in yeast. We also show that the highly purified yeast RNase MRP cleaves the TBSV RNA in vitro, resulting in TBSV RNA degradation products similar in size to those observed in yeast cells. Knocking down the NME1 homolog in Nicotiana benthamiana also led to decreased production of the cleaved TBSV RNA, suggesting that in plants, RNase MRP is involved in TBSV RNA degradation. Altogether, this work suggests a role for the host endoribonuclease RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and recombination.

  5. Wild-type and A315T mutant TDP-43 exert differential neurotoxicity in a Drosophila model of ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Patricia S.; Boehringer, Ashley; Zwick, Rebecca; Tang, Jonathan E.; Grigsby, Brianna; Zarnescu, Daniela C.

    2011-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 has been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) both as a causative locus and as a marker of pathology. With several missense mutations being identified within TDP-43, efforts have been directed towards generating animal models of ALS in mouse, zebrafish, Drosophila and worms. Previous loss of function and overexpression studies have shown that alterations in TDP-43 dosage recapitulate hallmark features of ALS pathology, including neuronal loss and locomotor dysfunction. Here we report a direct in vivo comparison between wild-type and A315T mutant TDP-43 overexpression in Drosophila neurons. We found that when expressed at comparable levels, wild-type TDP-43 exerts more severe effects on neuromuscular junction architecture, viability and motor neuron loss compared with the A315T allele. A subset of these differences can be compensated by higher levels of A315T expression, indicating a direct correlation between dosage and neurotoxic phenotypes. Interestingly, larval locomotion is the sole parameter that is more affected by the A315T allele than wild-type TDP-43. RNA interference and genetic interaction experiments indicate that TDP-43 overexpression mimics a loss-of-function phenotype and suggest a dominant-negative effect. Furthermore, we show that neuronal apoptosis does not require the cytoplasmic localization of TDP-43 and that its neurotoxicity is modulated by the proteasome, the HSP70 chaperone and the apoptosis pathway. Taken together, our findings provide novel insights into the phenotypic consequences of the A315T TDP-43 missense mutation and suggest that studies of individual mutations are critical for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of ALS and related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21441568

  6. Effect of intramolecular photochemical cross-linking and of alkylation of 4-thiouridine in E. coli tRNAsub(l)sup(Val). On the heterologous misccharging by yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S A; Krauskopf, M; Ofengand, J [Roche Inst. of Molecular Biology, Nutley, N.J. (USA)

    1973-08-01

    The ability of yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase to carry out the heterologous mischarging of nine E. coli tRNAs with phenylalanine, and the presence of a common sequence in these tRNAs in the double stranded region adjacent to the dihydrouridine loop, have led to the proposal (by Dudock) that this region of the tRNA is involved in recognition by the yeast enzyme. The validity of this hypothesis has now been examined by chemical modification of the region in question using as a test tRNA, E. coli tRNA/sub 1/sup( val). Photochemical cross-linking of /sup 4/S(8) and C(13) by irradiation at 335 nm led to a complete loss of the ability of yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase to functionally recognize tRNA/sub 1/sup( val) and the rate of cross-linking was correlated with the rate of loss of activity when appropriate assay conditions were used. Cross-linking had no effect on the recognition by the homologous E. coli valyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.9). Similarly, S-alkylation of the /sup 4/S(8) residue with iodoacetamide at pH 9 yielded the uridine-4-thio(2-acetamide) derivative of tRNA with no loss of homologous recognition but with complete loss of heterologous charging activity. These results provide evidence that at least part of the yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase recognition site is located in the region of the tRNA proposed by Dudock, and, as a corollary, show that the E. coli valyl-tRNA synthetase recognition site(s) must be elsewhere in the molecule.

  7. Evaluation of MIC Strip Isavuconazole test for susceptibility testing of wild-type and non-wild-type Aspergillus fumigatus isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Verweij, Paul; Nielsen, Henrik Vedel

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the MIC Strip Isavuconazole test against EUCAST E.Def 9.3 by using 40 wild-type and 39 CYP51A mutant Aspergillus fumigatus strains. The strip full inhibition endpoint (FIE) and 80% growth inhibition endpoint were determined by two independent readers, reader 1 (R1) and R2. The essent......We evaluated the MIC Strip Isavuconazole test against EUCAST E.Def 9.3 by using 40 wild-type and 39 CYP51A mutant Aspergillus fumigatus strains. The strip full inhibition endpoint (FIE) and 80% growth inhibition endpoint were determined by two independent readers, reader 1 (R1) and R2...

  8. Genetic control of yeast cell radiosensitivity modification by oxygen and hypoxic sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuranovskaya, G.P.; Petin, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Diploid yeast cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae ''of the wild type'', individual mutants, homozygous in rad 2 and rad 54 and double mutants, containing both these loci in homozygous state are considered to prove genetic determination of radiosensitivity modification of hypoxic cells by oxygen and electron acceptor compounds previously demonstrated on yeast cells of other genotypes. It is shown that both ''oxygen effect'' and the effect of hypoxic sensitizers depend on the activity of repair systems. The possible mechanism of participation of post-radiation restoration processes in the modification of cell radiosensitivity, is discussed

  9. UV-sensitivity and repair of UV-damage in Salmonella of wild type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratiev, Y.S.; Brukhansky, G.V.; Andreeva, I.V.; Skavronskaya, A.G.

    1977-01-01

    The UV-sensitivity of wild type Salmonella strains has been compared to that of wild type E.coli and its UV-sensitive mutants. Many wild type Salmonella strains are 4-5 times more sensitive than wild type E.coli and their inactivation curve is similar to that for E.coli with a mutation in the polA gene. Alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation has shown a deficiency of these strains in normal excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. This deficiency is not a Salmonella genus feature because one strain as resistant as wild type E.coli was found. This resistant strain showed normal excision repair in alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation experiments. The possible influence of plasmids and mutations in repair genes on the ability of Salmonella to repair UV-damaged DNA is discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. UV-sensitivity and repair of UV-damage in Salmonella of wild type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratiev, Y S; Brukhansky, G V; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaya, A G [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehpidemiologii i Mikrobiologii

    1977-12-01

    The UV-sensitivity of wild type Salmonella strains has been compared to that of wild type E.coli and its UV-sensitive mutants. Many wild type Salmonella strains are 4-5 times more sensitive than wild type E.coli and their inactivation curve is similar to that for E.coli with a mutation in the polA gene. Alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation has shown a deficiency of these strains in normal excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. This deficiency is not a Salmonella genus feature because one strain as resistant as wild type E.coli was found. This resistant strain showed normal excision repair in alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation experiments. The possible influence of plasmids and mutations in repair genes on the ability of Salmonella to repair UV-damaged DNA is discussed.

  11. Mpn1, Mutated in Poikiloderma with Neutropenia Protein 1, Is a Conserved 3′-to-5′ RNA Exonuclease Processing U6 Small Nuclear RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Shchepachev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Clericuzio-type poikiloderma with neutropenia (PN is a rare genodermatosis associated with mutations in the C16orf57 gene, which codes for the uncharacterized protein hMpn1. We show here that, in both fission yeasts and humans, Mpn1 processes the spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA posttranscriptionally. In Mpn1-deficient cells, U6 molecules carry 3′ end polyuridine tails that are longer than those in normal cells and lack a terminal 2′,3′ cyclic phosphate group. In mpn1Δ yeast cells, U6 snRNA and U4/U6 di-small nuclear RNA protein complex levels are diminished, leading to precursor messenger RNA splicing defects, which are reverted by expression of either yeast or human Mpn1 and by overexpression of U6. Recombinant hMpn1 is a 3′-to-5′ RNA exonuclease that removes uridines from U6 3′ ends, generating terminal 2′,3′ cyclic phosphates in vitro. Finally, U6 degradation rates increase in mpn1Δ yeasts and in lymphoblasts established from individuals affected by PN. Our data indicate that Mpn1 promotes U6 stability through 3′ end posttranscriptional processing and implicate altered U6 metabolism as a potential mechanism for PN pathogenesis.

  12. 'Killer' character of yeasts isolated from ethanolic fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccato-Antonini Sandra Regina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of killer, neutral and sensitive yeasts was determined from strains isolated from substrates related to alcoholic fermentations. From 113 isolates, 24 showed killer activity against NCYC 1006 (standard sensitive strain, while 30 were sensitive to NCYC 738 (standard killer strain, and 59 had no reaction in assays at 25-27°C. Two wild yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one of Candida colliculosa were tested against 10 standard killer strains and one standard sensitive strain in a cell x cell and well-test assays at four different pHs. None of the isolates displayed strong killer activity or were sensitive to the standard strains. All belonged to the neutral type. It was concluded that although the number of killer strains was high, this character cannot be used to protect ethanol fermentation processes against yeast contaminants like those which form cell clusters.

  13. Authentic interdomain communication in an RNA helicase reconstituted by expressed protein ligation of two helicase domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karow, Anne R; Theissen, Bettina; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2007-01-01

    RNA helicases mediate structural rearrangements of RNA or RNA-protein complexes at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Members of the DEAD box helicase family consist of two flexibly connected helicase domains. They share nine conserved sequence motifs that are involved in nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, RNA binding, and helicase activity. Most of these motifs line the cleft between the two helicase domains, and extensive communication between them is required for RNA unwinding. The two helicase domains of the Bacillus subtilis RNA helicase YxiN were produced separately as intein fusions, and a functional RNA helicase was generated by expressed protein ligation. The ligated helicase binds adenine nucleotides with very similar affinities to the wild-type protein. Importantly, its intrinsically low ATPase activity is stimulated by RNA, and the Michaelis-Menten parameters are similar to those of the wild-type. Finally, ligated YxiN unwinds a minimal RNA substrate to an extent comparable to that of the wild-type helicase, confirming authentic interdomain communication.

  14. A compromised yeast RNA polymerase II enhances UV sensitivity in the absence of global genome nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J M; Ingles, C J

    2001-02-01

    Nucleotide excision repair is the major pathway responsible for removing UV-induced DNA damage, and is therefore essential for cell survival following exposure to UV radiation. In this report, we have assessed the contributions of some components of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription machinery to UV resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of the gene encoding the Pol II elongation factor TFIIS (SII) resulted in enhanced UV sensitivity, but only in the absence of global genome repair dependent on the RAD7 and RAD16 genes, a result seen previously with deletions of RAD26 and RAD28, yeast homologs of the human Cockayne syndrome genes CSB and CSA, respectively. A RAD7/16-dependent reduction in survival after UV irradiation was also seen in the presence of mutations in RNA Pol II that confer a defect in its response to SII, as well as with other mutations which reside in regions of the largest subunit of Pol II not involved in SII interactions. Indeed, an increase in UV sensitivity was achieved by simply decreasing the steadystate level of RNA Pol II. Truncation of the C-terminal domain and other RNA Pol II mutations conferred sensitivity to the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea and induction of RNR1 and RNR2 mRNAs after UV irradiation was attenuated in these mutant cells. That UV sensitivity can be a consequence of mutations in the RNA Pol II machinery in yeast cells suggests that alterations in transcriptional programs could underlie some of the pathophysiological defects seen in the human disease Cockayne syndrome.

  15. Not your ordinary yeast: non-Saccharomyces yeasts in wine production uncovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Neil P; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S

    2014-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and grape juice are 'natural companions' and make a happy wine marriage. However, this relationship can be enriched by allowing 'wild' non-Saccharomyces yeast to participate in a sequential manner in the early phases of grape must fermentation. However, such a triangular relationship is complex and can only be taken to 'the next level' if there are no spoilage yeast present and if the 'wine yeast' - S. cerevisiae - is able to exert its dominance in time to successfully complete the alcoholic fermentation. Winemakers apply various 'matchmaking' strategies (e.g. cellar hygiene, pH, SO2 , temperature and nutrient management) to keep 'spoilers' (e.g. Dekkera bruxellensis) at bay, and allow 'compatible' wild yeast (e.g. Torulaspora delbrueckii, Pichia kluyveri, Lachancea thermotolerans and Candida/Metschnikowia pulcherrima) to harmonize with potent S. cerevisiae wine yeast and bring the best out in wine. Mismatching can lead to a 'two is company, three is a crowd' scenario. More than 40 of the 1500 known yeast species have been isolated from grape must. In this article, we review the specific flavour-active characteristics of those non-Saccharomyces species that might play a positive role in both spontaneous and inoculated wine ferments. We seek to present 'single-species' and 'multi-species' ferments in a new light and a new context, and we raise important questions about the direction of mixed-fermentation research to address market trends regarding so-called 'natural' wines. This review also highlights that, despite the fact that most frontier research and technological developments are often focussed primarily on S. cerevisiae, non-Saccharomyces research can benefit from the techniques and knowledge developed by research on the former. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tapping into yeast diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Justin C

    2012-11-01

    Domesticated organisms demonstrate our capacity to influence wild species but also provide us with the opportunity to understand rapid evolution in the context of substantially altered environments and novel selective pressures. Recent advances in genetics and genomics have brought unprecedented insights into the domestication of many organisms and have opened new avenues for further improvements to be made. Yet, our ability to engineer biological systems is not without limits; genetic manipulation is often quite difficult. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is not only one of the most powerful model organisms, but is also the premier producer of fermented foods and beverages around the globe. As a model system, it entertains a hefty workforce dedicated to deciphering its genome and the function it encodes at a rich mechanistic level. As a producer, it is used to make leavened bread, and dozens of different alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. Yet, applying the awesome power of yeast genetics to understanding its origins and evolution requires some knowledge of its wild ancestors and the environments from which they were derived. A number of surprisingly diverse lineages of S. cerevisiae from both primeval and secondary forests in China have been discovered by Wang and his colleagues. These lineages substantially expand our knowledge of wild yeast diversity and will be a boon to elucidating the ecology, evolution and domestication of this academic and industrial workhorse.

  17. rRNA maturation in yeast cells depleted of large ribosomal subunit proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Pöll

    Full Text Available The structural constituents of the large eukaryotic ribosomal subunit are 3 ribosomal RNAs, namely the 25S, 5.8S and 5S rRNA and about 46 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins. They assemble and mature in a highly dynamic process that involves more than 150 proteins and 70 small RNAs. Ribosome biogenesis starts in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm and is completed after nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation of the subunits in the cytoplasm. In this work we created 26 yeast strains, each of which conditionally expresses one of the large ribosomal subunit (LSU proteins. In vivo depletion of the analysed LSU r-proteins was lethal and led to destabilisation and degradation of the LSU and/or its precursors. Detailed steady state and metabolic pulse labelling analyses of rRNA precursors in these mutant strains showed that LSU r-proteins can be grouped according to their requirement for efficient progression of different steps of large ribosomal subunit maturation. Comparative analyses of the observed phenotypes and the nature of r-protein-rRNA interactions as predicted by current atomic LSU structure models led us to discuss working hypotheses on i how individual r-proteins control the productive processing of the major 5' end of 5.8S rRNA precursors by exonucleases Rat1p and Xrn1p, and ii the nature of structural characteristics of nascent LSUs that are required for cytoplasmic accumulation of nascent subunits but are nonessential for most of the nuclear LSU pre-rRNA processing events.

  18. Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus Noncoding RNA Production Depends on a 5′→3′ Xrn Exoribonuclease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Flobinus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The RNA3 species of the beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV, a multipartite positive-stranded RNA phytovirus, contains the ‘core’ nucleotide sequence required for its systemic movement in Beta macrocarpa. Within this ‘core’ sequence resides a conserved “coremin” motif of 20 nucleotides that is absolutely essential for long-distance movement. RNA3 undergoes processing steps to yield a noncoding RNA3 (ncRNA3 possessing “coremin” at its 5′ end, a mandatory element for ncRNA3 accumulation. Expression of wild-type (wt or mutated RNA3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae allows for the accumulation of ncRNA3 species. Screening of S. cerevisiae ribonuclease mutants identified the 5′-to-3′ exoribonuclease Xrn1 as a key enzyme in RNA3 processing that was recapitulated both in vitro and in insect cell extracts. Xrn1 stalled on ncRNA3-containing RNA substrates in these decay assays in a similar fashion as the flavivirus Xrn1-resistant structure (sfRNA. Substitution of the BNYVV-RNA3 ‘core’ sequence by the sfRNA sequence led to the accumulation of an ncRNA species in yeast in vitro but not in planta and no viral long distance occurred. Interestingly, XRN4 knockdown reduced BNYVV RNA accumulation suggesting a dual role for the ribonuclease in the viral cycle.

  19. Genome-Wide Identification of circRNAs in Pathogenic Basidiomycetous Yeast Cryptococcus neoformans Suggests Conserved circRNA Host Genes over Kingdoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Huo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Circular RNAs (circRNAs, a novel class of ubiquitous and intriguing noncoding RNA, have been found in a number of eukaryotes but not yet basidiomycetes. In this study, we identified 73 circRNAs from 39.28 million filtered RNA reads from the basidiomycete Cryptococcus neoformans JEC21 using next-generation sequencing (NGS and the bioinformatics tool circular RNA identification (CIRI. Furthermore, mapping of newly found circRNAs to the genome showed that 73.97% of the circRNAs originated from exonic regions, whereas 20.55% were from intergenic regions and 5.48% were from intronic regions. Enrichment analysis of circRNA host genes was conducted based on the Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway databases. The results reveal that host genes are mainly responsible for primary metabolism and, interestingly, ribosomal protein production. Furthermore, we uncovered a high-level circRNA that was a transcript from the guanosine triphosphate (GTPase gene CNM01190 (gene ID: 3255052 in our yeast. Coincidentally, YPT5, CNM01190′s ortholog of the GTPase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, protists, and humans, has already been proven to generate circRNAs. Additionally, overexpression of RNA debranching enzyme DBR1 had varied influence on the expression of circRNAs, indicating that multiple circRNA biosynthesis pathways exist in C. neoformans. Our study provides evidence for the existence of stable circRNAs in the opportunistic human pathogen C. neoformans and raises a question regarding their role related to pathogenesis in this yeast.

  20. Sabin and wild type polioviruses from children who presented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study further confirms the presence of Sabin and wild-type poliovirus among children in Nigeria. The isolation of Sabin strain of poliovirus is advantageous to the polio eradication program as it is capable of inducing natural immunity in susceptible hosts. Transmission of wild-type poliovirus among children ...

  1. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  2. Improvement of lipid production by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides through UV mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ryosuke; Kashihara, Tomomi; Ogino, Hiroyasu

    2017-05-01

    Oleaginous yeasts are considered a promising alternative lipid source for biodiesel fuel production. In this study, we attempted to improve the lipid productivity of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides through UV irradiation mutagenesis and selection based on ethanol and H 2 O 2 tolerance or cerulenin, a fatty acid synthetase inhibitor. Glucose consumption, cell growth, and lipid production of mutants were evaluated. The transcription level of genes involved in lipid production was also evaluated in mutants. The ethanol and H 2 O 2 tolerant strain 8766 2-31M and the cerulenin resistant strain 8766 3-11C were generated by UV mutagenesis. The 8766 2-31M mutant showed a higher lipid production rate, and the 8766 3-11C mutant produced a larger amount of lipid and had a higher lipid production rate than the wild type strain. Transcriptional analysis revealed that, similar to the wild type strain, the ACL1 and GND1 genes were expressed at significantly low levels, whereas IDP1 and ME1 were highly expressed. In conclusion, lipid productivity in the oleaginous yeast R. toruloides was successfully improved via UV mutagenesis and selection. The study also identified target genes for improving lipid productivity through gene recombination.

  3. Transcriptome-wide mapping of 5-methylcytidine RNA modifications in bacteria, archaea, and yeast reveals m5C within archaeal mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Edelheit

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of 5-methylcytidine (m(5C in tRNA and rRNA molecules of a wide variety of organisms was first observed more than 40 years ago. However, detection of this modification was limited to specific, abundant, RNA species, due to the usage of low-throughput methods. To obtain a high resolution, systematic, and comprehensive transcriptome-wide overview of m(5C across the three domains of life, we used bisulfite treatment on total RNA from both gram positive (B. subtilis and gram negative (E. coli bacteria, an archaeon (S. solfataricus and a eukaryote (S. cerevisiae, followed by massively parallel sequencing. We were able to recover most previously documented m(5C sites on rRNA in the four organisms, and identified several novel sites in yeast and archaeal rRNAs. Our analyses also allowed quantification of methylated m(5C positions in 64 tRNAs in yeast and archaea, revealing stoichiometric differences between the methylation patterns of these organisms. Molecules of tRNAs in which m(5C was absent were also discovered. Intriguingly, we detected m(5C sites within archaeal mRNAs, and identified a consensus motif of AUCGANGU that directs methylation in S. solfataricus. Our results, which were validated using m(5C-specific RNA immunoprecipitation, provide the first evidence for mRNA modifications in archaea, suggesting that this mode of post-transcriptional regulation extends beyond the eukaryotic domain.

  4. Characterization, Ecological Distribution, and Population Dynamics of Saccharomyces Sensu Stricto Killer Yeasts in the Spontaneous Grape Must Fermentations of Southwestern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Matilde; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, María L.

    2012-01-01

    Killer yeasts secrete protein toxins that are lethal to sensitive strains of the same or related yeast species. Among the four types of Saccharomyces killer yeasts already described (K1, K2, K28, and Klus), we found K2 and Klus killer yeasts in spontaneous wine fermentations from southwestern Spain. Both phenotypes were encoded by medium-size double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses, Saccharomyces cerevisiae virus (ScV)-M2 and ScV-Mlus, whose genome sizes ranged from 1.3 to 1.75 kb and from 2.1 to 2.3 kb, respectively. The K2 yeasts were found in all the wine-producing subareas for all the vintages analyzed, while the Klus yeasts were found in the warmer subareas and mostly in the warmer ripening/harvest seasons. The middle-size isotypes of the M2 dsRNA were the most frequent among K2 yeasts, probably because they encoded the most intense K2 killer phenotype. However, the smallest isotype of the Mlus dsRNA was the most frequent for Klus yeasts, although it encoded the least intense Klus killer phenotype. The killer yeasts were present in most (59.5%) spontaneous fermentations. Most were K2, with Klus being the minority. The proportion of killer yeasts increased during fermentation, while the proportion of sensitive yeasts decreased. The fermentation speed, malic acid, and wine organoleptic quality decreased in those fermentations where the killer yeasts replaced at least 15% of a dominant population of sensitive yeasts, while volatile acidity and lactic acid increased, and the amount of bacteria in the tumultuous and the end fermentation stages also increased in an unusual way. PMID:22101056

  5. Defective mitochondrial rRNA methyltransferase MRM2 causes MELAS-like clinical syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garone, Caterina; D'Souza, Aaron R; Dallabona, Cristina; Lodi, Tiziana; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Rorbach, Joanna; Donati, Maria Alice; Procopio, Elena; Montomoli, Martino; Guerrini, Renzo; Zeviani, Massimo; Calvo, Sarah E; Mootha, Vamsi K; DiMauro, Salvatore; Ferrero, Ileana; Minczuk, Michal

    2017-11-01

    Defects in nuclear-encoded proteins of the mitochondrial translation machinery cause early-onset and tissue-specific deficiency of one or more OXPHOS complexes. Here, we report a 7-year-old Italian boy with childhood-onset rapidly progressive encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes. Multiple OXPHOS defects and decreased mtDNA copy number (40%) were detected in muscle homogenate. Clinical features combined with low level of plasma citrulline were highly suggestive of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, however, the common m.3243 A > G mutation was excluded. Targeted exome sequencing of genes encoding the mitochondrial proteome identified a damaging mutation, c.567 G > A, affecting a highly conserved amino acid residue (p.Gly189Arg) of the MRM2 protein. MRM2 has never before been linked to a human disease and encodes an enzyme responsible for 2'-O-methyl modification at position U1369 in the human mitochondrial 16S rRNA. We generated a knockout yeast model for the orthologous gene that showed a defect in respiration and the reduction of the 2'-O-methyl modification at the equivalent position (U2791) in the yeast mitochondrial 21S rRNA. Complementation with the mrm2 allele carrying the equivalent yeast mutation failed to rescue the respiratory phenotype, which was instead completely rescued by expressing the wild-type allele. Our findings establish that defective MRM2 causes a MELAS-like phenotype, and suggests the genetic screening of the MRM2 gene in patients with a m.3243 A > G negative MELAS-like presentation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Electrotransformation and expression of cellulase genes in wild-type Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wang; Yang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Guang-Qin; He, Wan-Ling; Li, Yuan-Xiao; Chen, Yu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Two cellulase genes, Cel15 and Cel73, were amplified from Bacillus subtilis genome DNA in a previous study. Two integrative vectors, pLEM4153 and pLEM4154, containing the genes Cel15 and Cel73, respectively, were constructed and successfully electroporated into the wild-type Lactobacillus reuteri which was isolated from chick guts through an optimized procedure. Two recombinant L. reuteri were selected from a Man, Rogosa, and Sharp (MRS) plate with 10 µg/ml erythromycin, and named L. reuteri XNY-Cel15 and L. reuteri XNY-Cel73, respectively. To verify the transcription and expression of the two cellulase genes in the recombinant L. reuteri strains, the mRNA relative quantity (RQ) and the cellulase activity were determined. The mRNA RQ of Cel15 in L. reuteri XNY-Cel15 is 1,8849.5, and that of Cel73 in L. reuteri XNY-Cel73 is 1,388, and the cellulase activity of the modified MRS broth cultured with L. reuteri XNY-Cel15 was 0.158 U/ml, whereas that with L. reuteri XNY-Cel73 was 0.15 U/ml. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Functions for fission yeast splicing factors SpSlu7 and SpPrp18 in alternative splice-site choice and stress-specific regulated splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Melangath

    Full Text Available Budding yeast spliceosomal factors ScSlu7 and ScPrp18 interact and mediate intron 3'ss choice during second step pre-mRNA splicing. The fission yeast genome with abundant multi-intronic transcripts, degenerate splice signals and SR proteins is an apt unicellular fungal model to deduce roles for core spliceosomal factors in alternative splice-site choice, intron retention and to study the cellular implications of regulated splicing. From our custom microarray data we deduce a stringent reproducible subset of S. pombe alternative events. We examined the role of factors SpSlu7 or SpPrp18 for these splice events and investigated the relationship to growth phase and stress. Wild-type log and stationary phase cells showed ats1+ exon 3 skipped and intron 3 retained transcripts. Interestingly the non-consensus 5'ss in ats1+ intron 3 caused SpSlu7 and SpPrp18 dependent intron retention. We validated the use of an alternative 5'ss in dtd1+ intron 1 and of an upstream alternative 3'ss in DUF3074 intron 1. The dtd1+ intron 1 non-canonical 5'ss yielded an alternative mRNA whose levels increased in stationary phase. Utilization of dtd1+ intron 1 sub-optimal 5' ss required functional SpPrp18 and SpSlu7 while compromise in SpSlu7 function alone hampered the selection of the DUF3074 intron 1 non canonical 3'ss. We analysed the relative abundance of these splice isoforms during mild thermal, oxidative and heavy metal stress and found stress-specific splice patterns for ats1+ and DUF3074 intron 1 some of which were SpSlu7 and SpPrp18 dependent. By studying ats1+ splice isoforms during compromised transcription elongation rates in wild-type, spslu7-2 and spprp18-5 mutant cells we found dynamic and intron context-specific effects in splice-site choice. Our work thus shows the combinatorial effects of splice site strength, core splicing factor functions and transcription elongation kinetics to dictate alternative splice patterns which in turn serve as an additional

  8. Enterovirus type 71 2A protease functions as a transcriptional activator in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Meng-Jiun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus type 71 (EV71 2A protease exhibited strong transcriptional activity in yeast cells. The transcriptional activity of 2A protease was independent of its protease activity. EV71 2A protease retained its transcriptional activity after truncation of 40 amino acids at the N-terminus but lost this activity after truncation of 60 amino acids at the N-terminus or deletion of 20 amino acids at the C-terminus. Thus, the acidic domain at the C-terminus of this protein is essential for its transcriptional activity. Indeed, deletion of amino acids from 146 to 149 (EAME in this acidic domain lost the transcriptional activity of EV71 2A protein though still retained its protease activity. EV71 2A protease was detected both in the cytoplasm and nucleus using confocal microscopy analysis. Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease also exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. As expected, an acidic domain in the C-terminus of Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease was also identified. Truncation of this acidic domain resulted in the loss of transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this acidic region of poliovirus 2A protease is critical for viral RNA replication. The transcriptional activity of the EV71 or Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease should play a role in viral replication and/or pathogenesis.

  9. The decapping activator Edc3 and the Q/N-rich domain of Lsm4 function together to enhance mRNA stability and alter mRNA decay pathway dependence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Huch

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The rate and regulation of mRNA decay are major elements in the proper control of gene expression. Edc3 and Lsm4 are two decapping activator proteins that have previously been shown to function in the assembly of RNA granules termed P bodies. Here, we show that deletion of edc3, when combined with a removal of the glutamine/asparagine rich region of Lsm4 (edc3Δ lsm4ΔC reduces mRNA stability and alters pathways of mRNA degradation. Multiple tested mRNAs exhibited reduced stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant. The destabilization was linked to an increased dependence on Ccr4-mediated deadenylation and mRNA decapping. Unlike characterized mutations in decapping factors that either are neutral or are able to stabilize mRNA, the combined edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant reduced mRNA stability. We characterized the growth and activity of the major mRNA decay systems and translation in double mutant and wild-type yeast. In the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant, we observed alterations in the levels of specific mRNA decay factors as well as nuclear accumulation of the catalytic subunit of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Hence, we suggest that the effects on mRNA stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant may originate from mRNA decay protein abundance or changes in mRNPs, or alternatively may imply a role for P bodies in mRNA stabilization.

  10. Management of the endoplasmic reticulum stress by activation of the heat shock response in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Tang, Hongting; Liu, Zihe

    2014-01-01

    In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is mediated by Hac1p. The heat shock response (HSR) mediated by Hsf1p, mainly regulates cytosolic processes and protects...... the cell from stresses. Here, we find that a constitutive activation of the HSR could increase ER stress resistance in both wild-type and UPR-deficient cells. Activation of HSR decreased UPR activation in the WT (as shown by the decreased HAC1 mRNA splicing). We analyzed the genome-wide transcriptional...... response in order to propose regulatory mechanisms that govern the interplay between UPR and HSR and followed up for the hypotheses by experiments in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, we found that the regulation of ER stress response via HSR is (1) only partially dependent on over-expression of Kar2p (ER...

  11. Prions in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Bezdíčka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes yeast prions and their biological effects on yeast in general. It defines the basic characteristics of yeast prions, that distinguish prions from other proteins. The thesis introduces various possibilities of prion formation, and propagation as well as specific types of yeast prions, including various functions of most studied types of prions. The thesis also focuses on chaperones that affect the state of yeast prions in cells. Lastly, the thesis indicates similarities be...

  12. Growth on Alpha-Ketoglutarate Increases Oxidative Stress Resistance in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bayliak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG is an important intermediate in cell metabolism, linking anabolic and catabolic processes. The effect of exogenous AKG on stress resistance in S. cerevisiae cells was studied. The growth on AKG increased resistance of yeast cells to stresses, but the effects depended on AKG concentration and type of stressor. Wild-type yeast cells grown on AKG were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide, menadione, and transition metal ions (Fe2+ and Cu2+ but not to ethanol and heat stress as compared with control ones. Deficiency in SODs or catalases abolished stress-protective effects of AKG. AKG-supplemented growth led to higher values of total metabolic activity, level of low-molecular mass thiols, and activities of catalase and glutathione reductase in wild-type cells compared with the control. The results suggest that exogenous AKG may enhance cell metabolism leading to induction of mild oxidative stress. It turn, it results in activation of antioxidant system that increases resistance of S. cerevisiae cells to H2O2 and other stresses. The presence of genes encoding SODs or catalases is required for the expression of protective effects of AKG.

  13. Microbe domestication and the identification of the wild genetic stock of lager-brewing yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libkind, Diego; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Valério, Elisabete; Gonçalves, Carla; Dover, Jim; Johnston, Mark; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Domestication of plants and animals promoted humanity's transition from nomadic to sedentary lifestyles, demographic expansion, and the emergence of civilizations. In contrast to the well-documented successes of crop and livestock breeding, processes of microbe domestication remain obscure, despite the importance of microbes to the production of food, beverages, and biofuels. Lager-beer, first brewed in the 15th century, employs an allotetraploid hybrid yeast, Saccharomyces pastorianus (syn. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis), a domesticated species created by the fusion of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ale-yeast with an unknown cryotolerant Saccharomyces species. We report the isolation of that species and designate it Saccharomyces eubayanus sp. nov. because of its resemblance to Saccharomyces bayanus (a complex hybrid of S. eubayanus, Saccharomyces uvarum, and S. cerevisiae found only in the brewing environment). Individuals from populations of S. eubayanus and its sister species, S. uvarum, exist in apparent sympatry in Nothofagus (Southern beech) forests in Patagonia, but are isolated genetically through intrinsic postzygotic barriers, and ecologically through host-preference. The draft genome sequence of S. eubayanus is 99.5% identical to the non-S. cerevisiae portion of the S. pastorianus genome sequence and suggests specific changes in sugar and sulfite metabolism that were crucial for domestication in the lager-brewing environment. This study shows that combining microbial ecology with comparative genomics facilitates the discovery and preservation of wild genetic stocks of domesticated microbes to trace their history, identify genetic changes, and suggest paths to further industrial improvement. PMID:21873232

  14. An Approach to Detect and Study DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Transcript RNA Using a Spliced-Antisense RNA Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Storici, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    A double-strand break (DSB) is one of the most dangerous DNA lesion, and its repair is crucial for genome stability. Homologous recombination is considered the safest way to repair a DNA DSB and requires an identical or nearly identical DNA template, such as a sister chromatid or a homologous chromosome for accurate repair. Can transcript RNA serve as donor template for DSB repair? Here, we describe an approach that we developed to detect and study DNA repair by transcript RNA. Key features of the method are: (i) use of antisense (noncoding) RNA as template for DSB repair by RNA, (ii) use of intron splicing to distinguish the sequence of the RNA template from that of the DNA that generates the RNA template, and (iii) use of a trans and cis system to study how RNA repairs a DSB in homologous but distant DNA or in its own DNA, respectively. This chapter provides details on how to use a spliced-antisense RNA template to detect and study DSB repair by RNA in trans or cis in yeast cells. Our approach for detection of DSB repair by RNA in cells can be applied to cell types other than yeast, such as bacteria, mammalian cells, or other eukaryotic cells. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Senataxin, the ortholog of a yeast RNA helicase, is mutant in ataxia-ocular apraxia 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maria-Céu; Klur, Sandra; Watanabe, Mitsunori; Németh, Andrea H; Le Ber, Isabelle; Moniz, José-Carlos; Tranchant, Christine; Aubourg, Patrick; Tazir, Meriem; Schöls, Lüdger; Pandolfo, Massimo; Schulz, Jörg B; Pouget, Jean; Calvas, Patrick; Shizuka-Ikeda, Masami; Shoji, Mikio; Tanaka, Makoto; Izatt, Louise; Shaw, Christopher E; M'Zahem, Abderrahim; Dunne, Eimear; Bomont, Pascale; Benhassine, Traki; Bouslam, Naïma; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brice, Alexis; Guimarães, João; Mendonça, Pedro; Barbot, Clara; Coutinho, Paula; Sequeiros, Jorge; Dürr, Alexandra; Warter, Jean-Marie; Koenig, Michel

    2004-03-01

    Ataxia-ocular apraxia 2 (AOA2) was recently identified as a new autosomal recessive ataxia. We have now identified causative mutations in 15 families, which allows us to clinically define this entity by onset between 10 and 22 years, cerebellar atrophy, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Ten of the fifteen mutations cause premature termination of a large DEAxQ-box helicase, the human ortholog of yeast Sen1p, involved in RNA maturation and termination.

  16. Structural Studies of the Yeast Mitochondrial Degradosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    The yeast mitochondrial degradosome/exosome (mtExo) is responsible for most RNA turnover in mitochondria and has been proposed to form a central part of a mitochondrial RNA surveillance system responsible for degradation of aberrant and unprocessed RNA ([1], [2]). In contrast to the cytoplasmic...... and nuclear exosome complexes, which consist of 10-12 different nuclease subunits, the mitochondrial degradosome is composed of only two large subunits - an RNase (Dss1p) and a helicase (Suv3p), belonging the Ski2 class of DExH box RNA helicases. Both subunits are encoded on the yeast nuclear genome...... and and Suv3p from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, have been cloned for heterologous expression in E. coli. Of the two, we have succeeded in purifying the 73kDa Suv3p by Ni2+-affinity chromatography followed by cleavage of the N-terminal His-tag, cation exchange, and gel filtration. Crystals...

  17. Integrated RNA- and protein profiling of fermentation and respiration in diploid budding yeast provides insight into nutrient control of cell growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yuchen; Lardenois, Aurélie; Walther, Thomas; Horecka, Joe; Stuparevic, Igor; Law, Michael J; Lavigne, Régis; Evrard, Bertrand; Demougin, Philippe; Riffle, Michael; Strich, Randy; Davis, Ronald W; Pineau, Charles; Primig, Michael

    2015-04-24

    Diploid budding yeast undergoes rapid mitosis when it ferments glucose, and in the presence of a non-fermentable carbon source and the absence of a nitrogen source it triggers sporulation. Rich medium with acetate is a commonly used pre-sporulation medium, but our understanding of the molecular events underlying the acetate-driven transition from mitosis to meiosis is still incomplete. We identified 263 proteins for which mRNA and protein synthesis are linked or uncoupled in fermenting and respiring cells. Using motif predictions, interaction data and RNA profiling we find among them 28 likely targets for Ume6, a subunit of the conserved Rpd3/Sin3 histone deacetylase-complex regulating genes involved in metabolism, stress response and meiosis. Finally, we identify 14 genes for which both RNA and proteins are detected exclusively in respiring cells but not in fermenting cells in our sample set, including CSM4, SPR1, SPS4 and RIM4, which were thought to be meiosis-specific. Our work reveals intertwined transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms acting when a MATa/α strain responds to nutritional signals, and provides molecular clues how the carbon source primes yeast cells for entering meiosis. Our integrated genomics study provides insight into the interplay between the transcriptome and the proteome in diploid yeast cells undergoing vegetative growth in the presence of glucose (fermentation) or acetate (respiration). Furthermore, it reveals novel target genes involved in these processes for Ume6, the DNA binding subunit of the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the co-repressor Sin3. We have combined data from an RNA profiling experiment using tiling arrays that cover the entire yeast genome, and a large-scale protein detection analysis based on mass spectrometry in diploid MATa/α cells. This distinguishes our study from most others in the field-which investigate haploid yeast strains-because only diploid cells can undergo meiotic development

  18. Adaptation of the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Robertson

    Full Text Available Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and

  19. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  20. Auxotrophy-stimulated sensitivity to quaternary ammonium salts and its relation to active transport in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachowicz, T.M.; Oblak, E.; Piatkowski, J.

    1992-01-01

    In previous studies we have observed that auxotrophic mutants of yeast were much more sensitive to quaternary ammonium salts than the corresponding isogenic wild type strains. The super sensitivity of the auxotrophs seems to be a characteristic feature of yeast and yeast-like microorganisms: the level of sensitivity of the quaternary ammonium salts of the bacterial auxotrophs and their original prototrophic forms appeared to be the same. The super sensitivity of yeast auxotrophs disappeared on minimal media with ammonium as a nitrogen source. In this report there are presented the data indicating that enrichment of the minimal medium with arginine restores the super sensitivity of auxotrophic yeast mutants to the quaternary ammonium salts. The results of amino-acid transport into the auxotrophic yeast cells treated with a quaternary ammonium salt in the presence and absence of arginine are given. A working hypothesis of the mechanism of these salts action as a specific inhibition of nutrient transport is discussed. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs, 8 figs

  1. Proteolytic activities in yeast after UV irradiation. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwencke, J.; Moustacchi, E.

    1982-01-01

    Specific proteolytic activities are known to be induced in Escherichia coli following irradiation. Consequently it seemed of interest to investigate whether variations in proteinase activities occur in yeast. Among the five most well known proteinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have found that proteinase B activity increases up to three times in wild-type RAD + yeast cells after a dose of 50 Jm -2 of 254 nm ultraviolet light (40% survival). Carboxypeptidase Y and aminopeptidase I (leucin aminopeptidase) activities were only moderately increased. Proteinase A activity was only slightly enhanced, while aminopeptidase II (lysin aminopeptidase) was unaffected in both RAD + strains studied. The observed post UV-increase in proteinase B activity was inhibited by cycloheximide and was dose dependent. Increases in proteinase B levels were independent of the activation method used to destroy the proteinase B-inhibitor complex present in the crude yeast extracts. A standard method for comparison of the postirradiation levels among different proteinases, strains and methods of activation is presented. (orig.)

  2. Proteolytic activities in yeast after UV irradiation. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwencke, J.; Moustacchi, E.

    1982-04-01

    Specific proteolytic activities are known to be induced in Escherichia coli following irradiation. Consequently it seemed of interest to investigate whether variations in proteinase activities occur in yeast. Among the five most well known proteinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have found that proteinase B activity increases up to three times in wild-type RAD/sup +/ yeast cells after a dose of 50 Jm/sup -2/ of 254 nm ultraviolet light (40% survival). Carboxypeptidase Y and aminopeptidase I (leucin aminopeptidase) activities were only moderately increased. Proteinase A activity was only slightly enhanced, while aminopeptidase II (lysin aminopeptidase) was unaffected in both RAD/sup +/ strains studied. The observed post UV-increase in proteinase B activity was inhibited by cycloheximide and was dose dependent. Increases in proteinase B levels were independent of the activation method used to destroy the proteinase B-inhibitor complex present in the crude yeast extracts. A standard method for comparison of the postirradiation levels among different proteinases, strains and methods of activation is presented.

  3. Novel Wine Yeast for Improved Utilisation of Proline during Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danfeng Long

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Proline is the predominant amino acid in grape juice, but it is poorly assimilated by wine yeast under the anaerobic conditions typical of most fermentations. Exploiting the abundance of this naturally occurring nitrogen source to overcome the need for nitrogen supplementation and/or the risk of stuck or sluggish fermentations would be most beneficial. This study describes the isolation and evaluation of a novel wine yeast isolate, Q7, obtained through ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS mutagenesis. The utilisation of proline by the EMS isolate was markedly higher than by the QA23 wild type strain, with approximately 700 and 300 mg/L more consumed under aerobic and self-anaerobic fermentation conditions, respectively, in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources. Higher intracellular proline contents in the wild type strain implied a lesser rate of proline catabolism or incorporation by this strain, but with higher cell viability after freezing treatment. The expression of key genes (PUT1, PUT2, PUT3, PUT4, GAP1 and URE2 involved in proline degradation, transport and repression were compared between the parent strain and the isolate, revealing key differences. The application of these strains for efficient conduct for nitrogen-limited fermentations is a possibility.

  4. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Solving ethanol production problems with genetically modified yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abreu-Cavalheiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The current world demand for bioethanol is increasing as a consequence of low fossil fuel availability and a growing number of ethanol/gasoline flex-fuel cars. In addition, countries in several parts of the world have agreed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and the use of ethanol as a fuel (which produces fewer pollutants than petroleum products has been considered to be a good alternative to petroleum products. The ethanol that is produced in Brazil from the first-generation process is optimized and can be accomplished at low cost. However, because of the large volume of ethanol that is produced and traded each year, any small improvement in the process could represent a savings of billions dollars. Several Brazilian research programs are investing in sugarcane improvement, but little attention has been given to the improvement of yeast strains that participate in the first-generation process at present. The Brazilian ethanol production process uses sugarcane as a carbon source for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is then grown at a high cellular density and high temperatures in large-capacity open tanks with cells recycle. All of these culture conditions compel the yeast to cope with several types of stress. Among the main stressors are high temperatures and high ethanol concentrations inside the fermentation tanks during alcohol production. Moreover, the competition between the desired yeast strains, which are inoculated at the beginning of the process, with contaminants such as wild type yeasts and bacteria, requires acid treatment to successfully recycle the cells. This review is focused on describing the problems and stressors within the Brazilian ethanol production system. It also highlights some genetic modifications that can help to circumvent these difficulties in yeast.

  6. Solving ethanol production problems with genetically modified yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Cavalheiro, A; Monteiro, G

    2013-01-01

    The current world demand for bioethanol is increasing as a consequence of low fossil fuel availability and a growing number of ethanol/gasoline flex-fuel cars. In addition, countries in several parts of the world have agreed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and the use of ethanol as a fuel (which produces fewer pollutants than petroleum products) has been considered to be a good alternative to petroleum products. The ethanol that is produced in Brazil from the first-generation process is optimized and can be accomplished at low cost. However, because of the large volume of ethanol that is produced and traded each year, any small improvement in the process could represent a savings of billions dollars. Several Brazilian research programs are investing in sugarcane improvement, but little attention has been given to the improvement of yeast strains that participate in the first-generation process at present. The Brazilian ethanol production process uses sugarcane as a carbon source for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is then grown at a high cellular density and high temperatures in large-capacity open tanks with cells recycle. All of these culture conditions compel the yeast to cope with several types of stress. Among the main stressors are high temperatures and high ethanol concentrations inside the fermentation tanks during alcohol production. Moreover, the competition between the desired yeast strains, which are inoculated at the beginning of the process, with contaminants such as wild type yeasts and bacteria, requires acid treatment to successfully recycle the cells. This review is focused on describing the problems and stressors within the Brazilian ethanol production system. It also highlights some genetic modifications that can help to circumvent these difficulties in yeast.

  7. Compositional and Functional Differences in the Human Gut Microbiome Correlate with Clinical Outcome following Infection with Wild-Type Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Brady, Arthur; Jones, Cheron; Song, Yang; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Blohmke, Christoph J; Pollard, Andrew J; Magder, Laurence S; Fasano, Alessio; Sztein, Marcelo B; Fraser, Claire M

    2018-05-08

    Insights into disease susceptibility as well as the efficacy of vaccines against typhoid and other enteric pathogens may be informed by better understanding the relationship between the effector immune response and the gut microbiota. In the present study, we characterized the composition (16S rRNA gene profiling) and function (RNA sequencing [RNA-seq]) of the gut microbiota following immunization and subsequent exposure to wild-type Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in a human challenge model to further investigate the central hypothesis that clinical outcomes may be linked to the gut microbiota. Metatranscriptome analysis of longitudinal stool samples collected from study subjects revealed two stable patterns of gene expression for the human gut microbiota, dominated by transcripts from either Methanobrevibacter or a diverse representation of genera in the Firmicutes phylum. Immunization with one of two live oral attenuated vaccines against S.  Typhi had minimal effects on the composition or function of the gut microbiota. It was observed that subjects harboring the methanogen-dominated transcriptome community at baseline displayed a lower risk of developing symptoms of typhoid following challenge with wild-type S.  Typhi. Furthermore, genes encoding antioxidant proteins, metal homeostasis and transport proteins, and heat shock proteins were expressed at a higher level at baseline or after challenge with S.  Typhi in subjects who did not develop symptoms of typhoid. These data suggest that functional differences relating to redox potential and ion homeostasis in the gut microbiota may impact clinical outcomes following exposure to wild-type S.  Typhi. IMPORTANCE S.  Typhi is a significant cause of systemic febrile morbidity in settings with poor sanitation and limited access to clean water. It has been demonstrated that the human gut microbiota can influence mucosal immune responses, but there is little information available on the impact of the human gut

  8. Segregating YKU80 and TLC1 alleles underlying natural variation in telomere properties in wild yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Liti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In yeast, as in humans, telomere length varies among individuals and is controlled by multiple loci. In a quest to define the extent of variation in telomere length, we screened 112 wild-type Saccharomyces sensu stricto isolates. We found extensive telomere length variation in S. paradoxus isolates. This phenotype correlated with their geographic origin: European strains were observed to have extremely short telomeres (400 bp. Insertions of a URA3 gene near telomeres allowed accurate analysis of individual telomere lengths and telomere position effect (TPE. Crossing the American and European strains resulted in F1 spores with a continuum of telomere lengths consistent with what would be predicted if many quantitative trait loci (QTLs were involved in length maintenance. Variation in TPE is similarly quantitative but only weakly correlated with telomere length. Genotyping F1 segregants indicated several QTLs associated with telomere length and silencing variation. These QTLs include likely candidate genes but also map to regions where there are no known genes involved in telomeric properties. We detected transgressive segregation for both phenotypes. We validated by reciprocal hemizygosity that YKU80 and TLC1 are telomere-length QTLs in the two S. paradoxus subpopulations. Furthermore, we propose that sequence divergence within the Ku heterodimer generates negative epistasis within one of the allelic combinations (American-YKU70 and European-YKU80 resulting in very short telomeres.

  9. Segregating YKU80 and TLC1 alleles underlying natural variation in telomere properties in wild yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liti, Gianni; Haricharan, Svasti; Cubillos, Francisco A; Tierney, Anna L; Sharp, Sarah; Bertuch, Alison A; Parts, Leopold; Bailes, Elizabeth; Louis, Edward J

    2009-09-01

    In yeast, as in humans, telomere length varies among individuals and is controlled by multiple loci. In a quest to define the extent of variation in telomere length, we screened 112 wild-type Saccharomyces sensu stricto isolates. We found extensive telomere length variation in S. paradoxus isolates. This phenotype correlated with their geographic origin: European strains were observed to have extremely short telomeres (400 bp). Insertions of a URA3 gene near telomeres allowed accurate analysis of individual telomere lengths and telomere position effect (TPE). Crossing the American and European strains resulted in F1 spores with a continuum of telomere lengths consistent with what would be predicted if many quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were involved in length maintenance. Variation in TPE is similarly quantitative but only weakly correlated with telomere length. Genotyping F1 segregants indicated several QTLs associated with telomere length and silencing variation. These QTLs include likely candidate genes but also map to regions where there are no known genes involved in telomeric properties. We detected transgressive segregation for both phenotypes. We validated by reciprocal hemizygosity that YKU80 and TLC1 are telomere-length QTLs in the two S. paradoxus subpopulations. Furthermore, we propose that sequence divergence within the Ku heterodimer generates negative epistasis within one of the allelic combinations (American-YKU70 and European-YKU80) resulting in very short telomeres.

  10. Chemical shift assignments of the first and second RRMs of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK-target RNA binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2017-10-01

    Negative regulator differentiation 1 (Nrd1), a fission yeast RNA binding protein, modulates cytokinesis and sexual development and contributes to stress granule formation in response to environmental stresses. Nrd1 comprises four RRM domains and binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA that encodes the myosin II light chain. Nrd1 binds the Cpc2 fission-yeast RACK1 homolog, and the interaction promotes Nrd1 localization to stress granules. Interestingly, Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylates Thr40 in the unstructured N-terminal region and Thr126 in the first RRM domain of Nrd1. Phosphorylation significantly reduces RNA-binding activity and likely modulates Nrd1 function. To reveal the relationship between the structure and function of Nrd1 and how phosphorylation affects structure, we used heteronuclear NMR techniques to investigate the three-dimensional structure of Nrd1. Here we report the 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N resonance assignments of RRM1-RRM2 (residues 108-284) comprising the first and second RRMs obtained using heteronuclear NMR techniques. Secondary structures derived from the chemical shifts are reported. These data should contribute to the understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the RRM1-RRM2 region of Nrd1 and the perturbation caused by phosphorylation.

  11. MALDI-TOF MS typing enables the classification of brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces to major beer styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Alexander; Usbeck, Julia C; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-01-01

    Brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces are either available from yeast distributor centers or from breweries employing their own "in-house strains". During the last years, the classification and characterization of yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces was achieved by using biochemical and DNA-based methods. The current lack of fast, cost-effective and simple methods to classify brewing yeasts to a beer type, may be closed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) upon establishment of a database based on sub-proteome spectra from reference strains of brewing yeasts. In this study an extendable "brewing yeast" spectra database was established including 52 brewing yeast strains of the most important types of bottom- and top-fermenting strains as well as beer-spoiling S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains. 1560 single spectra, prepared with a standardized sample preparation method, were finally compared against the established database and investigated by bioinformatic analyses for similarities and distinctions. A 100% separation between bottom-, top-fermenting and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains was achieved. Differentiation between Alt and Kölsch strains was not achieved because of the high similarity of their protein patterns. Whereas the Ale strains show a high degree of dissimilarity with regard to their sub-proteome. These results were supported by MDS and DAPC analysis of all recorded spectra. Within five clusters of beer types that were distinguished, and the wheat beer (WB) cluster has a clear separation from other groups. With the establishment of this MALDI-TOF MS spectra database proof of concept is provided of the discriminatory power of this technique to classify brewing yeasts into different major beer types in a rapid, easy way, and focus brewing trails accordingly. It can be extended to yeasts for specialty beer types and other applications including wine making or baking.

  12. MALDI-TOF MS typing enables the classification of brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces to major beer styles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lauterbach

    Full Text Available Brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces are either available from yeast distributor centers or from breweries employing their own "in-house strains". During the last years, the classification and characterization of yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces was achieved by using biochemical and DNA-based methods. The current lack of fast, cost-effective and simple methods to classify brewing yeasts to a beer type, may be closed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS upon establishment of a database based on sub-proteome spectra from reference strains of brewing yeasts. In this study an extendable "brewing yeast" spectra database was established including 52 brewing yeast strains of the most important types of bottom- and top-fermenting strains as well as beer-spoiling S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains. 1560 single spectra, prepared with a standardized sample preparation method, were finally compared against the established database and investigated by bioinformatic analyses for similarities and distinctions. A 100% separation between bottom-, top-fermenting and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains was achieved. Differentiation between Alt and Kölsch strains was not achieved because of the high similarity of their protein patterns. Whereas the Ale strains show a high degree of dissimilarity with regard to their sub-proteome. These results were supported by MDS and DAPC analysis of all recorded spectra. Within five clusters of beer types that were distinguished, and the wheat beer (WB cluster has a clear separation from other groups. With the establishment of this MALDI-TOF MS spectra database proof of concept is provided of the discriminatory power of this technique to classify brewing yeasts into different major beer types in a rapid, easy way, and focus brewing trails accordingly. It can be extended to yeasts for specialty beer types and other applications including wine making or baking.

  13. Identification of the Transcription Factor Znc1p, which Regulates the Yeast-to-Hypha Transition in the Dimorphic Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Vazquez, Azul; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Angelica; Domínguez, Ángel; Rachubinski, Richard; Riquelme, Meritxell; Cuellar-Mata, Patricia; Guzman, Juan Carlos Torres

    2013-01-01

    The dimorphic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is used as a model to study fungal differentiation because it grows as yeast-like cells or forms hyphal cells in response to changes in environmental conditions. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a gene, ZNC1, involved in the dimorphic transition in Y. lipolytica. The ZNC1 gene encodes a 782 amino acid protein that contains a Zn(II)2C6 fungal-type zinc finger DNA-binding domain and a leucine zipper domain. ZNC1 transcription is elevated during yeast growth and decreases during the formation of mycelium. Cells in which ZNC1 has been deleted show increased hyphal cell formation. Znc1p-GFP localizes to the nucleus, but mutations within the leucine zipper domain of Znc1p, and to a lesser extent within the Zn(II)2C6 domain, result in a mislocalization of Znc1p to the cytoplasm. Microarrays comparing gene expression between znc1::URA3 and wild-type cells during both exponential growth and the induction of the yeast-to-hypha transition revealed 1,214 genes whose expression was changed by 2-fold or more under at least one of the conditions analyzed. Our results suggest that Znc1p acts as a transcription factor repressing hyphal cell formation and functions as part of a complex network regulating mycelial growth in Y. lipolytica. PMID:23826133

  14. Heterologous Expression of Membrane and Soluble Proteins Derepresses GCN4 mRNA Translation in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, L.; Pedersen, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    -ATPase also induced GCN4 translation. Derepression of GCN4 translation required phosphorylation of eIF-2 , the tRNA binding domain of Gcn2p, and the ribosome-associated proteins Gcn1p and Gcn20p. The increase in Gcn4p density in response to heterologous expression did not induce transcription from the HIS4...... promoter, a traditional Gcn4p target.......This paper describes the first physiological response at the translational level towards heterologous protein production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In yeast, the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF-2 ) by Gcn2p protein kinase mediates derepression of GCN4 mRNA translation. Gcn4...

  15. The Accuracy of Seryl-tRNA Synthesis

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    Ita Gruic-Sovulj

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The high level of translational fidelity is ensured by various types of quality control mechanisms, which are adapted to prevent or correct naturally occurring mistakes. Accurate aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis is mostly dependent on the specificity of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS, i.e. their ability to choose among competing structurally similar substrates. Our studies have revealed that accurate seryl-tRNA synthesis in yeast and plants is accomplished via tRNA-assisted optimization of amino acid binding to the active site of seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS. Based on our recent kinetic data, a mechanism is proposed by which transient protein : RNA complex activates the cognate amino acid more efficiently and more specifically than the apoenzyme alone. This may proceed via a tRNA induced conformational change in the enzyme’s active site. The influence of tRNASer, on the activation of serine by SerRS variants mutated in the active site, is much less pronounced. Although SerRS misactivates structurally similar threonine in vitro, the formation of such erroneous threonyl-adenylate is reduced in the presence of nonchargeable tRNASer analog. Thus, the sequence-specific tRNA : SerRS interactions enhance the accuracy of amino acid recognition. Another type of quality control mechanism in tRNA serylation is assumed to be based on the complex formation between SerRS and a nonsynthetase protein. Using in vivo interaction screen, yeast peroxin Pex21p was identified as SerRS interacting protein. This was confirmed by an in vitro binding assay. Kinetic experiments performed in the presence of Pex21p revealed that this peroxin acts as an activator of seryl-tRNA synthetase in the aminoacylation reaction.

  16. Production of yeast extract from whey using Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revillion Jean P. de Palma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was grown on whey to produce nucleotide-rich yeast extracts. Thermal treatments of cells at 35 or 50ºC for 15-30h resulted in yeast extracts containing about 20 g/L protein, with only the second treatment resulting in the presence of small amounts of RNA. In contrast, autolysis in buffered solution was the unique treatment that resulted in release of high amounts of intracellular RNA, being, therefore, the better procedure to produce 5'-nucletide rich extract with K. marxianus.

  17. The rate of metabolism as a factor determining longevity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molon, Mateusz; Szajwaj, Monika; Tchorzewski, Marek; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Niewiadomska, Ewa; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2016-02-01

    Despite many controversies, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be used as a model organism for the study of aging. Numerous theories and hypotheses have been created for several decades, yet basic mechanisms of aging have remained unclear. Therefore, the principal aim of this work is to propose a possible mechanism leading to increased longevity in yeast. In this paper, we suggest for the first time that there is a link between decreased metabolic activity, fertility and longevity expressed as time of life in yeast. Determination of reproductive potential and total lifespan with the use of fob1Δ and sfp1Δ mutants allows us to compare the "longevity" presented as the number of produced daughters with the longevity expressed as the time of life. The results of analyses presented in this paper suggest the need for a change in the definition of longevity of yeast by taking into consideration the time parameter. The mutants that have been described as "long-lived" in the literature, such as the fob1Δ mutant, have an increased reproductive potential but live no longer than their standard counterparts. On the other hand, the sfp1Δ mutant and the wild-type strain produce a similar number of daughter cells, but the former lives much longer. Our results demonstrate a correlation between the decreased efficiency of the translational apparatus and the longevity of the sfp1Δ mutant. We suggest that a possible factor regulating the lifespan is the rate of cell metabolism. To measure the basic metabolism of the yeast cells, we used the isothermal microcalorimetry method. In the case of sfp1Δ, the flow of energy, ATP concentration, polysome profile and translational fitness are significantly lower in comparison with the wild-type strain and the fob1Δ mutant.

  18. Genetic variability and evolutionary implications of RNA silencing suppressor genes in RNA1 of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus isolates infecting sweetpotato and related wild species.

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    Arthur K Tugume

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3, a putative hydrophobic protein (p7 and a 22-kDa protein (p22 from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3 able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in

  19. Comparison of protocols and RNA carriers for plasma miRNA isolation. Unraveling RNA carrier influence on miRNA isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Laura; Fernández-Pardo, Álvaro; Oto, Julia; Medina, Pilar; España, Francisco; Navarro, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs are promising biomarkers in biological fluids in several diseases. Different plasma RNA isolation protocols and carriers are available, but their efficiencies have been scarcely compared. Plasma microRNAs were isolated using a phenol and column-based procedure and a column-based procedure, in the presence or absence of two RNA carriers (yeast RNA and MS2 RNA). We evaluated the presence of PCR inhibitors and the relative abundance of certain microRNAs by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we analyzed the association between different isolation protocols, the relative abundance of the miRNAs in the sample, the GC content and the free energy of microRNAs. In all microRNAs analyzed, the addition of yeast RNA as a carrier in the different isolation protocols used gave lower raw Cq values, indicating higher microRNA recovery. Moreover, this increase in microRNAs recovery was dependent on their own relative abundance in the sample, their GC content and the free-energy of their own most stable secondary structure. Furthermore, the normalization of microRNA levels by an endogenous microRNA is more reliable than the normalization by plasma volume, as it reduced the difference in microRNA fold abundance between the different isolation protocols evaluated. Our thorough study indicates that a standardization of pre- and analytical conditions is necessary to obtain reproducible inter-laboratory results in plasma microRNA studies. PMID:29077772

  20. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Occurrence of Killer Yeast Strains in Fruit and Berry Wine Yeast Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintare Gulbiniene

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apple, cranberry, chokeberry and Lithuanian red grape wine yeast populations were used for the determination of killer yeast occurrence. According to the tests of the killer characteristics and immunity the isolated strains were divided into seven groups. In this work the activity of killer toxins purified from some typical strains was evaluated. The analysed strains produced different amounts of active killer toxin and some of them possessed new industrially significant killer properties. Total dsRNA extractions in 11 killer strains of yeast isolated from spontaneous fermentations revealed that the molecular basis of the killer phenomenon was not only dsRNAs, but also unidentified genetic determinants.

  2. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  3. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed

  4. Isolation of glutathione-deficient mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, M.; Eckardt, F.; Summer, K.-H.

    1986-01-01

    Glutathione-deficient (gsh - ) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated after UV treatment using MNNG as selective agent. For genetic and biochemical characterization 5 mutant strains were chosen which exhibited considerably decreased residual GSH contents varying from 2 to 6% of the wild-type levels. All 5 isolates showed a 2:2 segregation of the gsh - :GSH + phenotypes alluding to a monogenic recessive mutation. Complementation analysis indicates that all gsh - mutants belong to one complementation group. (Auth.)

  5. Activation Of Wild-Type Hras Suppresses The Earliest Stages Of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Weyandt

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Loss of wild-type Hras promotes the earliest stages of pancreatic tumorigenesis, and moreover results in more rapid progression of the disease. As such, mechanisms leading to activation of wild-type Ras proteins, including but not limited to redox-dependent reactions, may influence the development of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Production and Its Anti-hyperglycemic Effects of γ-Aminobutyric Acid from the Wild Yeast Strain Pichia silvicola UL6-1 and Sporobolomyces carnicolor 402-JB-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Min; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2017-09-01

    This study was done to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from wild yeast as well as investigate its anti-hyperglycemic effects. Among ten GABA-producing yeast strains, Pichia silvicola UL6-1 and Sporobolomyces carnicolor 402-JB-1 produced high GABA concentration of 134.4 µg/mL and 179.2 µg/mL, respectively. P. silvicola UL6-1 showed a maximum GABA yield of 136.5 µg/mL and 200.8 µg/mL from S. carnicolor 402-JB-1 when they were cultured for 30 hr at 30℃ in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose medium. The cell-free extract from P. silvicola UL6-1 and S. carnicolor 402-JB-1 showed very high anti-hyperglycemic α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of 72.3% and 69.9%, respectively. Additionally, their cell-free extract-containing GABA showed the anti-hyperglycemic effect in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats.

  7. The yeast PNC1 longevity gene is up-regulated by mRNA mistranslation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel M Silva

    Full Text Available Translation fidelity is critical for protein synthesis and to ensure correct cell functioning. Mutations in the protein synthesis machinery or environmental factors that increase synthesis of mistranslated proteins result in cell death and degeneration and are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and with an increasing number of mitochondrial disorders. Remarkably, mRNA mistranslation plays critical roles in the evolution of the genetic code, can be beneficial under stress conditions in yeast and in Escherichia coli and is an important source of peptides for MHC class I complex in dendritic cells. Despite this, its biology has been overlooked over the years due to technical difficulties in its detection and quantification. In order to shed new light on the biological relevance of mistranslation we have generated codon misreading in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using drugs and tRNA engineering methodologies. Surprisingly, such mistranslation up-regulated the longevity gene PNC1. Similar results were also obtained in cells grown in the presence of amino acid analogues that promote protein misfolding. The overall data showed that PNC1 is a biomarker of mRNA mistranslation and protein misfolding and that PNC1-GFP fusions can be used to monitor these two important biological phenomena in vivo in an easy manner, thus opening new avenues to understand their biological relevance.

  8. Effect of ion implantation on apple wine yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Andong; Chen Hongge; Zhang Shimin; Jia Cuiying

    2004-01-01

    The wild type apple wine yeast Y 02 was treated by ion implantation with the dose of 8 x 10 15 ion/cm 2 . As results, a special mutant strain, ION II -11 dry, was obtained. The morphology characters, partial biochemistry characters, mycelium protein of the mutant strain were distinctively changed compared with original strain Y 02 . After the fermentation test ,the apple wine producing rate of the mutant strain increased 22.4% compared with original strain. These results showed that ion implantation was an effective method for mutagenesis

  9. Yeast dynamics during spontaneous fermentation of mawe and tchoukoutou, two traditional products from Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greppi, Anna; Rantisou, Kalliopi; Padonou, Wilfrid

    2013-01-01

    Mawe and tchoukoutou are two traditional fermented foods largely consumed in Benin, West Africa. Their preparations remain as a house art and they are the result of spontaneous fermentation processes. In this study, dynamics of the yeast populations occurring during spontaneous fermentations...... of mawe and tchoukoutou were investigated using both culture-dependent and -independent approaches. For each product, two productions were followed. Samples were taken at different fermentation times and yeasts were isolated, resulting in the collection of 177 isolates. They were identified by the PCR......-DGGE technique followed by the sequencing of the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. The predominant yeast species identified were typed by rep-PCR. Candida krusei was the predominant yeast species in mawe fermentation followed by Candida glabrata and Kluyveromyces marxianus. Other yeast species were detected...

  10. Yeast as a Heterologous Model System to Uncover Type III Effector Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crina Popa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Type III effectors (T3E are key virulence proteins that are injected by bacterial pathogens inside the cells of their host to subvert cellular processes and contribute to disease. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an important heterologous system for the functional characterisation of T3E proteins in a eukaryotic environment. Importantly, yeast contains eukaryotic processes with low redundancy and are devoid of immunity mechanisms that counteract T3Es and mask their function. Expression in yeast of effectors from both plant and animal pathogens that perturb conserved cellular processes often resulted in robust phenotypes that were exploited to elucidate effector functions, biochemical properties, and host targets. The genetic tractability of yeast and its amenability for high-throughput functional studies contributed to the success of this system that, in recent years, has been used to study over 100 effectors. Here, we provide a critical view on this body of work and describe advantages and limitations inherent to the use of yeast in T3E research. "Favourite" targets of T3Es in yeast are cytoskeleton components and small GTPases of the Rho family. We describe how mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling, vesicle trafficking, membrane structures, and programmed cell death are also often altered by T3Es in yeast and how this reflects their function in the natural host. We describe how effector structure-function studies and analysis of candidate targeted processes or pathways can be carried out in yeast. We critically analyse technologies that have been used in yeast to assign biochemical functions to T3Es, including transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as suppressor, gain-of-function, or synthetic lethality screens. We also describe how yeast can be used to select for molecules that block T3E function in search of new antibacterial drugs with medical applications. Finally, we provide our opinion on the limitations

  11. Evidence that the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol in yeast involves a 35-kDa membrane protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palamarczyk, G.; Drake, R.; Haley, B.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to identify the polypeptide chain of glucosylphosphodolichol synthase, yeast microsomal membranes were allowed to react with 5-azido[β- 32 P]UDPGlc, a photoactive analogue of UDPGlc, which is a substrate for this enzyme. Upon photolysis the 32 P-labeled probe was shown to link covalently to a 35-kDa protein present in microsomal membranes prepared from several wild-type yeast strains. Binding was either reduced or absent in the microsomal membranes from two yeast mutants (alg5 and dpg1) that are known to be defective in the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol. The microsomes isolated from a heterozygous diploid strain alg5::dpg1 generated from these two mutants exhibited partial restoration of both the ability to photolabel the 35-kDa protein and the ability to catalyze the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol. Microsomal membranes from a mutant strain that synthesized glucosylphosphodolichol but lacked the ability to transfer the glucosyl residue to the growing lipid-linked oligosaccharide (alg6) exhibited labeling with 5-azido[β- 32 P]UDPGlc comparable to that found in microsomes from the wild-type strain. In all cases photoinsertion of the probe into the 35-kDa protein correlated with the level of synthase assayed in the microsomal membranes. These results strongly support the conclusion that the 35-kDa protein labeled in these experiments is a component of glucosylphosphodolichol synthase

  12. Mutation induction in haploid yeast after split-dose radiation-exposure. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, K.; Zoelzer, F.; Kiefer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Mutation induction was investigated in wild-type haploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae after split-dose UV-irradiation. Cells were exposed to fractionated 254 nm-UV-doses separated by intervals from 0 to 6 h with incubation either on non-nutrient or nutrient agar between. The test parameter was resistance to canavanine. If modifications of sensitivity due to incubation are appropriately taken into account there is no change of mutation frequency. (orig.)

  13. MALDI-TOF MS typing enables the classification of brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces to major beer styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Alexander; Usbeck, Julia C.; Behr, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Brewing yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces are either available from yeast distributor centers or from breweries employing their own “in-house strains”. During the last years, the classification and characterization of yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces was achieved by using biochemical and DNA-based methods. The current lack of fast, cost-effective and simple methods to classify brewing yeasts to a beer type, may be closed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization–Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) upon establishment of a database based on sub-proteome spectra from reference strains of brewing yeasts. In this study an extendable “brewing yeast” spectra database was established including 52 brewing yeast strains of the most important types of bottom- and top-fermenting strains as well as beer-spoiling S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains. 1560 single spectra, prepared with a standardized sample preparation method, were finally compared against the established database and investigated by bioinformatic analyses for similarities and distinctions. A 100% separation between bottom-, top-fermenting and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus strains was achieved. Differentiation between Alt and Kölsch strains was not achieved because of the high similarity of their protein patterns. Whereas the Ale strains show a high degree of dissimilarity with regard to their sub-proteome. These results were supported by MDS and DAPC analysis of all recorded spectra. Within five clusters of beer types that were distinguished, and the wheat beer (WB) cluster has a clear separation from other groups. With the establishment of this MALDI-TOF MS spectra database proof of concept is provided of the discriminatory power of this technique to classify brewing yeasts into different major beer types in a rapid, easy way, and focus brewing trails accordingly. It can be extended to yeasts for specialty beer types and other applications including wine making or baking. PMID

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary phasing of the heteromerization domain of the tRNA-export and aminoacylation cofactor Arc1p from yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simader, Hannes; Suck, Dietrich

    2006-01-01

    The heteromerization domain of an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase cofactor from yeast was crystallized, complete selenomethionine MAD data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution and preliminary phasing reveals the presence of 20 monomers in the asymmetric unit. Eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) must be integrated into an efficient tRNA-export and shuttling machinery. This is reflected by the presence of additional protein–protein interaction domains and a correspondingly higher degree of complex formation in eukaryotic aaRSs. However, the structural basis of interaction between eukaryotic aaRSs and associated protein cofactors has remained elusive. The N-terminal heteromerization domain of the tRNA aminoacylation and export cofactor Arc1p has been cloned from yeast, expressed and purified. Crystals have been obtained belonging to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 222.32, b = 89.46, c = 126.79 Å, β = 99.39°. Calculated Matthews coefficients are compatible with the presence of 10–25 monomers in the asymmetric unit. A complete multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion data set has been collected from a selenomethionine-substituted crystal at 2.8 Å resolution. Preliminary phasing reveals the presence of 20 monomers organized in five tetramers per asymmetric unit

  15. A genetic and pharmacological analysis of isoprenoid pathway by LC-MS/MS in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Takami

    Full Text Available Currently, statins are the only drugs acting on the mammalian isoprenoid pathway. The mammalian genes in this pathway are not easily amenable to genetic manipulation. Thus, it is difficult to study the effects of the inhibition of various enzymes on the intermediate and final products in the isoprenoid pathway. In fission yeast, antifungal compounds such as azoles and terbinafine are available as inhibitors of the pathway in addition to statins, and various isoprenoid pathway mutants are also available. Here in these mutants, treated with statins or antifungals, we quantified the final and intermediate products of the fission yeast isoprenoid pathway using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In hmg1-1, a mutant of the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, ergosterol (a final sterol product, and squalene (an intermediate pathway product, were decreased to approximately 80% and 10%, respectively, compared with that of wild-type cells. Consistently in wild-type cells, pravastatin, an HMGR inhibitor decreased ergosterol and squalene, and the effect was more pronounced on squalene. In hmg1-1 mutant and in wild-type cells treated with pravastatin, the decrease in the levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate respectively was larger than that of ergosterol but was smaller than that of squalene. In Δerg6 or Δsts1 cells, mutants of the genes involved in the last step of the pathway, ergosterol was not detected, and the changes of intermediate product levels were distinct from that of hmg1-1 mutant. Notably, in wild-type cells miconazole and terbinafine only slightly decreased ergosterol level. Altogether, these studies suggest that the pleiotropic phenotypes caused by the hmg1-1 mutation and pravastatin might be due to decreased levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates or other isoprenoid pathway intermediate products rather than due to a decreased ergosterol level.

  16. Insight into the molecular mechanism of yeast acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase mutants F510I, N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R resistant to soraphen A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Chen, Qingqing; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Tonghui

    2018-02-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases (ACCs) is the first committed enzyme of fatty acid synthesis pathway. The inhibition of ACC is thought to be beneficial not only for diseases related to metabolism, such as type-2 diabetes, but also for infectious disease like bacterial infection disease. Soraphen A, a potent allosteric inhibitor of BC domain of yeast ACC, exhibit lower binding affinities to several yeast ACC mutants and the corresponding drug resistance mechanisms are still unknown. We report here a theoretical study of binding of soraphen A to wild type and yeast ACC mutants (including F510I, N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R) via molecular dynamic simulation and molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area free energy calculations methods. The calculated binding free energies of soraphen A to yeast ACC mutants are weaker than to wild type, which is highly consistent with the experimental results. The mutant F510I weakens the binding affinity of soraphen A to yeast ACC mainly by decreasing the van der Waals contributions, while the weaker binding affinities of Soraphen A to other yeast ACC mutants including N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R are largely attributed to the decreased net electrostatic (ΔE ele + ΔG GB) interactions. Our simulation results could provide important insights for the development of more potent ACC inhibitors.

  17. Innate immune responses to obesity in cloned and wild-type domestic pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan

    as a refined pig model for obesity-induced innate host responses by reducing pig-to-pig biological variation compared to wild-type (WT) pigs (n=19). Pigs were fed ad libitum with a high fat/high sucrose diet to induce obesity or kept lean on a restricted diet (60% of ad libitum intake) beginning at three...... months of age. mRNA expression levels were determined for 39 innate immune factors on a high-throughput qPCR system in samples from liver, abdominal fat, mesenteric fat and subcutaneous fat. Previous findings have suggested that cloning may affect certain phenotypic traits of pigs including basic...... concentrations and responsiveness of components of the innate immune system. Terminal body weights at 7½ - 9½ months of age were significantly higher for both (WT and cloned) obese groups compared to the lean groups. However, obese WT pigs weighed significantly more than obese cloned pigs (P

  18. 6S-1 RNA function leads to a delay in sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Amy T; Wassarman, Karen M

    2013-05-01

    We have discovered that 6S-1 RNA (encoded by bsrA) is important for appropriate timing of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis in that cells lacking 6S-1 RNA sporulate earlier than wild-type cells. The time to generate a mature spore once the decision to sporulate has been made is unaffected by 6S-1 RNA, and, therefore, we propose that it is the timing of onset of sporulation that is altered. Interestingly, the presence of cells lacking 6S-1 RNA in coculture leads to all cell types exhibiting an early-sporulation phenotype. We propose that cells lacking 6S-1 RNA modify their environment in a manner that promotes early sporulation. In support of this model, resuspension of wild-type cells in conditioned medium from ΔbsrA cultures also resulted in early sporulation. Use of Escherichia coli growth as a reporter of the nutritional status of conditioned media suggested that B. subtilis cells lacking 6S-1 RNA reduce the nutrient content of their environment earlier than wild-type cells. Several pathways known to impact the timing of sporulation, such as the skf- and sdp-dependent cannibalism pathways, were eliminated as potential targets of 6S-1 RNA-mediated changes, suggesting that 6S-1 RNA activity defines a novel mechanism for altering the timing of onset of sporulation. In addition, 6S-2 RNA does not influence the timing of sporulation, providing further evidence of the independent influences of these two related RNAs on cell physiology.

  19. Yeast petites and small colony variants: for everything there is a season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The yeast petite mutant was first found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The colony is small because of a block in the aerobic respiratory chain pathway, which generates ATP. The petite yeasts are thus unable to grow on nonfermentable carbon sources (such as glycerol or ethanol), and form small anaerobic-sized colonies when grown in the presence of fermentable carbon sources (such as glucose). The petite phenotype results from mutations in the mitochondrial genome, loss of mitochondria, or mutations in the host cell genome. The latter mutations affect nuclear-encoded genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation and these mutants are termed neutral petites. They all produce wild-type progeny when crossed with a wild-type strain. The staphylococcal small colony variant (SCV) is a slow-growing mutant that typically exhibits the loss of many phenotypic characteristics and pathogenic traits. SCVs are mostly small, nonpigmented, and nonhaemolytic. Their small size is often due to an inability to synthesize electron transport chain components and so cannot generate ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. Evidence suggests that they are responsible for persistent and/or recurrent infections. This chapter compares the physiological and genetic basis of the petite mutants and SCVs. The review focuses principally on two representatives, the eukaryote S. cerevisiae and the prokaryote Staphylococcus aureus. There is, clearly, commonality in the physiological response. Interestingly, the similarity, based on their physiological states, has not been commented on previously. The finding of an overlapping physiological response that occurs across a taxonomic divide is novel. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The fission yeast ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes UbcP3, Ubc15, and Rhp6 affect transcriptional silencing of the mating-type region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Inga Sig; Nielsen, Olaf; Murray, Johanne M

    2002-01-01

    Genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II are silenced when introduced near the mat2 or mat3 mating-type loci of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Silencing is mediated by a number of gene products and cis-acting elements. We report here the finding of novel trans-acting factors identified...... was not suppressed by a mutation in the 26S proteasome, suggesting that loss of silencing is not due to an increased degradation of silencing factors but rather to the posttranslational modification of proteins by ubiquitination. We discuss the implications of these results for the possible modes of action of UbcP3...

  1. Construction of the yeast whole-cell Rhizopus oryzae lipase biocatalyst with high activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-ling; Guo, Qin; Wang, Rui-zhi; Xu, Juan; Zhou, Chen-wei; Ruan, Hui; He, Guo-qing

    2011-07-01

    Surface display is effectively utilized to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Codon optimization has been proven to be effective in maximizing production of heterologous proteins in yeast. Here, the cDNA sequence of Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) was optimized and synthesized according to the codon bias of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and based on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface display system with α-agglutinin as an anchor, recombinant yeast displaying fully codon-optimized ROL with high activity was successfully constructed. Compared with the wild-type ROL-displaying yeast, the activity of the codon-optimized ROL yeast whole-cell biocatalyst (25 U/g dried cells) was 12.8-fold higher in a hydrolysis reaction using p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPP) as the substrate. To our knowledge, this was the first attempt to combine the techniques of yeast surface display and codon optimization for whole-cell biocatalyst construction. Consequently, the yeast whole-cell ROL biocatalyst was constructed with high activity. The optimum pH and temperature for the yeast whole-cell ROL biocatalyst were pH 7.0 and 40 °C. Furthermore, this whole-cell biocatalyst was applied to the hydrolysis of tributyrin and the resulted conversion of butyric acid reached 96.91% after 144 h.

  2. Mitochondrial depolarization in yeast zygotes inhibits clonal expansion of selfish mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Golyshev, Sergey A; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Sokolov, Svyatoslav S; Severin, Fedor F; Knorre, Dmitry A

    2017-04-01

    Non-identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) compete with each other within a cell and the ultimate variant of mtDNA present depends on their relative replication rates. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells as a model, we studied the effects of mitochondrial inhibitors on the competition between wild-type mtDNA and mutant selfish mtDNA in heteroplasmic zygotes. We found that decreasing mitochondrial transmembrane potential by adding uncouplers or valinomycin changes the competition outcomes in favor of the wild-type mtDNA. This effect was significantly lower in cells with disrupted mitochondria fission or repression of the autophagy-related genes ATG8 , ATG32 or ATG33 , implying that heteroplasmic zygotes activate mitochondrial degradation in response to the depolarization. Moreover, the rate of mitochondrially targeted GFP turnover was higher in zygotes treated with uncoupler than in haploid cells or untreated zygotes. Finally, we showed that vacuoles of zygotes with uncoupler-activated autophagy contained DNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mitochondrial depolarization inhibits clonal expansion of selfish mtDNA and this effect depends on mitochondrial fission and autophagy. These observations suggest an activation of mitochondria quality control mechanisms in heteroplasmic yeast zygotes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2011-01-01

    and have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells.......The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases...

  4. The Genomic Landscape and Evolutionary Resolution of Antagonistic Pleiotropy in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Qian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antagonistic pleiotropy (AP, or genetic tradeoff, is an important concept that is frequently invoked in theories of aging, cancer, genetic disease, and other common phenomena. However, the prevalence of AP, which genes are subject to AP, and to what extent and how AP may be resolved remain unclear. By measuring the fitness difference between the wild-type and null alleles of ∼5,000 nonessential genes in yeast, we found that in any given environment, yeast expresses hundreds of genes that harm rather than benefit the organism, demonstrating widespread AP. Nonetheless, under sufficient selection, AP is often resolvable through regulatory evolution, primarily by trans-acting changes, although in one case we also detected a cis-acting change and localized its causal mutation. However, AP is resolved more slowly in smaller populations, predicting more unresolved AP in multicellular organisms than in yeast. These findings provide an empirical foundation for AP-dependent theories and have broad biomedical and evolutionary implications.

  5. Comparison of preribosomal RNA processing pathways in yeast, plant and human cells - focus on coordinated action of endo- and exoribonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomecki, Rafal; Sikorski, Pawel J; Zakrzewska-Placzek, Monika

    2017-07-01

    Proper regulation of ribosome biosynthesis is mandatory for cellular adaptation, growth and proliferation. Ribosome biogenesis is the most energetically demanding cellular process, which requires tight control. Abnormalities in ribosome production have severe consequences, including developmental defects in plants and genetic diseases (ribosomopathies) in humans. One of the processes occurring during eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis is processing of the ribosomal RNA precursor molecule (pre-rRNA), synthesized by RNA polymerase I, into mature rRNAs. It must not only be accurate but must also be precisely coordinated with other phenomena leading to the synthesis of functional ribosomes: RNA modification, RNA folding, assembly with ribosomal proteins and nucleocytoplasmic RNP export. A multitude of ribosome biogenesis factors ensure that these events take place in a correct temporal order. Among them are endo- and exoribonucleases involved in pre-rRNA processing. Here, we thoroughly present a wide spectrum of ribonucleases participating in rRNA maturation, focusing on their biochemical properties, regulatory mechanisms and substrate specificity. We also discuss cooperation between various ribonucleolytic activities in particular stages of pre-rRNA processing, delineating major similarities and differences between three representative groups of eukaryotes: yeast, plants and humans. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. [Intragenic mitotic recombination induced by ultraviolet and gamma rays in radiosensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, I A; Kasinova, G V; Koval'tsova, S V

    1983-01-01

    The effect of UV- and gamma-irradiation on the survival and intragenic mitotic recombination (gene conversion) of 5 radiosensitive mutants was studied in comparison with the wild type. The level of spontaneous conversion was similar for RAD, rad2 and rad15, mutations xrs2 and xrs4 increasing and rad54 significantly decreasing it. The frequency of conversion induced by UV-light was greater in rad2, rad15 and xrs2 mutants and lower in xrs4, as compared to RAD. Gamma-irradiation caused induction of gene conversion with an equal frequency in RAD, rad2, rad15. Xrs2 and xrs4 mutations slightly decreased gamma-induced conversion. In rad54 mutant, UV-and gamma-induced conversion was practically absent. In the wild type yeast, a diploid strain is more resistant than a haploid, whereas in rad54 a diploid strain has the same or an increased sensitivity, as compared to a haploid strain (the "inverse ploidy effect"). This effect and also the block of induced mitotic recombination caused by rad54 indicate the presence in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae of repair pathways of UV- and gamma-induced damages acting in diploid cells and realised by recombination. The data obtained as a result of many years' investigation of genetic effects in radiosensitive mutants of yeast are summarised and considered.

  7. High-throughput determination of RNA structure by proximity ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Vijay; Qiu, Ruolan; Shendure, Jay

    2015-09-01

    We present an unbiased method to globally resolve RNA structures through pairwise contact measurements between interacting regions. RNA proximity ligation (RPL) uses proximity ligation of native RNA followed by deep sequencing to yield chimeric reads with ligation junctions in the vicinity of structurally proximate bases. We apply RPL in both baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human cells and generate contact probability maps for ribosomal and other abundant RNAs, including yeast snoRNAs, the RNA subunit of the signal recognition particle and the yeast U2 spliceosomal RNA homolog. RPL measurements correlate with established secondary structures for these RNA molecules, including stem-loop structures and long-range pseudoknots. We anticipate that RPL will complement the current repertoire of computational and experimental approaches in enabling the high-throughput determination of secondary and tertiary RNA structures.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a sexy yeast with a prion problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amy C; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-01-01

    Yeast prions are infectious proteins that spread exclusively by mating. The frequency of prions in the wild therefore largely reflects the rate of spread by mating counterbalanced by prion growth slowing effects in the host. We recently showed that the frequency of outcross mating is about 1% of mitotic doublings with 23-46% of total matings being outcrosses. These findings imply that even the mildest forms of the [PSI+], [URE3] and [PIN+] prions impart > 1% growth/survival detriment on their hosts. Our estimate of outcrossing suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is far more sexual than previously thought and would therefore be more responsive to the adaptive effects of natural selection compared with a strictly asexual yeast. Further, given its large effective population size, a growth/survival detriment of > 1% for yeast prions should strongly select against prion-infected strains in wild populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  9. The stress granule protein Vgl1 and poly(A)-binding protein Pab1 are required for doxorubicin resistance in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Takahiro; Satoh, Ryosuke; Umeda, Nanae; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Stress granules (SGs) as a mechanism of doxorubicin tolerance. ► We characterize the role of stress granules in doxorubicin tolerance. ► Deletion of components of SGs enhances doxorubicin sensitivity in fission yeast. ► Doxorubicin promotes SG formation when combined with heat shock. ► Doxorubicin regulates stress granule assembly independent of eIF2α phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Doxorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic widely used for chemotherapy. Although doxorubicin is effective in the treatment of several cancers, including solid tumors and leukemias, the basis of its mechanism of action is not completely understood. Here, we describe the effects of doxorubicin and its relationship with stress granules formation in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that disruption of genes encoding the components of stress granules, including vgl1 + , which encodes a multi-KH type RNA-binding protein, and pab1 + , which encodes a poly(A)-binding protein, resulted in greater sensitivity to doxorubicin than seen in wild-type cells. Disruption of the vgl1 + and pab1 + genes did not confer sensitivity to other anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. We also showed that doxorubicin treatment promoted stress granule formation when combined with heat shock. Notably, doxorubicin treatment did not induce hyperphosphorylation of eIF2α, suggesting that doxorubicin is involved in stress granule assembly independent of eIF2α phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of fission yeast for elucidating the molecular targets of doxorubicin toxicity and suggest a novel drug-resistance mechanism involving stress granule assembly.

  10. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  11. Probing of RNA structures in a positive sense RNA virus reveals selection pressures for structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Choudhary, Krishna; Aviran, Sharon; Perry, Keith L

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In single stranded (+)-sense RNA viruses, RNA structural elements (SEs) play essential roles in the infection process from replication to encapsidation. Using selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension sequencing (SHAPE-Seq) and covariation analysis, we explore the structural features of the third genome segment of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), RNA3 (2216 nt), both in vitro and in plant cell lysates. Comparing SHAPE-Seq and covariation analysis results revealed multiple SEs in the coat protein open reading frame and 3′ untranslated region. Four of these SEs were mutated and serially passaged in Nicotiana tabacum plants to identify biologically selected changes to the original mutated sequences. After passaging, loop mutants showed partial reversion to their wild-type sequence and SEs that were structurally disrupted by mutations were restored to wild-type-like structures via synonymous mutations in planta. These results support the existence and selection of virus open reading frame SEs in the host organism and provide a framework for further studies on the role of RNA structure in viral infection. Additionally, this work demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput chemical probing in plant cell lysates and presents a new method for calculating SHAPE reactivities from overlapping reverse transcriptase priming sites. PMID:29294088

  12. Recoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases for synthetic biology by rational protein-RNA engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2014-12-19

    We have taken a rational approach to redesigning the amino acid binding and aminoacyl-tRNA pairing specificities of bacterial glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase. The four-stage engineering incorporates generalizable design principles and improves the pairing efficiency of noncognate glutamate with tRNA(Gln) by over 10(5)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Better optimized designs of the protein-RNA complex include substantial reengineering of the globular core region of the tRNA, demonstrating a role for specific tRNA nucleotides in specifying the identity of the genetically encoded amino acid. Principles emerging from this engineering effort open new prospects for combining rational and genetic selection approaches to design novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that ligate noncanonical amino acids onto tRNAs. This will facilitate reconstruction of the cellular translation apparatus for applications in synthetic biology.

  13. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  14. Comparative behaviour of lab.-cultured and wild-type Dacus oleae flies in the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokopy, R.J.; Haniotakis, G.E.; Economopoulos, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    Under field conditions, the authors compared the responses of lab.-type (ca. 85 generations under artificial conditions) and wild-type Dacus oleae flies to host plant colour and odour, host fruit colour and shape, small rectangles of different colours and shades, and McPhail-type traps of different colours baited with different odours. Except for the lab.-type flies being relatively more attracted toward red fruit models and small red rectangles and relatively less attracted toward yellow fruit models and small yellow rectangles than the wild type, the qualitative nature of the responses of the two fly types toward the various experimental treatments was essentially the same. Quantitatively, however, consistently smaller percentages of the released lab.-type than the released wild-type flies were recaptured, suggesting that the mobility, flight pattern, or vigour of the two types of flies may be different. (author)

  15. A Model of Yeast Cell-Cycle Regulation Based on a Standard Component Modeling Strategy for Protein Regulatory Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeraphan Laomettachit

    Full Text Available To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression in eukaryotes, a variety of mathematical modeling approaches have been employed, ranging from Boolean networks and differential equations to stochastic simulations. Each approach has its own characteristic strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we propose a "standard component" modeling strategy that combines advantageous features of Boolean networks, differential equations and stochastic simulations in a framework that acknowledges the typical sorts of reactions found in protein regulatory networks. Applying this strategy to a comprehensive mechanism of the budding yeast cell cycle, we illustrate the potential value of standard component modeling. The deterministic version of our model reproduces the phenotypic properties of wild-type cells and of 125 mutant strains. The stochastic version of our model reproduces the cell-to-cell variability of wild-type cells and the partial viability of the CLB2-dbΔ clb5Δ mutant strain. Our simulations show that mathematical modeling with "standard components" can capture in quantitative detail many essential properties of cell cycle control in budding yeast.

  16. Structure and Composition of Protein Bodies from Wild-Type and High-Lysine Barley Endosperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Protein bodies were isolated from 13 and 28 day old endosperms of barley mutant 1508 and its wild type, Bomi barley. The fine structure of the isolated protein bodies was determined by electron microscopy, and the proteins present in the preparations characterized by amino-acid analysis and SDS......-polyacrylamidegel electrophoresis. Sections through pellets of isolated protein bodies from both the mutant and the wild type revealed protein body structures corresponding with those observed in sections through the intact starchy endosperms. The majority of the wild-type protein bodies was homogeneous spheres accompanied...... that the wild-type protein bodies contained large amounts of prolamines (the storage protein group which is soluble in 55 % isopropanol) and some glutelins (the storage proteins soluble in dilute alkali), whereas the mutant protein bodies have glutelin as the major component and little prolamines...

  17. Transcriptomic profiling of chemical exposure reveals roles of Yap1 in protecting yeast cells from oxidative and other types of stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Zhouquan; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Li; Dai, Heping; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptomic profiles are generated by comparing wild-type and the yeast yap1 mutant to various chemicals in an attempt to establish a correlation between this gene mutation and chemical exposure. Test chemicals include ClonNAT as a non-genotoxic agent, methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) as an alkylating agent, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) as an oxidative agent and the mixture of t-BHP and MMS to reflect complex natural exposure. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and specific DEGs were obtained by excluding overlapping DEGs with the control group. In the MMS exposure group, deoxyribonucleotide biosynthetic processes were upregulated, while oxidation-reduction processes were downregulated. In the t-BHP exposure group, metabolic processes were upregulated while peroxisome and ion transport pathways were downregulated. In the mixture exposure group, the proteasome pathway was upregulated, while the aerobic respiration was downregulated. Homologue analysis of DEGs related to human diseases showed that many of DEGs were linked to cancer, ageing and neuronal degeneration. These observations confirm that the yap1 mutant is more sensitive to chemicals than wild-type cells and that the susceptible individuals carrying the YAP1-like gene defect may enhance risk to chemical exposure. Hence, this study offers a novel approach to environmental risk assessment, based on the genetic backgrounds of susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Comparisons of radiosensitivity and damage repair potential between mutants from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of yeast and laboratory-bred wild yeasts with particular attention being given to giant cell formation after X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Yeast cells were exposed to X-rays at dose levels up to 10 kGy to induce damage to the DNA and investigate its effects on cellular growth patterns. For this purpose, comparisons were carried out between one diploid strain and six haploid strains of the Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae species, which permitted the individual recovery and damage repair pathways to be described in more detail. The laboratory-bred wild strains ATCC 9080, 211 and 706 were judged to have unimpaired repair mechanisms as compared to the auxotrophs, which fact was evident from the higher radiosensitivity of the latter. A further parameter in this evaluation of growth behaviours was giant cell formation. The results here provided evidence in confirmation of deviations between wild strains and mutants. Even though the ceiling values for the formation of giant cells were similarly high in all strains, impairments of cell division and initial development were observed for the mutants already at considerably lower dose levels. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Yeast hulls: effect on spontaneous fermentation in different vinification conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa López

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the addition of yeast hulls in vinification was investigated during three consecutive years. The study was carried out in the experimental winery of C.I.D.A in La Rioja (Spain with free running white grape juice of the Viura variety. Four different vinifications were studied. In two of these vinifications, stuck fermentations were detected. In all the studies, the addition of yeast hulls (yeast ghosts improved the fermentation kinetics, increasing the number of viable yeasts at the end of the exponential stage and decreasing the final content of reducing sugars. This work revealed a new effect of yeast hull addition which had not been identified previously; their selection effect on the wild yeast strain in spontaneous fermentation.

  20. Mutation induction in haploid yeast after split-dose radiation-exposure. I. Fractionated UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, K; Zölzer, F; Kiefer, J

    1989-01-01

    Mutation induction was investigated in wild-type haploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae after split-dose UV-irradiation. Cells were exposed to fractionated 254 nm-UV-doses separated by intervals from 0 to 6 h with incubation either on non-nutrient or nutrient agar between. The test parameter was resistance to canavanine. If modifications of sensitivity due to incubation are appropriately taken into account there is no change of mutation frequency.

  1. Quantitative characterization of pyrimidine dimer excision from UV-irradiated DNA (excision capacity) by cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekker, M.L.; Kaboev, O.K.; Akhmedov, A.T.; Luchkina, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    Cell-free extracts from wild-type yeast (RAD + ) and from rad mutants belonging to the RAD3 epistatic group (rad1-1, rad2-1, rad3-1, rad4-1) contain activities catalyzing the excision of pyrimidine dimers (PD) from purified ultraviolet-irradiated DNA which was not pre-treated with exogenous UV-endonuclease. The level of these activities in cell-free extracts from rad mutants did not differ from that in wild-type extract and was close to the in vivo excision capacity of the latter calculated from the LD 37 (about 10 4 PD per haploid genome). (Auth.)

  2. Type 1 diabetes in children is not a predisposing factor for oral yeast colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana L; Silva, Branca M A; Soares, Rui; Mota, Diana; Alves, Vera; Mirante, Alice; Ramos, João C; Maló de Abreu, João; Santos-Rosa, Manuel; Caramelo, Francisco; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is considered a risk factor associated with oral yeast infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yeast oral carriage (in saliva and mucosal surface) of children with T1D and potential relation with host factors, particularly the subset of CD4+ T cells. Yeasts were quantified and identified in stimulated saliva and in cheek mucosal swabs of 133 diabetic T1D and 72 healthy control subjects. Salivary lymphocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The presence of yeasts in the oral cavity (60% of total patients) was not affected by diabetes, metabolic control, duration of the disease, salivary flow rate or saliva buffer capacity, by age, sex, place of residence, number of daily meals, consumption of sweets or frequency of tooth brushing. Candida albicans was the most prevalent yeast species, but a higher number of yeast species was isolated in nondiabetics. T1D children with HbA1c ≤ 7.5 (metabolically controlled) presented higher number of CD4+ T salivary subsets when compared with the other groups of children (non-diabetic and nonmetabolically controlled) and also presented the highest number of individuals without oral yeast colonization. In conclusion, T1D does not predisposes for increased oral yeast colonization and a higher number of salivary CD4+T cells seems to result in the absence of oral colonization by yeasts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A test of the transcription model for biased inheritance of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, H E; Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1995-09-01

    Two strand-specific origins of replication appear to be required for mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. Structural equivalents of these origins are found in the rep sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA. These striking similarities have contributed to a universal model for the initiation of mtDNA replication in which a primer is created by cleavage of an origin region transcript. Consistent with this model are the properties of deletion mutants of yeast mtDNA ([rho-]) with a high density of reps (HS [rho-]). These mutant mtDNAs are preferentially inherited by the progeny resulting from the mating of HS [rho-] cells with cells containing wild-type mtDNA ([rho+]). This bias is presumed to result from a replication advantage conferred on HS [rho-] mtDNA by the high density of rep sequences acting as origins. To test whether transcription is indeed required for the preferential inheritance of HS [rho-] mtDNA, we deleted the nuclear gene (RPO41) for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, reducing transcripts by at least 1000-fold. Since [rho-] genomes, but not [rho+] genomes, are stable when RPO41 is deleted, we examined matings between HS [rho-] and neutral [rho-] cells. Neutral [rho-] mtDNAs lack rep sequences and are not preferentially inherited in [rho-] x [rho+] crosses. In HS [rho-] x neutral [rho-] matings, the HS [rho-] mtDNA was preferentially inherited whether both parents were wild type or both were deleted for RPO41. Thus, transcription from the rep promoter does not appear to be necessary for biased inheritance. Our results, and analysis of the literature, suggest that priming by transcription is not a universal mechanism for mtDNA replication initiation.

  4. Functional analysis of the cloverleaf-like structure in the 3' untranslated region of bamboo mosaic potexvirus RNA revealed dual roles in viral RNA replication and long distance movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I-H.; Meng Hsiao; Hsu, Y.-H.; Tsai, C.-H.

    2003-01-01

    The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of bamboo mosaic potexvirus (BaMV) RNA was identified to fold into a tertiary structure comprising a cloverleaf-like structure designated ABC domain followed by a major stem-loop D, which in turn is followed by a pseudoknot E and a poly(A) tail. The coat protein accumulation level of the mutant, BaMV40A/ΔABC, lacking ABC domain was just 15% that of wild-type when inoculated into protoplasts of Nicotiana benthamiana. This suggested that ABC domain might play an important role in BaMV RNA replication. To define the precise role of each of the three stem-loops of ABC domain in RNA replication, three mutants BaMV40B and C each lacking stem-loop A, B, and C, respectively, were created. Our results showed that accumulation of viral products of mutants BaMV40B and C were not as efficient as wild-type. On the contrary, level of accumulation of viral products of BaMVA was similar to that of wild-type in protoplasts and inoculated leaves. Interestingly, the accumulation of viral products was not as efficient as that of wild-type in systemic leaves, implying that stem-loop A is dispensable for replication, but signifies a role in systemic accumulation. Using UV cross-linking and competition experiments, it was demonstrated that the E. coli expressed helicase domain of BaMV ORF1 can preferentially interact with the ABC domain

  5. The crystal structure of tRNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    of yeast alanine tRNA by Robert Holley's group at Cornell. University ... decode nonsense codons) with John Smith and Brenner. However, my ... tRNA from 10 g of unfractionated tRNA. ... tRNA crystals were, in fact, protein (Hendrikson et al.

  6. Identification of RNA species in the RNA-toxin complex and structure of the complex in Clostridium botulinum type E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Masaru

    2002-02-15

    Clostridium botulinum type E toxin was isolated in the form of a complex with RNA(s) from bacterial cells. Characterization of the complexed RNA remains to be elucidated. The RNA is identified here as ribosomal RNA (rRNA) having 23S and 16S components. The RNA-toxin complexes were found to be made up of three types with different molecular sizes. The three types of RNA-toxin complex are toxin bound to both the 23S and 16S rRNA, toxin bound to the 16S rRNA and a small amount of 23S rRNA, and toxin bound only to the 16S rRNA. ©2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  7. Radiation stimulation of yeast crops for increasing output of alcohol and baker yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, E.; Marsheu, P.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to stimulate by gamma radiation the existing commercial types of yeast so as to obtain yeasts that would better reflect the substrate and have improved reproductive capacity. The experiments were conducted under ordinary conditions using commercial yeasts received from one factory producing alcohol and bakery yeasts and isolated as pure cultures. Irradiating yeast cultures with small doses (up to 10 krad) was found to stimulate the reproduction and fermenting activity of yeast cells as manifested in increased accumulation of yeast biomass and greater yield of ethyl alcohol. (E.T.)

  8. Terroir of yeasts? – Application of FTIR spectroscopy and molecular methods for strain typing of yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhards Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The site specific influence on wine (Terroir is an often by wine producers, consumers and scientists discussed topic in the world of wine. A study on grapes and (spontaneous fermentations from six different vineyards was done to investigate the biodiversity of yeasts and to answer the question if there is a terroir of yeast and how it could be influenced. Randomly isolated yeasts were identified by FTIR-spectroscopy and molecular methods on species and strain level. Vineyard specific yeast floras would be observed but they are not such important as expected. Only a few overlapping strain patterns would be identified during both vintages. The yeast flora of the winery had a huge impact on the spontaneous fermentations, but is not really constant and influenced by different factors from outside.

  9. The splicing mutant of the human tumor suppressor protein DFNA5 induces programmed cell death when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rossom, Sofie; Op de Beeck, Ken; Franssens, Vanessa; Swinnen, Erwin; Schepers, Anne; Ghillebert, Ruben; Caldara, Marina; Van Camp, Guy; Winderickx, Joris

    2012-01-01

    DFNA5 was first identified as a gene responsible for autosomal dominant deafness. Different mutations were found, but they all resulted in exon 8 skipping during splicing and premature termination of the protein. Later, it became clear that the protein also has a tumor suppression function and that it can induce apoptosis. Epigenetic silencing of the DFNA5 gene is associated with different types of cancers, including gastric and colorectal cancers as well as breast tumors. We introduced the wild-type and mutant DFNA5 allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of the wild-type protein was well tolerated by the yeast cells, although the protein was subject of degradation and often deposited in distinct foci when cells entered the diauxic shift. In contrast, cells had problems to cope with mutant DFNA5 and despite an apparent compensatory reduction in expression levels, the mutant protein still triggered a marked growth defect, which in part can be ascribed to its interaction with mitochondria. Consistently, cells with mutant DFNA5 displayed significantly increased levels of ROS and signs of programmed cell death. The latter occurred independently of the yeast caspase, Mca1, but involved the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1, the voltage-dependent anion channel protein, Por1 and the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocators, Aac1 and Aac3. Recent data proposed DFNA5 toxicity to be associated to a globular domain encoded by exon 2–6. We confirmed these data by showing that expression of solely this domain confers a strong growth phenotype. In addition, we identified a point mutant in this domain that completely abrogated its cytotoxicity in yeast as well as human Human Embryonic Kidney 293T cells (HEK293T). Combined, our data underscore that the yeast system offers a valuable tool to further dissect the apoptotic properties of DFNA5.

  10. The splicing mutant of the human tumor suppressor protein DFNA5 induces programmed cell death when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rossom, Sofie [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Op de Beeck, Ken [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Franssens, Vanessa; Swinnen, Erwin [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Schepers, Anne [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Ghillebert, Ruben; Caldara, Marina [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Van Camp, Guy [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Winderickx, Joris, E-mail: guy.vancamp@ua.ac.be, E-mail: joris.winderickx@bio.kuleuven.be [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium)

    2012-07-25

    DFNA5 was first identified as a gene responsible for autosomal dominant deafness. Different mutations were found, but they all resulted in exon 8 skipping during splicing and premature termination of the protein. Later, it became clear that the protein also has a tumor suppression function and that it can induce apoptosis. Epigenetic silencing of the DFNA5 gene is associated with different types of cancers, including gastric and colorectal cancers as well as breast tumors. We introduced the wild-type and mutant DFNA5 allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of the wild-type protein was well tolerated by the yeast cells, although the protein was subject of degradation and often deposited in distinct foci when cells entered the diauxic shift. In contrast, cells had problems to cope with mutant DFNA5 and despite an apparent compensatory reduction in expression levels, the mutant protein still triggered a marked growth defect, which in part can be ascribed to its interaction with mitochondria. Consistently, cells with mutant DFNA5 displayed significantly increased levels of ROS and signs of programmed cell death. The latter occurred independently of the yeast caspase, Mca1, but involved the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1, the voltage-dependent anion channel protein, Por1 and the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocators, Aac1 and Aac3. Recent data proposed DFNA5 toxicity to be associated to a globular domain encoded by exon 2–6. We confirmed these data by showing that expression of solely this domain confers a strong growth phenotype. In addition, we identified a point mutant in this domain that completely abrogated its cytotoxicity in yeast as well as human Human Embryonic Kidney 293T cells (HEK293T). Combined, our data underscore that the yeast system offers a valuable tool to further dissect the apoptotic properties of DFNA5.

  11. Hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]Glucose reports on glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway activity in EL4 tumors and glycolytic activity in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Kerstin N; Hartl, Johannes; Keller, Markus A; Hu, De-En; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Ralser, Markus; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-12-01

    A resonance at ∼181 ppm in the (13) C spectra of tumors injected with hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose was assigned to 6-phosphogluconate (6PG), as in previous studies in yeast, whereas in breast cancer cells in vitro this resonance was assigned to 3-phosphoglycerate (3PG). These peak assignments were investigated here using measurements of 6PG and 3PG (13) C-labeling using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) METHODS: Tumor-bearing mice were injected with (13) C6 glucose and the (13) C-labeled and total 6PG and 3PG concentrations measured. (13) C MR spectra of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (zwf1Δ) and wild-type yeast were acquired following addition of hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose and again (13) C-labeled and total 6PG and 3PG were measured by LC-MS/MS RESULTS: Tumor (13) C-6PG was more abundant than (13) C-2PG/3PG and the resonance at ∼181 ppm matched more closely that of 6PG. (13) C MR spectra of wild-type and zwf1Δ yeast cells showed a resonance at ∼181 ppm after labeling with hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose, however, there was no 6PG in zwf1Δ cells. In the wild-type cells 3PG was approximately four-fold more abundant than 6PG CONCLUSION: The resonance at ∼181 ppm in (13) C MR spectra following injection of hyperpolarized [U-(2) H, U-(13) C]glucose originates predominantly from 6PG in EL4 tumors and 3PG in yeast cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Study of the Metatranscriptome of Eight Social and Solitary Wild Bee Species Reveals Novel Viruses and Bee Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonvaere, Karel; Smagghe, Guy; Francis, Frédéric; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2018-01-01

    Bees are associated with a remarkable diversity of microorganisms, including unicellular parasites, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The application of next-generation sequencing approaches enables the identification of this rich species composition as well as the discovery of previously unknown associations. Using high-throughput polyadenylated ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequencing, we investigated the metatranscriptome of eight wild bee species ( Andrena cineraria, Andrena fulva, Andrena haemorrhoa, Bombus terrestris, Bombus cryptarum, Bombus pascuorum, Osmia bicornis , and Osmia cornuta ) sampled from four different localities in Belgium. Across the RNA sequencing libraries, 88-99% of the taxonomically informative reads were of the host transcriptome. Four viruses with homology to insect pathogens were found including two RNA viruses (belonging to the families Iflaviridae and Tymoviridae that harbor already viruses of honey bees), a double stranded DNA virus (family Nudiviridae ) and a single stranded DNA virus (family Parvoviridae ). In addition, we found genomic sequences of 11 unclassified arthropod viruses (related to negeviruses, sobemoviruses, totiviruses, rhabdoviruses, and mononegaviruses), seven plant pathogenic viruses, and one fungal virus. Interestingly, nege-like viruses appear to be widespread, host-specific, and capable of attaining high copy numbers inside bees. Next to viruses, three novel parasite associations were discovered in wild bees, including Crithidia pragensis and a tubulinosematid and a neogregarine parasite. Yeasts of the genus Metschnikowia were identified in solitary bees. This study gives a glimpse of the microorganisms and viruses associated with social and solitary wild bees and demonstrates that their diversity exceeds by far the subset of species first discovered in honey bees.

  13. Study of the Metatranscriptome of Eight Social and Solitary Wild Bee Species Reveals Novel Viruses and Bee Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Schoonvaere

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bees are associated with a remarkable diversity of microorganisms, including unicellular parasites, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The application of next-generation sequencing approaches enables the identification of this rich species composition as well as the discovery of previously unknown associations. Using high-throughput polyadenylated ribonucleic acid (RNA sequencing, we investigated the metatranscriptome of eight wild bee species (Andrena cineraria, Andrena fulva, Andrena haemorrhoa, Bombus terrestris, Bombus cryptarum, Bombus pascuorum, Osmia bicornis, and Osmia cornuta sampled from four different localities in Belgium. Across the RNA sequencing libraries, 88–99% of the taxonomically informative reads were of the host transcriptome. Four viruses with homology to insect pathogens were found including two RNA viruses (belonging to the families Iflaviridae and Tymoviridae that harbor already viruses of honey bees, a double stranded DNA virus (family Nudiviridae and a single stranded DNA virus (family Parvoviridae. In addition, we found genomic sequences of 11 unclassified arthropod viruses (related to negeviruses, sobemoviruses, totiviruses, rhabdoviruses, and mononegaviruses, seven plant pathogenic viruses, and one fungal virus. Interestingly, nege-like viruses appear to be widespread, host-specific, and capable of attaining high copy numbers inside bees. Next to viruses, three novel parasite associations were discovered in wild bees, including Crithidia pragensis and a tubulinosematid and a neogregarine parasite. Yeasts of the genus Metschnikowia were identified in solitary bees. This study gives a glimpse of the microorganisms and viruses associated with social and solitary wild bees and demonstrates that their diversity exceeds by far the subset of species first discovered in honey bees.

  14. Pathological Roles of Wild-Type Cu, Zn-Superoxide Dismutase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Furukawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations in a Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. While it remains controversial how SOD1 mutations lead to onset and progression of the disease, many in vitro and in vivo studies have supported a gain-of-toxicity mechanism where pathogenic mutations contribute to destabilizing a native structure of SOD1 and thus facilitate misfolding and aggregation. Indeed, abnormal accumulation of SOD1-positive inclusions in spinal motor neurons is a pathological hallmark in SOD1-related familial ALS. Furthermore, similarities in clinical phenotypes and neuropathology of ALS cases with and without mutations in sod1 gene have implied a disease mechanism involving SOD1 common to all ALS cases. Although pathogenic roles of wild-type SOD1 in sporadic ALS remain controversial, recent developments of novel SOD1 antibodies have made it possible to characterize wild-type SOD1 under pathological conditions of ALS. Here, I have briefly reviewed recent progress on biochemical and immunohistochemical characterization of wild-type SOD1 in sporadic ALS cases and discussed possible involvement of wild-type SOD1 in a pathomechanism of ALS.

  15. Isolation of Blastomyces dermatitidis yeast from lung tissue during murine infection for in vivo transcriptional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Amber J; Wüthrich, Marcel; Carmen, John C; Sullivan, Thomas D; Klein, Bruce S; Cuomo, Christina A; Gauthier, Gregory M

    2013-07-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis belongs to a group of thermally dimorphic fungi that grow as sporulating mold in the soil and convert to pathogenic yeast in the lung following inhalation of spores. Knowledge about the molecular events important for fungal adaptation and survival in the host remains limited. The development of high-throughput analytic tools such as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has potential to provide novel insight on fungal pathogenesis especially if applied in vivo during infection. However, in vivo transcriptional profiling is hindered by the low abundance of fungal cells relative to mammalian tissue and difficulty in isolating fungal cells from the tissues they infect. For the purpose of obtaining B. dermatitidis RNA for in vivo transcriptional analysis by RNA-Seq, we developed a simple technique for isolating yeast from murine lung tissue. Using a two-step approach of filtration and centrifugation following lysis of murine lung cells, 91% of yeast cells causing infection were isolated from lung tissue. B. dermatitidis recovered from the lung yielded high-quality RNA with minimal murine contamination and was suitable for RNA-Seq. Approximately 87% of the sequencing reads obtained from the recovered yeast aligned with the B. dermatitidis genome. This was similar to 93% alignment for yeast grown in vitro. The use of near-freezing temperature along with short ex vivo time minimized transcriptional changes that would have otherwise occurred with higher temperature or longer processing time. In conclusion, we have developed a technique that recovers the majority of yeast causing pulmonary infection and yields high-quality fungal RNA with minimal contamination by mammalian RNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vaginal yeast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts ...

  17. Yeast diversity during the fermentation of Andean chicha: A comparison of high-throughput sequencing and culture-dependent approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Lucía M; Neef, Alexander; Vignolo, Graciela; Belloch, Carmela

    2017-10-01

    Diversity and dynamics of yeasts associated with the fermentation of Argentinian maize-based beverage chicha was investigated. Samples taken at different stages from two chicha productions were analyzed by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Five hundred and ninety six yeasts were isolated by classical microbiological methods and 16 species identified by RFLPs and sequencing of D1/D2 26S rRNA gene. Genetic typing of isolates from the dominant species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by PCR of delta elements revealed up to 42 different patterns. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of D1/D2 26S rRNA gene amplicons from chicha samples detected more than one hundred yeast species and almost fifty filamentous fungi taxa. Analysis of the data revealed that yeasts dominated the fermentation, although, a significant percentage of filamentous fungi appeared in the first step of the process. Statistical analysis of results showed that very few taxa were represented by more than 1% of the reads per sample at any step of the process. S. cerevisiae represented more than 90% of the reads in the fermentative samples. Other yeast species dominated the pre-fermentative steps and abounded in fermented samples when S. cerevisiae was in percentages below 90%. Most yeasts species detected by pyrosequencing were not recovered by cultivation. In contrast, the cultivation-based methodology detected very few yeast taxa, and most of them corresponded with very few reads in the pyrosequencing analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. RNA-seq data comparisons of wild soybean genotypes in response to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyou Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is an important crop rich in vegetable protein and oil, and is a staple food for human and animals worldwide. However, soybean plants have been challenged by soybean cyst nematode (SCN, Heterodera glycines, one of the most damaging pests found in soybean fields. Applying SCN-resistant cultivars is the most efficient and environmentally friendly strategy to manage SCN. Currently, soybean breeding and further improvement in soybean agriculture are hindered by severely limited genetic diversity in cultivated soybeans. G. soja is a soybean wild progenitor with much higher levels of genetic diversity compared to cultivated soybeans. In this study, transcriptomes of the resistant and susceptible genotypes of the wild soybean, Glycine soja Sieb & Zucc, were sequenced to examine the genetic basis of SCN resistance. Seedling roots were treated with infective second-stage juveniles (J2s of the soybean cyst nematode (HG type 2.5.7 for 3, 5, 8 days and pooled for library construction and RNA sequencing. The transcriptome sequencing generated approximately 245 million (M high quality (Q > 30 raw sequence reads (125 bp in length for twelve libraries. The raw sequence reads were deposited in NCBI sequence read archive (SRA database, with the accession numbers SRR5227314-25. Further analysis of this data would be helpful to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of soybean-SCN interaction and facilitate the development of diverse SCN resistance cultivars.

  19. Improving the Organoleptic Properties of a Craft Mezcal Beverage by Increasing Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Contents through ATF1 Expression in an Engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus UMPe-1 Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-García, Jesús; Vargas, Alejandra; Farías-Rosales, Lorena; Miranda, Ana L; Meza-Carmen, Víctor; Díaz-Pérez, Alma L

    2018-05-02

    Mezcal, a traditional beverage that originated in Mexico, is produced from species of the Agavaceae family. The esters associated with the yeasts utilized during fermentation are important for improving the organoleptic properties of the beverage. We improved the ester contents in a mezcal beverage by using the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, which was engineered with the ATF1 gene. ATF1 expression in the recombinant yeast significantly increased compared with that in the parental yeast, but its fermentative parameters were unchanged. Volatile-organic-compound-content analysis showed that esters had significantly increased in the mezcal produced with the engineered yeast. In a sensory-panel test, 48% of the panelists preferred the mezcal produced from the engineered yeast, 30% preferred the mezcal produced from the wild type, and 15 and 7% preferred the two mezcal types produced following the routine procedure. Correlation analysis showed that the fruitiness/sweetness description of the mezcal produced using the ATF1-engineered K. marxianus yeast correlated with the content of the esters, whose presence improved the organoleptic properties of the craft mezcal beverage.

  20. A Ten-Week Biochemistry Lab Project Studying Wild-Type and Mutant Bacterial Alkaline Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, D. Scott

    2016-01-01

    This work describes a 10-week laboratory project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase, in which students purify, quantitate, and perform kinetic assays on wild-type and selected mutants of the enzyme. Students also perform plasmid DNA purification, digestion, and gel analysis. In addition to simply learning important…

  1. Biogenesis of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is composed of four different protein complexes that cooperate in electron transfer and proton pumping across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The cytochrome bc1 complex, or complex III, is a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This review will focus on the biogenesis of the bc1 complex in the mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In wild type yeast mitochondrial membranes the major part of the cytochrome bc1 complex was found in association with one or two copies of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. The analysis of several yeast mutant strains in which single genes or pairs of genes encoding bc1 subunits had been deleted revealed the presence of a common set of bc1 sub-complexes. These sub-complexes are represented by the central core of the bc1 complex, consisting of cytochrome b bound to subunit 7 and subunit 8, by the two core proteins associated with each other, by the Rieske protein associated with subunit 9, and by those deriving from the unexpected interaction of each of the two core proteins with cytochrome c1. Furthermore, a higher molecular mass sub-complex is that composed of cytochrome b, cytochrome c1, core protein 1 and 2, subunit 6, subunit 7 and subunit 8. The identification and characterization of all these sub-complexes may help in defining the steps and the molecular events leading to bc1 assembly in yeast mitochondria.

  2. Pyruvate decarboxylases from the petite-negative yeast Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    was controlled by variations in the amount of mRNA. The mRNA level and the pyruvate decarboxylase activity responded to anaerobiosis and growth on different carbon sources in essentially the same fashion as in S. cerevisiae. This indicates that the difference in ethanol formation between these two yeasts...... is not due to differences in the regulation of pyruvate decarboxylase(s), but rather to differences in the regulation of the TCA cycle and the respiratory machinery. However, the PDC genes of Saccharomyces/Kluyveromyces yeasts differ in their genetic organization and phylogenetic origin. While S. cerevisiae...

  3. Effective gene silencing activity of prodrug-type 2'-O-methyldithiomethyl siRNA compared with non-prodrug-type 2'-O-methyl siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Junsuke; Nishigaki, Misa; Ochi, Yosuke; Wada, Shun-Ichi; Wada, Fumito; Nakagawa, Osamu; Obika, Satoshi; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Urata, Hidehito

    2018-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are an active agent to induce gene silencing and they have been studied for becoming a biological and therapeutic tool. Various 2'-O-modified RNAs have been extensively studied to improve the nuclease resistance. However, the 2'-O-modified siRNA activities were often decreased by modification, since the bulky 2'-O-modifications inhibit to form a RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We developed novel prodrug-type 2'-O-methyldithiomethyl (MDTM) siRNA, which is converted into natural siRNA in an intracellular reducing environment. Prodrug-type 2'-O-MDTM siRNAs modified at the 5'-end side including 5'-end nucleotide and the seed region of the antisense strand exhibited much stronger gene silencing effect than non-prodrug-type 2'-O-methyl (2'-O-Me) siRNAs. Furthermore, the resistances for nuclease digestion of siRNAs were actually enhanced by 2'-O-MDTM modifications. Our results indicate that 2'-O-MDTM modifications improve the stability of siRNA in serum and they are able to be introduced at any positions of siRNA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The stress granule protein Vgl1 and poly(A)-binding protein Pab1 are required for doxorubicin resistance in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Takahiro [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Umeda, Nanae; Kita, Ayako [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko, E-mail: sugiurar@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, Kowakae 3-4-1, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stress granules (SGs) as a mechanism of doxorubicin tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize the role of stress granules in doxorubicin tolerance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deletion of components of SGs enhances doxorubicin sensitivity in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxorubicin promotes SG formation when combined with heat shock. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxorubicin regulates stress granule assembly independent of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Doxorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic widely used for chemotherapy. Although doxorubicin is effective in the treatment of several cancers, including solid tumors and leukemias, the basis of its mechanism of action is not completely understood. Here, we describe the effects of doxorubicin and its relationship with stress granules formation in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that disruption of genes encoding the components of stress granules, including vgl1{sup +}, which encodes a multi-KH type RNA-binding protein, and pab1{sup +}, which encodes a poly(A)-binding protein, resulted in greater sensitivity to doxorubicin than seen in wild-type cells. Disruption of the vgl1{sup +} and pab1{sup +} genes did not confer sensitivity to other anti-cancer drugs such as cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. We also showed that doxorubicin treatment promoted stress granule formation when combined with heat shock. Notably, doxorubicin treatment did not induce hyperphosphorylation of eIF2{alpha}, suggesting that doxorubicin is involved in stress granule assembly independent of eIF2{alpha} phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of fission yeast for elucidating the molecular targets of doxorubicin toxicity and suggest a novel drug-resistance mechanism involving stress granule assembly.

  5. Noncoding Subgenomic Flavivirus RNA Is Processed by the Mosquito RNA Interference Machinery and Determines West Nile Virus Transmission by Culex pipiens Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göertz, G P; Fros, J J; Miesen, P; Vogels, C B F; van der Bent, M L; Geertsema, C; Koenraadt, C J M; van Rij, R P; van Oers, M M; Pijlman, G P

    2016-11-15

    Flaviviruses, such as Zika virus, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus (WNV), are a serious concern for human health. Flaviviruses produce an abundant noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in infected cells. sfRNA results from stalling of the host 5'-3' exoribonuclease XRN1/Pacman on conserved RNA structures in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the viral genomic RNA. sfRNA production is conserved in insect-specific, mosquito-borne, and tick-borne flaviviruses and flaviviruses with no known vector, suggesting a pivotal role for sfRNA in the flavivirus life cycle. Here, we investigated the function of sfRNA during WNV infection of Culex pipiens mosquitoes and evaluated its role in determining vector competence. An sfRNA1-deficient WNV was generated that displayed growth kinetics similar to those of wild-type WNV in both RNA interference (RNAi)-competent and -compromised mosquito cell lines. Small-RNA deep sequencing of WNV-infected mosquitoes indicated an active small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based antiviral response for both the wild-type and sfRNA1-deficient viruses. Additionally, we provide the first evidence that sfRNA is an RNAi substrate in vivo Two reproducible small-RNA hot spots within the 3' UTR/sfRNA of the wild-type virus mapped to RNA stem-loops SL-III and 3' SL, which stick out of the three-dimensional (3D) sfRNA structure model. Importantly, we demonstrate that sfRNA-deficient WNV displays significantly decreased infection and transmission rates in vivo when administered via the blood meal. Finally, we show that transmission and infection rates are not affected by sfRNA after intrathoracic injection, thereby identifying sfRNA as a key driver to overcome the mosquito midgut infection barrier. This is the first report to describe a key biological function of sfRNA for flavivirus infection of the arthropod vector, providing an explanation for the strict conservation of sfRNA production. Understanding the flavivirus transmission

  6. Enhancement of ethanol fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast by disrupting mitophagy function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Shodai; Jayakody, Lahiru Niroshan; Horie, Kenta; Okamoto, Koji; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 has one of the highest fermentation rates among brewery yeasts used worldwide; therefore, it is assumed that it is not possible to enhance its fermentation rate. However, in this study, we found that fermentation by sake yeast can be enhanced by inhibiting mitophagy. We observed mitophagy in wild-type sake yeast during the brewing of Ginjo sake, but not when the mitophagy gene (ATG32) was disrupted. During sake brewing, the maximum rate of CO2 production and final ethanol concentration generated by the atg32Δ laboratory yeast mutant were 7.50% and 2.12% higher than those of the parent strain, respectively. This mutant exhibited an improved fermentation profile when cultured under limiting nutrient concentrations such as those used during Ginjo sake brewing as well as in minimal synthetic medium. The mutant produced ethanol at a concentration that was 2.76% higher than the parent strain, which has significant implications for industrial bioethanol production. The ethanol yield of the atg32Δ mutant was increased, and its biomass yield was decreased relative to the parent sake yeast strain, indicating that the atg32Δ mutant has acquired a high fermentation capability at the cost of decreasing biomass. Because natural biomass resources often lack sufficient nutrient levels for optimal fermentation, mitophagy may serve as an important target for improving the fermentative capacity of brewery yeasts.

  7. Competing to destroy: a fight between two RNA-degradation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thon, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    The Argonaute-1 (Ago1) protein bound to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directs heterochromatin formation in fission yeast. A high-throughput sequencing approach reveals that the composition of the Ago1-bound siRNA population is sensitive to the noncanonical poly(A) polymerase Cid14, indicating t...... that the RNA-interference and Cid14-TRAMP RNA-degradation pathways compete for substrates in fission yeast.......The Argonaute-1 (Ago1) protein bound to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directs heterochromatin formation in fission yeast. A high-throughput sequencing approach reveals that the composition of the Ago1-bound siRNA population is sensitive to the noncanonical poly(A) polymerase Cid14, indicating...

  8. Nucleobase but not Sugar Fidelity is Maintained in the Sabin I RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinran; Musser, Derek M; Lee, Cheri A; Yang, Xiaorong; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Boehr, David D

    2015-10-26

    The Sabin I poliovirus live, attenuated vaccine strain encodes for four amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E, and T362I) in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). We have previously shown that the T362I substitution leads to a lower fidelity RdRp, and viruses encoding this variant are attenuated in a mouse model of poliovirus. Given these results, it was surprising that the nucleotide incorporation rate and nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp is similar to that of wild-type enzyme, although the Sabin I RdRp is less selective against nucleotides with modified sugar groups. We suggest that the other Sabin amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E) help to re-establish nucleotide incorporation rates and nucleotide discrimination near wild-type levels, which may be a requirement for the propagation of the virus and its efficacy as a vaccine strain. These results also suggest that the nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp likely does not contribute to viral attenuation.

  9. Warburg effect and translocation-induced genomic instability: two yeast models for cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosato, Valentina; Grüning, Nana-Maria; Breitenbach, Michael; Arnak, Remigiusz; Ralser, Markus; Bruschi, Carlo V.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast has been established as an efficient model system to study biological principles underpinning human health. In this review we focus on yeast models covering two aspects of cancer formation and progression (i) the activity of pyruvate kinase (PK), which recapitulates metabolic features of cancer cells, including the Warburg effect, and (ii) chromosome bridge-induced translocation (BIT) mimiking genome instability in cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study cancer cell metabolism, as exponentially growing yeast cells exhibit many metabolic similarities with rapidly proliferating cancer cells. The metabolic reconfiguration includes an increase in glucose uptake and fermentation, at the expense of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (the Warburg effect), and involves a broad reconfiguration of nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Both in yeast and humans, the regulation of this process seems to have a central player, PK, which is up-regulated in cancer, and to occur mostly on a post-transcriptional and post-translational basis. Furthermore, BIT allows to generate selectable translocation-derived recombinants (“translocants”), between any two desired chromosomal locations, in wild-type yeast strains transformed with a linear DNA cassette carrying a selectable marker flanked by two DNA sequences homologous to different chromosomes. Using the BIT system, targeted non-reciprocal translocations in mitosis are easily inducible. An extensive collection of different yeast translocants exhibiting genome instability and aberrant phenotypes similar to cancer cells has been produced and subjected to analysis. In this review, we hence provide an overview upon two yeast cancer models, and extrapolate general principles for mimicking human disease mechanisms in yeast.

  10. Warburg effect and translocation-induced genomic instability: two yeast models for cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosato, Valentina [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste (Italy); Grüning, Nana-Maria [Cambridge System Biology Center, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Breitenbach, Michael [Division of Genetics, Department of Cell Biology, University of Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); Arnak, Remigiusz [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste (Italy); Ralser, Markus [Cambridge System Biology Center, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bruschi, Carlo V., E-mail: bruschi@icgeb.org [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste (Italy)

    2013-01-18

    Yeast has been established as an efficient model system to study biological principles underpinning human health. In this review we focus on yeast models covering two aspects of cancer formation and progression (i) the activity of pyruvate kinase (PK), which recapitulates metabolic features of cancer cells, including the Warburg effect, and (ii) chromosome bridge-induced translocation (BIT) mimiking genome instability in cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study cancer cell metabolism, as exponentially growing yeast cells exhibit many metabolic similarities with rapidly proliferating cancer cells. The metabolic reconfiguration includes an increase in glucose uptake and fermentation, at the expense of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (the Warburg effect), and involves a broad reconfiguration of nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Both in yeast and humans, the regulation of this process seems to have a central player, PK, which is up-regulated in cancer, and to occur mostly on a post-transcriptional and post-translational basis. Furthermore, BIT allows to generate selectable translocation-derived recombinants (“translocants”), between any two desired chromosomal locations, in wild-type yeast strains transformed with a linear DNA cassette carrying a selectable marker flanked by two DNA sequences homologous to different chromosomes. Using the BIT system, targeted non-reciprocal translocations in mitosis are easily inducible. An extensive collection of different yeast translocants exhibiting genome instability and aberrant phenotypes similar to cancer cells has been produced and subjected to analysis. In this review, we hence provide an overview upon two yeast cancer models, and extrapolate general principles for mimicking human disease mechanisms in yeast.

  11. WARBURG EFFECT AND TRANSLOCATION-INDUCED GENOMIC INSTABILITY: TWO YEAST MODELS FOR CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eTosato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeast has been established as an efficient model system to study biological principles underpinning human health. In this review we focus on yeast models covering two aspects of cancer formation and progression i the activity of pyruvate kinase (PK, which recapitulates metabolic features of cancer cells, including the Warburg effect, and ii Bridge-Induced chromosome Translocation (BIT mimicking genome instability in cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study cancer cell metabolism, as exponentially growing yeast cells exhibit many metabolic similarities with rapidly proliferating cancer cells. The metabolic reconfiguration includes an increase in glucose uptake and fermentation, at the expense of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (the Warburg effect, and involves a broad reconfiguration of nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Both in yeast and humans, the regulation of this process seems to have a central player, pyruvate kinase, which is up-regulated in cancer, and to occur mostly on a post-transcriptional and posttranslational basis. Furthermore, BIT allows to generate selectable translocation-derived recombinants (translocants, between any two desired chromosomal locations, in wild-type yeast strains transformed with a linear DNA cassette carrying a selectable marker flanked by two DNA sequences homologous to different chromosomes. Using the Bridge-Induced Translocation system, targeted non-reciprocal translocations in mitosis are easily inducible. An extensive collection of different yeast translocants exhibiting genome instability and aberrant phenotypes similar to cancer cells has been produced and subjected to analysis. In this review, we hence provide an overview upon two yeast cancer models, and extrapolate general principles for mimicking human disease mechanisms in yeast.

  12. A Mutation in PGM2 Causing Inefficient Galactose Metabolism in the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kong, In Iok; Yun, Eun Ju; Zheng, Jia-Qi; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Jin, Yong-Su

    2018-05-15

    The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been extensively studied for the prevention and treatment of diarrheal diseases, and it is now commercially available in some countries. S. boulardii displays notable phenotypic characteristics, such as a high optimal growth temperature, high tolerance against acidic conditions, and the inability to form ascospores, which differentiate S. boulardii from Saccharomyces cerevisiae The majority of prior studies stated that S. boulardii exhibits sluggish or halted galactose utilization. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying inefficient galactose uptake have yet to be elucidated. When the galactose utilization of a widely used S. boulardii strain, ATCC MYA-796, was examined under various culture conditions, the S. boulardii strain could consume galactose, but at a much lower rate than that of S. cerevisiae While all GAL genes were present in the S. boulardii genome, according to analysis of genomic sequencing data in a previous study, a point mutation (G1278A) in PGM2 , which codes for phosphoglucomutase, was identified in the genome of the S. boulardii strain. As the point mutation resulted in the truncation of the Pgm2 protein, which is known to play a pivotal role in galactose utilization, we hypothesized that the truncated Pgm2 might be associated with inefficient galactose metabolism. Indeed, complementation of S. cerevisiae PGM2 in S. boulardii restored galactose utilization. After reverting the point mutation to a full-length PGM2 in S. boulardii by Cas9-based genome editing, the growth rates of wild-type (with a truncated PGM2 gene) and mutant (with a full-length PGM2 ) strains with glucose or galactose as the carbon source were examined. As expected, the mutant (with a full-length PGM2 ) was able to ferment galactose faster than the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the mutant showed a lower growth rate than that of the wild-type strain on glucose at 37°C. Also, the wild-type strain was enriched in the

  13. Inheritance and organisation of the mitochondrial genome differ between two Saccharomyces yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Hvidtfeldt, J.

    2002-01-01

    Petite-positive Saccharomyces yeasts can be roughly divided into the sensu stricto, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and sensu lato group, including Saccharomyces castellii; the latter was recently studied for transmission and the organisation of its mitochondrial genome. S. castellii mitochon......Petite-positive Saccharomyces yeasts can be roughly divided into the sensu stricto, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and sensu lato group, including Saccharomyces castellii; the latter was recently studied for transmission and the organisation of its mitochondrial genome. S. castellii...... mitochondrial molecules (mtDNA) carrying point mutations, which confer antibiotic resistance, behaved in genetic crosses as the corresponding point mutants of S. cerevisiae. While S. castellii generated spontaneous petite mutants in a similar way as S. cerevisiae, the petites exhibited a different inheritance...... pattern. In crosses with the wild type strains a majority of S. castellii petites was neutral, and the suppressivity in suppressive petites was never over 50%. The two yeasts also differ in organisation of their mtDNA molecules. The 25,753 bp sequence of S. castellii mtDNA was determined and the coding...

  14. Candida xinjiangensis sp. nov., a new anamorphic yeast species isolated from Scolytus scheryrewi Semenov in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Dian-Peng; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Qing-Wen

    2017-03-01

    Three yeast strains designated as S44, XF1 and XF2, respectively, were isolated from Scolytus scheryrewi Semenov of apricot tree in Shule County, Xinjiang, China, and were demonstrated to be a new member of the genus Candida by sequence comparisons of 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. BLASTn alignments on NCBI showed that the similarity of 26S rRNA gene sequences of S44 (type strain) to all sequences of other Candida yeasts was very low (≦93 %). The phylogenetic tree based on the 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and ITS region sequences revealed that the strain S44 is closely related to C. blattae, C. dosseyi, C. pruni, C. asparagi, C. fructus and C. musae. However, the strain S44 is distinguished from these Candida species by the physiological characteristics. Moreover, the strain S44 formed typical pseudohyphae when grown on cornmeal agar at 25 °C for 7 days, but did not form ascospores in sporulation medium for 3-4 weeks. Therefore, the name Candida xinjiangensis is proposed for the novel species, with S44 (=KCTC T 27747) as the type strain.

  15. Pharmacologic Treatment Assigned for Niemann Pick Type C1 Disease Partly Changes Behavioral Traits in Wild-Type Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Victoria; Thieme, Markus; Holzmann, Carsten; Witt, Martin; Grittner, Ulrike; Rolfs, Arndt; Wree, Andreas

    2016-11-09

    Niemann-Pick Type C1 (NPC1) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. Previously, we demonstrated that BALB/c-npc1 nih Npc1 -/- mice treated with miglustat, cyclodextrin and allopregnanolone generally performed better than untreated Npc1 -/- animals. Unexpectedly, they also seemed to accomplish motor tests better than their sham-treated wild-type littermates. However, combination-treated mutant mice displayed worse cognition performance compared to sham-treated ones. To evaluate effects of these drugs in healthy BALB/c mice, we here analyzed pharmacologic effects on motor and cognitive behavior of wild-type mice. For combination treatment mice were injected with allopregnanolone/cyclodextrin weekly, starting at P7. Miglustat injections were performed daily from P10 till P23. Starting at P23, miglustat was embedded in the chow. Other mice were treated with miglustat only, or sham-treated. The battery of behavioral tests consisted of accelerod, Morris water maze, elevated plus maze, open field and hot-plate tests. Motor capabilities and spontaneous motor behavior were unaltered in both drug-treated groups. Miglustat-treated wild-type mice displayed impaired spatial learning compared to sham- and combination-treated mice. Both combination- and miglustat-treated mice showed enhanced anxiety in the elevated plus maze compared to sham-treated mice. Additionally, combination treatment as well as miglustat alone significantly reduced brain weight, whereas only combination treatment reduced body weight significantly. Our results suggest that allopregnanolone/cyclodextrin ameliorate most side effects of miglustat in wild-type mice.

  16. Pharmacologic Treatment Assigned for Niemann Pick Type C1 Disease Partly Changes Behavioral Traits in Wild-Type Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Schlegel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C1 (NPC1 is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. Previously, we demonstrated that BALB/c-npc1nihNpc1−/− mice treated with miglustat, cyclodextrin and allopregnanolone generally performed better than untreated Npc1−/− animals. Unexpectedly, they also seemed to accomplish motor tests better than their sham-treated wild-type littermates. However, combination-treated mutant mice displayed worse cognition performance compared to sham-treated ones. To evaluate effects of these drugs in healthy BALB/c mice, we here analyzed pharmacologic effects on motor and cognitive behavior of wild-type mice. For combination treatment mice were injected with allopregnanolone/cyclodextrin weekly, starting at P7. Miglustat injections were performed daily from P10 till P23. Starting at P23, miglustat was embedded in the chow. Other mice were treated with miglustat only, or sham-treated. The battery of behavioral tests consisted of accelerod, Morris water maze, elevated plus maze, open field and hot-plate tests. Motor capabilities and spontaneous motor behavior were unaltered in both drug-treated groups. Miglustat-treated wild-type mice displayed impaired spatial learning compared to sham- and combination-treated mice. Both combination- and miglustat-treated mice showed enhanced anxiety in the elevated plus maze compared to sham-treated mice. Additionally, combination treatment as well as miglustat alone significantly reduced brain weight, whereas only combination treatment reduced body weight significantly. Our results suggest that allopregnanolone/cyclodextrin ameliorate most side effects of miglustat in wild-type mice.

  17. Phenylbutyrate Sensitizes Human Glioblastoma Cells Lacking Wild-Type P53 Function to Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Carlos A.; Feng, Felix Y.; Herman, Joseph M.; Nyati, Mukesh K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ljungman, Mats

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer cells. Phenylbutyrate (PB) is a HDAC inhibitor used clinically for treatment of urea cycle disorders. Because of its low cytotoxicity, cerebrospinal fluid penetration, and high oral bioavailability, we investigated PB as a potential radiation sensitizer in human glioblastoma cell lines. Methods and Materials: Four glioblastoma cell lines were selected for this study. Phenylbutyrate was used at a concentration of 2 mM, which is achievable in humans. Western blots were used to assess levels of acetylated histone H3 in tumor cells after treatment with PB. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis. Clonogenic assays were performed to assess the effect of PB on radiation sensitivity. We used shRNA against p53 to study the role of p53 in radiosensitization. Results: Treatment with PB alone resulted in hyperacetylation of histones, confirmed by Western blot analysis. The PB alone resulted in cytostatic effects in three cell lines. There was no evidence of G 1 arrest, increase in sub-G 1 fraction or p21 protein induction. Clonogenic assays showed radiosensitization in two lines harboring p53 mutations, with enhancement ratios (± SE) of 1.5 (± 0.2) and 1.3 (± 0.1), respectively. There was no radiopotentiating effect in two cell lines with wild-type p53, but knockdown of wild-type p53 resulted in radiosensitization by PB. Conclusions: Phenylbutyrate can produce p21-independent cytostasis, and enhances radiation sensitivity in p53 mutant human glioblastoma cells in vitro. This suggests the potential application of combined PB and radiotherapy in glioblastoma harboring mutant p53

  18. A single mutation in the 15S rRNA gene confers nonsense suppressor activity and interacts with mRF1 the release factor in yeast mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gargouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the mim3-1 mitochondrial ribosomal suppressor, acting on ochre mitochondrial mutations and one frameshift mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 15s rRNA suppressor gene contains a G633 to C transversion. Yeast mitochondrial G633 corresponds to G517 of the E.coli 15S rRNA, which is occupied by an invariant G in all known small rRNA sequences. Interestingly, this mutation has occurred at the same position as the known MSU1 mitochondrial suppressor which changes G633 to A. The suppressor mutation lies in a highly conserved region of the rRNA, known in E.coli as the 530-loop, interacting with the S4, S5 and S12 ribosomal proteins. We also show an interesting interaction between the mitochondrial mim3-1 and the nuclear nam3-1 suppressors, both of which have the same action spectrum on mitochondrial mutations: nam3-1 abolishes the suppressor effect when present with mim3-1 in the same haploid cell. We discuss these results in the light of the nature of Nam3, identified by [1] as the yeast mitochondrial translation release factor. A hypothetical mechanism of suppression by "ribosome shifting" is also discussed in view of the nature of mutations suppressed and not suppressed.

  19. RDE-4 preferentially binds long dsRNA and its dimerization is necessary for cleavage of dsRNA to siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Greg S; Eckert, Debra M; Bass, Brenda L

    2006-05-01

    In organisms ranging from Arabidopsis to humans, Dicer requires dsRNA-binding proteins (dsRBPs) to carry out its roles in RNA interference (RNAi) and micro-RNA (miRNA) processing. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the dsRBP RDE-4 acts with Dicer during the initiation of RNAi, when long dsRNA is cleaved to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). RDE-4 is not required in subsequent steps, and how RDE-4 distinguishes between long dsRNA and short siRNA is unclear. We report the first detailed analysis of RDE-4 binding, using purified recombinant RDE-4 and various truncated proteins. We find that, similar to other dsRBPs, RDE-4 is not sequence-specific. However, consistent with its in vivo roles, RDE-4 binds with higher affinity to long dsRNA. We also observe that RDE-4 is a homodimer in solution, and that the C-terminal domain of the protein is required for dimerization. Using extracts from wild-type and rde-4 mutant C. elegans, we show that the C-terminal dimerization domain is required for the production of siRNA. Our findings suggest a model for RDE-4 function during the initiation of RNAi.

  20. The primary structures of two yeast enolase genes. Homology between the 5' noncoding flanking regions of yeast enolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M J; Holland, J P; Thill, G P; Jackson, K A

    1981-02-10

    Segments of yeast genomic DNA containing two enolase structural genes have been isolated by subculture cloning procedures using a cDNA hybridization probe synthesized from purified yeast enolase mRNA. Based on restriction endonuclease and transcriptional maps of these two segments of yeast DNA, each hybrid plasmid contains a region of extensive nucleotide sequence homology which forms hybrids with the cDNA probe. The DNA sequences which flank this homologous region in the two hybrid plasmids are nonhomologous indicating that these sequences are nontandemly repeated in the yeast genome. The complete nucleotide sequence of the coding as well as the flanking noncoding regions of these genes has been determined. The amino acid sequence predicted from one reading frame of both structural genes is extremely similar to that determined for yeast enolase (Chin, C. C. Q., Brewer, J. M., Eckard, E., and Wold, F. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 1370-1376), confirming that these isolated structural genes encode yeast enolase. The nucleotide sequences of the coding regions of the genes are approximately 95% homologous, and neither gene contains an intervening sequence. Codon utilization in the enolase genes follows the same biased pattern previously described for two yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structural genes (Holland, J. P., and Holland, M. J. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 2596-2605). DNA blotting analysis confirmed that the isolated segments of yeast DNA are colinear with yeast genomic DNA and that there are two nontandemly repeated enolase genes per haploid yeast genome. The noncoding portions of the two enolase genes adjacent to the initiation and termination codons are approximately 70% homologous and contain sequences thought to be involved in the synthesis and processing messenger RNA. Finally there are regions of extensive homology between the two enolase structural genes and two yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structural genes within the 5

  1. Defective replication initiation results in locus specific chromosome breakage and a ribosomal RNA deficiency in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Sanchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A form of dwarfism known as Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS is caused by recessive mutations in one of six different genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDC6, CDT1, and MCM5. These genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, which assembles at origins of replication prior to S phase. Also, variants in two additional replication initiation genes have joined the list of causative mutations for MGS (Geminin and CDC45. The identity of the causative MGS genetic variants strongly suggests that some aspect of replication is amiss in MGS patients; however, little evidence has been obtained regarding what aspect of chromosome replication is faulty. Since the site of one of the missense mutations in the human ORC4 alleles is conserved between humans and yeast, we sought to determine in what way this single amino acid change affects the process of chromosome replication, by introducing the comparable mutation into yeast (orc4Y232C. We find that yeast cells with the orc4Y232C allele have a prolonged S-phase, due to compromised replication initiation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus located on chromosome XII. The inability to initiate replication at the rDNA locus results in chromosome breakage and a severely reduced rDNA copy number in the survivors, presumably helping to ensure complete replication of chromosome XII. Although reducing rDNA copy number may help ensure complete chromosome replication, orc4Y232C cells struggle to meet the high demand for ribosomal RNA synthesis. This finding provides additional evidence linking two essential cellular pathways-DNA replication and ribosome biogenesis.

  2. Defective replication initiation results in locus specific chromosome breakage and a ribosomal RNA deficiency in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Joseph C; Kwan, Elizabeth X; Pohl, Thomas J; Amemiya, Haley M; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2017-10-01

    A form of dwarfism known as Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is caused by recessive mutations in one of six different genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDC6, CDT1, and MCM5). These genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, which assembles at origins of replication prior to S phase. Also, variants in two additional replication initiation genes have joined the list of causative mutations for MGS (Geminin and CDC45). The identity of the causative MGS genetic variants strongly suggests that some aspect of replication is amiss in MGS patients; however, little evidence has been obtained regarding what aspect of chromosome replication is faulty. Since the site of one of the missense mutations in the human ORC4 alleles is conserved between humans and yeast, we sought to determine in what way this single amino acid change affects the process of chromosome replication, by introducing the comparable mutation into yeast (orc4Y232C). We find that yeast cells with the orc4Y232C allele have a prolonged S-phase, due to compromised replication initiation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus located on chromosome XII. The inability to initiate replication at the rDNA locus results in chromosome breakage and a severely reduced rDNA copy number in the survivors, presumably helping to ensure complete replication of chromosome XII. Although reducing rDNA copy number may help ensure complete chromosome replication, orc4Y232C cells struggle to meet the high demand for ribosomal RNA synthesis. This finding provides additional evidence linking two essential cellular pathways-DNA replication and ribosome biogenesis.

  3. Nanolaser Spectroscopy of Genetically Engineered Yeast: New Tool for a Better Brew?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K.; Yaffe, Michael P.

    2006-03-01

    A basic function of the cell membrane is to selectively uptake ions or molecules from its environment to concentrate them into the interior. This concentration difference results in an osmostic pressure difference across the membrane. Ultimately, this pressure and its fluctuation from cell to cell will be limited by the availability and fluctuations of the solute concentrations in solution, the extent of inter-cell communication, and the state of respiring intracellular mitochondria that fuel the process. To measure these fluctuations, we have employed a high-speed nanolaser technique that samples the osmotic pressure in individual yeast cells and isolated mitochondria. We analyzed 2 yeast cell strains, normal baker’s yeast and a genetically-altered version, that differ only by the presence of mitochondrial DNA. The absence of mitochondrial DNA results in the complete loss of all the mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes. These cells have mitochondria, but the mitochondria lack most normal respiratory chain complexes. The frequency distributions in the nanolaser spectra produced by wild-type and modified cells and mitochondria show a striking shift from Gaussian to Poissonian distributions, revealing a powerful novel method for studying statistical physics of yeast.

  4. Wild type measles virus attenuation independent of type I IFN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvat Branka

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measles virus attenuation has been historically performed by adaptation to cell culture. The current dogma is that attenuated virus strains induce more type I IFN and are more resistant to IFN-induced protection than wild type (wt. Results The adaptation of a measles virus isolate (G954-PBL by 13 passages in Vero cells induced a strong attenuation of this strain in vivo. The adapted virus (G954-V13 differs from its parental strain by only 5 amino acids (4 in P/V/C and 1 in the M gene. While a vaccine strain, Edmonston Zagreb, could replicate equally well in various primate cells, both G954 strains exhibited restriction to the specific cell type used initially for their propagation. Surprisingly, we observed that both G954 strains induced type I IFN, the wt strain inducing even more than the attenuated ones, particularly in human plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells. Type I IFN-induced protection from the infection of both G954 strains depended on the cell type analyzed, being less efficient in the cells used to grow the viral strain. Conclusion Thus, mutations in M and P/V/C proteins can critically affect MV pathogenicity, cellular tropism and lead to virus attenuation without interfering with the α/β IFN system.

  5. Energetics of cellular repair processes in a respiratory-deficient mutant of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.; Gupta, I.; Lata, K.

    1982-01-01

    Repair of potentially lethal damage induced by cytoxic agents like UV irradiation (254 nm), psorelen-plus-UVA (365 mn), and methyl methanesulfonate has been studied in the presence of a glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, in yeast cells. Simultaneously, effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose were also investigated on parameters of energy metabolism like glucose utilization, rate of ATP production, and ATP content of cells. The following results were obtained. (i) 2-Deoxy-D-glucose is able to inhibit repair of potentially lethal damage induced by all the cytotoxic agents tested. The 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced inhibition of repair depends upon the type of lesion and the pattern of cellular energy metabolism, the inhibition being greater in respiratory-deficient mutants than in the wild type. (ii) A continuous energy flow is necessary for repair of potentially lethal damage in yeast cells. Energy may be supplied by the glycolytic and/or the respiratory pathway; respiratory metabolism is not essential for this purpose. (iii) The magnitude of repair correlates with the rate of ATP production in a sigmoid manner

  6. Genetic relationships and epidemiological links between wild type 1 poliovirus isolates in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angez, Mehar; Shaukat, Shahzad; Alam, Muhammad M; Sharif, Salmaan; Khurshid, Adnan; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2012-02-22

    Efforts have been made to eliminate wild poliovirus transmission since 1988 when the World Health Organization began its global eradication campaign. Since then, the incidence of polio has decreased significantly. However, serotype 1 and serotype 3 still circulate endemically in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Both countries constitute a single epidemiologic block representing one of the three remaining major global reservoirs of poliovirus transmission. In this study we used genetic sequence data to investigate transmission links among viruses from diverse locations during 2005-2007. In order to find the origins and routes of wild type 1 poliovirus circulation, polioviruses were isolated from faecal samples of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) patients. We used viral cultures, two intratypic differentiation methods PCR, ELISA to characterize as vaccine or wild type 1 and nucleic acid sequencing of entire VP1 region of poliovirus genome to determine the genetic relatedness. One hundred eleven wild type 1 poliovirus isolates were subjected to nucleotide sequencing for genetic variation study. Considering the 15% divergence of the sequences from Sabin 1, Phylogenetic analysis by MEGA software revealed that active inter and intra country transmission of many genetically distinct strains of wild poliovirus type 1 belonged to genotype SOAS which is indigenous in this region. By grouping wild type 1 polioviruses according to nucleotide sequence homology, three distinct clusters A, B and C were obtained with multiple chains of transmission together with some silent circulations represented by orphan lineages. Our results emphasize that there was a persistent transmission of wild type 1 polioviruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan during 2005-2007. The epidemiologic information provided by the sequence data can contribute to the formulation of better strategies for poliomyelitis control to those critical areas, associated with high risk population groups which include migrants

  7. Genetic relationships and epidemiological links between wild type 1 poliovirus isolates in Pakistan and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angez Mehar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim Efforts have been made to eliminate wild poliovirus transmission since 1988 when the World Health Organization began its global eradication campaign. Since then, the incidence of polio has decreased significantly. However, serotype 1 and serotype 3 still circulate endemically in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Both countries constitute a single epidemiologic block representing one of the three remaining major global reservoirs of poliovirus transmission. In this study we used genetic sequence data to investigate transmission links among viruses from diverse locations during 2005-2007. Methods In order to find the origins and routes of wild type 1 poliovirus circulation, polioviruses were isolated from faecal samples of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP patients. We used viral cultures, two intratypic differentiation methods PCR, ELISA to characterize as vaccine or wild type 1 and nucleic acid sequencing of entire VP1 region of poliovirus genome to determine the genetic relatedness. Results One hundred eleven wild type 1 poliovirus isolates were subjected to nucleotide sequencing for genetic variation study. Considering the 15% divergence of the sequences from Sabin 1, Phylogenetic analysis by MEGA software revealed that active inter and intra country transmission of many genetically distinct strains of wild poliovirus type 1 belonged to genotype SOAS which is indigenous in this region. By grouping wild type 1 polioviruses according to nucleotide sequence homology, three distinct clusters A, B and C were obtained with multiple chains of transmission together with some silent circulations represented by orphan lineages. Conclusion Our results emphasize that there was a persistent transmission of wild type1 polioviruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan during 2005-2007. The epidemiologic information provided by the sequence data can contribute to the formulation of better strategies for poliomyelitis control to those critical areas

  8. Co-fermentation using Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strains Hyper-secreting Different Cellulases for the Production of Cellulosic Bioethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cho-Ryong; Sung, Bong Hyun; Lim, Kwang-Mook; Kim, Mi-Jin; Sohn, Min Jeong; Bae, Jung-Hoon; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2017-06-30

    To realize the economical production of ethanol and other bio-based chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass by consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), various cellulases from different sources were tested to improve the level of cellulase secretion in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by screening an optimal translational fusion partner (TFP) as both a secretion signal and fusion partner. Among them, four indispensable cellulases for cellulose hydrolysis, including Chaetomium thermophilum cellobiohydrolase (CtCBH1), Chrysosporium lucknowense cellobiohydrolase (ClCBH2), Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase (TrEGL2), and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera β-glucosidase (SfBGL1), were identified to be highly secreted in active form in yeast. Despite variability in the enzyme levels produced, each recombinant yeast could secrete approximately 0.6-2.0 g/L of cellulases into the fermentation broth. The synergistic effect of the mixed culture of the four strains expressing the essential cellulases with the insoluble substrate Avicel and several types of cellulosic biomass was demonstrated to be effective. Co-fermentation of these yeast strains produced approximately 14 g/L ethanol from the pre-treated rice straw containing 35 g/L glucan with 3-fold higher productivity than that of wild type yeast using a reduced amount of commercial cellulases. This process will contribute to the cost-effective production of bioenergy such as bioethanol and biochemicals from cellulosic biomass.

  9. Yarrowia divulgata f.a., sp. nov., a yeast species from animal-related and marine sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, Edina; Niss, Marete; Dlauchy, Dénes

    2013-01-01

    Five yeast strains, phenotypically indistinguishable from Yarrowia lipolytica and Yarrowia deformans, were recovered from different animal-related samples. One strain was isolated from a bacon processing plant in Denmark, two strains from chicken liver in the USA, one strain from chicken breast...... the genotypically closest relative (LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 and ITS region similarity of 97.0 and 93.7 %, respectively). Yarrowia divulgata f.a., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains with F6-17(T) ( = CBS 11013(T) = CCUG 56725(T)) as the type strain. Some D1/D2 sequences of yeasts from marine habitats were...

  10. Identification of yeast genes that confer resistance to chitosan oligosaccharide (COS using chemogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Maria DLA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chitosan oligosaccharide (COS, a deacetylated derivative of chitin, is an abundant, and renewable natural polymer. COS has higher antimicrobial properties than chitosan and is presumed to act by disrupting/permeabilizing the cell membranes of bacteria, yeast and fungi. COS is relatively non-toxic to mammals. By identifying the molecular and genetic targets of COS, we hope to gain a better understanding of the antifungal mode of action of COS. Results Three different chemogenomic fitness assays, haploinsufficiency (HIP, homozygous deletion (HOP, and multicopy suppression (MSP profiling were combined with a transcriptomic analysis to gain insight in to the mode of action and mechanisms of resistance to chitosan oligosaccharides. The fitness assays identified 39 yeast deletion strains sensitive to COS and 21 suppressors of COS sensitivity. The genes identified are involved in processes such as RNA biology (transcription, translation and regulatory mechanisms, membrane functions (e.g. signalling, transport and targeting, membrane structural components, cell division, and proteasome processes. The transcriptomes of control wild type and 5 suppressor strains overexpressing ARL1, BCK2, ERG24, MSG5, or RBA50, were analyzed in the presence and absence of COS. Some of the up-regulated transcripts in the suppressor overexpressing strains exposed to COS included genes involved in transcription, cell cycle, stress response and the Ras signal transduction pathway. Down-regulated transcripts included those encoding protein folding components and respiratory chain proteins. The COS-induced transcriptional response is distinct from previously described environmental stress responses (i.e. thermal, salt, osmotic and oxidative stress and pre-treatment with these well characterized environmental stressors provided little or any resistance to COS. Conclusions Overexpression of the ARL1 gene, a member of the Ras superfamily that regulates membrane

  11. ALS Associated Mutations in Matrin 3 Alter Protein-Protein Interactions and Impede mRNA Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Ashley; Garcia-Mansfield, Krystine; Singh, Gurkaran; Bakkar, Nadine; Pirrotte, Patrick; Bowser, Robert

    2017-11-06

    Mutations in Matrin 3 have recently been linked to ALS, though the mechanism that induces disease in these patients is unknown. To define the protein interactome of wild-type and ALS-linked MATR3 mutations, we performed immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry using NSC-34 cells expressing human wild-type or mutant Matrin 3. Gene ontology analysis identified a novel role for Matrin 3 in mRNA transport centered on proteins in the TRanscription and EXport (TREX) complex, known to function in mRNA biogenesis and nuclear export. ALS-linked mutations in Matrin 3 led to its re-distribution within the nucleus, decreased co-localization with endogenous Matrin 3 and increased co-localization with specific TREX components. Expression of disease-causing Matrin 3 mutations led to nuclear mRNA export defects of both global mRNA and more specifically the mRNA of TDP-43 and FUS. Our findings identify a potential pathogenic mechanism attributable to MATR3 mutations and further link cellular transport defects to ALS.

  12. A cloned prokaryotic Cd2+ P-type ATPase increases yeast sensitivity to Cd2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.-C.; Bal, Nathalie; Perard, Julien; Lowe, Jennifer; Boscheron, Cecile; Mintz, Elisabeth; Catty, Patrice

    2004-01-01

    CadA, the P1-type ATPase involved in Listeria monocytogenes resistance to Cd 2+ , was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and did just the opposite to what was expected, as it strikingly decreased the Cd 2+ tolerance of these cells. Yeast cells expressing the non-functional mutant Asp 398 Ala could grow on selective medium containing up to 100 μM Cd 2+ , whereas those expressing the functional protein could not grow in the presence of 1 μM Cd 2+ . The CadA-GFP fusion protein was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, suggesting that yeast hyper-sensitivity was due to Cd 2+ accumulation in the reticulum lumen. CadA is also known to transport Zn 2+ , but Zn 2+ did not protect the cells against Cd 2+ poisoning. In the presence of 10 μM Cd 2+ , transformed yeasts survived by rapid loss of their expression vector

  13. Genome-wide identification of conserved microRNA and their response to drought stress in Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fantao; Luo, Xiangdong; Zhou, Yi; Xie, Jiankun

    2016-04-01

    To identify drought stress-responsive conserved microRNA (miRNA) from Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff., DXWR) on a genome-wide scale, high-throughput sequencing technology was used to sequence libraries of DXWR samples, treated with and without drought stress. 505 conserved miRNAs corresponding to 215 families were identified. 17 were significantly down-regulated and 16 were up-regulated under drought stress. Stem-loop qRT-PCR revealed the same expression patterns as high-throughput sequencing, suggesting the accuracy of the sequencing result was high. Potential target genes of the drought-responsive miRNA were predicted to be involved in diverse biological processes. Furthermore, 16 miRNA families were first identified to be involved in drought stress response from plants. These results present a comprehensive view of the conserved miRNA and their expression patterns under drought stress for DXWR, which will provide valuable information and sequence resources for future basis studies.

  14. A population study of killer viruses reveals different evolutionary histories of two closely related Saccharomyces sensu stricto yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shang-Lin; Leu, Jun-Yi; Chang, Tien-Hsien

    2015-08-01

    Microbes have evolved ways of interference competition to gain advantage over their ecological competitors. The use of secreted killer toxins by yeast cells through acquiring double-stranded RNA viruses is one such prominent example. Although the killer behaviour has been well studied in laboratory yeast strains, our knowledge regarding how killer viruses are spread and maintained in nature and how yeast cells co-evolve with viruses remains limited. We investigated these issues using a panel of 81 yeast populations belonging to three Saccharomyces sensu stricto species isolated from diverse ecological niches and geographic locations. We found that killer strains are rare among all three species. In contrast, killer toxin resistance is widespread in Saccharomyces paradoxus populations, but not in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Saccharomyces eubayanus populations. Genetic analyses revealed that toxin resistance in S. paradoxus is often caused by dominant alleles that have independently evolved in different populations. Molecular typing identified one M28 and two types of M1 killer viruses in those killer strains. We further showed that killer viruses of the same type could lead to distinct killer phenotypes under different host backgrounds, suggesting co-evolution between the viruses and hosts in different populations. Taken together, our data suggest that killer viruses vary in their evolutionary histories even within closely related yeast species. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Nucleobase but not Sugar Fidelity is Maintained in the Sabin I RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinran Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sabin I poliovirus live, attenuated vaccine strain encodes for four amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E, and T362I in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp. We have previously shown that the T362I substitution leads to a lower fidelity RdRp, and viruses encoding this variant are attenuated in a mouse model of poliovirus. Given these results, it was surprising that the nucleotide incorporation rate and nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp is similar to that of wild-type enzyme, although the Sabin I RdRp is less selective against nucleotides with modified sugar groups. We suggest that the other Sabin amino acid changes (i.e., D53N, Y73H, K250E help to re-establish nucleotide incorporation rates and nucleotide discrimination near wild-type levels, which may be a requirement for the propagation of the virus and its efficacy as a vaccine strain. These results also suggest that the nucleobase fidelity of the Sabin I RdRp likely does not contribute to viral attenuation.

  16. RNA-Binding Proteins Revisited – The Emerging Arabidopsis mRNA Interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Köster, Tino

    2017-04-13

    RNA–protein interaction is an important checkpoint to tune gene expression at the RNA level. Global identification of proteins binding in vivo to mRNA has been possible through interactome capture – where proteins are fixed to target RNAs by UV crosslinking and purified through affinity capture of polyadenylated RNA. In Arabidopsis over 500 RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in UV-crosslinked samples have been identified. As in mammals and yeast, the mRNA interactomes came with a few surprises. For example, a plethora of the proteins caught on RNA had not previously been linked to RNA-mediated processes, for example proteins of intermediary metabolism. Thus, the studies provide unprecedented insights into the composition of the mRNA interactome, highlighting the complexity of RNA-mediated processes.

  17. RNA-Binding Proteins Revisited – The Emerging Arabidopsis mRNA Interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Kö ster, Tino; Marondedze, Claudius; Meyer, Katja; Staiger, Dorothee

    2017-01-01

    RNA–protein interaction is an important checkpoint to tune gene expression at the RNA level. Global identification of proteins binding in vivo to mRNA has been possible through interactome capture – where proteins are fixed to target RNAs by UV crosslinking and purified through affinity capture of polyadenylated RNA. In Arabidopsis over 500 RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in UV-crosslinked samples have been identified. As in mammals and yeast, the mRNA interactomes came with a few surprises. For example, a plethora of the proteins caught on RNA had not previously been linked to RNA-mediated processes, for example proteins of intermediary metabolism. Thus, the studies provide unprecedented insights into the composition of the mRNA interactome, highlighting the complexity of RNA-mediated processes.

  18. The AAA-ATPase NVL2 is a component of pre-ribosomal particles that interacts with the DExD/H-box RNA helicase DOB1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahama, Masami; Yamazoe, Takeshi; Hara, Yoshimitsu; Tani, Katsuko; Tsuji, Akihiko; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear VCP/p97-like protein 2 (NVL2) is a member of the chaperone-like AAA-ATPase family with two conserved ATP-binding modules. Our previous studies have shown that NVL2 is localized to the nucleolus by interacting with ribosomal protein L5 and may participate in ribosome synthesis, a process involving various non-ribosomal factors including chaperones and RNA helicases. Here, we show that NVL2 is associated with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. Moreover, we used yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays to identify an NVL2-interacting protein that could yield insights into NVL2 function in ribosome biogenesis. We found that NVL2 interacts with DOB1, a DExD/H-box RNA helicase, whose yeast homologue functions in a late stage of the 60S subunit synthesis. DOB1 can interact with a second ATP-binding module mutant of NVL2, which shows a dominant negative effect on ribosome synthesis. In contrast, it cannot interact with a first ATP-binding module mutant, which does not show the dominant negative effect. When the dominant negative mutant of NVL2 was overexpressed in cells, DOB1 appeared to remain associated with nuclear pre-ribosomal particles. Such accumulation was not observed upon overexpression of wild-type NVL2 or a nondominant-negative mutant. Taken together, our results suggest that NVL2 might regulate the association/dissociation reaction of DOB1 with pre-ribosomal particles by acting as a molecular chaperone

  19. Rearing in seawater mesocosms improves the spawning performance of growth hormone transgenic and wild-type coho salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind A Leggatt

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH transgenes can significantly accelerate growth rates in fish and cause associated alterations to their physiology and behaviour. Concern exists regarding potential environmental risks of GH transgenic fish, should they enter natural ecosystems. In particular, whether they can reproduce and generate viable offspring under natural conditions is poorly understood. In previous studies, GH transgenic salmon grown under contained culture conditions had lower spawning behaviour and reproductive success relative to wild-type fish reared in nature. However, wild-type salmon cultured in equal conditions also had limited reproductive success. As such, whether decreased reproductive success of GH transgenic salmon is due to the action of the transgene or to secondary effects of culture (or a combination has not been fully ascertained. Hence, salmon were reared in large (350,000 L, semi-natural, seawater tanks (termed mesocosms designed to minimize effects of standard laboratory culture conditions, and the reproductive success of wild-type and GH transgenic coho salmon from mesocosms were compared with that of wild-type fish from nature. Mesocosm rearing partially restored spawning behaviour and success of wild-type fish relative to culture rearing, but remained lower overall than those reared in nature. GH transgenic salmon reared in the mesocosm had similar spawning behaviour and success as wild-type fish reared in the mesocosm when in full competition and without competition, but had lower success in male-only competition experiments. There was evidence of genotype×environmental interactions on spawning success, so that spawning success of transgenic fish, should they escape to natural systems in early life, cannot be predicted with low uncertainty. Under the present conditions, we found no evidence to support enhanced mating capabilities of GH transgenic coho salmon compared to wild-type salmon. However, it is clear that GH transgenic

  20. Functional toxicogenomic profiling expands insight into modulators of formaldehyde toxicity in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew North

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (FA is a commercially important chemical with numerous and diverse uses. Accordingly, occupational and environmental exposure to FA is prevalent worldwide. Various adverse effects, including nasopharyngeal, sinonasal, and lymphohematopoietic cancers, have been linked to FA exposure, prompting designation of FA as a human carcinogen by U.S. and international scientific entities. Although the mechanism(s of FA toxicity have been well studied, additional insight is needed in regard to the genetic requirements for FA tolerance. In this study, a functional toxicogenomics approach was utilized in the model eukaryotic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify genes and cellular processes modulating the cellular toxicity of FA. Our results demonstrate mutant strains deficient in multiple DNA repair pathways–including homologous recombination, single strand annealing, and postreplication repair–were sensitive to FA, indicating FA may cause various forms of DNA damage in yeast. The SKI complex and its associated factors, which regulate mRNA degradation by the exosome, were also required for FA tolerance, suggesting FA may have unappreciated effects on RNA stability. Furthermore, various strains involved in osmoregulation and stress response were sensitive to FA. Together, our results are generally consistent with FA-mediated damage to both DNA and RNA. Considering DNA repair and RNA degradation pathways are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans, mechanisms of FA toxicity identified in yeast may be relevant to human disease and genetic susceptibility.

  1. Tombusviruses upregulate phospholipid biosynthesis via interaction between p33 replication protein and yeast lipid sensor proteins during virus replication in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; Sharma, Monika; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Positive-stranded RNA viruses induce new membranous structures and promote membrane proliferation in infected cells to facilitate viral replication. In this paper, the authors show that a plant-infecting tombusvirus upregulates transcription of phospholipid biosynthesis genes, such as INO1, OPI3 and CHO1, and increases phospholipid levels in yeast model host. This is accomplished by the viral p33 replication protein, which interacts with Opi1p FFAT domain protein and Scs2p VAP protein. Opi1p and Scs2p are phospholipid sensor proteins and they repress the expression of phospholipid genes. Accordingly, deletion of OPI1 transcription repressor in yeast has a stimulatory effect on TBSV RNA accumulation and enhanced tombusvirus replicase activity in an in vitro assay. Altogether, the presented data convincingly demonstrate that de novo lipid biosynthesis is required for optimal TBSV replication. Overall, this work reveals that a (+)RNA virus reprograms the phospholipid biosynthesis pathway in a unique way to facilitate its replication in yeast cells. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with FFAT-domain host protein. • Tombusvirus replication leads to upregulation of phospholipids. • Tombusvirus replication depends on de novo lipid synthesis. • Deletion of FFAT-domain host protein enhances TBSV replication. • TBSV rewires host phospholipid synthesis

  2. A soluble diacylglycerol acyltransferase is involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis in the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sapa Hima; Saha, Saikat; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG) occurs in the microsomal membranes of eukaryotes. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), a member of the 10 S cytosolic TAG biosynthetic complex (TBC) in Rhodotorula glutinis. Both a full-length and an N-terminally truncated cDNA clone of a single gene were isolated from R. glutinis. The DGAT activity of the protein encoded by RgDGAT was confirmed in vivo by the heterologous expression of cDNA in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae quadruple mutant (H1246) that is defective in TAG synthesis. RgDGAT overexpression in yeast was found to be capable of acylating diacylglycerol (DAG) in an acyl-CoA-dependent manner. Quadruple mutant yeast cells exhibit growth defects in the presence of oleic acid, but wild-type yeast cells do not. In an in vivo fatty acid supplementation experiment, RgDGAT expression rescued quadruple mutant growth in an oleate-containing medium. We describe a soluble acyl-CoA-dependent DAG acyltransferase from R. glutinis that belongs to the DGAT3 class of enzymes. The study highlights the importance of an alternative TAG biosynthetic pathway in oleaginous yeasts.

  3. A quantitative characterization of the yeast heterotrimeric G protein cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tau-Mu; Kitano, Hiroaki; Simon, Melvin I.

    2003-01-01

    The yeast mating response is one of the best understood heterotrimeric G protein signaling pathways. Yet, most descriptions of this system have been qualitative. We have quantitatively characterized the heterotrimeric G protein cycle in yeast based on direct in vivo measurements. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor the association state of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gα and Gβγ-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and we found that receptor-mediated G protein activation produced a loss of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Quantitative time course and dose–response data were obtained for both wild-type and mutant cells possessing an altered pheromone response. These results paint a quantitative portrait of how regulators such as Sst2p and the C-terminal tail of α-factor receptor modulate the kinetics and sensitivity of G protein signaling. We have explored critical features of the dynamics including the rapid rise and subsequent decline of active G proteins during the early response, and the relationship between the G protein activation dose–response curve and the downstream dose–response curves for cell-cycle arrest and transcriptional induction. Fitting the data to a mathematical model produced estimates of the in vivo rates of heterotrimeric G protein activation and deactivation in yeast. PMID:12960402

  4. The wild type as concept and in experimental practice: A history of its role in classical genetics and evolutionary theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Tarquin

    2017-06-01

    Wild types in genetics are specialised strains of laboratory experimental organism which principally serve as standards against which variation is measured. As selectively inbred lineages highly isolated from ancestral wild populations, there appears to be little wild or typical about them. I will nonetheless argue that they have historically been successfully used as stand-ins for nature, allowing knowledge produced in the laboratory to be extrapolated to the natural world. In this paper, I will explore the 19th century origins of the wild type concept, the theoretical and experimental innovations which allowed concepts and organisms to move from wild nature to laboratory domestication c. 1900 (resulting in the production of standardised lab strains), and the conflict among early geneticists between interactionist and atomist accounts of wild type, which would eventually lead to the conceptual disintegration of wild types and the triumph of genocentrism and population genetics. I conclude by discussing how the strategy of using wild type strains to represent nature in the lab has nonetheless survived the downfall of the wild type concept and continues to provide, significant limitations acknowledged, an epistemically productive means of investigating heredity and evolutionary variation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of novel miRNAs and miRNA dependent developmental shifts of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Zhan

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are small, endogenous RNAs of 20 approximately 25 nucleotides, processed from stem-loop regions of longer RNA precursors. Plant miRNAs act as negative regulators of target mRNAs predominately by slicing target transcripts, and a number of miRNAs play important roles in development. We analyzed a number of published datasets from Arabidopsis thaliana to characterize novel miRNAs, novel miRNA targets, and miRNA-regulated developmental changes in gene expression. These data include microarray profiling data and small RNA (sRNA deep sequencing data derived from miRNA biogenesis/transport mutants, microarray profiling data of mRNAs in a developmental series, and computational predictions of conserved genomic stem-loop structures. Our conservative analyses identified five novel mature miRNAs and seven miRNA targets, including one novel target gene. Two complementary miRNAs that target distinct mRNAs were encoded by one gene. We found that genes targeted by known miRNAs, and genes up-regulated or down-regulated in miRNA mutant inflorescences, are highly expressed in the wild type inflorescence. In addition, transcripts upregulated within the mutant inflorescences were abundant in wild type leaves and shoot meristems and low in pollen and seed. Downregulated transcripts were abundant in wild type pollen and seed and low in shoot meristems, roots and leaves. Thus, disrupting miRNA function causes the inflorescence transcriptome to resemble the leaf and meristem and to differ from pollen and seed. Applications of our computational approach to other species and the use of more liberal criteria than reported here will further expand the number of identified miRNAs and miRNA targets. Our findings suggest that miRNAs have a global role in promoting vegetative to reproductive transitions in A. thaliana.

  6. Fusarium spp. Associated with Field-Grown Grain of Near-Isogenic Low Lignin and Wild-Type Sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium spp. associated with field-grown grain of near-isogenic low lignin and wild-type sorghum. Deanna Funnell-Harris and Jeff Pedersen, USDA-ARS, Lincoln, NE Previous studies indicated that low lignin brown midrib (bmr) sorghum may be more resistant to Fusarium spp. than wild-type and that phen...

  7. Transplacental and oral transmission of wild-type bluetongue virus serotype 8 in cattle after experimental infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, A.; Heutink, C.G.; Rooij, van E.M.A.; Rijn, van P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Potential vertical transmission of wild-type bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) in cattle was explored in this experiment. We demonstrated transplacental transmission of wild-type BTV-8 in one calf and oral infection with BTV-8 in another calf. Following the experimental BTV-8 infection of seven

  8. [Antivirus effect of polysaccharides of brewer yeast in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Shi, Y; Guan, X; Zhang, S; Tian, T

    1998-03-01

    The antivirus effect of polysaccharides of brewer yeast from yeast mud on 13 kinds of viruses including DNA and RNA virus along with their mechanisms were studied. The result showed that this effect was remarkable on the infections with poliovirus III, adenovirus III, ECHO6 virus, enterovirus 71, vesicular stomatitis virus, herpesvirus I, II, coxsackie A16 virus and coxsackie B3 virus. The polysaccharides of brewer yeast could also inhibit the development of cytopathic effect(CPE) and protect cultural cells from being infected with the above viruses.

  9. Transcript specificity in yeast pre-mRNA splicing revealed by mutations in core spliceosomal components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Pleiss

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate expression of most eukaryotic genes requires the removal of introns from their pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs, a process catalyzed by the spliceosome. In higher eukaryotes a large family of auxiliary factors known as SR proteins can improve the splicing efficiency of transcripts containing suboptimal splice sites by interacting with distinct sequences present in those pre-mRNAs. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks functional equivalents of most of these factors; thus, it has been unclear whether the spliceosome could effectively distinguish among transcripts. To address this question, we have used a microarray-based approach to examine the effects of mutations in 18 highly conserved core components of the spliceosomal machinery. The kinetic profiles reveal clear differences in the splicing defects of particular pre-mRNA substrates. Most notably, the behaviors of ribosomal protein gene transcripts are generally distinct from other intron-containing transcripts in response to several spliceosomal mutations. However, dramatically different behaviors can be seen for some pairs of transcripts encoding ribosomal protein gene paralogs, suggesting that the spliceosome can readily distinguish between otherwise highly similar pre-mRNAs. The ability of the spliceosome to distinguish among its different substrates may therefore offer an important opportunity for yeast to regulate gene expression in a transcript-dependent fashion. Given the high level of conservation of core spliceosomal components across eukaryotes, we expect that these results will significantly impact our understanding of how regulated splicing is controlled in higher eukaryotes as well.

  10. [Yeast-like fungi in the gastrointestinal tract in children and adolescents with diabetes type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Beata; Kawko, Małgorzata; Zorena, Katarzyna; Myśliwiec, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the frequency of fungal infections in human populations has increased considerably. The most common type offungus attacking the human organism is Candida albicans. Yeast-like fungi occur naturally in the oral cavity, intestines, vagina, or skin, however in amounts not dangerous to human health. The studies so far have shown that patients with diabetes type 1 (T1DM) to a large degree are exposed to complications related to fungal infections. A substantial growth of fungi observed in diabetic patients may unfavorably affect metabolic compensation, and lead to increased demand for insulin, as well as to the difficult to cure symptom infections. The weaker the immune resistance in patients with diabetes, the greater the risk of ailments related to candidiasis. The article contains a review of recent literature regarding the problems related to occurrence of yeast-like fungi in digestive tract of children with diabetes type 1. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  11. Identification and comparative profiling of miRNAs in an early flowering mutant of trifoliate orange and its wild type by genome-wide deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Ming Sun

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a new class of small, endogenous RNAs that play a regulatory role in various biological and metabolic processes by negatively affecting gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. While the number of known Arabidopsis and rice miRNAs is continuously increasing, information regarding miRNAs from woody plants such as citrus remains limited. Solexa sequencing was performed at different developmental stages on both an early flowering mutant of trifoliate orange (precocious trifoliate orange, Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf. and its wild-type in this study, resulting in the obtainment of 141 known miRNAs belonging to 99 families and 75 novel miRNAs in four libraries. A total of 317 potential target genes were predicted based on the 51 novel miRNAs families, GO and KEGG annotation revealed that high ranked miRNA-target genes are those implicated in diverse cellular processes in plants, including development, transcription, protein degradation and cross adaptation. To characterize those miRNAs expressed at the juvenile and adult development stages of the mutant and its wild-type, further analysis on the expression profiles of several miRNAs through real-time PCR was performed. The results revealed that most miRNAs were down-regulated at adult stage compared with juvenile stage for both the mutant and its wild-type. These results indicate that both conserved and novel miRNAs may play important roles in citrus growth and development, stress responses and other physiological processes.

  12. DNA binding properties of dioxin receptors in wild-type and mutant mouse hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuthill, S.; Poellinger, L.

    1988-01-01

    The current model of action of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) entails stimulation of target gene transcription via the formation of dioxin-receptor complexes and subsequent accumulation of the complexes within the cell nucleus. Here, the authors have analyzed the DNA binding properties of the dioxin receptor in wild-type mouse hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells and a class of nonresponsive mutant cells which fail to accumulate dioxin-receptor complexes within the nucleus in vivo. In vitro, both the wild-type and mutant [ 3 H]dioxin-receptor complexes exhibited low affinity for DNA-cellulose (5-8% and around 4% retention, respectively) in the absence of prior biochemical manipulations. However, following chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, the wild-type but not the mutant dioxin receptor was transformed to a species with an increased affinity for DNA (40-50% retention on DNA-cellulose). The gross molecular structure of the mutant, non DNA binding dioxin receptor did not appear to be altered as compared to that of the wild-type receptor. These results imply that the primary deficiency in the mutant dioxin receptor form may reside at the DNA binding level and that, in analogy to steroid hormone receptors, DNA binding of the receptor may be an essential step in the regulation of target gene transcription by dioxin

  13. The smt-0 mutation which abolishes mating-type switching in fission yeast is a deletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrkársdóttir, U; Egel, R; Nielsen, O

    1993-01-01

    Mating-type switching in the fission yeast, S. pombe, is initiated by a DNA double-strand break (DSB) between the mat1 cassette and the H1 homology box. The mat1-cis-acting mutant, smt-0, abolishes mating-type switching and is shown here to be a 263-bp deletion. This deletion starts in the middle...

  14. The bifunctional abiotic stress signalling regulator and endogenous RNA silencing suppressor FIERY1 is required for lateral root formation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2010-09-28

    The Arabidopsis FIERY1 (FRY1) locus was originally identified as a negative regulator of stress-responsive gene expression and later shown to be required for suppression of RNA silencing. In this study we discovered that the FRY1 locus also regulates lateral root formation. Compared with the wild type, fry1 mutant seedlings generated significantly fewer lateral roots under normal growth conditions and also exhibited a dramatically reduced sensitivity to auxin in inducing lateral root initiation. Using transgenic plants that overexpress a yeast homolog of FRY1 that possesses only the 3\\', 5\\'-bisphosphate nucleotidase activity but not the inositol 1-phosphatase activity, we demonstrated that the lateral root phenotypes in fry1 result from loss of the nucleotidase activity. Furthermore, a T-DNA insertion mutant of another RNA silencing suppressor, XRN4 (but not XRN2 or XRN3), which is an exoribonuclease that is inhibited by the substrate of the FRY1 3\\', 5\\'-bisphosphate nucleotidase, exhibits similar lateral root defects. Although fry1 and xrn4 exhibited reduced sensitivity to ethylene, our experiments demonstrated that restoration of ethylene sensitivity in the fry1 mutant is not sufficient to rescue the lateral root phenotypes of fry1. Our results indicate that RNA silencing modulated by FRY1 and XRN4 plays an important role in shaping root architecture. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Combinatorial RNA Interference Therapy Prevents Selection of Pre-existing HBV Variants in Human Liver Chimeric Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yao-Ming; Sun, Cheng-Pu; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wu, Ping-Yi; Enya Chen, Yu-Chen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Selection of escape mutants with mutations within the target sequence could abolish the antiviral RNA interference activity. Here, we investigated the impact of a pre-existing shRNA-resistant HBV variant on the efficacy of shRNA therapy. We previously identified a highly potent shRNA, S1, which, when delivered by an adeno-associated viral vector, effectively inhibits HBV replication in HBV transgenic mice. We applied the “PICKY” software to systemically screen the HBV genome, then used hydrodynamic transfection and HBV transgenic mice to identify additional six highly potent shRNAs. Human liver chimeric mice were infected with a mixture of wild-type and T472C HBV, a S1-resistant HBV variant, and then treated with a single or combined shRNAs. The presence of T472C mutant compromised the therapeutic efficacy of S1 and resulted in replacement of serum wild-type HBV by T472C HBV. In contrast, combinatorial therapy using S1 and P28, one of six potent shRNAs, markedly reduced titers for both wild-type and T472C HBV. Interestingly, treatment with P28 alone led to the emergence of escape mutants with mutations in the P28 target region. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial RNAi therapy can minimize the escape of resistant viral mutants in chronic HBV patients. PMID:26482836

  16. The fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri produces holomycin and uses an RNA methyltransferase for self-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhiwei; Baker, Alexander Thomas; Raab, Andrea; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Tiehui; Yu, Yi; Jaspars, Marcel; Secombes, Christopher J; Deng, Hai

    2013-05-24

    Holomycin and its derivatives belong to a class of broad-spectrum antibacterial natural products containing a rare dithiolopyrrolone heterobicyclic scaffold. The antibacterial mechanism of dithiolopyrrolone compounds has been attributed to the inhibition of bacterial RNA polymerase activities, although the exact mode of action has not been established in vitro. Some dithiopyrrolone derivatives display potent anticancer activities. Recently the biosynthetic gene cluster of holomycin has been identified and characterized in Streptomyces clavuligerus. Here we report that the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri is a holomycin producer, as evidenced through genome mining, chemical isolation, and structural elucidation as well as genetic manipulation. We also identified a unique regulatory gene hom15 at one end of the gene cluster encoding a cold-shock-like protein that likely regulates the production of holomycin in low cultivation temperatures. Inactivation of hom15 resulted in a significant loss of holomycin production. Finally, gene disruption of an RNA methyltransferase gene hom12 resulted in the sensitivity of the mutant toward holomycin. A complementation experiment of hom12 restored the resistance against holomycin. Although the wild-type Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Gold is susceptible to holomycin, the mutant harboring hom12 showed tolerance toward holomycin. High resolution liquid chromatography (LC)-ESI/MS analysis of digested RNA fragments demonstrated that the wild-type Y. ruckeri and E. coli harboring hom12 contain a methylated RNA fragment, whereas the mutated Y. ruckeri and the wild-type E. coli only contain normal non-methylated RNA fragments. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that this putative RNA methyltransferase Hom12 is the self-resistance protein that methylates the RNA of Y. ruckeri to reduce the cytotoxic effect of holomycin during holomycin production.

  17. Effects of regionally applied heating on the respiration of wild type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nocturnal dark respiration (Rn) in wild type and transgenic soybean plants ... Illinois, USA under ambient and elevated CO2 conditions was examined in this study. ... Experimental plants were transferred to a controlled growth chamber at V4 ...

  18. Distinct Domestication Trajectories in Top-Fermenting Beer Yeasts and Wine Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Margarida; Pontes, Ana; Almeida, Pedro; Barbosa, Raquel; Serra, Marta; Libkind, Diego; Hutzler, Mathias; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-10-24

    Beer is one of the oldest alcoholic beverages and is produced by the fermentation of sugars derived from starches present in cereal grains. Contrary to lager beers, made by bottom-fermenting strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus, a hybrid yeast, ale beers are closer to the ancient beer type and are fermented by S. cerevisiae, a top-fermenting yeast. Here, we use population genomics to investigate (1) the closest relatives of top-fermenting beer yeasts; (2) whether top-fermenting yeasts represent an independent domestication event separate from those already described; (3) whether single or multiple beer yeast domestication events can be inferred; and (4) whether top-fermenting yeasts represent non-recombinant or recombinant lineages. Our results revealed that top-fermenting beer yeasts are polyphyletic, with a main clade composed of at least three subgroups, dominantly represented by the German, British, and wheat beer strains. Other beer strains were phylogenetically close to sake, wine, or bread yeasts. We detected genetic signatures of beer yeast domestication by investigating genes previously linked to brewing and using genome-wide scans. We propose that the emergence of the main clade of beer yeasts is related with a domestication event distinct from the previously known cases of wine and sake yeast domestication. The nucleotide diversity of the main beer clade more than doubled that of wine yeasts, which might be a consequence of fundamental differences in the modes of beer and wine yeast domestication. The higher diversity of beer strains could be due to the more intense and different selection regimes associated to brewing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Yeast genetics. A manual of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.F.T.; Spencer, D.M.; Bruce, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    This is a bench-top manual of methods needed both for classical genetics as related to yeasts, such as mating, sporulation, isolation of hybrids, microdissection of asci for the isolation of single-spore clones, as well as for mapping of genes and the construction of new strains by protoplast fusion. Special emphasis is on mutations in general, and on methods of isolating a number of important classes of mutants in particular. Basic techniques for the separation of chromosomes by electrophoresis, such as OFAGE, FIGE, and CHEF, are discussed, with detailed protocols for the first two. Furthermore, new methods, e.g. for the isolation of high molecular weight DNA from yeast, isolation of RNA, and techniques for transformation of yeasts, are also described in detail. (orig.) With 10 figs.

  20. Influence of intracellular adenosine-triphosphate concentration of yeast cells on survival following X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, R.D.; Pohlit, W.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of D-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and starvation in buffer on the ATP-concentration of yeast cells has been studied. In both the wild-type and a respiratory-deficient mutant strain 2-deoxy-D-glucose decreases the value for ATP, while it is enhanced by glucose only in the mutant strain. Populations with different ATP-concentrations have been irradiated. The results suggest that ATP may be an essential factor in the system that determines the length of the shoulder of the dose effect curves. (orig.) [de

  1. Genetic effects of decay of radionuclides, products of nuclear fission, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.G.; Gracheva, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Decay of 89 Sr incorporated in yeast cells produces a pronounced inactivating effect. The transmutation mainly contributes (about 80%) to cell inactivation. Haploid cells are more sensitive to 89 Sr disintegration than diploid and tetraploid ones. A radiosensitive mutant XRS2, that is particularly sensitive to the transmutation effect of radionuclides, has proved to be sensitive to 89 Sr transmutation as well. At the same time, another radiosensitive mutant, rad 54, does not virtually differ from the wild-type strain by its sensitivity to 89 Sr decay

  2. Comparative analysis of the protein compositions between wild type and body color mutant of helicoverpa armigera adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Lihua; Chen Jin'e; Liu Yan; Wang Yongqiang; Liu Peigang; Meng Zhiqi

    2012-01-01

    To gain an in-depth understanding of the fineness and regulation mechanism of body color mutant of Helicoverpa armigera Hbner, the protein composition differences between adult of dominant mutant, recessive mutant and wild type were studied using the SDS-PAGE combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS and bioinformatics analysis. The results indicated that the protein composition of the dominant mutant and wild type had little difference. However, there were obvious differences between the recessive mutant and wild-type. Three specific stripe were chosen for mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis, and two types of proteins related to energy metabolism and cytoskeleton were identified. These findings suggested that the two types of proteins may be associated with occurrence and regulation of body color mutant traits of H. armigera. (authors)

  3. MicroRNA-155 knockout mice are susceptible to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Hiroki; Funatogawa, Keiji; Matsumura, Kazunori; Kato-Miyazawa, Masako; Kirikae, Fumiko; Kiga, Kotaro; Sasakawa, Chihiro; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Kirikae, Teruo

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, conserved, non-coding RNA molecules that repress translation, followed by the decay of miRNA-targeted mRNAs that encode molecules involved in cell differentiation, development, immunity and apoptosis. At least six miRNAs, including microRNA-155 (miR-155), were up-regulated when born marrow-derived macrophages from C57BL/6 mice were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman. C57BL/6 mice intravenously infected with Erdman showed up-regulation of miR-155 in livers and lungs. Following infection, miR-155-deficient C57BL/6 mice died significantly earlier and had significantly higher numbers of CFU in lungs than wild-type mice. Moreover, fewer CD4(+) T cells, but higher numbers of monocytes and neutrophils, were present in the lungs of Erdman-infected miR-155 knockout (miR-155(-/-)) than of wild-type mice. These findings indicated that miR-155 plays a critical role in immune responses to M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Wild-type MIC distributions for aminoglycoside and cyclic polypeptide antibiotics used for treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juréen, P; Angeby, K; Sturegård, E; Chryssanthou, E; Giske, C G; Werngren, J; Nordvall, M; Johansson, A; Kahlmeter, G; Hoffner, S; Schön, T

    2010-05-01

    The aminoglycosides and cyclic polypeptides are essential drugs in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, underscoring the need for accurate and reproducible drug susceptibility testing (DST). The epidemiological cutoff value (ECOFF) separating wild-type susceptible strains from non-wild-type strains is an important but rarely used tool for indicating susceptibility breakpoints against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we established wild-type MIC distributions on Middlebrook 7H10 medium for amikacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, capreomycin, and viomycin using 90 consecutive clinical isolates and 21 resistant strains. Overall, the MIC variation between and within runs did not exceed +/-1 MIC dilution step, and validation of MIC values in Bactec 960 MGIT demonstrated good agreement. Tentative ECOFFs defining the wild type were established for all investigated drugs, including amikacin and viomycin, which currently lack susceptibility breakpoints for 7H10. Five out of seven amikacin- and kanamycin-resistant isolates were classified as susceptible to capreomycin according to the current critical concentration (10 mg/liter) but were non-wild type according to the ECOFF (4 mg/liter), suggesting that the critical concentration may be too high. All amikacin- and kanamycin-resistant isolates were clearly below the ECOFF for viomycin, and two of them were below the ECOFF for streptomycin, indicating that these two drugs may be considered for treatment of amikacin-resistant strains. Pharmacodynamic indices (peak serum concentration [Cmax]/MIC) were more favorable for amikacin and viomycin compared to kanamycin and capreomycin. In conclusion, our data emphasize the importance of establishing wild-type MIC distributions for improving the quality of drug susceptibility testing against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  5. Overexpression of p53 activated by small activating RNA suppresses the growth of human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Q

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Qiangqiang Ge,1,* Chenghe Wang,2,* Yajun Ruan,1,* Zhong Chen,1 Jihong Liu,1 Zhangqun Ye1 1Department of Urology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 2Department of Urology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Previous research has reported that a particular double-stranded RNA, named dsP53-285, has the capacity to induce expression of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 in chimpanzee cells by targeting its promoter. Usually, it is the wild-type p53 protein, rather than mutants, which exhibits potent cancer-inhibiting effects. In addition, nonhuman primates, such as chimpanzees, share almost identical genome sequences with humans. This prompted us to speculate whether dsP53-285 can trigger wild-type p53 protein expression in human prostate cancer (PCa cells and consequently suppress cell growth. The human PCa cell lines LNCaP and DU145 were transfected with dsP53-285 for 72 hours. Compared with the dsControl and mock transfection groups, expression of both p53 messenger RNA and p53 protein was significantly enhanced after dsP53-285 transfection, and this enhancement was followed by upregulation of p21, which indirectly indicated that dsP53-285 induced wild-type p53 expression. Moreover, overexpression of wild-type p53 mediated by dsP53-285 downregulated the expression of Cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6, thereby inducing PCa cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and then inhibiting cell proliferation and clonogenicity. More importantly, dsP53-285 suppressed PCa cells mainly by modulating wild-type p53 expression. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that dsP53-285 can significantly stimulate wild-type p53 expression in the human PCa cell lines LNCaP and DU145 and can exert potent antitumor effects. Keywords: p53, small activating RNA, prostate

  6. Cellular La protein shields nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viral leader RNA from RIG-I and enhances virus growth by diverse mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitko, Vira; Musiyenko, Alla; Bayfield, Mark A; Maraia, Richard J; Barik, Sailen

    2008-08-01

    The La antigen (SS-B) associates with a wide variety of cellular and viral RNAs to affect gene expression in multiple systems. We show that La is the major cellular protein found to be associated with the abundant 44-nucleotide viral leader RNA (leRNA) early after infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. Consistent with this, La redistributes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in RSV-infected cells. Upon RNA interference knockdown of La, leRNA is redirected to associate with the RNA-binding protein RIG-I, a known activator of interferon (IFN) gene expression, and this is accompanied by the early induction of IFN mRNA. These results suggest that La shields leRNA from RIG-I, abrogating the early viral activation of type I IFN. We mapped the leRNA binding function to RNA recognition motif 1 of La and showed that while wild-type La greatly enhanced RSV growth, a La mutant defective in RSV leRNA binding also did not support RSV growth. Comparative studies of RSV and Sendai virus and the use of IFN-negative Vero cells indicated that La supports the growth of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses by both IFN suppression and a potentially novel IFN-independent mechanism.

  7. Speciation driven by hybridization and chromosomal plasticity in a wild yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Nielly-Thibault, Lou; Charron, Guillaume; Eberlein, Chris; Verta, Jukka-Pekka; Samani, Pedram; Sylvester, Kayla; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Bell, Graham; Landry, Christian R

    2016-01-11

    Hybridization is recognized as a powerful mechanism of speciation and a driving force in generating biodiversity. However, only few multicellular species, limited to a handful of plants and animals, have been shown to fulfil all the criteria of homoploid hybrid speciation. This lack of evidence could lead to the interpretation that speciation by hybridization has a limited role in eukaryotes, particularly in single-celled organisms. Laboratory experiments have revealed that fungi such as budding yeasts can rapidly develop reproductive isolation and novel phenotypes through hybridization, showing that in principle homoploid speciation could occur in nature. Here, we report a case of homoploid hybrid speciation in natural populations of the budding yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus inhabiting the North American forests. We show that the rapid evolution of chromosome architecture and an ecological context that led to secondary contact between nascent species drove the formation of an incipient hybrid species with a potentially unique ecological niche.

  8. Sabin and wild type polioviruses from children who presented with acute flaccid paralysis in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedeji, A O; Okonko, I O; Adu, F D

    2012-09-01

    Sensitive poliovirus surveillance to detect vaccine-derived-polioviruses will continue to increase in importance. Isolating and identifying poliovirus strains from children of pediatrics age in Nigeria. A total of 120 fecal samples were randomly collected from children under the age of five who presented with acute flaccid paralysis. Samples were tested by tissue culture technique and further characterized by intratypic differentiation testing using ELISA and PCR methods. The study confirmed the presence of 22(18.3%) enteroviral isolates comprising 19(86.4%) polioviruses and 3(13.6%) non-polio enteroviruses. These 19 polioviruses include: Sabin-type poliovirus-1 (15.8%), poliovirus-2 (10.5%), poliovirus-3 (10.5%) and wild-type poliovirus-1 (63.2%) isolates. It showed that poliovirus infection was higher in children ages 6-11 months (18.9%), females (18.4%), northern states (91.0%) with no vaccination record (75.0%). Wild-type poliovirus-1 was isolated from the stool samples of 12(54.6%) children from northern states and in all age groups except 18-23 months. No significant differences (P >0.05) between poliovirus infection and age (18.9% vs. 17.7%; 81.9% vs. 18.2%) and sex (18.3% vs. 18.4%). There was significant differences (Pvaccination (75.0% vs. 0.0%). No wild-type poliovirus was found in those with complete vaccination. This study further confirms the presence of Sabin and wild-type poliovirus among children in Nigeria. The isolation of Sabin strain of poliovirus is advantageous to the polio eradication program as it is capable of inducing natural immunity in susceptible hosts. Transmission of wild-type poliovirus among children with incomplete vaccination poses a serious threat to polio eradication program in Nigeria. Environmental and serological surveillance with larger sample size are important for monitoring poliovirus circulation in Nigeria.

  9. Role of the CCA bulge of prohead RNA of bacteriophage ø29 in DNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Morais, Marc C; Anderson, Dwight L; Jardine, Paul J; Grimes, Shelley

    2008-11-14

    The oligomeric ring of prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the ATP-driven DNA packaging motor of bacteriophage ø29. The A-helix of pRNA binds the DNA translocating ATPase gp16 (gene product 16) and the CCA bulge in this helix is essential for DNA packaging in vitro. Mutation of the bulge by base substitution or deletion showed that the size of the bulge, rather than its sequence, is primary in DNA packaging activity. Proheads reconstituted with CCA bulge mutant pRNAs bound the packaging ATPase gp16 and the packaging substrate DNA-gp3, although DNA translocation was not detected with several mutants. Prohead/bulge-mutant pRNA complexes with low packaging activity had a higher rate of ATP hydrolysis per base pair of DNA packaged than proheads with wild-type pRNA. Cryoelectron microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of proheads reconstituted with a CCA deletion pRNA showed that the protruding pRNA spokes of the motor occupy a different position relative to the head when compared to particles with wild-type pRNA. Therefore, the CCA bulge seems to dictate the orientation of the pRNA spokes. The conformational changes observed for this mutant pRNA may affect gp16 conformation and/or subsequent ATPase-DNA interaction and, consequently, explain the decreased packaging activity observed for CCA mutants.

  10. Repair of gamma radiation damage in wild type and a radiation sensitive mutant of Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuma, Nagayo

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to examine production and repair of radiation-induced single and double strand breaks in the DNA, a repair-deficient wild type and a repair-deficient mutant, UV17, of Deinococcus radiodurans were subjected to Co-60 gamma irradiation at a dose rate of 6.3 kGy/hr for wild type and 3.9 kGy/hr for UV17 mutant. The shoulder of the curve of UV17 mutant was narrow but existed with the intercept of 0.7 kGy and the corresponding value of the wild type was 4.2 kGy. Mutant cells exhibited about 6 fold increases in sensitivity for the shoulder relative to the wild type. The D 37 doses in the wild type and the mutant were 0.57 kGy and 0.25 kGy, respectively. From the survival curves, difference in the sensitivity between two strains was mainly due to difference of repair capacity than the number of radiation sensitive target. Sedimentation rate of the main component in the irradiated cells of UV17 mutant increased almost to the level of unirradiated control by the postincubation at 30deg C for 3 hrs. The results indicated that this sensitive mutant also exhibited an ability to restore single strand breaks after exposure to a sublethal dose of 0.6 kGy. When restitution of double strand breaks was analyzed by sedimentation in a neutral sucrose gradient, the wild type showed restitution to DNA-membrane complex from large part of the breaks. For UV17 mutant, the apparent increase in DNA-membrane complex formation was seen after 3 hours incubation. Large part of the decrease in the activities of peak 2 was recovered in the peak 1 for the wild type. For the mutant, there was little restitution to peak 1. Almost free DNA component in UV17 mutant, therefore, was merely degraded into shorter pieces. Restoration of DNA-membrane complex from free DNA derived from gamma-ray induced double strand scission involved closely in the repair of gamma-induced damage and survival. (N.K.)

  11. A Phenotypic Screen for Functional Mutants of Human Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Havel, Jocelyn; Beal, Peter A

    2015-11-20

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are RNA-editing enzymes responsible for the conversion of adenosine to inosine at specific locations in cellular RNAs. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are two members of the family that have been shown to be catalytically active. Earlier, we reported a phenotypic screen for the study of human ADAR2 using budding yeast S. cerevisiae as the host system. While this screen has been successfully applied to the study of ADAR2, it failed with ADAR1. Here, we report a new reporter that uses a novel editing substrate and is suitable for the study of ADAR1. We screened plasmid libraries with randomized codons for two important residues in human ADAR1 (G1007 and E1008). The screening results combined with in vitro deamination assays led to the identification of mutants that are more active than the wild type protein. Furthermore, a screen of the ADAR1 E1008X library with a reporter construct bearing an A•G mismatch at the editing site suggests one role for the residue at position 1008 is to sense the identity of the base pairing partner for the editing site adenosine. This work has provided a starting point for future in vitro evolution studies of ADAR1 and led to new insight into ADAR's editing site selectivity.

  12. Induction of pure and sectored mutant clones in excision-proficient and deficient strains of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, F; Haynes, R H

    1977-06-01

    We have found that UV-induced mutation frequency in a forward non-selective assay system (scoring white adex ade2 double auxotroph mutants among the red pigmented ade2 clones) increases linearly with dose up to a maximum frequency of about 3 X 10(-3) mutants per survivor and then declines in both RAD wild-type and rad2 excision deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutation frequencies of the RAD and the rad2 strains plotted against survival are nearly identical over the entire survival range. On this basis we conclude that unexcised pyrimidine dimers are the predominant type of pre-mutational lesions in both strains. In the RAD wild-type strain pure mutant clones outnumber sectors in a 10:1 ratio at all doses used; in rad2 this ratio varies from 1:1 at low doses up to 10:1 at high doses. As others have concluded for wild-type strains we find also in the rad2 strain that pure clone formation cannot be accounted for quantitatively by lethal sectoring events alone. We conclude that heteroduplex repair is a crucial step in pure mutant clone formation and we examine the plausibility of certain macromolecular mechanisms according to which heteroduplex repair may be coupled with replication, repair and sister strand exchange in yeast mutagenesis.

  13. Induction of pure and sectored mutant clones in excision-proficient and deficient strains of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, F.; Haynes, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    It was found that UV-induced mutation frequency in a forward non-selective assay system (scoring white adex ade2 double auxotroph mutants among the red pigmented ade2 clones) increases linearly with dose up to a maximum frequency of about 3 x 10 -3 mutants per survivor and then declines in both RAD wild-type and rad2 excision deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutation frequencies of the RAD and the rad2 strains plotted against survival are nearly identical over the entire survival range. On this basis it is concluded that unexcised pyrimidine dimers are the predominant type of pre-mutational lesions in both strains. In the RAD wild-type strain pure mutant clones outnumber sectors in a 10:1 ratio at all doses used; in rad2 this ratio varies from 1:1 at low doses up to 10:1 at high doses. In agreement with conclusions of others, it was also found that for wild-type strains in the rad2 strain pure clone formation cannot be accounted for quantitatively by lethal sectoring events alone. It is concluded that heteroduplex repair is a crucial step in pure mutant clone formation and the plausibility of certain macromolecular mechanisms according to which heteroduplex repair may be coupled with replication, repair and sister strand exchange in yeast mutagenesis is examined

  14. Identification and Analysis of NaHCO3 Stress Responsive Genes in Wild Soybean (Glycine soja Roots by RNA-seq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil alkalinity is a major abiotic constraint to crop productivity and quality. Wild soybean (Glycine soja is considered to be more stress-tolerant than cultivated soybean (G. max, and has considerable genetic variation for increasing alkalinity tolerance of soybean. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptome profile in the roots of an alkalinity tolerant wild soybean variety N24852 at 12 and 24 h after 90 mM NaHCO3 stress by RNA-sequencing. Compared with the controls, a total of 449 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified, including 95 and 140 up-regulated genes, and 108 and 135 down-regulated genes at 12 and 24 h after NaHCO3 treatment, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 14 DEGs showed a high consistency with their expression profiles by RNA-sequencing. Gene Ontology (GO terms related to transcription factors and transporters were significantly enriched in the up-regulated genes at 12 and 24 h after NaHCO3 stress, respectively. Nuclear Factor Y subunit A (NF-YA transcription factors were enriched at 12 h after NaHCO3 stress, and high percentages of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH, ethylene-responsive factor (ERF, Trihelix and zinc finger (C2H2, C3H transcription factors were found at both 12 and 24 h after NaHCO3 stress. Genes related to ion transporters such as ABC transporter, aluminum activated malate transporter (ALMT, glutamate receptor (GLR, nitrate transporter (NRT / proton dependent oligopeptide (POT family, and S-type anion channel (SLAH were enriched in up-regulated DEGs at 24 h after NaHCO3 treatment, implying their roles in maintaining ion homeostasis in soybean roots under alkalinity. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and phenylalanine metabolism pathways might participate in soybean response to alkalinity. This study provides a foundation to further investigate the functions of NaHCO3 stress-responsive genes and the molecular basis of soybean tolerance to alkalinity.

  15. Unbiased RNA Shotgun Metagenomics in Social and Solitary Wild Bees Detects Associations with Eukaryote Parasites and New Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Schoonvaere

    Full Text Available The diversity of eukaryote organisms and viruses associated with wild bees remains poorly characterized in contrast to the well-documented pathosphere of the western honey bee, Apis mellifera. Using a deliberate RNA shotgun metagenomic sequencing strategy in combination with a dedicated bioinformatics workflow, we identified the (micro-organisms and viruses associated with two bumble bee hosts, Bombus terrestris and Bombus pascuorum, and two solitary bee hosts, Osmia cornuta and Andrena vaga. Ion Torrent semiconductor sequencing generated approximately 3.8 million high quality reads. The most significant eukaryote associations were two protozoan, Apicystis bombi and Crithidia bombi, and one nematode parasite Sphaerularia bombi in bumble bees. The trypanosome protozoan C. bombi was also found in the solitary bee O. cornuta. Next to the identification of three honey bee viruses Black queen cell virus, Sacbrood virus and Varroa destructor virus-1 and four plant viruses, we describe two novel RNA viruses Scaldis River bee virus (SRBV and Ganda bee virus (GABV based on their partial genomic sequences. The novel viruses belong to the class of negative-sense RNA viruses, SRBV is related to the order Mononegavirales whereas GABV is related to the family Bunyaviridae. The potential biological role of both viruses in bees is discussed in the context of recent advances in the field of arthropod viruses. Further, fragmentary sequence evidence for other undescribed viruses is presented, among which a nudivirus in O. cornuta and an unclassified virus related to Chronic bee paralysis virus in B. terrestris. Our findings extend the current knowledge of wild bee parasites in general and addsto the growing evidence of unexplored arthropod viruses in valuable insects.

  16. Unbiased RNA Shotgun Metagenomics in Social and Solitary Wild Bees Detects Associations with Eukaryote Parasites and New Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonvaere, Karel; De Smet, Lina; Smagghe, Guy; Vierstraete, Andy; Braeckman, Bart P; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of eukaryote organisms and viruses associated with wild bees remains poorly characterized in contrast to the well-documented pathosphere of the western honey bee, Apis mellifera. Using a deliberate RNA shotgun metagenomic sequencing strategy in combination with a dedicated bioinformatics workflow, we identified the (micro-)organisms and viruses associated with two bumble bee hosts, Bombus terrestris and Bombus pascuorum, and two solitary bee hosts, Osmia cornuta and Andrena vaga. Ion Torrent semiconductor sequencing generated approximately 3.8 million high quality reads. The most significant eukaryote associations were two protozoan, Apicystis bombi and Crithidia bombi, and one nematode parasite Sphaerularia bombi in bumble bees. The trypanosome protozoan C. bombi was also found in the solitary bee O. cornuta. Next to the identification of three honey bee viruses Black queen cell virus, Sacbrood virus and Varroa destructor virus-1 and four plant viruses, we describe two novel RNA viruses Scaldis River bee virus (SRBV) and Ganda bee virus (GABV) based on their partial genomic sequences. The novel viruses belong to the class of negative-sense RNA viruses, SRBV is related to the order Mononegavirales whereas GABV is related to the family Bunyaviridae. The potential biological role of both viruses in bees is discussed in the context of recent advances in the field of arthropod viruses. Further, fragmentary sequence evidence for other undescribed viruses is presented, among which a nudivirus in O. cornuta and an unclassified virus related to Chronic bee paralysis virus in B. terrestris. Our findings extend the current knowledge of wild bee parasites in general and addsto the growing evidence of unexplored arthropod viruses in valuable insects.

  17. How does yeast respond to pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes P.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The brewing and baking yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for stress response studies of eukaryotic cells. In this review we focus on the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP on S. cerevisiae. HHP exerts a broad effect on yeast cells characteristic of common stresses, mainly associated with protein alteration and lipid bilayer phase transition. Like most stresses, pressure induces cell cycle arrest. Below 50 MPa (500 atm yeast cell morphology is unaffected whereas above 220 MPa wild-type cells are killed. S. cerevisiae cells can acquire barotolerance if they are pretreated with a sublethal stress due to temperature, ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, or pressure. Nevertheless, pressure only leads to protection against severe stress if, after pressure pretreatment, the cells are also re-incubated at room pressure. We attribute this effect to the inhibition of the protein synthesis apparatus under HHP. The global genome expression analysis of S. cerevisiae cells submitted to HHP revealed a stress response profile. The majority of the up-regulated genes are involved in stress defense and carbohydrate metabolism while most repressed genes belong to the cell cycle progression and protein synthesis categories. However, the signaling pathway involved in the pressure response is still to be elucidated. Nitric oxide, a signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions, confers baroprotection. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae cells in the early exponential phase submitted to 50-MPa pressure show induction of the expression level of the nitric oxide synthase inducible isoform. As pressure becomes an important biotechnological tool, studies concerning this kind of stress in microorganisms are imperative.

  18. Yeast ribonuclease III uses a network of multiple hydrogen bonds for RNA binding and cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Mathieu; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2008-08-19

    Members of the bacterial RNase III family recognize a variety of short structured RNAs with few common features. It is not clear how this group of enzymes supports high cleavage fidelity while maintaining a broad base of substrates. Here we show that the yeast orthologue of RNase III (Rnt1p) uses a network of 2'-OH-dependent interactions to recognize substrates with different structures. We designed a series of bipartite substrates permitting the distinction between binding and cleavage defects. Each substrate was engineered to carry a single or multiple 2'- O-methyl or 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions to prevent the formation of hydrogen bonds with a specific nucleotide or group of nucleotides. Interestingly, introduction of 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides near the cleavage site increased the rate of catalysis, indicating that 2'-OH are not required for cleavage. Substitution of nucleotides in known Rnt1p binding site with 2'- O-methyl ribonucleotides inhibited cleavage while single 2'-fluoro ribonucleotide substitutions did not. This indicates that while no single 2'-OH is essential for Rnt1p cleavage, small changes in the substrate structure are not tolerated. Strikingly, several nucleotide substitutions greatly increased the substrate dissociation constant with little or no effect on the Michaelis-Menten constant or rate of catalysis. Together, the results indicate that Rnt1p uses a network of nucleotide interactions to identify its substrate and support two distinct modes of binding. One mode is primarily mediated by the dsRNA binding domain and leads to the formation of stable RNA/protein complex, while the other requires the presence of the nuclease and N-terminal domains and leads to RNA cleavage.

  19. Yeast mating and image-based quantification of spatial pattern formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Diener

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Communication between cells is a ubiquitous feature of cell populations and is frequently realized by secretion and detection of signaling molecules. Direct visualization of the resulting complex gradients between secreting and receiving cells is often impossible due to the small size of diffusing molecules and because such visualization requires experimental perturbations such as attachment of fluorescent markers, which can change diffusion properties. We designed a method to estimate such extracellular concentration profiles in vivo by using spatiotemporal mathematical models derived from microscopic analysis. This method is applied to populations of thousands of haploid yeast cells during mating in order to quantify the extracellular distributions of the pheromone α-factor and the activity of the aspartyl protease Bar1. We demonstrate that Bar1 limits the range of the extracellular pheromone signal and is critical in establishing α-factor concentration gradients, which is crucial for effective mating. Moreover, haploid populations of wild type yeast cells, but not BAR1 deletion strains, create a pheromone pattern in which cells differentially grow and mate, with low pheromone regions where cells continue to bud and regions with higher pheromone levels and gradients where cells conjugate to form diploids. However, this effect seems to be exclusive to high-density cultures. Our results show a new role of Bar1 protease regulating the pheromone distribution within larger populations and not only locally inside an ascus or among few cells. As a consequence, wild type populations have not only higher mating efficiency, but also higher growth rates than mixed MATa bar1Δ/MATα cultures. We provide an explanation of how a rapidly diffusing molecule can be exploited by cells to provide spatial information that divides the population into different transcriptional programs and phenotypes.

  20. Significance of the BRAF mRNA Expression Level in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: An Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jun Chai

    Full Text Available BRAFV600E is the most common mutation in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, and it is associated with high-risk prognostic factors. However, the significance of the BRAF mRNA level in PTC remains unknown. We evaluated the significance of BRAF mRNA expression level by analyzing PTC data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA database.Data from 499 patients were downloaded from the TCGA database. After excluding other PTC variants, we selected 353 cases of classic PTC, including 193 cases with BRAFV600E and 160 cases with the wild-type BRAF. mRNA abundances were measured using RNA-Seq with the Expectation Maximization algorithm.The mean BRAF mRNA level was significantly higher in BRAFV600E patients than in patients with wild-type BRAF (197.6 vs. 179.3, p = 0.031. In wild-type BRAF patients, the mean BRAF mRNA level was higher in cases with a tumor > 2 cm than those with a tumor ≤ 2.0 cm (189.4 vs. 163.8, p = 0.046, and was also higher in cases with lymph node metastasis than in those without lymph node metastasis (188.5 vs. 157.9, p = 0.040. Within BRAFV600E patients, higher BRAF mRNA expression was associated with extrathyroidal extension (186.4 vs. 216.4, p = 0.001 and higher T stage (188.1 vs. 210.2, p = 0.016.A higher BRAF mRNA expression level was associated with tumor aggressiveness in classic PTC regardless of BRAF mutational status. Evaluation of BRAF mRNA level may be helpful in prognostic risk stratification of PTC.

  1. The ecology of the Drosophila-yeast mutualism in wineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is preferentially found on fermenting fruits. The yeasts that dominate the microbial communities of these substrates are the primary food source for developing D. melanogaster larvae, and adult flies manifest a strong olfactory system-mediated attraction for the volatile compounds produced by these yeasts during fermentation. Although most work on this interaction has focused on the standard laboratory yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a wide variety of other yeasts naturally ferment fallen fruit. Here we address the open question of whether D. melanogaster preferentially associates with distinct yeasts in different, closely-related environments. We characterized the spatial and temporal dynamics of Drosophila-associated fungi in Northern California wineries that use organic grapes and natural fermentation using high-throughput, short-amplicon sequencing. We found that there is nonrandom structure in the fungal communities that are vectored by flies both between and within vineyards. Within wineries, the fungal communities associated with flies in cellars, fermentation tanks, and pomace piles are distinguished by varying abundances of a small number of yeast species. To investigate the origins of this structure, we assayed Drosophila attraction to, oviposition on, larval development in, and longevity when consuming the yeasts that distinguish vineyard microhabitats from each other. We found that wild fly lines did not respond differentially to the yeast species that distinguish winery habitats in habitat specific manner. Instead, this subset of yeast shares traits that make them attractive to and ensure their close association with Drosophila. PMID:29768432

  2. Absence of fks1p in lager brewing yeast results in aberrant cell wall composition and improved beer flavor stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-jing; Xu, Wei-na; Li, Xin'er; Li, Jia; Li, Qi

    2014-06-01

    The flavor stability during storage is very important to the freshness and shelf life of beer. However, beer fermented with a yeast strain which is prone to autolyze will significantly affect the flavor of product. In this study, the gene encoding β-1,3-glucan synthetase catalytic subunit (fks1) of the lager yeast was destroyed via self-clone strategy. β-1,3-glucan is the principle cell wall component, so fks1 disruption caused a decrease in β-1,3-glucan level and increase in chitin level in cell wall, resulting in the increased cell wall thickness. Comparing with wild-type strain, the mutant strain had 39.9 and 63.41 % less leakage of octanoic acid and decanoic acid which would significantly affect the flavor of beer during storage. Moreover, the results of European Brewery Convention tube fermentation test showed that the genetic manipulation to the industrial brewing yeast helped with the anti-staling ability, rather than affecting the fermentation ability. The thiobarbituric acid value reduced by 65.59 %, and the resistant staling value increased by 26.56 %. Moreover, the anti-staling index of the beer fermented with mutant strain increased by 2.64-fold than that from wild-type strain respectively. China has the most production and consumption of beer around the world, so the quality of beer has a significant impact on Chinese beer industry. The result of this study could help with the improvement of the quality of beer in China as well as around the world.

  3. Transcription of lncRNA prt, clustered prt RNA sites for Mmi1 binding, and RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites govern the repression of pho1 gene expression under phosphate-replete conditions in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Sanchez, Ana M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart; Schwer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Expression of fission yeast Pho1 acid phosphatase is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium. Repression is mediated by transcription of the prt locus upstream of pho1 to produce a long noncoding (lnc) prt RNA. Repression is also governed by RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation status, whereby inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) derepresses Pho1 expression, and inability to place a Thr4-PO4 mark (as in T4A) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate replete cells. Here we find that basal pho1 expression from the prt-pho1 locus is inversely correlated with the activity of the prt promoter, which resides in a 110-nucleotide DNA segment preceding the prt transcription start site. CTD mutations S7A and T4A had no effect on the activity of the prt promoter or the pho1 promoter, suggesting that S7A and T4A affect post-initiation events in prt lncRNA synthesis that make it less and more repressive of pho1, respectively. prt lncRNA contains clusters of DSR (determinant of selective removal) sequences recognized by the YTH-domain-containing protein Mmi1. Altering the nucleobase sequence of two DSR clusters in the prt lncRNA caused hyper-repression of pho1 in phosphate replete cells, concomitant with increased levels of the prt transcript. The isolated Mmi1 YTH domain binds to RNAs with single or tandem DSR elements, to the latter in a noncooperative fashion. We report the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain and provide evidence that Mmi1 recognizes DSR RNA via a binding mode distinct from that of structurally homologous YTH proteins that recognize m(6)A-modified RNA. © 2016 Chatterjee et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Genetic recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses among wild-type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, Peter; Roth, Anette; Bergström, Tomas

    2013-06-05

    Genetic recombination has been suggested to occur in mosquito-borne flaviviruses. In contrast, tick-borne flaviviruses have been thought to evolve in a clonal manner, although recent studies suggest that recombination occurs also for these viruses. We re-analyzed the data and found that previous conclusions on wild type recombination were probably falsely drawn due to misalignments of nucleotide sequences, ambiguities in GenBank sequences, or different laboratory culture histories suggestive of recombination events in laboratory. To evaluate if reliable predictions of wild type recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses can be made, we analyzed viral strains sequenced exclusively for this study, and other flavivirus sequences retrieved from GenBank. We detected genetic signals supporting recombination between viruses within the three clades of TBEV-Eu, TBEV-Sib and TBEV-Fe, respectively. Our results suggest that the tick-borne encephalitis viruses may undergo recombination under natural conditions, but that geographic barriers restrict most recombination events to involve only closely genetically related viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wild-Type MIC Distributions for Aminoglycoside and Cyclic Polypeptide Antibiotics Used for Treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juréen, P.; Ängeby, K.; Sturegård, E.; Chryssanthou, E.; Giske, C. G.; Werngren, J.; Nordvall, M.; Johansson, A.; Kahlmeter, G.; Hoffner, S.; Schön, T.

    2010-01-01

    The aminoglycosides and cyclic polypeptides are essential drugs in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, underscoring the need for accurate and reproducible drug susceptibility testing (DST). The epidemiological cutoff value (ECOFF) separating wild-type susceptible strains from non-wild-type strains is an important but rarely used tool for indicating susceptibility breakpoints against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we established wild-type MIC distributions on Middlebrook 7H10 medium for amikacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, capreomycin, and viomycin using 90 consecutive clinical isolates and 21 resistant strains. Overall, the MIC variation between and within runs did not exceed ±1 MIC dilution step, and validation of MIC values in Bactec 960 MGIT demonstrated good agreement. Tentative ECOFFs defining the wild type were established for all investigated drugs, including amikacin and viomycin, which currently lack susceptibility breakpoints for 7H10. Five out of seven amikacin- and kanamycin-resistant isolates were classified as susceptible to capreomycin according to the current critical concentration (10 mg/liter) but were non-wild type according to the ECOFF (4 mg/liter), suggesting that the critical concentration may be too high. All amikacin- and kanamycin-resistant isolates were clearly below the ECOFF for viomycin, and two of them were below the ECOFF for streptomycin, indicating that these two drugs may be considered for treatment of amikacin-resistant strains. Pharmacodynamic indices (peak serum concentration [Cmax]/MIC) were more favorable for amikacin and viomycin compared to kanamycin and capreomycin. In conclusion, our data emphasize the importance of establishing wild-type MIC distributions for improving the quality of drug susceptibility testing against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:20237102

  6. Development of industrial brewing yeast with low acetaldehyde production and improved flavor stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinjing; Shen, Nan; Yin, Hua; Liu, Chunfeng; Li, Yongxian; Li, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Higher acetaldehyde concentration in beer is one of the main concerns of current beer industry in China. Acetaldehyde is always synthesized during beer brewing by the metabolism of yeast. Here, using ethanol as the sole carbon source and 4-methylpyrazole as the selection marker, we constructed a new mutant strain with lower acetaldehyde production and improved ethanol tolerance via traditional mutagenesis strategy. European Brewery Convention tube fermentation tests comparing the fermentation broths of mutant strain and industrial brewing strain showed that the acetaldehyde concentration of mutant strain was 81.67 % lower, whereas its resistant staling value was 1.0-fold higher. Owing to the mutation, the alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the mutant strain decreased to about 30 % of the wild-type strain. In the meantime, the fermentation performance of the newly screened strain has little difference compared with the wild-type strain, and there are no safety problems regarding the industrial usage of the mutant strain. Therefore, we suggest that the newly screened strain could be directly applied to brewing industry.

  7. Detection of wild-type EGFR amplification and EGFRvIII mutation in CSF-derived extracellular vesicles of glioblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Javier M; Skog, Johan; Akers, Johnny; Li, Hongying; Komotar, Ricardo; Jensen, Randy; Ringel, Florian; Yang, Isaac; Kalkanis, Steven; Thompson, Reid; LoGuidice, Lori; Berghoff, Emily; Parsa, Andrew; Liau, Linda; Curry, William; Cahill, Daniel; Bettegowda, Chetan; Lang, Frederick F; Chiocca, E Antonio; Henson, John; Kim, Ryan; Breakefield, Xandra; Chen, Clark; Messer, Karen; Hochberg, Fred; Carter, Bob S

    2017-10-19

    RNAs within extracellular vesicles (EVs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for patients with cancer and are identified in a variety of biofluids. Glioblastomas (GBMs) release EVs containing RNA into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here we describe a multi-institutional study of RNA extracted from CSF-derived EVs of GBM patients to detect the presence of tumor-associated amplifications and mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). CSF and matching tumor tissue were obtained from patients undergoing resection of GBMs. We determined wild-type (wt)EGFR DNA copy number amplification, as well as wtEGFR and EGFR variant (v)III RNA expression in tumor samples. We also characterized wtEGFR and EGFRvIII RNA expression in CSF-derived EVs. EGFRvIII-positive tumors had significantly greater wtEGFR DNA amplification (P = 0.02) and RNA expression (P = 0.03), and EGFRvIII-positive CSF-derived EVs had significantly more wtEGFR RNA expression (P = 0.004). EGFRvIII was detected in CSF-derived EVs for 14 of the 23 EGFRvIII tissue-positive GBM patients. Conversely, only one of the 48 EGFRvIII tissue-negative patients had the EGFRvIII mutation detected in their CSF-derived EVs. These results yield a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 98% for the utility of CSF-derived EVs to detect an EGFRvIII-positive GBM. Our results demonstrate CSF-derived EVs contain RNA signatures reflective of the underlying molecular genetic status of GBMs in terms of wtEGFR expression and EGFRvIII status. The high specificity of the CSF-derived EV diagnostic test gives us an accurate determination of positive EGFRvIII tumor status and is essentially a less invasive "liquid biopsy" that might direct mutation-specific therapies for GBMs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  9. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (−/−) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5–6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82–95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 μM) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20–23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: ► C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. ► Wild type and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout littermates

  10. Multicolor microRNA FISH effectively differentiates tumor types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Masry, Paul A.; McGeary, Sean E.; Miller, Jason B.; Hafner, Markus; Li, Zhen; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Morozov, Pavel; Brown, Miguel; Gogakos, Tasos; Mobin, Mehrpouya B.; Snorrason, Einar L.; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Zhang, Xiao; Perlis, Clifford S.; Wu, Hong; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Feng, Huichen; Shuda, Masahiro; Moore, Patrick S.; Tron, Victor A.; Chang, Yuan; Tuschl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are excellent tumor biomarkers because of their cell-type specificity and abundance. However, many miRNA detection methods, such as real-time PCR, obliterate valuable visuospatial information in tissue samples. To enable miRNA visualization in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, we developed multicolor miRNA FISH. As a proof of concept, we used this method to differentiate two skin tumors, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), with overlapping histologic features but distinct cellular origins. Using sequencing-based miRNA profiling and discriminant analysis, we identified the tumor-specific miRNAs miR-205 and miR-375 in BCC and MCC, respectively. We addressed three major shortcomings in miRNA FISH, identifying optimal conditions for miRNA fixation and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) retention using model compounds and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, enhancing signal amplification and detection by increasing probe-hapten linker lengths, and improving probe specificity using shortened probes with minimal rRNA sequence complementarity. We validated our method on 4 BCC and 12 MCC tumors. Amplified miR-205 and miR-375 signals were normalized against directly detectable reference rRNA signals. Tumors were classified using predefined cutoff values, and all were correctly identified in blinded analysis. Our study establishes a reliable miRNA FISH technique for parallel visualization of differentially expressed miRNAs in FFPE tumor tissues. PMID:23728175

  11. Research on the ultrafast fluorescence property of thylakoid membranes of the wild-type and mutant rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhao-Yu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Shui-Cai; Xin, Yue-Yong; He, Jun-Fang; Hou, Xun

    2003-10-01

    A high yielding rice variety mutant (Oryza sativa L., Zhenhui 249) with low chlorophyll b (Chl b) has been discovered in natural fields. It has a quality character controlled by a pair of recessive genes (nuclear gene). The partial loss of Chl b in content affects the efficiency of light harvest in a light harvest complex (LHC), thus producing the difference of the exciting energy transfer and the efficiency of photochemistry conversion between the mutant and wild-type rice in photosynthetic unit. The efficiency of utilizing light energy is higher in the mutant than that in the wild-type rice relatively. For further discussion of the above-mentioned difference and learning about the mechanism of the increase in the photochemical efficiency of the mutant, the pico-second resolution fluorescence spectrum measurement with delay-frame-scanning single photon counting technique is adopted. Thylakoid membranes of the mutant and the wild-type rice are excited by an Ar+ laser with a pulse width of 120 ps, repetition rate of 4 MHz and wavelength of 514 nm. Compared with the time and spectrum property of exciting fluorescence, conclusions of those ultrafast dynamic experiments are: 1) The speeds of the exciting energy transferred in photo-system I are faster than that in photo-system II in both samples. 2) The speeds of the exciting energy transfer of mutant sample are faster than those of the wild-type. This might be one of the major reasons why the efficiency of photosynthesis is higher in mutant than that in the wild-type rice.

  12. Experimental analysis of an effect of the nutrient type and its concentration on the rheological properties of the baker’s yeast suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major-Godlewska Marta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study presented was to experimentally analyze an effect of the nutrient type and its concentration on the variability of rheological properties of the baker’s yeast suspensions for different time periods. Aqueous suspensions of the baker’s yeast of various concentration (solution I, without nutrient and yeasts suspended in aqueous solution of sucrose or honey as nutrients with different concentration (solution II or solution III were tested. Experiments were carried out using rotational rheoviscometer of type RT10 by a company HAAKE. The measurements were conducted for different time periods (from 1 h up to 144 h at given fluid temperature. On the basis of the obtained data, rheological characteristics of the aqueous solution of baker’s yeast suspensions without and with nutrients of different sucrose or honey concentration were identified and mathematically described.

  13. Structural Characterization of Lignin in Wild-Type versus COMT Down-Regulated Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, Reichel [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pu, Yunqiao, E-mail: yunqiao.pu@ipst.gatech.edu [BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jiang, Nan [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fu, Chunxiang [Forage Improvement Division, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Wang, Zeng-Yu [BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Forage Improvement Division, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Ragauskas, Arthur, E-mail: yunqiao.pu@ipst.gatech.edu [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-01-20

    This study examined the chemical structural characteristics of cellulolytic enzyme lignin isolated from switchgrass focusing on comparisons between wild-type control and caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) down-regulated transgenic line. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques including {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P, and two-dimensional {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H heteronuclear single quantum coherence as well as gel permeation chromatography were employed. Compared to the wild-type, the COMT down-regulated transgenic switchgrass lignin demonstrated a decrease in syringyl (S):guaiacyl (G) ratio and p-coumarate:ferulate ratio, an increase in relative abundance of phenylcoumaran unit, and a comparable content of total free phenolic OH groups along with formation of benzodioxane unit. In addition, COMT down-regulation had no significant effects on the lignin molecular weights during its biosynthesis process.

  14. Identification of Nitrogen Consumption Genetic Variants in Yeast Through QTL Mapping and Bulk Segregant RNA-Seq Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Francisco A; Brice, Claire; Molinet, Jennifer; Tisné, Sebastién; Abarca, Valentina; Tapia, Sebastián M; Oporto, Christian; García, Verónica; Liti, Gianni; Martínez, Claudio

    2017-06-07

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is responsible for wine must fermentation. In this process, nitrogen represents a limiting nutrient and its scarcity results in important economic losses for the wine industry. Yeast isolates use different strategies to grow in poor nitrogen environments and their genomic plasticity enables adaptation to multiple habitats through improvements in nitrogen consumption. Here, we used a highly recombinant S. cerevisiae multi-parent population (SGRP-4X) derived from the intercross of four parental strains of different origins to identify new genetic variants responsible for nitrogen consumption differences during wine fermentation. Analysis of 165 fully sequenced F12 segregants allowed us to map 26 QTL in narrow intervals for 14 amino acid sources and ammonium, the majority of which represent genomic regions previously unmapped for these traits. To complement this strategy, we performed Bulk segregant RNA-seq (BSR-seq) analysis in segregants exhibiting extremely high and low ammonium consumption levels. This identified several QTL overlapping differentially expressed genes and refined the gene candidate search. Based on these approaches, we were able to validate ARO1 , PDC1 , CPS1 , ASI2 , LYP1 , and ALP1 allelic variants underlying nitrogen consumption differences between strains, providing evidence of many genes with small phenotypic effects. Altogether, these variants significantly shape yeast nitrogen consumption with important implications for evolution, ecological, and quantitative genomics. Copyright © 2017 Cubillos et al.

  15. Identification of Nitrogen Consumption Genetic Variants in Yeast Through QTL Mapping and Bulk Segregant RNA-Seq Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. Cubillos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is responsible for wine must fermentation. In this process, nitrogen represents a limiting nutrient and its scarcity results in important economic losses for the wine industry. Yeast isolates use different strategies to grow in poor nitrogen environments and their genomic plasticity enables adaptation to multiple habitats through improvements in nitrogen consumption. Here, we used a highly recombinant S. cerevisiae multi-parent population (SGRP-4X derived from the intercross of four parental strains of different origins to identify new genetic variants responsible for nitrogen consumption differences during wine fermentation. Analysis of 165 fully sequenced F12 segregants allowed us to map 26 QTL in narrow intervals for 14 amino acid sources and ammonium, the majority of which represent genomic regions previously unmapped for these traits. To complement this strategy, we performed Bulk segregant RNA-seq (BSR-seq analysis in segregants exhibiting extremely high and low ammonium consumption levels. This identified several QTL overlapping differentially expressed genes and refined the gene candidate search. Based on these approaches, we were able to validate ARO1, PDC1, CPS1, ASI2, LYP1, and ALP1 allelic variants underlying nitrogen consumption differences between strains, providing evidence of many genes with small phenotypic effects. Altogether, these variants significantly shape yeast nitrogen consumption with important implications for evolution, ecological, and quantitative genomics.

  16. RNA Polymerase III Output Is Functionally Linked to tRNA Dimethyl-G26 Modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneeshkumar G Arimbasseri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of the differential abundance or activity of tRNAs can be important determinants of gene regulation. RNA polymerase (RNAP III synthesizes all tRNAs in eukaryotes and it derepression is associated with cancer. Maf1 is a conserved general repressor of RNAP III under the control of the target of rapamycin (TOR that acts to integrate transcriptional output and protein synthetic demand toward metabolic economy. Studies in budding yeast have indicated that the global tRNA gene activation that occurs with derepression of RNAP III via maf1-deletion is accompanied by a paradoxical loss of tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor activity, manifested as an antisuppression phenotype, by an unknown mechanism. We show that maf1-antisuppression also occurs in the fission yeast S. pombe amidst general activation of RNAP III. We used tRNA-HydroSeq to document that little changes occurred in the relative levels of different tRNAs in maf1Δ cells. By contrast, the efficiency of N2,N2-dimethyl G26 (m(22G26 modification on certain tRNAs was decreased in response to maf1-deletion and associated with antisuppression, and was validated by other methods. Over-expression of Trm1, which produces m(22G26, reversed maf1-antisuppression. A model that emerges is that competition by increased tRNA levels in maf1Δ cells leads to m(22G26 hypomodification due to limiting Trm1, reducing the activity of suppressor-tRNASerUCA and accounting for antisuppression. Consistent with this, we show that RNAP III mutations associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy decrease tRNA transcription, increase m(22G26 efficiency and reverse antisuppression. Extending this more broadly, we show that a decrease in tRNA synthesis by treatment with rapamycin leads to increased m(22G26 modification and that this response is conserved among highly divergent yeasts and human cells.

  17. The Generation of Turnip Crinkle Virus-Like Particles in Plants by the Transient Expression of Wild-Type and Modified Forms of Its Coat Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Keith; Lomonossoff, George P

    2015-01-01

    Turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a member of the genus carmovirus of the Tombusviridae family, has a genome consisting of a single positive-sense RNA molecule that is encapsidated in an icosahedral particle composed of 180 copies of a single type of coat protein. We have employed the CPMV-HT transient expression system to investigate the formation of TCV-like particles following the expression of the wild-type coat protein or modified forms of it that contain either deletions and/or additions. Transient expression of the coat protein in plants results in the formation of capsid structures that morphologically resemble TCV virions (T = 3 structure) but encapsidate heterogeneous cellular RNAs, rather than the specific TCV coat protein messenger RNA. Expression of an amino-terminal deleted form of the coat protein resulted in the formation of smaller T = 1 structures that are free of RNA. The possibility of utilizing TCV as a carrier for the presentation of foreign proteins on the particle surface was also explored by fusing the sequence of GFP to the C-terminus of the coat protein. The expression of coat protein-GFP hybrids permitted the formation of VLPs but the yield of particles is diminished compared to the yield obtained with unmodified coat protein. Our results confirm the importance of the N-terminus of the coat protein for the encapsidation of RNA and show that the coat protein's exterior P domain plays a key role in particle formation.

  18. Antioxidant N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 of industrial baker's yeast enhances fermentation ability after air-drying stress in bread dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasano, Yu; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2010-03-31

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to multiple stresses. Air-drying stress is one of the most harmful stresses by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previously, we discovered that the novel N-acetyltransferase Mpr1/2 confers oxidative stress tolerance by reducing intracellular ROS level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sigma1278b strain. In this study, we revealed that Japanese industrial baker's yeast possesses one MPR gene. The nucleotide sequence of the MPR gene in industrial baker's yeast was identical to the MPR2 gene in Sigma1278b strain. Gene disruption analysis showed that the MPR2 gene in industrial baker's yeast is involved in air-drying stress tolerance by reducing the intracellular oxidation levels. We also found that expression of the Lys63Arg and Phe65Leu variants with enhanced enzymatic activity and stability, respectively, increased the fermentation ability of bread dough after exposure to air-drying stress compared with the wild-type Mpr1. In addition, our recent study showed that industrial baker's yeast cells accumulating proline exhibited enhanced freeze tolerance in bread dough. Proline accumulation also enhanced the fermentation ability after air-drying stress treatment in industrial baker's yeast. Hence, the antioxidant enzyme Mpr1/2 could be promising for breeding novel yeast strains that are tolerant to air-drying stress. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Yeasts and lactic acid bacteria microbiota from masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruits and their fermented fruit pulp in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Gadaga, T.H.; Theelen, R.M.C.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Masau are Zimbabwean wild fruits, which are usually eaten raw and/ or processed into products such as porridge, traditional cakes, mahewu and jam. Yeasts, yeast-like fungi, and lactic acid bacteria present on the unripe, ripe and dried fruits, and in the fermented masau fruits collected from

  20. Family with sequence similarity 83, member B is a predictor of poor prognosis and a potential therapeutic target for lung adenocarcinoma expressing wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Takumi; Ezaki, Junji; Okabe, Naoyuki; Takagi, Hironori; Ozaki, Yuki; Inoue, Takuya; Watanabe, Yuzuru; Fukuhara, Mitsuro; Muto, Satoshi; Matsumura, Yuki; Hasegawa, Takeo; Hoshino, Mika; Osugi, Jun; Shio, Yutaka; Waguri, Satoshi; Tamura, Hirosumi; Imai, Jun-Ichi; Ito, Emi; Yanagisawa, Yuka; Honma, Reiko; Watanabe, Shinya; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2018-02-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients with tumors that harbor no targetable driver gene mutation, such as epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR ) gene mutations, have unfavorable prognosis, and thus, novel therapeutic targets are required. Family with sequence similarity 83, member B ( FAM83B ) is a biomarker for squamous cell lung cancer. FAM83B has also recently been shown to serve an important role in the EGFR signaling pathway. In the present study, the molecular and clinical impact of FAM83B in lung ADC was investigated. Matched tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples were obtained from 216 patients who underwent complete lung resection for primary lung ADC and were examined for FAM83B expression using cDNA microarray analysis. The associations between FAM83B expression and clinicopathological parameters, including patient survival, were examined. FAM83B was highly expressed in tumors from males, smokers and in tumors with wild-type EGFR . Multivariate analyses further confirmed that wild-type EGFR tumors were significantly positively associated with FAM83B expression. In survival analysis, FAM83B expression was associated with poor outcomes in disease-free survival and overall survival, particularly when stratified against tumors with wild-type EGFR . Furthermore, FAM83B knockdown was performed to investigate its phenotypic effect on lung ADC cell lines. Gene silencing by FAM83B RNA interference induced growth suppression in the HLC-1 and H1975 lung ADC cell lines. FAM83B may be involved in lung ADC tumor proliferation and can be a predictor of poor survival. FAM83B is also a potential novel therapeutic target for ADC with wild-type EGFR .

  1. An emerging role for misfolded wild-type SOD1 in sporadic ALS pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S Rotunno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that targets motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death within a few years of disease onset. While several genes have been linked to the inheritable, or familial, form of ALS, much less is known about the cause(s of sporadic ALS, which accounts for approximately 90% of ALS cases. Due to the clinical similarities between familial and sporadic ALS, it is plausible that both forms of the disease converge on a common pathway and, therefore, involve common factors. Recent evidence suggests the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 protein to be one such factor that is common to both sporadic and familial ALS. In 1993, mutations were uncovered in SOD1 that represent the first known genetic cause of familial ALS. While the exact mechanism of mutant-SOD1 toxicity is still not known today, most evidence points to a gain of toxic function that stems, at least in part, from the propensity of this protein to misfold. In the wild-type SOD1 protein, non-genetic perturbations such as metal depletion, disruption of the quaternary structure, and oxidation, can also induce SOD1 to misfold. In fact, these aforementioned post-translational modifications cause wild-type SOD1 to adopt a toxic conformation that is similar to familial ALS-linked SOD1 variants. These observations, together with the detection of misfolded wild-type SOD1 within human post-mortem sporadic ALS samples, have been used to support the controversial hypothesis that misfolded forms of wild-type SOD1 contribute to sporadic ALS pathogenesis. In this review, we present data from the literature that both support and contradict this hypothesis. We also discuss SOD1 as a potential therapeutic target for both familial and sporadic ALS.

  2. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  3. Ribosomal DNA sequence heterogeneity reflects intraspecies phylogenies and predicts genome structure in two contrasting yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Claire; James, Stephen A; Davey, Robert P; Dicks, Jo; Roberts, Ian N

    2014-07-01

    The ribosomal RNA encapsulates a wealth of evolutionary information, including genetic variation that can be used to discriminate between organisms at a wide range of taxonomic levels. For example, the prokaryotic 16S rDNA sequence is very widely used both in phylogenetic studies and as a marker in metagenomic surveys and the internal transcribed spacer region, frequently used in plant phylogenetics, is now recognized as a fungal DNA barcode. However, this widespread use does not escape criticism, principally due to issues such as difficulties in classification of paralogous versus orthologous rDNA units and intragenomic variation, both of which may be significant barriers to accurate phylogenetic inference. We recently analyzed data sets from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project, characterizing rDNA sequence variation within multiple strains of the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its nearest wild relative Saccharomyces paradoxus in unprecedented detail. Notably, both species possess single locus rDNA systems. Here, we use these new variation datasets to assess whether a more detailed characterization of the rDNA locus can alleviate the second of these phylogenetic issues, sequence heterogeneity, while controlling for the first. We demonstrate that a strong phylogenetic signal exists within both datasets and illustrate how they can be used, with existing methodology, to estimate intraspecies phylogenies of yeast strains consistent with those derived from whole-genome approaches. We also describe the use of partial Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, a type of sequence variation found only in repetitive genomic regions, in identifying key evolutionary features such as genome hybridization events and show their consistency with whole-genome Structure analyses. We conclude that our approach can transform rDNA sequence heterogeneity from a problem to a useful source of evolutionary information, enabling the estimation of highly accurate phylogenies of

  4. Endogenous Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus RNA is expressed by different cell types in ovine foetus and placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Sanna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The endogenous retroviruses are inherited elements transmitted trough the germline of most animal species and their biological role is still controversial. Ovine Pulmonary Carcinoma (OPC represents a good model for studying the interactions of endogenous retroviruses with their exogenous counterparts. The type D exogenous retrovirus known as Jaagsiekte Sheep Retro-Virus (JSRV is necessary and sufficient to cause OPC in domestic and wild sheep, but both affected and unaffected animals host in their genome 15 to 20 copies of related endogenous retroviruses named endogenous JSRV (enJSRV. In this study we evaluated the expression of enJSRV gag sequences in ovine foetal and placental tissues. RNA in situ hybridisation was performed on tissue sections of thymi, lymph nodes and lungs from ovine foetuses and related placentas, taken at a late stage of development. Reverse transcriptase- in situ polymerase chain reactions were also carried out on placental samples to better define the involved cells. In foetal tissues, specific signals were observed in the thymus medulla, lymph nodes and, at a lesser extent, in foetal bronchiolar cells. In the placental tissues, positive areas were detected in various cell types in the sincythium-and cyto-trophoblast. These data demonstrate that en JSRV RNA is largely expressed in a broad spectrum of cells including tissues which are critical for the development of the immune system.

  5. [Genetic control of mitotic crossing-over in yeasts. III. Induction by 8-methoxypsoralen and long-wave UV irradiation (lambda=365 nm)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, I V; Marfin, S V

    1982-02-01

    The lethal effect of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus 365 nm light has been studied in haploid radiosensitive strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The diploid of wild type and the diploid homozygous for the rad2 mutation (this mutation blocks the excision of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers) were more resistant to the lethal effect of 8-MOP plus 365 nm light than the haploid of wild type and rad2 haploid, respectively. The diploid homozygous for rad54 mutation (the mutation blocks the repair of double-strand breaks in DNA) was more sensitive than haploid rad54. The method of repeated irradiation allowed to study the capacity of radiosensitive diploids to remove monoadducts induced by 8-MOP in DNA. This process was very effective in diploids of wild type and in the rad54 rad54 diploid, while the rad2 rad2 diploid was characterized by nearly complete absence of monoadduct excision. The study of mitotic crossing over and mitotic segregation in yeast diploids, containing a pair of complementing alleles of the ade2 gene (red/pink) has shown a very high recombinogenic effect of 8-MOP plus 365 nm light. The rad2 mutation slightly increased the frequency of mitotic segregation and mitotic crossing over. The rad54 mutation decreased the frequency of mitotic segregation and entirely suppressed mitotic crossing over. The method of repeated irradiation showed that the cross-links, but not monoadducts, are the main cause of high recombinogenic effect of 8-MOP plus 365 nm light. The possible participation of different repair systems in recombinational processes induced by 8-MOP in yeast cells is discussed.

  6. Tombusvirus-yeast interactions identify conserved cell-intrinsic viral restriction factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna eSasvari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat viral infections, plants possess innate and adaptive immune pathways, such as RNA silencing, R gene and recessive gene-mediated resistance mechanisms. However, it is likely that additional cell-intrinsic restriction factors (CIRF are also involved in limiting plant virus replication. This review discusses novel CIRFs with antiviral functions, many of them RNA-binding proteins or affecting the RNA binding activities of viral replication proteins. The CIRFs against tombusviruses have been identified in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is developed as an advanced model organism. Grouping of the identified CIRFs based on their known cellular functions and subcellular localization in yeast reveals that TBSV replication is limited by a wide variety of host gene functions. Yeast proteins with the highest connectivity in the network map include the well-characterized Xrn1p 5’-3’ exoribonuclease, Act1p actin protein and Cse4p centromere protein. The protein network map also reveals an important interplay between the pro-viral Hsp70 cellular chaperone and the antiviral co-chaperones, and possibly key roles for the ribosomal or ribosome-associated factors. We discuss the antiviral functions of selected CIRFs, such as the RNA binding nucleolin, ribonucleases, WW-domain proteins, single- and multi-domain cyclophilins, TPR-domain co-chaperones and cellular ion pumps. These restriction factors frequently target the RNA-binding region in the viral replication proteins, thus interfering with the recruitment of the viral RNA for replication and the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase. Although many of the characterized CIRFs act directly against TBSV, we propose that the TPR-domain co-chaperones function as guardians of the cellular Hsp70 chaperone system, which is subverted efficiently by TBSV for viral replicase assembly in the absence of the TPR-domain co-chaperones.

  7. Biological effectiveness of pulsed and continuous neutron radiation for cells of yeast Saccharomyces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyb, T.S.; Komarova, E.V.; Potetnya, V.I.; Obaturov, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Data are presented on biological effectiveness of fast neutrons generated by BR-10 reactor (dose rate up to 3.8 Gy/s) in comparison with neutrons of pulsed BARS-6 reactor (dose rate ∼6x10 6 Gy/s) for yeast Saccharomyces vini cells of a wild type Menri 139-B and radiosensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae (rad52/rad52; rad54/rad54) mutants which are defective over different systems of DNA reparation. Value of relative biological efficiency (RBE) of continuous radiation for wild stam is from 3.5 up to 2.5 when survival level being 75-10 %, and RBE of pulsed neutron radiation is in the limits of 2.0-1.7 at the same levels. For mutant stam the value of RBE (1.4-1.6) of neutrons is constant at all survival levels and does not depend on dose rate [ru

  8. Substitution of arginine for histidine-47 in the coenzyme binding site of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, R.M.; Plapp, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular modeling of alcohol dehydrogenases suggests that His-47 in the yeast enzyme (His-44 in the protein sequence, corresponding to Arg-47 in the horse liver enzyme) binds the pyrophosphate of the NAD coenzyme. His-47 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae isoenzyme I was substituted with an arginine by a directed mutation. Steady-state kinetic results at pH 7.3 and 30 degree C of the mutant and wild-type enzymes were consistent with an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism. The substitution decreased dissociation constants by 4-fold for NAD + and 2-fold for NADH while turnover numbers were decreased by 4-fold for ethanol oxidation and 6-fold for acetaldehyde reduction. The magnitudes of these effects are smaller than those found for the same mutation in the human liver β enzyme, suggesting that other amino acid residues in the active site modulate the effects of the substitution. The pH dependencies of dissociation constants and other kinetic constants were similar in the two yeast enzymes. Thus, it appears that His-47 is not solely responsible for a pK value near 7 that controls activity and coenzyme binding rates in the wild-type enzyme. The small substrate deuterium isotope effect above pH 7 and the single exponential phase of NADH production during the transient oxidation of ethanol by the Arg-47 enzyme suggest that the mutation makes an isomerization of the enzyme-NAD + complex limiting for turnover with ethanol

  9. Yeast Killer Toxin K28: Biology and Unique Strategy of Host Cell Intoxication and Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Becker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The initial discovery of killer toxin-secreting brewery strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae in the mid-sixties of the last century marked the beginning of intensive research in the yeast virology field. So far, four different S. cerevisiae killer toxins (K28, K1, K2, and Klus, encoded by cytoplasmic inherited double-stranded RNA viruses (dsRNA of the Totiviridae family, have been identified. Among these, K28 represents the unique example of a yeast viral killer toxin that enters a sensitive cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis to reach its intracellular target(s. This review summarizes and discusses the most recent advances and current knowledge on yeast killer toxin K28, with special emphasis on its endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, pointing towards future directions and open questions in this still timely and fascinating field of killer yeast research.

  10. Symptomatic type 1 protein C deficiency caused by a de novo Ser270Leu mutation in the catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, B; Koefoed, P; Thorsen, S

    2001-01-01

    the intracellular content of mutant and wild-type protein was similar. Northern blot analysis of total mRNA from transfected cells showed no reduction of the mutant protein C mRNA compared with wild-type protein C mRNA. Collectively, these results indicate that the Ser270Leu mutation in the affected family caused......Heterozygosity for a C8524T transition in the protein C gene converting Ser270(TCG) to Leu(TTG) in the protease domain was identified in a family with venous thrombosis. The mutation was associated with parallel reduction in plasma levels of protein C anticoagulant activity and protein C antigen......, which is consistent with a type 1 deficiency. Transient expression of mutant protein C cDNA in human kidney 293 cells and analysis of protein C antigen in culture media and cell lysates showed that the secretion of mutant protein compared with wild-type protein was reduced by at least 97% while...

  11. No evidence for functional inactivation of wild-type p53 protein by MDM2 overexpression in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, P.; Craanen, M. E.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    Inactivation of wild-type p53 during gastric carcinogenesis is usually caused by mutations within exons 5-8 of the p53 gene leading to mutated, usually immunohistochemically detectable p53 proteins. However, functional inactivation of wild-type p53, mimicking mutational inactivation, may also result

  12. Evidence for propagation of cold-adapted yeast in an ice core from a Siberian Altai glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Jun; Kohshima, Shiro; Nakazawa, Fumio; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Fujita, Koji; Miyake, Takayuki; Narita, Hideki; Aizen, Vladimir; Nakawo, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    Cold environments, including glacier ice and snow, are known habitats for cold-adapted microorganisms. We investigated the potential for cold-adapted yeast to have propagated in the snow of the high-altitude Belukha glacier. We detected the presence of highly concentrated yeast (over 104 cells mL-1) in samples of both an ice core and firn snow. Increasing yeast cell concentrations in the same snow layer from July 2002 to July 2003 suggests that the yeast cells propagated in the glacier snow. A cold-adapted Rhodotorula sp. was isolated from the snow layer and found to be related to psychrophilic yeast previously found in other glacial environments (based on the D1/D2 26S rRNA domains). 26S rRNA clonal analysis directly amplified from meltwater within the ice core also revealed the presence of genus Rhodotorula. Analyses of the ice core showed that all peaks in yeast concentration corresponded to the peaks in indices of surface melting. These results support the hypothesis that occasional surface melting in an accumulation area is one of the major factors influencing cold-adapted yeast propagation.

  13. Effect of brewer’s yeast supplementation on serum glucose and lipids in type II diabetic patients with dislipidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sh. Ravanshad; H. Khosvani Borujeni; M. Soveid; B. Zeighami

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose : Chromium deficiency leads to impaired glucose and lipid metabolism. Chromium supplementation in type II diabetic patients improves glucose and lipid profiles. Organic chromium, such as found in brewer’s yeast, is much better absorbed than inorganic chromium. In this study, the effect of chromium supplementation in the form of brewer’s yeast on glucose and lipid profile of diabetic patients were evaluated.Materials and methods : In a clinical trial study (before and af...

  14. A collaborative European exercise on mRNA-based body fluid/skin typing and interpretation of DNA and RNA results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berge, M; Carracedo, A; Gomes, I

    2014-01-01

    The European Forensic Genetics Network of Excellence (EUROFORGEN-NoE) undertook a collaborative project on mRNA-based body fluid/skin typing and the interpretation of the resulting RNA and DNA data. Although both body fluids and skin are composed of a variety of cell types with different function...

  15. Panitumumab and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer with KRAS wild-type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Pallisgård, Niels

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The increasing number of negative trials for ovarian cancer treatment has prompted an evaluation of new biologic agents, which in combination with chemotherapy may improve survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the response rate in platinum-resistant, KRAS wild-type ovarian...... cancer patients treated with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) supplemented with panitumumab. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Major eligibility criteria were relapsed ovarian/fallopian/peritoneal cancer patients with platinum-resistant disease, measurable disease by GCIG CA125 criteria and KRAS wild-type...

  16. Noninvasive characterization of the fission yeast cell cycle by monitoring dry mass with digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Cano, Elena; Colomb, Tristan; Kühn, Jonas; Depeursinge, Christian; Simanis, Viesturs; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Digital holography microscopy (DHM) is an optical technique which provides phase images yielding quantitative information about cell structure and cellular dynamics. Furthermore, the quantitative phase images allow the derivation of other parameters, including dry mass production, density, and spatial distribution. We have applied DHM to study the dry mass production rate and the dry mass surface density in wild-type and mutant fission yeast cells. Our study demonstrates the applicability of DHM as a tool for label-free quantitative analysis of the cell cycle and opens the possibility for its use in high-throughput screening.

  17. Aggregation and retention of human urokinase type plasminogen activator in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vladimir N

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secretion of recombinant proteins in yeast can be affected by their improper folding in the endoplasmic reticulum and subsequent elimination of the misfolded molecules via the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway. Recombinant proteins can also be degraded by the vacuolar protease complex. Human urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA is poorly secreted by yeast but the mechanisms interfering with its secretion are largely unknown. Results We show that in Hansenula polymorpha overexpression worsens uPA secretion and stimulates its intracellular aggregation. The absence of the Golgi modifications in accumulated uPA suggests that aggregation occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletion analysis has shown that the N-terminal domains were responsible for poor uPA secretion and propensity to aggregate. Mutation abolishing N-glycosylation decreased the efficiency of uPA secretion and increased its aggregation degree. Retention of uPA in the endoplasmic reticulum stimulates its aggregation. Conclusions The data obtained demonstrate that defect of uPA secretion in yeast is related to its retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. Accumulation of uPA within the endoplasmic reticulum disturbs its proper folding and leads to formation of high molecular weight aggregates.

  18. Starmerella syriaca f.a., sp. nov., an osmotolerant yeast species isolated from flowers in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipiczki, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Four strains of a novel asexual ascomycetous yeast species were isolated from Malva sp. flowers in Syria. Sequencing of the regions spanning the small subunit, 5.8S, and the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit ribosomal RNA genes showed that the isolates were conspecific. Comparative analysis of these sequences and the corresponding sequences of the type strains of ascomycetous yeasts revealed that the novel species is phylogenetically related to members of the Starmerella clade. Its closest relative is Candida vaccinii. For the new species the name Starmerella syriaca is proposed. Its strains are osmotolerant and produce pseudohypha-like structures capable of penetrating agar media. The type strain is 2-1362(T) (=CBS 13909(T) = NCAIM Y.02138(T) = CCY 090-003-001(T)). The GenBank accession numbers for its nucleotide sequences are: JX515986 (D1/D2 LSU), JX515987 (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and JX515988 (SSU). Mycobank: MB 810090.

  19. Automatic Detection of Wild-type Mouse Cranial Sutures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, Nuno V.

    , automatic detection of the cranial sutures becomes important. We have previously built a craniofacial, wild-type mouse atlas from a set of 10 Micro CT scans using a B-spline-based nonrigid registration method by Rueckert et al. Subsequently, all volumes were registered nonrigidly to the atlas. Using......, the observer traced the sutures on each of the mouse volumes as well. The observer outperforms the automatic approach by approximately 0.1 mm. All mice have similar errors while the suture error plots reveal that suture 1 and 2 are cumbersome, both for the observer and the automatic approach. These sutures can...

  20. The use of lactic acid-producing, malic acid-producing, or malic acid-degrading yeast strains for acidity adjustment in the wine industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Wang, Tao; Wang, Yun; Li, Ying-Ying; Li, Hua

    2014-03-01

    In an era of economic globalization, the competition among wine businesses is likely to get tougher. Biotechnological innovation permeates the entire world and intensifies the severity of the competition of the wine industry. Moreover, modern consumers preferred individualized, tailored, and healthy and top quality wine products. Consequently, these two facts induce large gaps between wine production and wine consumption. Market-orientated yeast strains are presently being selected or developed for enhancing the core competitiveness of wine enterprises. Reasonable biological acidity is critical to warrant a high-quality wine. Many wild-type acidity adjustment yeast strains have been selected all over the world. Moreover, mutation breeding, metabolic engineering, genetic engineering, and protoplast fusion methods are used to construct new acidity adjustment yeast strains to meet the demands of the market. In this paper, strategies and concepts for strain selection or improvement methods were discussed, and many examples based upon selected studies involving acidity adjustment yeast strains were reviewed. Furthermore, the development of acidity adjustment yeast strains with minimized resource inputs, improved fermentation, and enological capabilities for an environmentally friendly production of healthy, top quality wine is presented.

  1. Liver steatosis study_PFAA treated Wild type and PPAR KO mouse data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data set 1 consists of the experimental data for the Wild Type and PPAR KO animal study and includes data used to prepare Figures 1-4 and Table 1 of the Das et al,...

  2. Defective i6A37 modification of mitochondrial and cytosolic tRNAs results from pathogenic mutations in TRIT1 and its substrate tRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Yarham

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the genetic basis for mitochondrial diseases is technically challenging given the size of the mitochondrial proteome and the heterogeneity of disease presentations. Using next-generation exome sequencing, we identified in a patient with severe combined mitochondrial respiratory chain defects and corresponding perturbation in mitochondrial protein synthesis, a homozygous p.Arg323Gln mutation in TRIT1. This gene encodes human tRNA isopentenyltransferase, which is responsible for i6A37 modification of the anticodon loops of a small subset of cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs. Deficiency of i6A37 was previously shown in yeast to decrease translational efficiency and fidelity in a codon-specific manner. Modelling of the p.Arg323Gln mutation on the co-crystal structure of the homologous yeast isopentenyltransferase bound to a substrate tRNA, indicates that it is one of a series of adjacent basic side chains that interact with the tRNA backbone of the anticodon stem, somewhat removed from the catalytic center. We show that patient cells bearing the p.Arg323Gln TRIT1 mutation are severely deficient in i6A37 in both cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs. Complete complementation of the i6A37 deficiency of both cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs was achieved by transduction of patient fibroblasts with wild-type TRIT1. Moreover, we show that a previously-reported pathogenic m.7480A>G mt-tRNASer(UCN mutation in the anticodon loop sequence A36A37A38 recognised by TRIT1 causes a loss of i6A37 modification. These data demonstrate that deficiencies of i6A37 tRNA modification should be considered a potential mechanism of human disease caused by both nuclear gene and mitochondrial DNA mutations while providing insight into the structure and function of TRIT1 in the modification of cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs.

  3. First successful reduction of clinical allergenicity of food by genetic modification: Mal d 1-silenced apples cause fewer allergy symptoms than the wild-type cultivar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubois, A. E. J.; Pagliarani, G.; Brouwer, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic modification of allergenic foods such as apple has the potential to reduce their clinical allergenicity, but this has never been studied by oral challenges in allergic individuals. METHODS: We performed oral food challenges in 21 apple-allergic individuals with Elstar apples...... which had undergone gene silencing of the major allergen of apple, Mal d 1, by RNA interference. Downregulation of Mal d 1 gene expression in the apples was verified by qRT-PCR. Clinical responses to the genetically modified apples were compared to those seen with the wild-type Elstar using a visual...

  4. Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Yeast Biosensor for Deep-space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Diana B.; Santa Maria, Sergio; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    The BioSentinel mission was selected to launch as a secondary payload onboard NASA Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) in 2018. In BioSentinel, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae will be used as a biosensor to measure the long-term impact of deep-space radiation to living organisms. In the 4U-payload, desiccated yeast cells from different strains will be stored inside microfluidic cards equipped with 3-color LED optical detection system to monitor cell growth and metabolic activity. At different times throughout the 12-month mission, these cards will be filled with liquid yeast growth media to rehydrate and grow the desiccated cells. The growth and metabolic rates of wild-type and radiation-sensitive strains in deep-space radiation environment will be compared to the rates measured in the ground- and microgravity-control units. These rates will also be correlated with measurements obtained from onboard physical dosimeters. In our preliminary long-term desiccation study, we found that air-drying yeast cells in 10% trehalose is the best method of cell preservation in order to survive the entire 18-month mission duration (6-month pre-launch plus 12-month full-mission periods). However, our study also revealed that desiccated yeast cells have decreasing viability over time when stored in payload-like environment. This suggests that the yeast biosensor will have different population of cells at different time points during the long-term mission. In this study, we are characterizing genomic and phenotypic changes in our yeast biosensor due to long-term storage and desiccation. For each yeast strain that will be part of the biosensor, several clones were reisolated after long-term storage by desiccation. These clones were compared to their respective original isolate in terms of genomic composition, desiccation tolerance and radiation sensitivity. Interestingly, clones from a radiation-sensitive mutant have better desiccation tolerance compared to their original isolate

  5. Development of a challenge-protective vaccine concept by modification of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, D; Lyubomska, O; Ludlow, M; Duprex, W P; Rima, B K

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate that insertion of the open reading frame of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the coding sequence for the second hinge region of the viral L (large) protein (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase) attenuates a wild-type canine distemper virus. Moreover, we show that single intranasal immunization with this recombinant virus provides significant protection against challenge with the virulent parental virus. Protection against wild-type challenge was gained either after recovery of cellular immunity postimmunization or after development of neutralizing antibodies. Insertion of EGFP seems to result in overattenuation of the virus, while our previous experiments demonstrated that the insertion of an epitope tag into a similar position did not affect L protein function. Thus, a desirable level of attenuation could be reached by manipulating the length of the insert (in the second hinge region of the L protein), providing additional tools for optimization of controlled attenuation. This strategy for controlled attenuation may be useful for a "quick response" in vaccine development against well-known and "new" viral infections and could be combined efficiently with other strategies of vaccine development and delivery systems.

  6. Exportin-5 mediates nuclear export of SRP RNA in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeiwa, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ichiro; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2015-04-01

    The signal recognition particle is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is essential for the translocation of nascent proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum. It has been shown that the RNA component (SRP RNA) is exported from the nucleus by CRM1 in the budding yeast. However, how SRP RNA is exported in higher species has been elusive. Here, we show that SRP RNA does not use the CRM1 pathway in Xenopus oocytes. Instead, SRP RNA uses the same export pathway as pre-miRNA and tRNA as showed by cross-competition experiments. Consistently, the recombinant Exportin-5 protein specifically stimulated export of SRP RNA as well as of pre-miRNA and tRNA, whereas an antibody raised against Exportin-5 specifically inhibited export of the same RNA species. Moreover, biotinylated SRP RNA can pull down Exportin-5 but not CRM1 from HeLa cell nuclear extracts in a RanGTP-dependent manner. These results, taken together, strongly suggest that the principal export receptor for SRP RNA in vertebrates is Exportin-5 unlike in the budding yeast. © 2015 The Authors. Genes to Cells published by Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Molecular identification of infective larvae of three species of Onchocerca found in wild-caught females of Simulium bidentatum in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuda M.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Wild female black flies attracted to a man or an idling automobile were collected at Oita, Japan where five cases of zoonotic onchocerciasis had occurred. Among the five Simulium species captured, 2% of Simulium bidentatum, the predominant species, were infected with filarial larvae. There were at least two types of infective larvae, types A and B, based on morphometric observation. Moreover, molecular analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1 gene revealed that types A and B were represented by a single unknown species of Onchocerca and two species, i.e., Onchocerca dewittei japonica from wild boar, the causative agent of zoonotic onchocerciasis in Japan, and an undescribed Onchocerca sp. from wild boar, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA (12S rRNA gene also showed that type A is likely to be an unknown species of Onchocerca. Natural infection of black flies with infective larvae of O. dewittei japonica and O. sp. was demonstrated for the first time. The present study strongly suggests that S. bidentatum plays a role as a vector in the transmission of zoonotic onchocerciasis due to O. dewittei japonica in Japan.

  8. Fluorinated Phenylalanine Precursor Resistance in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S. Murdoch

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of a counter-selection method for phenylalanine auxotrophy could be a useful tool in the repertoire of yeast genetics. Fluorinated and sulfurated precursors of phenylalanine were tested for toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One such precursor, 4-fluorophenylpyruvate (FPP, was found to be toxic to several strains from the Saccharomyces and Candida genera. Toxicity was partially dependent on ARO8 and ARO9, and correlated with a strain’s ability to convert FPP into 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPA. Thus, strains with deletions in ARO8 and ARO9, having a mild phenylalanine auxotrophy, could be separated from a culture of wild-type strains using FPP. Tetrad analysis suggests FPP resistance in one strain is due to two genes. Strains resistant to FPA have previously been shown to exhibit increased phenylethanol production. However, FPP resistant isolates did not follow this trend. These results suggest that FPP could effectively be used for counter-selection but not for enhanced phenylethanol production.

  9. Dose selenomethionine have radio-protective effect on cell lines with wild type p53?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, K.; Hagihira, T.; Ohnishi, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Selenium compounds are known to have cancer preventive effects. It is reported recently that selenium in the form of selenomethionine (SeMet) can protect cells with wild type p53 from UV-induced cell killing by activating the DNA repair mechanism of p53 tumor suppressor protein via redox factor Ref1 by reducing p53 cysteine residue 275 and 277. In contrast, SeMet has no protective effect on UV-induced cell killing in p53-null cells. If SeMet also has protective effect in cells with wild type p53 on cell killing by photon irradiation, SeMet can be used as normal tissue radio-protector. We examined the effect of SeMet on cell killing by X-ray irradiation in several cell lines with different p53 status at exponentially growing phase. Cell lines used in this experiment were as follows: H1299/neo; human lung cancer cell line of p53 null type tranfected with control vector with no p53, H1299/wp53; wild type p53 transfected counterpart. A172/neo; human glioblastoma cell line with wild type p53, A172/mp53-248; mp53-248 (248-mutant, ARG >TRP) transfected counterpart. SAS/neo; human tongue cancer cell line with wild type p53, and SAS/mp53-248; mp53-248 transfected counterpart. Cells were subcultured at monolayer in D-MEM containing 10% FBS. Survivals of the cells were determined by colony forming ability. Ten-MV linac X-ray was used to irradiate the cells. Exponentially growing cells were incubated with 20μM of SeMet for 15 hours before irradiation. After 24 hours exposure of SeMet, cells were incubated up to two weeks in growth medium for colony formation. Twenty-four hours exposure of 20μM of SeMet had no cytotoxicity on these cell lines. SeMet had no modification effect on cell killing by photon irradiation in H1299/neo, H1299/wp53, SAS/neo, SAS/mp53-248, and A172/mp53-248. On the other hand, SeMet sensitized A172/neo in radiation cell killing. The effects of p53 on interaction of SeMet and photon irradiation differ according to cell lines

  10. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  11. Nucleosome structure of the yeast CHA1 promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1998-01-01

    conditions. Five yeast TBP mutants defective in different steps in activated transcription abolished CHA1 expression, but failed to affect induction-dependent chromatin rearrangement of the promoter region. Progressive truncations of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain caused a progressive reduction...

  12. Anthelmintic effect of Psidium guajava and Tagetes erecta on wild-type and Levamisole-resistant Caenorhabditis elegans strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Vázquez, Denia M; Mayoral-Peña, Zyanya; Gómez-Sánchez, Maricela; Salazar-Olivo, Luis A; Arellano-Carbajal, Fausto

    2017-04-18

    Psidium guajava and Tagetes erecta have been used traditionally to treat gastrointestinal parasites, but their active metabolites and mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. To evaluate the anthelmintic potential of Psidium guajava and Tagetes erecta extracts on Levamisole-sensitive and Levamisole-resistant strains of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Aqueous extracts of Psidium guajava (PGE) and Tagetes erecta (TEE) were assayed on locomotion and egg-laying behaviors of the wild-type (N2) and Levamisole-resistant (CB193) strains of Caenorhabditis elegans. Both extracts paralyzed wild-type and Levamisole-resistant nematodes in a dose-dependent manner. In wild-type worms, TEE 25mg/mL induced a 75% paralysis after 8h of treatment and PGE 25mg/mL induced a 100% paralysis after 4h of treatment. PGE exerted a similar paralyzing effect on N2 wild-type and CB193 Levamisole-resistant worms, while TEE only partially paralyzed CB193 worms. TEE 25mg/mL decreased N2 egg-laying by 65% with respect to the untreated control, while PGE did it by 40%. Psidium guajava leaves and Tagetes erecta flower-heads possess hydrosoluble compounds that block the motility of Caenorhabditis elegans by a mechanism different to that of the anthelmintic drug Levamisole. Effects are also observable on oviposition, which was diminished in the wild-type worms. The strong anthelmintic effects in crude extracts of these plants warrants future work to identify their active compounds and to elucidate their molecular mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Yeast cell differentiation: Lessons from pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuše

    2016-09-01

    Yeasts, historically considered to be single-cell organisms, are able to activate different differentiation processes. Individual yeast cells can change their life-styles by processes of phenotypic switching such as the switch from yeast-shaped cells to filamentous cells (pseudohyphae or true hyphae) and the transition among opaque, white and gray cell-types. Yeasts can also create organized multicellular structures such as colonies and biofilms, and the latter are often observed as contaminants on surfaces in industry and medical care and are formed during infections of the human body. Multicellular structures are formed mostly of stationary-phase or slow-growing cells that diversify into specific cell subpopulations that have unique metabolic properties and can fulfill specific tasks. In addition to the development of multiple protective mechanisms, processes of metabolic reprogramming that reflect a changed environment help differentiated individual cells and/or community cell constituents to survive harmful environmental attacks and/or to escape the host immune system. This review aims to provide an overview of differentiation processes so far identified in individual yeast cells as well as in multicellular communities of yeast pathogens of the Candida and Cryptococcus spp. and the Candida albicans close relative, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Molecular mechanisms and extracellular signals potentially involved in differentiation processes are also briefly mentioned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Repression of a mating type cassette in the fission yeast by four DNA elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekwall, K; Nielsen, O; Ruusala, T

    1991-01-01

    The fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, expresses one of two alternative mating types. They are specified by one of two determinants (M or P) present at the mat1 locus. In addition, silent copies of M and P are present on the same chromosome. In the present work we demonstrate that the diff...... partitioning in mitosis to Schizosaccharomyces pombe ars plasmids....

  15. Hybrid yeast strains capable of raising an extraordinarily broad range of dough types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, S.; Zander, I.; Windisch, S.

    1981-01-01

    Over 200 hybrid yeast strains were screened and 11 of these found to have versatile fermentation characteristics. This paper reports the results obtained with these 11 strains compared with a commercially available strain of baker's yeast used for bread making and marketed as 'instant active dry yeast'. In contrast to bakers yeast, the hybrid strains fermented very well in yeast, hard biscuit, shortcake and heavy cake dough without prior sponge formation. The fermentation kinetics were investigated and the technical potential of such hybrid strains discussed on the basis of the fermentation kinetics.

  16. Disruption of the yeast ATH1 gene confers better survival after dehydration, freezing, and ethanol shock: potential commercial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Alizadeh, P; Harding, T; Hefner-Gravink, A; Klionsky, D J

    1996-01-01

    The accumulation of trehalose is a critical determinant of stress resistance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have constructed a yeast strain in which the activity of the trehalose-hydrolyzing enzyme, acid trehalase (ATH), has been abolished. Loss of ATH activity was accomplished by disrupting the ATH1 gene, which is essential for ATH activity. The delta ath1 strain accumulated greater levels of cellular trehalose and grew to a higher cell density than the isogenic wild-type strain. In addition, the elevated levels of trehalose in the delta ath1 strain correlated with increased tolerance to dehydration, freezing, and toxic levels of ethanol. The improved resistance to stress conditions exhibited by the delta ath1 strain may make this strain useful in commercial applications, including baking and brewing. PMID:8633854

  17. Mutations in MARS identified in a specific type of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis alter methionyl-tRNA synthetase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comisso, Martine; Hadchouel, Alice; de Blic, Jacques; Mirande, Marc

    2018-05-18

    Biallelic missense mutations in MARS are responsible for rare but severe cases of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) prevalent on the island of La Réunion. MARS encodes cytosolic methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS), an essential translation factor. The multisystemic effects observed in patients with this form of PAP are consistent with a loss-of-function defect in an ubiquitously expressed enzyme. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in MARS-related PAP are currently unknown. In this work, we analyzed the effect of the PAP-related mutations in MARS on the thermal stability and on the catalytic parameters of the MetRS mutants, relative to wild-type. The effect of these mutations on the structural integrity of the enzyme as a member of the cytosolic multisynthetase complex was also investigated. Our results establish that the PAP-related substitutions in MetRS impact the tRNA Met -aminoacylation reaction especially at the level of methionine recognition, and suggest a direct link between the loss of activity of the enzyme and the pathological disorders in PAP. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. A set of nutrient limitations trigger yeast cell death in a nitrogen-dependent manner during wine alcoholic fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Duc

    Full Text Available Yeast cell death can occur during wine alcoholic fermentation. It is generally considered to result from ethanol stress that impacts membrane integrity. This cell death mainly occurs when grape musts processing reduces lipid availability, resulting in weaker membrane resistance to ethanol. However the mechanisms underlying cell death in these conditions remain unclear. We examined cell death occurrence considering yeast cells ability to elicit an appropriate response to a given nutrient limitation and thus survive starvation. We show here that a set of micronutrients (oleic acid, ergosterol, pantothenic acid and nicotinic acid in low, growth-restricting concentrations trigger cell death in alcoholic fermentation when nitrogen level is high. We provide evidence that nitrogen signaling is involved in cell death and that either SCH9 deletion or Tor inhibition prevent cell death in several types of micronutrient limitation. Under such limitations, yeast cells fail to acquire any stress resistance and are unable to store glycogen. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analyses did not reveal any major changes in stress genes expression, suggesting that post-transcriptional events critical for stress response were not triggered by micronutrient starvation. Our data point to the fact that yeast cell death results from yeast inability to trigger an appropriate stress response under some conditions of nutrient limitations most likely not encountered by yeast in the wild. Our conclusions provide a novel frame for considering both cell death and the management of nutrients during alcoholic fermentation.

  19. A two-plasmid strategy for engineering a dengue virus type 3 infectious clone from primary Brazilian isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jefferson J S; Cordeiro, Marli T; Bertani, Giovani R; Marques, Ernesto T A; Gil, Laura H V G

    2014-12-01

    Dengue infections represent one of the most prevalent arthropod-borne diseases worldwide, causing a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes. Engineered infectious clone is an important tool to study Dengue virus (DENV) biology. Functional full-length cDNA clones have been constructed for many positive-strand RNA viruses and have provided valuable tools for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in viral genome replication, virion assembly, virus pathogenesis and vaccine development. We report herein the successful development of an infectious clone from a primary Brazilian isolate of dengue virus 3 (DENV3) of the genotype III. Using a two-plasmid strategy, DENV3 genome was divided in two parts and cloned separately into a yeast-bacteria shuttle vector. All plasmids were assembled in yeast by homologous recombination technique and a full-length template for transcription was obtained by in vitro ligation of the two parts of the genome. Transcript-derived DENV3 is infectious upon transfection into BHK-21 cells and in vitro characterization confirmed its identity. Growth kinetics of transcript-derived DENV3 was indistinguishable from wild type DENV3. This system is a powerful tool that will help shed light on molecular features of DENV biology, as the relationship of specific mutations and DENV pathogenesis.

  20. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of wild-type hepatitis - A virus and its attenuated candidate vaccine derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.I.; Rosenblum, B.; Ticehurst, J.R.; Daemer, R.; Feinstone, S.; Purcell, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Development of attenuated mutants for use as vaccines is in progress for other viruses, including influenza, rotavirus, varicella-zoster, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis-A virus (HAV). Attenuated viruses may be derived from naturally occurring mutants that infect human or nonhuman hosts. Alternatively, attenuated mutants may be generated by passage of wild-type virus in cell culture. Production of attenuated viruses in cell culture is a laborious and empiric process. Despite previous empiric successes, understanding the molecular basis for attenuation of vaccine viruses could facilitate future development and use of live-virus vaccines. Comparison of the complete nucleotide sequences of wild-type (virulent) and vaccine (attenuated) viruses has been reported for polioviruses and yellow fever virus. Here, the authors compare the nucleotide sequence of wild-type HAV HM-175 with that of a candidate vaccine derivative

  1. The CUP2 gene product regulates the expression of the CUP1 gene, coding for yeast metallothionein.

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, J; Fogel, S; Buchman, C; Karin, M

    1989-01-01

    The yeast CUP1 gene codes for a copper-binding protein similar to metallothionein. Copper sensitive cup1s strains contain a single copy of the CUP1 locus. Resistant strains (CUP1r) carry 12 or more multiple tandem copies. We isolated 12 ethyl methane sulfonate-induced copper sensitive mutants in a wild-type CUP1r parental strain, X2180-1A. Most mutants reduce the copper resistance phenotype only slightly. However, the mutant cup2 lowers resistance by nearly two orders of magnitude. We cloned ...

  2. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B.; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex associated protein/ elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase wild-type IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine if oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was tolerable, we administered kinetin to eight FD individuals homozygous for the splice mutation. Subjects received 23.5 mg/Kg/day for 28 days. An increase in wild-type IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes was noted after eight days in six of eight individuals; after 28 days the mean increase as compared to baseline was significant (p=0.002). We have demonstrated that kinetin is tolerable in this medically fragile population. Not only did kinetin produce the desired effect on splicing in FD patients, but also that effect appears to improve with time despite lack of dose change. This is the first report of a drug that produces in vivo mRNA splicing changes in individuals with FD and supports future long-term trials to determine if kinetin will prove therapeutic in FD patients. PMID:21775922

  3. Swine and rabbits are the main reservoirs of hepatitis E virus in China: detection of HEV RNA in feces of farmed and wild animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junke; Zeng, Hang; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Yulin; Liu, Peng; Geng, Jiabao; Wang, Lin; Wang, Ling; Zhuang, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is recognized as a zoonosis. The prevalence of HEV RNA and anti-HEV antibodies in many animal species has been reported, but the host range of HEV is unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate HEV infection in various animal species and to determine the reservoirs of HEV. Eight hundred twenty-two fecal samples from 17 mammal species and 67 fecal samples from 24 avian species were collected in China and tested for HEV RNA by RT-nPCR. The products of PCR were sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. The positive rates of HEV RNA isolated from pigs in Beijing, Shandong, and Henan were 33%, 30%, and 92%, respectively, and that from rabbits in Beijing was 5%. HEV RNA was not detectable in farmed foxes, sheep or sika deer, or in wild animals in zoos, including wild boars, yaks, camels, Asiatic black bears, African lions, red pandas, civets, wolves, jackals and primates. Sequence analysis revealed that swine isolates had 97.8%-98.4% nucleotide sequence identity to genotype 4d isolates from patients in Shandong and Jiangsu of China. Phylogenetic analysis showed that swine HEV isolates belong to genotype 4, including subgenotype 4h in Henan and 4d in Beijing and Shandong. The rabbit HEV strains shared 93%-99% nucleotide sequence identity with rabbit strains isolated from Inner Mongolia. In conclusion, swine and rabbits have been confirmed to be the main reservoirs of HEV in China.

  4. Mutations in the RNA-binding domains of tombusvirus replicase proteins affect RNA recombination in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panaviene, Zivile; Nagy, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    RNA recombination, which is thought to occur due to replicase errors during viral replication, is one of the major driving forces of virus evolution. In this article, we show evidence that the replicase proteins of Cucumber necrosis virus, a tombusvirus, are directly involved in RNA recombination in vivo. Mutations within the RNA-binding domains of the replicase proteins affected the frequency of recombination observed with a prototypical defective-interfering (DI) RNA, a model template for recombination studies. Five of the 17 replicase mutants tested showed delay in the formation of recombinants when compared to the wild-type helper virus. Interestingly, two replicase mutants accelerated recombinant formation and, in addition, these mutants also increased the level of subgenomic RNA synthesis (Virology 308 (2003), 191-205). A trans-complementation system was used to demonstrate that mutation in the p33 replicase protein resulted in altered recombination rate. Isolated recombinants were mostly imprecise (nonhomologous), with the recombination sites clustered around a replication enhancer region and a putative cis-acting element, respectively. These RNA elements might facilitate the proposed template switching events by the tombusvirus replicase. Together with data in the article cited above, results presented here firmly establish that the conserved RNA-binding motif of the replicase proteins is involved in RNA replication, subgenomic RNA synthesis, and RNA recombination

  5. RNA Export through the NPC in Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masumi; Inose, Haruko; Masuda, Seiji

    2015-03-20

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complex. The RNA molecules that are exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm include messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs), and viral mRNAs. Each RNA is transported by a specific nuclear export receptor. It is believed that most of the mRNAs are exported by Nxf1 (Mex67 in yeast), whereas rRNAs, snRNAs, and a certain subset of mRNAs are exported in a Crm1/Xpo1-dependent manner. tRNAs and miRNAs are exported by Xpot and Xpo5. However, multiple export receptors are involved in the export of some RNAs, such as 60S ribosomal subunit. In addition to these export receptors, some adapter proteins are required to export RNAs. The RNA export system of eukaryotic cells is also used by several types of RNA virus that depend on the machineries of the host cell in the nucleus for replication of their genome, therefore this review describes the RNA export system of two representative viruses. We also discuss the NPC anchoring-dependent mRNA export factors that directly recruit specific genes to the NPC.

  6. No evidence for extrinsic post-zygotic isolation in a wild Saccharomyces yeast system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Guillaume; Landry, Christian R

    2017-06-01

    Although microorganisms account for the largest fraction of Earth's biodiversity, we know little about how their reproductive barriers evolve. Sexual microorganisms such as Saccharomyces yeasts rapidly develop strong intrinsic post-zygotic isolation, but the role of extrinsic isolation in the early speciation process remains to be investigated. We measured the growth of F 1 hybrids between two incipient species of Saccharomyces paradoxus to assess the presence of extrinsic post-zygotic isolation across 32 environments. More than 80% of hybrids showed either partial dominance of the best parent or over-dominance for growth, revealing no fitness defects in F 1 hybrids. Extrinsic reproductive isolation therefore likely plays little role in limiting gene flow between incipient yeast species and is not a requirement for speciation. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Production of Food Grade Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyro Bekatorou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the production of microbiology media and extracts, as well as livestock feeds. Modern scientific advances allow the isolation, construction and industrial production of new yeast strains to satisfy the specific demands of the food industry. Types of commercial food grade yeasts, industrial production processes and raw materials are highlighted. Aspects of yeast metabolism, with respect to carbohydrate utilization, nutritional aspects and recent research advances are also discussed.

  8. Improvement of stress tolerance and leavening ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions by overexpression of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Bing; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-03-16

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast cells are exposed to multiple baking-associated stresses, such as elevated high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. There is a high demand for baker's yeast strains that could withstand these stresses with high leavening ability. The SNR84 gene encodes H/ACA snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), which is known to be involved in pseudouridylation of the large subunit rRNA. However, the function of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast coping with baking-associated stresses remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of SNR84 overexpression on baker's yeast which was exposed to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. These results suggest that overexpression of the SNR84 gene conferred tolerance of baker's yeast cells to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses and enhanced their leavening ability in high-sucrose and freeze-thaw dough. These findings could provide a valuable insight for breeding of novel stress-resistant baker's yeast strains that are useful for baking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Steric restrictions of RISC in RNA interference identified with size-expanded RNA nucleobases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Armando R; Peterson, Larryn W; Kool, Eric T

    2012-08-17

    Understanding the interactions between small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), the key protein complex of RNA interference (RNAi), is of great importance to the development of siRNAs with improved biological and potentially therapeutic function. Although various chemically modified siRNAs have been reported, relatively few studies with modified nucleobases exist. Here we describe the synthesis and hybridization properties of siRNAs bearing size-expanded RNA (xRNA) nucleobases and their use as a novel and systematic set of steric probes in RNAi. xRNA nucleobases are expanded by 2.4 Å using benzo-homologation and retain canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing groups. Our data show that the modified siRNA duplexes display small changes in melting temperature (+1.4 to -5.0 °C); substitutions near the center are somewhat destabilizing to the RNA duplex, while substitutions near the ends are stabilizing. RNAi studies in a dual-reporter luciferase assay in HeLa cells revealed that xRNA nucleobases in the antisense strand reduce activity at some central positions near the seed region but are generally well tolerated near the ends. Most importantly, we observed that xRNA substitutions near the 3'-end increased activity over that of wild-type siRNAs. The data are analyzed in terms of site-dependent steric effects in RISC. Circular dichroism experiments show that single xRNA substitutions do not significantly distort the native A-form helical structure of the siRNA duplex, and serum stability studies demonstrated that xRNA substitutions protect siRNAs against nuclease degradation.

  10. One-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for detecting and genotyping wild-type group A rotavirus strains and vaccine strains (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) in stool samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Esona, Mathew D.; Tam, Ka Ian; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Group A rotavirus (RVA) infection is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in young children worldwide. Introduction of two live-attenuated rotavirus vaccines, RotaTeq® and Rotarix®, has dramatically reduced RVA associated AGE and mortality in developed as well as in many developing countries. High-throughput methods are needed to genotype rotavirus wild-type strains and to identify vaccine strains in stool samples. Quantitative RT-PCR assays (qRT-PCR) offer several advantages including increased sensitivity, higher throughput, and faster turnaround time. Methods. In this study, a one-step multiplex qRT-PCR assay was developed to detect and genotype wild-type strains and vaccine (Rotarix® and RotaTeq®) rotavirus strains along with an internal processing control (Xeno or MS2 RNA). Real-time RT-PCR assays were designed for VP7 (G1, G2, G3, G4, G9, G12) and VP4 (P[4], P[6] and P[8]) genotypes. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay also included previously published NSP3 qRT-PCR for rotavirus detection and Rotarix® NSP2 and RotaTeq® VP6 qRT-PCRs for detection of Rotarix® and RotaTeq® vaccine strains respectively. The multiplex qRT-PCR assay was validated using 853 sequence confirmed stool samples and 24 lab cultured strains of different rotavirus genotypes. By using thermostable rTth polymerase enzyme, dsRNA denaturation, reverse transcription (RT) and amplification (PCR) steps were performed in single tube by uninterrupted thermocycling profile to reduce chances of sample cross contamination and for rapid generation of results. For quantification, standard curves were generated using dsRNA transcripts derived from RVA gene segments. Results. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8–100% sensitivity, 99.7–100% specificity, 85–95% efficiency and a limit of detection of 4–60 copies per singleplex reaction. The VP7 qRT-PCRs exhibited 81–92% efficiency and limit of detection of 150–600 copies in multiplex reactions. The VP4 qRT-PCRs exhibited 98.8

  11. Interactions between Drosophila and its natural yeast symbionts-Is Saccharomyces cerevisiae a good model for studying the fly-yeast relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Don; Kopp, Artyom; Chandler, James Angus

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts play an important role in the biology of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In addition to being a valuable source of nutrition, yeasts affect D. melanogaster behavior and interact with the host immune system. Most experiments investigating the role of yeasts in D. melanogaster biology use the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae is rarely found with natural populations of D. melanogaster or other Drosophila species. Moreover, the strain of S. cerevisiae used most often in D. melanogaster experiments is a commercially and industrially important strain that, to the best of our knowledge, was not isolated from flies. Since disrupting natural host-microbe interactions can have profound effects on host biology, the results from D. melanogaster-S. cerevisiae laboratory experiments may not be fully representative of host-microbe interactions in nature. In this study, we explore the D. melanogaster-yeast relationship using five different strains of yeast that were isolated from wild Drosophila populations. Ingested live yeasts have variable persistence in the D. melanogaster gastrointestinal tract. For example, Hanseniaspora occidentalis persists relative to S. cerevisiae, while Brettanomyces naardenensis is removed. Despite these differences in persistence relative to S. cerevisiae, we find that all yeasts decrease in total abundance over time. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an important component of the D. melanogaster anti-microbial response and can inhibit S. cerevisiae growth in the intestine. To determine if sensitivity to ROS explains the differences in yeast persistence, we measured yeast growth in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. We find that B. naardenesis is completely inhibited by hydrogen peroxide, while H. occidentalis is not, which is consistent with yeast sensitivity to ROS affecting persistence within the D. melanogaster gastrointestinal tract. We also compared the feeding preference of D

  12. The ROS-sensitive microRNA-9/9* controls the expression of mitochondrial tRNA-modifying enzymes and is involved in the molecular mechanism of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, Salvador; Martínez-Zamora, Ana; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antonio L; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction activates mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling pathways whose components are mostly unknown. Identification of these components is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mitochondrial diseases and to discover putative therapeutic targets. MELAS syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial (mt) DNA affecting mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)). Patient and cybrid cells exhibit elevated oxidative stress. Moreover, mutant mt-tRNAs(Leu(UUR)) lack the taurine-containing modification normally present at the wobble uridine (U34) of wild-type mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)), which is considered an etiology of MELAS. However, the molecular mechanism is still unclear. We found that MELAS cybrids exhibit a significant decrease in the steady-state levels of several mt-tRNA-modification enzymes, which is not due to transcriptional regulation. We demonstrated that oxidative stress mediates an NFkB-dependent induction of microRNA-9/9*, which acts as a post-transcriptional negative regulator of the mt-tRNA-modification enzymes GTPBP3, MTO1 and TRMU. Down-regulation of these enzymes by microRNA-9/9* affects the U34 modification status of non-mutant tRNAs and contributes to the MELAS phenotype. Anti-microRNA-9 treatments of MELAS cybrids reverse the phenotype, whereas miR-9 transfection of wild-type cells mimics the effects of siRNA-mediated down-regulation of GTPBP3, MTO1 and TRMU. Our data represent the first evidence that an mt-DNA disease can directly affect microRNA expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the modification status of mt-tRNAs is dynamic and that cells respond to stress by modulating the expression of mt-tRNA-modifying enzymes. microRNA-9/9* is a crucial player in mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling as it regulates expression of nuclear genes in response to changes in the functional state of mitochondria. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  13. The effect of allyl isothiocyanate on RNA | Habibi | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the interaction of Allylisothiocyanate with yeast RNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using constant RNA concentration and various molar ratios of AITC/RNA complexes are examine. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and uv-visible difference spectroscopic methods are used to determine the ...

  14. The fusion protein of wild-type canine distemper virus is a major determinant of persistent infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plattet, Philippe; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Zuber, BenoIt; Brunner, Jean-Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Wittek, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    The wild-type A75/17 canine distemper virus (CDV) strain induces a persistent infection in the central nervous system but infects cell lines very inefficiently. In contrast, the genetically more distant Onderstepoort CDV vaccine strain (OP-CDV) induces extensive syncytia formation. Here, we investigated the roles of wild-type fusion (F WT ) and attachment (H WT ) proteins in Vero cells expressing, or not, the canine SLAM receptor by transfection experiments and by studying recombinants viruses expressing different combinations of wild-type and OP-CDV glycoproteins. We show that low fusogenicity is not due to a defect of the envelope proteins to reach the cell surface and that H WT determines persistent infection in a receptor-dependent manner, emphasizing the role of SLAM as a potent enhancer of fusogenicity. However, importantly, F WT reduced cell-to-cell fusion independently of the cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating that the fusion protein of the neurovirulent A75/17-CDV strain plays a key role in determining persistent infection

  15. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase in wild-type and ada mutants of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Pal, B.C.; Foote, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    O 6 -Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase is induced in Escherichia coli during growth in low levels of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. We have developed a sensitive assay for quantitating low levels of this activity with a synthetic DNA substrate containing 3 H-labeled O 6 -methylguanine as the only modified base. Although both wild-type and adaptation-deficient (ada) mutants of E. coli contained low but comparable numbers (from 13 to 60) of the enzyme molecules per cell, adaptation treatment caused a significant increase of the enzyme in the wild type but not in the ada mutants, suggesting that the ada mutation is in a regulatory locus and not in the structural gene for the methyltransferase

  16. Improving yeast strains using recyclable integration cassettes, for the production of plant terpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Christopher B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoids constitute a large family of natural products, attracting commercial interest for a variety of uses as flavours, fragrances, drugs and alternative fuels. Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers a versatile cell factory, as the precursors of terpenoid biosynthesis are naturally synthesized by the sterol biosynthetic pathway. Results S. cerevisiae wild type yeast cells, selected for their capacity to produce high sterol levels were targeted for improvement aiming to increase production. Recyclable integration cassettes were developed which enable the unlimited sequential integration of desirable genetic elements (promoters, genes, termination sequence at any desired locus in the yeast genome. The approach was applied on the yeast sterol biosynthetic pathway genes HMG2, ERG20 and IDI1 resulting in several-fold increase in plant monoterpene and sesquiterpene production. The improved strains were robust and could sustain high terpenoid production levels for an extended period. Simultaneous plasmid-driven co-expression of IDI1 and the HMG2 (K6R variant, in the improved strain background, maximized monoterpene production levels. Expression of two terpene synthase enzymes from the sage species Salvia fruticosa and S. pomifera (SfCinS1, SpP330 in the modified yeast cells identified a range of terpenoids which are also present in the plant essential oils. Co-expression of the putative interacting protein HSP90 with cineole synthase 1 (SfCinS1 also improved production levels, pointing to an additional means to improve production. Conclusions Using the developed molecular tools, new yeast strains were generated with increased capacity to produce plant terpenoids. The approach taken and the durability of the strains allow successive rounds of improvement to maximize yields.

  17. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Busenlehner, Laura [Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Marcus, Stevan, E-mail: smarcus@bama.ua.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. {yields} The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. {yields} Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. {yields} PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  18. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel; Busenlehner, Laura; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. → The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. → Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. → PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  19. Expression of wild-type and mutant medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) cDNA in eucaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T G; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    1992-01-01

    An effective EBV-based expression system for eucaryotic cells has been developed and used for the study of the mitochondrial enzyme medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD). 1325 bp of PCR-generated MCAD cDNA, containing the entire coding region, was placed between the SV40 early promoter...... and polyadenylation signals in the EBV-based vector. Both wild-type MCAD cDNA and cDNA containing the prevalent disease-causing mutation A to G at position 985 of the MCAD cDNA were tested. In transfected COS-7 cells, the steady state amount of mutant MCAD protein was consistently lower than the amount of wild......-type human enzyme. The enzyme activity in extracts from cells harbouring the wild-type MCAD cDNA was dramatically higher than in the controls (harbouring the vector without the MCAD gene) while only a slightly higher activity was measured with the mutant MCAD. The mutant MCAD present behaves like wild...

  20. An improved, bias-reduced probabilistic functional gene network of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insuk Lee

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic functional gene networks are powerful theoretical frameworks for integrating heterogeneous functional genomics and proteomics data into objective models of cellular systems. Such networks provide syntheses of millions of discrete experimental observations, spanning DNA microarray experiments, physical protein interactions, genetic interactions, and comparative genomics; the resulting networks can then be easily applied to generate testable hypotheses regarding specific gene functions and associations.We report a significantly improved version (v. 2 of a probabilistic functional gene network of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe our optimization methods and illustrate their effects in three major areas: the reduction of functional bias in network training reference sets, the application of a probabilistic model for calculating confidences in pair-wise protein physical or genetic interactions, and the introduction of simple thresholds that eliminate many false positive mRNA co-expression relationships. Using the network, we predict and experimentally verify the function of the yeast RNA binding protein Puf6 in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis.YeastNet v. 2, constructed using these optimizations together with additional data, shows significant reduction in bias and improvements in precision and recall, in total covering 102,803 linkages among 5,483 yeast proteins (95% of the validated proteome. YeastNet is available from http://www.yeastnet.org.

  1. First successful reduction of clinical allergenicity of food by genetic modification: Mal d 1-silenced apples cause fewer allergy symptoms than the wild-type cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, A E J; Pagliarani, G; Brouwer, R M; Kollen, B J; Dragsted, L O; Eriksen, F D; Callesen, O; Gilissen, L J W J; Krens, F A; Visser, R G F; Smulders, M J M; Vlieg-Boerstra, B J; Flokstra-de Blok, B J; van de Weg, W E

    2015-11-01

    Genetic modification of allergenic foods such as apple has the potential to reduce their clinical allergenicity, but this has never been studied by oral challenges in allergic individuals. We performed oral food challenges in 21 apple-allergic individuals with Elstar apples which had undergone gene silencing of the major allergen of apple, Mal d 1, by RNA interference. Downregulation of Mal d 1 gene expression in the apples was verified by qRT-PCR. Clinical responses to the genetically modified apples were compared to those seen with the wild-type Elstar using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Gene silencing produced two genetically modified apple lines expressing Mal d 1.02 and other Mal d 1 gene mRNA levels which were extensively downregulated, that is only 0.1-16.4% (e-DR1) and 0.2-9.9% (e-DR2) of those of the wild-type Elstar, respectively. Challenges with these downregulated apple lines produced significantly less intense maximal symptoms to the first dose (Vmax1) than with Elstar (Vmax1 Elstar 3.0 mm vs 0.0 mm for e-DR1, P = 0.017 and 0.0 mm for e-DR2, P = 0.043), as well as significantly less intense mean symptoms per dose (meanV/d) than with Elstar (meanV/d Elstar 2.2 mm vs 0.2 mm for e-DR1, P = 0.017 and 0.0 mm for e-DR2, P = 0.043). Only one subject (5%) remained symptom-free when challenged with the Elstar apple, whereas 43% did so with e-DR1 and 63% with e-DR2. These data show that mRNA silencing of Mal d 1 results in a marked reduction of Mal d 1 gene expression in the fruit and reduction of symptoms when these apples are ingested by allergic subjects. Approximately half of the subjects developed no symptoms whatsoever, and virtually all subjects wished to consume the apple again in the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The correlation between the use of personal protective equipment and level wild-type p53 of dental technicians in Surabaya

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    Puspa Dila Rohmaniar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure of metals among dental technicians that come from the working environment can lead to the formation reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS can cause mutations in the p53 gene (p53. The mutation is transversion mutation GuanineThymine. p53 mutations can lead to low expression of the wild-type p53 protein (p53. Wild-type p53 involved in many biological processes such as regulation of genes involved in cell cycle, cell growth after DNA damage, and apoptosis. However, exposure to metals among dental technicians can be prevented through the use of personal protective equipment (PPE during work. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the correlation between the use of personal protective equipment to wild-type p53 protein levels among dental technicians in Surabaya. Method: This study was observational analytic with cross sectional approach. 40 samples were taken by random sampling. Data were retrieved through interviews and observations. Wild-type p53 was analyzed from saliva with indirect ELISA method. Analysis of data used Kolmogorov Smirnov normality test and a Pearson correlation test. Value significance was p<0.05 (95% confidence level. Result: There was a significant association between the use of personal protective equipment with wild-type p53 levels with p=0.002 Conclusion: The use PPE properly is positively correlated with the wild-type p53 protein levels of dental technicians in Surabaya.

  3. Cell-type specific role of the RNA-binding protein, NONO, in the DNA double-strand break response in the mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Shu, Feng-Jue; Li, Zhentian; Jaafar, Lahcen; Zhao, Shourong; Dynan, William S

    2017-03-01

    The tandem RNA recognition motif protein, NONO, was previously identified as a candidate DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor in a biochemical screen for proteins with end-joining stimulatory activity. Subsequent work showed that NONO and its binding partner, SFPQ, have many of the properties expected for bona fide repair factors in cell-based assays. Their contribution to the DNA damage response in intact tissue in vivo has not, however, been demonstrated. Here we compare DNA damage sensitivity in the testes of wild-type mice versus mice bearing a null allele of the NONO homologue (Nono gt ). In wild-type mice, NONO protein was present in Sertoli, peritubular myoid, and interstitial cells, with an increase in expression following induction of DNA damage. As expected for the product of an X-linked gene, NONO was not detected in germ cells. The Nono gt/0 mice had at most a mild testis developmental phenotype in the absence of genotoxic stress. However, following irradiation at sublethal, 2-4 Gy doses, Nono gt/0 mice displayed a number of indicators of radiosensitivity as compared to their wild-type counterparts. These included higher levels of persistent DSB repair foci, increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the seminiferous tubules, and partial degeneration of the blood-testis barrier. There was also an almost complete loss of germ cells at later times following irradiation, evidently arising as an indirect effect reflecting loss of stromal support. Results demonstrate a role for NONO protein in protection against direct and indirect biological effects of ionizing radiation in the whole animal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lack of HXK2 Induces Localization of Active Ras in Mitochondria and Triggers Apoptosis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Loredana Amigoni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that activated Ras proteins are localized to the plasma membrane and in the nucleus in wild-type cells growing exponentially on glucose, while in the hxk2Δ strain they accumulated mainly in mitochondria. An aberrant accumulation of activated Ras in these organelles was previously reported and correlated to mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of ROS, and cell death. Here we show that addition of acetic acid to wild-type cells results in a rapid recruitment of Ras-GTP from the nucleus and the plasma membrane to the mitochondria, providing a further proof that Ras proteins might be involved in programmed cell death. Moreover, we show that Hxk2 protects against apoptosis in S. cerevisiae. In particular, cells lacking HXK2 and showing a constitutive accumulation of activated Ras at the mitochondria are more sensitive to acetic-acid-induced programmed cell death compared to the wild type strain. Indeed, deletion of HXK2 causes an increase of apoptotic cells with several morphological and biochemical changes that are typical of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and ROS production. Finally, our results suggest that apoptosis induced by lack of Hxk2 may not require the activation of Yca1, the metacaspase homologue identified in yeast.

  5. Lack of HXK2 induces localization of active Ras in mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigoni, Loredana; Martegani, Enzo; Colombo, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that activated Ras proteins are localized to the plasma membrane and in the nucleus in wild-type cells growing exponentially on glucose, while in the hxk2Δ strain they accumulated mainly in mitochondria. An aberrant accumulation of activated Ras in these organelles was previously reported and correlated to mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of ROS, and cell death. Here we show that addition of acetic acid to wild-type cells results in a rapid recruitment of Ras-GTP from the nucleus and the plasma membrane to the mitochondria, providing a further proof that Ras proteins might be involved in programmed cell death. Moreover, we show that Hxk2 protects against apoptosis in S. cerevisiae. In particular, cells lacking HXK2 and showing a constitutive accumulation of activated Ras at the mitochondria are more sensitive to acetic-acid-induced programmed cell death compared to the wild type strain. Indeed, deletion of HXK2 causes an increase of apoptotic cells with several morphological and biochemical changes that are typical of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation, externalization of phosphatidylserine, and ROS production. Finally, our results suggest that apoptosis induced by lack of Hxk2 may not require the activation of Yca1, the metacaspase homologue identified in yeast.

  6. Analysis of the secondary compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and wild yeast strains during the production of "cachaça" Análise dos componentes secundários produzidos por Saccharomyces cerevisiae e leveduras selvagens durante a produção de cachaça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Fachine Dato

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare the composition of "cachaças" produced in 10 fermentation cycles by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc and wild yeast strains [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 and Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isolated from distilleries in Jaboticabal - SP, Brazil. The secondary components of the heart fraction were determined by gas chromatography. The levels of secondary components were influenced by the wine pH, which varied among yeast strains. S. cerevisiae showed slightly more secondary components, whereas wild strains produced more higher alcohols. Wild yeast strains were shown to be adequate for the production of a high quality "cachaça".O presente trabalho visou estabelecer uma comparação entre composição de cachaças produzidas por Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc e estirpes de leveduras selvagens [Pichia silvicola (Ps, Pichia anomala 1 (Pa1, Pichia anomala 2 (Pa2 e Dekkera bruxelensis (Db], isoladas em destilarias da região de Jaboticabal-SP. Os componentes secundários da fração denominada coração foram determinados por cromatografia gasosa. Os níveis dos componentes secundários foram influenciados pelo pH dos respectivos vinhos, os quais dependem da estirpe de levedura empregada no processo fermentativo. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae apresentou valores ligeiramente superiores de componentes secundários, enquanto as estirpes selvagens produziram maiores teores de álcoois superiores. As estirpes selvagens de leveduras mostraram-se adequadas para obtenção de uma cachaça de boa qualidade.

  7. Effect of uremia on HDL composition, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild-type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Christian A; Bro, Susanne; Bartels, Emil D

    2007-01-01

    Wild-type mice normally do not develop atherosclerosis, unless fed cholic acid. Uremia is proinflammatory and increases atherosclerosis 6- to 10-fold in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. This study examined the effect of uremia on lipoproteins, vascular inflammation, and atherosclerosis in wild...... in cholic acid-fed sham mice. The results suggest that moderate uremia neither induces aortic inflammation nor atherosclerosis in C57BL/6J mice despite increased LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio and altered HDL composition....

  8. File list: Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell sacCer3 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase II Yeast... strain http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Pol.YSt.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  9. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang

    2012-04-03

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display pleiotropic developmental phenotypes. We report the identification of five new hyl1 suppressor mutants, all of which are alleles of DCL1. These new alleles affect either the helicase or the RNaseIIIa domains of DCL1, highlighting the critical functions of these domains. Biochemical analysis of the DCL1 suppressor variants reveals that they process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) more efficiently than wild-type DCL1, with both higher Kcat and lower Km values. The DCL1 variants largely rescue wild-type miRNA accumulation levels in vivo, but do not rescue the MIRNA processing precision defects of the hyl1 mutant. In vitro, the helicase domain confers ATP dependence on DCL1-catalyzed MIRNA processing, attenuates DCL1 cleavage activity, and is required for precise MIRNA processing of some substrates. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  10. Small RNA Deep Sequencing and the Effects of microRNA408 on Root Gravitropic Bending in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying; Sun, Qiao; Chen, Yu; He, Dacheng; Liu, Min

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a non-coding small RNA composed of 20 to 24 nucleotides that influences plant root development. This study analyzed the miRNA expression in Arabidopsis root tip cells using Illumina sequencing and real-time PCR before (sample 0) and 15 min after (sample 15) a 3-D clinostat rotational treatment was administered. After stimulation was performed, the expression levels of seven miRNA genes, including Arabidopsis miR160, miR161, miR394, miR402, miR403, miR408, and miR823, were significantly upregulated. Illumina sequencing results also revealed two novel miRNAsthat have not been previously reported, The target genes of these miRNAs included pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein and diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase. An overexpression vector of Arabidopsis miR408 was constructed and transferred to Arabidopsis plant. The roots of plants over expressing miR408 exhibited a slower reorientation upon gravistimulation in comparison with those of wild-type. This result indicate that miR408 could play a role in root gravitropic response.

  11. Pro-region engineering for improved yeast display and secretion of brain derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael L; Malott, Thomas M; Metcalf, Kevin J; Puguh, Arthya; Chan, Jonah R; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-03-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a promising therapeutic candidate for a variety of neurological diseases. However, it is difficult to produce as a recombinant protein. In its native mammalian context, BDNF is first produced as a pro-protein with subsequent proteolytic removal of the pro-region to yield mature BDNF protein. Therefore, in an attempt to improve yeast as a host for heterologous BDNF production, the BDNF pro-region was first evaluated for its effects on BDNF surface display and secretion. Addition of the wild-type pro-region to yeast BDNF production constructs improved BDNF folding both as a surface-displayed and secreted protein in terms of binding its natural receptors TrkB and p75, but titers remained low. Looking to further enhance the chaperone-like functions provided by the pro-region, two rounds of directed evolution were performed, yielding mutated pro-regions that further improved the display and secretion properties of BDNF. Subsequent optimization of the protease recognition site was used to control whether the produced protein was in pro- or mature BDNF forms. Taken together, we have demonstrated an effective strategy for improving BDNF compatibility with yeast protein engineering and secretion platforms. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Cisplatin cytotoxicity is dependent on mitochondrial respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhipriya Inapurapu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: To understand the role of mitochondrial respiration in cisplatin sensitivity, we have employed wild-type and mitochondrial DNA depleted Rho0 yeast cells. Materials and Methods: Wild type and Rho0 yeast cultured in fermentable and non-fermentable sugar containing media, were studied for their sensitivity against cisplatin by monitoring growth curves, oxygen consumption, pH changes in cytosol/mitochondrial compartments, reactive oxygen species production and respiratory control ratio. Results: Wild-type yeast grown on glycerol exhibited heightened sensitivity to cisplatin than yeast grown on glucose. Cisplatin (100 μM, although significantly reduced the growth of wild- type cells, only slightly altered the growth rate of Rho0 cells. Cisplatin treatment decreased both pHcyt and pHmit to a similar extent without affecting the pH difference. Cisplatin dose-dependently increased the oxidative stress in wild-type, but not in respiration-deficient Rho0 strain. Cisplatin decreased the respiratory control ratio. Conclusion: These results suggest that cisplatin toxicity is influenced by the respiratory capacity of the cells and the intracellular oxidative burden. Although cisplatin per se slightly decreased the respiration of yeast cells grown in glucose, it did not disturb the mitochondrial chemiosmotic gradient.

  13. SOURCE OF THE FITNESS DEFECT IN RIFAMYCIN-RESISTANT M. TUBERCULOSIS RNA POLYMERASE AND THE MECHANISM OF COMPENSATION BY MUTATIONS IN THE β'-SUBUNIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Maxwell A; Ugur, Fatima S; Garcia, George A

    2018-04-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a critical threat to human health due to the increased prevalence of rifampin resistance (RMP R ). Fitness defects have been observed in RMP R mutants having amino acid substitutions in the β-subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP). In clinical isolates, this fitness defect can be ameliorated by the presence of secondary mutations in the double-psi β-barrel (DPBB) domain of the β'-subunit of RNAP. To identify factors contributing to the fitness defects observed in vivo, several in vitro RNA transcription assays were utilized to probe initiation, elongation, termination, and 3' -RNA hydrolysis with the wild-type and RMP R MTB RNAPs. We found that the less prevalent RMP R mutants exhibit significantly poorer termination efficiencies relative to wild-type, an important factor for proper gene expression. We also found that several mechanistic aspects of transcription of the RMP R mutant RNAPs are impacted relative to wild-type. For the clinically most prevalent, βS450L mutant, these defects are mitigated by the presence of secondary/compensatory mutations in the DPBB domain of the β'-subunit. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Wild-type minimal inhibitory concentration distributions in bacteria of animal origin in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia L Pantozzi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profiles of indicator bacteria isolated from domestic animal feces. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by agar dilution. Interpretative criteria on the basis of wild-type MIC distributions and epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFF or ECV were used according to the 'European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing' (EUCAST data. Results from 237 isolates of Escherichia coli showed reduced susceptibility for ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline, the antimicrobials commonly used in intensive breeding of pigs and hens. Regarding all the species of the genus Enterococcus spp., there are only ECOFF or ECV for vancomycin. Of the 173 Enterococcus spp. isolated, only one showed reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and was classified as 'non-wild-type' (NWT population. This is the first report in Argentina showing data of epidemiological cutoff values in animal bacteria.

  15. Human NKCC2 cation–Cl– co-transporter complements lack of Vhc1 transporter in yeast vacuolar membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrezselyova, Silvia; Dominguez, Angel; Herynkova, Pavla; Macias, Juan F; Sychrova, Hana

    2013-10-01

    Cation–chloride co-transporters serve to transport Cl– and alkali metal cations. Whereas a large family of these exists in higher eukaryotes, yeasts only possess one cation–chloride co-transporter, Vhc1, localized to the vacuolar membrane. In this study, the human cation–chloride co-transporter NKCC2 complemented the phenotype of VHC1 deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its activity controlled the growth of salt-sensitive yeast cells in the presence of high KCl, NaCl and LiCl. A S. cerevisiae mutant lacking plasma-membrane alkali–metal cation exporters Nha1 and Ena1-5 and the vacuolar cation–chloride co-transporter Vhc1 is highly sensitive to increased concentrations of alkali–metal cations, and it proved to be a suitable model for characterizing the substrate specificity and transport activity of human wild-type and mutated cation–chloride co-transporters. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Enhanced NMR signal detection of imino protons in RNA molecules containing 3' dangling nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amborski, Andrew N.; Johnson, Philip E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for improving the quality of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra involving exchangeable protons near the base of the stem of RNA hairpin molecules. NMR spectra of five different RNA hairpins were compared. These hairpins consisted of a native RNA structure and four molecules each having different unpaired, or dangling, nucleotides at the 3' end. NMR experiments were acquired in water for each construct and the quality of the imino proton spectral regions were examined. The imino resonances near the base of the stem of the wild type RNA structure were not observed due to breathing motions. However, a significant increase in spectral quality for molecules with dangling 3' adenosine or guanosine nucleotides was observed, with imino protons detected in these constructs that were not observed in the wild type construct. A modest improvement in spectral quality was seen for the construct with a 3' unpaired uridine, whereas no significant improvement was observed for a 3' unpaired cytidine. This improvement in NMR spectral quality mirrors the increased thermodynamic stability observed for 3' unpaired nucleotides which is dependant on the stacking interactions of these nucleotides against the base of the stem. The use of a dangling 3' adenosine nucleotide represents an easy method to significantly improve the quality of NMR spectra of RNA molecules

  17. Linking maternal and somatic 5S rRNA types with different sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locati, Mauro D; Pagano, Johanna F B; Ensink, Wim A; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Zhu, Kongju; Spaink, Herman P; Girard, Geneviève; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J; Dekker, Rob J; Breit, Timo M

    2017-04-01

    5S rRNA is a ribosomal core component, transcribed from many gene copies organized in genomic repeats. Some eukaryotic species have two 5S rRNA types defined by their predominant expression in oogenesis or adult tissue. Our next-generation sequencing study on zebrafish egg, embryo, and adult tissue identified maternal-type 5S rRNA that is exclusively accumulated during oogenesis, replaced throughout the embryogenesis by a somatic-type, and thus virtually absent in adult somatic tissue. The maternal-type 5S rDNA contains several thousands of gene copies on chromosome 4 in tandem repeats with small intergenic regions, whereas the somatic-type is present in only 12 gene copies on chromosome 18 with large intergenic regions. The nine-nucleotide variation between the two 5S rRNA types likely affects TFIII binding and riboprotein L5 binding, probably leading to storage of maternal-type rRNA. Remarkably, these sequence differences are located exactly at the sequence-specific target site for genome integration by the 5S rRNA-specific Mutsu retrotransposon family. Thus, we could define maternal- and somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies. Furthermore, we identified four additional maternal-type and two new somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies, each with their own target sequence. This target-site specificity, frequently intact maternal-type retrotransposon elements, plus specific presence of Mutsu retrotransposon RNA and piRNA in egg and adult tissue, suggest an involvement of retrotransposons in achieving the differential copy number of the two types of 5S rDNA loci. © 2017 Locati et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-05-21

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised learning paradigms. However, a growing body of evidence challenges this theory, in that additional sites of plasticity appear to contribute to motor adaptation. Here, we consider phase-reversal training of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), a simple form of motor learning for which a large body of experimental data is available in wild-type and mutant mice, in which the excitability of granule cells or inhibition of Purkinje cells was affected in a cell-specific fashion. We present novel electrophysiological recordings of Purkinje cell activity measured in naive wild-type mice subjected to this VOR adaptation task. We then introduce a minimal model that consists of learning at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells with the help of the climbing fibers. Although the minimal model reproduces the behavior of the wild-type animals and is analytically tractable, it fails at reproducing the behavior of mutant mice and the electrophysiology data. Therefore, we build a detailed model involving plasticity at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells' synapse guided by climbing fibers, feedforward inhibition of Purkinje cells, and plasticity at the mossy fiber to vestibular nuclei neuron synapse. The detailed model reproduces both the behavioral and electrophysiological data of both the wild-type and mutant mice and allows for experimentally testable predictions. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/347203-13$15.00/0.

  19. Specific Silencing of L392V PSEN1 Mutant Allele by RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Sierant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi technology provides a powerful molecular tool to reduce an expression of selected genes in eukaryotic cells. Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs are the effector molecules that trigger RNAi. Here, we describe siRNAs that discriminate between the wild type and mutant (1174 C→G alleles of human Presenilin1 gene (PSEN1. This mutation, resulting in L392V PSEN1 variant, contributes to early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Using the dual fluorescence assay, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy we identified positions 8th–11th, within the central part of the antisense strand, as the most sensitive to mismatches. 2-Thiouridine chemical modification introduced at the 3′-end of the antisense strand improved the allele discrimination, but wobble base pairing adjacent to the mutation site abolished the siRNA activity. Our data indicate that siRNAs can be designed to discriminate between the wild type and mutant alleles of genes that differ by just a single nucleotide.

  20. Genomics and Biochemistry of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeast Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldarov, M A; Kishkovskaia, S A; Tanaschuk, T N; Mardanov, A V

    2016-12-01

    Saccharomyces yeasts have been used for millennia for the production of beer, wine, bread, and other fermented products. Long-term "unconscious" selection and domestication led to the selection of hundreds of strains with desired production traits having significant phenotypic and genetic differences from their wild ancestors. This review summarizes the results of recent research in deciphering the genomes of wine Saccharomyces strains, the use of comparative genomics methods to study the mechanisms of yeast genome evolution under conditions of artificial selection, and the use of genomic and postgenomic approaches to identify the molecular nature of the important characteristics of commercial wine strains of Saccharomyces. Succinctly, data concerning metagenomics of microbial communities of grapes and wine and the dynamics of yeast and bacterial flora in the course of winemaking is provided. A separate section is devoted to an overview of the physiological, genetic, and biochemical features of sherry yeast strains used to produce biologically aged wines. The goal of the review is to convince the reader of the efficacy of new genomic and postgenomic technologies as tools for developing strategies for targeted selection and creation of new strains using "classical" and modern techniques for improving winemaking technology.

  1. C-Terminal Tyrosine Residue Modifications Modulate the Protective Phosphorylation of Serine 129 of α-Synuclein in a Yeast Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinknecht, Alexandra; Popova, Blagovesta; Lázaro, Diana F; Pinho, Raquel; Valerius, Oliver; Outeiro, Tiago F; Braus, Gerhard H

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson´s disease (PD) is characterized by the presence of proteinaceous inclusions called Lewy bodies that are mainly composed of α-synuclein (αSyn). Elevated levels of oxidative or nitrative stresses have been implicated in αSyn related toxicity. Phosphorylation of αSyn on serine 129 (S129) modulates autophagic clearance of inclusions and is prominently found in Lewy bodies. The neighboring tyrosine residues Y125, Y133 and Y136 are phosphorylation and nitration sites. Using a yeast model of PD, we found that Y133 is required for protective S129 phosphorylation and for S129-independent proteasome clearance. αSyn can be nitrated and form stable covalent dimers originating from covalent crosslinking of two tyrosine residues. Nitrated tyrosine residues, but not di-tyrosine-crosslinked dimers, contributed to αSyn cytotoxicity and aggregation. Analysis of tyrosine residues involved in nitration and crosslinking revealed that the C-terminus, rather than the N-terminus of αSyn, is modified by nitration and di-tyrosine formation. The nitration level of wild-type αSyn was higher compared to that of A30P mutant that is non-toxic in yeast. A30P formed more dimers than wild-type αSyn, suggesting that dimer formation represents a cellular detoxification pathway in yeast. Deletion of the yeast flavohemoglobin gene YHB1 resulted in an increase of cellular nitrative stress and cytotoxicity leading to enhanced aggregation of A30P αSyn. Yhb1 protected yeast from A30P-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and peroxynitrite-induced nitrative stress. Strikingly, overexpression of neuroglobin, the human homolog of YHB1, protected against αSyn inclusion formation in mammalian cells. In total, our data suggest that C-terminal Y133 plays a major role in αSyn aggregate clearance by supporting the protective S129 phosphorylation for autophagy and by promoting proteasome clearance. C-terminal tyrosine nitration increases pathogenicity and can only be partially detoxified by

  2. Comparison of anti-inflammatory activity of extracts with supercritical carbon dioxide from radiation mutant perilla frutescens(L.) Britton and wild-type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Han Chul; So, Yang Kang; Kim, Jin Baek; Jin, Chang Hyun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Yuk, Hong Sun [Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In previous study, the radiation mutant Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton with a higher anti-inflammatory activity was selected. The extracts were obtained from the mutant and wildtype using a supercritical carbon dioxide technique. This study aimed to compare the antiinflammatory activities between the mutant supercritical extract (MSE) and wild-type supercritical extract (WSE). The contents of isoegomaketone (IK) of MSE and WSE were measured through an HPLC analysis. MSE contained IK contents approximately 7-fold higher than those of WSE. To compare the anti-inflammatory activities of MSE and WSE, the expression levels of the mRNA and protein of pro-inflammatory mediators were measured in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW264.7 cells. As a result, MSE inhibited the expression levels of the mRNA and protein of pro-inflammatory mediators, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) to a much greater extent than did WSE. Taken together, MSE had more IK contents and higher antiinflammatory activities than WSE. Therefore, MSE is proposed based on its therapeutic potential in the prevention of inflammatory disease.

  3. The yeast ADH7 promoter enables gene expression under pronounced translation repression caused by the combined stress of vanillin, furfural, and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yoko; Nguyen, Trinh Thi My; Izawa, Shingo

    2017-06-20

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion inhibitors such as vanillin, furfural, and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) inhibit the growth of and fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A high concentration of each fermentation inhibitor represses translation and increases non-translated mRNAs. We previously reported that the mRNAs of ADH7 and BDH2, which encode putative NADPH- and NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases, respectively, were efficiently translated even with translation repression in response to severe vanillin stress. However, the combined effects of these fermentation inhibitors on the expression of ADH7 and BDH2 remain unclear. We herein demonstrated that exposure to a combined stress of vanillin, furfural, and HMF repressed translation. The protein synthesis of Adh7, but not Bdh2 was significantly induced under combined stress conditions, even though the mRNA levels of ADH7 and BDH2 were up-regulated. Additionally, adh7Δ cells were more sensitive to the combined stress than wild-type and bdh2Δ cells. These results suggest that induction of the ADH7 expression plays a role in the tolerance to the combined stress of vanillin, furfural, and HMF. Furthermore, we succeeded in improving yeast tolerance to the combined stress by controlling the expression of ALD6 with the ADH7 promoter. Our results demonstrate that the ADH7 promoter can overcome the pronounced translation repression caused by the combined stress of vanillin, furfural, and HMF, and also suggest a new gene engineering strategy to breed robust and optimized yeasts for bioethanol production from a lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The RNA of turnip yellow mosaic virus exhibits icosahedral order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, Steven B.; Lucas, Robert W.; Greenwood, Aaron; McPherson, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Difference electron density maps, based on structure factor amplitudes and experimental phases from crystals of wild-type turnip yellow mosaic virus and those of empty capsids prepared by freeze-thawing, show a large portion of the encapsidated RNA to have an icosahedral distribution. Four unique segments of base-paired, double-helical RNA, one to two turns in length, lie between 33-A and 101-A radius and are organized about either 2-fold or 5-fold icosahedral axes. In addition, single-stranded loops of RNA invade the pentameric and hexameric capsomeres where they contact the interior capsid surface. The remaining RNA, not seen in electron density maps, must serve as connecting links between these secondary structural elements and is likely icosahedrally disordered. The distribution of RNA observed crystallographically appears to be in agreement with models based on biochemical data and secondary structural analyses

  5. Candida neustonensis sp. nov., a novel ascomycetous yeast isolated from the sea surface microlayer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin-Feng; Lee, Ching-Fu; Liu, Shiu-Mei

    2010-01-01

    A new ascomycetous yeast species, Candida neustonensis is proposed in this study based on four strains (SN92(T), SN47, SJ22, SJ25) isolated from sea surface microlayer in Taiwan. These four yeast strains were morphologically, physiologically and phylogenetically identical to each other. No sexual reproduction was observed on 5% malt extract agar, corn meal agar, V8 agar, McClary's acetate agar and potato-dextrose agar. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of the D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene places C. neustonensis as a member of the Pichia guilliermondii clade, it also reveals that the phylogenetically closest relatives of C. neustonensis are C. fukuyamaensis (4.4% divergence), C. xestobii (4.4% divergence) and P. guilliermondii (4.5% divergence). C. neustonensis also is clearly distinguished from other known species in the P. guilliermondii clade based on the results of physiology tests. From these comparison analyses, the following novel yeast species is proposed: Candida neustonensis sp. nov., with strain SN92(T) (= BCRC 23108(T) = JCM 14892(T) = CBS 11061(T)) as the type strain.

  6. Inactivation of the host lipin gene accelerates RNA virus replication through viral exploitation of the expanded endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingkai Chuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses take advantage of cellular resources, such as membranes and lipids, to assemble viral replicase complexes (VRCs that drive viral replication. The host lipins (phosphatidate phosphatases are particularly interesting because these proteins play key roles in cellular decisions about membrane biogenesis versus lipid storage. Therefore, we examined the relationship between host lipins and tombusviruses, based on yeast model host. We show that deletion of PAH1 (phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, which is the single yeast homolog of the lipin gene family of phosphatidate phosphatases, whose inactivation is responsible for proliferation and expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane, facilitates robust RNA virus replication in yeast. We document increased tombusvirus replicase activity in pah1Δ yeast due to the efficient assembly of VRCs. We show that the ER membranes generated in pah1Δ yeast is efficiently subverted by this RNA virus, thus emphasizing the connection between host lipins and RNA viruses. Thus, instead of utilizing the peroxisomal membranes as observed in wt yeast and plants, TBSV readily switches to the vastly expanded ER membranes in lipin-deficient cells to build VRCs and support increased level of viral replication. Over-expression of the Arabidopsis Pah2p in Nicotiana benthamiana decreased tombusvirus accumulation, validating that our findings are also relevant in a plant host. Over-expression of AtPah2p also inhibited the ER-based replication of another plant RNA virus, suggesting that the role of lipins in RNA virus replication might include several more eukaryotic viruses.

  7. Performance of non-conventional yeasts in co-culture with brewers’ yeast for steering ethanol and aroma production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijck, van Irma M.H.; Wolkers - Rooijackers, Judith C.M.; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing interest in new beer types has stimulated the search for approaches to extend the metabolic variation of brewers’ yeast. Therefore, we tested two approaches using non-conventional yeast to create a beer with lower ethanol content and a complex aroma bouquet. First, the mono-culture

  8. West Nile Virus and Usutu Virus Monitoring of Wild Birds in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Friederike; Fast, Christine; Reuschel, Maximilian; Müller, Kerstin; Urbaniak, Sylvia; Brandes, Florian; Schwehn, Rebekka; Groschup, Martin H.; Ziegler, Ute

    2018-01-01

    By systematically setting up a unique nation-wide wild bird surveillance network, we monitored migratory and resident birds for zoonotic arthropod-borne virus infections, such as the flaviviruses West Nile virus (WNV) and Usutu virus (USUV). More than 1900 wild bird blood samples, from 20 orders and 136 different bird species, were collected between 2014 and 2016. Samples were investigated by WNV and USUV-specific real-time polymerase chain reactions as well as by differentiating virus neutralization tests. Dead bird surveillance data, obtained from organ investigations in 2016, were also included. WNV-specific RNA was not detected, whereas four wild bird blood samples tested positive for USUV-specific RNA. Additionally, 73 USUV-positive birds were detected in the 2016 dead bird surveillance. WNV neutralizing antibodies were predominantly found in long-distance, partial and short-distance migrants, while USUV neutralizing antibodies were mainly detected in resident wild bird species, preferentially with low seroprevalences. To date, WNV-specific RNA has neither been detected in wild birds, nor in mosquitoes, thus, we conclude that WNV is not yet present in Germany. Continued wild bird and mosquito monitoring studies are essential to detect the incursion of zoonotic viruses and to allow risk assessments for zoonotic pathogens. PMID:29361762

  9. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Canine distemper virus modified live vaccine shedding for differentiation from infection with wild-type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Sanchez, Elena; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains a common cause of infectious disease in dogs, particularly in high-density housing situations such as shelters. Vaccination of all dogs against CDV is recommended at the time of admission to animal shelters and many use a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. From a diagnostic standpoint for dogs with suspected CDV infection, this is problematic because highly sensitive diagnostic real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests are able to detect MLV virus in clinical samples. Real-time PCR can be used to quantitate amount of virus shedding and can differentiate vaccine strains from wild-type strains when shedding is high. However, differentiation by quantitation is not possible in vaccinated animals during acute infection, when shedding is low and could be mistaken for low level vaccine virus shedding. While there are gel-based RT-PCR assays for differentiation of vaccine strains from field strains based on sequence differences, the sensitivity of these assays is unable to match that of the real-time RT-PCR assay currently used in the authors' laboratory. Therefore, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that detects CDV MLV vaccine strains and distinguishes them from wild-type strains based on nucleotide sequence differences, rather than the amount of viral RNA in the sample. The test is highly sensitive, with detection of as few as 5 virus genomic copies (corresponding to 10(-1) TCID(50)). Sequencing of the DNA real-time products also allows phylogenetic differentiation of the wild-type strains. This test will aid diagnosis during outbreaks of CDV in recently vaccinated animals.

  10. Quantitative analysis by next generation sequencing of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (LSK and of splenic B cells transcriptomes from wild-type and Usp3-knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Lancini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The data described here provide genome-wide expression profiles of murine primitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (LSK and of B cell populations, obtained by high throughput sequencing. Cells are derived from wild-type mice and from mice deficient for the ubiquitin-specific protease 3 (USP3; Usp3Δ/Δ. Modification of histone proteins by ubiquitin plays a crucial role in the cellular response to DNA damage (DDR (Jackson and Durocher, 2013 [1]. USP3 is a histone H2A deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB that regulates ubiquitin-dependent DDR in response to DNA double-strand breaks (Nicassio et al., 2007; Doil et al., 2008 [2,3]. Deletion of USP3 in mice increases the incidence of spontaneous tumors and affects hematopoiesis [4]. In particular, Usp3-knockout mice show progressive loss of B and T cells and decreased functional potential of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during aging. USP3-deficient cells, including HSCs, display enhanced histone ubiquitination, accumulate spontaneous DNA damage and are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation (Lancini et al., 2014 [4]. To address whether USP3 loss leads to deregulation of specific molecular pathways relevant to HSC homeostasis and/or B cell development, we have employed the RNA-sequencing technology and investigated transcriptional differences between wild-type and Usp3Δ/Δ LSK, naïve B cells or in vitro activated B cells. The data relate to the research article “Tight regulation of ubiquitin-mediated DNA damage response by USP3 preserves the functional integrity of hematopoietic stem cells” (Lancini et al., 2014 [4]. The RNA-sequencing and analysis data sets have been deposited in NCBI׳s Gene Expression Omnibus (Edgar et al., 2002 [5] and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE58495 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE58495. With this article, we present validation of the RNA-seq data set through quantitative real-time PCR and comparative analysis. Keywords: B

  11. [Mechanism of mutant induction in the ade2 gene of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts by ultraviolet rays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordenin, D A; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) at 3000 ergs/mm-2 induces ade2 mutants with a frequency about 10(-4) in wild-type haploid strains of yeast and about 10(-5) in diploid wild-type strains. UV irradiation effectively induced mitotic segregation of ade2 in the heterozygous diploid (the frequency of segregation is 6%). Interallelic complementation and localization spectra are similar for mutations induced both in haploids and diploids. The occurrence of ade2 mutants in diploids correlated with mitotic segregation of the marker his8 which is situated in the same arm of XY chromosome as ade2 is, distal to the centromere. Our data about the frequency of ade2 mutants in diploids and haploids, the frequency of ade2 mitotic segregation, mitotic segregation of other markers and genetic characteristics of ade2 mutations confirm the suggestion that the major mechanism of diploid ade2 mutants appearance is mutation in one of the two ADE2 alleles and consequent mitotic homozygotisation of mutation as a result of mitotic crossingover between ade2 and the centromere.

  12. A Coarse-Grained Biophysical Model of E. coli and Its Application to Perturbation of the rRNA Operon Copy Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, Arbel

    2009-03-01

    In this work a biophysical model of Escherichia coli is presented that predicts growth rate and an effective cellular composition from an effective, coarse-grained representation of its genome. We assume that E. coli is in a state of balanced exponential steady-state growth, growing in a temporally and spatially constant environment, rich in resources. We apply this model to a series of past measurements, where the growth rate and rRNA-to-protein ratio have been measured for seven E. coli strains with an rRNA operon copy number ranging from one to seven (the wild-type copy number). These experiments show that growth rate markedly decreases for strains with fewer than six copies. Using the model, we were able to reproduce these measurements. We show that the model that best fits these data suggests that the volume fraction of macromolecules inside E. coli is not fixed when the rRNA operon copy number is varied. Moreover, the model predicts that increasing the copy number beyond seven results in a cytoplasm densely packed with ribosomes and proteins. Assuming that under such overcrowded conditions prolonged diffusion times tend to weaken binding affinities, the model predicts that growth rate will not increase substantially beyond the wild-type growth rate, as indicated by other experiments. Our model therefore suggests that changing the rRNA operon copy number of wild-type E. coli cells growing in a constant rich environment does not substantially increase their growth rate. Other observations regarding strains with an altered rRNA operon copy number, such as nucleoid compaction and the rRNA operon feedback response, appear to be qualitatively consistent with this model. In addition, we discuss possible design principles suggested by the model and propose further experiments to test its validity.

  13. Yeast eIF4B binds to the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit and promotes mRNA recruitment through its N-terminal and internal repeat domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah E; Zhou, Fujun; Mitchell, Sarah F; Larson, Victoria S; Valasek, Leos; Hinnebusch, Alan G; Lorsch, Jon R

    2013-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)4B stimulates recruitment of mRNA to the 43S ribosomal pre-initiation complex (PIC). Yeast eIF4B (yeIF4B), shown previously to bind single-stranded (ss) RNA, consists of an N-terminal domain (NTD), predicted to be unstructured in solution; an RNA-recognition motif (RRM); an unusual domain comprised of seven imperfect repeats of 26 amino acids; and a C-terminal domain. Although the mechanism of yeIF4B action has remained obscure, most models have suggested central roles for its RRM and ssRNA-binding activity. We have dissected the functions of yeIF4B's domains and show that the RRM and its ssRNA-binding activity are dispensable in vitro and in vivo. Instead, our data indicate that the 7-repeats and NTD are the most critical domains, which mediate binding of yeIF4B to the head of the 40S ribosomal subunit via interaction with Rps20. This interaction induces structural changes in the ribosome's mRNA entry channel that could facilitate mRNA loading. We also show that yeIF4B strongly promotes productive interaction of eIF4A with the 43S•mRNA PIC in a manner required for efficient mRNA recruitment.

  14. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate-limited habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    The success of the Antarctic Dry Valley yeasts presumeably results from adaptations to multiple stresses, to low temperatures and substrate-limitation as well as prolonged resting periods enforced by low water availability. Previous investigations have suggested that the crucial stress is substrate limitation. Specific adaptations may be pinpointed by comparing the physiology of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex, the yeasts of the Tyrol Valley, with their congeners from other habitats. Progress was made in methods of isolation and definition of ecological niches, in the design of experiments in competition for limited substrate, and in establishing the relationships of the Cryptococcus vishniacii complex with other yeasts. In the course of investigating relationships, a new method for 25SrRNA homology was developed. For the first time it appears that 25SrRNA homology may reflect parallel or convergent evolution.

  15. Cellular radiation effects and hyperthermia: Cytokinetic investigations with stationary phase yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerhut, R.; Otto, F.; Oldiges, H.; Kiefer, J.

    1980-01-01

    Wild type diploid yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 211, was subjected to 250 kV X-rays or 50 0 C heat treatment for 30 min or to a combination of both. X-ray exposure took place either in air or in nitrogen. Cell number, percentage of budding cells and cell cycle progression was followed for up to 12 h post irradiation. The distribution of cell cycle stages was determined by flow cytofluorometry. All treatments cause a retardation of cell division rate. Hyperthermia leads mainly to a lengthening of G 1 , whereas X-rays arrest the cells reversibly in G 2 . The effect of the combined treatment appears to be merely additive. No selective action of hyperthermia on hypoxic cells was found. (orig.) [de

  16. Mutations affecting RNA polymerase I-stimulated exchange and rDNA recombination in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.H.; Keil, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    HOT1 is a cis-acting recombination-stimulatory sequence isolated from the rDNA repeat unit of yeast. The ability of HOT1 to stimulate mitotic exchange appears to depend on its ability to promote high levels of RNA polymerase I transcription. A qualitative colony color sectoring assay was developed to screen for trans-acting mutations that alter the activity of HOT1. Both hypo-recombination and hyper-recombination mutants were isolated. Genetic analysis of seven HOT1 recombination mutants (hrm) that decrease HOT1 activity shows that they behave as recessive nuclear mutations and belong to five linkage groups. Three of these mutations, hrm1, hrm2, and hrm3, also decrease rDNA exchange but do not alter recombination in the absence of HOT1. Another mutation, hrm4, decreases HOT1-stimulated recombination but does not affect rDNA recombination or exchange in the absence of HOT1. Two new alleles of RAD52 were also isolated using this screen. With regard to HOT1 activity, rad52 is epistatic to all four hrm mutations indicating that the products of the HRM genes and of RAD52 mediate steps in the same recombination pathway. Finding mutations that decrease both the activity of HOT1 and exchange in the rDNA supports the hypothesis that HOT1 plays a role in rDNA recombination

  17. Binding of DEAD-box helicase Dhh1 to the 5'-untranslated region of ASH1 mRNA represses localized translation of ASH1 in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianjun; Meng, Xiuhua; Li, Delin; Chen, Shaoyin; Luo, Jianmin; Zhu, Linjie; Singer, Robert H; Gu, Wei

    2017-06-09

    Local translation of specific mRNAs is regulated by dynamic changes in their subcellular localization, and these changes are due to complex mechanisms controlling cytoplasmic mRNA transport. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well suited to studying these mechanisms because many of its transcripts are transported from the mother cell to the budding daughter cell. Here, we investigated the translational control of ASH1 mRNA after transport and localization. We show that although ASH1 transcripts were translated after they reached the bud tip, some mRNAs were bound by the RNA-binding protein Puf6 and were non-polysomal. We also found that the DEAD-box helicase Dhh1 complexed with the untranslated ASH1 m