WorldWideScience

Sample records for widespread near-surface damage

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature effects on low energy near-surface cascades and surface damage in Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo; Sun, Jiangping; Guo, Xiongxiong; Zou, Xixi; Zhang, Libin; Gan, Zhiyin

    2017-06-01

    The temperature effects on near-surface cascades and surface damage in Cu(0 0 1) surface under 500 eV argon ion bombardment were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) method. In present MD model, substrate system was fully relaxed for 1 ns and a read-restart scheme was introduced to save total computation time. The temperature dependence of damage production was calculated. The evolution of near-surface cascades and spatial distribution of adatoms at varying temperature were analyzed and compared. It was found that near-surface vacancies increased with temperature, which was mainly due to the fact that more atoms initially located in top two layers became adatoms with the decrease of surface binding energy. Moreover, with the increase of temperature, displacement cascades altered from channeling-like structure to branching structure, and the length of collision sequence decreased gradually, because a larger portion of energy of primary knock-on atom (PKA) was scattered out of focused chain. Furthermore, increasing temperature reduced the anisotropy of distribution of adatoms, which can be ascribed to that regular registry of surface lattice atoms was changed with the increase of thermal vibration amplitude of surface atoms.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of temperature effects on low energy near-surface cascades and surface damage in Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Guo; Sun, Jiangping; Guo, Xiongxiong; Zou, Xixi; Zhang, Libin; Gan, Zhiyin, E-mail: ganzhiyin@126.com

    2017-06-15

    The temperature effects on near-surface cascades and surface damage in Cu(0 0 1) surface under 500 eV argon ion bombardment were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) method. In present MD model, substrate system was fully relaxed for 1 ns and a read-restart scheme was introduced to save total computation time. The temperature dependence of damage production was calculated. The evolution of near-surface cascades and spatial distribution of adatoms at varying temperature were analyzed and compared. It was found that near-surface vacancies increased with temperature, which was mainly due to the fact that more atoms initially located in top two layers became adatoms with the decrease of surface binding energy. Moreover, with the increase of temperature, displacement cascades altered from channeling-like structure to branching structure, and the length of collision sequence decreased gradually, because a larger portion of energy of primary knock-on atom (PKA) was scattered out of focused chain. Furthermore, increasing temperature reduced the anisotropy of distribution of adatoms, which can be ascribed to that regular registry of surface lattice atoms was changed with the increase of thermal vibration amplitude of surface atoms.

  3. Surface structural damage associated with longwall mining near Tuscaloosa, Alabama: a case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isphording, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    Initially the paper examines the frequency of coal mine subsidence and the influence on surface subsidence of subsurface mining methods, i.e. room and pillar and longwall mining. A case study of the subsidence damage caused to a log house near Tuscaloosa, Alabama (USA), when a longwall panel passed beneath it is presented. The damage resulted in the homeowners suing the mining company for negligence. The article discusses information provided to the plaintiffs attorneys by the author. Aspects covered are: the subsidence and damage to the property; prediction of subsidence; the monitoring of subsidence; and the prevention of subsidence. An out-of-court settlement was agreed by the two parties. 15 refs., 5 figs

  4. Manual resurfacing and trichloroacetic acid for the treatment of patients with widespread actinic damage. Clinical and histologic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, J E; Casey, D L; Kauffman, C L

    1997-05-01

    A facial resurfacing regimen combining manual abrasion of the skin and 25% trichloroacetic acid has been reported to produce excellent results, but the histologic depth of injury produced by this technique has not been studied. To describe our experience with this technique treating patients with extensive actinic damage and to determine the histologic depth of injury produced. We treated 40 patients using manual resurfacing and trichloroacetic acid, primarily for widespread actinic keratoses. Resurfacing tools included silicone carbide sandpaper, drywall screen, electrocautery tip cleaners, abrasive pads, scalpel blades, and curettes. Four patients underwent sequential biopsies to evaluate the depth of wounding using this technique. Manual resurfacing combined with trichloroacetic acid consistently produced excellent cosmetic results and nearly complete eradication of actinic keratoses. Histologically, treated areas showed replacement of the dermal elastotic band by newly formed collagen, a significantly deeper level of wounding than the Jessner's/35% trichloroacetic acid peel. There was no evidence for foreign body granulomas clinically or histologically as a result of the abrasive materials. The deeper level of this peel explains the improved cosmetic outcome and greater eradication of actinic keratoses. This treatment is particularly well suited for patients with extensive photodamage and widespread actinic keratoses.

  5. Near-surface thermal characterization of plasma facing components using the 3-omega method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechaumphai, Edward; Barton, Joseph L.; Tesmer, Joseph R.; Moon, Jaeyun; Wang, Yongqiang; Tynan, George R.; Doerner, Russell P.; Chen, Renkun

    2014-01-01

    Near-surface regime plays an important role in thermal management of plasma facing components in fusion reactors. Here, we applied a technique referred to as the ‘3ω’ method to measure the thermal conductivity of near-surface regimes damaged by ion irradiation. By modulating the frequency of the heating current in a micro-fabricated heater strip, the technique enables the probing of near-surface thermal properties. The technique was applied to measure the thermal conductivity of a thin ion-irradiated layer on a tungsten substrate, which was found to decrease by nearly 60% relative to pristine tungsten for a Cu ion dosage of 0.2 dpa

  6. Surface-structure dependence of healing radiation-damage mechanism in nanoporous tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guohua; Li, Xiangyan; Sun, Jingjing; Hao, Congyu; Xu, Yichun; Zhang, Yange; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S.

    2018-01-01

    Under nuclear fusion environments, displacement damage in tungsten (W) is usually caused by neutrons irradiation through producing large quantities of vacancies (Vs) and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs). These defects not only affect the mechanical properties of W, but also act as the trap sites for implanted hydrogen isotopes and helium. Nano-porous (NP) W with a high fraction of free surfaces has been developed to mitigate the radiation damage. However, the mechanism of the surface reducing defects accumulation is not well understood. By using multi-scale simulation methods, we investigated the interaction of the SIA and V with different surfaces on across length and time scales. We found that, at a typical operation temperature of 1000 K, surface (1 1 0) preferentially heals radiation damage of W compared with surface (1 0 0) and boundary (3 1 0). On surface (1 1 0), the diffusion barrier for the SIA is only 0.68 eV. The annihilation of the SIA-V happens via the coupled motion of the V segregation towards the surface from the bulk and the two-dimensional diffusion of the SIA on the surface. Such mechanism makes the surface (1 1 0) owe better healing capability. On surface (1 0 0), the diffusion energy barrier for the SIA is 2.48 eV, higher than the diffusion energy barrier of the V in bulk. The annihilation of the SIA-V occurs via the V segregation and recombination. The SIA was found to migrate one-dimensionally along a boundary (3 1 0) with a barrier of 0.21 eV, leading to a lower healing efficiency in the boundary. This study suggested that the on-surface process plays an important role in healing radiation damage of NP W in addition to surface-enhanced diffusion and annihilation near the surface. A certain surface structure renders nano-structured W more radiation-tolerant.

  7. DNA damage caused by UV- and near UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Much work with mutants deficient in DNA repair has been performed concerning UV-induced DNA damage under the condition where there is no artificial stimulation. In an attempt to infer the effects of solar wavelengths, the outcome of the work is discussed in terms of cellular radiation sensitivity, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and mutation induction, leading to the conclusion that some DNA damage occurs even by irradiation of the shorter wavelength light (270 - 315 nm) and is repaired by excision repair. It has been thought to date that pyrimidine dimer (PD) plays the most important role in UV-induced DNA damage, followed by (6 - 4) photoproducts. As for DNA damage induced by near UV irradiation, the yield of DNA single-strand breaks and of DNA-protein crosslinking, other than PD, is considered. The DNA-protein crosslinking has proved to be induced by irradiation at any wavelength of UV ranging from 260 to 425 nm. Near UV irradiation causes the inhibition of cell proliferation to take place. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Micro- and nano-scale damage on the surface of W divertor component during exposure to high heat flux loads with He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.; Greuner, H.; Zhao, S.X.; Böswirth, B.; Luo, G.N.; Zhou, X.; Jia, Y.Z.; Liu, X.; Liu, W.

    2015-01-01

    Micro- and nano-scale surface damage on a W divertor component sample exposed to high heat flux loads generated with He atoms has been investigated through SEM, EBSD, AFM and FIB-SEM. The component sample was supplied by the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) and AT&M company, China, and the loading experiment was performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP Garching, Germany. Two typical damage structures were observed on the surface: the first one is characterized by obvious blisters and some grooves formed from ruptured blisters, and the other one is a kind of porous structure accompanying with at least ∼25 nm surface material loss. As the grain orientation is further away from , the damage morphology gradually changes from the former structure to the latter. The possible damage mechanism is discussed. - Highlights: • Two damage structures were observed on W component surface under He beam heating. • Blistering was more obvious in near grains. • Porous structure appeared in the grains away from . • A loose layer caused by He aggregation was formed in near-surface region.

  9. Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Gibson, Tracy; Lane, John; Medelius, Pedro; Snyder, Sarah; Ciarlariello, Dan; Parks, Steve; Carrejo, Danny; Rojdev, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The Flat Surface Damage Detection system (FSDDS} is a sensory system that is capable of detecting impact damages to surfaces utilizing a novel sensor system. This system will provide the ability to monitor the integrity of an inflatable habitat during in situ system health monitoring. The system consists of three main custom designed subsystems: the multi-layer sensing panel, the embedded monitoring system, and the graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI LABVIEW software uses a custom developed damage detection algorithm to determine the damage location based on the sequence of broken sensing lines. It estimates the damage size, the maximum depth, and plots the damage location on a graph. Successfully demonstrated as a stand alone technology during 2011 D-RATS. Software modification also allowed for communication with HDU avionics crew display which was demonstrated remotely (KSC to JSC} during 2012 integration testing. Integrated FSDDS system and stand alone multi-panel systems were demonstrated remotely and at JSC, Mission Operations Test using Space Network Research Federation (SNRF} network in 2012. FY13, FSDDS multi-panel integration with JSC and SNRF network Technology can allow for integration with other complementary damage detection systems.

  10. Near-surface monitoring strategies for geologic carbon dioxide storage verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hepple, Robert P.

    2003-10-31

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage verification will be needed to ensure that CO{sub 2} is not leaking from the intended storage formation and seeping out of the ground. Because the ultimate failure of geologic CO{sub 2} storage occurs when CO{sub 2} seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, and because elevated concentrations of CO{sub 2} near the ground surface can cause health, safety, and environmental risks, monitoring will need to be carried out in the near-surface environment. The detection of a CO{sub 2} leakage or seepage signal (LOSS) in the near-surface environment is challenging because there are large natural variations in CO{sub 2} concentrations and fluxes arising from soil, plant, and subsurface processes. The term leakage refers to CO{sub 2} migration away from the intended storage site, while seepage is defined as CO{sub 2} passing from one medium to another, for example across the ground surface. The flow and transport of CO{sub 2} at high concentrations in the near-surface environment will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of leakage and seepage show that CO{sub 2} concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively modest CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. However, once CO{sub 2} seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO{sub 2} seepage. In natural ecological systems with no CO{sub 2} LOSS, near-surface CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations are controlled by CO{sub 2} uptake by photosynthesis, and production by root respiration, organic carbon biodegradation in soil, deep outgassing of CO{sub 2}, and by exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Existing technologies available for monitoring CO{sub 2} in the near-surface environment

  11. Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, B.; Torres-Vidal, C.

    2002-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated research program ''Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities'' (ISAM) has developed improved safety assessment methodology for near surface disposal facilities. The program has been underway for three years and has included around 75 active participants from 40 countries. It has also provided examples for application to three safety cases--vault, Radon type and borehole radioactive waste disposal facilities. The program has served as an excellent forum for exchange of information and good practices on safety assessment approaches and methodologies used worldwide. It also provided an opportunity for reaching broad consensus on the safety assessment methodologies to be applied to near surface low and intermediate level waste repositories. The methodology has found widespread acceptance and the need for its application on real waste disposal facilities has been clearly identified. The ISAM was finalized by the end of 2000, working material documents are available and an IAEA report will be published in 2002 summarizing the work performed during the three years of the program. The outcome of the ISAM program provides a sound basis for moving forward to a new IAEA program, which will focus on practical application of the safety assessment methodologies to different purposes, such as licensing radioactive waste repositories, development of design concepts, upgrading existing facilities, reassessment of operating repositories, etc. The new program will also provide an opportunity for development of guidance on application of the methodology that will be of assistance to both safety assessors and regulators

  12. Postmortem near surface analysis of beryllium limiter tiles from ISX-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuhr, R.A.

    1985-11-01

    Beryllium is a promising material for plasma-side components in magnetic confinement fusion devices and is being considered for possible use in the Joint European Torus (JET). In order to test beryllium as a limiter material, a collaborative JET/ISX-B experiment was carried out in which the ISX-B tokamak was operated for more than 4000 discharges with a beryllium limiter. At the end of the test period the limiter was removed and the composition of the near-surface region of selected tiles was analyzed as a function of position by Rutherford backscattering. The amount of deuterium retained near the surface was measured by nuclear reaction analysis. Chromium, iron, and nickel were the dominant metallic impurities in the surface with a combined concentration on the order of 10 16 cm -2 . Oxygen surface coverages were generally in the mid-10 16 cm -2 range. A consistent trend in the impurity data was that heavily damaged or melted areas generally incorporated more impurities. The amounts of deuterium trapped in the tiles ranged from 1 to 5 x 10 17 cm -2 over all of the surfaces exposed to the plasma. No deuterium was detectable on surfaces (the protected sides) not directly exposed to the plasma

  13. Distribution of near-surface permafrost in Alaska: estimates of present and future conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Nield, Shawn J.; Johnson, Kristofer D.; Finley, Andrew O.

    2015-01-01

    High-latitude regions are experiencing rapid and extensive changes in ecosystem composition and function as the result of increases in average air temperature. Increasing air temperatures have led to widespread thawing and degradation of permafrost, which in turn has affected ecosystems, socioeconomics, and the carbon cycle of high latitudes. Here we overcome complex interactions among surface and subsurface conditions to map nearsurface permafrost through decision and regression tree approaches that statistically and spatially extend field observations using remotely sensed imagery, climatic data, and thematic maps of a wide range of surface and subsurface biophysical characteristics. The data fusion approach generated medium-resolution (30-m pixels) maps of near-surface (within 1 m) permafrost, active-layer thickness, and associated uncertainty estimates throughout mainland Alaska. Our calibrated models (overall test accuracy of ~85%) were used to quantify changes in permafrost distribution under varying future climate scenarios assuming no other changes in biophysical factors. Models indicate that near-surface permafrost underlies 38% of mainland Alaska and that near-surface permafrost will disappear on 16 to 24% of the landscape by the end of the 21st Century. Simulations suggest that near-surface permafrost degradation is more probable in central regions of Alaska than more northerly regions. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for potential remobilization of frozen soil carbon pools under warmer temperatures. Additionally, warmer and drier conditions may increase fire activity and severity, which may exacerbate rates of permafrost thaw and carbon remobilization relative to climate alone. The mapping of permafrost distribution across Alaska is important for land-use planning, environmental assessments, and a wide-array of geophysical studies.

  14. Mining-induced surface damage and the study of countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Jixian

    1994-01-01

    Coal constitutes China's major energy resource. The majority of the coal is produced from underground mining operations. Surface subsidence may amount to 80% of the thickness of the seam mined, while the subsided volume is around 60% of the mined volume underground. An area of 20 hectares of land will be affected with each 1 million tons of coal mined, thereby causing severe surface damage. Following a description of the characteristics of surface damages due to underground mining disturbance, this paper elaborates on the damage prediction method, standards applied for evaluating the damages experienced by surface buildings, land reclamation methods in subsided area, measures for reinforcing and protecting buildings in mining-affected areas, and performance of antideformation buildings

  15. Laser-induced damage of fused silica at 355 and 1065 nm initiated at aluminum contamination particles on the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genin, F.Y.; Michlitsch, K.; Furr, J.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Krulevitch, P.

    1997-01-01

    1-μm thick circular dots, 10-250 μm dia, were deposited onto 1.14 cm thick fused silica windows by sputtering Al through a mask. Al shavings were also deposited on the windows to investigate effects of particle-substrate adhesion. The silica windows were then illuminated repetitively using a 3-ns, 355 nm and an 8.6-ns, 1064 nm laser. The tests were conducted at near normal incidence with particles on input and output surfaces of the windows. During the first shot, a plasma ignited at the metal particle and damage initiated on the fused silica surface. The morphology of the damage at the metal dots were reproducible but different for input and output surface contamination. For input surface contamination, minor damage occurred where the particle was located; such damage ceased to grow with the removal of contaminant material. More serious damage (pits and cracks) was initiated on the output surface (especially at 355 nm) and grew to catastrophic proportions after few shots. Output surface contaminants were usually ejected on the initial shot, leaving a wave pattern on the surface. No further damage occurred with subsequent shots unless a shot (usually the first shot) cracked the surface; such behavior was mostly observed at 355 nm and occasionally for large shavings at 1064 nm. The size of the damaged area scaled with the size of the particle (except when catastrophic damage occurred). Onset of catastrophic damage on output surface occurred only when particles exceeded a critical size. Damage behavior of the sputtered dots was found to be qualitatively similar to that of the shavings. The artificial contamination technique accelerated the study by allowing better control of the test conditions

  16. Arcing and surface damage in DITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodall, D.H.J.; McCracken, G.M.

    1977-11-01

    An investigation into the arcing damage on surfaces exposed to plasmas in the DITE tokamak is described. It has been found that arcing occurs on the fixed limiters, on probes inserted into the plasma and on parts of the torus structure. For surfaces parallel to the toroidal field most of the arcs run across the surface orthogonal to the field direction. Observations in the scanning electron microscope show that the arc tracks are formed by a series of melted craters characteristic of cathode arc spots. The amount of metal removed from the surface is consistent with the concentration of metal observed in the plasma. In plasmas with hydrogen gas puffing during the discharge or with injection of low Z impurities, the arc tracks are observed to be much shallower than in normal low density discharges. Several types of surface damage other than arc tracks have also been observed on probes. These phenomena occur less frequently than arcing and appear to be associated with abnormal discharge conditions. (author)

  17. He-ion and self-atom induced damage and surface-morphology changes of a hot W target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F W; Hijazi, H; Bannister, M E; Dadras, J; Krstic, P S; Meyer, H M III; Parish, C M

    2014-01-01

    We report results of measurements on the evolution of the surface morphology of a hot tungsten surface due to impacting low-energy (80–12 000 eV) He ions and of simulations of damage caused by cumulative bombardment of 1 and 10 keV W self-atoms. The measurements were performed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility, while the simulations were done at the Kraken supercomputing facility of the University of Tennessee. At 1 keV, the simulations show strong defect-recombination effects that lead to a saturation of the total defect number after a few hundred impacts, while sputtering leads to an imbalance of the vacancy and interstitial number. On the experimental side, surface morphology changes were investigated over a broad range of fluences, energies and temperatures for both virgin and pre-damaged W-targets. At the lowest accumulated fluences, small surface-grain features and near-surface He bubbles are observed. At the largest fluences, individual grain characteristics disappear in focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) scans, and the entire surface is covered by a multitude of near-surface bubbles with a broad range of sizes, and disordered whisker growth, while in top-down SEM imaging the surface is virtually indistinguishable from the nano-fuzz produced on linear plasma devices. These features are evident at progressively lower fluences as the He-ion energy is increased. (paper)

  18. Bacterial Cell Surface Damage Due to Centrifugal Compaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Brandon W.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Centrifugal damage has been known to alter bacterial cell surface properties and interior structures, including DNA. Very few studies exist on bacterial damage caused by centrifugation because of the difficulty in relating centrifugation speed and container geometry to the damage caused. Here, we

  19. Duplex sonography of the near-surface leg veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, E.

    2007-01-01

    The book contains the following contributions: The ultrasonograph, selection of the ultrasonic transducer, anatomy of the near-surface vein system, physiology of the near-surface vein system, varicose status classification, systematics of the duplex sonography of near-surface leg veins, provocational maneuver for the duplex sonographic varicose diagnostics, exploration of vena saphena parva, perforans veins, side branches, phlebitis, sonography for varicose therapy, postsurgical sonography, deep leg veins, examination of near-surface leg veins for the pathology of the deep vein system, differential diagnostic clarification of leg oedema from the phlebologic-lymphological view, diagnostic side features along the near-surface leg veins

  20. Near-surface land disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittel, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Handbook provides a comprehensive, systematic treatment of nuclear waste management. Near-Surface Land Disposal, the first volume, is a primary and secondary reference for the technical community. To those unfamiliar with the field, it provides a bridge to a wealth of technical information, presenting the technology associated with the near-surface disposal of low or intermediate level wastes. Coverage ranges from incipient planning to site closure and subsequent monitoring. The book discusses the importance of a systems approach during the design of new disposal facilities so that performance objectives can be achieved; gives an overview of the radioactive wastes cosigned to near-surface disposal; addresses procedures for screening and selecting sites; and emphasizes the importance of characterizing sites and obtaining reliable geologic and hydrologic data. The planning essential to the development of particular sites (land acquisition, access, layout, surface water management, capital costs, etc.) is considered, and site operations (waste receiving, inspection, emplacement, closure, stabilization, etc.) are reviewed. In addition, the book presents concepts for improved confinement of waste, important aspects of establishing a monitoring program at the disposal facility, and corrective actions available after closure to minimize release. Two analytical techniques for evaluating alternative technologies are presented. Nontechnical issues surrounding disposal, including the difficulties of public acceptance are discussed. A glossary of technical terms is included

  1. Dust Dynamics Near Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Joshua; Hughes, Anna; Grund, Chris

    Observations of a lunar "horizon glow" by several Surveyor spacecraft in the 1960s opened the study of the dynamics of charged dust particles near planetary surfaces. The surfaces of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies in the solar system (asteroids, and other moons) are directly exposed to the solar wind and ionizing solar ultraviolet radiation, resulting in a time-dependent electric surface potential. Because these same objects are also exposed to bombardment by micrometeoroids, the surfaces are usually characterized by a power-law size distribution of dust that extends to sub-micron-sized particles. Individual particles can acquire a charge different from their surroundings leading to electrostatic levitation. Once levitated, particles may simply return to the surface on nearly ballistic trajectories, escape entirely from the moon or asteroid if the initial velocity is large, or in some cases be stably levitated for extended periods of time. All three outcomes have observable consequences. Furthermore, the behavior of charged dust near the surface has practical implications for planned future manned and unmanned activities on the lunar surface. Charged dust particles also act as sensitive probes of the near-surface plasma environment. Recent numerical modeling of dust levitation and transport show that charged micron-sized dust is likely to accumulate in topographic lows such as craters, providing a mechanism for the creation of dust "ponds" observed on the asteroid 433 Eros. Such deposition can occur when particles are supported by the photoelectron sheath above the dayside and drift over shadowed regions of craters where the surface potential is much smaller. Earlier studies of the lunar horizon glow are consistent with those particles being on simple ballistic trajectories following electrostatic launching from the surface. Smaller particles may be accelerated from the lunar surface to high altitudes consistent with observations of high altitude

  2. Thermal healing of the sub-surface damage layer in sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkas, Malki; Lotem, Haim; Golan, Yuval; Einav, Yeheskel; Golan, Roxana; Chakotay, Elad; Haim, Avivit; Sinai, Ela; Vaknin, Moshe; Hershkovitz, Yasmin; Horowitz, Atara

    2010-01-01

    The sub-surface damage layer formed by mechanical polishing of sapphire is known to reduce the mechanical strength of the processed sapphire and to degrade the performance of sapphire based components. Thermal annealing is one of the methods to eliminate the sub-surface damage layer. This study focuses on the mechanism of thermal healing by studying its effect on surface topography of a- and c-plane surfaces, on the residual stresses in surface layers and on the thickness of the sub-surface damage layer. An atomically flat surface was developed on thermally annealed c-plane surfaces while a faceted roof-top topography was formed on a-plane surfaces. The annealing resulted in an improved crystallographic perfection close to the sample surface as was indicated by a noticeable decrease in X-ray rocking curve peak width. Etching experiments and surface roughness measurements using white light interferometry with sub-nanometer resolution on specimens annealed to different extents indicate that the sub-surface damage layer of the optically polished sapphire is less than 3 μm thick and it is totally healed after thermal treatment at 1450 deg. C for 72 h.

  3. Modeling of laser damage initiated by surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Faux, D.R.; Riddle, R.A.; Shapiro, A.; Eder, D.C.; Penetrante, B.M.; Milam, D.; Genin, F.Y.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1996-11-01

    The authors are engaged in a comprehensive effort to understand and model the initiation and growth of laser damage initiated by surface contaminants. This includes, for example, the initial absorption by the contaminant, heating and plasma generation, pressure and thermal loading of the transparent substrate, and subsequent shockwave propagation, 'splashing' of molten material and possible spallation, optical propagation and scattering, and treatment of material fracture. The integration use of large radiation hydrodynamics codes, optical propagation codes and material strength codes enables a comprehensive view of the damage process The following picture of surface contaminant initiated laser damage is emerging from our simulations

  4. Positron annihilation near fractal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, C.W.; Deng, K.M.; Xiong, L.Y.

    1991-07-01

    A model for positron annihilation in the sub-surface region near a fractal surface is proposed. It is found that the power law relationship between the mean positron implantation depth and incident positron energy can be used to measure the fractal dimension of the fractal surface in materials. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs

  5. Surface damage characterization of FBK devices for High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatelli, F.; Passeri, D.; Morozzi, A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Mattiazzo, S.; Bomben, M.; Bilei, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    The very high fluences (e.g. up to 2×1016 1 MeV neq/cm2) and total ionising doses (TID) of the order of 1 Grad, expected at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), impose new challenges for the design of effective, radiation resistant detectors. Ionising energy loss is the dominant effect for what concerns SiO2 and SiO2/Si interface radiation damage. In particular, surface damage can create a positive charge layer near the SiO2/Si interface and interface traps along the SiO2/Si interface, which strongly influence the breakdown voltage, the inter-electrode isolation and capacitance, and might also impact the charge collection properties of silicon sensors. To better understand in a comprehensive framework the complex and articulated phenomena related to surface damage at these very high doses, measurements on test structures have been carried out in this work (e.g. C-V and I-V). In particular, we have studied the properties of the SiO2 layer and of the SiO2/Si interface, using MOS capacitors, gated diodes (GD) and MOSFETs manufactured by FBK on high-resistivity n-type and p-type silicon, before and after irradiation with X-rays in the range from 50 krad(SiO2) to 20 Mrad(SiO2). Relevant parameters have been determined for all the tested devices, converging in the oxide charge density NOX, the surface generation velocity s0 and the integrated interface-trap density NIT dose-dependent values. These parameters have been extracted to both characterize the technology as a function of the dose and to be used in TCAD simulations for the surface damage effect modeling and the analysis and optimization of different classes of detectors for the next HEP experiments.

  6. Widespread ground motion distribution caused by rupture directivity during the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koketsu, Kazuki; Miyake, Hiroe; Guo, Yujia; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Masuda, Tetsu; Davuluri, Srinagesh; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Adhikari, Lok Bijaya; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2016-06-01

    The ground motion and damage caused by the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake can be characterized by their widespread distributions to the east. Evidence from strong ground motions, regional acceleration duration, and teleseismic waveforms indicate that rupture directivity contributed significantly to these distributions. This phenomenon has been thought to occur only if a strike-slip or dip-slip rupture propagates to a site in the along-strike or updip direction, respectively. However, even though the earthquake was a dip-slip faulting event and its source fault strike was nearly eastward, evidence for rupture directivity is found in the eastward direction. Here, we explore the reasons for this apparent inconsistency by performing a joint source inversion of seismic and geodetic datasets, and conducting ground motion simulations. The results indicate that the earthquake occurred on the underthrusting Indian lithosphere, with a low dip angle, and that the fault rupture propagated in the along-strike direction at a velocity just slightly below the S-wave velocity. This low dip angle and fast rupture velocity produced rupture directivity in the along-strike direction, which caused widespread ground motion distribution and significant damage extending far eastwards, from central Nepal to Mount Everest.

  7. Inverting near-surface models from virtual-source gathers (SM Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigrok, Elmer; Vossen, Caron; Paulssen, Hanneke

    2017-04-01

    The Groningen gas field is a massive natural gas accumulation in the north-east of the Netherlands. Decades of production have led to significant compaction of the reservoir rock. The (differential) compaction is thought to have reactivated existing faults and to be the main driver of induced seismicity. The potential damage at the surface is largely affected by the state of the near surface. Thin and soft sedimentary layers can lead to large amplifications. By measuring the wavefield at different depth levels, near-surface properties can directly be estimated from the recordings. Seismicity in the Groningen area is monitored primarily with an array of vertical arrays. In the nineties a network of 8 boreholes was deployed. Since 2015, this network has been expanded with 70 new boreholes. Each new borehole consists of an accelerometer at the surface and four downhole geophones with a vertical spacing of 50 m. We apply seismic interferometry to local seismicity, for each borehole individually. Doing so, we obtain the responses as if there were virtual sources at the lowest geophones and receivers at the other depth levels. From the retrieved direct waves and reflections, we invert for P- & S- velocity and Q models. We discuss different implementations of seismic interferometry and the subsequent inversion. The inverted near-surface properties are used to improve both the source location and the hazard assessment.

  8. Continuum damage mechanics method for fatigue growth of surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xiqiao; He Shuyan

    1997-01-01

    With the background of leak-before-break (LBB) analysis of pressurized vessels and pipes in nuclear plants, the fatigue growth problem of either circumferential or longitudinal semi-elliptical surface cracks subjected to cyclic loading is studied by using a continuum damage mechanics method. The fatigue damage is described by a scalar damage variable. From the damage evolution equation at the crack tip, a crack growth equation similar to famous Paris' formula is derived, which shows the physical meaning of Paris' formula. Thereby, a continuum damage mechanics approach is developed to analyze the configuration evolution of surface cracks during fatigue growth

  9. Low surface damage dry etched black silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym M.; Gaudig, Maria; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Lindhard, Jonas Michael; Hirsch, Jens; Lausch, Dominik; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Stamate, Eugen; Hansen, Ole

    2017-10-01

    Black silicon (bSi) is promising for integration into silicon solar cell fabrication flow due to its excellent light trapping and low reflectance, and a continuously improving passivation. However, intensive ion bombardment during the reactive ion etching used to fabricate bSi induces surface damage that causes significant recombination. Here, we present a process optimization strategy for bSi, where surface damage is reduced and surface passivation is improved while excellent light trapping and low reflectance are maintained. We demonstrate that reduction of the capacitively coupled plasma power, during reactive ion etching at non-cryogenic temperature (-20 °C), preserves the reflectivity below 1% and improves the effective minority carrier lifetime due to reduced ion energy. We investigate the effect of the etching process on the surface morphology, light trapping, reflectance, transmittance, and effective lifetime of bSi. Additional surface passivation using atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 significantly improves the effective lifetime. For n-type wafers, the lifetime reaches 12 ms for polished and 7.5 ms for bSi surfaces. For p-type wafers, the lifetime reaches 800 μs for both polished and bSi surfaces.

  10. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han; Guo, Bowen; Hanafy, Sherif; Lin, Fan-Chi; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps

  11. Impact damage reduction by structured surface geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Fedorov, Vladimir; McGugan, Malcolm

    2018-01-01

    performance was observed for polyurethane-coated fibre composites with structured geometries at the back surfaces. Repeated impacts by rubber balls on the coated side caused damage and delamination of the coating. The laminates with structured back surfaces showed longer durability than those with a flat back...

  12. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that near-surface heterogeneities can be imaged by natural migration of backscattered surface waves in common shot gathers. No velocity model is required because the data are migrated onto surface points with the virtual Green

  13. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1978-11-01

    The potential seismic risk for an underground nuclear waste repository will be one of the considerations in evaluating its ultimate location. However, the risk to subsurface facilities cannot be judged by applying intensity ratings derived from the surface effects of an earthquake. A literature review and analysis were performed to document the damage and non-damage due to earthquakes to underground facilities. Damage from earthquakes to tunnels, s, and wells and damage (rock bursts) from mining operations were investigated. Damage from documented nuclear events was also included in the study where applicable. There are very few data on damage in the subsurface due to earthquakes. This fact itself attests to the lessened effect of earthquakes in the subsurface because mines exist in areas where strong earthquakes have done extensive surface damage. More damage is reported in shallow tunnels near the surface than in deep mines. In mines and tunnels, large displacements occur primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures or at the surface entrance to these facilities.Data indicate vertical structures such as wells and shafts are less susceptible to damage than surface facilities. More analysis is required before seismic criteria can be formulated for the siting of a nuclear waste repository

  14. Strategies for Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems by Near-Surface Gas Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2004-12-15

    the near-surface environment include (1) the infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) for measurement of concentrations at point locations, (2) the accumulation chamber (AC) method for measuring soil CO2 fluxes at point locations, (3) the eddy covariance (EC) method for measuring net CO2 flux over a given area, (4) hyperspectral imaging of vegetative stress resulting from elevated CO2 concentrations, and (5) light detection and ranging (LIDAR) that can measure CO2 concentrations over an integrated path. Technologies currently in developmental stages that have the potential to be used for CO2 monitoring include tunable lasers for long distance integrated concentration measurements and micro-electronic mechanical systems (MEMS) that can make widespread point measurements. To address the challenge of detecting potentially small-magnitude geothermal CO2 emissions within the natural background variability of CO2, we propose an approach that integrates available detection and monitoring methodologies with statistical analysis and modeling strategies. Within the area targeted for geothermal exploration, point measurements of soil CO2 fluxes and concentrations using the AC method and a portable IRGA, respectively, and measurements of net surface flux using EC should be made. Also, the natural spatial and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes and subsurface CO2 concentrations should be quantified within a background area with similar geologic, climatic, and ecosystem characteristics to the area targeted for geothermal exploration. Statistical analyses of data collected from both areas should be used to guide sampling strategy, discern spatial patterns that may be indicative of geothermal CO2 emissions, and assess the presence (or absence) of geothermal CO2 within the natural background variability with a desired confidence level. Once measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes have been determined to be of anomalous geothermal origin with high confidence, more expensive vertical

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy for detection of hailstorm damage on olive fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid, robust, unbiased and inexpensive discriminant method capable of classifying olive fruit (Olea europaea L.) on the basis of the presence of hailstorm damage is economically important to the olive oil milling industry. Thus, in the present study, the feasibility of Near-Infrared (NIR) spectro...

  16. Erosion of surface and near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    A literature search was undertaken to identify existing data and analytical procedures regarding the processes of gully erosion. The applicability of the available information to the problems of gully erosion potential at surface and near surface disposal sites is evaluated. It is concluded that the existing knowledge regarding gully erosion is insufficient to develop procedures to ensure the long-term stability of disposal sites. Recommendations for further research are presented. 46 refs

  17. Spin properties of dense near-surface ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetienne, J.-P.; de Gille, R. W.; Broadway, D. A.; Teraji, T.; Lillie, S. E.; McCoey, J. M.; Dontschuk, N.; Hall, L. T.; Stacey, A.; Simpson, D. A.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of the spin properties of dense layers of near-surface nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond created by nitrogen ion implantation. The optically detected magnetic resonance contrast and linewidth, spin coherence time, and spin relaxation time, are measured as a function of implantation energy, dose, annealing temperature, and surface treatment. To track the presence of damage and surface-related spin defects, we perform in situ electron spin resonance spectroscopy through both double electron-electron resonance and cross-relaxation spectroscopy on the NV centers. We find that, for the energy (4 -30 keV) and dose (5 ×1011-1013ions/cm 2 ) ranges considered, the NV spin properties are mainly governed by the dose via residual implantation-induced paramagnetic defects, but that the resulting magnetic sensitivity is essentially independent of both dose and energy. We then show that the magnetic sensitivity is significantly improved by high-temperature annealing at ≥1100 ∘C . Moreover, the spin properties are not significantly affected by oxygen annealing, apart from the spin relaxation time, which is dramatically decreased. Finally, the average NV depth is determined by nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, giving ≈10 -17 nm at 4-6 keV implantation energy. This study sheds light on the optimal conditions to create dense layers of near-surface NV centers for high-sensitivity sensing and imaging applications.

  18. Office buildings and energy from the environment. Cooling and heating using near-surface geothermal energy; Buerogebaeude und Umweltenergie. Kuehlen und Heizen mit oberflaechennaher Geothermie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohne, Dirk; Harhausen, Gunnar; Wohlfahrt, Matthias [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Entwerfen und Konstruieren

    2009-07-01

    Increasing energy prices, uncertainties relating to imported energy and the first signs of an impending global climate change have enhanced interest in renewable energy sources, whose wide-spread use is receiving much public interest. Three scientists of the Institute of Design and Construction of Leibniz University Hanover investigated the application of near-surface geothermal energy for heating and cooling of buildings. (orig.)

  19. Laser-based structural sensing and surface damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldur, Burcu

    Damage due to age or accumulated damage from hazards on existing structures poses a worldwide problem. In order to evaluate the current status of aging, deteriorating and damaged structures, it is vital to accurately assess the present conditions. It is possible to capture the in situ condition of structures by using laser scanners that create dense three-dimensional point clouds. This research investigates the use of high resolution three-dimensional terrestrial laser scanners with image capturing abilities as tools to capture geometric range data of complex scenes for structural engineering applications. Laser scanning technology is continuously improving, with commonly available scanners now capturing over 1,000,000 texture-mapped points per second with an accuracy of ~2 mm. However, automatically extracting meaningful information from point clouds remains a challenge, and the current state-of-the-art requires significant user interaction. The first objective of this research is to use widely accepted point cloud processing steps such as registration, feature extraction, segmentation, surface fitting and object detection to divide laser scanner data into meaningful object clusters and then apply several damage detection methods to these clusters. This required establishing a process for extracting important information from raw laser-scanned data sets such as the location, orientation and size of objects in a scanned region, and location of damaged regions on a structure. For this purpose, first a methodology for processing range data to identify objects in a scene is presented and then, once the objects from model library are correctly detected and fitted into the captured point cloud, these fitted objects are compared with the as-is point cloud of the investigated object to locate defects on the structure. The algorithms are demonstrated on synthetic scenes and validated on range data collected from test specimens and test-bed bridges. The second objective of

  20. ISLSCP II Reanalysis Near-Surface Meteorology Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set for the ISLSCP Initiative II data collection provides near surface meteorological variables, fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum at the surface, and...

  1. Quantum field theory near surfaces of discontinuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, H.T.

    1981-01-01

    This work deals with the problem of a quantized scalar field propagating near a surface of discontinuity. The proper time formalism is employed to express the Green's function and stress tensor as proper time integrals of a transformation function. The transformation function is calculated by a WKB approximation which exhibits the essential singularities generated by the high frequency behavior of waves propagating near the surface. Two singularities are present, the usual direct singularity and an additional reflected singularity generated by the high frequency behavior of waves reflected by the discontinuity. The stress tensor is calculated by dimensional continuation. The results are employed to analyze energy generated by the surface

  2. Technology and economics of near-surface geothermal resources exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Э. И. Богуславский

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents economic justification for applicability of near-surface geothermal installations in Luga region, based on results of techno-economic calculations as well as integrated technical and economic comparison of different prediction scenarios of heat supply, both conventional and using geothermal heat pumps (GHP. Construction costs of a near-surface geothermal system can exceed the costs of central heating by 50-100 %. However, operation and maintenance (O&M costs of heat production for geothermal systems are 50-70 % lower than for conventional sources of heating. Currently this technology is very important, it is applied in various countries (USA, Germany, Japan, China etc., and depending on the region both near-surface and deep boreholes are being used. World practice of near-surface geothermal systems application is reviewed in the paper.

  3. Role of marble microstructure in near-infrared laser-induced damage during laser cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Elert, Kerstin; Sebastian, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    When marble is cleaned by nanosecond neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers (1064 nm), strongly absorbing surface contaminants are removed at fluences substantially below the damage threshold for the much less absorptive marble substrate. Recent studies have shown, however, that unacceptable roughening of the marble surface also may occur at low fluences due to removal of individual grains. In order to elucidate this effect, we have compared the low-fluence response of marbles with two different grain sizes and single-crystal calcite, in the fluence range 0.12-1.25 J cm-2. Damage was greater in fine-grained than coarse-grained marble, and did not occur in the single-crystal calcite at these fluences. The temperature rise following defect-mediated absorption triggers thermal plasma emission and generates shock waves; the concomitant surface damage depends on the size and crystallographic orientation of the crystals. Laser irradiation anneals the defects and increases ''crystallite size.'' The implications for the laser-assisted cleaning of marble artworks are outlined

  4. Assessment of mitochondrial DNA damage in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) collected near a mercury-contaminated river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; White, Carl; Perkins, Christopher R.; Schmerfeld, John J.; Yates, David

    2014-01-01

    Historical discharges of Hg into the South River near the town of Waynesboro, VA, USA, have resulted in persistently elevated Hg concentrations in sediment, surface water, ground water, soil, and wildlife downstream of the discharge site. In the present study, we examined mercury (Hg) levels in in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) from this location and assessed the utility of a non-destructively collected tissue sample (wing punch) for determining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in Hg exposed bats. Bats captured 1 and 3 km from the South River, exhibited significantly higher levels of total Hg (THg) in blood and fur than those from the reference location. We compared levels of mtDNA damage using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of two distinct regions of mtDNA. Genotoxicity is among the many known toxic effects of Hg, resulting from direct interactions with DNA or from oxidative damage. Because it lacks many of the protective protein structures and repair mechanisms associated with nuclear DNA, mtDNA is more sensitive to the effects of genotoxic chemicals and therefore may be a useful biomarker in chronically exposed organisms. Significantly higher levels of damage were observed in both regions of mtDNA in bats captured 3 km from the river than in controls. However, levels of mtDNA damage exhibited weak correlations with fur and blood THg levels, suggesting that other factors may play a role in the site-specific differences.

  5. NDE of Damage in Aircraft Flight Control Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, David K.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Dayal, Vinay

    2007-01-01

    Flight control surfaces on an aircraft, such as ailerons, flaps, spoilers and rudders, are typically adhesively bonded composite or aluminum honeycomb sandwich structures. These components can suffer from damage caused by hail stone, runway debris, or dropped tools during maintenance. On composites, low velocity impact damages can escape visual inspection, whereas on aluminum honeycomb sandwich, budding failure of the honeycomb core may or may not be accompanied by a disbond. This paper reports a study of the damage morphology in such structures and the NDE methods for detecting and characterizing them. Impact damages or overload failures in composite sandwiches with Nomex or fiberglass core tend to be a fracture or crinkle or the honeycomb cell wall located a distance below the facesheet-to-core bondline. The damage in aluminum honeycomb is usually a buckling failure, propagating from the top skin downward. The NDE methods used in this work for mapping out these damages were: air-coupled ultrasonic scan, and imaging by computer aided tap tester. Representative results obtained from the field will be shown

  6. Superresolution Near-field Imaging with Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei; Liu, Zhaolun; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    We present the theory for near-field superresolution imaging with surface waves and time reverse mirrors (TRMs). Theoretical formulas and numerical results show that applying the TRM operation to surface waves in an elastic half-space can achieve

  7. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2016-09-06

    We demonstrate that near-surface heterogeneities can be imaged by natural migration of backscattered surface waves in common shot gathers. No velocity model is required because the data are migrated onto surface points with the virtual Green\\'s functions computed from the shot gathers. Migrating shot gathers recorded by 2D and 3D land surveys validates the effectiveness of detecting nearsurface heterogeneities by natural migration. The implication is that more accurate hazard maps can be created by migrating surface waves in land surveys.

  8. Near-surface clay authigenesis in exhumed fault rock of the Alpine Fault Zone (New Zealand); O-H-Ar isotopic, XRD and chemical analysis of illite and chlorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Austin; Mulch, Andreas; van der Pluijm, Ben

    2018-06-01

    Exhumed fault rock of the central Alpine Fault Zone (South Island, New Zealand) shows extensive clay mineralization, and it has been the focus of recent research that aims to describe the evolution and frictional behavior of the fault. Using Quantitative X-ray powder diffraction, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, hydrogen isotope (δD) geochemistry, and electron microbeam analysis, we constrain the thermal and fluid conditions of deformation that produced two predominant clay phases ubiquitous to the exposed fault damage zone, illite and chlorite. Illite polytype analysis indicates that most end-member illite and chlorite material formed in equilibrium with meteoric fluid (δD = -55 to -75‰), but two locations preserve a metamorphic origin of chlorite (δD = -36 to -45‰). Chlorite chemical geothermometry constrains crystal growth to T = 210-296 °C. Isotopic analysis also constrains illite growth to T < 100 °C, consistent with the mineralogy, with Ar ages <0.5 Ma. High geothermal gradients in the study area promoted widespread, near-surface mineralization, and limited the window of clay authigenesis in the Alpine Fault Zone to <5 km for chlorite and <2 km for illite. This implies a significant contrast between fault rock exposed at the surface and that at depth, and informs discussions about fault strength, clays and frictional behavior.

  9. Damage to underground coal mines caused by surface blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourie, A.B.; Green, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the potential damage to underground coal workings as a result of surface blasting at an opencast coal mine is described. Seismometers were installed in a worked out area of an underground mine, in the eastern Transvaal region of South Africa, and the vibration caused by nearby surface blasting recorded. These measurements were used to derive peak particle velocities. These velocities were correlated with observed damage underground in order to establish the allowable combination of the two blasting parameters of charge mass per relay, and blast-to-gage point distance. An upper limit of 110mm/sec peak particle velocity was found to be sufficient to ensure that the damage to the particular workings under consideration was minimal. It was further found that a cube-root scaling law provided a better fit to the field data than the common square-root law. 11 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Characterization of the damage produced on different materials surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellavale Clara, Hector Damian

    2004-01-01

    In the present work the characterization techniques of surfaces ULOI and RIMAPS have been applied on laboratory samples made from aluminium, stainless steel and material based on fiberglass.The resultant surfaces of, chemical etching with corrosive agents Keller and Tucker, mechanic damage from the wear and tear of abrasive paper and sandrubbing with alumina particles, are analyzed to different level of damage.The systematic application of the above mentioned techniques is carried out with the objective of finding information, which allows to characterize the superficial damage, both in its incipient state as in the extreme situation revealed by the presence of etch pits. Important results have been obtained, in the characterization of the incipient stage of the chemical etching, using the curves of the normalized area.In addition, it was possible to verify the capacity of the techniques in the early detection of the preferential directions generated by the etch pits

  11. Recovery from damage induced by acridine plus near-ultraviolet light in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.; Feldman, A.; Snipes, W.

    1982-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells treated with sublethal doses of acridine plus near-UV light exhibit an effective split-dose recovery response that requires an incubation period of about 30-45 min. Studies of the metabolic requirements for split-dose recovery revealed the following: (a) DNA synthesis is not required for split-dose recovery: (b) inhibition of electron transport or protein synthesis reduces the efficiency of split-dose recovery by about one-half: (c) inhibition of phospholipid synthesis or cell wall synthesis completely eliminates the split-dose recovery response. These results suggest an involvement of membrane repair mechanisms in response to damage by acridine plus near-UV light. Additional evidence for such a process was provided by more direct assays for membrane recovery. It was found that cells treated with sublethal doses of acridine plus near-UV light are sensitive to low concentrations of detergents, and lose that sensitivity upon incubation. Likewise, treated cells are susceptible to lethal osmotic shock, but can recover from this susceptibility if incubated after treatment but prior to exposure to low osmotic conditions. Based on accumulating evidence it is proposed that E. coli cells are capable of repairing membrane damage resulting from exposure to acridine plus near-UV light. (author)

  12. Inertial collapse of bubble pairs near a solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Johnsen, Eric

    2017-11-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of applications ranging from naval structures to biomedical ultrasound. One important consequence is structural damage to neighboring surfaces following repeated inertial collapse of vapor bubbles. Although the mechanical loading produced by the collapse of a single bubble has been widely investigated, less is known about the detailed dynamics of the collapse of multiple bubbles. In such a problem, the bubble-bubble interactions typically affect the dynamics, e.g., by increasing the non-sphericity of the bubbles and amplifying/hindering the collapse intensity depending on the flow parameters. Here, we quantify the effects of bubble-bubble interactions on the bubble dynamics, as well as the pressures/temperatures produced by the collapse of a pair of gas bubbles near a rigid surface. We perform high-resolution simulations of this problem by solving the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for gas/liquid flows. The results are used to investigate the non-spherical bubble dynamics and characterize the pressure and temperature fields based on the relevant parameters entering the problem: stand-off distance, geometrical configuration (angle, relative size, distance), collapse strength. This research was supported in part by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0751 and NSF Grant CBET 1253157.

  13. Near-Surface Geophysical Character of a Holocene Fault Carrying Geothermal Flow Near Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, C.; Dorsey, A.; Louie, J. N.; Schwering, P. C.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2012-12-01

    Lines of calcium carbonate tufa columns mark recent faults that cut 11 ka Lake Lahontan sediments at Astor Pass, north of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. Throughout the Great Basin, faults appear to control the location of geothermal resources, providing pathways for fluid migration. Reservoir-depth (greater than 1 km) seismic imaging at Astor Pass shows a fault that projects to one of the lines of tufa columns at the surface. The presence of the tufa deposits suggests this fault carried warm geothermal waters through the lakebed clay sediments in recent time. The warm fluids deposited the tufa when they hit cold Lake Lahontan water at the lakebed. Lake Lahontan covered this location to a depth of at least 60 m at 11 ka. In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe, an Applied Geophysics class at UNR investigated the near-surface geophysical characteristics of this fault. The survey comprises near-surface seismic reflection and refraction, nine near-surface refraction microtremor (SeisOpt® ReMi™) arrays, nine near-surface direct-current resistivity soundings, magnetic surveys, and gravity surveys at and near the tufa columns. The refraction microtremor results show shear velocities near tufa and faults to be marginally lower, compared to Vs away from the faults. Overall, the 30-m depth-averaged shear velocities are low, less than 300 m/s, consistent with the lakebed clay deposits. These results show no indication of any fast (> 500 m/s) tufa below the surface at or near the tufa columns. Vs30 averages were 274 ± 13 m/s on the fault, 287 ± 2 m/s at 150 m east of the fault, and 290 ± 15 m/s at 150 m west of the fault. The P-velocity refraction optimization results also show no indication of high-velocity tufa buried below the surface in the Lahontan sediments, reinforcing the idea that all tufa was deposited above the lakebed surface. The seismic results provide a negative test of the hypothesis that deposition of the lakebeds in the Quaternary buried and

  14. Data-driven exploration of copper mineralogy and its application to Earth's near-surface oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S. M.; Eleish, A.; Runyon, S.; Prabhu, A.; Fox, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Golden, J. J.; Downs, R. T.; Liu, C.; Meyer, M.; Hazen, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's atmospheric composition has changed radically throughout geologic history.1,2 The oxidation of our atmosphere, driven by biology, began with the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) 2.5 Ga and has heavily influenced Earth's near surface mineralogy. Therefore, temporal trends in mineral occurrence elucidate large and small scale geologic and biologic processes. Cu, and other first-row transition elements, are of particular interest due to their variation in valance state and sensitivity to ƒO2. Widespread formation of oxidized Cu mineral species (Cu2+) would not have been possible prior to the GOE and we have found that the proportion of oxidized Cu minerals increased steadily with the increase in atmospheric O2 on Earth's surface (see Fig. 1). To better characterize the changes in Cu mineralogy through time, we have employed advanced analytical and visualization methods. These techniques rely on large and growing mineral databases (e.g., rruff.info, mindat.org, earthchem.org, usgs.gov) and allow us to quantify and visualize multi-dimensional trends.5

  15. Direct detection of near-surface faults by migration of back-scattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2014-08-05

    We show that diffraction stack migration can be used to estimate the distribution of near-surface faults. The assumption is that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. The processing steps are to isolate the back-scattered surface waves, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. A deconvolution filter derived from the data can be used to collapse a dispersive arrival into a non-dispersive event. Results with synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. Applying this method to USArray data or passively recorded exploration data might open new opportunities in mapping tectonic features over the extent of the array.

  16. Multi-method Near-surface Geophysical Surveys for Site Response and Earthquake Damage Assessments at School Sites in Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, R.; Walsh, T. J.; Norman, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    We, Washington Geological Survey (WGS), have been performing multi-method near surface geophysical surveys to help assess potential earthquake damage at public schools in Washington. We have been conducting active and passive seismic surveys, and estimating Shear-wave velocity (Vs) profiles, then determining the NEHRP soil classifications based on Vs30m values at school sites in Washington. The survey methods we have used: 1D and 2D MASW and MAM, P- and S-wave refraction, horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (H/V), and 2ST-SPAC to measure Vs and Vp at shallow (0-70m) and greater depths at the sites. We have also run Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys at the sites to check possible horizontal subsurface variations along and between the seismic survey lines and the actual locations of the school buildings. The seismic survey results were then used to calculate Vs30m for determining the NEHRP soil classifications at school sites, thus soil amplification effects on the ground motions. Resulting shear-wave velocity profiles generated from these studies can also be used for site response and liquefaction potential studies, as well as for improvement efforts of the national Vs30m database, essential information for ShakeMap and ground motion modeling efforts in Washington and Pacific Northwest. To estimate casualties, nonstructural, and structural losses caused by the potential earthquakes in the region, we used these seismic site characterization results associated with structural engineering evaluations based on ASCE41 or FEMA 154 (Rapid Visual Screening) as inputs in FEMA Hazus-Advanced Engineering Building Module (AEBM) analysis. Compelling example surveys will be presented for the school sites in western and eastern Washington.

  17. Duplex sonography of the near-surface leg veins; Duplexsonographie der oberflaechlichen Beinvenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, E.

    2007-07-01

    The book contains the following contributions: The ultrasonograph, selection of the ultrasonic transducer, anatomy of the near-surface vein system, physiology of the near-surface vein system, varicose status classification, systematics of the duplex sonography of near-surface leg veins, provocational maneuver for the duplex sonographic varicose diagnostics, exploration of vena saphena parva, perforans veins, side branches, phlebitis, sonography for varicose therapy, postsurgical sonography, deep leg veins, examination of near-surface leg veins for the pathology of the deep vein system, differential diagnostic clarification of leg oedema from the phlebologic-lymphological view, diagnostic side features along the near-surface leg veins.

  18. Investigation of the near-surface electronic structure of Cr(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebanoff, L.E.; Robey, S.W.; Liu, G.; Shirley, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    An angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) study of Cr(001) near-surface electronic structure is presented. Measurements are reported for energy-band dispersions along the [010] direction parallel to the crystal surface. The periodicity of these band dispersions indicates that the valence electrons experience and self-consistently establish antiferromagnetism in the near-surface layers of Cr(001). We also present highly-surface-sensitive ARPES measurements of the energy-band dispersions along the [001] direction normal to the surface. The results suggest that the surface magnetic moments, which couple ferromagnetically to each other within the surface layer, couple antiferromagnetically to the moments of the atoms in the second layer. Temperature-dependent studies are presented that reveal the persistence of near-surface antiferromagnetic order for temperatures up to 2.5 times the bulk Neel temperature. The temperature dependence of this antiferromagnetic order suggests that its thermal stability derives in part from the stability of the Cr(001) ferromagnetic surface phase

  19. Near-ground cooling efficacies of trees and high-albedo surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Daytime summer urban heat islands arise when the prevalence of dark-colored surfaces and lack of vegetation make a city warmer than neighboring countryside. Two frequently-proposed summer heat island mitigation measures are to plant trees and to increase the albedo (solar reflectivity) of ground surfaces. This dissertation examines the effects of these measures on the surface temperature of an object near the ground, and on solar heating of air near the ground. Near-ground objects include people, vehicles, and buildings. The variation of the surface temperature of a near-ground object with ground albedo indicates that a rise in ground albedo will cool a near-ground object only if the object`s albedo exceeds a critical value. This critical value of object albedo depends on wind speed, object geometry, and the height of the atmospheric thermal boundary layer. It ranges from 0.15 to 0.37 for a person. If an object has typical albedo of 0.3, increasing the ground albedo by.

  20. Near Surface Stoichiometry in UO2: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of oxygen stoichiometry variation in UO2 at different temperature and oxygen partial pressure are important for understanding the dynamics of microstructure in these crystals. However, very limited experimental studies have been performed to understand the atomic structure of UO2 near surface and defect effects of near surface on stoichiometry in which the system can exchange atoms with the external reservoir. In this study, the near (110 surface relaxation and stoichiometry in UO2 have been studied with density functional theory (DFT calculations. On the basis of the point-defect model (PDM, a general expression for the near surface stoichiometric variation is derived by using DFT total-energy calculations and atomistic thermodynamics, in an attempt to pin down the mechanisms of oxygen exchange between the gas environment and defected UO2. By using the derived expression, it is observed that, under poor oxygen conditions, the stoichiometry of near surface is switched from hyperstoichiometric at 300 K with a depth around 3 nm to near-stoichiometric at 1000 K and hypostoichiometric at 2000 K. Furthermore, at very poor oxygen concentrations and high temperatures, our results also suggest that the bulk of the UO2 prefers to be hypostoichiometric, although the surface is near-stoichiometric.

  1. Automated analysis of damages for radiation in plastics surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Camacho M, E.; Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.

    1990-02-01

    Analysis of damages done by the radiation in a polymer characterized by optic properties of polished surfaces, of uniformity and chemical resistance that the acrylic; resistant until the 150 centigrade grades of temperature, and with an approximate weight of half of the glass. An objective of this work is the development of a method that analyze in automated form the superficial damages induced by radiation in plastic materials means an images analyst. (Author)

  2. Electronic structures near surfaces of perovskite type oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Toru

    2005-01-01

    This work is intended to draw attention to the origin of the electronic structures near surfaces of perovskite type oxides. Deep states were observed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The film thickness dependent electronic structures near surfaces of (Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 )TiO 3 thin films were observed. As for the 117-308 nm thick (Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 )TiO 3 films, deep states were lying at 0.20, 0.55, and 0.85 eV below the quasi-fermi level, respectively. However, as for the 40 nm thick (Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 )TiO 3 film, the states were overlapped. The A-site doping affected electronic structures near surfaces of SrTiO 3 single crystals. No evolution of deep states in non-doped SrTiO 3 single crystal was observed. However, the evolution of deep states in La-doped SrTiO 3 single crystal was observed

  3. Low energy Ar ion bombardment damage of Si, GaAs, and InP surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    Argon bombardment damage to (100) surfaces of Si, GaAs, and InP for sputter ion-gun potentials of 1, 2, and 3 kilovolts was studied using Rutherford backscattering. Initial damage rates and saturation damage levels were determined. Bombardment damage sensitivity increased for the sequence Si, GaAs, and InP. Saturation damage levels for Si and GaAs correspond reasonably to LSS projected range plus standard deviation estimates; damage to InP exceeded this level significantly. For an ion-gun potential of 3 keV, the initial sputter yield of P from an InP surface exceeded the sputter yield of In by four atoms per incident Ar projectile. (author)

  4. Superresolution Near-field Imaging with Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Lei

    2017-10-21

    We present the theory for near-field superresolution imaging with surface waves and time reverse mirrors (TRMs). Theoretical formulas and numerical results show that applying the TRM operation to surface waves in an elastic half-space can achieve superresolution imaging of subwavelength scatterers if they are located less than about 1/2 of the shear wavelength from the source line. We also show that the TRM operation for a single frequency is equivalent to natural migration, which uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration, and only costs O(N4) algebraic operations for poststack migration compared to O(N6) operations for natural prestack migration. Here, we assume the sources and receivers are on an N × N grid and there are N2 trial image points on the free surface. Our theoretical predictions of superresolution are validated with tests on synthetic data. The field-data tests suggest that hidden faults at the near surface can be detected with subwavelength imaging of surface waves by using the TRM operation if they are no deeper than about 1/2 the dominant shear wavelength.

  5. Research Note : Near-surface layer replacement for sparse data: Is interpolation needed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Yimin; Verschuur, D.J.; Luo, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Near-surface problem is a common challenge faced by land seismic data processing, where often, due to near-surface anomalies, events of interest are obscured. One method to handle this challenge is near-surface layer replacement, which is a wavefield reconstruction process based on downward

  6. Damage Mechanism in Counter Pairs Caused by Bionic Non-smoothed Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Zhan-hui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Four biomimetic non-smoothed surface specimens with different shapes were prepared by laser processing. Tests were conducted on MMU-5G wear and abrasion test machine to study the influencing rule of non-smoothed surfaces on counter pairs. The results show that the mass loss of the friction pair matching with the non-smoothed units is much greater than the ones matching with the smooth specimens. The pairs matching with different non-smoothed units suffer differently. The non-smoothed surface protruding zone exerts micro cutting on counter pairs. The striation causes the greatest mass loss of the pairs than the other non-smoothed units, which almost doubles the damage of the grid ones suffering the least. The difference in pairs damage is attributed to the different mechanism of undertaking the load in the process of wear. The damage can be alleviated effectively by changing the shapes of the units without increasing or decreasing the area ratio of the non-smoothed units.

  7. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves: Field data test

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a methodology for detecting the presence of near-surface heterogeneities by naturally migrating backscattered surface waves in controlled-source data. The near-surface heterogeneities must be located within a depth of approximately one-third the dominant wavelength λ of the strong surface-wave arrivals. This natural migration method does not require knowledge of the near-surface phase-velocity distribution because it uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration. Prior to migration, the backscattered data are separated from the original records, and the band-passed filtered data are migrated to give an estimate of the migration image at a depth of approximately one-third λ. Each band-passed data set gives a migration image at a different depth. Results with synthetic data and field data recorded over known faults validate the effectiveness of this method. Migrating the surface waves in recorded 2D and 3D data sets accurately reveals the locations of known faults. The limitation of this method is that it requires a dense array of receivers with a geophone interval less than approximately one-half λ.

  8. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves: Field data test

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Zhaolun

    2017-03-06

    We have developed a methodology for detecting the presence of near-surface heterogeneities by naturally migrating backscattered surface waves in controlled-source data. The near-surface heterogeneities must be located within a depth of approximately one-third the dominant wavelength λ of the strong surface-wave arrivals. This natural migration method does not require knowledge of the near-surface phase-velocity distribution because it uses the recorded data to approximate the Green’s functions for migration. Prior to migration, the backscattered data are separated from the original records, and the band-passed filtered data are migrated to give an estimate of the migration image at a depth of approximately one-third λ. Each band-passed data set gives a migration image at a different depth. Results with synthetic data and field data recorded over known faults validate the effectiveness of this method. Migrating the surface waves in recorded 2D and 3D data sets accurately reveals the locations of known faults. The limitation of this method is that it requires a dense array of receivers with a geophone interval less than approximately one-half λ.

  9. Formation of nanocrystalline surface layers in various metallic materials by near surface severe plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Sato, Nobuhiro Tsuji, Yoritoshi Minamino and Yuichiro Koizumi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of the various kinds of metallic materials sheets were severely deformed by wire-brushing at ambient temperature to achieve nanocrystalline surface layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the near surface severe plastic deformation (NS-SPD were characterized by means of TEM. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 30 to 200 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all the severely scratched metallic materials, which are Ti-added ultra-low carbon interstitial free steel, austenitic stainless steel (SUS304, 99.99 wt.%Al, commercial purity aluminum (A1050 and A1100, Al–Mg alloy (A5083, Al-4 wt.%Cu alloy, OFHC-Cu (C1020, Cu–Zn alloy (C2600 and Pb-1.5%Sn alloy. In case of the 1050-H24 aluminum, the depth of the surface nanocrystalline layer was about 15 μm. It was clarified that wire-brushing is an effective way of NS-SPD, and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials.

  10. Noninvasive assessment of articular cartilage surface damage using reflected polarized light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ruby N.; Nehmetallah, George; Raub, Christopher B.

    2017-06-01

    Articular surface damage occurs to cartilage during normal aging, osteoarthritis, and in trauma. A noninvasive assessment of cartilage microstructural alterations is useful for studies involving cartilage explants. This study evaluates polarized reflectance microscopy as a tool to assess surface damage to cartilage explants caused by mechanical scraping and enzymatic degradation. Adult bovine articular cartilage explants were scraped, incubated in collagenase, or underwent scrape and collagenase treatments. In an additional experiment, cartilage explants were subject to scrapes at graduated levels of severity. Polarized reflectance parameters were compared with India ink surface staining, features of histological sections, changes in explant wet weight and thickness, and chondrocyte viability. The polarized reflectance signal was sensitive to surface scrape damage and revealed individual scrape features consistent with India ink marks. Following surface treatments, the reflectance contrast parameter was elevated and correlated with image area fraction of India ink. After extensive scraping, polarized reflectance contrast and chondrocyte viability were lower than that from untreated explants. As part of this work, a mathematical model was developed and confirmed the trend in the reflectance signal due to changes in surface scattering and subsurface birefringence. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of polarized reflectance microscopy to sensitively assess surface microstructural alterations in articular cartilage explants.

  11. NEAR-SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A HOLOCENE FAULT CONDUCIVE TO GEOTHERMAL FLOW NEAR PYRAMID LAKE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsey, Alison; Dudley, Colton; Louie, John [UNR; Schwering, Paul; Pullammanappallil, Satish [Optim

    2013-06-30

    Linear deposits of calcium carbonate tufa columns mark recent faults that cut 11 ka Lake Lahontan sediments at Astor Pass, north of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. Throughout the Great Basin, faults appear to control the location of geothermal resources by providing pathways for fluid migration. Reservoir-depth (greater than 1 km) seismic imaging at Astor Pass reveals a fault that projects to one of the lines of tufa columns at the surface. The presence of the tufa deposits suggests this fault carried warm geothermal waters through the lakebed clay sediments in recent time. The warm fluids deposited the tufa when they hit cold Lake Lahontan water at the lakebed. Lake Lahontan covered this location 11 ka to a depth of at least 60 m. In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe, an Applied Geophysics class at UNR investigated the near-surface geophysical characteristics of this fault. The survey at and near the tufa columns comprises near-surface Pwave seismic reflection and refraction, electrical resistivity tomography, nearsurface refraction microtremor arrays, nine near-surface direct-current resistivity soundings, magnetic surveys, and gravity surveys. The refraction microtremor results show shear velocities near tufa and faults to be marginally lower, compared to Vs away from the faults. Overall, the 30-m depth-averaged shear velocities are low, less than 300 m/s, consistent with the lakebed clay deposits. These results indicate that no seismically fast (> 500 m/s) tufa deposits are present below the surface at or near the tufa columns. Vs30 averages were for example 274 ± 13 m/s on the fault, 287 ± 2 m/s at 150 m east of the fault, and 290 ± 15 m/s at 150 m west of the fault. The P-velocity refraction optimization results similarly indicate a lack of high-velocity tufa buried below the surface in the Lahontan sediments, reinforcing the idea that all tufa was deposited above the lakebed surface. The seismic results provide a negative test of the hypothesis that

  12. Quantifying Uncertainty in Near Surface Electromagnetic Imaging Using Bayesian Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatter, D. B.; Ray, A.; Key, K.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscientists commonly use electromagnetic methods to image the Earth's near surface. Field measurements of EM fields are made (often with the aid an artificial EM source) and then used to infer near surface electrical conductivity via a process known as inversion. In geophysics, the standard inversion tool kit is robust and can provide an estimate of the Earth's near surface conductivity that is both geologically reasonable and compatible with the measured field data. However, standard inverse methods struggle to provide a sense of the uncertainty in the estimate they provide. This is because the task of finding an Earth model that explains the data to within measurement error is non-unique - that is, there are many, many such models; but the standard methods provide only one "answer." An alternative method, known as Bayesian inversion, seeks to explore the full range of Earth model parameters that can adequately explain the measured data, rather than attempting to find a single, "ideal" model. Bayesian inverse methods can therefore provide a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty inherent in trying to infer near surface conductivity from noisy, measured field data. This study applies a Bayesian inverse method (called trans-dimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo) to transient airborne EM data previously collected over Taylor Valley - one of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica. Our results confirm the reasonableness of previous estimates (made using standard methods) of near surface conductivity beneath Taylor Valley. In addition, we demonstrate quantitatively the uncertainty associated with those estimates. We demonstrate that Bayesian inverse methods can provide quantitative uncertainty to estimates of near surface conductivity.

  13. ISLSCP II Reanalysis Near-Surface Meteorology Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set for the ISLSCP Initiative II data collection provides near surface meteorological variables, fluxes of heat, moisture and momentum at the...

  14. Surface Damage and Treatment by Impact of a Low Temperature Nitrogen Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribou, Hicham; Fressengeas, Claude; Entemeyer, Denis; Jeanclaude, Véronique; Tazibt, Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen jets under high pressure and low temperature have been introduced recently. The process consists in projecting onto a surface a low temperature jet obtained from releasing the liquid nitrogen stored in a high pressure tank (e.g. 3000 bars) through a nozzle. It can be used in a range of industrial applications, including surface treatment or material removal through cutting, drilling, striping and cleaning. The process does not generate waste other than the removed matter, and it only releases neutral gas into the atmosphere. This work is aimed at understanding the mechanisms of the interaction between the jet and the material surface. Depending on the impacted material, the thermo-mechanical shock and blast effect induced by the jet can activate a wide range of damage mechanisms, including cleavage, crack nucleation and spalling, as well as void expansion and localized ductile failure. The test parameters (standoff distance, dwell time, operating pressure) play a role in selecting the dominant damage mechanism, but combinations of these various modes are usually present. Surface treatment through phase transformation or grain fragmentation in a layer below the surface can also be obtained by adequate tuning of the process parameters. In the current study, work is undertaken to map the damage mechanisms in metallic materials as well as the influence of the test parameters on damage, along with measurements of the thermo-mechanical conditions (impact force, temperature) in the impacted area.

  15. Quantifying widespread aqueous surface weathering on Mars: The plateaus south of Coprates Chasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizeau, D.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Carter, J.; Flahaut, J.; Thollot, P.; Lozac'h, L.; Millot, C.

    2018-03-01

    Pedogenesis has been previously proposed on the plateaus around Coprates Chasma, Valles Marineris to explain the presence of widespread clay sequences with Al-clays and possible hydrated silica over Fe/Mg-clays on the surface of the plateaus (Le Deit et al., 2012; Carter et al., 2015). We use previous observations together with new MRO targeted observations and DEMs to constrain the extent and thickness of the plateau clay unit: the Al-clay unit is less than 3 m thick, likely ∼1 m, while the Fe/Mg-clays underneath are few tens of meters thick. We also refine the age of alteration by retrieving crater retention ages of the altered plateau and of later deposits: the observed clay sequence was created by surface pedogenesis between model ages of 4.1 Ga and 3.75 Ga. Using a leaching model from Zolotov and Mironenko (2016), we estimate the quantity of atmospheric precipitations needed to create such a clay sequence, that strongly depends on the chemistry of the precipitating fluid. A few hundreds of meters of cumulated precipitations of highly acidic fluids could explain the observed clay sequence, consistent with estimates based on late Noachian valley erosion for example (Rosenberg and Head, 2015). We show finally that the maximum quantity of sulfates potentially formed during this surface weathering event can only contribute minimally to the volume of sulfates deposited in Valles Marineris.

  16. Structure of the 1906 near-surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault, San Francisco Peninsula segment, near Woodside, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, C.M.; Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Grove, Karen; Goldman, M.R.

    2016-07-08

    High-resolution seismic-reflection and refraction images of the 1906 surface rupture zone of the San Andreas Fault near Woodside, California reveal evidence for one or more additional near-surface (within about 3 meters [m] depth) fault strands within about 25 m of the 1906 surface rupture. The 1906 surface rupture above the groundwater table (vadose zone) has been observed in paleoseismic trenches that coincide with our seismic profile and is seismically characterized by a discrete zone of low P-wave velocities (Vp), low S-wave velocities (Vs), high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios. A second near-surface fault strand, located about 17 m to the southwest of the 1906 surface rupture, is inferred by similar seismic anomalies. Between these two near-surface fault strands and below 5 m depth, we observed a near-vertical fault strand characterized by a zone of high Vp, low Vs, high Vp/Vs ratios, and high Poisson’s ratios on refraction tomography images and near-vertical diffractions on seismic-reflection images. This prominent subsurface zone of seismic anomalies is laterally offset from the 1906 surface rupture by about 8 m and likely represents the active main (long-term) strand of the San Andreas Fault at 5 to 10 m depth. Geometries of the near-surface and subsurface (about 5 to 10 m depth) fault zone suggest that the 1906 surface rupture dips southwestward to join the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at about 5 to 10 m below the surface. The 1906 surface rupture forms a prominent groundwater barrier in the upper 3 to 5 m, but our interpreted secondary near-surface fault strand to the southwest forms a weaker barrier, suggesting that there has been less or less-recent near-surface slip on that strand. At about 6 m depth, the main strand of the San Andreas Fault consists of water-saturated blue clay (collected from a hand-augered borehole), which is similar to deeply weathered serpentinite observed within the main strand of the San Andreas Fault at

  17. Imaging near-surface heterogeneities by natural migration of backscattered surface waves

    KAUST Repository

    AlTheyab, Abdullah

    2016-02-01

    We present a migration method that does not require a velocity model to migrate backscattered surface waves to their projected locations on the surface. This migration method, denoted as natural migration, uses recorded Green\\'s functions along the surface instead of simulated Green\\'s functions. The key assumptions are that the scattering bodies are within the depth interrogated by the surface waves, and the Green\\'s functions are recorded with dense receiver sampling along the free surface. This natural migration takes into account all orders of multiples, mode conversions and non-linear effects of surface waves in the data. The natural imaging formulae are derived for both active source and ambient-noise data, and computer simulations show that natural migration can effectively image near-surface heterogeneities with typical ambient-noise sources and geophone distributions.

  18. The Cool Surfaces of Binaries Near-Earth Asteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delbo, Marco; Walsh, K.; Mueller, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from thermal-infrared observations of binary near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). These objects, in general, have surface temperatures cooler than the average values for non-binary NEAs. We discuss how this may be evidence of higher-than-average surface thermal inertia. The comparison of

  19. Investigation of cutting-induced damage in CMC bend bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubrand A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic matrix composites (“CMC” with a strong fibre-matrix interface can be made damage-tolerant by introducing a highly porous matrix. Such composites typically have only a low interlaminar shear strength, which can potentially promote damage when preparing specimens or components by cutting. In order to investigate the damage induced by different cutting methods, waterjet cutting with and without abrasives, laser-cutting, wire eroding and cutoff grinding were used to cut plates of two different CMCs with a matrix porosity up to 35 vol.-%. For each combination of cutting method and composite, the flexural and interlaminar shear strength of the resulting specimens was determined. Additionally, the integrity of the regions near the cut surfaces was investigated by high-resolution x-ray computer tomography. It could be shown that the geometrical quality of the cut is strongly affected by the cutting method employed. Laser cut and waterjet cut specimens showed damage and delaminations near the cut surface leading to a reduced interlaminar shear strength of short bend bars in extreme cases.

  20. Gravitational states of antihydrogen near material surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voronin, Alexei Yu., E-mail: dr.a.voronin@gmail.com [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Froelich, Piotr [Uppsala University, Department of Quantum Chemistry (Sweden); Nesvizhevsky, Valery V. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) (France)

    2012-12-15

    We present a theoretical study of the motion of antihydrogen atoms in the Earth's gravitational field near a material surface. We predict the existence of long-living quasistationary states of antihydrogen in a superposition of the gravitational and Casimir-van der Waals potentials of the surface. We suggest an interferometric method of measuring the energy difference between such gravitational states, hence the gravitational mass of antihydrogen.

  1. Photoionization microscopy of hydrogen atom near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hai-Feng; Wang Lei; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface with a semiclassical analysis of photoionization microscopy. Interference patterns of the electron radial distribution are calculated at different scaled energies above the classical saddle point and at various atom—surface distances. We find that different types of trajectories contribute predominantly to different manifolds in a certain interference pattern. As the scaled energy increases, the structure of the interference pattern evolves smoothly and more types of trajectories emerge. As the atom approaches the metal surface closer, there are more types of trajectories contributing to the interference pattern as well. When the Rydberg atom comes very close to the metal surface or the scaled energy approaches the zero field ionization energy, the potential induced by the metal surface will make atomic system chaotic. The results also show that atoms near a metal surface exhibit similar properties like the atoms in the parallel electric and magnetic fields. (atomic and molecular physics)

  2. Surface finish and subsurface damage in polycrystalline optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafrir, Shai Negev

    We measure and describe surface microstructure and subsurface damage (SSD) induced by microgrinding of hard metals and hard ceramics used in optical applications. We examine grinding of ceramic materials with bonded abrasives, and, specifically, deterministic microgrinding (DMG). DMG, at fixed nominal infeed rate and with bound diamond abrasive tools, is the preferred technique for optical fabrication of ceramic materials. In DMG material removal is by microcracking. DMG provides cost effective high manufacturing rates, while attaining higher strength and performance, i.e., low level of subsurface damage (SSD). A wide range of heterogeneous materials of interest to the optics industry were studied in this work. These materials include: A binderless tungsten carbide, nonmagnetic Ni-based tungsten carbides, magnetic Co-based tungsten carbides, and, in addition, other hard optical ceramics, such as aluminum oxynitride (Al23O27N5/ALON), polycrystalline alumina (Al2O3/PCA), and chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (Si4C/SiC). These materials are all commercially available. We demonstrate that spots taken with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) platforms can be used for estimating SSD depth induced by the grinding process. Surface morphology was characterized using various microscopy techniques, such as: contact interferometer, noncontact white light interferometer, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The evolution of surface roughness with the amount of material removed by the MRF process, as measured within the spot deepest point of penetration, can be divided into two stages. In the first stage the induced damaged layer and associated SSD from microgrinding are removed, reaching a low surface roughness value. In the second stage we observe interaction between the MRF process and the material's microstructure as MRF exposes the subsurface without introducing new damage. Line scans taken parallel to the MR

  3. Fluctuation diamagnetism near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmistrov, S.N.; Dubovskii, L.B.

    1984-01-01

    Fluctuations of the magnetic moment and of the specific heat near surfaces and twinning planes in superconductors are studied. Fluctuations near a surface yield an additional contribution to the effect of the usual bulk fluctuations on the diamagnetic moment. Such an additional contribution has a singularity near a temperature T/sub c/3(H), which is higher than the bulk superconducting transition temperature in a magnetic field T/sub c/2(H). Depending on the strength of the magnetic field, the singularity of the additional contribution to the magnetic moment can be either logarithmic (strong fields) or of square-root type (weak fields). Experiments which could reveal the aforementioned anomalous behavior are discussed in detail

  4. Automated 3D Damaged Cavity Model Builder for Lower Surface Acreage Tile on Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, Shannon; Zhang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Automated Thermal Tool for Damaged Acreage Tile Math Model builder was developed to perform quickly and accurately 3D thermal analyses on damaged lower surface acreage tiles and structures beneath the damaged locations on a Space Shuttle Orbiter. The 3D model builder created both TRASYS geometric math models (GMMs) and SINDA thermal math models (TMMs) to simulate an idealized damaged cavity in the damaged tile(s). The GMMs are processed in TRASYS to generate radiation conductors between the surfaces in the cavity. The radiation conductors are inserted into the TMMs, which are processed in SINDA to generate temperature histories for all of the nodes on each layer of the TMM. The invention allows a thermal analyst to create quickly and accurately a 3D model of a damaged lower surface tile on the orbiter. The 3D model builder can generate a GMM and the correspond ing TMM in one or two minutes, with the damaged cavity included in the tile material. A separate program creates a configuration file, which would take a couple of minutes to edit. This configuration file is read by the model builder program to determine the location of the damage, the correct tile type, tile thickness, structure thickness, and SIP thickness of the damage, so that the model builder program can build an accurate model at the specified location. Once the models are built, they are processed by the TRASYS and SINDA.

  5. Near-real time Monitoring of the widespread winter Fog over the Indo-Gangetic Plains using satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, D. L.; Gautam, R.; Rizvi, S.; Singh, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    The persistent and widespread winter fog impacts the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) on an annual basis, disrupting day-to-day lives of millions of people in parts of northern India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh. The IGP is a densely-populated region located south of the Himalaya, in the northern parts of south Asia. During the past three decades or so, associated with growing population and energy demands, the IGP has witnessed strong upward trends in air pollution, particularly leading to poor air quality in the winter months. Co-occurring with the dense haze over the IGP, severe fog episodes persist throughout the months of December and January. Building on our recent work on satellite-based detection of fog, we have further extended the detection capability towards the development of a near-real time (NRT) fog monitoring system using satellite radiances and products. Here, we use multi-spectral radiances and aerosol/cloud retrievals from Terra/Aqua MODIS data for NRT fog monitoring over the IGP for both daytime as well as nighttime. Specifically, the nighttime fog detection algorithm employs a bi-spectral brightness temperature difference technique between two spectral channels: 3.9 μm and 11 μm. Our ongoing efforts also include extending fog detection capability in NRT to geostationary satellites, for providing continuous monitoring of the onset, evolution and spatial-temporal variation of fog, as well as the geospatial integration of surface meteorological observations of visibility, relative humidity, temperature. We anticipate that the ongoing and future development of a fog monitoring system may be of particular assistance to air and rail transportation management, as well as of general interest to the public. The outputs of fog detection algorithm and related aerosol/cloud parameters are operationally disseminated via http://fogsouthasia.com/.

  6. Projected change in characteristics of near surface temperature inversions for southeast Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fei; Evans, Jason Peter; Di Luca, Alejandro; Jiang, Ningbo; Olson, Roman; Fita, Lluis; Argüeso, Daniel; Chang, Lisa T.-C.; Scorgie, Yvonne; Riley, Matt

    2018-05-01

    Air pollution has significant impacts on human health. Temperature inversions, especially near surface temperature inversions, can amplify air pollution by preventing convective movements and trapping pollutants close to the ground, thus decreasing air quality and increasing health issues. This effect of temperature inversions implies that trends in their frequency, strength and duration can have important implications for air quality. In this study, we evaluate the ability of three reanalysis-driven high-resolution regional climate model (RCM) simulations to represent near surface inversions at 9 sounding sites in southeast Australia. Then we use outputs of 12 historical and future RCM simulations (each with three time periods: 1990-2009, 2020-2039, and 2060-2079) from the NSW/ACT (New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory) Regional Climate Modelling (NARCliM) project to investigate changes in near surface temperature inversions. The results show that there is a substantial increase in the strength of near surface temperature inversions over southeast Australia which suggests that future inversions may intensify poor air quality events. Near surface inversions and their future changes have clear seasonal and diurnal variations. The largest differences between simulations are associated with the driving GCMs, suggesting that the large-scale circulation plays a dominant role in near surface inversion strengths.

  7. Test case for a near-surface repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elert, M.; Jones, C.; Nilsson, L.B.; Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M.

    1998-01-01

    A test case is presented for assessment of a near-surface disposal facility for radioactive waste. The case includes waste characterization and repository design, requirements and constraints in an assessment context, scenario development, model description and test calculations

  8. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite at 100 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ) was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar 2+ . Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with MeV He + ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 x 10 15 Ar 2+ cm -2 , considerable near-surface He + ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 nm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO 3 ) and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides

  9. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite under cryogenic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar 2+ . Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with 2 MeV He + ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 x 10 15 Ar 2+ cm -2 , considerable near-surface He + ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 mm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO 3 ) and spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides

  10. Ion irradiation damage in ilmenite at 100 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J.N.; Yu, N.; Devanathan, R.; Sickafus, K.E.; Nastasi, M.A.; Nord, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    A natural single crystal of ilmenite (FeTiO3) was irradiated at 100 K with 200 keV Ar2+. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and ion channeling with 2 MeV He+ ions were used to monitor damage accumulation in the surface region of the implanted crystal. At an irradiation fluence of 1 ?? 1015 Ar2+/cm2, considerable near-surface He+ ion dechanneling was observed, to the extent that ion yield from a portion of the aligned crystal spectrum reached the yield level of a random spectrum. This observation suggests that the near-surface region of the crystal was amorphized by the implantation. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction on this sample confirmed the presence of a 150 nm thick amorphous layer. These results are compared to similar investigations on geikielite (MgTiO3) and spinel (MgAl2O4) to explore factors that may influence radiation damage response in oxides.

  11. 22-year surface salinity changes in the Seasonal Ice Zone near 140°E off Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Rosemary; Kestenare, Elodie

    2017-11-01

    Seasonal and interannual variations in sea surface salinity (SSS) are analyzed in the Sea Ice Zone south of 60°S, from a 22-year time series of observations near 140°E. In the northern sea-ice zone during the warming, melting cycle from October to March, waters warm by an average of 3.5 °C and become fresher by 0.1 to 0.25. In the southern sea-ice zone, the surface temperatures vary from - 1 to 1 °C over summer, and the maximal SSS range occurs in December, with a minimum SSS of 33.65 near the Southern Boundary of the ACC, reaching 34.4 in the shelf waters close to the coast. The main fronts, normally defined at subsurface, are shown to have more distinct seasonal characteristics in SSS than in SST. The interannual variations in SSS are more closely linked to variations in upstream sea-ice cover than surface forcing. SSS and sea-ice variations show distinct phases, with large biannual variations in the early 1990s, weaker variations in the 2000s and larger variations again from 2009 onwards. The calving of the Mertz Glacier Tongue in February 2010 leads to increased sea-ice cover and widespread freshening of the surface layers from 2011 onwards. Summer freshening in the northern sea-ice zone is 0.05-0.07 per decade, increasing to 0.08 per decade in the southern sea-ice zone, largely influenced by the Mertz Glacier calving event at the end of our time series. The summer time series of SSS on the shelf at 140°E is in phase but less variable than the SSS observed upstream in the Adélie Depression, and thus represents a spatially integrated index of the wider SSS variations.

  12. Surface Irregularity Factor as a Parameter to Evaluate the Fatigue Damage State of CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Zuluaga-Ramírez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an optical non-contact technique to evaluate the fatigue damage state of CFRP structures measuring the irregularity factor of the surface. This factor includes information about surface topology and can be measured easily on field, by techniques such as optical perfilometers. The surface irregularity factor has been correlated with stiffness degradation, which is a well-accepted parameter for the evaluation of the fatigue damage state of composite materials. Constant amplitude fatigue loads (CAL and realistic variable amplitude loads (VAL, representative of real in- flight conditions, have been applied to “dog bone” shaped tensile specimens. It has been shown that the measurement of the surface irregularity parameters can be applied to evaluate the damage state of a structure, and that it is independent of the type of fatigue load that has caused the damage. As a result, this measurement technique is applicable for a wide range of inspections of composite material structures, from pressurized tanks with constant amplitude loads, to variable amplitude loaded aeronautical structures such as wings and empennages, up to automotive and other industrial applications.

  13. Surface Irregularity Factor as a Parameter to Evaluate the Fatigue Damage State of CFRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga-Ramírez, Pablo; Frövel, Malte; Belenguer, Tomás; Salazar, Félix

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an optical non-contact technique to evaluate the fatigue damage state of CFRP structures measuring the irregularity factor of the surface. This factor includes information about surface topology and can be measured easily on field, by techniques such as optical perfilometers. The surface irregularity factor has been correlated with stiffness degradation, which is a well-accepted parameter for the evaluation of the fatigue damage state of composite materials. Constant amplitude fatigue loads (CAL) and realistic variable amplitude loads (VAL), representative of real in- flight conditions, have been applied to “dog bone” shaped tensile specimens. It has been shown that the measurement of the surface irregularity parameters can be applied to evaluate the damage state of a structure, and that it is independent of the type of fatigue load that has caused the damage. As a result, this measurement technique is applicable for a wide range of inspections of composite material structures, from pressurized tanks with constant amplitude loads, to variable amplitude loaded aeronautical structures such as wings and empennages, up to automotive and other industrial applications. PMID:28793655

  14. Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, Colton; Dorsey, Alison; Louie, John [UNR; Schwering, Paul; Pullammanappallil, Satish

    2016-08-01

    Colton Dudley, Alison Dorsey, Paul Opdyke, Dustin Naphan, Marlon Ramos, John Louie, Paul Schwering, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2013, Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at Amer. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists, Pacific Section Annual Meeting, Monterey, Calif., April 19-25.

  15. Site selection report basalt waste isolation program near-surface test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    A site selection committee was established to review the information gathered on potential sites and to select a site for the Near-Surface Test Facility Phase I. A decision was made to use a site on the north face of Gable Mountain located on the Hanford Site. This site provided convenient access to the Pomona Basalt Flow. This flow was selected for use at this site because it exhibited the characteristics established in the primary criteria. These criteria were: the flows thickness; its dryness; its nearness to the surface; and, its similarities to basalt units which are candidates for the repository. After the selection of the Near-Surface Test Facility Phase I Site, the need arose for an additional facility to demonstrate safe handling, storage techniques, and the physical effects of radioactive materials on an in situ basalt formation. The committee reviewed the sites selected for Phase I and chose the same site for locating Phase II of the Near-Surface Test Facility

  16. Accumulated surface damage on ZnS crystals produced by closely spaced pairs of picosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, L.L.; Lee, H.W.H.

    1988-12-01

    Excitation of a transparent ZnS crystal by repetitive picosecond dye laser pulses causes an accumulated surface modification leading to optical damage. The onset of the damage is detected by an abrupt increase in the emission of neutral Zn (and possibly S 2 ) from the surface. Comparison of the neutral emission thresholds with pulse-pair and single-pulse excitation shows that linear absorption is the dominant laser-surface interaction. In general, this measurement technique shows considerable promise for investigating the possible influence of nonlinear absorption or excitation processes on damage mechanisms. The data suggest that heating of small absorbing regions produces the surface modification that leads to the observed surface ablation. The nature of the damage observed at fluences above the threshold suggests that it is caused by heating of a relatively large (/approximately/10 - 100 μm) surface region that has been modified by the accumulation pulses. 3 refs., 5 figs

  17. Effect of electrical discharge machining on surface characteristics and machining damage of AISI D2 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guu, Y.H.; Hocheng, H.; Chou, C.Y.; Deng, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the electrical discharge machining (EDM) of AISI D2 tool steel was investigated. The surface characteristics and machining damage caused by EDM were studied in terms of machining parameters. Based on the experimental data, an empirical model of the tool steel was also proposed. A new damage variable was used to study the EDM damage. The workpiece surface and re-solidified layers were examined by a scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness was determined with a surface profilometer. The residual stress acting on the EDM specimen was measured by the X-ray diffraction technique. Experimental results indicate that the thickness of the recast layer, and surface roughness are proportional to the power input. The EDM process introduces tensile residual stress on the machined surface. The EDM damage leads to strength degradation

  18. Surface wind energy trends near Taiwan in winter since 1871

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The tropical surface wind speed in boreal winter reaches a maximum near Taiwan. This stable wind resource may be used for future clean energy development. How this surface wind energy source has changed in past 141 years is investigated using the 20th century reanalysis dataset and CMIP5 models. Our observational analysis shows that the surface wind speed experienced a weakening trend in the past 141 years (1871 - 2010. The average decreasing rate is around -1.4 m s-1 per century. The decrease is primarily attributed to the relative sea surface temperature (SST cooling in the subtropical North Pacific, which forces a large-scale low-level anti-cyclonic circulation anomaly in situ and is thus responsible for the southerly trend near Taiwan. The relative SST trend pattern is attributed mainly to the greenhouse gas effect associated with anthropogenic activities. The southerly trend near Taiwan is more pronounced in the boreal winter than in summer. Such seasonal difference is attributed to the reversed seasonal mean wind, which promotes more efficient positive feedback in the boreal winter. The CMIP5 historical run analysis reveals that climate models capture less SST warming and large-scale anti-cyclonic circulation in the subtropical North Pacific, but the simulated weakening trend of the surface wind speed near Taiwan is too small.

  19. Hurricane Harvey: Infrastructure Damage Assessment of Texas' Central Gulf Coast Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, W. D.; Fovenyessy, S.; Patterson, S. F.

    2017-12-01

    We report a detailed ground-based damage survey for Hurricane Harvey, the first major hurricane to make landfall along the central Texas coast since the 1970 Category 3 Hurricane Celia. Harvey, a Category 4 storm, made landfall near Rockport, Texas on August 25th, 2017 at 10 PM local time. From September 2nd to 5th we visited Rockport and 22 nearby cities to assess the severity of the damage. Nearly all damage observed occurred as a direct result of the hurricane-force winds, rather than a storm surge. This observation is in contrast to the severe damage caused by both high winds and a significant storm surge, locally 3 to 5 m in height, in the 2013 Category 5 Hurricane Haiyan, that devastated the Philippines. We have adopted a damage scale and have given an average damage score for each of the areas investigated. Our damage contour map illustrates the areal variation in damage. The damage observed was widespread with a high degree of variability. Different types of damage included: (1) fallen fences and utility poles; (2) trees with branches broken or completely snapped in half; (3) business signs that were either partially or fully destroyed; (4) partially sunken or otherwise damaged boats; (5) and sheet metal sheds either completely or partially destroyed. There was also varying degrees of damage to both residential and commercial structures. Many homes had (6) roof damage, ranging from minor damage to complete destruction of the roof and second story, and (7) siding damage, where parts or whole sections of the homes siding had been removed. The area that had the lowest average damage score was Corpus Christi, and the areas that had the highest average damage score was both Fulton and Holiday Beach. There is no simple, uniform pattern of damage distribution. Rather, the damage was scattered, revealing hot spots of areas that received more damage than the surrounding area. However, when compared to the NOAA wind swath map, all of the damage was contained within

  20. Convergent evidence for widespread rock nitrogen sources in Earth's surface environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, B Z; Morford, S L; Dahlgren, R A

    2018-04-06

    Nitrogen availability is a pivotal control on terrestrial carbon sequestration and global climate change. Historical and contemporary views assume that nitrogen enters Earth's land-surface ecosystems from the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that bedrock is a nitrogen source that rivals atmospheric nitrogen inputs across major sectors of the global terrestrial environment. Evidence drawn from the planet's nitrogen balance, geochemical proxies, and our spatial weathering model reveal that ~19 to 31 teragrams of nitrogen are mobilized from near-surface rocks annually. About 11 to 18 teragrams of this nitrogen are chemically weathered in situ, thereby increasing the unmanaged (preindustrial) terrestrial nitrogen balance from 8 to 26%. These findings provide a global perspective to reconcile Earth's nitrogen budget, with implications for nutrient-driven controls over the terrestrial carbon sink. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  1. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between θ = 78.5 and θ = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For θ = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount of material as a

  2. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-07-10

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between {theta} = 78.5 and {theta} = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For {theta} = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount

  3. Description of climate, surface hydrology, and near-surface hydrogeology. Simpevarp 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Kent; Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten

    2005-04-01

    This report presents and evaluates the site investigations and primary data on meteorology, surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that are available in the Simpevarp 1.2 'data freeze'. The main objective is to update the previous Simpevarp 1.1 description of the meteorological, surface hydrological and near-surface hydrogeological conditions in the Simpevarp area. Based on the Simpevarp 1.2 dataset, an updated conceptual and descriptive model of the surface and near-surface water flow conditions in the Simpevarp area is presented. In cases where site investigation data are not yet available, regional and/or generic data are used as input to the modelling. GIS- and process-based tools, used for initial quantitative flow modelling, are also presented. The objectives of this initial quantitative modelling are to illustrate, quantify and support the site descriptive model, and also to produce relevant input data to the ecological systems modelling within the SKB SurfaceNet framework.For the Simpevarp 1.2 model, the relevant site investigations include the establishment of one local meteorological station and surface-hydrological stations for discharge measurements, delineation and description of catchment areas, manual discharge measurements in water courses, slug tests in groundwater monitoring wells, and manual groundwater level measurements. In addition, other investigations have also contributed to the modelling, providing data on geometry (including topography), data from surface-based geological investigations and boreholes in Quaternary deposits, and data on the hydrogeological properties of the bedrock. The conceptual and descriptive modelling includes an identification and basic description of type areas, domains and interfaces between domains within the model area. The surface and near-surface flow system is described, including the assignment of hydrogeological properties to HSDs (Hydraulic Soil Domains) of Quaternary deposits based on a

  4. Description of climate, surface hydrology, and near-surface hydrogeology. Simpevarp 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Kent [SWECO VIAK AB/Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    This report presents and evaluates the site investigations and primary data on meteorology, surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that are available in the Simpevarp 1.2 'data freeze'. The main objective is to update the previous Simpevarp 1.1 description of the meteorological, surface hydrological and near-surface hydrogeological conditions in the Simpevarp area. Based on the Simpevarp 1.2 dataset, an updated conceptual and descriptive model of the surface and near-surface water flow conditions in the Simpevarp area is presented. In cases where site investigation data are not yet available, regional and/or generic data are used as input to the modelling. GIS- and process-based tools, used for initial quantitative flow modelling, are also presented. The objectives of this initial quantitative modelling are to illustrate, quantify and support the site descriptive model, and also to produce relevant input data to the ecological systems modelling within the SKB SurfaceNet framework.For the Simpevarp 1.2 model, the relevant site investigations include the establishment of one local meteorological station and surface-hydrological stations for discharge measurements, delineation and description of catchment areas, manual discharge measurements in water courses, slug tests in groundwater monitoring wells, and manual groundwater level measurements. In addition, other investigations have also contributed to the modelling, providing data on geometry (including topography), data from surface-based geological investigations and boreholes in Quaternary deposits, and data on the hydrogeological properties of the bedrock. The conceptual and descriptive modelling includes an identification and basic description of type areas, domains and interfaces between domains within the model area. The surface and near-surface flow system is described, including the assignment of hydrogeological properties to HSDs (Hydraulic Soil Domains) of Quaternary deposits based on a

  5. Test case for a near-surface repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elert, M.; Jones, C. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Nilsson, L.B. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Co, Stockholm (Sweden); Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    A test case is presented for assessment of a near-surface disposal facility for radioactive waste. The case includes waste characterization and repository design, requirements and constraints in an assessment context, scenario development, model description and test calculations 6 refs, 12 tabs, 16 figs

  6. Damage resistance of AR-coated germanium surfaces for nanosecond CO2 laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnam, B.E.; Gill, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of the state-of-the-art of AR coatings on gallium-doped germanium, used as a saturable absorber at 10.6 μm, has been conducted. Both 1-on-1 and N-on-1 laser damage thresholds were measured with 1.2 ns pulses on bare and coated surfaces. Only front surface damage was observed. With few exceptions, the thresholds for coated surfaces were centered at 0.49 +- 0.3 J/cm 2 . Bare Ge had a threshold ranging from 0.65 to 0.70 J/cm 2 . No significant differences due to substrate polish, crystallinity or doping level were evident and multiple-shot conditioning resulted in the same threshold as for single shot tests. From an analysis of standing-wave electric fields, damage for AR-coated Ge appeared to be limited by the surface properties of Ge. Measurements at both 1.2 and 70 ns indicated that the threshold (J/cm 2 ) of both coated and uncoated Ge increases as the square root of the pulse-width

  7. Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    The INEEL Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) program has launched a new R and D project on Near-Surface Engineered Environmental Barrier Integrity to increase knowledge and capabilities for using engineering and ecological components to improve the integrity of near-surface barriers used to confine contaminants from the public and the environment. The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions and enable improved solutions for future cleanup decisions. The research is planned to (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms (weathering, biological, geological, chemical, radiological, and catastrophic) in times shorter than service life, (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics, (c) develop sensor systems to identify degradation prior to failure, and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems to increase reliability and reduce the risk of failure. Our project combine s selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing and the meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The performance of evapo-transpiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers will be examined

  8. Convergent evidence for widespread rock nitrogen sources in Earth’s surface environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Morford, S. L.; Dahlgren, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    Nitrogen availability is a pivotal control on terrestrial carbon sequestration and global climate change. Historical and contemporary views assume that nitrogen enters Earth’s land-surface ecosystems from the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that bedrock is a nitrogen source that rivals atmospheric nitrogen inputs across major sectors of the global terrestrial environment. Evidence drawn from the planet’s nitrogen balance, geochemical proxies, and our spatial weathering model reveal that ~19 to 31 teragrams of nitrogen are mobilized from near-surface rocks annually. About 11 to 18 teragrams of this nitrogen are chemically weathered in situ, thereby increasing the unmanaged (preindustrial) terrestrial nitrogen balance from 8 to 26%. These findings provide a global perspective to reconcile Earth’s nitrogen budget, with implications for nutrient-driven controls over the terrestrial carbon sink.

  9. Process induced sub-surface damage in mechanically ground silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yu; De Munck, Koen; Teixeira, Ricardo Cotrin; Swinnen, Bart; De Wolf, Ingrid; Verlinden, Bert

    2008-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microcopy, atomic force microscopy and preferential etching were used to characterize the sub-surface damage induced by the rough and fine grinding steps used to make ultra-thin silicon wafers. The roughly and ultra-finely ground silicon wafers were examined on both the machined (1 0 0) planes and the cross-sectional (1 1 0) planes. They reveal similar multi-layer damage structures, consisting of amorphous, plastically deformed and elastically stressed layers. However, the thickness of each layer in the roughly ground sample is much higher than its counterpart layers in the ultra-finely ground sample. The residual stress after rough and ultra-fine grinding is in the range of several hundreds MPa and 30 MPa, respectively. In each case, the top amorphous layer is believed to be the result of sequential phase transformations (Si-I to Si-II to amorphous Si). These phase transformations correspond to a ductile grinding mechanism, which is dominating in ultra-fine grinding. On the other hand, in rough grinding, a mixed mechanism of ductile and brittle grinding causes multi-layer damage and sub-surface cracks

  10. Photodetachment of H− near a Hard Spherical Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneef, M.; Rahman, A.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Afaq, A.

    2012-01-01

    The photodetachment of a hydrogen negative ion (H − ) near a hard spherical surface is investigated by using the theoretical imaging method. The surface is oriented in such a fashion that the laser polarization direction is perpendicular to the principal axis of the spherical surface. Analytical expressions are derived for the detached-electron flux and photodetachment cross section. Strong interference patterns are observed in the detached-electron flux, while no visible oscillations are found in the photodetachment cross section. (atomic and molecular physics)

  11. Research on near-surface disposal of very low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shaowei; Yue Huiguo; Hou Jie; Chen Haiying; Zuo Rui; Wang Jinsheng

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal is one of the most sensitive environmental problems to control and solve. As the arriving of decommissioning of early period nuclear facilities in China, large amounts of very low level radioactive waste will be produced inevitably. The domestic and abroad definitions about very low level radioactive waste and its disposal were introduced, and then siting principles of near-surface disposal of very low level radioactive waste were discussed. The near- surface disposal siting methods of very low level radioactive waste were analyzed from natural and geographical conditions assessment, geological conditions analysis, hydrogeological conditions analysis, geological hazard assessment and radioactive background investigation; the near-surface disposal sites'natural barriers of very low level radioactive waste were analyzed from the crustal structure and physico-chemical characteristics, the dynamics characteristics of groundwater, the radionuclide adsorption characteristics of natural barriers and so on; the near-surface disposal sites' engineered barriers of very low level radioactive waste were analyzed from the repository design, the repository barrier materials selection and so on. Finally, the improving direction of very low level radioactive waste disposal was proposed. (authors)

  12. Dry Etch Black Silicon with Low Surface Damage: Effect of Low Capacitively Coupled Plasma Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iandolo, Beniamino; Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Gaudig, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Black silicon fabricated by reactive ion etch (RIE) is promising for integration into silicon solar cells thanks to its excellent light trapping ability. However, intensive ion bombardment during the RIE induces surface damage, which results in enhanced surface recombination velocity. Here, we pr...... carrier lifetime thanks to reduced ion energy. Surface passivation using atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 improves the effective lifetime to 7.5 ms and 0.8 ms for black silicon n- and p-type wafers, respectively.......Black silicon fabricated by reactive ion etch (RIE) is promising for integration into silicon solar cells thanks to its excellent light trapping ability. However, intensive ion bombardment during the RIE induces surface damage, which results in enhanced surface recombination velocity. Here, we...... present a RIE optimization leading to reduced surface damage while retaining excellent light trapping and low reflectivity. In particular, we demonstrate that the reduction of the capacitively coupled power during reactive ion etching preserves a reflectance below 1% and improves the effective minority...

  13. Damages of surface ozone: evidence from agricultural sector in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fujin; McCarl, Bruce A.; Zhou, Xun; Jiang, Fei

    2018-03-01

    This study measures the damages that surface ozone pollution causes within the Chinese agricultural sector under 2014 conditions. It also analyzes the agricultural benefits of ozone reductions. The analysis is done using a partial equilibrium model of China’s agricultural sector. Results indicate that there are substantial, spatially differentiated damages that are greatest in ozone-sensitive crop growing areas with higher ozone concentrations. The estimated damage to China’s agricultural sector range is between CNY 1.6 trillion and 2.2 trillion, which for comparison is about one fifth of 2014 agricultural revenue. When considering concentration reduction we find a 30% ozone reduction yields CNY 678 billion in sectoral benefits. These benefits largely fall to consumers with producers losing as the production gains lead to lower prices.

  14. Kinetics of Accumulation of Damage in Surface Layers of Lithium-Containing Aluminum Alloys in Fatigue Tests with Rigid Loading Cycle and Corrosive Effect of Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, L. V.; Zhegina, I. P.; Grigorenko, V. B.; Fomina, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    High-resolution methods of metal physics research including electron, laser and optical microscopy are used to study the kinetics of the accumulation of slip lines and bands and the corrosion damage in the plastic zone of specimens of aluminum-lithium alloys 1441 and B-1469 in rigid-cycle fatigue tests under the joint action of applied stresses and corrosive environment. The strain parameters (the density of slip bands, the sizes of plastic zones near fracture, the surface roughness in singled-out zones) and the damage parameters (the sizes of pits and the pitting area) are evaluated.

  15. Measurements and TCAD Simulations of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects

    CERN Document Server

    F. Moscatelli; G. M. Bilei; A. Morozzi; G.-F. Dalla Betta; R. Mendicino; M. Boscardin; N. Zorzi; L. Servoli; P. Maccagnani

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose the application of a radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of radiation detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 1÷2×1016 1-MeV equivalent neutrons per square centimeter) combined with a surface damage model developed by using experimental parameters extracted from measurements from gamma irradiated p-type dedicated test structures.

  16. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection for Surfaces and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Roberson, Luke; Medelius, Pedro; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steen; Snyder, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Current designs for inflatable or semi-rigidized structures for habitats and space applications use a multiple-layer construction, alternating thin layers with thicker, stronger layers, which produces a layered composite structure that is much better at resisting damage. Even though such composite structures or layered systems are robust, they can still be susceptible to penetration damage. The ability to detect damage to surfaces of inflatable or semi-rigid habitat structures is of great interest to NASA. Damage caused by impacts of foreign objects such as micrometeorites can rupture the shell of these structures, causing loss of critical hardware and/or the life of the crew. While not all impacts will have a catastrophic result, it will be very important to identify and locate areas of the exterior shell that have been damaged by impacts so that repairs (or other provisions) can be made to reduce the probability of shell wall rupture. This disclosure describes a system that will provide real-time data regarding the health of the inflatable shell or rigidized structures, and information related to the location and depth of impact damage. The innovation described here is a method of determining the size, location, and direction of damage in a multilayered structure. In the multi-dimensional damage detection system, layers of two-dimensional thin film detection layers are used to form a layered composite, with non-detection layers separating the detection layers. The non-detection layers may be either thicker or thinner than the detection layers. The thin-film damage detection layers are thin films of materials with a conductive grid or striped pattern. The conductive pattern may be applied by several methods, including printing, plating, sputtering, photolithography, and etching, and can include as many detection layers that are necessary for the structure construction or to afford the detection detail level required. The damage is detected using a detector or

  17. Widespread distribution of OH/H2O on the lunar surface inferred from spectral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandfield, Joshua L; Poston, Michael J; Klima, Rachel L; Edwards, Christopher S

    2018-01-01

    Remote sensing data from lunar orbiters have revealed spectral features consistent with the presence of OH or H 2 O on the lunar surface. Analyses of data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper spectrometer onboard the Chandryaan-1 spacecraft have suggested that OH/H 2 O is recycled on diurnal timescales and persists only at high latitudes. However, the spatial distribution and temporal variability of the OH/H 2 O, as well as its source, remain uncertain. Here we incorporate a physics-based thermal correction into analysis of reflectance spectra from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper and find that prominent absorption features consistent with OH/H 2 O can be present at all latitudes, local times, and surface types examined. This suggests the widespread presence of OH/H 2 O on the lunar surface without significant diurnal migration. We suggest that the spectra are consistent with the production of OH in space weathered materials by the solar wind implantation of H + and formation of OH at crystal defect sites, as opposed to H 2 O sourced from the lunar interior. Regardless of the specific composition or formation mechanism, we conclude that OH/H 2 O can be present on the Moon under thermal conditions more wide-ranging than previously recognized.

  18. Biomolecular Nano-Flow-Sensor to Measure Near-Surface Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noji Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated that the measurement of the near-surface flow at the interface between a liquid and solid using a 10 nm-sized biomolecular motor of F1-ATPase as a nano-flow-sensor. For this purpose, we developed a microfluidic test-bed chip to precisely control the liquid flow acting on the F1-ATPase. In order to visualize the rotation of F1-ATPase, several hundreds nanometer-sized particle was immobilized at the rotational axis of F1-ATPase to enhance the rotation to be detected by optical microscopy. The rotational motion of F1-ATPase, which was immobilized on an inner surface of the test-bed chip, was measured to obtain the correlation between the near-surface flow and the rotation speed of F1-ATPase. As a result, we obtained the relationship that the rotation speed of F1-ATPase was linearly decelerated with increasing flow velocity. The mechanism of the correlation between the rotation speed and the near-surface flow remains unclear, however the concept to use biomolecule as a nano-flow-sensor was proofed successfully. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9479-3 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  19. Drought's legacy: multiyear hydraulic deterioration underlies widespread aspen forest die-off and portends increased future risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, William R L; Plavcová, Lenka; Anderegg, Leander D L; Hacke, Uwe G; Berry, Joseph A; Field, Christopher B

    2013-04-01

    Forest mortality constitutes a major uncertainty in projections of climate impacts on terrestrial ecosystems and carbon-cycle feedbacks. Recent drought-induced, widespread forest die-offs highlight that climate change could accelerate forest mortality with its diverse and potentially severe consequences for the global carbon cycle, ecosystem services, and biodiversity. How trees die during drought over multiple years remains largely unknown and precludes mechanistic modeling and prediction of forest die-off with climate change. Here, we examine the physiological basis of a recent multiyear widespread die-off of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) across much of western North America. Using observations from both native trees while they are dying and a rainfall exclusion experiment on mature trees, we measure hydraulic performance over multiple seasons and years and assess pathways of accumulated hydraulic damage. We test whether accumulated hydraulic damage can predict the probability of tree survival over 2 years. We find that hydraulic damage persisted and increased in dying trees over multiple years and exhibited few signs of repair. This accumulated hydraulic deterioration is largely mediated by increased vulnerability to cavitation, a process known as cavitation fatigue. Furthermore, this hydraulic damage predicts the probability of interyear stem mortality. Contrary to the expectation that surviving trees have weathered severe drought, the hydraulic deterioration demonstrated here reveals that surviving regions of these forests are actually more vulnerable to future droughts due to accumulated xylem damage. As the most widespread tree species in North America, increasing vulnerability to drought in these forests has important ramifications for ecosystem stability, biodiversity, and ecosystem carbon balance. Our results provide a foundation for incorporating accumulated drought impacts into climate-vegetation models. Finally, our findings highlight the

  20. The sinkhole of Schmalkalden, Germany - Imaging of near-surface subrosion structures and faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja H.; Tschache, Saskia; Polom, Ulrich; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2017-04-01

    In November 2010 a sinkhole of 30 m diameter and 20 m depth opened in a residential area in the village Schmalkalden, Germany, which fortunately led to damage of buildings and property only. The collapse was caused by leaching of soluble rocks in the subsurface, called subrosion. For an improved understanding of the processes leading to subrosion and sinkhole development a detailed characterization of the subsurface structures and elastic parameters is required. We used shear wave reflection seismic, which has proven to be a suitable method for high-resolution imaging of the near-surface. The village Schmalkalden is located in southern Thuringia in Germany. Since the Upper Cretaceous the area is dominated by fault tectonics, fractures and joints, which increase the rock permeability. The circulating groundwater leaches the Permian saline deposits in the subsurface and forms upward migrating cavities, which can develop into sinkholes, if the overburden collapses. In the direct vicinity of the backfilled sinkhole, five 2-D shear wave reflection seismic profiles with total length of ca. 900 m and a zero-offset VSP down to 150 m depth were acquired. For the surface profiles a 120-channel landstreamer attached with horizontal geophones and an electrodynamic micro-vibrator, exciting horizontally polarized shear waves, were used. For the VSP survey an oriented borehole probe equipped with a 3C-geophone and electrodynamic and hydraulic vibrators, exciting compression- and shear waves, were utilized. The seismic sections show high-resolution images from the surface to ca. 100 m depth. They display heterogeneous structures as indicated by strong vertical and lateral variations of the reflectors. In the near-surface, depressions are visible and zones of low seismic velocities sinkhole. The VSP data shows anomalies of the Vp-Vs ratio with values above 2,5. This indicates unstable zones correlated with the anomalies revealed by the 2-D sections. Possible factors for the

  1. The impact of mechanical log surface damage on chip size ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanised harvesting operations are becoming more prevalent in South Africa with the realisation that motormanual and manual harvesting operations pose significant health and safety risks to workers. The damage inflicted by single-grip harvester feed rollers and delimbing knives on log surfaces during debranching ...

  2. Near-surface bulk densities of asteroids derived from dual-polarization radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, A.; Taylor, P. A.; Zambrano-Marin, L. F.; Howell, E. S.; Nolan, M. C.; Lejoly, C.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Aponte, B. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a new method to constrain the near-surface bulk density and surface roughness of regolith on asteroid surfaces using planetary radar measurements. The number of radar observations has increased rapidly during the last five years, allowing us to compare and contrast the radar scattering properties of different small-body populations and compositional types. This provides us with new opportunities to investigate their near-surface physical properties such as the chemical composition, bulk density, porosity, or the structural roughness in the scale of centimeters to meters. Because the radar signal can penetrate into a planetary surface up to a few decimeters, radar can reveal information that is hidden from other ground-based methods, such as optical and infrared measurements. The near-surface structure of asteroids and comets in centimeter-to-meter scale is essential information for robotic and human space missions, impact threat mitigation, and understanding the history of these bodies as well as the formation of the whole Solar System.

  3. Quantitative evaluation for small surface damage based on iterative difference and triangulation of 3D point cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyan; Guo, Quanli; Wang, Zhenchun; Yang, Degong

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes a non-contact, non-destructive evaluation method for the surface damage of high-speed sliding electrical contact rails. The proposed method establishes a model of damage identification and calculation. A laser scanning system is built to obtain the 3D point cloud data of the rail surface. In order to extract the damage region of the rail surface, the 3D point cloud data are processed using iterative difference, nearest neighbours search and a data registration algorithm. The curvature of the point cloud data in the damage region is mapped to RGB color information, which can directly reflect the change trend of the curvature of the point cloud data in the damage region. The extracted damage region is divided into three prism elements by a method of triangulation. The volume and mass of a single element are calculated by the method of geometric segmentation. Finally, the total volume and mass of the damage region are obtained by the principle of superposition. The proposed method is applied to several typical injuries and the results are discussed. The experimental results show that the algorithm can identify damage shapes and calculate damage mass with milligram precision, which are useful for evaluating the damage in a further research stage.

  4. Highlighting the DNA damage response with ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared and kinetic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eFerrando-May

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the mechanisms governing the response to DNA damage in higher eucaryotes crucially depends on our ability to dissect the temporal and spatial organization of the cellular machinery responsible for maintaining genomic integrity. To achieve this goal, we need experimental tools to inflict DNA lesions with high spatial precision at pre-defined locations, and to visualize the ensuing reactions with adequate temporal resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses focused through high-aperture objective lenses of advanced scanning microscopes offer the advantage of inducing DNA damage in a 3D-confined volume of subnuclear dimensions. This high spatial resolution results from the highly nonlinear nature of the excitation process. Here we review recent progress based on the increasing availability of widely tunable and user-friendly technology of ultrafast lasers in the near infrared. We present a critical evaluation of this approach for DNA microdamage as compared to the currently prevalent use of UV or VIS laser irradiation, the latter in combination with photosensitizers. Current and future applications in the field of DNA repair and DNA-damage dependent chromatin dynamics are outlined. Finally, we discuss the requirement for proper simulation and quantitative modeling. We focus in particular on approaches to measure the effect of DNA damage on the mobility of nuclear proteins and consider the pros and cons of frequently used analysis models for FRAP and photoactivation and their applicability to nonlinear photoperturbation experiments.

  5. Modeling and observational occurrences of near-surface drainage in Utopia Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F.; Sejourne, A.; Kargel, J.; Godin, E.

    2016-12-01

    During the past 15 years, evidence for an ice-rich planet Mars has rapidly mounted, become increasingly varied in terms of types of deposits and types of observational data, and has become more widespread across the surface. The mid-latitudes of Mars, especially Utopia Planitia, show many types of interesting landforms similar to those in periglacial landscapes on Earth that suggest the presence of ice-rich permafrost. These include thermal contraction polygonal networks, scalloped terrains similar to thermokarst pits, debris flows, small mounds like pingos and rock glaciers. Here, we address questions concerning the influence of meltwater in the Utopia Planitia (UP) landscape using analogs of near-surface melting and drainage along ice-wedge troughs on Bylot Island, northern Canada. In Utopia Planitia, based on the identification of sinuous channel-like pits within polygonal networks, we suggest that episodic underground melting was possible under severe periglacial climate conditions. In UP, the collapse pattern and morphology of unconnected sinuous elongated pits that follow the polygon crack are similar to underground melting in Bylot Island (Nunavut, Canada). Based on this terrestrial analogue, we develop a thermal model that consists of a thick insulating dusty layer over ice-saturated dust during a period of slight climatic warming relative to today's climate. In the model, the melting point is reached at depths down to 150 m. We suggest that small-scale melting could have occurred below ground within ground-ice polygonal fractures and pooled in underground cavities. Then the water may have been released episodically causing mechanical erosion as well as undermining and collapse. After melting, the dry surface dusty layer might have been blown away, thus exposing the degraded terrain of the substrate layer.

  6. Photodetachment of negative ion in a gradient electric field near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tian-Qi; Wang De-Hua; Han Cai; Liu Jiang; Liang Dong-Qi; Xie Si-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Based on closed-orbit theory, the photodetachment of H − in a gradient electric field near a metal surface is studied. It is demonstrated that the gradient electric field has a significant influence on the photodetachment of negative ions near a metal surface. With the increase of the gradient of the electric field, the oscillation in the photodetachment cross section becomes strengthened. Besides, in contrast to the photodetachment of H − near a metal surface in a uniform electric field, the oscillating amplitude and the oscillating region in the cross section of a gradient electric field also become enlarged. Therefore, we can use the gradient electric field to control the photodetachment of negative ions near a metal surface. We hope that our results will be useful for understanding the photodetachment of negative ions in the vicinity of surfaces, cavities, and ion traps. (atomic and molecular physics)

  7. Near-field Spectroscopy of Surface Plasmons in Flat Gold Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achermann, Marc; Shuford, Kevin L.; Schatz, George C.; Dahanayaka, D.H.; Bumm, Lloyd A; Klimov, Victor I.

    2007-01-01

    We use near-field interference spectroscopy with a broadband femtosecond, white-light probe to study local surface plasmon resonances in flat gold nanoparticles (FGNPs). Depending on nanoparticle dimensions, local near-field extinction spectra exhibit none, one, or two resonances in the range of visible wavelengths (1.6-2.6 eV). The measured spectra can be accurately described in terms of interference between the field emitted by the probe aperture and the field reradiated by driven FGNP surface plasmon oscillations. The measured resonances are in good agreement with those predicted by calculations using discrete dipole approximation. We observe that the amplitudes of these resonances are dependent upon the spatial position of the near-field probe, which indicates the possibility of spatially selective excitation of specific plasmon modes

  8. Near-ground cooling efficacies of trees and high-albedo surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Daytime summer urban heat islands arise when the prevalence of dark-colored surfaces and lack of vegetation make a city warmer than neighboring countryside. Two frequentlyproposed summer heat island mitigation measures are to plant trees and to increase the albedo (solar reflectivity) of ground surfaces. This dissertation examines the effects of these measures on the surface temperature of an object near the ground, and on solar heating of air near the ground. Near-ground objects include people, vehicles, and buildings. The variation of the surface temperature of a near-ground object with ground albedo indicates that a rise in ground albedo will cool a near-ground object only if the object’s albedo exceeds a critical value. This critical value of object albedo depends on wind speed, object geometry, and the height of the atmospheric thermal boundary layer. It ranges from 0.15 to 0.37 for a person. If an object has typical albedo of 0.3, increasing the ground albedo by 0.25 perturbs the object’s surface temperature by -1 to +2 K. Comparing a tree’s canopy-to-air convection to the reduction in ground-to-air convection induced by tree shading of the ground indicates that the presence of a tree can either increase or decrease solar heating of ground-level air. The tree’s net effect depends on the extent to which solar heating of the canopy is dissipated by evaporation, and on the fraction of air heated by the canopy that flows downward and mixes with the ground-level air. A two-month lysimeter (plant-weighing) experiment was conducted to measure instantaneous rates of water loss from a tree under various conditions of weather and soil-moisture. Calculations of canopy-to-air convection and the reduction of ground-to-air convection based on this data indicate that canopy-induced heating would negate shadowinduced cooling if approximately 45% of the canopy-heated air mixed with ground level air. This critical fraction is comparable to typical downward mixing

  9. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios, E-mail: maroudas@ecs.umass.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-9303 (United States); Hammond, Karl D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He{sub 4} and He{sub 5} clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  10. Near surface silicide formation after off-normal Fe-implantation of Si(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbabaee, B., E-mail: khanbabaee@physik.uni-siegen.de; Pietsch, U. [Solid State Physics, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Hübner, R.; Grenzer, J.; Facsko, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-14

    We report on formation of non-crystalline Fe-silicides of various stoichiometries below the amorphized surface of crystalline Si(001) after irradiation with 5 keV Fe{sup +} ions under off-normal incidence. We examined samples prepared with ion fluences of 0.1 × 10{sup 17} and 5 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2} exhibiting a flat and patterned surface morphology, respectively. Whereas the iron silicides are found across the whole surface of the flat sample, they are concentrated at the top of ridges at the rippled surface. A depth resolved analysis of the chemical states of Si and Fe atoms in the near surface region was performed by combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The chemical shift and the line shape of the Si 2p core levels and valence bands were measured and associated with the formation of silicide bonds of different stoichiometric composition changing from an Fe-rich silicides (Fe{sub 3}Si) close to the surface into a Si-rich silicide (FeSi{sub 2}) towards the inner interface to the Si(001) substrate. This finding is supported by XAS analysis at the Fe K-edge which shows changes of the chemical environment and the near order atomic coordination of the Fe atoms in the region close to surface. Because a similar Fe depth profile has been found for samples co-sputtered with Fe during Kr{sup +} ion irradiation, our results suggest the importance of chemically bonded Fe in the surface region for the process of ripple formation.

  11. The wide-spread presence of rib-like patterns in basal shear of ice streams detected by surface data inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergienko, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    The direct observations of the basal conditions under continental-scale ice sheets are logistically impossible. A possible approach to estimate conditions at the ice - bed interface is from surface observations by means of inverse methods. The recent advances in remote and ground-based observations have allowed to acquire a wealth observations from Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. Using high-resolution data sets of ice surface and bed elevations and surface velocities, inversions for basal conditions have been performed for several ice streams in Greenland and Antarctica. The inversion results reveal the wide-spread presence of rib-like spatial structures in basal shear. The analysis of the hydraulic potential distribution shows that these rib-like structures co-locate with highs of the gradient of hydraulic potential. This suggests that subglacial water plays a role in the development and evolution of the basal shear ribs.

  12. Multi-scale fracture damage associated with underground chemical explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, E. M.; Sussman, A. J.; Wilson, J. E.; Townsend, M. J.; Prothro, L. B.; Gang, H. E.

    2018-05-01

    Understanding rock damage induced by explosions is critical for a number of applications including the monitoring and verification of underground nuclear explosions, mine safety issues, and modeling fluid flow through fractured rock. We use core observations, televiewer logs, and thin section observations to investigate fracture damage associated with two successive underground chemical explosions (SPE2 and SPE3) in granitic rock at both the mesoscale and microscale. We compare the frequency and orientations of core-scale fractures, and the frequency of microfractures, between a pre-experiment core and three post-experiment cores. Natural fault zones and explosion-induced fractures in the vicinity of the explosive source are readily apparent in recovered core and in thin sections. Damage from faults and explosions is not always apparent in fracture frequency plots from televiewer logs, although orientation data from these logs suggests explosion-induced fracturing may not align with the pre-existing fracture sets. Core-scale observations indicate the extent of explosion-induced damage is 10.0 m after SPE2 and 6.8 m after SPE3, despite both a similar size and location for both explosions. At the microscale, damage is observed to a range distance of 10.2 ± 0.9 m after SPE2, and 16.6 ± 0.9 and 11.2 ± 0.6 in two different cores collected after SPE3. Additional explosion-induced damage, interpreted to be the result of spalling, is readily apparent near the surface, but only in the microfracture data. This depth extent and intensity of damage in the near-surface region also increased after an additional explosion. This study highlights the importance of evaluating structural damage at multiple scales for a more complete characterization of the damage, and particularly shows the importance of microscale observations for identifying spallation-induced damage.

  13. Near-surface fault detection by migrating back-scattered surface waves with and without velocity profiles

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Han

    2016-04-26

    We demonstrate that diffraction stack migration can be used to discover the distribution of near-surface faults. The methodology is based on the assumption that near-surface faults generate detectable back-scattered surface waves from impinging surface waves. We first isolate the back-scattered surface waves by muting or FK filtering, and then migrate them by diffraction migration using the surface wave velocity as the migration velocity. Instead of summing events along trial quasi-hyperbolas, surface wave migration sums events along trial quasi-linear trajectories that correspond to the moveout of back-scattered surface waves. We have also proposed a natural migration method that utilizes the intrinsic traveltime property of the direct and the back-scattered waves at faults. For the synthetic data sets and the land data collected in Aqaba, where surface wave velocity has unexpected perturbations, we migrate the back-scattered surface waves with both predicted velocity profiles and natural Green\\'s function without velocity information. Because the latter approach avoids the need for an accurate velocity model in event summation, both the prestack and stacked migration images show competitive quality. Results with both synthetic data and field records validate the feasibility of this method. We believe applying this method to global or passive seismic data can open new opportunities in unveiling tectonic features.

  14. Surface damage in TEM thick α-Fe samples by implantation with 150 keV Fe ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliaga, M.J.; Caturla, M.J.; Schäublin, R.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of implantation of 150 keV Fe ions in pure bcc Fe. The thickness of the simulation box is of the same order of those used in in situ TEM analysis of irradiated materials. We assess the effect of the implantation angle and the presence of front and back surfaces. The number and type of defects, ion range, cluster distribution and primary damage morphology are studied. Results indicate that, for the very thin samples used in in situ TEM irradiation experiments the presence of surfaces affect dramatically the damage produced. At this particular energy, the ion has sufficient energy to damage both the top and the back surfaces and still leave the sample through the bottom. This provides new insights on the study of radiation damage using TEM in situ

  15. Correlation of DT and DD fusion neutron damage in silicon surface barrier detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Toshiyuki; Sueyoshi, Yasuhiro; Sunarno; Takahashi, Akito

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the correlation of DT and DD fusion neutron damage in Si, a silicon surface barrier detector (Si-SBD) was irradiation with neutrons from a deuteron accelerator. The leakage current increased proportionally with neutron fluence, which determined the neutron damage constant for the Si-SBD. The correlation factor of the DT and DD neutron damage in the Si-SBD was determined from the ratio of the DT and DD neutron damage constants and was found to be 2.3. We also calculated the rate of DT and DD neutron displacement damage for Si by using the TRIM-90 computer program and actual data on neutron reactions in the Si-SBD. The correlation factor of DT and DD neutron damage from the calculation agreed with that from the Si-SBD irradiation experiment. (author)

  16. The study of sub-surface damage distributions during grinding process on different abrasion materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Huang, Chien-Yao; Yu, Zong-Ru; Shu, Shyu-Cheng; Chang, Keng-Shou; Hsu, Wei-Yao

    2017-10-01

    The grinding process is the primary technology for curvature generation (CG) on glass optics. The higher material removal rate (MRR) leads to deeper sub-surface damage (SSD) on lens surface. The SSD must be removed by following lapping and polishing processes to ensure the lens quality. However, these are not an easy and an efficient process to remove the SSD from ground surface directly for aspheric surfaces with tens or hundreds microns departure from bestfit- sphere (BFS). An efficient fabrication procedure for large aspheric departure on glass materials must be considered. We propose 3-step fabrication procedures for aspheric surface with larger departure. 1st step is to generate a specific aspheric surface with depth less than 10 μm of SSD residual. 2nd step is to remove SSD and keep the aspheric form by using Zeeko polisher with higher MRR pad. Final step is to figure and finish the aspheric surface by using QED MRF machine. In this study, we focus on the 1st step to investigate the residual depth of SSD after grinding process on different abrasion materials. The materials of tested part are fused silica, S-NPH2, and S-PHM52. The cross grinding would be configured and depth of SSD/surface roughness would be evaluated in this study. The characteristic of SSD could be observed after etching by confocal microscope. The experimental results show the depth of SSD below 31.1 μm with #400 grinding wheel. And the near 10 μm depth of SSD would be achieved with #1,000 grinding wheel. It means the aspherization polishing on large parts with large departure from best fit sphere would be replaced. The fabrication of large aspheric part would be efficient.

  17. Quantification of acute vocal fold epithelial surface damage with increasing time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kojima

    Full Text Available Because the vocal folds undergo repeated trauma during continuous cycles of vibration, the epithelium is routinely susceptible to damage during phonation. Excessive and prolonged vibration exposure is considered a significant predisposing factor in the development of vocal fold pathology. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the extent of epithelial surface damage following increased time and magnitude doses of vibration exposure using an in vivo rabbit phonation model. Forty-five New Zealand white breeder rabbits were randomized to nine groups and received varying phonation time-doses (30, 60, or 120 minutes and magnitude-doses (control, modal intensity phonation, or raised intensity phonation of vibration exposure. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy was used to quantify the degree of epithelial surface damage. Results revealed a significant reduction in microprojection density, microprojection height, and depth of the epithelial surface with increasing time and phonation magnitudes doses, signifying increased epithelial surface damage risk with excessive and prolonged vibration exposure. Destruction to the epithelial cell surface may provide significant insight into the disruption of cell function following prolonged vibration exposure. One important goal achieved in the present study was the quantification of epithelial surface damage using objective imaging criteria. These data provide an important foundation for future studies of long-term tissue recovery from excessive and prolonged vibration exposure.

  18. Surface damage in the small intestine of the mouse after X - or neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlet, R.; Carr, K.E.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1981-01-01

    Damage after X-irradiation includes lateral villous collapse, progressing after 3 - 5 days to villi which sometimes show signs of vertical collapse. After neutron irradiation vertical villous collapse is established earlier, with less swelling of villous tips. It seems, therefore, that at radiobiologically equivalent doses, neutron and X-irradiation produce different levels of surface damage, with neutron irradiation being the more destructive. Early villous tip damage may perhaps be due to disruption of susceptible cells already at the extrusion zone, or to stromal damage

  19. Regime transitions in near-surface temperature inversions : a conceptual model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wiel, B.J.H.; Vignon, E.; Baas, P.; Bosveld, F.C.; de Roode, S.R.; Moene, A.F.; Genthon, C.; van der Linden, Steven J.A.; van Hooft, J. Antoon; van Hooijdonk, I.G.S.

    2017-01-01

    A conceptual model is used in combination with observational analysis to understand regime transitions of near-surface temperature inversions at night as well as in Arctic conditions. The model combines a surface energy budget with a bulk parameterization for turbulent heat transport. Energy fluxes

  20. LASER SURFACE CLADDING FOR STRUCTURAL REPAIR

    OpenAIRE

    SANTANU PAUL

    2018-01-01

    Laser cladding is a powder deposition technique, which is used to deposit layers of clad material on a substrate to improve its surface properties. It has widespread application in the repair of dies and molds used in the automobile industry. These molds and dies are subjected to cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and therefore undergo localized damage and wear. The final clad quality and integrity is influenced by various physical phenomena, namely, melt pool morphology, microst...

  1. 30 CFR 780.27 - Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground mining. 780.27 Section 780.27 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL...

  2. KS 20322007 Near-Surface Disposal Radioactive Waste - Code Of Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omondi, C.

    2017-01-01

    To provide a basis for the near-surface disposal of solid radioactive waste to ensures that there is no unacceptable risk to humans, other biota or the environment. Near-Surface Disposal is the disposal of radioactive waste in below or above the natural ground surface, within app. 30 m. The code deals with management aspects associated with radioactive waste disposal only, and is not intended to cover issues related to the production and use of radionuclides. The objective of waste disposal is to isolate radioactive waste in order to ensure that there is no unacceptable health risk to humans and no long-term unacceptable effect to the environment. Radiation protection annual effective dose for exposure of members of the public should not exceed 1 mSv/year and occupational exposure of 20 mSv/year

  3. Clustering and segregation of small vacancy clusters near tungsten (0 0 1) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guohua; Li, Xiangyan; Xu, Yichun; Zhang, Yange; Jiang, Yan; Hao, Congyu; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2018-01-01

    Nanoporous metals have been shown to exhibit radiation-tolerance due to the trapping of the defects by the surface. However, the behavior of vacancy clusters near the surface is not clear which involves the competition between the self-trapping and segregation of small vacancy clusters (Vn) nearby the surface. In this study, we investigated the energetic and kinetic properties of small vacancy clusters near tungsten (0 0 1) surface by combining molecular statics (MS) calculations and object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations. Results show that vacancies could be clustered with the reduced formation energy and migration energy of the single vacancy around a cluster as the respective energetic and kinetic driving forces. The small cluster has a migration energy barrier comparable to that for the single vacancy; the migration energy barriers for V1-5 and V7 are 1.80, 1.94, 2.17, 2.78, 3.12 and 3.11 eV, respectively. Clusters and become unstable near surface (0 0 1) and tend to dissociate into the surface. At the operation temperature of 1000 K, the single vacancy, V2, 2 V 3 V3 and V4 were observed to segregate to the surface within a time of one hour. Meanwhile, larger clusters survived near the surface, which could serve as nucleating center for voids near the surface. Our results suggest that under a low radiation dose, surface (0 0 1) could act as a sink for small vacancy clusters, alleviating defect accumulation in the material under a low radiation dose. We also obtained several empirical expressions for the vacancy cluster formation energy, binding energy, and trapping radius as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  4. Measurements of the near-surface flow over a hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosper, S. B.; Mobbs, S. D.; Gardiner, B. A.

    2002-10-01

    The near-surface flow over a hill with moderate slope and height comparable with the boundary-layer depth is investigated through field measurements of the mean flow (at 2 m), surface pressure, and turbulent momentum flux divergence between 8 and 15 m. The measurements were made along an east-west transect across the hill Tighvein (height 458 m, approximate width 8 km) on the Isle of Arran, south-west Scotland, during two separate periods, each of around three-weeks duration. Radiosonde ascents are used to determine the variation of a Froude number, FL = U/NL, where U is the wind speed at the middle-layer height, hm, N is the mean Brunt-Väisälä frequency below this height and L is a hill length-scale. Measurements show that for moderately stratified flows (for which FL 0.25) a minimum in the hill-induced surface-pressure perturbation occurs across the summit and this is accompanied by a maximum in the near-surface wind speed. In the more strongly stratified case (FL 0.25) the pressure field is more asymmetric and the lee-slope flow is generally stronger than on the windward slope. Such a flow pattern is qualitatively consistent with that predicted by stratified linear boundary-layer and gravity-wave theories. The near-surface momentum budget is analysed by evaluating the dominant terms in a Bernoulli equation suitable for turbulent flow. Measurements during periods of westerly flow are used to evaluate the dominant terms, and the equation is shown to hold to a reasonable approximation on the upwind slope of the hill and also on the downwind slope, away from the summit. Immediately downwind of the summit, however, the Bernoulli equation does not hold. Possible reasons for this, such as non-separated sheltering and flow separation, are discussed.

  5. Near field evidence of backward surface plasmon polaritons on negative index material boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas, Mauro; Grunhut, Vivian; Depine, Ricardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electromagnetic scattering from a localized defect on a NIM surface is presented. • The electromagnetic response strongly depends on the SPPs excited. • Near field distribution reveals the forward or backward character of SPPs excited. - Abstract: We present a detailed analysis about the electromagnetic response of a metamaterial surface with a localized defect. The excitation of electromagnetic surface waves leads to a near-field distribution showing a periodic dependence along the metamaterial surface. We find that this periodic pattern provides a direct demonstration of the forward or backward surface wave propagation.

  6. Near field evidence of backward surface plasmon polaritons on negative index material boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas, Mauro, E-mail: cuevas@df.uba.ar [Facultad de Ingeniería y Tecnología Informática, Universidad de Belgrano, Villanueva 1324, C1426BMJ, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Grunhut, Vivian [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Austral (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Depine, Ricardo A. [Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Física, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2016-12-09

    Highlights: • Electromagnetic scattering from a localized defect on a NIM surface is presented. • The electromagnetic response strongly depends on the SPPs excited. • Near field distribution reveals the forward or backward character of SPPs excited. - Abstract: We present a detailed analysis about the electromagnetic response of a metamaterial surface with a localized defect. The excitation of electromagnetic surface waves leads to a near-field distribution showing a periodic dependence along the metamaterial surface. We find that this periodic pattern provides a direct demonstration of the forward or backward surface wave propagation.

  7. Effects of temperature and surface orientation on migration behaviours of helium atoms near tungsten surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoshuang; Wu, Zhangwen; Hou, Qing, E-mail: qhou@scu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dependence of migration behaviours of single helium atoms near tungsten surfaces on the surface orientation and temperature. For W{100} and W{110} surfaces, He atoms can quickly escape out near the surface without accumulation even at a temperature of 400 K. The behaviours of helium atoms can be well-described by the theory of continuous diffusion of particles in a semi-infinite medium. For a W{111} surface, the situation is complex. Different types of trap mutations occur within the neighbouring region of the W{111} surface. The trap mutations hinder the escape of He atoms, resulting in their accumulation. The probability of a He atom escaping into vacuum from a trap mutation depends on the type of the trap mutation, and the occurrence probabilities of the different types of trap mutations are dependent on the temperature. This finding suggests that the escape rate of He atoms on the W{111} surface does not show a monotonic dependence on temperature. For instance, the escape rate at T = 1500 K is lower than the rate at T = 1100 K. Our results are useful for understanding the structural evolution and He release on tungsten surfaces and for designing models in other simulation methods beyond molecular dynamics.

  8. The apparent effect of sample surface damage on the dielectric parameters of GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, J.A.A. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)], E-mail: Japie.Engelbrecht@nmmu.ac.za; Hashe, N.G. [Physics Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Hillie, K.T. [CSIR-NML Laboratory, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Claassens, C.H. [Physics Department, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa)

    2007-12-15

    The dielectric and optical parameters determined by infrared reflectance spectroscopy and computer simulation of a set of GaAs substrates of various surface topologies are reported. The influence of surface damage on the parameters is noted.

  9. The apparent effect of sample surface damage on the dielectric parameters of GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelbrecht, J.A.A.; Hashe, N.G.; Hillie, K.T.; Claassens, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    The dielectric and optical parameters determined by infrared reflectance spectroscopy and computer simulation of a set of GaAs substrates of various surface topologies are reported. The influence of surface damage on the parameters is noted

  10. Electrical properties of polyimides containing a near-surface deposit of silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancourt, J. D.; Porta, G. M.; Taylor, L. T.

    1987-01-01

    Films containing a surface or near-surface deposit of palladium, gold or copper metal as well as tin, cobalt, copper, or lithium oxides have been prepared by dissolving appropriate metal salts into poly(amide-acid)/N,N-dimethylacetamide solutions and curing the solvent cast films to temperatures up to 300 C. This preparation technique has been extended to evaluate the thermal, spectroscopic, and electrical characteristics of condensation polyimide films modified with silver nitrate. A near-surface deposit of metallic silver results but the reflective surface has high electrical resistivity (sheet resistivity) due to a polymer coating or overlayer above the metal. Details pertaining to the silver nitrate modified condensation polyimides are presented. Also, the applicability of the structural model and electrical model previously proposed for the cobalt oxide system are assessed.

  11. On the computation of the turbulent flow near rough surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, S. K.; Jaychibekov, N. Zh.; Shalabayeva, B. S.

    2018-05-01

    One of the problems in constructing mathematical models of turbulence is a description of the flows near a rough surface. An experimental study of such flows is also difficult because of the impossibility of measuring "inside" the roughness. The theoretical calculation is difficult because of the lack of equations describing the flow in this zone. In this paper, a new turbulence model based on the differential equation of turbulent viscosity balance was used to describe a turbulent flow near a rough surface. The difference between the new turbulence model and the previously known consists in the choice of constants and functions that determine the generation, dissipation and diffusion of viscosity.

  12. Condition Assessment for Wastewater Pipes: Method for Assessing Cracking and Surface Damage of Concrete Pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Hauge, Petter

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the Master Thesis has been to provide an improved method for condition assessment, which will give a better correlation between Condition class and actual Condition of concrete pipes with cracking and/or surface damages. Additionally improvement of the characterization of cracking (SR) and surface (KO) damages was a sub goal.Based on the findings described in my Thesis and my Specialization Project (Hauge 2012), I recommend that the Norwegian condition assessment method based...

  13. Technical considerations in the design of near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    Good design is an important step towards ensuring operational as well as long term safety of low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal. The IAEA has produced this report with the objective of outlining the most important technical considerations in the design of near surface disposal facilities and to provide some examples of the design process in different countries. This guidance has been developed in light of experience gained from the design of existing near surface disposal facilities in a range of Member States. In particular the report provide information on design objective, design requirements, and design phases. The report focuses on: near surface disposal facilities accepting solidified LILW; disposal facilities on or just below the ground surface, where the final protective covering is of the order of a few metres thick; and disposal facilities several tens of metres below the ground surface (including rock cavern type facilities)

  14. Surface damage of TFTR protective plate candidate materials by energetic D+ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.; Das, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the surface damage of ATJ graphite, V, Cu, and Type 316 stainless steel under 60-keV D + irradiation. The irradiations were conducted in the pulsed mode. For a total accumulated dose of 8.1 x 10 18 ions/cm 2 , blisters were readily seen for Cu surfaces, but no blisters were observed on Type 316 stainless steel and vanadium surfaces. For the case of ATJ graphite, the surface damage was observed in the form of ridges and grooves. In the case of copper, many large blisters with diameters ranging from 3.5 μm to 46 μm are observed in addition to some small ones (average diameter approx. 2 μm. The blister density of the large blisters is the highest in the case of copper (1.1 x 10 5 blisters/cm 2 ). These observations of blister formation are related to the differences in the premeability of deuterium in these materials. An examination of the cross section of the ridges in fractured samples of graphite indicates that they are not hollow. The mechanisms of formation of these ridges is not clear at present. 1 figure

  15. Damage Maps of Veneered Zirconia under Simulated Mastication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Joo-Hyung; Janal, Malvin N.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia based restorations often fracture from chipping and/or delamination of the porcelain veneers. We hypothesize that veneer chipping/delamination is a result of the propagation of near-contact induced partial cone cracks on the occlusal surface under mastication. Masticatory loading involves the opposing tooth sliding along the cuspal inner incline surface with an applied biting force. To test this hypothesis, flat porcelain veneered zirconia plates were cemented to dental composites and cyclically loaded (contact–slide–liftoff) at an inclination angle as a simplified model of zirconia based restorations under occlusion. In the light of in-situ observation of damage evolution in a transparent glass/zirconia/polycarbonate trilayer, postmortem damage evaluation of porcelain/zirconia/composite trilayers using a sectioning technique revealed that deep penetrating occlusal surface partial cone fracture is the predominant fracture mode of porcelain veneers. Clinical relevance is discussed. PMID:19029080

  16. Near-surface temperature gradient in a coastal upwelling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maske, H.; Ochoa, J.; Almeda-Jauregui, C. O.; Ruiz-de la Torre, M. C.; Cruz-López, R.; Villegas-Mendoza, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    In oceanography, a near homogeneous mixed layer extending from the surface to a seasonal thermocline is a common conceptual basis in physics, chemistry, and biology. In a coastal upwelling region 3 km off the coast in the Mexican Pacific, we measured vertical density gradients with a free-rising CTD and temperature gradients with thermographs at 1, 3, and 5 m depths logging every 5 min during more than a year. No significant salinity gradient was observed down to 10 m depth, and the CTD temperature and density gradients showed no pronounced discontinuity that would suggest a near-surface mixed layer. Thermographs generally logged decreasing temperature with depth with gradients higher than 0.2 K m-1 more than half of the time in the summer between 1 and 3 m, 3 and 5 m and in the winter between 1 and 3 m. Some negative temperature gradients were present and gradients were generally highly variable in time with high peaks lasting fractions of hours to hours. These temporal changes were too rapid to be explained by local heating or cooling. The pattern of positive and negative peaks might be explained by vertical stacks of water layers of different temperatures and different horizontal drift vectors. The observed near-surface gradient has implications for turbulent wind energy transfer, vertical exchange of dissolved and particulate water constituents, the interpretation of remotely sensed SST, and horizontal wind-induced transport.

  17. The cool surfaces of binary near-Earth asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbo, Marco; Walsh, Kevin; Mueller, Michael; Harris, Alan W.; Howell, Ellen S.

    2011-03-01

    Here we show results from thermal-infrared observations of km-sized binary near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). We combine previously published thermal properties for NEAs with newly derived values for three binary NEAs. The η value derived from the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) for each object is then used to estimate an average thermal inertia for the population of binary NEAs and compared against similar estimates for the population of non-binaries. We find that these objects have, in general, surface temperatures cooler than the average values for non-binary NEAs as suggested by elevated η values. We discuss how this may be evidence of higher-than-average surface thermal inertia. This latter physical parameter is a sensitive indicator of the presence or absence of regolith: bodies covered with fine regolith, such as the Earth’s moon, have low thermal inertia, whereas a surface with little or no regolith displays high thermal inertia. Our results are suggestive of a binary formation mechanism capable of altering surface properties, possibly removing regolith: an obvious candidate is the YORP effect. We present also newly determined sizes and geometric visible albedos derived from thermal-infrared observations of three binary NEAs: (5381) Sekhmet, (153591) 2001 SN263, and (164121) 2003 YT1. The diameters of these asteroids are 1.41 ± 0.21 km, 1.56 ± 0.31 km, and 2.63 ± 0.40 km, respectively. Their albedos are 0.23 ± 0.13, 0.24 ± 0.16, and 0.048 ± 0.015, respectively.

  18. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-07-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  19. Kinetic model for electric-field induced point defect redistribution near semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of point defects near semiconductor surfaces affects the efficiency of devices. Near-surface band bending generates electric fields that influence the spatial redistribution of charged mobile defects that exchange infrequently with the lattice, as recently demonstrated for pile-up of isotopic oxygen near rutile TiO 2 (110). The present work derives a mathematical model to describe such redistribution and establishes its temporal dependence on defect injection rate and band bending. The model shows that band bending of only a few meV induces significant redistribution, and that the direction of the electric field governs formation of either a valley or a pile-up.

  20. Climate change and forest fires synergistically drive widespread melt events of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Kaitlin M; Albert, Mary R; McConnell, Joseph R; Baker, Ian

    2014-06-03

    In July 2012, over 97% of the Greenland Ice Sheet experienced surface melt, the first widespread melt during the era of satellite remote sensing. Analysis of six Greenland shallow firn cores from the dry snow region confirms that the most recent prior widespread melt occurred in 1889. A firn core from the center of the ice sheet demonstrated that exceptionally warm temperatures combined with black carbon sediments from Northern Hemisphere forest fires reduced albedo below a critical threshold in the dry snow region, and caused the melting events in both 1889 and 2012. We use these data to project the frequency of widespread melt into the year 2100. Since Arctic temperatures and the frequency of forest fires are both expected to rise with climate change, our results suggest that widespread melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet may begin to occur almost annually by the end of century. These events are likely to alter the surface mass balance of the ice sheet, leaving the surface susceptible to further melting.

  1. Calculation of femtosecond pulse laser induced damage threshold for broadband antireflective microstructure arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xufeng; Shao, Jianda; Zhang, Junchao; Jin, Yunxia; He, Hongbo; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2009-12-21

    In order to more exactly predict femtosecond pulse laser induced damage threshold, an accurate theoretical model taking into account photoionization, avalanche ionization and decay of electrons is proposed by comparing respectively several combined ionization models with the published experimental measurements. In addition, the transmittance property and the near-field distribution of the 'moth eye' broadband antireflective microstructure directly patterned into the substrate material as a function of the surface structure period and groove depth are performed by a rigorous Fourier model method. It is found that the near-field distribution is strongly dependent on the periodicity of surface structure for TE polarization, but for TM wave it is insensitive to the period. What's more, the femtosecond pulse laser damage threshold of the surface microstructure on the pulse duration taking into account the local maximum electric field enhancement was calculated using the proposed relatively accurate theoretical ionization model. For the longer incident wavelength of 1064 nm, the weak linear damage threshold on the pulse duration is shown, but there is a surprising oscillation peak of breakdown threshold as a function of the pulse duration for the shorter incident wavelength of 532 nm.

  2. Near-Field Spectral Effects due to Electromagnetic Surface Excitations

    OpenAIRE

    Shchegrov , Andrei ,; Joulain , Karl; Carminati , Rémi; Greffet , Jean-Jacques

    2000-01-01

    International audience; We demonstrate theoretically that the spectra of electromagnetic emission of surface systems can display remarkable differences in the near and the far zones. The spectral changes occur due to the loss of evanescent modes and are especially pronounced for systems which support surface waves. PACS numbers: 78.20. – e, 05.40. – a, 44.40. + a, 87.64.Xx Spectroscopy of electromagnetic radiation is perhaps the most powerful exploration tool employed in natural sciences: ast...

  3. Regional pest suppression associated with widespread Bt maize adoption benefits vegetable growers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dively, Galen P; Venugopal, P Dilip; Bean, Dick; Whalen, Joanne; Holmstrom, Kristian; Kuhar, Thomas P; Doughty, Hélène B; Patton, Terry; Cissel, William; Hutchison, William D

    2018-03-27

    Transgenic crops containing the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes reduce pests and insecticide usage, promote biocontrol services, and economically benefit growers. Area-wide Bt adoption suppresses pests regionally, with declines expanding beyond the planted Bt crops into other non-Bt crop fields. However, the offsite benefits to growers of other crops from such regional suppression remain uncertain. With data spanning 1976-2016, we demonstrate that vegetable growers benefit via decreased crop damage and insecticide applications in relation to pest suppression in the Mid-Atlantic United States. We provide evidence for the regional suppression of Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), European corn borer, and Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), corn earworm, populations in association with widespread Bt maize adoption (1996-2016) and decreased economic levels for injury in vegetable crops [peppers ( Capsicum annuum L.), green beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and sweet corn ( Zea mays L., convar. saccharata )] compared with the pre-Bt period (1976-1995). Moth populations of both species significantly declined in association with widespread Bt maize (field corn) adoption, even as increased temperatures buffered the population reduction. We show marked decreases in the number of recommended insecticidal applications, insecticides applied, and O. nubilalis damage in vegetable crops in association with widespread Bt maize adoption. These offsite benefits to vegetable growers in the agricultural landscape have not been previously documented, and the positive impacts identified here expand on the reported ecological effects of Bt adoption. Our results also underscore the need to account for offsite economic benefits of pest suppression, in addition to the direct economic benefits of Bt crops.

  4. Near-surface facilities for disposal radioactive waste from non-nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barinov, A.

    2000-01-01

    The design features of the near-surface facilities of 'Radon', an estimation of the possible emergency situations, and the scenarios of their progress are given. The possible safety enhancing during operation of near-surface facilities, so called 'Historical facilities', and newly developed ones are described. The Moscow SIA 'Radon' experience in use of mobile module plants for liquid radioactive waste purification and principal technological scheme of the plant are presented. Upgrading of the technological scheme for treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste for new-developed facilities is shown. The main activities related to management of spent ionizing sources are mentioned

  5. Observed Near-Surface Currents Four Super Typhoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-16

    electromagnetic - autonomous profiling explorer (EM-APEX) floats, Surface Velocity Pro- gram(SVP) (Niiler, 2001) drifters, and acoustic Doppler...summer (Chang et al., 2013). For Fr N 1, the response is baroclinic with a wake consisting of the near- inertial waves as the dominant feature. For Fr b...24–141 km), the linear regressionwas fur - ther conducted under category-5 storms between Uobs (unit: m s−1) on the right side of the storm center (30

  6. Optical near-field lithography on hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steen; Müllenborn, Matthias; Birkelund, Karen

    1996-01-01

    by the optical near field, were observed after etching in potassium hydroxide. The uncoated fibers can also induce oxidation without light exposure, in a manner similar to an atomic force microscope, and linewidths of 50 nm have been achieved this way. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics.......We report on a novel lithography technique for patterning of hydrogen-passivated amorphous silicon surfaces. A reflection mode scanning near-field optical microscope with uncoated fiber probes has been used to locally oxidize a thin amorphous silicon layer. Lines of 110 nm in width, induced...

  7. Application of Laser Pulse Heating to Simulate Thermomechanical Damage at Gun Bore Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cote, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Laser pulse heating experiments were performed to provide insights into the thermomechanical damage effects that occur at the surface of coated and uncoated gun steel under cyclic rapid heating and cooling...

  8. Rapid bottom melting widespread near Antarctic ice sheet grounding lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rignot, E.; Jacobs, S.

    2002-01-01

    As continental ice from Antartica reaches the grounding line and begins to float, its underside melts into the ocean. Results obtained with satellite radar interferometry reveal that bottom melt rates experienced by large outlet glaciers near their grounding lines are far higher than generally assumed.

  9. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Ocean Near Surface Atmospheric Properties, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature; near-surface wind speed, air temperature, and specific...

  10. Determination of near surface in-situ stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garritty, P.; Irvin, R.

    1983-06-01

    One of the major unknowns affecting aspects of underground construction and the geohydrology of rock masses is the magnitude and direction of the geostatic principal stresses in the earth's crust. This is particularly the case in near surface rocks where there are indications that high horizontal stresses may exist. The techniques, experiences and results of a preliminary rock stress measurement programme conducted at shallow depth in the Carnmenellis Granite, Cornwall, using C.S.I.R.O. triaxial hollow inclusion cells are described. (author)

  11. Near-Surface Seismic Velocity Data: A Computer Program For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A computer program (NESURVELANA) has been developed in Visual Basic Computer programming language to carry out a near surface velocity analysis. The method of analysis used includes: Algorithms design and Visual Basic codes generation for plotting arrival time (ms) against geophone depth (m) employing the ...

  12. Global Validation of MODIS Atmospheric Profile-Derived Near-Surface Air Temperature and Dew Point Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiglietti, C.; Fisher, J.; Halverson, G. H.

    2017-12-01

    This study validates a method of remote sensing near-surface meteorology that vertically interpolates MODIS atmospheric profiles to surface pressure level. The extraction of air temperature and dew point observations at a two-meter reference height from 2001 to 2014 yields global moderate- to fine-resolution near-surface temperature distributions that are compared to geographically and temporally corresponding measurements from 114 ground meteorological stations distributed worldwide. This analysis is the first robust, large-scale validation of the MODIS-derived near-surface air temperature and dew point estimates, both of which serve as key inputs in models of energy, water, and carbon exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere. Results show strong linear correlations between remotely sensed and in-situ near-surface air temperature measurements (R2 = 0.89), as well as between dew point observations (R2 = 0.77). Performance is relatively uniform across climate zones. The extension of mean climate-wise percent errors to the entire remote sensing dataset allows for the determination of MODIS air temperature and dew point uncertainties on a global scale.

  13. Quantum beats from the coherent interaction of hole states with surface state in near-surface quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Salahuddin; Jayabalan, J., E-mail: jjaya@rrcat.gov.in; Chari, Rama; Pal, Suparna [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Porwal, Sanjay; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Oak, S. M. [Semiconductor Physics and Devices Lab., Solid State Laser Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2014-08-18

    We report tunneling assisted beating of carriers in a near-surface single GaAsP/AlGaAs quantum well using transient reflectivity measurement. The observed damped oscillating signal has a period of 120 ± 6 fs which corresponds to the energy difference between lh1 and hh2 hole states in the quantum well. Comparing the transient reflectivity signal at different photon energies and with a buried quantum well sample, we show that the beating is caused by the coherent coupling between surface state and the hole states (lh1 and hh2) in the near-surface quantum well. The dependence of decay of coherence of these tunneling carriers on the excitation fluence is also reported. This observation on the coherent tunneling of carrier is important for future quantum device applications.

  14. Quantum beats from the coherent interaction of hole states with surface state in near-surface quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Salahuddin; Jayabalan, J.; Chari, Rama; Pal, Suparna; Porwal, Sanjay; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Oak, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report tunneling assisted beating of carriers in a near-surface single GaAsP/AlGaAs quantum well using transient reflectivity measurement. The observed damped oscillating signal has a period of 120 ± 6 fs which corresponds to the energy difference between lh1 and hh2 hole states in the quantum well. Comparing the transient reflectivity signal at different photon energies and with a buried quantum well sample, we show that the beating is caused by the coherent coupling between surface state and the hole states (lh1 and hh2) in the near-surface quantum well. The dependence of decay of coherence of these tunneling carriers on the excitation fluence is also reported. This observation on the coherent tunneling of carrier is important for future quantum device applications.

  15. Primary Criteria for Near Surface Disposal Facility in Egypt Proposal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdellatif, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of radioactive waste disposal is to isolate waste from the surrounding media to protect human health and environment from the harmful effect of the ionizing radiation. The required degree of isolation can be obtained by implementing various disposal methods, of which near surface disposal represents an option commonly used and demonstrated in several countries. Near surface disposal has been practiced for some decades, with a wide variation in sites, types and amounts of wastes, and facility designs employed. Experience has shown that the effective and safe isolation of waste depends on the performance of the overall disposal system, which is formed by three major components or barriers: the site, the disposal facility and the waste form. The site selection process for low-level and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility addressed a wide range of public health, safety, environmental, social and economic factors. The primary goal of the sitting process is to identify a site that is capable of protecting public health, safety and the environment. This paper is concerning a proposal approach for the primary criteria for near surface disposal facility that could be applicable in Egypt.

  16. Inspection and verification of waste packages for near surface disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Extensive experience has been gained with various disposal options for low and intermediate level waste at or near surface disposal facilities. Near surface disposal is based on proven and well demonstrated technologies. To ensure the safety of near surface disposal facilities when available technologies are applied, it is necessary to control and assure the quality of the repository system's performance, which includes waste packages, engineered features and natural barriers, as well as siting, design, construction, operation, closure and institutional controls. Recognizing the importance of repository performance, the IAEA is producing a set of technical publications on quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) for waste disposal to provide Member States with technical guidance and current information. These publications cover issues on the application of QA/QC programmes to waste disposal, long term record management, and specific QA/QC aspects of waste packaging, repository design and R and D. Waste package QA/QC is especially important because the package is the primary barrier to radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Waste packaging also involves interface issues between the waste generator and the disposal facility operator. Waste should be packaged by generators to meet waste acceptance requirements set for a repository or disposal system. However, it is essential that the disposal facility operator ensure that waste packages conform with disposal facility acceptance requirements. Demonstration of conformance with disposal facility acceptance requirements can be achieved through the systematic inspection and verification of waste packages at both the waste generator's site and at the disposal facility, based on a waste package QA/QC programme established by the waste generator and approved by the disposal operator. However, strategies, approaches and the scope of inspection and verification will be somewhat different from country to country

  17. The measurement of in-situ stress in near surface environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garritty, P.; Irvin, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    One of the major unknowns affecting aspects of underground construction and the geohydrology of rock masses is the magnitude and direction of the geostatic principal stresses in the earth's crust. This is particularly the case in near surface rocks where there are indications that high horizontal stresses may exist. The measurement of stress in near surface environments is particularly difficult. The techniques, experience and results of a geostatic stress measurement programme using four commercially available devices at shallow depth in the Carnmenellis Granite are critically discussed and compared. This report also brings together some of the conclusions of two previous reports in the series, Garritty (1983) and Garritty and Irvin (1983), and emphasises the fundamental relationship between the state of stress in the earth's crust and the geohydrology of rock masses. (author)

  18. Experimental study of surface quality and damage when drilling unidirectional CFRP composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshetu D. Eneyew

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experimental investigation on the drilling of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (UD-CFRP composite was conducted using polycrystalline diamond (PCD tipped eight facet drill. The quality of the drilled hole surface was examined through surface roughness measurements and surface damage by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was found that fiber pullout occurred in two specific sectors relative to the angle between the cutting direction and the fiber orientation. The thrust force was highly influenced by the feed rate than the cutting speed and it shows a significant variation throughout the rotation of the drill.

  19. Examination of the effect of blowing on the near-surface flow structure over a dimpled surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchetta, C. G.; Martin, A.; Bailey, S. C. C.

    2018-03-01

    The near surface flow over a dimpled surface with flow injection through it was documented using time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The instantaneous flow structure, time-averaged statistics, and results from snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition were used to examine the coherent structures forming near the dimpled surface. In particular, the modifications made to the flow structures by the addition of flow injection through the surface were studied. It was observed that without flow injection, inclined flow structures with alternating vorticity from neighboring dimples are generated by the dimples and advect downstream. This behavior is coupled with fluid becoming entrained inside the dimples, recirculating and ejecting away from the surface. When flow injection was introduced through the surface, the flow structures became more disorganized, but some of the features of the semi-periodic structures observed without flow injection were preserved. The structures with flow injection appear in multiple wall-normal layers, formed from vortical structures shed from upstream dimples, with a corresponding increase in the size of the advecting structures. As a result of the more complex flow field observed with flow injection, there was an increase in turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress, with the Reynolds shear stress representing an increase in vertical transport of momentum by sweeping and ejecting motions that were not present without flow injection.

  20. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-15

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-{mu}m length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  1. Glass transition near the free surface studied by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorski, M.

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive picture of the glass transition near the liquid/vapor interface of the model organic glass former dibutyl phthalate is presented in this work. Several surface-sensitive techniques using x-ray synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the formation of the glassy state from the supercooled liquid. The amorphous nature of dibutyl phthalate close to the free surface was confirmed by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction studies. Results from X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate a uniform electron density distribution close to the interface excluding the possibility of surface freezing down to 175 K. Dynamics on sub-μm length-scales at the surface was studied with coherent synchrotron radiation via x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the analysis of the dispersion relation of the surface modes, viscoelastic properties of the dibutyl phthalate are deduced. The Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic media was found to describe well the properties of the liquid/vapor interface below room temperature. The data show that the viscosity at the interface matches the values reported for bulk dibutyl phthalate. The scaled relaxation rate at the surface agrees with the bulk data above 210 K. Upon approaching the glass transition temperature the free surface was observed to relax considerably faster close to the liquid/vapor interface than in bulk. The concept of higher relaxation rate at the free surface is also supported by the results of the quasielastic nuclear forward scattering experiment, during which dynamics on molecular length scales around the calorimetric glass transition temperature is studied. The data were analyzed using mode-coupling theory of the glass transition and the model of the liquid(glass)/vapor interface, predicting inhomogeneous dynamics near the surface. The quasielastic nuclear forward scattering data can be explained when the molecular mobility is assumed to decrease with the increasing

  2. Preliminary safety evaluation of an aircraft impact on a near-surface radioactive waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Frano, R.; Forasassi, G.; Pugliese, G. [Department of Industrial and Civil Engineering (DICI), University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    The aircraft impact accident has become very significant in the design of a nuclear facilities, particularly, after the tragic September 2001 event, that raised the public concern about the potential damaging effects that the impact of a large civilian airplane could bring in safety relevant structures. The aim of this study is therefore to preliminarily evaluate the global response and the structural effects induced by the impact of a military or commercial airplane (actually considered as a 'beyond design basis' event) into a near surface radioactive waste (RWs) disposal facility. The safety evaluation was carried out according to the International safety and design guidelines and in agreement with the stress tests requirements for the security track. To achieve the purpose, a lay out and a scheme of a possible near surface repository, like for example those of the El Cabril one, were taken into account. In order to preliminarily perform a reliable analysis of such a large-scale structure and to determine the structural effects induced by such a types of impulsive loads, a realistic, but still operable, numerical model with suitable materials characteristics was implemented by means of FEM codes. In the carried out structural analyses, the RWs repository was considered a 'robust' target, due to its thicker walls and main constitutive materials (steel and reinforced concrete). In addition to adequately represent the dynamic response of repository under crashing, relevant physical phenomena (i.e. penetration, spalling, etc.) were simulated and analysed. The preliminary assessment of the effects induced by the dynamic/impulsive loads allowed generally to verify the residual strength capability of the repository considered. The obtained preliminary results highlighted a remarkable potential to withstand the impact of military/large commercial aircraft, even in presence of ongoing concrete progressive failure (some penetration and spalling of the

  3. Identification of candidate sites for a near surface repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motiejunas, S.

    2004-01-01

    This Report comprises results of the area survey stage, which involves regional screening to define the regions of interest and identification of potential sites within suitable regions. The main goal was to define a few sites potentially suitable for constructing of the near surface repository. It was concluded that a vicinity of Ignalina NPP is among the best suitable regions for the near surface repository. At the present investigation level a ridge in Galilauke village has the most favorable conditions. However, Apvardai site is potentially suitable for the repository too

  4. Near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, H.Y.; Zhang, Y.; Snead, L.L.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xue, H.Z.; Weber, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ag release from SiC poses problems in safe operation of nuclear reactors. ► Near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag are studied by ab initio and ion beam methods. ► Ag prefers to adsorb on the surface rather than in the bulk SiC. ► At high temperature Ag desorbs from the surface instead of diffusion into bulk SiC. ► Surface diffusion may be a dominating mechanism accounting for Ag release from SiC. - Abstract: The diffusive release of fission products, such as Ag, from TRISO particles at high temperatures has raised concerns regarding safe and economic operation of advanced nuclear reactors. Understanding the mechanisms of Ag diffusion is thus of crucial importance for effective retention of fission products. Two mechanisms, i.e., grain boundary diffusion and vapor or surface diffusion through macroscopic structures such as nano-pores or nano-cracks, remain in debate. In the present work, an integrated computational and experimental study of the near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in silicon carbide (SiC) has been carried out. The ab initio calculations show that Ag prefers to adsorb on the SiC surface rather than in the bulk, and the mobility of Ag on the surface is high. The energy barrier for Ag desorption from the surface is calculated to be 0.85–1.68 eV, and Ag migration into bulk SiC through equilibrium diffusion process is not favorable. Experimentally, Ag ions are implanted into SiC to produce Ag profiles buried in the bulk and peaked at the surface. High-temperature annealing leads to Ag release from the surface region instead of diffusion into the interior of SiC. It is suggested that surface diffusion through mechanical structural imperfection, such as vapor transport through cracks in SiC coatings, may be a dominating mechanism accounting for Ag release from the SiC in the nuclear reactor.

  5. Socio-economic and other non-radiological impacts of the near surface disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this report is to introduce, in a generic sense, the elements that could comprise a socio-economic and non-radiological environmental impact assessment. The various social, economic and environmental impacts that could be associated with surface and near surface disposal are discussed through factors that could apply at the local, regional or national level. Impact management is also discussed. The report also introduces concepts to help Member States develop their own approaches to undertaking impact assessment and management. The report is intended to complement IAEA documents on the technology and safety aspects of the near surface disposal of radioactive waste. The scope of this report includes a discussion of a range of social, economic and nonradiological environmental impacts relevant to surface and near surface disposal and illustrations of some impact management measures

  6. Induced recovery from near- and far-UV damage in cultured marsupial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Colony-forming ability of cultured rat kangaroo cells (Ptk-2) decreases with increasing exposure to light from a daylight fluorescent lamp. After reaching a minimum, survival increases with further exposure, forming a V-shaped survival curve. This increase is inhibited by low concentrations of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. The resulting V-shaped survival curve was characterized with respect to several experimental parameters; it appears to be due to an induced repair system dependent on protein synthesis. These results suggest that induced repair, dependent on protein synthesis, in response to fluorescent, near UV, and far UV light damage, is a major repair pathway in Ptk-2 cells, and provides a characterizable system that can elucidate induced repair mechanisms in other mammalian cells

  7. Interactions between near-ground temperature and radiation, silvicultural treatments and frost damage to Norway spruce seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Langvall, Ola

    2000-01-01

    Several different silvicultural treatments were studied in two experiments. In the first, mechanical scarification, slash removal, vegetation control, clear-cut age and seedling types were investigated with respect to frost injury to Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings. Frost damage was also related to near-ground minimum temperature. In the other experiment, the effects of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris (L.)) shelterwood density gradients, ranging from dense, uncut forest to comp...

  8. Near-surface analysis with nuclear reactions and scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, K.L.; Hirvonen, J.K.

    1974-01-01

    Very useful information about the elemental composition of solids in the surface and near-surface regions can be obtained with small accelerators and suitable auxiliary apparatus. Two methods which produce data from which quantitative concentration depth profiles can be constructed and which have been used extensively at this laboratory are: nuclear resonance profiling and Rutherford backscattering. The first method is described in detail. Data are given on profiles of Al and Al + Na films implanted on silicon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectra for chromium implanted into silicon dioxide are used to illustrate the improved depth sensitivity that can be obtained with a magnetic spectrometer in depth concentration profiles of heavy impurities relative to that obtainable with a conventional semiconductor detector

  9. Probability of growth of small damage sites on the exit surface of fused silica optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negres, Raluca A; Abdulla, Ghaleb M; Cross, David A; Liao, Zhi M; Carr, Christopher W

    2012-06-04

    Growth of laser damage on fused silica optical components depends on several key parameters including laser fluence, wavelength, pulse duration, and site size. Here we investigate the growth behavior of small damage sites on the exit surface of SiO₂ optics under exposure to tightly controlled laser pulses. Results demonstrate that the onset of damage growth is not governed by a threshold, but is probabilistic in nature and depends both on the current size of a damage site and the laser fluence to which it is exposed. We also develop models for use in growth prediction. In addition, we show that laser exposure history also influences the behavior of individual sites.

  10. Measurement of Near-Surface Salinity, Temperature and Directional Wave Spectra using a Novel Wave-Following, Lagrangian Surface Contact Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Results from a surface contact drifter buoy which measures near-surface conductivity ( 10 cm depth), sea state characteristics and near-surface water temperature ( 2 cm depth) are described. This light (righting. It has a small above-surface profile and low windage, resulting in near-Lagrangian drift characteristics. It is autonomous, with low power requirements and solar panel battery recharging. Onboard sensors include an inductive toroidal conductivity probe for salinity measurement, a nine-degrees-of-freedom motion package for derivation of directional wave spectra and a thermocouple for water temperature measurement. Data retrieval for expendable, ocean-going operation uses an onboard Argos transmitter. Scientific results as well as data processing algorithms are presented from laboratory and field experiments which support qualification of buoy platform measurements. These include sensor calibration experiments, longer-term dock-side biofouling experiments during 2013-2014 and a series of short-duration ocean deployments in the Gulf Stream in 2014. In addition, a treatment method will be described which appears to minimize the effects of biofouling on the inductive conductivity probe when in coastal surface waters. Due to its low cost and ease of deployment, scores, perhaps hundreds of these novel instruments could be deployed from ships or aircraft during process studies or to provide surface validation for satellite-based measurements, particularly in high precipitation regions.

  11. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Baz, F.; Al-Ajmi, D.

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of ''oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait

  12. Near-surface segregation in irradiated Ni3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.; Rehn, L.E.; Wiedersich, H.

    1982-01-01

    The radiation-induced growth of Ni 3 Si films on the surfaces of Ni(Si) alloys containing = 3 Si phase has been observed. Post-irradiation depth profiling by Auger electron spectroscopy, as well as in situ analysis by high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, reveals Si-enrichment at the surfaces of Ni(Si) alloys in excess of stoichiometric Ni 3 Si during irradiation. Thin, near-surface layers with silicon concentrations of 28 to 30 at.% are observed, and even higher Si enrichment is found in the first few atom layers. Transmission electron microscopy and selected area-electron diffraction were employed to characterize these Si-enriched layers. A complex, multiple-spot diffraction pattern is observed superposed on the diffraction pattern of ordered Ni 3 Si. The d-spacings obtained from the extra spots are consistent with those of the orthohexagonal intermetallic compound Ni 5 Si 2 . (author)

  13. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the French SIM hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, C.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Calvet, J.-C.; Martin, E.; Wagner, W.

    2011-06-01

    The impact of assimilating near-surface soil moisture into the SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM) hydrological model over France is examined. Specifically, the root-zone soil moisture in the ISBA land surface model is constrained over three and a half years, by assimilating the ASCAT-derived surface degree of saturation product, using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter. In this experiment ISBA is forced with the near-real time SAFRAN analysis, which analyses the variables required to force ISBA from relevant observations available before the real time data cut-off. The assimilation results are tested against ISBA forecasts generated with a higher quality delayed cut-off SAFRAN analysis. Ideally, assimilating the ASCAT data will constrain the ISBA surface state to correct for errors in the near-real time SAFRAN forcing, the most significant of which was a substantial dry bias caused by a dry precipitation bias. The assimilation successfully reduced the mean root-zone soil moisture bias, relative to the delayed cut-off forecasts, by close to 50 % of the open-loop value. The improved soil moisture in the model then led to significant improvements in the forecast hydrological cycle, reducing the drainage, runoff, and evapotranspiration biases (by 17 %, 11 %, and 70 %, respectively). When coupled to the MODCOU hydrogeological model, the ASCAT assimilation also led to improved streamflow forecasts, increasing the mean discharge ratio, relative to the delayed cut off forecasts, from 0.68 to 0.76. These results demonstrate that assimilating near-surface soil moisture observations can effectively constrain the SIM model hydrology, while also confirming the accuracy of the ASCAT surface degree of saturation product. This latter point highlights how assimilation experiments can contribute towards the difficult issue of validating remotely sensed land surface observations over large spatial scales.

  14. Method of driving liquid flow at or near the free surface using magnetic microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snezhko, Oleksiy [Woodridge, IL; Aronson, Igor [Darien, IL; Kwok, Wai-Kwong [Evanston, IL; Belkin, Maxim V [Woodridge, IL

    2011-10-11

    The present invention provides a method of driving liquid flow at or near a free surface using self-assembled structures composed of magnetic particles subjected to an external AC magnetic field. A plurality of magnetic particles are supported at or near a free surface of liquid by surface tension or buoyancy force. An AC magnetic field traverses the free surface and dipole-dipole interaction between particles produces in self-assembled snake structures which oscillate at the frequency of the traverse AC magnetic field. The snake structures independently move across the free surface and may merge with other snake structures or break up and coalesce into additional snake structures experiencing independent movement across the liquid surface. During this process, the snake structures produce asymmetric flow vortices across substantially the entirety of the free surface, effectuating liquid flow across the free surface.

  15. Applications of high order harmonic radiation to UVX-solids interaction: high excitation density in electronic relaxation dynamics and surface damaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grazia, M.

    2007-12-01

    The new sources of radiation in the extreme-UV (X-UV: 10-100 nm), which deliver spatially coherent, ultra-short and intense pulses, allow studying high flux processes and ultra-fast dynamics in various domains. The thesis work presents two applications of the high-order laser harmonics (HH) to solid state physics. In Part I, we describe the optimization of the harmonic for studies of X-UV/solids interaction. In Part II, we investigate effects of high excitation density in the dynamics of electron relaxation in dielectric scintillator crystals - tungstates and fluorides, using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Quenching of luminescence at short time gives evidence of the competition between radiative and non-radiative recombination of self-trapped excitons (STE). The non-radiative channel is identified to mutual interaction of STE at high excitation density. In Part III, we study the X-UV induced damage mechanism in various materials, either conductor (amorphous carbon) or insulators (organic polymers, e.g., PMMA). In PMMA-Plexiglas, in the desorption regime (0.2 mJ/cm 2 , i.e., below damage threshold), the surface modifications reflect X-UV induced photochemical processes that are tentatively identified, as a function of dose: at low dose, polymer chain scission followed by the blow-up of the volatile, low-molecular fragments leads to crater formation; at high dose, cross-linking in the near-surface layer of remaining material leads to surface hardening. These promising results have great perspectives considering the performances already attained and planned in the next future in the development of the harmonic sources. (author)

  16. High Compressive Stresses Near the Surface of the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, S. J.; Logan, J. M.; Stock, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Observations and stress measurements in granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada, California reveal strong compressive stresses parallel to the surface of the range at shallow depths. New overcoring measurements show high compressive stresses at three locations along an east-west transect through Yosemite National Park. At the westernmost site (west end of Tenaya Lake), the mean compressive stress is 1.9. At the middle site (north shore of Tenaya Lake) the mean compressive stress is 6.8 MPa. At the easternmost site (south side of Lembert Dome) the mean compressive stress is 3.0 MPa. The trend of the most compressive stress at these sites is within ~30° of the strike of the local topographic surface. Previously published hydraulic fracturing measurements by others elsewhere in the Sierra Nevada indicate surface-parallel compressive stresses of several MPa within several tens of meters of the surface, with the stress magnitudes generally diminishing to the west. Both the new and the previously published compressive stress magnitudes are consistent with the presence of sheeting joints (i.e., "exfoliation joints") in the Sierra Nevada, which require lateral compressive stresses of several MPa to form. These fractures are widespread: they are distributed in granitic rocks from the north end of the range to its southern tip and across the width of the range. Uplift along the normal faults of the eastern escarpment, recently measured by others at ~1-2 mm/yr, probably contributes to these stresses substantially. Geodetic surveys reveal that normal faulting flexes a range concave upwards in response to fault slip, and this flexure is predicted by elastic dislocation models. The topographic relief of the eastern escarpment of the Sierra Nevada is 2-4 km, and since alluvial fill generally buries the bedrock east of the faults, the offset of granitic rocks is at least that much. Compressive stresses of several MPa are predicted by elastic dislocation models of the range front

  17. Near-ultraviolet radiation-induced damage using an actinic reticuloid strain as a possible sensitive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralli, A.

    1987-01-01

    The introduction to this thesis consists of a review of current concepts regarding the effects of ultraviolet radiation on living cells. Actinic reticuloid, a disease condition for which a near-ultraviolet radiation cellular sensitivity has been proposed as an underlying cause, is described. The experimental work, the broad aim of which is to expand existing knowledge of the effects of near-ultraviolet radiation that may lead to cell lethality, has centred upon the irradiation of a normal human skin fibroblast strain, GM730, and a strain derived from an actinic reticuloid patient, AR6LO. Parts 1 and 2 examine the effects of the irradiation on both normal and actinic fibroblast sensitivities to a range of ultraviolet wavelengths. The next two sections include observations on the protective effect of Trolox-C, a vitamin E analogue and the sensitization resulting from the replacement of the irradiation medium by a deuterated one, using both normal and actinic reticuloid fibroblasts. The final part examines broad-band near- and far-ultraviolet radiation induced membrane damage by the use of radioactively labelled rubidium as a potassium analogue. (author)

  18. Are neonicotinoid insecticides driving declines of widespread butterflies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre S. Gilburn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There has been widespread concern that neonicotinoid pesticides may be adversely impacting wild and managed bees for some years, but recently attention has shifted to examining broader effects they may be having on biodiversity. For example in the Netherlands, declines in insectivorous birds are positively associated with levels of neonicotinoid pollution in surface water. In England, the total abundance of widespread butterfly species declined by 58% on farmed land between 2000 and 2009 despite both a doubling in conservation spending in the UK, and predictions that climate change should benefit most species. Here we build models of the UK population indices from 1985 to 2012 for 17 widespread butterfly species that commonly occur at farmland sites. Of the factors we tested, three correlated significantly with butterfly populations. Summer temperature and the index for a species the previous year are both positively associated with butterfly indices. By contrast, the number of hectares of farmland where neonicotinoid pesticides are used is negatively associated with butterfly indices. Indices for 15 of the 17 species show negative associations with neonicotinoid usage. The declines in butterflies have largely occurred in England, where neonicotinoid usage is at its highest. In Scotland, where neonicotinoid usage is comparatively low, butterfly numbers are stable. Further research is needed urgently to show whether there is a causal link between neonicotinoid usage and the decline of widespread butterflies or whether it simply represents a proxy for other environmental factors associated with intensive agriculture.

  19. Electrostatic energy and screened charge interaction near the surface of metals with different Fermi surface shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabovich, A. M.; Il'chenko, L. G.; Pashitskii, E. A.; Romanov, Yu. A.

    1980-04-01

    Using the Poisson equation Green function for a self-consistent field in a spatially inhomogeneous system, expressions for the electrostatic energy and screened charge interaction near the surface of a semi-infinite metal and a thin quantizing film are derived. It is shown that the decrease law and Friedel oscillation amplitude of adsorbed atom indirect interaction are determined by the electron spectrum character and the Fermi surface shape. The results obtained enable us to explain, in particular, the submonolayer adsorbed film structure on the W and Mo surfaces.

  20. FEATURES OF GEODEFORMATION CHANGES OF NEAR SURFACE SEDIMENTARY ROCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Larionov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the deformation process in the near surface sedimentary rocks, which has been carried out in a seismically active region of Kamchatka peninsular since 2007,are presented. The peculiarity of the experiments on the registration of geodeformations is the application of a laser deformograph-interferometer constructed according to the Michelson interferometer scheme.

  1. Automatic monitoring of ecosystem structure and functions using integrated low-cost near surface sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Ryu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Hwang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Near surface sensors are able to acquire more reliable and detailed information with higher temporal resolution than satellite observations. Conventional near surface sensors usually work individually, and thus they require considerable manpower from data collection through information extraction and sharing. Recent advances of Internet of Things (IoT) provides unprecedented opportunities to integrate various low-cost sensors as an intelligent near surface observation system for monitoring ecosystem structure and functions. In this study, we developed a Smart Surface Sensing System (4S), which can automatically collect, transfer, process and analyze data, and then publish time series results on public-available website. The system is composed of micro-computer Raspberry pi, micro-controller Arduino, multi-spectral spectrometers made from Light Emitting Diode (LED), visible and near infrared cameras, and Internet module. All components are connected with each other and Raspberry pi intelligently controls the automatic data production chain. We did intensive tests and calibrations in-lab. Then, we conducted in-situ observations at a rice paddy field and a deciduous broadleaf forest. During the whole growth season, 4S obtained landscape images, spectral reflectance in red, green, blue, and near infrared, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR), and leaf area index (LAI) continuously. Also We compared 4S data with other independent measurements. NDVI obtained from 4S agreed well with Jaz hyperspectrometer at both diurnal and seasonal scales (R2 = 0.92, RMSE = 0.059), and 4S derived fPAR and LAI were comparable to LAI-2200 and destructive measurements in both magnitude and seasonal trajectory. We believe that the integrated low-cost near surface sensor could help research community monitoring ecosystem structure and functions closer and easier through a network system.

  2. Damage identification in beams by a response surface based technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teidj S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, identification of damage in uniform homogeneous metallic beams was considered through the propagation of non dispersive elastic torsional waves. The proposed damage detection procedure consisted of the following sequence. Giving a localized torque excitation, having the form of a short half-sine pulse, the first step was calculating the transient solution of the resulting torsional wave. This torque could be generated in practice by means of asymmetric laser irradiation of the beam surface. Then, a localized defect assumed to be characterized by an abrupt reduction of beam section area with a given height and extent was placed at a known location of the beam. Next, the response in terms of transverse section rotation rate was obtained for a point situated afterwards the defect, where the sensor was positioned. This last could utilize in practice the concept of laser vibrometry. A parametric study has been conducted after that by using a full factorial design of experiments table and numerical simulations based on a finite difference characteristic scheme. This has enabled the derivation of a response surface model that was shown to represent adequately the response of the system in terms of the following factors: defect extent and severity. The final step was performing the inverse problem solution in order to identify the defect characteristics by using measurement.

  3. The Modern Near-Surface Martian Climate: A Review of In-Situ Meteorological Data from Viking to Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G. M.; Newman, C. N.; De Vicente-Retortillo, A.; Fischer, E.; Renno, N. O.; Richardson, M. I.; Fairén, A. G.; Genzer, M.; Guzewich, S. D.; Haberle, R. M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the complete set of in-situ meteorological data obtained from the Viking landers in the 1970s to todays Curiosity rover to review our understanding of the modern near-surface climate of Mars, with focus on the dust, CO2 and H2O cycles and their impact on the radiative and thermodynamic conditions near the surface. In particular, we provide values of the highest confidence possible for atmospheric opacity, atmospheric pressure, near-surface air temperature, ground temperature, near-surface wind speed and direction, and near-surface air relative humidity and water vapor content. Then, we study the diurnal, seasonal and interannual variability of these quantities over a span of more than twenty Martian years. Finally, we propose measurements to improve our understanding of the Martian dust and H2O cycles, and discuss the potential for liquid water formation under Mars present day conditions and its implications for future Mars missions.

  4. Observation of modified radiative properties of cold atoms in vacuum near a dielectric surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V V; Cornelussen, R A; Heuvell, H B van Linden van den; Spreeuw, R J C

    2004-01-01

    We have observed a distance-dependent absorption linewidth of cold 87 Rb atoms close to a dielectric-vacuum interface. This is the first observation of modified radiative properties in vacuum near a dielectric surface. A cloud of cold atoms was created using a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and optical molasses cooling. Evanescent waves (EW) were used to observe the behaviour of the atoms near the surface. We observed an increase of the absorption linewidth by up to 25% with respect to the free-space value. Approximately half the broadening can be explained by cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) as an increase of the natural linewidth and inhomogeneous broadening. The remainder we attribute to local Stark shifts near the surface. By varying the characteristic EW length we have observed a distance dependence characteristic for CQED

  5. Finite Element Method Simulations of the Near-Field Enhancement at the Vicinity of Fractal Rough Metallic Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Lu, H Peter

    2004-01-01

    Near-field optical enhancement at metal surfaces and methods such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), fluorescent quenching and enhancement, and various near-field scanning microscopies (NSOM) all depend on a metals surface properties, mainly on its morphology and SPR resonant frequency. We report on simulations of the influence of different surface morphologies on electromagnetic field enhancements at the rough surfaces of noble metals and also evaluate the optimal conditions for the generation of a surface-enhanced Raman signal of absorbed species on a metallic substrate. All simulations were performed with a classical electrodynamics approach using the full set of Maxwells equations, which were solved with the three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). Two different classes of surfaces where modeled using fractals, representing diffusion limited aggregation growth dendritic structures, such as one on the surface of electrodes, and second one representing the sponge-like structure used to model surfaces of particles with high porosity, such as metal coated catalyst supports. The simulations depict the high inhomogeneity of an enhanced electromagnetic field as both a field enhancement and field attenuation near the surface. While the diffusion limited aggregation dendritical fractals enhanced the near-field electromagnetic field, the sponge fractals significantly reduced the local electromagnetic field intensity. Moreover, the fractal orders of the fractal objects did not significantly alter the total enhancement, and the distribution of a near-field enhancement was essentially invariant to the changes in the angle of an incoming laser beam

  6. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the SIM hydrological model over France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, C.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Calvet, J.-C.; Martin, E.; Wagner, W.

    2011-12-01

    This study examines whether the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture observations might benefit an operational hydrological model, specifically Météo-France's SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM) model. Soil moisture data derived from ASCAT backscatter observations are assimilated into SIM using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter (SEKF) over 3.5 years. The benefit of the assimilation is tested by comparison to a delayed cut-off version of SIM, in which the land surface is forced with more accurate atmospheric analyses, due to the availability of additional atmospheric observations after the near-real time data cut-off. However, comparing the near-real time and delayed cut-off SIM models revealed that the main difference between them is a dry bias in the near-real time precipitation forcing, which resulted in a dry bias in the root-zone soil moisture and associated surface moisture flux forecasts. While assimilating the ASCAT data did reduce the root-zone soil moisture dry bias (by nearly 50%), this was more likely due to a bias within the SEKF, than due to the assimilation having accurately responded to the precipitation errors. Several improvements to the assimilation are identified to address this, and a bias-aware strategy is suggested for explicitly correcting the model bias. However, in this experiment the moisture added by the SEKF was quickly lost from the model surface due to the enhanced surface fluxes (particularly drainage) induced by the wetter soil moisture states. Consequently, by the end of each winter, during which frozen conditions prevent the ASCAT data from being assimilated, the model land surface had returned to its original (dry-biased) climate. This highlights that it would be more effective to address the precipitation bias directly, than to correct it by constraining the model soil moisture through data assimilation.

  7. Groundwater flow modeling for near-field of a hypothetical near-surface disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. Y.; Park, J. W.; Jang, G. M.; Kim, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    For a hypothetical near-surface radioactive disposal facility, the behavior of groundwater flow around the near-field of disposal vault located at the unsaturated zone were analyzed. Three alternative conceptual models proposed as the hydraulic barrier layer design were simulated to assess the hydrologic performance of engineered barriers for the facility. In order to evaluate the seepage possibility of the infiltrated water passed through the final disposal cover after the facility closure, the flow path around and water flux through each disposal vault were compared. The hydrologic parameters variation that accounts for the long-term aging and degradation of the cover and engineered materials was considered in the simulations. The results showed that it is necessary to construct the hydraulic barrier at the upper and sides of the vault, and that, for this case, achieving design hydraulic properties of bentonite/sand mixture barrier in the as-built condition is crucial to limit the seepage into the waste

  8. Chromosome-damaging effect of betel leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivan, G; Rani, G; Kumari, C K

    1978-05-01

    The chewing of betel leaf with other ingredients is a widespread addiction in India. The chromosome damaging effect was studied in human leukocyte cultures. There was an increase in the frequency of chromatid aberrations when the leaf extract was added to cultures.

  9. High-flux He+ irradiation effects on surface damages of tungsten under ITER relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lu; Liu, Dongping; Hong, Yi; Fan, Hongyu; Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Bi, Zhenhua; Benstetter, Günther; Li, Shouzhe

    2016-01-01

    A large-power inductively coupled plasma source was designed to perform the continuous helium ions (He + ) irradiations of polycrystalline tungsten (W) under International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) relevant conditions. He + irradiations were performed at He + fluxes of 2.3 × 10 21 –1.6 × 10 22 /m 2  s and He + energies of 12–220 eV. Surface damages and microstructures of irradiated W were observed by scanning electron microscopy. This study showed the growth of nano-fuzzes with their lengths of 1.3–2.0 μm at He + energies of >70 eV or He + fluxes of >1.3 × 10 22 /m 2  s. Nanometer-sized defects or columnar microstructures were formed in W surface layer due to low-energy He + irradiations at an elevated temperature (>1300 K). The diffusion and coalescence of He atoms in W surface layers led to the growth and structures of nano-fuzzes. This study indicated that a reduction of He + energy below 12–30 eV may greatly decrease the surface damage of tungsten diverter in the fusion reactor.

  10. [Challenge and treatment strategy for ocular surface damage in patients with long term use of antiglaucoma drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiang-Ge

    2011-02-01

    Long term use of topical anti-glaucoma drugs has been shown to induce chronic conjunctivitis, superficial punctate keratitis (SPK) and dry eye symptom. Under these conditions, a loss of goblet cells in conjunctiva, epithelial squamous metaplasia and apoptosis were morphologically revealed. Benzalkonium Chloride (BKC), a most frequently used preservative in eye drops, has been found to be an important factor causing ocular surface damage. Furthermore, a big challenge for ophthalmologists is that toxic damage of medication to ocular surface tissues is mild, poor specificity, and delayed manifestation in patients, especially when coexisting with other ocular surface diseases. Impairment of ocular surface tissues greatly impacts the life quality of patients and subsequently influences compliance with glaucoma therapy. This paper emphasizes to take measures to prevent ocular surface tissue damage resulted from chronic use of topical anti-glaucoma drugs and further discusses the treatment strategy. Effective and long-lasting action drugs should always be selected for glaucomatous patients in order to decrease the frequency of topical instillation or at a more expensive medication, a fixed combination formula can be considered for glaucoma therapy. An early surgery or laser treatment is also proposed for the patients who require an IOP reduction with an existing ocular surface impairment. Future investigation and development of new medications with long-term efficacy and appropriate BKC are suggested and preservative-free or drugs with new preservative materials recommended.

  11. Techniques of surface optical breakdown prevention for low-depths femtosecond waveguides writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukharin, M A; Skryabin, N N; Ganin, D V; Khudyakov, D V; Vartapetov, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated technique of direct femtosecond waveguide writing at record low depth (2-15 μm) under surface of lithium niobate, that play a key role in design of electrooptical modulators with low operating voltage. To prevent optical breakdown of crystal surface we used high numerical aperture objectives for focusing of light and non-thermal regime of inscription in contrast to widespread femtosecond writing technique at depths of tens micrometers or higher. Surface optical breakdown threshold was measured for both x- and z- cut crystals. Inscribed waveguides were examined for intrinsic microstructure. It also reported sharp narrowing of operating pulses energy range with writing depth under the surface of crystal, that should be taken in account when near-surface waveguides design. Novelty of the results consists in reduction of inscription depth under the surface of crystals that broadens applications of direct femtosecond writing technique to full formation of near-surface waveguides and postproduction precise geometry correction of near-surfaces optical integrated circuits produced with proton-exchanged technique. (paper)

  12. Hydroxyapatite coating on damaged tooth surfaces by immersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Byoung-Ki; Ryu, Su-Chak; Sun, Fangfang; Koh, Kwangnak; Han, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jaebeom

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was coated on scratched areas of a human tooth and HAp disks by the immersion method in a HAp colloidal solution (≤20 μm of average diameter dispersed in DI water). The surface morphologies of the scratched area after immersion for 1-3 months were investigated showing that the damaged surfaces were remarkably recovered. Then, the mechanical property and chemical stability of the HAp coating layers on both specimens were determined via the Vickers hardness test and concentration measurement of extracted Ca 2+ ions, respectively, after strong acidic treatment. The cellular behavior of mouse calvaria-derived pre-osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) was also examined on the HAp layers regenerated on micro-scratched HAp disks for the purpose of their potential applications on maxillofacial bone conservation and reconstruction for prosthetic dentistry, and artificial disk preparation of a vertebral column. The notable loss of Ca 2+ ions under a highly acidic condition was not observed in the layers coated by HAp adsorption, indicating that the coating surface was well adhered with the original surfaces of the respective specimen. Moreover, the HAp adsorption did not adversely affect the adhesion, growth and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on the coated HAp layers for up to 21 days. These results suggest that the HAp coating on the scratched areas of the tooth would be effectively applicable for the development of long-term prevention of micro-cleavage and tooth health supporters to reduce discoloration and further maxillofacial and orthopedic applications.

  13. Lime mortar with mixed in crystallization modifiers to mitigate salt damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Lubelli, B.; Hees, R.P.J. van

    2016-01-01

    Although salt crystallization damage is a widespread damage process in the porous materials of our built cultural heritage, no definite solution yet exists to improve the durability of materials with respect to salt crystallization. Most research focuses on improving material properties, whereas

  14. Near-Surface Effects of Free Atmosphere Stratification in Free Convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Garcia, Jade Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a linear stratification in the free atmosphere on near-surface properties in a free convective boundary layer (CBL) is investigated by means of direct numerical simulation. We consider two regimes: a neutral stratification regime, which represents a CBL that grows into a residual

  15. Opportunities and pitfalls in surface-wave interpretation

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-21

    Many explorationists think of surface waves as the most damaging noise in land seismic data. Thus, much effort is spent in designing geophone arrays and filtering methods that attenuate these noisy events. It is now becoming apparent that surface waves can be a valuable ally in characterizing the near-surface geology. This review aims to find out how the interpreter can exploit some of the many opportunities available in surface waves recorded in land seismic data. For example, the dispersion curves associated with surface waves can be inverted to give the S-wave velocity tomogram, the common-offset gathers can reveal the presence of near-surface faults or velocity anomalies, and back-scattered surface waves can be migrated to detect the location of near-surface faults. However, the main limitation of surface waves is that they are typically sensitive to S-wave velocity variations no deeper than approximately half to one-third the dominant wavelength. For many exploration surveys, this limits the depth of investigation to be no deeper than approximately 0.5-1.0 km.

  16. Opportunities and pitfalls in surface-wave interpretation

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.; Li, Jing; Lu, Kai; Metwally, Ahmed Mohsen Hassan; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Hanafy, Sherif

    2017-01-01

    Many explorationists think of surface waves as the most damaging noise in land seismic data. Thus, much effort is spent in designing geophone arrays and filtering methods that attenuate these noisy events. It is now becoming apparent that surface waves can be a valuable ally in characterizing the near-surface geology. This review aims to find out how the interpreter can exploit some of the many opportunities available in surface waves recorded in land seismic data. For example, the dispersion curves associated with surface waves can be inverted to give the S-wave velocity tomogram, the common-offset gathers can reveal the presence of near-surface faults or velocity anomalies, and back-scattered surface waves can be migrated to detect the location of near-surface faults. However, the main limitation of surface waves is that they are typically sensitive to S-wave velocity variations no deeper than approximately half to one-third the dominant wavelength. For many exploration surveys, this limits the depth of investigation to be no deeper than approximately 0.5-1.0 km.

  17. Near-field Light Scattering Techniques for Measuring Nanoparticle-Surface Interaction Energies and Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; Ashcroft, Colby K; O'Dell, Dakota; Adam, Ian S; DiPaolo, Brian; Sabharwal, Manit; Shi, Ce; Hart, Robert; Earhart, Christopher; Erickson, David

    2015-08-15

    Nanoparticles are quickly becoming commonplace in many commercial and industrial products, ranging from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals to medical diagnostics. Predicting the stability of the engineered nanoparticles within these products a priori remains an important and difficult challenge. Here we describe our techniques for measuring the mechanical interactions between nanoparticles and surfaces using near-field light scattering. Particle-surface interfacial forces are measured by optically "pushing" a particle against a reference surface and observing its motion using scattered near-field light. Unlike atomic force microscopy, this technique is not limited by thermal noise, but instead takes advantage of it. The integrated waveguide and microfluidic architecture allow for high-throughput measurements of about 1000 particles per hour. We characterize the reproducibility of and experimental uncertainty in the measurements made using the NanoTweezer surface instrument. We report surface interaction studies on gold nanoparticles with 50 nm diameters, smaller than previously reported in the literature using similar techniques.

  18. Consideration of Criteria for a Conceptual Near Surface Radioactive Waste disposal Facility in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nderitu, Stanley Werugia; Kim, Changlak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of the criteria is to limit the consequences of events which could lead to radiation exposures. This study will present an approach for establishing radiological waste acceptance criteria using a safety assessment methodology and illustrate some of its application in establishing limits on the total activity and the activity concentrations of radioactive waste to be disposed in a conceptual near surface disposal facility in Kenya. The approach will make use of accepted methods and computational schemes currently used in assessing the safety of near surface disposal facilities. The study will mainly focus on post-closure periods. The study will employ some specific inadvertent human intrusion scenarios in the development of example concentration ranges for the disposal of near-surface wastes. The overall goal of the example calculations is to illustrate the application of the scenarios in a performance assessment to assure that people in the future cannot receive a dose greater than an established limit. The specific performance assessments will use modified scenarios and data to establish acceptable disposal concentrations for specific disposal sites and conditions. Safety and environmental impacts assessments is required in the post-closure phase to support particular decisions in development, operation, and closure of a near surface repository.

  19. Control and near-field detection of surface plasmon interference patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, Petr; Neuman, Tomáš; Břínek, Lukáš; Šamořil, Tomáš; Kalousek, Radek; Dub, Petr; Varga, Peter; Šikola, Tomáš

    2013-06-12

    The tailoring of electromagnetic near-field properties is the central task in the field of nanophotonics. In addition to 2D optics for optical nanocircuits, confined and enhanced electric fields are utilized in detection and sensing, photovoltaics, spatially localized spectroscopy (nanoimaging), as well as in nanolithography and nanomanipulation. For practical purposes, it is necessary to develop easy-to-use methods for controlling the electromagnetic near-field distribution. By imaging optical near-fields using a scanning near-field optical microscope, we demonstrate that surface plasmon polaritons propagating from slits along the metal-dielectric interface form tunable interference patterns. We present a simple way how to control the resulting interference patterns both by variation of the angle between two slits and, for a fixed slit geometry, by a proper combination of laser beam polarization and inhomogeneous far-field illumination of the structure. Thus the modulation period of interference patterns has become adjustable and new variable patterns consisting of stripelike and dotlike motifs have been achieved, respectively.

  20. A new surface fractal dimension for displacement mode shape-based damage identification of plate-type structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Binkai; Qiao, Pizhong

    2018-03-01

    Vibration-based nondestructive testing is an area of growing interest and worthy of exploring new and innovative approaches. The displacement mode shape is often chosen to identify damage due to its local detailed characteristic and less sensitivity to surrounding noise. Requirement for baseline mode shape in most vibration-based damage identification limits application of such a strategy. In this study, a new surface fractal dimension called edge perimeter dimension (EPD) is formulated, from which an EPD-based window dimension locus (EPD-WDL) algorithm for irregularity or damage identification of plate-type structures is established. An analytical notch-type damage model of simply-supported plates is proposed to evaluate notch effect on plate vibration performance; while a sub-domain of notch cases with less effect is selected to investigate robustness of the proposed damage identification algorithm. Then, fundamental aspects of EPD-WDL algorithm in term of notch localization, notch quantification, and noise immunity are assessed. A mathematical solution called isomorphism is implemented to remove false peaks caused by inflexions of mode shapes when applying the EPD-WDL algorithm to higher mode shapes. The effectiveness and practicability of the EPD-WDL algorithm are demonstrated by an experimental procedure on damage identification of an artificially-induced notched aluminum cantilever plate using a measurement system of piezoelectric lead-zirconate (PZT) actuator and scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). As demonstrated in both the analytical and experimental evaluations, the new surface fractal dimension technique developed is capable of effectively identifying damage in plate-type structures.

  1. Tornado Damage Assessment: Reconstructing the Wind Through Debris Tracking and Treefall Pattern Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, C. M.; Peterson, C. J.; Lombardo, F.

    2017-12-01

    Efforts to enhance the resilience of communities to tornadoes requires an understanding of the interconnected nature of debris and damage propagation in both the built and natural environment. A first step toward characterizing the interconnectedness of these elements within a given community involves detailed post-event surveys of tornado damage. Such damage surveys immediately followed the 22 January 2017 EF3 tornadoes in the southern Georgia towns of Nashville and Albany. After assigning EF-scale ratings to impacted structures, the authors geotagged hundreds of pieces of debris scattered around selected residential structures and outbuildings in each neighborhood and paired each piece of debris with its source structure. Detailed information on trees in the vicinity of the structures supplements the debris data, including the species, dimensions, location, fall direction, and level of damage. High-resolution satellite imagery helps to identify the location and fall direction of hundreds of additional forest trees. These debris and treefall patterns allow an estimation of the near-surface wind field using a Rankine vortex model coupled with both a tree stability model and an infrastructure fragility model that simulates debris flight. Comparisons between the modeled damage and the actual treefall and debris field show remarkable similarities for a selected set of vortex parameters, indicating the viability of this approach for estimating enhanced Fujita scale levels, determining the near-surface wind field of a tornado during its passage through a neighborhood, and identifying how debris may contribute to the overall risk from tornadoes.

  2. Assessment of near-surface dissolution at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachman, G.O.

    1985-07-01

    The area at and near the WIPP site was examined for evidence of karst development on the geomorphic surface encompassing the site. Certain surficial depressions of initial concern were identified as blowouts in sand dune fields (shallow features unrelated to karstification). An ancient stream system active more than 500,000 yr ago contained more water than any system since. During that time (Gatuna, Middle Pleistocene), many karst features such as Clayton Basin and Nash Draw began to form in the region. Halite was probably dissolved from parts of the Rustler Formation at that time. Dissolution of halite and gypsum from intervals encountered in Borehole WIPP-33 west of the WIPP site occurred during later Pleistocene time (i.e., <450,000 yr ago). However, there is no evidence of active near-surface dissolution within a belt to the east of WIPP-33 in the vicinity of the WIPP shaft. 26 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  3. Effects of surface orientation on lifetime of near-surface nanoscale He bubble in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jiechao; Fu, Baoqin; Wu, Zhangwen; Hou, Qing, E-mail: qhou@scu.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    In multiscale modeling of the morphological evolution of plasma facing materials in nuclear fusion reactors, the knowledge of the timescales of the involved physical processes is important. In the present study, a new method based on molecular dynamics simulations was developed to extract the lifetime of helium bubbles near tungsten surfaces. It was found that the lifetime of a helium bubble can be described by the Arrhenius equation. However, the lifetime of a helium bubble depends on the thickness of tungsten film above the helium bubble in the substrate and the bubble size. The influence of surface orientations on the lifetime of helium bubbles was also observed, and the performance of helium bubbles on the (1 1 1) surface is very different from on the (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces. The role of the helium bubble lifetime in other simulation techniques, such as in kinetic Monte Carlo methods and rate theory, is discussed.

  4. The Modern Near-Surface Martian Climate: A Review of In-situ Meteorological Data from Viking to Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, G. M.; Newman, C. N.; De Vicente-Retortillo, A.; Fischer, E.; Renno, N. O.; Richardson, M. I.; Fairén, A. G.; Genzer, M.; Guzewich, S. D.; Haberle, R. M.; Harri, A.-M.; Kemppinen, O.; Lemmon, M. T.; Smith, M. D.; de la Torre-Juárez, M.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2017-10-01

    We analyze the complete set of in-situ meteorological data obtained from the Viking landers in the 1970s to today's Curiosity rover to review our understanding of the modern near-surface climate of Mars, with focus on the dust, CO2 and H2O cycles and their impact on the radiative and thermodynamic conditions near the surface. In particular, we provide values of the highest confidence possible for atmospheric opacity, atmospheric pressure, near-surface air temperature, ground temperature, near-surface wind speed and direction, and near-surface air relative humidity and water vapor content. Then, we study the diurnal, seasonal and interannual variability of these quantities over a span of more than twenty Martian years. Finally, we propose measurements to improve our understanding of the Martian dust and H2O cycles, and discuss the potential for liquid water formation under Mars' present day conditions and its implications for future Mars missions. Understanding the modern Martian climate is important to determine if Mars could have the conditions to support life and to prepare for future human exploration.

  5. Interaction of flexible surface hairs with near-wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brücker, Ch

    2011-05-11

    The interaction of near-wall turbulence with hairy surfaces is investigated in a turbulent boundary layer flow along a flat plate in an oil channel at Re = 1.2 × 10⁶. The plate is covered locally with a dense carpet of elastomeric micro-hairs (length L = 1 mm, length in viscous units L( + ) = 30) which are arranged in a regular grid (60 × 30 hairs with a streamwise spacing Δx( + )≈15 and a spanwise spacing Δy( + )≈30). Instead of the micro-structures used in previous studies for sensory applications, the surface hairs are considerably larger and much more densely distributed with a spacing of S/D wall-normal directions. Near-wall high-frequency disturbances excited by the passage of turbulent sweeps are dampened over their course along the carpet. The cooperative action of the hairs leads to an energy transfer from small-scale motion to larger scales, thus increasing the coherence of the motion pattern in streamwise and spanwise directions. As a consequence of the specific arrangement of the micro-hairs in streamwise columns a reduced spanwise meandering and stabilization of the streamwise velocity streaks is achieved by promoting varicose waves and inhibiting sinusoidal waves. Streak stabilization is known to be a major contributor to turbulent drag reduction. Thus it is concluded that hairy surfaces may be of benefit for turbulent drag reduction as hypothesized by Bartenwerfer and Bechert (1991 Z. Flugwiss. Weltraumforsch. 15 19-26).

  6. Temporal variation of 228Ra in the near-surface Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, F.D.; Moore, W.S.; Sackett, W.M.

    1979-01-01

    The Mn-fiber technique for extracting radium from seawater has proved useful for studying the marine geochemistry of 228 Ra. In the Gulf of Mexico, this technique was used to measure the surface and near-surface distribution of 226 Ra and 228 Ra. The observed surface distribution of 228 Ra, and particularly the radium activity ratio (228/226) can be explained by known circulation patterns, or, when local surface currents are not well understood, may provide insight into their general characteristics. The radium activity ratio has increased from 0.5 in 1968 to 0.7 in 1973 in the surface Gulf of Mexico. This observed increase cannot be attributed to known anthropogenic or natural source perturbations within the Caribbean Sea-Gulf of Mexico system. Possible causes include a change in the residence time for near-surface water, or variations in the relative dominance of the two eastern Caribbean; the North Equatorial Current and the Guiana Current. The temporal distribution of 228 Ra is unstable and naturally variable over a time period less than or equal to five years in the Gulf of Mexico and by extrapolation, the Caribbean Sea. Therefore, its usefulness in calculations of eddy diffusion coefficients for these regions is greatly diminished. (Auth.)

  7. Surface Contaminant Control Technologies to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The large high-power solid lasers, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF of America and the Shenguang-III (SG-III laser facility of China, can output over 2.1 MJ laser pulse for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF experiments. Because of the enhancement of operating flux and the expansion of laser driver scale, the problem of contamination seriously influences their construction period and operation life. During irradiation by intense laser beams, the contaminants on the metallic surface of beam tubes can be transmitted to the optical surfaces and lead to damage of optical components. For the high-power solid-state laser facilities, contamination control focuses on the slab amplifiers, spatial filters, and final-optical assemblies. In this paper, an effective solution to control contaminations including the whole process of the laser driver is put forward to provide the safe operation of laser facilities, and the detailed technical methods of contamination control such as washing, cleanliness metrology, and cleanliness protecting are also introduced to reduce the probability of laser-induced damage of optics. The experimental results show that the cleanliness level of SG-III laser facility is much better to ensure that the laser facility can safely operate at high energy flux.

  8. Comparison of laser-based mitigation of fused silica surface damage using mid- versus far-infrared lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Cooke, D; Guss, G M; Draggoo, V G; Wegner, P J

    2009-12-16

    Laser induced growth of optical damage can limit component lifetime and therefore operating costs of large-aperture fusion-class laser systems. While far-infrared (IR) lasers have been used previously to treat laser damage on fused silica optics and render it benign, little is known about the effectiveness of less-absorbing mid-IR lasers for this purpose. In this study, they quantitatively compare the effectiveness and efficiency of mid-IR (4.6 {micro}m) versus far-IR (10.6 {micro}m) lasers in mitigating damage growth on fused silica surfaces. The non-linear volumetric heating due to mid-IR laser absorption is analyzed by solving the heat equation numerically, taking into account the temperature-dependent absorption coefficient {alpha}(T) at {lambda} = 4.6 {micro}m, while far-IR laser heating is well-described by a linear analytic approximation to the laser-driven temperature rise. In both cases, the predicted results agree well with surface temperature measurements based on infrared radiometry, as well as sub-surface fictive temperature measurements based on confocal Raman microscopy. Damage mitigation efficiency is assessed using a figure of merit (FOM) relating the crack healing depth to laser power required, under minimally-ablative conditions. Based on their FOM, they show that for cracks up to at least 500 {micro}m in depth, mitigation with a 4.6 {micro}m mid-IR laser is more efficient than mitigation with a 10.6 {micro}m far-IR laser. This conclusion is corroborated by direct application of each laser system to the mitigation of pulsed laser-induced damage possessing fractures up to 225 {micro}m in depth.

  9. Current status of the near surface repository in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrei, V.; Glodeanu, F.; Rotaru, I.

    2000-01-01

    The radioactive waste management at the Cernavoda NPP is based on collection, pretreatment and storage of all solid wastes. The disposal of operational and decommissioning wastes has been evaluated, based on the results of a research and development programme. A near surface disposal facility was selected and a siting process was implemented. The status of this project and its prospective are discussed in the paper. (author)

  10. Immediate, irreversible, posttraumatic coma: a review indicating that bilateral brainstem injury rather than widespread hemispheric damage is essential for its production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, William I

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury may result in immediate long-lasting coma. Much attention has been given to predicting this outcome from the initial examination because these predictions can guide future treatment and interactions with the patient's family. Reports of diffuse axonal injury in these cases have ascribed the coma to widespread damage in the deep white matter that disconnects the hemispheres from the ascending arousal system (AAS). However, brainstem lesions are also present in such cases, and the AAS may be interrupted at the brainstem level. This review examines autopsy and imaging literature that assesses the presence, extent, and predictive value of lesions in both sites. The evidence suggests that diffuse injury to the deep white matter is not the usual cause of immediate long-lasting posttraumatic coma. Instead, brainstem lesions in the rostral pons or midbrain are almost always the cause but only if the lesions are bilateral. Moreover, recovery is possible if critical brainstem inputs to the AAS are spared. The precise localization of the latter is subject to ongoing investigation with advanced imaging techniques using magnets of very high magnetic gradients. Limited availability of this equipment plus the need to verify the findings continue to require meticulous autopsy examination.

  11. Fatigue damage behavior of a surface-mount electronic package under different cyclic applied loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huai-Hui; Wang, Xi-Shu

    2014-04-01

    This paper studies and compares the effects of pull-pull and 3-point bending cyclic loadings on the mechanical fatigue damage behaviors of a solder joint in a surface-mount electronic package. The comparisons are based on experimental investigations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in-situ technology and nonlinear finite element modeling, respectively. The compared results indicate that there are different threshold levels of plastic strain for the initial damage of solder joints under two cyclic applied loads; meanwhile, fatigue crack initiation occurs at different locations, and the accumulation of equivalent plastic strain determines the trend and direction of fatigue crack propagation. In addition, simulation results of the fatigue damage process of solder joints considering a constitutive model of damage initiation criteria for ductile materials and damage evolution based on accumulating inelastic hysteresis energy are identical to the experimental results. The actual fatigue life of the solder joint is almost the same and demonstrates that the FE modeling used in this study can provide an accurate prediction of solder joint fatigue failure.

  12. Observations on the near-surface behaviour of sardinella schools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The schooling dynamics and swimming behaviour of sardinella Sardinella maderensis and S. aurita schooling near the surface in Angolan waters were recorded visually, using a calibrated echo integration system and a 95kHz high resolution sonar on board RV Dr Fridtjof Nansen during three cruises; July 1996, May 1997 ...

  13. Dynamics of radon-222 near below ground surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masami; Katsurayama, Kousuke; Nishimura, Susumu.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations and variation of 222 Rn were investigated both in unconfined groundwater and in the aerated zone to obtain information as to the behavior of Rn close to ground surface. The Rn concentrations in unconfined groundwater near the surface were depletive by the extent of about 50 % compared with that of lower part in a borehole, then the continuous extraction of groundwater causes pronounced increase of the concentration. The method, which monitors continuously the Rn concentration in such surroundings, was developed, where the unconfined groundwater extracted was injected into another borehole and sprayed gas was measured using an ionization chamber. The read-out values of this system well followed the variation of concentrations caused by the meteorological parameter, especially infiltrating water. The increase of 222 Rn concentration in the aerated zone above the water level was clearly observed following the ascendant of groundwater level caused by the infiltrating water, whereas the change of concentration in soil air just below the ground surface obeyed mainly to the wetness of soil and unconfined groundwater level rather than atmospheric pressure. (author)

  14. Deformation characteristics of the near-surface layers of zirconia ceramics implanted with aluminum ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghyngazov, S. A.; Vasiliev, I. P.; Frangulyan, T. S.; Chernyavski, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion treatment on the phase composition and mechanical properties of the near-surface layers of zirconium ceramic composition 97 ZrO2-3Y2O3 (mol%) was studied. Irradiation of the samples was carried out by accelerated ions of aluminum with using vacuum-arc source Mevva 5-Ru. Ion beam had the following parameters: the energy of the accelerated ions E = 78 keV, the pulse current density Ji = 4mA / cm2, current pulse duration equal τ = 250 mcs, pulse repetition frequency f = 5 Hz. Exposure doses (fluence) were 1016 и 1017 ion/cm2. The depth distribution implanted ions was studied by SIMS method. It is shown that the maximum projected range of the implanted ions is equal to 250 nm. Near-surface layers were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at fixed glancing incidence angle. It is shown that implantation of aluminum ions into the ceramics does not lead to a change in the phase composition of the near-surface layer. The influence of implanted ions on mechanical properties of ceramic near-surface layers was studied by the method of dynamic nanoindentation using small loads on the indenter P=300 mN. It is shown that in ion- implanted ceramic layer the processes of material recovery in the deformed region in the unloading mode proceeds with higher efficiency as compared with the initial material state. The deformation characteristics of samples before and after ion treatment have been determined from interpretation of the resulting P-h curves within the loading and unloading sections by the technique proposed by Oliver and Pharr. It was found that implantation of aluminum ions in the near-surface layer of zirconia ceramics increases nanohardness and reduces the Young's modulus.

  15. Atomic and electronic structure of V-Rh(110) near-surface alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píš, I.; Stetsovych, V.; Mysliveček, J.; Kettner, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Dvořák, F.; Mazur, D.; Matolín, V.; Nehasil, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 24 (2013), s. 12679-12688 ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : V−Rh(110) near-surface alloy * STM * XPS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.835, year: 2013

  16. Cuticular surface damage of Ascaridia galli adult worms treated with Veitchia merrillii betel nuts extract in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balqis, Ummu; Hambal, Muhammad; Rinidar; Athaillah, Farida; Ismail; Azhar; Vanda, Henni; Darmawi

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this research was to in vitro evaluate the cuticular surface damage of Ascaridia galli adult worms treated with ethanolic extract of betel nuts Veitchia merrillii . Phytochemical screening was done using FeCl 3 , Wagner and Dragendorff reagents, NaOH, MgHCl, and Liebermann-Burchard reaction test. Amount of 16 worms were segregated into four groups with three replicates. Four worms of each group submerged into phosphate buffered saline, 25 mg/ml, and 75 mg/ml crude ethanolic extract of V. merrillii , and 15 mg/ml albendazole. The effect of these extract was observed 40 h after incubation as soon as worms death. The worms were sectioned transversally and were explored for any cuticular histopathological changes in their body surface under microscope. We found that the ethanolic extract of V. merrillii betel nuts contains tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenoids, and saponins. The ethanolic extract of betel nuts V. merrillii induces surface alterations caused cuticular damage of A. galli adult worms. We concluded that ethanolic extract of betel nuts V. merrillii possess anthelmintic activity caused cuticular damage of A. galli adult worms.

  17. Picosecond laser damage of fused silica at 355 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Xiangjie; Liu Hongjie; Wang Fang; Zhang Zhen; An Xinyou; Huang Jin; Jiang Xiaodong; Wu Weidong; Ren Weiyi

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the initiated damage threshold, the damage morphology and the subsequent damage growth on fused silica's input-surface and exit-surface under picosecond laser irradiation at 355 nm. Defects induced fluorescence on surface of the optical component is observed. The results demonstrate a significant dependence of the initiated damage on pulse duration and surface defects, and that of the damage growth on self-focusing, sub-surface defects. The damage-threshold is 3.98 J/cm 2 of input surface and 2.91 J/cm 2 of exit surface. The damage morphologies are quite different between input surface and exit surface. Slow growth behavior appears for the diameter of exit-surface and linear growth one for the depth of exit-surface in the lateral side of damage site with the increase of shot number. Defects have changed obviously compared with nanosecond laser damage in the damage area. Several main reasons such as electric intensification and self-focusing for the observed initiated damage and damage growth behavior are discussed. (authors)

  18. The near-field acoustic levitation for spheres by transducer with concave spherical radiating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian Fang; Sun, Xu Guang; Jiao, Xiao Yang; Chen, Hong Xia; Hua, Shun Ming; Zhang, Hong Chun

    2013-01-01

    To levitate ICF target spheres in the near-field acoustic levitation, a transducer with concave spherical radiating surface and a nearfield acoustic levitation system is established. The concave spherical radiating surface of the transducer is designed by the finite element parametric method. Then the levitation height and levitation perturbation of spheres with different mass and diameters in the near-field acoustic levitation system are tested and discussed in the driving voltage at 400V, 500V and 600V, respectively, when the levitation system is under the resonant frequency. Finally, based on the experimental results, the height formula of the near-field acoustic levitation for spheres is deduced by introducing a coupling coefficient.

  19. The near-field acoustic levitation for spheres by transducer with concave spherical radiating surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian Fang; Sun, Xu Guang; Jiao, Xiao Yang; Chen, Hong Xia [Jilin University, Changchun (China); Hua, Shun Ming [Zhejiang University, Ningbo (China); Zhang, Hong Chun [Aviation University of AirForce, Changchun (China)

    2013-02-15

    To levitate ICF target spheres in the near-field acoustic levitation, a transducer with concave spherical radiating surface and a nearfield acoustic levitation system is established. The concave spherical radiating surface of the transducer is designed by the finite element parametric method. Then the levitation height and levitation perturbation of spheres with different mass and diameters in the near-field acoustic levitation system are tested and discussed in the driving voltage at 400V, 500V and 600V, respectively, when the levitation system is under the resonant frequency. Finally, based on the experimental results, the height formula of the near-field acoustic levitation for spheres is deduced by introducing a coupling coefficient.

  20. Longitudinal permittivity of a toroidal plasma near rational surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekrasov, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    A quite simple analytical formula for longitudinal permittivity, suitable for numerical processing on a computer, is determined. On the basis of a Fourier representation a poloidal angle a compact expression for the imaginary part of longitudinal permittivity near rational surfaces (m+nq=0) at an arbitrary relation between the bounce frequency and excited wave frequency is determined. A strongly magnetized collisionless plasma in the weak toroidality approximation is considered

  1. Deformation from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Ellen, Stephen D.; Peterson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to pavement and near-surface utility pipes, caused by the 17 October 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake, provides evidence for ground deformation in a 663 km2 area near the southwest margin of the Santa Clara Valley, California (USA). A total of 1427 damage sites, collected from more than 30 sources, are concentrated in four zones, three of which lie near previously mapped faults. In one of these zones, the channel lining of Los Gatos Creek, a 2-km-long concrete strip trending perpendicular to regional geologic structure, was broken by thrusts that were concentrated in two belts, each several tens of meters wide, separated by more than 300 m of relatively undeformed concrete.

  2. The size prediction of potential inclusions embedded in the sub-surface of fused silica by damage morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A model for predicting the size ranges of different potential inclusions initiating damage on the surface of fused silica has been presented. This accounts for the heating of nanometric inclusions whose absorptivity is described based on Mie Theory. The depth profile of impurities has been measured by ICP-OES. By the measured temporal pulse profile on the surface of fused silica, the temperature and thermal stress has been calculated. Furthermore, considering the limit conditions of temperature and thermal stress strength for different damage morphologies, the size range of potential inclusions for fused silica is discussed.

  3. Charge Dynamics in near-Surface, Variable-Density Ensembles of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhomkar, Siddharth; Jayakumar, Harishankar; Zangara, Pablo R; Meriles, Carlos A

    2018-06-13

    Although the spin properties of superficial shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers have been the subject of extensive scrutiny, considerably less attention has been devoted to studying the dynamics of NV charge conversion near the diamond surface. Using multicolor confocal microscopy, here we show that near-surface point defects arising from high-density ion implantation dramatically increase the ionization and recombination rates of shallow NVs compared to those in bulk diamond. Further, we find that these rates grow linearly, not quadratically, with laser intensity, indicative of single-photon processes enabled by NV state mixing with other defect states. Accompanying these findings, we observe NV ionization and recombination in the dark, likely the result of charge transfer to neighboring traps. Despite the altered charge dynamics, we show that one can imprint rewritable, long-lasting patterns of charged-initialized, near-surface NVs over large areas, an ability that could be exploited for electrochemical biosensing or to optically store digital data sets with subdiffraction resolution.

  4. Inverse compton emission of gamma rays near the pulsar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, M.

    1981-01-01

    The physical conditions near pulsar surface that might give rise to gamma ray emission from Crab and Vela pulsars are not yet well understood. Here I suggest that, in the context of the vacuum discharge mechanism proposed by Ruderman and Sutherland (1975), gamma rays are produced by inverse Compton scattering of secondary electrons with the thermal radiation of the star surface as well as for curvature and synchotron radiation. It is found that inverse Compton scattering is relevant if the neutron star surface temperature is greater than 10 6 K or of the polar cap temperature is of the order of 5 x 10 6 K. Inverse Compton scattering in anisotropic photon fields and Klein-Nishina regime is here carefully considered. (orig.)

  5. Derivation of activity limits for the disposal of radioactive waste in near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-12-01

    Radioactive waste must be managed safely, consistent with internationally agreed safety standards. The disposal method chosen for the waste should be commensurate with the hazard and longevity of the waste. Near surface disposal is an option used by many countries for the disposal of radioactive waste containing mainly short lived radionuclides and low concentrations of long lived radionuclides. The term 'near surface disposal' encompasses a wide range of design options, including disposal in engineered structures at or just below ground level, disposal in simple earthen trenches a few metres deep, disposal in engineered concrete vaults, and disposal in rock caverns several tens of metres below the surface. The use of a near surface disposal option requires design and operational measures to provide for the protection of human health and the environment, both during operation of the disposal facility and following its closure. To ensure the safety of both workers and the public (both in the short term and the long term), the operator is required to design a comprehensive waste management system for the safe operation and closure of a near surface disposal facility. Part of such a system is to establish criteria for accepting waste for disposal at the facility. The purpose of the criteria is to limit the consequences of events which could lead to radiation exposures and in addition, to prevent or limit hazards, which could arise from non-radiological causes. Waste acceptance criteria include limits on radionuclide content concentration in waste materials, and radionuclide amounts in packages and in the repository as a whole. They also include limits on quantity of free liquids, requirements for exclusion of chelating agents and pyrophoric materials, and specifications of the characteristics of the waste containers. Largely as a result of problems encountered at some disposal facilities operated in the past, in 1985 the IAEA published guidance on generic acceptance

  6. Chronic widespread pain in spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pain associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA can be intense, persistent and disabling. It frequently has a multifactorial, simultaneously central and peripheral origin, and may be due to currently active inflammation, or joint damage and tissue destruction arising from a previous inflammatory condition. Inflammatory pain symptoms can be reduced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but many patients continue to experience moderate pain due to alterations in the mechanisms that regulate central pain, as in the case of the chronic widespread pain (CWP that characterises fibromyalgia (FM. The importance of distinguishing SpA and FM is underlined by the fact that SpA is currently treated with costly drugs such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors, and direct costs are higher in patients with concomitant CWP or FM than in those with FM or SpA alone. Optimal treatment needs to take into account symptoms such as fatigue, mood, sleep, and the overall quality of life, and is based on the use of tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine, rather than adjustments in the dose of anti-TNF agents or disease-modifying drugs.

  7. Near surface geophysics techniques and geomorphological approach to reconstruct the hazard cave map in historical and urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, M.; Loperte, A.; Perrone, A.

    2009-04-01

    spreading can cause landslide phenomena (rockfall and toppling) along the steep sandy-clayey slopes. The secular multilevel cave excavation, developed along several fronts beneath the urban area, accelerated the pre-existing morphological processes acting on this site, favouring the water infiltration and subsurface erosional phenomena, characterized by widespread surface piping erosion of sandy bodies. Moreover, climate analysis carried out for the last century showed an increasing trend in rainfall intensity over short durations, which also induced an increase in hazard conditions of the slopes. All the natural and anthropic conditions described above show as a deep knowledge of cave distribution and their geometry is the basis for a good urban planning to apply in historical site particularly vulnerable; it shows also as the integrated near surface geophysics techniques can powerfully contribute to acquire useful information to mitigate the anthropic risk and preserve the historical-monumental heritage.

  8. Reactive ion beam etching for microcavity surface emitting laser fabrication: technology and damage characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutani, A.; Tadokoro, T.; Koyama, F.; Iga, K.

    1993-01-01

    Reactive ion beam etching (RIBE) is an effective dry etching technique for the fabrication of micro-sized surface emitting (SE) lasers and optoelectronic devices. In this chapter, some etching characteristics for GaAs, InP and GaInAsP with a Cl 2 gas using an RIBE system are discussed. Micro-sized circular mesas including GaInAsP/InP multilayers with vertical sidewalls were fabricated. RIBE-induced damage in InP substrates was estimated by C-V and PL measurement. In addition, the removal of the induced damage by the second RIBE with different conditions for the InP wafer was proposed. The sidewall damage is characterized by photoluminescence emitted from the etched sidewall of a GaInAsP/InP DH wafer. (orig.)

  9. The Influence of Ballistic Damage on the Aeroelastic Characteristics of Lifting Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    tunnel wall was sealed with a flexible rubber gasket. The pressure measurements were made using Scanivalve pressure multiplexers and DRUCK pressure...discharge, having a 1.52 by 2.13 m (5 x 7 ft) test section. The drive system comprises four fans of 200 hp each, DRUCK model PDCR differential pressure...3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 Surface # IC LS 1 3 2 2 4 2 3 2 2 4 3 2 5 4 2 6 2 2 7 3 3 8 4 3 9 2 3 Damaged - Cases: ID, 2D, 3D , 4D, 5D, 6D, 8D, 9D 1 .Surface # IC

  10. Roller Testing to Mimic Damage of the ISS SARJ Ring and Durability Test to Simulate Fifteen Years of SARJ Operation Using the Damaged Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Elchert, Justin P.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Dube, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station's starboard Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) experienced a breakdown of the joint's race ring surface. The starboard SARJ mechanism was cleaned and lubricated with grease. To provide some guidance on the expected behavior of the damaged SARJ ring with continued operations, experiments were conducted using rollers and a vacuum roller test rig. The approach of the experimental work involved three main steps: (1) initiate damage using conditions representative of the SARJ with inadequate lubrication; (2) propagate the damage by operating the test rollers without lubrication; and (3) assess the durability of the roller by testing to simulate the equivalent of 15 years of SARJ operation on the damaged surface assuming adequate grease lubrication. During the rig testing, additional and/or replacement grease was introduced at regular intervals to maintain good lubrication in the rig. The damage to the nitride layer continued even after application of grease. The grease lubrication proved to be effective for limiting the value of the axial force that can be developed. Limiting the axial force on the SARJ mechanism is important since the larger the axial force the more concentrated the load pressure becomes on the blend-radius location on the SARJ roller. After the testing simulating 15 years of SARJ operations, the wear depths were the order of 0.2 mm for the nitrided 15-5 roller and the order of 0.06 mm for the mating 440C roller. Metallographic inspections were done to search for indications of impending fatigue or other fracture indications that might eventually propagate and cause structural failure. There were no indications or features found that could eventually compromise structural integrity.

  11. Observation of near-infrared surface brightness of the large Magellanic cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Satio; Koizumi, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Uyama, Kiichiro.

    1981-01-01

    The near-infrared surface brightness of the large Magellanic cloud was observed by an infrared telescope carried by a balloon. The balloon flight was made at Australian Balloon Launching Station. The brightness distribution of 2.4 Mu m radiation was obtained. A part of Bar was bright, and the expansion of the contour at the east end of Bar corresponded to the 30 Dor region. Many near-infrared sources distribute in this region. Discussions on the color and brightness of the center of Bar and the 30 Dor region are presented. (Kato, T.)

  12. Evolution of surface topography in dependence on the grain orientation during surface thermal fatigue of polycrystalline copper

    CERN Document Server

    Aicheler, M; Taborelli, M; Calatroni, S; Neupert, H; Wuensch, W; Sgobba, S

    2011-01-01

    Surface degradation due to cyclic thermal loading plays a major role in the Accelerating Structures (AS) of the future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) In this article results on surface degradation of thermally cycled polycrystalline copper as a function of the orientation of surface grains are presented Samples with different grain sizes were subjected to thermal fatigue using two different methods and were then characterized using roughness measurements and Orientation Imaging Scanning-Electron-Microscopy (OIM-SEM) Samples fatigued by a pulsed laser show the same trend in the orientation-fatigue damage accumulation as the sample fatigued by pulsed Radio-Frequency-heating (RF) it is clearly shown that 11 1 1] surface grains develop significantly more damage than the surface grains oriented in {[}100] and three reasons for this behaviour are pointed out Based on observations performed near grain boundaries their role in the crack initiation process is discussed The results are in good agreement with previous f...

  13. Characterization of irradiation damage distribution near TiO2/SrTiO3 interfaces using coherent acoustic phonon interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarotski, Dmitry; Yan Li; Jia Quanxi; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Fu Engang; Wang Yongqiang; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2012-01-01

    We apply ultrafast coherent acoustic phonon interferometry to characterize the distribution of the radiation damage near the TiO 2 /SrTiO 3 interfaces. We show that the optical and mechanical properties of anatase TiO 2 remain unaffected by the radiation dosages in the 0.1÷5 dpa (displacements per atom) range, while the degraded optical response indicates a significant defect accumulation in the interfacial region of SrTiO 3 at 0.1 dpa and subsequent amorphization at 3 dpa. Comparison between the theoretical simulations and the experimental results reveals an almost threefold reduction of the sound velocity in the irradiated SrTiO 3 layer with peak damage levels of 3 and 5 dpa.

  14. Bulk and surface laser damage of silica by picosecond and nanosecond pulses at 1064 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Arlee V.; Do, Binh T.

    2008-01-01

    We measured bulk and surface dielectric breakdown thresholds of pure silica for 14 ps and 8 ns pulses of 1064 nm light. The thresholds are sharp and reproducible. For the 8 ns pulses the bulk threshold irradiance is 4.75 ± 0.25 kW/μm 2 . The threshold is approximately three times higher for 14 ps pulses. For 8 ns pulses the input surface damage threshold can be made equal to the bulk threshold by applying an alumina or silica surface polish

  15. Near-real-time Forensic Disaster Analysis: experiences from hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Michael; Mühr, Bernhard; Schröter, Kai; Kunz-Plapp, Tina; Daniell, James; Khazai, Bijan; Wenzel, Friedemann; Vannieuwenhuyse, Marjorie; Comes, Tina; Münzberg, Thomas; Elmer, Florian; Fohringer, Joachim; Lucas, Christian; Trieselmann, Werner; Zschau, Jochen

    2013-04-01

    Hurricane Sandy was the last tropical cyclone of the 2012 Northern Atlantic Hurricane season that made landfall. It moved on an unusual track from the Caribbean to the East Coast of the United States from 24 to 30 October as a Category 1 and 2 Hurricane according to the Saffir-Simpson Scale. Along its path, the severe storm event caused widespread damage including almost 200 fatalities. In the early hours of 30 October, Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, N.J. Sandy was an extraordinary event due to its multihazard nature and several cascading effects in the aftermath. From the hydro-meteorological perspective, most unusual was the very large spatial extent of up to 1,700 km. High wind speeds were associated with record breaking storm surges at the U.S. Mid- Atlantic and New England Coast during high (astronomical) tide, leading to widespread flooding. Though Sandy was not the most severe storm event in terms of wind speed and precipitation, the impact in the U.S. was enormous with total damage estimates of up to 90 billion US (own estimate from Dec. 2012). Although much better data emerge weeks after such an event, the Forensic Disaster Analysis (FDA) Task Force of the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM) made an effort to obtain a comprehensive and holistic overview of the causes, hazardous effects and consequences associated with Sandy immediately after landfall at the U.S. coast on 30 October 2012. This was done in an interdisciplinary way by collecting and compiling scattered and distributed information from available databases and sources via the Internet, by applying own methodologies and models for near-real time analyses developed in recent years, and by expert knowledge. This contribution gives an overview about the CEDIM-FDA analyses' results. It describes the situation that led to the extraordinary event, highlights the interaction of the tropical cyclone with other hydro-meteorological events, and examines the

  16. Siting of near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated from the production of nuclear energy and from the use of radioactive materials in industrial applications, research and medicine. The importance of safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme is the IAEA's contribution to establishing and promoting, in a coherent and comprehensive manner, the basic safety philosophy for radioactive waste management and the steps necessary to ensure its implementation. The Safety Standards are supplemented by a number of Safety Guides and Safety Practices. This Safety Guide defines the site selection process and criteria for identifying suitable near surface disposal facilities for low and intermediate level solid wastes. Management of the siting process and data needed to apply the criteria are also specified. 4 refs

  17. Characterization of the dynamic response of structures to damaging pulse-type near-fault ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollaioli, F.; Bruno, S.; Decanini, L.D.; Panza, G.F.

    2006-12-01

    The presence of long-period pulses in near-fault records can be considered as an important factor in causing damage due to the transmission of large amounts of energy to the structures in a very short time. Under such circumstances high-energy dissipation demands usually occur, which are likely to concentrate in the weakest parts of the structure. The maximum nonlinear response or collapse often happens at the onset of directivity pulse and fling, and this time is not predicted by the natural structural vibration periods. Nonlinear response leading to collapse may in most cases occur only during one large amplitude pulse of displacement. From the study of the response of both linear and nonlinear SDOF systems, the effects of these distinctive long-period pulses have been assessed by means of: (i) synthetic parameters directly derived from the strong ground motion records, and (ii) elastic and inelastic spectra of both conventional and energy-based seismic demand parameters. SDOF systems have first been subjected to records obtained during recent earthquakes in near-fault areas in forward directivity conditions. The results indicate that long duration pulses strongly affect the inelastic response, with very high energy and displacement demands which may be several times larger than the limit values specified by the majority of codes. In addition, from the recognition of the fundamental importance of velocity and energy-based parameters in the characterization of near-fault signals, idealized pulses equivalent to near-fault signals have been defined on account of such parameters. Equivalent pulses are capable of representing the salient observed features of the response to near-fault recorded ground motions. (author)

  18. Greenland meltwater storage in firn limited by near-surface ice formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; MacFerrin, Mike; van As, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    above sea level), firn has undergone substantial densification, while at lower elevations, where melt is most abundant, porous firn has lost most of its capability to retain meltwater. Here, the formation of near-surface ice layers renders deep pore space difficult to access, forcing meltwater to enter...

  19. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle

  20. Surface damage characteristics of CFC and tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Nishijima, D. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Ueno, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Shoda, K.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Kawai, T.; Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukumoto, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Doerner, R.P. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Surface damage of carbon fiber composite (CFC) and tungsten (W) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. CX2002U CFC and stress-relieved W samples were exposed to repetitive pulsed deuterium plasmas with duration of {approx}0.5 ms, incident ion energy of {approx}30 eV, and surface absorbed energy density of {approx}0.3-0.7 MJ/m{sup 2}. Bright spots on a CFC surface during pulsed plasma exposures were clearly observed with a high-speed camera, indicating a local surface heating. No melting of a W surface was observed under a single plasma pulse exposure at energy density of {approx}0.7 MJ/m{sup 2}, although cracks were formed. Cracking of the W surface grew with repetitive pulsed plasma exposures. Subsequently, the surface melted due to localized heat absorption.

  1. Reduced near-surface thermal inversions in 2005-06 in the southeastern Arabian Sea (Lakshadweep Sea)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nisha, K.; Rao, S.A.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Rao, R.R.; GirishKumar, M.S.; Pankajakshan, T.; Ravichandran, M.; Rajesh, S.; Girish, K.; Johnson, Z.; Anuradha, M.; Gavaskar, S.S.M.; Suneel, V.; Krishna, S.M.

    Repeat XBT transects made at near-fortnightly intervals in the Lakshadweep Sea (southeastern Arabian Sea) and ocean data assimilation products are examined to describe the year-to-year variability in the observed near-surface thermal inversions...

  2. Surface damage of W exposed to combined stationary D plasma and ELMs-like pulsed plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Y.Z., E-mail: jaja880816@aliyun.com [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610213 (China); Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, B.; Qu, S.L. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, 5612AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    The surface damage of W under D plasma and ELMs-like transient heat loads was studied by combined stationary and pulsed D plasma. Low-flux transient heat loads will promote blister formation due to the gas expansion inside the blisters. On the contrary, high-flux transient heat loads will mitigate blistering due to the high surface temperature. Therefore, blistering on W surface first increased and then decreased with the increasing transient heat loads. The promotion effect of pulsed plasma on blistering is more obvious on [001] and [110] surfaces than on [111] surface, and the orientation dependence of blisters was mitigated by the transient heat loads. Surface modification induced by transient heat loads only formed on [001] and [110] surfaces, but did not form on [111] surface. The orientation dependence of surface modification was mainly due to the slipping system of dislocations.

  3. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, E.; Ridky, R.W.; Schulz, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Water infiltration to buried waste is the prime problem of concern in designing waste disposal units for the humid areas. Conventional compacted clay layers (resistance layer barriers) have been subject to failure by subsidence and by permeability increases brought about by plant roots. A clay barrier with a rock cover sans plants is being investigated. Also a combination of a resistive layer overlying a conductive layer is being investigated. Laboratory studies indicate that this approach can be very effective and field evaluations are underway. However, it must be noted that subsidence will negate the effectiveness of any buried layer barriers. A surface barrier (bioengineering management) has been valuated in the field and found to be very effective in preventing water entry into waste disposal units. This surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence and could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions

  4. The Thermodynamics of Selenium Minerals in Near-Surface Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Krivovichev

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selenium compounds are relatively rare as minerals; there are presently only 118 known mineral species. This work is intended to codify and systematize the data of mineral systems and the thermodynamics of selenium minerals, which are unstable (selenides or formed in near-surface environments (selenites, where the behavior of selenium is controlled by variations of the redox potential and the acidity of solutions at low temperatures and pressures. These parameters determine the migration of selenium and its precipitation as various solid phases. All selenium minerals are divided into four groups—native selenium, oxide, selenides, and oxysalts—anhydrous selenites (I and hydrous selenites and selenates (II. Within each of the groups, minerals are codified according to the minimum number of independent elements necessary to define the composition of the mineral system. Eh–pH diagrams were calculated and plotted using the Geochemist’s Workbench (GMB 9.0 software package. The Eh–pH diagrams of the Me–Se–H2O systems (where Me = Co, Ni, Fe, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Hg, Ag, Bi, As, Sb, Al and Ca were plotted for the average contents of these elements in acidic waters in the oxidation zones of sulfide deposits. The possibility of the formation of Zn, Cd, Ag and Hg selenites under natural oxidation conditions in near surface environments is discussed.

  5. Near-field and far-field modeling of scattered surface waves. Application to the apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, J.; Parent, G.; Fumeron, S.; Jeandel, G.; Lacroix, D.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of surface waves through scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) is a promising technique for thermal measurements at very small scales. Recent studies have shown that electromagnetic waves, in the vicinity of a scattering structure such as an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip, can be scattered from near to far-field and thus detected. In the present work, a model based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and the near-field to far-field (NFTFF) transformation for electromagnetic waves propagation is presented. This model has been validated by studying the electromagnetic field of a dipole in vacuum and close to a dielectric substrate. Then simulations for a tetrahedral tip close to an interface are presented and discussed.

  6. North Atlantic near-surface salinity contrasts and intra-basin water vapor transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, J. R.; Seidov, D.; Boyer, T.

    2017-12-01

    The geographic distribution of near-surface salinity (NSS) in the North Atlantic is characterized by a very salty (>37) subtropical region contrasting with a much fresher (NSS. Additional results and potential implications will be presented and discussed.

  7. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  8. Surface analysis of transition metal oxalates: Damage aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenakin, S.P., E-mail: chenakin@imp.kiev.ua [Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Chimie-Physique des Matériaux, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Institute of Metal Physics, Nat. Acad. Sci. of Ukraine, Akad. Vernadsky Blvd. 36, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Szukiewicz, R. [Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Chimie-Physique des Matériaux, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Barbosa, R.; Kruse, N. [Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Chimie-Physique des Matériaux, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, 155 Wegner Hall, Pullman, WA 99164-6515 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Gas evolution from the Mn, Co, Ni and Cu oxalate hydrates in vacuum, during exposure to X-rays and after termination of X-ray irradiation is studied. • A comparative study of the damage caused by X-rays in NiC{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CuC{sub 2}O{sub 4} is carried out. • Effect of Ar{sup +} bombardment on the structure and composition of CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4} is studied. - Abstract: The behavior of transition metal oxalates in vacuum, under X-ray irradiation and low-energy Ar{sup +} ion bombardment was studied. A comparative mass-spectrometric analysis was carried out of gas evolution from the surface of Mn, Co, Ni and Cu oxalate hydrates in vacuum, during exposure to X-rays and after termination of X-ray irradiation. The rates of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} liberation from the oxalates were found to be in an inverse correlation with the temperatures of dehydration and decomposition, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the X-ray induced damage in NiC{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CuC{sub 2}O{sub 4} by measuring the various XP spectral characteristics and surface composition of the oxalates as a function of time of exposure to X-rays. It was shown that Cu oxalate underwent a significantly faster degradation than Ni oxalate and demonstrated a high degree of X-ray induced reduction from the Cu{sup 2+} to the Cu{sup 1+} chemical state. 500 eV Ar{sup +} sputter cleaning of CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4} for 10 min was found to cause a strong transformation of the oxalate structure which manifested itself in an appreciable alteration of the XP core-level and valence band spectra. The analysis of changes in stoichiometry and comparison of XP spectra of bombarded oxalate with respective spectra of a reference carbonate CoCO{sub 3} implied that the bombardment-induced decomposition of CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4} gave rise to the formation of CoO-like and disordered CoCO{sub 3}-like phases.

  9. Characterization of a complex near-surface structure using well logging and passive seismic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjumea, Beatriz; Macau, Albert; Gabàs, Anna; Figueras, Sara

    2016-04-01

    We combine geophysical well logging and passive seismic measurements to characterize the near-surface geology of an area located in Hontomin, Burgos (Spain). This area has some near-surface challenges for a geophysical study. The irregular topography is characterized by limestone outcrops and unconsolidated sediments areas. Additionally, the near-surface geology includes an upper layer of pure limestones overlying marly limestones and marls (Upper Cretaceous). These materials lie on top of Low Cretaceous siliciclastic sediments (sandstones, clays, gravels). In any case, a layer with reduced velocity is expected. The geophysical data sets used in this study include sonic and gamma-ray logs at two boreholes and passive seismic measurements: three arrays and 224 seismic stations for applying the horizontal-to-vertical amplitude spectra ratio method (H/V). Well-logging data define two significant changes in the P-wave-velocity log within the Upper Cretaceous layer and one more at the Upper to Lower Cretaceous contact. This technique has also been used for refining the geological interpretation. The passive seismic measurements provide a map of sediment thickness with a maximum of around 40 m and shear-wave velocity profiles from the array technique. A comparison between seismic velocity coming from well logging and array measurements defines the resolution limits of the passive seismic techniques and helps it to be interpreted. This study shows how these low-cost techniques can provide useful information about near-surface complexity that could be used for designing a geophysical field survey or for seismic processing steps such as statics or imaging.

  10. Comparison between assimilated and non-assimilated experiments of the MACCii global reanalysis near surface ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikerdekis, Athanasios; Katragou, Eleni; Zanis, Prodromos; Melas, Dimitrios; Eskes, Henk; Flemming, Johannes; Huijnen, Vincent; Inness, Antje; Kapsomenakis, Ioannis; Schultz, Martin; Stein, Olaf; Zerefos, Christos

    2014-05-01

    In this work we evaluate near surface ozone concentrations of the MACCii global reanalysis using measurements from the EMEP and AIRBASE database. The eight-year long reanalysis of atmospheric composition data covering the period 2003-2010 was constructed as part of the FP7-funded Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate project by assimilating satellite data into a global model and data assimilation system (Inness et al., 2013). The study mainly focuses in the differences between the assimilated and the non-assimilated experiments and aims to identify and quantify any improvements achieved by adding data assimilation to the system. Results are analyzed in eight European sub-regions and region-specific Taylor plots illustrate the evaluation and the overall predictive skill of each experiment. The diurnal and annual cycles of near surface ozone are evaluated for both experiments. Furthermore ozone exposure indices for crop growth (AOT40), human health (SOMO35) and the number of days that 8-hour ozone averages exceeded 60ppb and 90ppb have been calculated for each station based on both observed and simulated data. Results indicate mostly improvement of the assimilated experiment with respect to the high near surface ozone concentrations, the diurnal cycle and range and the bias in comparison to the non-assimilated experiment. The limitations of the comparison between assimilated and non-assimilated experiments for near surface ozone are also discussed.

  11. Hazard-to-Risk: High-Performance Computing Simulations of Large Earthquake Ground Motions and Building Damage in the Near-Fault Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M.; Rodgers, A. J.; McCallen, D.; Petersson, N. A.; Pitarka, A.

    2017-12-01

    We are running high-performance computing (HPC) simulations of ground motions for large (magnitude, M=6.5-7.0) earthquakes in the near-fault region (steel moment frame buildings throughout the near-fault domain. For ground motions, we are using SW4, a fourth order summation-by-parts finite difference time-domain code running on 10,000-100,000's of cores. Earthquake ruptures are generated using the Graves and Pitarka (2017) method. We validated ground motion intensity measurements against Ground Motion Prediction Equations. We considered two events (M=6.5 and 7.0) for vertical strike-slip ruptures with three-dimensional (3D) basin structures, including stochastic heterogeneity. We have also considered M7.0 scenarios for a Hayward Fault rupture scenario which effects the San Francisco Bay Area and northern California using both 1D and 3D earth structure. Dynamic, inelastic response of canonical buildings is computed with the NEVADA, a nonlinear, finite-deformation finite element code. Canonical buildings include 3-, 9-, 20- and 40-story steel moment frame buildings. Damage potential is tracked by the peak inter-story drift (PID) ratio, which measures the maximum displacement between adjacent floors of the building and is strongly correlated with damage. PID ratios greater 1.0 generally indicate non-linear response and permanent deformation of the structure. We also track roof displacement to identify permanent deformation. PID (damage) for a given earthquake scenario (M, slip distribution, hypocenter) is spatially mapped throughout the SW4 domain with 1-2 km resolution. Results show that in the near fault region building damage is correlated with peak ground velocity (PGV), while farther away (> 20 km) it is better correlated with peak ground acceleration (PGA). We also show how simulated ground motions have peaks in the response spectra that shift to longer periods for larger magnitude events and for locations of forward directivity, as has been reported by

  12. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  13. Three-dimensional rotational plasma flows near solid surfaces in an axial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorshunov, N. M., E-mail: gorshunov-nm@nrcki.ru; Potanin, E. P., E-mail: potanin45@yandex.ru [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    A rotational flow of a conducting viscous medium near an extended dielectric disk in a uniform axial magnetic field is analyzed in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approach. An analytical solution to the system of nonlinear differential MHD equations of motion in the boundary layer for the general case of different rotation velocities of the disk and medium is obtained using a modified Slezkin–Targ method. A particular case of a medium rotating near a stationary disk imitating the end surface of a laboratory device is considered. The characteristics of a hydrodynamic flow near the disk surface are calculated within the model of a finite-thickness boundary layer. The influence of the magnetic field on the intensity of the secondary flow is studied. Calculations are performed for a weakly ionized dense plasma flow without allowance for the Hall effect and plasma compressibility. An MHD flow in a rotating cylinder bounded from above by a retarding cap is considered. The results obtained can be used to estimate the influence of the end surfaces on the main azimuthal flow, as well as the intensities of circulating flows in various devices with rotating plasmas, in particular, in plasma centrifuges and laboratory devices designed to study instabilities of rotating plasmas.

  14. Adsorbate induced surface alloy formation investigated by near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev; Conradsen, Christian Nagstrup; McCarthy, David Norman

    2014-01-01

    for engineering of more active or selective catalyst materials. Dynamical surface changes on alloy surfaces due to the adsorption of reactants in high gas pressures are challenging to investigate using standard characterization tools. Here we apply synchrotron illuminated near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron...

  15. Rayleigh oscillations localized near free surface of a fcc crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosevich, A.M.; Matsokin, D.V.; Savotchenko, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    The waves, which are localized near the free (001) surface of a fcc crystal and propagate in the [110] direction, are described using the model of central interaction of the nearest neighbors. The frequencies of these waves come into the gaps within the frequency spectrum of bulk harmonic oscillations with a fixed wave vector k component along the surface. The long-wave limit and the case of wave vectors close to the Brillouin band boundary are studied analytically. These limit dependences are in agreement with other authors results which were obtained by numerical methods. Analytical calculations in the limit intervals of k are supplemented by numerical calculations for any values of the wave vector. It is essential that these waves have a displacement component which is perpendicular to the crystal surface and can, therefore, be studied by methods of He atoms inelastic scattering

  16. Type of Ground Surface during Plyometric Training Affects the Severity of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Arazi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage from a bout of plyometric exercise (PE; 10 × 10 vertical jumps performed in aquatic, sand and firm conditions. Twenty-four healthy college-aged men were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Aquatic (AG, n = 8, Sand (SG, n = 8 and Firm (FG, n = 8. The AG performed PE in an aquatic setting with a depth of ~130 cm. The SG performed PE on a dry sand surface at a depth of 20 cm, and the FG performed PE on a 10-cm-thick wooden surface. Plasma creatine kinase (CK activity, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, knee range of motion (KROM, maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC of the knee extensors, vertical jump (VJ and 10-m sprint were measured before and 24, 48 and 72 h after the PE. Compared to baseline values, FG showed significantly (p < 0.05 greater changes in CK, DOMS, and VJ at 24 until 48 h. The MIVC decreased significantly for the SG and FG at 24 until 48 h post-exercise in comparison to the pre-exercise values. There were no significant (p > 0.05 time or group by time interactions in KROM. In the 10-m sprint, all the treatment groups showed significant (p < 0.05 changes compared to pre-exercise values at 24 h, and there were no significant (p > 0.05 differences between groups. The results indicate that PE in an aquatic setting and on a sand surface induces less muscle damage than on a firm surface. Therefore, training in aquatic conditions and on sand may be beneficial for the improvement of performance, with a concurrently lower risk of muscle damage and soreness.

  17. Assimilation and High Resolution Forecasts of Surface and Near Surface Conditions for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Natacha B.; Bélair, Stéphane; Bilodeau, Bernard; Tong, Linying

    2014-01-01

    A dynamical model was experimentally implemented to provide high resolution forecasts at points of interests in the 2010 Vancouver Olympics and Paralympics Region. In a first experiment, GEM-Surf, the near surface and land surface modeling system, is driven by operational atmospheric forecasts and used to refine the surface forecasts according to local surface conditions such as elevation and vegetation type. In this simple form, temperature and snow depth forecasts are improved mainly as a result of the better representation of real elevation. In a second experiment, screen level observations and operational atmospheric forecasts are blended to drive a continuous cycle of near surface and land surface hindcasts. Hindcasts of the previous day conditions are then regarded as today's optimized initial conditions. Hence, in this experiment, given observations are available, observation driven hindcasts continuously ensure that daily forecasts are issued from improved initial conditions. GEM-Surf forecasts obtained from improved short-range hindcasts produced using these better conditions result in improved snow depth forecasts. In a third experiment, assimilation of snow depth data is applied to further optimize GEM-Surf's initial conditions, in addition to the use of blended observations and forecasts for forcing. Results show that snow depth and summer temperature forecasts are further improved by the addition of snow depth data assimilation.

  18. Effect of Saturated Near Surface on Nitrate and Ammonia Nitrogen Losses in Surface Runoff at the Loess Soil Hillslope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-bin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water pollution from agricultural fields is a global problem and cause of eutrophication of surface waters. A laboratory study was designed to evaluate the effects of near-surface hydraulic gradients on NO3–N and NH4–N losses in surface runoff from soil boxes at 27% slope undersimulated rainfall of a loess soil hillslope. Experimental treatments included two near-surface hydraulic gradients (free drainage, FD; saturation, SA, three fertilizer application rates (control, no fertilizer input; low, 120 kg N ha-1; high, 240 kg N ha-1, and simulated rainfall of 100 mm h-1 was applied for 70 min. The results showed that saturated near-surface soil moisture had dramatic effects on NO3–N and NH4–N losses and water quality. Under the low fertilizer treatment, average NO3–N concentrations in runoff water of SA averaged 2.2 times greater than that of FD, 1.6 times greater for NH4–N. Under the high fertilizer treatment, NO3–N concentrations in runoff water from SA averaged 5.7 times greater than that of FD, 4.3 times greater for NH4–N. Nitrogen loss formed with NO3–N is dominant during the event, but not NH4–N. Under the SA condition, the total loss of NO3–N from low fertilizer treatment was 34.2 to 42.3% of applied nitrogen, while under the FD treatment that was 3.9 to 6.9%. However, the total loss of NH4–N was less than 1% of applied nitrogen. These results showed that saturated condition could make significant contribution to water quality problems.

  19. Effect of Cavitation on Surface Damage of 16.7Cr-10Ni-2Mo Stainless Steel in Marine Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Sang-Ok; Han, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Stainless steel is generally known to have characteristics of excellent corrosion resistance and durability, but in a marine environment it can suffer from localized corrosion due to the breakdown of passivity film due to chloride ion in seawater. Furthermore, the damage behaviors are sped up under a cavitation environment because of complex damage from electrochemical corrosion and cavitation-erosion. In this study the characteristics of electrochemical corrosion and cavitation erosion behavior were evaluated on 16.7Cr-10Ni-2Mo stainless steel under a cavitation environment in natural seawater. The electrochemical experiments have been conducted at both static conditions and dynamic conditions inducing cavitation with different current density parameters. The surface morphology and damage behaviors were compared after the experiment. After the cavitation test with time variables morphological examinations on damaged specimens were analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope and a 3D microscope. the galvanostatic experiment gave a cleaner surface morphology presented with less damage depth at high current density regions. It is due to the effect of water cavitation peening under the cavitation condition. In the cavitation experiment, with amplitude of 30 μm and seawater temperature of 25 ℃, weight loss and cavitation-erosion damage depth were dramatically increased after 5 hours inducing cavitation.

  20. Interaction of flexible surface hairs with near-wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecker, Ch

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of near-wall turbulence with hairy surfaces is investigated in a turbulent boundary layer flow along a flat plate in an oil channel at Re = 1.2 x 10 6 . The plate is covered locally with a dense carpet of elastomeric micro-hairs (length L = 1 mm, length in viscous units L + = 30) which are arranged in a regular grid (60 x 30 hairs with a streamwise spacing Δx + ∼15 and a spanwise spacing Δy + ∼30). Instead of the micro-structures used in previous studies for sensory applications, the surface hairs are considerably larger and much more densely distributed with a spacing of S/D < 5 such that they interact with each other by flow coupling. The non-fluctuating mean part of the flow forces a substantial pre-bending in the streamwise direction (reconfiguration). As a consequence, the hairs align with the streamwise direction, thus imposing anisotropic damping characteristics with regard to flow fluctuations in streamwise and spanwise or wall-normal directions. Near-wall high-frequency disturbances excited by the passage of turbulent sweeps are dampened over their course along the carpet. The cooperative action of the hairs leads to an energy transfer from small-scale motion to larger scales, thus increasing the coherence of the motion pattern in streamwise and spanwise directions. As a consequence of the specific arrangement of the micro-hairs in streamwise columns a reduced spanwise meandering and stabilization of the streamwise velocity streaks is achieved by promoting varicose waves and inhibiting sinusoidal waves. Streak stabilization is known to be a major contributor to turbulent drag reduction. Thus it is concluded that hairy surfaces may be of benefit for turbulent drag reduction as hypothesized by Bartenwerfer and Bechert (1991 Z. Flugwiss. Weltraumforsch. 15 19-26).

  1. Surface Damage Mechanism of Monocrystalline Si Under Mechanical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Quanli; To, Suet; Guo, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Single-point diamond scratching and nanoindentation on monocrystalline silicon wafer were performed to investigate the surface damage mechanism of Si under the contact loading. The results showed that three typical stages of material removal appeared during dynamic scratching, and a chemical reaction of Si with the diamond indenter and oxygen occurred under the high temperature. In addition, the Raman spectra of the various points in the scratching groove indicated that the Si-I to β-Sn structure (Si-II) and the following β-Sn structure (Si-II) to amorphous Si transformation appeared under the rapid loading/unloading condition of the diamond grit, and the volume change induced by the phase transformation resulted in a critical depth (ductile-brittle transition) of cut (˜60 nm ± 15 nm) much lower than the theoretical calculated results (˜387 nm). Moreover, it also led to abnormal load-displacement curves in the nanoindentation tests, resulting in the appearance of elbow and pop-out effects (˜270 nm at 20 s, 50 mN), which were highly dependent on the loading/unloading conditions. In summary, phase transformation of Si promoted surface deformation and fracture under both static and dynamic mechanical loading.

  2. Safety performance of a near surface repository subject to a fuel burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanini, Lorenzo; Frano, Rosa Lo; Forasassi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the performances of a near surface repository subject to fuel burning occurring simultaneously or subsequently to a large commercial aircraft impact. Specifically the thermal effects caused by a Boeing-747 crushing (considered like “beyond design basis accident”) are studied. An important part of this study is the analysis of the possible (thermo-mechanical) degradation effects, as dehydration, degasification, pressurization, etc. that the concrete may undergo, particularly in the case of prolonged fire, and of the resistance of structure itself in this condition. Conservative assumptions and restrictions have been made with regard to the fire scenario, the maximum temperature of which is calculated on the basis of the fuel airplane amount, the normal impact, the variation of the material properties along with the temperature as well the damaging phenomena of concrete. The airplane impact load, calculated with the Riera approach, and the maximum temperature, reached during the fuel combustion, are used as input (boundary condition) in the numerical simulations performed by MARC© code. The obtained results showed that a repository wall thickness, ranging from 0.6 to 0.9 m, is not sufficient to prevent the local penetration of wall. To reduce the computational cost, the analyses have been made only on a half part of the structure, highlighting the dominance of thermal effects. Despite the ongoing concrete degradation phenomena, the overall integrity of the repository seemed to be guaranteed as well as the containment and the confinement of radioactive waste. (author)

  3. Preliminary Post-Closure Safety Assessment and Preoperational Radiomonitoring of Anarak Near Surface Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: • The results of design scenario demonstrate that the effect of surface water erosion scenario is acceptable. The results suggest that doses would still be well below the typical acceptance criteria, even with cautious assumptions likely to result in over-estimates of dose in surface water erosion scenario. • (Assuming the representative person who is living near the repository, 1100 years after closure and in case of water erosion scenario the maximum total dose is less than 0.2 mSv y -1 . Furthermore, the maximum dose is caused by 241 Am that is equal to 0.15 mSv y -1 ). The activity concentration levels of the natural and artificial radionuclides were determined in the all samples collected from Anarak site and surrounding area using active and passive device. All results showed the background level of the natural and artificial radionuclides before any operation in Anarak Near Surface Disposal Facility.

  4. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Kevin B [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, Otis R [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benjamin, Russ [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, William H [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    A computational study was performed to examine the differences in near-surface ground-waves and air-blast waves generated by high-explosive energy sources and those generated by much higher energy - density low - yield nuclear sources. The study examined the effect of explosive-source emplacement (i.e., height-of-burst, HOB, or depth-of-burial, DOB) over a range from depths of -35m to heights of 20m, for explosions with an explosive yield of 1-kt . The chemical explosive was modeled by a JWL equation-of-state model for a ~14m diameter sphere of ANFO (~1,200,000kg – 1 k t equivalent yield ), and the high-energy-density source was modeled as a one tonne (1000 kg) plasma of ‘Iron-gas’ (utilizing LLNL’s tabular equation-of-state database, LEOS) in a 2m diameter sphere, with a total internal-energy content equivalent to 1 k t . A consistent equivalent-yield coupling-factor approach was developed to compare the behavior of the two sources. The results indicate that the equivalent-yield coupling-factor for air-blasts from 1 k t ANFO explosions varies monotonically and continuously from a nearly perfec t reflected wave off of the ground surface for a HOB ≈ 20m, to a coupling factor of nearly zero at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear air - blast coupling curve, on the other hand, remained nearly equal to a perfectly reflected wave all the way down to HOB’s very near zero, and then quickly dropped to a value near zero for explosions with a DOB ≈ -10m. The near - surface ground - wave traveling horizontally out from the explosive source region to distances of 100’s of meters exhibited equivalent - yield coupling - factors t hat varied nearly linearly with HOB/DOB for the simulated ANFO explosive source, going from a value near zero at HOB ≈ 5m to nearly one at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear-source generated near-surface ground wave coupling-factor remained near zero for almost all HOB’s greater than zero, and then appeared to vary nearly - linearly with depth

  5. Safety Assessment Methodologies and Their Application in Development of Near Surface Waste Disposal Facilities--ASAM Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, B.; Metcalf, P.

    2003-01-01

    Safety of near surface disposal facilities is a primary focus and objective of stakeholders involved in radioactive waste management of low and intermediate level waste and safety assessment is an important tool contributing to the evaluation and demonstration of the overall safety of these facilities. It plays significant role in different stages of development of these facilities (site characterization, design, operation, closure) and especially for those facilities for which safety assessment has not been performed or safety has not been demonstrated yet and the future has not been decided. Safety assessments also create the basis for the safety arguments presented to nuclear regulators, public and other interested parties in respect of the safety of existing facilities, the measures to upgrade existing facilities and development of new facilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has initiated a number of research coordinated projects in the field of development and improvement of approaches to safety assessment and methodologies for safety assessment of near surface disposal facilities, such as NSARS (Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Assessment Reliability Study) and ISAM (Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities) projects. These projects were very successful and showed that there is a need to promote the consistent application of the safety assessment methodologies and to explore approaches to regulatory review of safety assessments and safety cases in order to make safety related decisions. These objectives have been the basis of the IAEA follow up coordinated research project--ASAM (Application of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities), which will commence in November 2002 and continue for a period of three years

  6. Combined Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects at Very High Fluences in Silicon Detectors: Measurements and TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Morozzi, A; Mendicino, R; Dalla Betta, G F; Bilei, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new combined TCAD radiation damage modelling scheme, featuring both bulk and surface radiation damage effects, for the analysis of silicon detectors aimed at the High Luminosity LHC. In particular, a surface damage model has been developed by introducing the relevant parameters (NOX, NIT) extracted from experimental measurements carried out on p-type substrate test structures after gamma irradiations at doses in the range 10-500 Mrad(Si). An extended bulk model, by considering impact ionization and deep-level cross-sections variation, was included as well. The model has been validated through the comparison of the simulation findings with experimental measurements carried out at very high fluences (2×1016 1 MeV equivalent n/cm2) thus fostering the application of this TCAD approach for the design and optimization of the new generation of silicon detectors to be used in future HEP experiments.

  7. Compression of thick laminated composite beams with initial impact-like damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, N. L.; Guerdal, Z.; Griffin, O. H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    While the study of compression after impact of laminated composites has been under consideration for many years, the complexity of the damage initiated by low velocity impact has not lent itself to simple predictive models for compression strength. The damage modes due to non-penetrating, low velocity impact by large diameter objects can be simulated using quasi-static three-point bending. The resulting damage modes are less coupled and more easily characterized than actual impact damage modes. This study includes the compression testing of specimens with well documented initial damage states obtained from three-point bend testing. Compression strengths and failure modes were obtained for quasi-isotropic stacking sequences from 0.24 to 1.1 inches thick with both grouped and interspersed ply stacking. Initial damage prior to compression testing was divided into four classifications based on the type, extent, and location of the damage. These classifications are multiple through-thickness delaminations, isolated delamination, damage near the surface, and matrix cracks. Specimens from each classification were compared to specimens tested without initial damage in order to determine the effects of the initial damage on the final compression strength and failure modes. A finite element analysis was used to aid in the understanding and explanation of the experimental results.

  8. Mass transfer of CO2 to groundwaters from a near-surface waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, F.; Wilkinson, S.R.; Manni, G.; Torok, J.

    1995-01-01

    Gaseous 14 CO 2 originating from buried low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW) in a near-surface disposal site can be released to the environment via two major paths: gas-phase diffusion through soils to the atmosphere, and dissolution in groundwater, followed by aqueous migration. Aqueous migration would give the highest dose to an individual, especially if C-14 was converted to an organic form and ingested. Gaseous diffusion would give a lower dose, largely because of atmospheric dispersion and dilution. The objective of this study was to develop the capability to estimate which of the two paths will likely be dominant for typical near-surface disposal facilities. The main missing parameter for making this estimate was a mass-transfer coefficient (K L ) of 14 CO 2 to groundwaters, which was determined experimentally using a large sand box. The K L thus determined was approximately 10 to 20 times smaller than for an open liquid surface. This suggests that there is a potential resistance to mass transfer, probably caused by the capillary fringe. The value obtained was incorporated into a simple model of CO 2 transport around a typical near-surface disposal site. The model suggests that CO 2 transport via both gaseous release and aqueous migration paths are of similar magnitude for a repository located ∼2 m above the water table. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  9. Near-surface characterization for seismic exploration based on gravity and resistivity data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrlina, Jan

    (2016), č. článku 41892. [Middle East Geoscience Conference and Exhibition /12./. Manama, 07.03.2016-10.03.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : gravity and resistivity surveys * near-surface formations * seismic velocity Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  10. Modeling the Impacts of Boreal Deforestation on the Near-Surface Temperature in European Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Boreal deforestation plays an important role in affecting regional and global climate. In this study, the regional temperature variation induced by future boreal deforestation in European Russia boreal forest region was simulated based on future land cover change and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. This study firstly tested and validated the simulation results of the WRF model. Then the land cover datasets in different years (2000 as baseline year, 2010, and 2100 was used in the WRF model to explore the impacts of boreal deforestation on the near-surface temperature. The results indicated that the WRF model has good ability to simulate the temperature change in European Russia. The land cover change in European Russia boreal forest region, which will be characterized by the conversion from boreal forests to croplands (boreal deforestation in the future 100 years, will lead to significant change of the near-surface temperature. The regional annual temperature will decrease by 0.58°C in the future 100 years, resulting in cooling effects to some extent and making the near-surface temperature decrease in most seasons except the spring.

  11. Mitigation of defocusing by statics and near-surface velocity errors by interferometric least-squares migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Mrinal

    2015-08-19

    We propose an interferometric least-squares migration method that can significantly reduce migration artifacts due to statics and errors in the near-surface velocity model. We first choose a reference reflector whose topography is well known from the, e.g., well logs. Reflections from this reference layer are correlated with the traces associated with reflections from deeper interfaces to get crosscorrelograms. These crosscorrelograms are then migrated using interferometric least-squares migration (ILSM). In this way statics and velocity errors at the near surface are largely eliminated for the examples in our paper.

  12. The visual system prioritizes locations near corners of surfaces (not just locations near a corner).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertamini, Marco; Helmy, Mai; Bates, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    When a new visual object appears, attention is directed toward it. However, some locations along the outline of the new object may receive more resources, perhaps as a consequence of their relative importance in describing its shape. Evidence suggests that corners receive enhanced processing, relative to the straight edges of an outline (corner enhancement effect). Using a technique similar to that in an original study in which observers had to respond to a probe presented near a contour (Cole et al. in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 27:1356-1368, 2001), we confirmed this effect. When figure-ground relations were manipulated using shaded surfaces (Exps. 1 and 2) and stereograms (Exps. 3 and 4), two novel aspects of the phenomenon emerged: We found no difference between corners perceived as being convex or concave, and we found that the enhancement was stronger when the probe was perceived as being a feature of the surface that the corner belonged to. Therefore, the enhancement is not based on spatial aspects of the regions in the image, but critically depends on figure-ground stratification, supporting the link between the prioritization of corners and the representation of surface layout.

  13. Ion-induced damage and amorphization in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; White, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Ion-induced damage growth in high-energy, self-ion irradiated Si was studied using electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The results show that there is a marked variation in the rate of damage growth, as well as the damage morphology, along the path of the ion. Near the ion end-of-range (eor), damage increases monotonically with ion fluence until a buried amorphous layer is formed, while damage growth saturates at a low level in the region ahead. The morphology of the damage in the saturated region is shown to consist predominantly of simple defect clusters such as the divacancy. Damage growth remains saturated ahead of the eor until expansion of the buried amorphous layer encroaches into the region. A homogeneous growth model is presented which accounts for damage saturation, and accurately predicts the dose-rate dependence of the saturation level. Modifications of the model are discussed which are needed to account for the rapid growth in the eor region and near the interface of the buried amorphous layer. Two important factors contributing to rapid damage growth are identified. Spatial separation of the Frenkel defect pairs (i.e. interstitials and vacancies) due to the momentum of the interstitials is shown to greatly impact damage growth near the eor, while uniaxial strain in the interfacial region of the amorphous layer is identified as an important factor contributing to growth at that location. 20 refs., 10 figs

  14. Characterization of groundwater flow for near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    The main objective of this report is to provide a description of the site investigation techniques and modelling approaches that can be used to characterise the flow of subsurface water at near surface disposal facilities in relation to the various development stages of the repositories. As one of the main goals of defining groundwater flow is to establish the possible contaminant migration, certain aspects related to groundwater transport are also described. Secondary objectives are to discuss the implications of various groundwater conditions with regard to the performance of the isolation systems

  15. Near surface mechanical properties of optical single crystals and surface response to deterministic microgrinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randi, Joseph A., III

    2005-12-01

    This thesis makes use of microindentation, nanoindentation and nanoscratching methods to better understand the mechanical properties of single crystalline silicon, calcium fluoride, and magnesium fluoride. These properties are measured and are used to predict the material's response to material removal, specifically by grinding and polishing, which is a combination of elastic, plastic and fracture processes. The hardness anisotropy during Knoop microindentation, hardness from nanoindentation, and scratch morphology from nanoscratching are reported. This information is related to the surface microroughness from grinding. We show that mechanical property relationships that predict the surface roughness from lapping and deterministic microgrinding of optical glasses are applicable to single crystals. We show the range of hardness from some of the more common crystallographic faces. Magnesium fluoride, having a tetragonal structure, has 2-fold hardness anisotropy. Nanoindentation, as expected provides higher hardness than microindentation, but anisotropy is not observed. Nanoscratching provides the scratch profile during loading, after the load has been removed, and the coefficient of friction during the loading. Ductile and brittle mode scratching is present with brittle mode cracking being orientation specific. Subsurface damage (SSD) measurements are made using a novel process known as the MRF technique. Magnetorheological finishing is used to polish spots into the ground surface where SSD can be viewed. SSD is measured using an optical microscope and knowledge of the spot profile. This technique is calibrated with a previous technique and implemented to accurately measure SSD in single crystals. The data collected are compared to the surface microroughness of the ground surface, resulting in an upper bound relationship. The results indicate that SSD is always less than 1.4 times the peak-to-valley surface microroughness for single crystals regardless of the

  16. Exploring the link between multiscale entropy and fractal scaling behavior in near-surface wind.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Nogueira

    Full Text Available The equivalency between the power law behavior of Multiscale Entropy (MSE and of power spectra opens a promising path for interpretation of complex time-series, which is explored here for the first time for atmospheric fields. Additionally, the present manuscript represents a new independent empirical validation of such relationship, the first one for the atmosphere. The MSE-fractal relationship is verified for synthetic fractal time-series covering the full range of exponents typically observed in the atmosphere. It is also verified for near-surface wind observations from anemometers and CFSR re-analysis product. The results show a ubiquitous β ≈ 5/3 behavior inside the inertial range. A scaling break emerges at scales around a few seconds, with a tendency towards 1/f noise. The presence, extension and fractal exponent of this intermediate range are dependent on the particular surface forcing and atmospheric conditions. MSE shows an identical picture which is consistent with the turbulent energy cascade model: viscous dissipation at the small-scale end of the inertial range works as an information sink, while at the larger (energy-containing scales the multiple forcings in the boundary layer act as widespread information sources. Another scaling transition occurs at scales around 1-10 days, with an abrupt flattening of the spectrum. MSE shows that this transition corresponds to a maximum of the new information introduced, occurring at the time-scales of the synoptic features that dominate weather patterns. At larger scales, a scaling regime with flatter slopes emerges extending to scales larger than 1 year. MSE analysis shows that the amount of new information created decreases with increasing scale in this low-frequency regime. Additionally, in this region the energy injection is concentrated in two large energy peaks: daily and yearly time-scales. The results demonstrate that the superposition of these periodic signals does not destroy the

  17. Exploring the link between multiscale entropy and fractal scaling behavior in near-surface wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The equivalency between the power law behavior of Multiscale Entropy (MSE) and of power spectra opens a promising path for interpretation of complex time-series, which is explored here for the first time for atmospheric fields. Additionally, the present manuscript represents a new independent empirical validation of such relationship, the first one for the atmosphere. The MSE-fractal relationship is verified for synthetic fractal time-series covering the full range of exponents typically observed in the atmosphere. It is also verified for near-surface wind observations from anemometers and CFSR re-analysis product. The results show a ubiquitous β ≈ 5/3 behavior inside the inertial range. A scaling break emerges at scales around a few seconds, with a tendency towards 1/f noise. The presence, extension and fractal exponent of this intermediate range are dependent on the particular surface forcing and atmospheric conditions. MSE shows an identical picture which is consistent with the turbulent energy cascade model: viscous dissipation at the small-scale end of the inertial range works as an information sink, while at the larger (energy-containing) scales the multiple forcings in the boundary layer act as widespread information sources. Another scaling transition occurs at scales around 1-10 days, with an abrupt flattening of the spectrum. MSE shows that this transition corresponds to a maximum of the new information introduced, occurring at the time-scales of the synoptic features that dominate weather patterns. At larger scales, a scaling regime with flatter slopes emerges extending to scales larger than 1 year. MSE analysis shows that the amount of new information created decreases with increasing scale in this low-frequency regime. Additionally, in this region the energy injection is concentrated in two large energy peaks: daily and yearly time-scales. The results demonstrate that the superposition of these periodic signals does not destroy the underlying

  18. Near-field Oblique Remote Sensing of Stream Water-surface Elevation, Slope, and Surface Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minear, J. T.; Kinzel, P. J.; Nelson, J. M.; McDonald, R.; Wright, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for estimating discharges during flood events or in steep channels is the difficulty and hazard inherent in obtaining in-stream measurements. One possible solution is to use near-field remote sensing to obtain simultaneous water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities. In this test case, we utilized Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to remotely measure water-surface elevations and slope in combination with surface velocities estimated from particle image velocimetry (PIV) obtained by video-camera and/or infrared camera. We tested this method at several sites in New Mexico and Colorado using independent validation data consisting of in-channel measurements from survey-grade GPS and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instruments. Preliminary results indicate that for relatively turbid or steep streams, TLS collects tens of thousands of water-surface elevations and slopes in minutes, much faster than conventional means and at relatively high precision, at least as good as continuous survey-grade GPS measurements. Estimated surface velocities from this technique are within 15% of measured velocity magnitudes and within 10 degrees from the measured velocity direction (using extrapolation from the shallowest bin of the ADCP measurements). Accurately aligning the PIV results into Cartesian coordinates appears to be one of the main sources of error, primarily due to the sensitivity at these shallow oblique look angles and the low numbers of stationary objects for rectification. Combining remotely-sensed water-surface elevations, slope, and surface velocities produces simultaneous velocity measurements from a large number of locations in the channel and is more spatially extensive than traditional velocity measurements. These factors make this technique useful for improving estimates of flow measurements during flood flows and in steep channels while also decreasing the difficulty and hazard associated with making measurements in these

  19. Improved laser damage threshold performance of calcium fluoride optical surfaces via Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Svrluga, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optics are not keeping up with the pace of laser advancements. The laser industry is rapidly increasing its power capabilities and reducing wavelengths which have exposed the optics as a weak link in lifetime failures for these advanced systems. Nanometer sized surface defects (scratches, pits, bumps and residual particles) on the surface of optics are a significant limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, magnesium fluoride, zinc sulfide, LBO and others presents a unique challenge for traditional polishing techniques. Exogenesis Corporation, using its new and proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and particle contamination leaving many material surfaces with roughness typically around one Angstrom. This surface defect mitigation via ANAB processing can be shown to increase performance properties of high intensity optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for calcium fluoride laser windows. It further correlates laser damage threshold improvements with the smoothing produced by ANAB surface treatment. All ANAB processing was performed at Exogenesis Corporation using an nAccel100TM Accelerated Particle Beam processing tool. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis on a Park Model XE70 AFM, and all laser damage testing was performed at Spica Technologies, Inc. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply mechanical forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface

  20. Acoustic-gravity waves generated by atmospheric and near-surface sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav E.; Kholodov, Alexander S.; Krysanov, Boris Yu.; Andreeva, Elena S.; Nesterov, Ivan A.; Vorontsov, Artem M.

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulation of the acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) generated by long-period oscillations of the Earth's (oceanic) surface, earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seiches, and tsunami is carried out. Wavelike disturbances are quite frequent phenomena in the atmosphere and ionosphere. These events can be caused by the impacts from space and atmosphere, by oscillations of the Earth'as surface and other near-surface events. These wavelike phenomena in the atmosphere and ionosphere appear as the alternating areas of enhanced and depleted density (in the atmosphere) or electron concentration (in the ionosphere). In the paper, AGW with typical frequencies of a few hertz - millihertz are analyzed. AGW are often observed after the atmospheric perturbations, during the earthquakes, and some time (a few days to hours) in advance of the earthquakes. Numerical simulation of the generation of AGW by long-period oscillations of the Earth's and oceanic surface, earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seiches, and tsunami is carried out. The AGW generated by the near-surface phenomena within a few hertz-millihertz frequency range build up at the mid-atmospheric and ionospheric altitudes, where they assume their typical spatial scales of the order of a few hundred kilometers. Oscillations of the ionospheric plasma within a few hertz-millihertz frequency range generate electromagnetic waves with corresponding frequencies as well as travelling ionospheric irregularities (TIDs). Such structures can be successfully monitored using satellite radio tomography (RT) techniques. For the purposes of RT diagnostics, 150/400 MHz transmissions from low-orbiting navigational satellites flying in polar orbits at the altitudes of about 1000 km as well as 1.2-1.5 GHz signals form high-orbiting (orbital altitudes about 20000 km) navigation systems like GPS/GLONASS are used. The results of experimental studies on generation of wavelike disturbances by particle precipitation are presented

  1. Effect of far-UV and near-UV radiation on the cell surface charge of the protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Filho, F C; Elias, C A; Souza, W de

    1986-05-01

    Cell electrophoresis was used to detect the effect of far-UV or near-UV radiation on the cell surface charge of the pathogenic protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus. Either far-UV or near-UV radiation interfered with the surface charge of T. foetus at fluences which inhibited cell growth by 50%. Both UV-radiations induced a significant decrease on surface charge of T. foetus, as evaluated by measurement of its electrophoretic mobility (EPM). Determinations of EPM of protozoa in solution of low ionic strength indicated that the decrease in the EPM induced by far-UV is much less pronounced that that observed for near-UV or control cells.

  2. Effect of far-UV and near-UV radiation on the cell surface charge of the protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Filho, F.C.; Elias, C.A.; Souza, W. de

    1986-01-01

    Cell electrophoresis was used to detect the effect of far-UV or near-UV radiation on the cell surface charge of the pathogenic protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus. Either far-UV or near-UV radiation interfered with the surface charge of T. foetus at fluences which inhibited cell growth by 50%. Both UV-radiations induced a significant decrease on surface charge of T. foetus, as evaluated by measurement of its electrophoretic mobility (EPM). Determinations of EPM of protozoa in solution of low ionic strength indicated that the decrease in the EPM induced by far-UV is much less pronounced that that observed for near-UV or control cells. (author)

  3. Supercavitating flow around high-speed underwater projectile near free surface induced by air entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Xu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cavitating flow near free surface is a complicated issue and may provide new inspiration on high-speed surface cruising. This study observes stable supercavitating flow as a new phenomenon in a launch experiment of axisymmetric projectile when the upper side of the projectile coincides with the free surface. A numerical approach is established using large eddy-simulation and volume-of-fluid methods, and good agreements are achieved between numerical and experimental results. Supercavity formation mechanism is revealed by analyzing the experiment photographs and the iso-surface of 90% water volume fraction in numerical results. The entrainment of a large amount of air into the cavity can cause the pressure inside the cavity to similarly increase with the pressure outside the cavity, which makes the actual cavitation number close to zero and is similar to supercavitation. Cases with various headforms of the projectile and cavitation numbers on the cavitating flow, as well as the drag reduction effects are further examined. Results indicate that the present strategy near the free surface could possibly be a new effective approach for high-speed cruising after vigorous design optimization in the future.

  4. Near-surface residual stresses and microstructural changes after turning of a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlauer, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are precipitation hardened alloys with complex compositions. They are used in aircraft engines and land-based gas turbines in load bearing structural components that are exposed to high temperatures. Failure mechanisms in this environment are high and low cycle fatigue, creep, and corrosion. During manufacturing, residual stresses are often introduced into the material due to inhomogeneous plastic deformations, both intentionally and unintentionally. One such manufacturing process is metal cutting, which introduces residual stresses in the surface layer. The stress state in the near-surface zone of components is of special interest as the surface often experiences peak loads and cracks have their starting point there. In this thesis, near-surface residual stress distributions and microstructural changes are studied in the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 for two different turning operations, face grooving and facing. Process variables are in both cases cutting speed and feed that have been varied between (10 and 1200) m/min and (0.01 and 0.5) mm, respectively. The first turning technique face grooving, which gives cutting conditions similar to orthogonal cutting, showed a clear dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed. The tensile stress at the surface, the maximum compressive stress below the surface, and the thickness of the affected layer increase with increasing cutting speed. The tensile stresses are constrained to a thin surface layer and compressive residual stresses below the surface dominate the depth profile of the residual stresses. Only at low cutting speed, residual stresses were largely avoided. The second turning technique facing confirmed the dependency of the residual stresses on the cutting speed and revealed a similar dependency on the feed. Microstructural investigations of near-surface cross-sections by means of transmission electron microscopy showed a zone where the grains had undergone plastic

  5. Highly controllable near-surface swimming of magnetic Janus nanorods: application to payload capture and manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, Lamar O; Carpenter, Jerome; Evans, Benjamin; Hall, Adam R; Shields, Adam; Superfine, Richard; Ford, Kris; Millard, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Directed manipulation of nanomaterials has significant implications in the field of nanorobotics, nanobiotechnology, microfluidics and directed assembly. With the goal of highly controllable nanomaterial manipulation in mind, we present a technique for the near-surface manoeuvering of magnetic nanorod swimmers and its application to controlled micromanipulation. We fabricate magnetic Janus nanorods and show that the magnetic rotation of these nanorods near a floor results in predictable translational motion. The nanorod plane of rotation is nearly parallel to the floor, the angle between rod tilt and floor being expressed by θ, where 0 0 0 . Orthogonal magnetic fields control in-plane motion arbitrarily. Our model for translation incorporates symmetry breaking through increased drag at the no-slip surface boundary. Using this method we demonstrate considerable rod steerability. Additionally, we approach, capture, and manipulate a polystyrene microbead as proof of principle. We attach Janus nanorods to the surfaces of cells and utilize these rods to manipulate individual cells, proving the ability to manoeuver payloads with a wide range of sizes.

  6. Electron Beam Irradiation Dose Dependently Damages the Bacillus Spore Coat and Spore Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Fiester

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective control of spore-forming bacilli begs suitable physical or chemical methods. While many spore inactivation techniques have been proven effective, electron beam (EB irradiation has been frequently chosen to eradicate Bacillus spores. Despite its widespread use, there are limited data evaluating the effects of EB irradiation on Bacillus spores. To study this, B. atrophaeus spores were purified, suspended in sterile, distilled water, and irradiated with EB (up to 20 kGy. Irradiated spores were found (1 to contain structural damage as observed by electron microscopy, (2 to have spilled cytoplasmic contents as measured by spectroscopy, (3 to have reduced membrane integrity as determined by fluorescence cytometry, and (4 to have fragmented genomic DNA as measured by gel electrophoresis, all in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cytometry data reveal decreased spore size, increased surface alterations, and increased uptake of propidium iodide, with increasing EB dose, suggesting spore coat alterations with membrane damage, prior to loss of spore viability. The present study suggests that EB irradiation of spores in water results in substantial structural damage of the spore coat and inner membrane, and that, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent spore inactivation.

  7. Description of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM. Site Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Per-Olof

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the modelling of the surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that was performed for the final site descriptive model of Forsmark produced in the site investigation stage, SDM-Site Forsmark. The comprehensive investigation and monitoring programme forms a strong basis for the developed conceptual and descriptive model of the hydrological and near-surface hydrological system of the site investigation area. However, there are some remaining uncertainties regarding the interaction of deep and near-surface groundwater and surface water of importance for the understanding of the system: The groundwaters in till below Lake Eckarfjaerden, Lake Gaellbotraesket, Lake Fiskarfjaerden and Lake Bolundsfjaerden have high salinities. The hydrological and hydrochemical interpretations indicate that these waters are relict waters of mainly marine origin. From the perspective of the overall water balance, the water below the central parts of the lakes can be considered as stagnant. However, according to the hydrochemical interpretation, these waters also contain weak signatures of deep saline water. Rough chloride budget calculations for the Gaellbotraesket depression also raise the question of a possible upward flow of deep groundwater. No absolute conclusion can be drawn from the existing data analyses regarding the key question of whether there is a small ongoing upward flow of deep saline water. However, Lake Bolundsfjaerden is an exception where the clear downward flow gradient from the till to the bedrock excludes the possibility of an active deep saline source. The available data indicate that there are no discharge areas for flow systems involving deep bedrock groundwater in the northern part of the tectonic lens, where the repository is planned to be located (the so-called 'target area'). However, it can not be excluded that such discharge areas exist. Data indicate that the prevailing downward vertical flow gradients from the QD to the bedrock

  8. Description of surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology at Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling SDM. Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes the modelling of the surface hydrology and near-surface hydrogeology that was performed for the final site descriptive model of Forsmark produced in the site investigation stage, SDM-Site Forsmark. The comprehensive investigation and monitoring programme forms a strong basis for the developed conceptual and descriptive model of the hydrological and near-surface hydrological system of the site investigation area. However, there are some remaining uncertainties regarding the interaction of deep and near-surface groundwater and surface water of importance for the understanding of the system: The groundwaters in till below Lake Eckarfjaerden, Lake Gaellbotraesket, Lake Fiskarfjaerden and Lake Bolundsfjaerden have high salinities. The hydrological and hydrochemical interpretations indicate that these waters are relict waters of mainly marine origin. From the perspective of the overall water balance, the water below the central parts of the lakes can be considered as stagnant. However, according to the hydrochemical interpretation, these waters also contain weak signatures of deep saline water. Rough chloride budget calculations for the Gaellbotraesket depression also raise the question of a possible upward flow of deep groundwater. No absolute conclusion can be drawn from the existing data analyses regarding the key question of whether there is a small ongoing upward flow of deep saline water. However, Lake Bolundsfjaerden is an exception where the clear downward flow gradient from the till to the bedrock excludes the possibility of an active deep saline source. The available data indicate that there are no discharge areas for flow systems involving deep bedrock groundwater in the northern part of the tectonic lens, where the repository is planned to be located (the so-called 'target area'). However, it can not be excluded that such discharge areas exist. Data indicate that the prevailing downward vertical flow gradients from the QD to

  9. Surface topography acquisition method for double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces based on dual-probe wavelength scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2017-10-02

    This paper proposes an approach to measure double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces based on dual-probe wavelength scanning interferometry (DPWSI). The principle and mathematical model is discussed and the measurement system is calibrated with a combination of standard step-height samples for both probes vertical calibrations and a specially designed calibration artefact for building up the space coordinate relationship of the dual-probe measurement system. The topography of the specially designed artefact is acquired by combining the measurement results with white light scanning interferometer (WLSI) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for reference. The relative location of the two probes is then determined with 3D registration algorithm. Experimental validation of the approach is provided and the results show that the method is able to measure double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces with nanometer vertical resolution and micrometer lateral resolution.

  10. Evidence of stochastic region near a rational surface in core plasmas of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Tamura, N.; Tuchiya, H.

    2010-11-01

    Clear evidence of stochastization of the magnetic surfaces near a rational surface is observed in the core plasma with weak magnetic shear in the Large Helical Device (LHD) by applying heat pulses driven by modulated electron cyclotron heating (MECH). The stochastization of the magnetic surfaces is confirmed by the observation of flattening of electron temperature (T e ) profiles and very fast propagation of the heat pulse, which is in contrast to the slow heat pulse propagation observed in the T e flat region of the nested magnetic island. (author)

  11. Earthquake damage to underground facilities and earthquake related displacement fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Stephenson, D.E.; Zandt, G.; Bouchon, M.; Hustrulid, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    The potential seismic risk for an underground facility is considered in the evaluation of its location and design. The possible damage resulting from either large-scale displacements or high accelerations should be considered in evaluating potential sites of underground facilities. Scattered through the available literature are statements to the effect that below a few hundred meters shaking and damage in mines is less than at the surface; however, data for decreased damage underground have not been completely reported or explained. In order to assess the seismic risk for an underground facility, a data base was established and analyzed to evaluate the potential for seismic disturbance. Substantial damage to underground facilities is usually the result of displacements primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures, or at the surface entrance to these facilities. Evidence of this comes from both earthquakes as a function of depth is important in the evaluation of the hazard to underground facilities. To evaluate potential displacements due to seismic effects of block motions along pre-existing or induced fractures, the displacement fields surrounding two types of faults were investigated. Analytical models were used to determine relative displacements of shafts and near-surface displacement of large rock masses. Numerical methods were used to determine the displacement fields associated with pure strike-slip and vertical normal faults. Results are presented as displacements for various fault lengths as a function of depth and distance. This provides input to determine potential displacements in terms of depth and distance for underground facilities, important for assessing potential sites and design parameters

  12. Near-surface temperature inversion during summer at Summit, Greenland, and its relation to MODIS-derived surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Alden C.; Albert, Mary R.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2018-03-01

    As rapid warming of the Arctic occurs, it is imperative that climate indicators such as temperature be monitored over large areas to understand and predict the effects of climate changes. Temperatures are traditionally tracked using in situ 2 m air temperatures and can also be assessed using remote sensing techniques. Remote sensing is especially valuable over the Greenland Ice Sheet, where few ground-based air temperature measurements exist. Because of the presence of surface-based temperature inversions in ice-covered areas, differences between 2 m air temperature and the temperature of the actual snow surface (referred to as skin temperature) can be significant and are particularly relevant when considering validation and application of remote sensing temperature data. We present results from a field campaign extending from 8 June to 18 July 2015, near Summit Station in Greenland, to study surface temperature using the following measurements: skin temperature measured by an infrared (IR) sensor, 2 m air temperature measured by a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) meteorological station, and a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface temperature product. Our data indicate that 2 m air temperature is often significantly higher than snow skin temperature measured in situ, and this finding may account for apparent biases in previous studies of MODIS products that used 2 m air temperature for validation. This inversion is present during our study period when incoming solar radiation and wind speed are both low. As compared to our in situ IR skin temperature measurements, after additional cloud masking, the MOD/MYD11 Collection 6 surface temperature standard product has an RMSE of 1.0 °C and a mean bias of -0.4 °C, spanning a range of temperatures from -35 to -5 °C (RMSE = 1.6 °C and mean bias = -0.7 °C prior to cloud masking). For our study area and time series, MODIS surface temperature products agree with skin surface

  13. Unwrapped phase inversion for near surface seismic data

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-11-04

    The Phase-wrapping is one of the main obstacles of waveform inversion. We use an inversion algorithm based on the instantaneous-traveltime that overcomes the phase-wrapping problem. With a high damping factor, the frequency-dependent instantaneous-traveltime inversion provides the stability of refraction tomography, with higher resolution results, and no arrival picking involved. We apply the instantaneous-traveltime inversion to the synthetic data generated by the elastic time-domain modeling. The synthetic data is a representative of the near surface seismic data. Although the inversion algorithm is based on the acoustic wave equation, the numerical examples show that the instantaneous-traveltime inversion generates a convergent velocity model, very similar to what we see from traveltime tomography.

  14. Tail posture predicts tail damage among weaned piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, J.J.; Riel, van J.W.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Kemp, B.; Hartog, den L.A.; Spoolder, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a widespread behavioural vice with significant animal welfare and economic consequences. All too often, tail biting is not diagnosed nor dealt with until tail damage is present. To effectively reduce the negative effects of tail biting, it must be diagnosed in an early stage.

  15. Characterization of metal additive manufacturing surfaces using synchrotron X-ray CT and micromechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzos, C. A.; Cunningham, R. W.; Tari, V.; Rollett, A. D.

    2018-05-01

    Characterizing complex surface topologies is necessary to understand stress concentrations created by rough surfaces, particularly those made via laser power-bed additive manufacturing (AM). Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (μ XCT) of AM surfaces was shown to provide high resolution detail of surface features and near-surface porosity. Using the CT reconstructions to instantiate a micromechanical model indicated that surface notches and near-surface porosity both act as stress concentrators, while adhered powder carried little to no load. Differences in powder size distribution had no direct effect on the relevant surface features, nor on stress concentrations. Conventional measurements of surface roughness, which are highly influenced by adhered powder, are therefore unlikely to contain the information relevant to damage accumulation and crack initiation.

  16. Improvements to the swath-level near-surface atmospheric state parameter retrievals within the NRL Ocean Surface Flux System (NFLUX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J. C.; Rowley, C. D.; Meyer, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Ocean Surface Flux System (NFLUX) is an end-to-end data processing and assimilation system used to provide near-real-time satellite-based surface heat flux fields over the global ocean. The first component of NFLUX produces near-real-time swath-level estimates of surface state parameters and downwelling radiative fluxes. The focus here will be on the satellite swath-level state parameter retrievals, namely surface air temperature, surface specific humidity, and surface scalar wind speed over the ocean. Swath-level state parameter retrievals are produced from satellite sensor data records (SDRs) from four passive microwave sensors onboard 10 platforms: the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) sensor onboard the DMSP F16, F17, and F18 platforms; the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) sensor onboard the NOAA-15, NOAA-18, NOAA-19, Metop-A, and Metop-B platforms; the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) sensor onboard the S-NPP platform; and the Advanced Microwave Scannin Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) sensor onboard the GCOM-W1 platform. The satellite SDRs are translated into state parameter estimates using multiple polynomial regression algorithms. The coefficients to the algorithms are obtained using a bootstrapping technique with all available brightness temperature channels for a given sensor, in addition to a SST field. For each retrieved parameter for each sensor-platform combination, unique algorithms are developed for ascending and descending orbits, as well as clear vs cloudy conditions. Each of the sensors produces surface air temperature and surface specific humidity retrievals. The SSMIS and AMSR2 sensors also produce surface scalar wind speed retrievals. Improvement is seen in the SSMIS retrievals when separate algorithms are used for the even and odd scans, with the odd scans performing better than the even scans. Currently, NFLUX treats all SSMIS scans as even scans. Additional improvement in all of

  17. Experimental studies of photon-surface interaction dynamics in the alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.; Tolk, N.H.

    1986-01-01

    We describe recent measurements which have provided, in unprecedented detail, insights into the electronic mechanisms through which energy carried into a material by photon irradiation is absorbed, localized and rechanneled to produce desorption, surface modification, erosion and damage. The specific object of these studies has been desorption induced by electronic transition in alkali halide crystals, with particular emphasis on the dynamics of changes in the surface and near-surface regions. In our experiments, the irradiating ultraviolet photons are provided by a synchrotron storage ring, and the dynamical information about desorption products is obtained from optical measurements of the quantum states, yields and velocity distributions of neutral ground-state and excited-state atoms ejected from the surface of the irradiating material. These studies have shown that the dominant exit channels in photon-induced particle emission are those producing ground-state and excited-state neutral atoms. Using dynamical information about these desorbing neutral species, obtained, for example, by laser-induced fluorescence and laser Doppler spectroscopy, we are generating an increasingly comprehensive picture of the dynamics of electronic energy flow into and out of pure crystalline surfaces in these prototypical dielectrics. We are also beginning to be able to relate desorption dynamics to specific materials properties, and to discriminate between pure surface and near-surface effects in these materials. Applications of these techniques to the problem of photon-induced surface damage and to analysis of surface dynamics in dielectric materials are discussed, and the relationships between these nearly ideal model materials and the non-crystalline, covalently bonded materials more typical of real optical elements are pointed out. 19 refs., 13 figs

  18. Evaluation of surface fractal dimension of carbon for plasma-facing material damaged by hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Nobuhiro

    1997-01-01

    The surface structure of the plasma facing materials (PFM) changes due to plasma-surface interaction in a nuclear fusion reactor. Usually B 4 C coated graphite block are used as PFM. In this report, the surface fractal was applied to study the surface structure of plasma-damaged PFM carbon. A convenient flow-type adsorption apparatus was developed to evaluate the surface fractal dimension of materials. Four branched alkanol molecules with different apparent areas were used as the probe adsorbates. The samples used here were B 4 C coated isotopic graphite which were subjected to hydrogen plasma for various periods of exposure. The monolayer capacities of these samples for alkanols were determined by applying BET theory. The surface fractal dimension was calculated using the monolayer capacities and molecular areas for probe molecules and was found to increase from 2 to 3 with the plasma exposure time. (author)

  19. Biconvex intraocular lenses and Nd:YAG capsulotomy: Experimental comparison of surface damage with different poly(methyl methacrylate) formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, J.E.; Alberhasky, M.T. (Greenview Hospital, Bowling Green, KY (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Biconvex posterior chamber lenses have optical advantages and decrease the risk of capsular opacification, but they are more likely to be pitted during ND:YAG capsulotomy because of apposition of the lens to the capsule. This study reports the likelihood of surface damage to different formulations of poly(methyl methacrylate) at the energy levels required to open posterior capsules. Molded lenses are more easily damaged than higher molecular weight lathe-cut materials (P less than .01), as expected. However, by keeping energy output low, even injection-molded lenses showed minimal damage, with mean pit size 39 +/- 39 microns at 1 mJ. By using a converging contact lens, low power, and keeping the focus behind the capsule, damage to all materials tested should be clinically insignificant.

  20. Technetium getters in the near surface environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James L.; Zhang, Pengchu; Westrich, Henry R.; Bryan, Charles R.; Molecke, Martin A.

    2000-01-01

    Conventional performance assessments assume that radioactive 99 Tc travels as a non-sorbing component with an effective K d (distribution coefficient) of 0. This is because soil mineral surfaces commonly develop net negative surface charges and pertechnetate (TcO 4 ), with large ionic size and low electrical density, is not sorbed onto them. However, a variety of materials have been identified that retain Tc and may eventually lead to promising Tc getters. In assessing Tc getter performance it is important to evaluate the environment in which the getter is to function. In many contaminant plumes Tc will only leach slowly from the source of the contamination and significant dilution is likely. Thus, sub-ppb Tc concentrations are expected and normal groundwater constituents will dominate the aquifer chemistry. In this setting a variety of constituents were found to retard TcO 4 : imogolite, boehmite, hydrotalcite, goethite, copper sulfide and oxide and coal. Near leaking tanks of high level nuclear waste, Tc may be present in mg/L level concentrations and groundwater chemistry will be dominated by constituents from the waste. Both bone char, and to a lesser degree, freshly precipitated Al hydroxides may be effective Tc scavengers in this environment. Thus, the search for Tc getters is far from hopeless, although much remains to be learned about the mechanisms by which these materials retain Tc

  1. Manipulation of near-wall turbulence by surface slip and permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de-Segura, G.; Fairhall, C. T.; MacDonald, M.; Chung, D.; García-Mayoral, R.

    2018-04-01

    We study the effect on near-wall turbulence of tangential slip and wall-normal transpiration, typically produced by textured surfaces and other surface manipulations. For this, we conduct direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with different virtual origins for the different velocity components. The different origins result in a relative wall-normal displacement of the near-wall, quasi-streamwise vortices with respect to the mean flow, which in turn produces a change in drag. The objective of this work is to extend the existing understanding on how these virtual origins affect the flow. In the literature, the virtual origins for the tangential velocities are typically characterised by slip boundary conditions, while the wall-normal velocity is assumed to be zero at the boundary plane. Here we explore different techniques to define and implement the three virtual origins, with special emphasis on the wall-normal one. We investigate impedance conditions relating the wall-normal velocity to the pressure, and linear relations between the velocity components and their wall-normal gradients, as is typically done to impose slip conditions. These models are first tested to represent a smooth wall below the boundary plane, with all virtual origins equal, and later for different tangential and wall-normal origins. Our results confirm that the change in drag is determined by the offset between the origins perceived by mean flow and the quasi-streamwise vortices or, more generally, the near-wall turbulent cycle. The origin for the latter, however, is not set by the spanwise virtual origin alone, as previously proposed, but by a combination of the spanwise and wall-normal origins, and mainly determined by the shallowest of the two. These observations allow us to extend the existing expression to predict the change in drag, accounting for the wall-normal effect when the transpiration is not negligible.

  2. Evaluation of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage of Silicon Sensors for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Mikeštíková, Marcela; Št'astný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of different types of end-cap miniature n + -in- p strip sensors, ATLAS12A, were evaluated in Institute of Physics in Prague before and after proton and gamma irradiation. We report here on the bulk damage aspects, including the increase of leakage current and evaluation of the full depletion voltage and the surface damage, including the decrease of inter-strip resistance, changes in inter-strip capacitance and the effectiveness of punch-through protection structure. It was verified that different geometries of end-cap sensors do not influence their stability; the sensors should provide acceptable strip isolation and n ew gate PTP structure functions well even at the highest tested proton fluence 2× 10 15 n eq / cm 2

  3. Damage detection in high-rise buildings using damage-induced rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Seung Hun; Jung, Ho Youn; Lee, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyung Jo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new damage-detection method based on structural vibration is proposed. The essence of the proposed method is the detection of abrupt changes in rotation. Damage-induced rotation (DIR), which is determined from the modal flexibility of the structure, initially occurs only at a specific damaged location. Therefore, damage can be localized by evaluating abrupt changes in rotation. We conducted numerical simulations of two damage scenarios using a 10-story cantilever-type building model. Measurement noise was also considered in the simulation. We compared the sensitivity of the proposed method to localize damage to that of two conventional modal-flexibility-based damage-detection methods, i.e., uniform load surface (ULS) and ULS curvature. The proposed method was able to localize damage in both damage scenarios for cantilever structures, but the conventional methods could not

  4. Damage detection in high-rise buildings using damage-induced rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Seung Hoon; Jung, Ho Youn; Lee, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyung Jo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new damage-detection method based on structural vibration is proposed. The essence of the proposed method is the detection of abrupt changes in rotation. Damage-induced rotation (DIR), which is determined from the modal flexibility of the structure, initially occurs only at a specific damaged location. Therefore, damage can be localized by evaluating abrupt changes in rotation. We conducted numerical simulations of two damage scenarios using a 10-story cantilever-type building model. Measurement noise was also considered in the simulation. We compared the sensitivity of the proposed method to localize damage to that of two conventional modal-flexibility-based damage-detection methods, i.e., uniform load surface (ULS) and ULS curvature. The proposed method was able to localize damage in both damage scenarios for cantilever structures, but the conventional methods could not.

  5. Near Surface CO2 Triple Oxygen Isotope Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasadhar Mahata

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is a powerful tool for constraining its sources and sinks. In particular, the 17O oxygen anomaly [Δ17O = 1000 × ln(1 + δ17O/1000 - 0.516 × 1000 × ln(1 + δ18O/1000], with a value > 0.5‰ produced in the middle atmosphere, provides an ideal tool for probing the exchange of carbon dioxide between the biosphere/hydrosphere and atmosphere. The biosphere/hydrosphere and anthropogenic emissions give values ≤ 0.3‰. Therefore, any anomaly in near surface CO2 would reflect the balance between stratospheric input and exchange with the aforementioned surface sources. We have analyzed Δ17O values of CO2 separated from air samples collected in Taipei, Taiwan, located in the western Pacific region. The obtained mean anomaly is 0.42 ± 0.14‰ (1-σ standard deviation, in good agreement with model prediction and a published decadal record. Apart from typically used δ13C and δ18O values, the Δ17O value could provide an additional tracer for constraining the carbon cycle.

  6. Upgrading of radon's type near surface repository in Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenkovs, A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1959, the Soviet government decided to construct the near surface radioactive wastes repository 'Radons' near the Baldone city. It was put in operation in 1962. The changes in the development of the repository were induced by the necessarily to upgrade it for disposal of radioactive wastes from the decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor (SRR). The safety assessment of repository was performed during 2000-2001 under the PHARE project for necessary upgrades of repository. The outline design for new vaults and interim storage for long lived radioactive wastes was elaborated during 2003-2004 years. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for upgrade of Baldone repository was performed during 2004-2005 years. It was found, that additional efforts must be devoted for solution of social aspects o for successful operation and upgrade of repository. It was shown by EIA, that the local population has a negative opinion against the upgrade of repository in Latvia. The main recommendations for upgrades were connected with increasing the safety of repository, increasing of PR activities for education of society and developing of compensation mechanism for local municipality. (author)

  7. Detection of a milling-induced surface damage by the magnetic Barkhausen noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupakov, A.; Neslušan, M.; Perevertov, O.

    2016-07-01

    The potential of the magnetic Barkhausen noise method for a non-destructive evaluation of the steel surface damage cased by milling was comprehensively investigated. A typical bearing steel was heat treated to three different hardnesses and then machined using the cutting tools with different degrees of the flank wear. The magnetic low-frequency measurements with a high reading depth were performed using a unique laboratory system providing a full control of the magnetization process. The high-frequency measurements were performed using a commercial Rollscan device. To study the induced magnetic anisotropy, the measurements were performed in two magnetization directions. In the feeding direction, the Barkhausen noise profiles showed a second high-field peak ascribed to an induced hardened surface layer, a so-called white layer. The most reliable results were obtained with the controlled waveform of the surface magnetic field measured directly by Hall sensors. In the perpendicular rotation direction, formation of the preferentially oriented matrix resulted in an enormously high Barkhausen noise activity. Based on these results, new magnetic parameters were proposed for the non-destructive evaluation of the white layer formation.

  8. Meltwater storage in low-density near-surface bare ice in the Greenland ice sheet ablation zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Matthew G.; Smith, Laurence C.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Miège, Clément; Pitcher, Lincoln H.; Ryan, Jonathan C.; Yang, Kang; Cooley, Sarah W.

    2018-03-01

    We document the density and hydrologic properties of bare, ablating ice in a mid-elevation (1215 m a.s.l.) supraglacial internally drained catchment in the Kangerlussuaq sector of the western Greenland ice sheet. We find low-density (0.43-0.91 g cm-3, μ = 0.69 g cm-3) ice to at least 1.1 m depth below the ice sheet surface. This near-surface, low-density ice consists of alternating layers of water-saturated, porous ice and clear solid ice lenses, overlain by a thin (sheet ablation zone surface. A conservative estimate for the ˜ 63 km2 supraglacial catchment yields 0.009-0.012 km3 of liquid meltwater storage in near-surface, porous ice. Further work is required to determine if these findings are representative of broader areas of the Greenland ice sheet ablation zone, and to assess the implications for sub-seasonal mass balance processes, surface lowering observations from airborne and satellite altimetry, and supraglacial runoff processes.

  9. Automated analysis of damages for radiation in plastics surfaces; Analisis automatizado de danos por radiacion en superficies plasticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C; Camacho M, E; Tavera, L; Balcazar, M [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1990-02-15

    Analysis of damages done by the radiation in a polymer characterized by optic properties of polished surfaces, of uniformity and chemical resistance that the acrylic; resistant until the 150 centigrade grades of temperature, and with an approximate weight of half of the glass. An objective of this work is the development of a method that analyze in automated form the superficial damages induced by radiation in plastic materials means an images analyst. (Author)

  10. The effect of near-surface convection on oscillation frequencies of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modelled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term”. The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modelling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelength (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary 3-D flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt-Väisäla frequency and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified wave equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of three dimensional flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from three dimensional numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies, and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  11. Near-surface temperature inversion during summer at Summit, Greenland, and its relation to MODIS-derived surface temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Adolph

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As rapid warming of the Arctic occurs, it is imperative that climate indicators such as temperature be monitored over large areas to understand and predict the effects of climate changes. Temperatures are traditionally tracked using in situ 2 m air temperatures and can also be assessed using remote sensing techniques. Remote sensing is especially valuable over the Greenland Ice Sheet, where few ground-based air temperature measurements exist. Because of the presence of surface-based temperature inversions in ice-covered areas, differences between 2 m air temperature and the temperature of the actual snow surface (referred to as skin temperature can be significant and are particularly relevant when considering validation and application of remote sensing temperature data. We present results from a field campaign extending from 8 June to 18 July 2015, near Summit Station in Greenland, to study surface temperature using the following measurements: skin temperature measured by an infrared (IR sensor, 2 m air temperature measured by a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA meteorological station, and a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS surface temperature product. Our data indicate that 2 m air temperature is often significantly higher than snow skin temperature measured in situ, and this finding may account for apparent biases in previous studies of MODIS products that used 2 m air temperature for validation. This inversion is present during our study period when incoming solar radiation and wind speed are both low. As compared to our in situ IR skin temperature measurements, after additional cloud masking, the MOD/MYD11 Collection 6 surface temperature standard product has an RMSE of 1.0 °C and a mean bias of −0.4 °C, spanning a range of temperatures from −35 to −5 °C (RMSE  =  1.6 °C and mean bias  =  −0.7 °C prior to cloud masking. For our study area and time series

  12. Effect of temperature on surface error and laser damage threshold for self-healing BK7 glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu; Wang, Hongxiang; Shen, Lu; Hou, Jing; Xu, Qiao; Wang, Jian; Chen, Xianhua; Liu, Zhichao

    2018-03-20

    Cracks caused during the lapping and polishing process can decrease the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the BK7 glass optical elements, which would shorten the lifetime and limit the output power of the high-energy laser system. When BK7 glass is heated under appropriate conditions, the surface cracks can exhibit a self-healing phenomenon. In this paper, based on thermodynamics and viscous fluid mechanics theory, the mechanisms of crack self-healing are explained. The heat-healing experiment was carried out, and the effect of water was analyzed. The multi-spatial-frequency analysis was used to investigate the effect of temperature on surface error for self-healing BK7 glass, and the lapped BK7 glass specimens before and after heat healing were detected by an interferometer and atomic force microscopy. The low-spatial-frequency error was analyzed by peak to valley and root mean square, the mid-spatial-frequency error was analyzed by power spectral density, and the high-spatial-frequency error was analyzed by surface roughness. The results showed that the optimal heating temperature for BK7 was 450°C, and when the heating temperature was higher than the glass transition temperature (555°C), the surface quality decreased a lot. The laser damage test was performed, and the specimen heated at 450°C showed an improvement in LIDT.

  13. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2009-03-31

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  14. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  15. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load

  16. A methodology for evaluating alternative sites for a near-surface radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, S.R.; Brownlow, S.A.

    1986-02-01

    This report addresses the issue of constructing an evaluation procedure for a near-surface radioactive waste repository. It builds on earlier work of the authors, and describes a basis for a practicable methodology for assessing the relative merits of different sites. (author)

  17. Infrared laser damage thresholds in corneal tissue phantoms using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretsky, Adam R.; Clary, Joseph E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast lasers have become a fixture in many biomedical, industrial, telecommunications, and defense applications in recent years. These sources are capable of generating extremely high peak power that can cause laser-induced tissue breakdown through the formation of a plasma upon exposure. Despite the increasing prevalence of such lasers, current safety standards (ANSI Z136.1-2014) do not include maximum permissible exposure (MPE) values for the cornea with pulse durations less than one nanosecond. This study was designed to measure damage thresholds in corneal tissue phantoms in the near-infrared and mid-infrared to identify the wavelength dependence of laser damage thresholds from 1200-2500 nm. A high-energy regenerative amplifier and optical parametric amplifier outputting 100 femtosecond pulses with pulse energies up to 2 mJ were used to perform exposures and determine damage thresholds in transparent collagen gel tissue phantoms. Three-dimensional imaging, primarily optical coherence tomography, was used to evaluate tissue phantoms following exposure to determine ablation characteristics at the surface and within the bulk material. The determination of laser damage thresholds in the near-IR and mid-IR for ultrafast lasers will help to guide safety standards and establish the appropriate MPE levels for exposure sensitive ocular tissue such as the cornea. These data will help promote the safe use of ultrafast lasers for a wide range of applications.

  18. Damage at a tungsten surface induced by impacts of self-atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yong [Data Center for High Energy Density Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and, Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Krstic, Predrag, E-mail: predrag.krstic@stonybrook.edu [Institute for Advanced Computational Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5250 (United States); Zhou, Fu Yang [College of Material Sciences and Optoelectronic Technology, University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 4588, Beijing 100049 (China); Meyer, Fred [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6372 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We study evolution of the surface defects of a 300 K tungsten surface due to the cumulative impact of 0.25–10 keV self-atoms. The simulation is performed by molecular dynamics with bond-order Tersoff-form potentials. At all studied impact energies the computation shows strong defect-recombination effect of both created Frenkel pairs as well as recombination of the implanted atoms with the vacancies created by the sputtering. This leads to a saturation of the cumulative count of vacancies, evident at energies below 2 keV, as long as the implantation per impact atom exceeds sputtering and to a saturation of the interstitial count when production of the sputtered particles per impact atom becomes larger than 1 (in the energy range 2-4 keV). The number of cumulative defects is fitted as functions of impact fluence and energy, enabling their analytical extrapolation outside the studied range of parameters. - Highlights: • We calculated cumulative creation of defects in tungsten by self-atom impact. • At some energies, the defect count saturate with increasing damage dose. • The defects are accumulated in the first few layers of the tungsten surface. • The interstitials are formed predominantly as adatoms.

  19. Computational simulation of biomolecules transport with multi-physics near microchannel surface for development of biomolecules-detection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuma; Shimizu, Tetsuhide; Yang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics in nano/micro scale is demanded in order to optimize the design of microfluidics device for the biomolecules detection with high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis. This paper aimed to investigate the effectivity of the computational simulation using the numerical model of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics near a microchannel surface on the development of biomolecules-detection devices. The biomolecules transport with fluid drag force, electric double layer (EDL) force, and van der Waals force was modeled by Newtonian Equation of motion. The model validity was verified in the influence of ion strength and flow velocity on biomolecules distribution near the surface compared with experimental results of previous studies. The influence of acting forces on its distribution near the surface was investigated by the simulation. The trend of its distribution to ion strength and flow velocity was agreement with the experimental result by the combination of all acting forces. Furthermore, EDL force dominantly influenced its distribution near its surface compared with fluid drag force except for the case of high velocity and low ion strength. The knowledges from the simulation might be useful for the design of biomolecules-detection devices and the simulation can be expected to be applied on its development as the design tool for high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis in the future.

  20. UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS FOR RAPID NEAR SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Stoll

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at some of the unmanned aircraft systems (UAS options and deals with a magnetometer sensor system which might be of interest in conducting rapid near surface geophysical measurements. Few of the traditional airborne geophysical sensors are now capable of being miniaturized to sizes and payload within mini UAS limits (e.g. airborne magnetics, gamma ray spectrometer. Here the deployment of a fluxgate magnetometer mounted on an UAS is presented demonstrating its capability of detecting metallic materials that are buried in the soil. The effectiveness in finding ferrous objects (e.g. UXO, landslides is demonstrated in two case studies.

  1. MODIS/Aqua Near Real Time (NRT) Surface Reflectance Daily L2G Global 250m SIN Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS Near Real Time (NRT) Surface Reflectance products are an estimate of the surface spectral reflectance as it would be measured at ground level in the...

  2. Methodology for safety assessment of near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateeva, M.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the work is to present the conceptual model of the methodology of safety assessment of near-surface radioactive disposal facilities. The widely used mathematical models and approaches are presented. The emphasis is given on the mathematical models and approaches, which are applicable for the conditions in our country. The different transport models for analysis and safety assessment of migration processes are presented. The parallel between the Mixing-Cell Cascade model and model of Finite-Differences is made. In the methodology the basic physical and chemical processes and events, concerning mathematical modelling of the flow and the transport of radionuclides from the Near Field to Far Field and Biosphere are analyzed. Suitable computer codes corresponding to the ideology and appropriate for implementing of the methodology are shown

  3. Secondary ion mass spectrometry induced damage adjacent to analysis craters in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, M.H.; Jones, K.S.; Stevie, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    Damage introduced by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling is studied. A silicon sample with a boron marker layer was depth profiled by dynamic SIMS. After subsequent annealing at 750 deg. C for 30 min, the SIMS sample was reanalyzed by plan-view transmission electron microscope (PTEM) and SIMS. PTEM images showed the presence of interstitial defects near the original SIMS crater, and SIMS depth profiles of similar regions exhibited boron diffusivity enhancements. Excess interstitials were introduced into the Si surface up to 2 mm from the original 225 μmx225 μm crater. Both PTEM and SIMS results showed that the damage and its effects diminished with an increase in distance from the original crater

  4. Development of performance assessment methodology for establishment of quantitative acceptance criteria of near-surface radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. R.; Lee, E. Y.; Park, J. W.; Chang, G. M.; Park, H. Y.; Yeom, Y. S. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    The contents and the scope of this study are as follows : review of state-of-the-art on the establishment of waste acceptance criteria in foreign near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities, investigation of radiological assessment methodologies and scenarios, investigation of existing models and computer codes used in performance/safety assessment, development of a performance assessment methodology(draft) to derive quantitatively radionuclide acceptance criteria of domestic near-surface disposal facility, preliminary performance/safety assessment in accordance with the developed methodology.

  5. Nonlinear estimation of weathering rate parameters for uranium in surface soil near a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Rope, S.K.; Shleien, B.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    A dynamic mass-balance model has been calibrated by a nonlinear parameter estimation method, using time-series measurements of uranium in surface soil near the former Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near Fernald, Ohio, USA. The time-series data, taken at six locations near the site boundary since 1971, show a statistically significant downtrend of above-background uranium concentration in surface soil for all six locations. The dynamic model is based on first-order kinetics in a surface-soil compartment 10 cm in depth. Median estimates of weathering rate coefficients for insoluble uranium in this soil compartment range from about 0.065-0.14 year -1 , corresponding to mean transit times of about 7-15 years, depending on the location sampled. The model, calibrated by methods similar to those discussed in this paper, has been used to simulate surface soil kinetics of uranium for a dose reconstruction study. It was also applied, along with other data, to make confirmatory estimates of airborne releases of uranium from the FMPC between 1951 and 1988. Two soil-column models (one diffusive and one advective, the latter similar to a catenary first-order kinetic box model) were calibrated to profile data taken at one of the six locations in 1976. The temporal predictions of the advective model approximate the trend of the time series data for that location. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. An overview of technical requirements on durable concrete production for near surface disposal facilities for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolentino, Evandro; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive waste can be generated by a wide range of activities varying from activities in hospitals to nuclear power plants, to mines and mineral processing facilities. General public have devoted nowadays considerable attention to the subject of radioactive waste management due to heightened awareness of environmental protection. The preferred strategy for the management of all radioactive waste is to contain it and to isolate it from the accessible biosphere. The Federal Government of Brazil has announced the construction for the year of 2014 and operation for the year of 2016 of a near surface disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of technical requirements related to production of durable concrete to be used in near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste concrete structures. These requirements have been considered by researchers dealing with ongoing designing effort of the Brazilian near surface disposal facility. (author)

  7. Time-lapse changes in velocity and anisotropy in Japan's near surface after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, R.; Nakata, N.

    2012-12-01

    A strong-motion recording network, KiK-net, helps us to monitor temporal changes in the near surface in Japan. Each KiK-net station has two seismometers at the free surface and in a borehole a few hundred meters deep, and we can retrieve a traveling wave from the borehole receiver to the surface receiver by applying deconvolution based seismic interferometry. KiK-net recorded the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, which is one of the largest earthquakes in recent history, and seismicity around the time of the main shock. Using records of these seismicity and computing mean values of near-surface shear-wave velocities in the periods of January 1--March 10 and March 12--May 26 in 2011, we detect about a 5% reduction in the velocity after the Tohoku earthquake. The area of the velocity reduction is about 1,200 km wide, which is much wider than earlier studies reporting velocity reductions after larger earthquakes. The reduction partly recovers with time. We can also estimate the azimuthal anisotropy by detecting shear-wave splitting after applying seismic interferometry. Estimating mean values over the same periods as the velocity, we find the strength of anisotropy increased in most parts of northeastern Japan, but fast shear-wave polarization directions in the near surface did not significantly change. The changes in anisotropy and velocity are generally correlated, especially in the northeastern Honshu (the main island in Japan).

  8. Nanophotonic force microscopy: characterizing particle-surface interactions using near-field photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; Kang, Pilgyu; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2015-02-11

    Direct measurements of particle-surface interactions are important for characterizing the stability and behavior of colloidal and nanoparticle suspensions. Current techniques are limited in their ability to measure pico-Newton scale interaction forces on submicrometer particles due to signal detection limits and thermal noise. Here we present a new technique for making measurements in this regime, which we refer to as nanophotonic force microscopy. Using a photonic crystal resonator, we generate a strongly localized region of exponentially decaying, near-field light that allows us to confine small particles close to a surface. From the statistical distribution of the light intensity scattered by the particle we are able to map out the potential well of the trap and directly quantify the repulsive force between the nanoparticle and the surface. As shown in this Letter, our technique is not limited by thermal noise, and therefore, we are able to resolve interaction forces smaller than 1 pN on dielectric particles as small as 100 nm in diameter.

  9. Design data sheets Near-Surface Test Facility Bottom Loading Transporter (BLT): Title 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    This document is an accumulation of all the Design Data Sheets relative to the handling equipment in the transporter for the Near-Surface Test Facility. The Data Sheets are in ascending numerical order. Each Data Sheet, regardless of the number of pages, shall stand by itself within this document

  10. ''Over the horizon'' SANS: Measurements on near-surface Poiseuille shear-induced ordering of dilute solutions of threadlike micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, W.A.; Butler, P.D.; Hayter, J.B.; Magid, L.J.; Kreke, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Although the behavior of a fluid under shear near a surface can be expected to be critically important to its drag and lubrication properties, most shear measurements to date have been of the bulk. This paper outlines the use of a specially developed Poiseuille shear cell at grazing incidence to measure the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) signal from the first few tens of microns in the interfacial region. The authors illustrate the technique with measurements made on the near-surface ordering in flow past a quartz surface of dilute surfactant solutions comprising highly extended self-assembling ''threadlike'' micelles

  11. Retrieval of Surface Lambert Albedos and Aerosols Optical Depths Using OMEGA Near-IR EPF Observations of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincendon, M.; Langevin, Y.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J.-P.; Gondet, B.

    2007-03-01

    We have analyzed five EPF sequences acquired by OMEGA/Mars Express in the near-IR over ice-free and ice-covered surfaces to retrieve simultaneously the Lambert albedo of the surface and the optical depth of aerosols.

  12. Study of surface damage on cell envelope assessed by AFM and flow cytometry of Lactobacillus plantarum exposed to ethanol and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Ferrada, B M; Gonçalves, S; Semorile, L; Santos, N C; Tymczyszyn, E E; Hollmann, A

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we evaluated freeze-drying damage at the surface level of oenological strain Lactobacillus plantarum UNQLp155, as well as its ability to grow in a synthetic wine with and without pre-acclimation. Damage on cell surface was studied by flow cytometry, zeta potential and atomic force microscopy, and cell survival was analysed by plate count. Results showed that beside cells acclimated at lower ethanol concentration (6% v/v) became more susceptible to drying than nonacclimated ones, after rehydration they maintain their increased ability to grow in a synthetic wine. Acclimation at a higher ethanol concentration (10% v/v) produces several damages on the cell surface losing its ability to grow in a synthetic wine. In this work, we showed for the first time that sublethal alterations on bacterial surface induced by a pre-acclimation with a low ethanol concentration (6%), upon a freeze-drying process, result in a better bacterial adaptation to the stress conditions of wine-like medium, as well as to the preservation process. Understanding the adaptation to ethanol of oenological strains and their effects on the preservation process has a strong impact on winemaking process and allows to define the most appropriate conditions to obtain malolactic starters cultures. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Conceptual design plan near-surface test facility: Phase II, Project B-300b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heneveld, W.H.; Mack, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Activities are reported in programs devoted to demonstration and development of techniques for the safe placement and retrieval of the spent fuel canisters in a near-surface flow of the Columbia River Basalt. Other programs are reported designed to determine whether there are any unacceptable effects resulting from the interaction of the nuclear waste and basalt and to provide information to be used for near-term validation of the current numerical design models of the repository. Work is also reported on development of a data base for the design, construction, and licensing of a permanent large-scale basalt repository

  14. Impact damages modeling in laminated composite structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreculj Dragan D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminated composites have an important application in modern engineering structures. They are characterized by extraordinary properties, such as: high strength and stiffness and lightweight. Nevertheless, a serious obstacle to more widespread use of those materials is their sensitivity to the impact loads. Impacts cause initiation and development of certain types of damages. Failures that occur in laminated composite structures can be intralaminar and interlaminar. To date it was developed a lot of simulation models for impact damages analysis in laminates. Those models can replace real and expensive testing in laminated structures with a certain accuracy. By using specialized software the damage parameters and distributions can be determined (at certain conditions on laminate structures. With performing numerical simulation of impact on composite laminates there are corresponding results valid for the analysis of these structures.

  15. Dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the electron-extraction scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Lanchares, Víctor [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Palacián, Jesús [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Pascual, Ana I. [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Yanguas, Patricia [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-01-23

    We study the classical dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the presence of a constant electric field in the electron-extraction situation [1], e.g., when the field attracts the electron to the vacuum. From a dynamical point of view, this field configuration provides a dynamics richer than in the usual ion-extraction scheme, because, depending on the values of field and the atom–surface distance, the atom can be ionized only towards the metal surface, only to the vacuum or to the both sides. The evolution of the phase space structure as a function of the atom–surface distance is explored in the bound regime of the atom. In the high energy regime, the ionization mechanism is also investigated. We find that the classical results of this work are in good agreement with the results obtained in the wave-packet propagation study carried out by So et al. [1]. - Highlights: • We study a classical hydrogen atom near a metal surface plus a electric field. • We explore the phase space structure as a function of the field strength. • We find most of the electronic orbits are oriented along the field direction. • We study the ionization of the atom for several atom–surface distances. • This classical study is in good agreement with the quantum results.

  16. Time-resolved imaging of filamentary damage on the exit surface of fused silica induced by 1064 nm nanosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Shen; Xiang’ai, Cheng; Tian, Jiang; Zhiwu, Zhu; Yifan, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced damage on the exit surface of fused silica with a filament was observed. The filament has a central hollow core surrounded by molten materials and no obvious cracks could be observed. The critical intensity for the transition from pure surface damage (SD) to filamentary damage (FD) was measured. Time-resolved shadowgraphic microscopy with nanosecond time resolution was employed to compare the propagation of shock wave and material response in the SD and FD process. The main different features during the material response process include: (i) thermoelastic shock waves launched in FD were multiple and a column envelope was observed in the lateral direction; (ii) more energy is deposited in the bulk for FD resulting to a lower speed of shock wave in air; (iii) the overall time for establishing the main character of the damage site for FD was shorter because of the absence of crack expansion. Self-focusing and temperature-activated optical absorption enhancement of the bulk material are discussed to explain the morphology difference between SD and FD and the evolution of filament length under different incident intensities. (paper)

  17. Safety assessment of near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities: Model intercomparison using simple hypothetical data (Test Case 1). First report of NSARS. Part of the co-ordinated research programme on the safety assessment of near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (NSARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    In many countries near surface disposal is the preferred option for the comparatively large volumes of low and intermediate level wastes which arise during nuclear power plant operations, nuclear fuel reprocessing and also for the wastes arising from radionuclide applications in hospitals and research establishments. Near surface disposal is also widely practised in the case of hazardous wastes from chemical industries. It is obviously necessary to show that waste disposal methods are safe and that both man and the environment will be adequately protected. Following a previous related Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Migration and Biological Transfer of Radionuclides from Shallow Land Burial'' during 1985 to 1989 (IAEA-TECDOC-579, Vienna, 1990), the issue of reliability of safety assessments was identified as an important topic for further support and development. A new CRP was formulated with the acronym NSARS (Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Assessment Reliability Study). This technical document is the first report of from the CRP and contains the intercomparison of results of the first test exercise (Test Case 1) on modelling of potential radiation exposures as a result of near surface disposal. Test Case 1 is based on entirely hypothetical data and includes consideration of exposures due to leaching and as a result of human intrusion into the site. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Safety assessment of near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities: Model intercomparison using simple hypothetical data (Test Case 1). First report of NSARS. Part of the co-ordinated research programme on the safety assessment of near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (NSARS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    In many countries near surface disposal is the preferred option for the comparatively large volumes of low and intermediate level wastes which arise during nuclear power plant operations, nuclear fuel reprocessing and also for the wastes arising from radionuclide applications in hospitals and research establishments. Near surface disposal is also widely practised in the case of hazardous wastes from chemical industries. It is obviously necessary to show that waste disposal methods are safe and that both man and the environment will be adequately protected. Following a previous related Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ``Migration and Biological Transfer of Radionuclides from Shallow Land Burial`` during 1985 to 1989 (IAEA-TECDOC-579, Vienna, 1990), the issue of reliability of safety assessments was identified as an important topic for further support and development. A new CRP was formulated with the acronym NSARS (Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Assessment Reliability Study). This technical document is the first report of from the CRP and contains the intercomparison of results of the first test exercise (Test Case 1) on modelling of potential radiation exposures as a result of near surface disposal. Test Case 1 is based on entirely hypothetical data and includes consideration of exposures due to leaching and as a result of human intrusion into the site. Refs, figs and tabs.

  19. Near-surface groundwater responses to injection of geothermal wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.C.

    1984-06-01

    Experiences with injecting geothermal fluids have identified technical problems associated with geothermal waste disposal. This report assesses the feasibility of injection as an alternative for geothermal wastewater disposal and analyzes hydrologic controls governing the upward migration of injected fluids. Injection experiences at several geothermal developments are presented, including: Raft River, Salton Sea, East Mesa, Otake and Hatchobaru in Japan, and Ahuachapan in El Salvador. Hydrogeologic and design/operational factors affecting the success of an injection program are identified. Hydrogeologic factors include subsidence, near-surface effects of injected fluids, and seismicity. Design/operational factors include hydrodynamic breakthrough, condition of the injection system and reservoir maintenance. Existing and potential effects of production/injection on these factors are assessed.

  20. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear-tooth-pitting-fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4 [Ed. 's note: See Appendix A-Definitions D were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters perfomu:d average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant 8lDOunt of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  1. Near-surface flow of volcanic gases on Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Thomas, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    Significant near-surface flow of gas several hundred kilometers from Pele (Plume 1) on Io is indicated by a series of bright, elongate albedo markings. Particles produced at small, local vents are apparently carried as much as 70 km farther 'downwind' from Pele. The gas densities and velocities necessary to suspend 0.1 to 10 micron particles at such a distance imply mass flow rates of 10 to the 7th - 10 to the 9th g/sec. Such flow rates are consistent with other estimates of mass transport by the plume. The large flow rates so far from the source allow an estimate of the rate of resurfacing of Io by lava flows and pyroclastics that is independent of estimates based on meteorite flux or on the amount of solids carried within the plumes themselves

  2. Near-surface alloys for hydrogen fuel cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2006-01-01

    of CO with relatively facile H-2 activation is nearly ideal for this application. We suggest that. as nanoscale materials synthesis techniques improve, it will become feasible to reproducibly prepare NSAs with highly specified surface structures, resulting in the design and manufacture of a wide variety...... facile H-2 activation. These NSAs could, potentially, facilitate highly selective hydrogenation reactions at low temperatures. In the present work, the suitability of NSAs for use as hydrogen fuel cell anodes has been evaluated: the combination of properties, possessed by selected NSAs, of weak binding...... of such materials for use in fuel cells and in an ever. increasing range of catalytic applications. Furthermore, we introduce a new concept for NSA-defect sites, which could be responsible for the promotional catalytic effects of a second metal added. even in minute quantities, to a host metal catalyst....

  3. Strong Control of Salts on Near Surface Liquid Water Content in a High Polar Desert Indicated by Near Surface Resistivity Mapping with a Helicopter-Borne TEM Sensor, Lower Taylor Valley, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, N.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Auken, E.; Mikucki, J.; Myers, K. F.; Dugan, H.; Doran, P. T.; Virginia, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    Closed depressions in the Lower Taylor Valley (McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica) have near surface (top 5m) electrical resistivity that is lower by about an order of magnitude than the resistivity of nearby slopes and ridges (100s of ohm-m vs. 1000s). We interpret this spatial pattern as being due to long term concentration of salts carried by liquid water and/or deliquescent vapor fronts. High concentration of salts in the top decimeters to meters beneath the surface may prolong the existence and abundance of liquid water in this otherwise very cold and dry high polar desert. Due to its connections with life and chemical transport, liquid water is a much studied feature in the McMurdo Dry Valleys. This setting can be used as an analogue for similar features on the surface of Mars, where liquid water tracks have been observed and are believed to be controlled by eutectic brines. Our study demonstrates the utility of mapping at a regional scale via helicopter-borne Transient EM. Airborne EM covers more ground and can measure deeper than surface-based measurements, at the expense of resolution. This allows creating valley-scale datasets which could not feasibly be collected on the ground. Our remote measurements complement physical samples that indicate that soluble salts concentrate in certain areas of surface soil where water moves ions and is later removed by evaporation or sublimation. In areas where we measured low resistivity, the integrated liquid water fraction in the top 5m may be a few to several percent by volume, equivalent to a few or several dozens of cm of water layer thickness. This estimate assumes that the interstitial waters have very low resistivity, comparable to seawater or hypersaline brines at freezing (0.2-0.35 ohm-m). If soil water was considerably fresher than this, liquid water content would have to reach dozens of percent throughout the top 5m for bulk resistivities to drop to 100s of ohm-m. We consider the latter case to be unlikely as

  4. Surface geometry of protoplanetary disks inferred from near-infrared imaging polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takami, Michihiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Gu, Pin-Gao; Karr, Jennifer L.; Chapillon, Edwige; Tang, Ya-Wen [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, PO Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Dong, Ruobing [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hashimoto, Jun [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St. Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kusakabe, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Eiji; Kwon, Jungmi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Itoh, Youchi [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Carson, Joseph [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Charleston, 58 Coming Street, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Follette, Katherine B. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mayama, Satoshi [The Center for the Promotion of Integrated Sciences, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan International Village, Hayama-cho, Miura-gun, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Sitko, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Janson, Markus [Astrophysics Research Center, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Grady, Carol A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96402 (United States); Kudo, Tomoyuki, E-mail: hiro@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Subaru Telescope, 650 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); and others

    2014-11-01

    We present a new method of analysis for determining the surface geometry of five protoplanetary disks observed with near-infrared imaging polarimetry using Subaru-HiCIAO. Using as inputs the observed distribution of polarized intensity (PI), disk inclination, assumed properties for dust scattering, and other reasonable approximations, we calculate a differential equation to derive the surface geometry. This equation is numerically integrated along the distance from the star at a given position angle. We show that, using these approximations, the local maxima in the PI distribution of spiral arms (SAO 206462, MWC 758) and rings (2MASS J16042165-2130284, PDS 70) are associated with local concave-up structures on the disk surface. We also show that the observed presence of an inner gap in scattered light still allows the possibility of a disk surface that is parallel to the light path from the star, or a disk that is shadowed by structures in the inner radii. Our analysis for rings does not show the presence of a vertical inner wall as often assumed in studies of disks with an inner gap. Finally, we summarize the implications of spiral and ring structures as potential signatures of ongoing planet formation.

  5. Surface geometry of protoplanetary disks inferred from near-infrared imaging polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takami, Michihiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Gu, Pin-Gao; Karr, Jennifer L.; Chapillon, Edwige; Tang, Ya-Wen; Muto, Takayuki; Dong, Ruobing; Hashimoto, Jun; Kusakabe, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Eiji; Kwon, Jungmi; Itoh, Youchi; Carson, Joseph; Follette, Katherine B.; Mayama, Satoshi; Sitko, Michael; Janson, Markus; Grady, Carol A.; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method of analysis for determining the surface geometry of five protoplanetary disks observed with near-infrared imaging polarimetry using Subaru-HiCIAO. Using as inputs the observed distribution of polarized intensity (PI), disk inclination, assumed properties for dust scattering, and other reasonable approximations, we calculate a differential equation to derive the surface geometry. This equation is numerically integrated along the distance from the star at a given position angle. We show that, using these approximations, the local maxima in the PI distribution of spiral arms (SAO 206462, MWC 758) and rings (2MASS J16042165-2130284, PDS 70) are associated with local concave-up structures on the disk surface. We also show that the observed presence of an inner gap in scattered light still allows the possibility of a disk surface that is parallel to the light path from the star, or a disk that is shadowed by structures in the inner radii. Our analysis for rings does not show the presence of a vertical inner wall as often assumed in studies of disks with an inner gap. Finally, we summarize the implications of spiral and ring structures as potential signatures of ongoing planet formation.

  6. Micro-mechanisms of Surface Defects Induced on Aluminum Alloys during Plastic Deformation at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, Olufisayo A.

    Near-surface deformed layers developed on aluminum alloys significantly influence the corrosion and tribological behavior as well as reduce the surface quality of the rolled aluminum. The evolution of the near-surface microstructures induced on magnesium containing aluminum alloys during thermomechanical processing has been investigated with the aim generating an understanding of the influence of individual forming parameters on its evolution and examine the microstructure of the roll coating induced on the mating steel roll through material transfer during rolling. The micro-mechanisms related to the various features of near-surface microstructure developed during tribological conditions of the simulated hot rolling process were identified. Thermomechanical processing experiments were performed with the aid of hot rolling (operating temperature: 550 to 460 °C, 4, 10 and 20 rolling pass schedules) and hot forming (operating temperature: 350 to 545 °C, strain rate: 4 x 10-2 s-1) tribo-simulators. The surface, near-surface features and material transfer induced during the elevated temperature plastic deformation were examined and characterized employing optical interferometry, SEM/EDS, FIB and TEM. Near-surface features characterized on the rolled aluminum alloys included; cracks, fractured intermetallic particles, aluminum nano-particles, oxide decorated grain boundaries, rolled-in oxides, shingles and blisters. These features were related to various individual rolling parameters which included, the work roll roughness, which induced the formation of shingles, rolling marks and were responsible for the redistribution of surface oxide and the enhancements of the depth of the near-surface damage. The enhanced stresses and strains experienced during rolling were related to the formation and propagation of cracks, the nanocrystalline structure of the near-surface layers and aluminum nano-particles. The mechanism of the evolution of the near-surface microstructure were

  7. IASI's sensitivity to near-surface carbon monoxide (CO): Theoretical analyses and retrievals on test cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauduin, Sophie; Clarisse, Lieven; Theunissen, Michael; George, Maya; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2017-03-01

    Separating concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) in the boundary layer from the rest of the atmosphere with nadir satellite measurements is of particular importance to differentiate emission from transport. Although thermal infrared (TIR) satellite sounders are considered to have limited sensitivity to the composition of the near-surface atmosphere, previous studies show that they can provide information on CO close to the ground in case of high thermal contrast. In this work we investigate the capability of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) to retrieve near-surface CO concentrations, and we quantitatively assess the influence of thermal contrast on such retrievals. We present a 3-part analysis, which relies on both theoretical forward simulations and retrievals on real data, performed for a large range of negative and positive thermal contrast situations. First, we derive theoretically the IASI detection threshold of CO enhancement in the boundary layer, and we assess its dependence on thermal contrast. Then, using the optimal estimation formalism, we quantify the role of thermal contrast on the error budget and information content of near-surface CO retrievals. We demonstrate that, contrary to what is usually accepted, large negative thermal contrast values (ground cooler than air) lead to a better decorrelation between CO concentrations in the low and the high troposphere than large positive thermal contrast (ground warmer than the air). In the last part of the paper we use Mexico City and Barrow as test cases to contrast our theoretical predictions with real retrievals, and to assess the accuracy of IASI surface CO retrievals through comparisons to ground-based in-situ measurements.

  8. Scoping survey of perceived concerns, issues, and problems for near-surface disposal of FUSRAP waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.E.; Gilbert, T.L.

    1982-12-01

    This report is a scoping summary of concerns, issues, and perceived problems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste, based on a survey of the current literature. Near-surface disposal means land burial in or within 15 to 20 m of the earth's surface. It includes shallow land burial (burial in trenches, typically about 6 m deep with a 2-m cap and cover) and some intermediate-depth land burial (e.g., trenches and cap similar to shallow land burial, but placed below 10 to 15 m of clean soil). Proposed solutions to anticipated problems also are discussed. The purpose of the report is to provide a better basis for identifying and evaluating the environmental impacts and related factors that must be analyzed and compared in assessing candidate near-surface disposal sites for FUSRAP waste. FUSRAP wastes are of diverse types, and their classification for regulatory purposes is not yet fixed. Most of it may be characterized as low-activity bulk solid waste, and is similar to mill tailings, but with somewhat lower average specific activity. It may also qualify as Class A segregated waste under the proposed 10 CFR 61 rules, but the parent radionuclides of concern in FUSRAP (primarily U-238 and Th-232) have longer half-lives than do the radionuclides of concern in most low-level waste. Most of the references reviewed deal with low-level waste or mill tailings, since there is as yet very little literature in the public domain on FUSRAP per se

  9. Enceladus' near-surface CO2 gas pockets and surface frost deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Johnson, Torrence V.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Thomas B.; Radebaugh, Jani; Singh, Sandeep

    2018-03-01

    Solid CO2 surface deposits were reported in Enceladus' South Polar Region by Brown et al. (2006). They noted that such volatile deposits are temporary and posited ongoing replenishment. We present a model for this replenishment by expanding on the Matson et al. (2012) model of subsurface heat and chemical transport in Enceladus. Our model explains the distributions of both CO2 frost and complexed CO2 clathrate hydrate as seen in the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data. We trace the journey of CO2 from a subsurface ocean. The ocean-water circulation model of Matson et al. (2012) brings water up to near the surface where gas exsolves to form bubbles. Some of the CO2 bubbles are trapped and form pockets of gas in recesses at the bottom of the uppermost ice layer. When fissures break open these pockets, the CO2 gas is vented. Gas pocket venting is episodic compared to the more or less continuous eruptive plumes, emanating from the "tiger stripes", that are supported by plume chambers. Two styles of gas pocket venting are considered: (1) seeps, and (2) blowouts. The presence of CO2 frost patches suggests that the pocket gas slowly seeped through fractured, cold ice and when some of the gas reached the surface it was cold enough to condense (i.e., T ∼70 to ∼119 K). If the fissure opening is large, a blowout occurs. The rapid escape of gas and drop in pocket pressure causes water in the pocket to boil and create many small aerosol droplets of seawater. These may be carried along by the erupting gas. Electrically charged droplets can couple to the magnetosphere, and be dragged away from Enceladus. Most of the CO2 blowout gas escapes from Enceladus and the remainder is distributed globally. However, CO2 trapped in a clathrate structure does not escape. It is much heavier and slower moving than the CO2 gas. Its motion is ballistic and has an average range of about 17 km. Thus, it contributes to deposits in the vicinity of the vent. Local heat

  10. Types of safety assessments of near surface repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateeva, M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to presents the classification of different types safety assessments of near surface repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste substantiated with results of safety assessments generated in Bulgaria. The different approach of safety assessments applied for old existing repository as well as for site selection for construction new repository is outlined. The regulatory requirements in Bulgaria define three main types of assessments: Safety assessment; Technical substation of repository safety; Assessment of repository influence on environment that is in form of report prepared from the Ministry of environment and waters on the base of results obtained in two first types of assessments. Additionally first type is subdivided in three categories - preliminary safety assessment, safety assessment and post closure safety assessment, which are generated using deterministic approach. The technical substation of repository safety is generated using probabilistic approach. Safety assessment results that are presented here are based on evaluation of existing old repository type 'Radon' in Novi Han and real site selection procedure for new near surface repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste from nuclear power station in Kozloduy. The important role of safety assessment for improvement the repository safety as well as for repository licensing, correct site selection and right choice of engineer barriers and repository design is discussed using generated results. (author)

  11. Effects of shrub and tree cover increase on the near-surface atmosphere in northern Fennoscandia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Rydsaa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased shrub and tree cover in high latitudes is a widely observed response to climate change that can lead to positive feedbacks to the regional climate. In this study we evaluate the sensitivity of the near-surface atmosphere to a potential increase in shrub and tree cover in the northern Fennoscandia region. We have applied the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model with the Noah-UA land surface module in evaluating biophysical effects of increased shrub cover on the near-surface atmosphere at a fine resolution (5.4 km  ×  5.4 km. Perturbation experiments are performed in which we prescribe a gradual increase in taller vegetation in the alpine shrub and tree cover according to empirically established bioclimatic zones within the study region. We focus on the spring and summer atmospheric response. To evaluate the sensitivity of the atmospheric response to inter-annual variability in climate, simulations were conducted for two contrasting years, one warm and one cold. We find that shrub and tree cover increase leads to a general increase in near-surface temperatures, with the highest influence seen during the snowmelt season and a more moderate effect during summer. We find that the warming effect is stronger in taller vegetation types, with more complex canopies leading to decreases in the surface albedo. Counteracting effects include increased evapotranspiration, which can lead to increased cloud cover, precipitation, and snow cover. We find that the strength of the atmospheric feedback is sensitive to snow cover variations and to a lesser extent to summer temperatures. Our results show that the positive feedback to high-latitude warming induced by increased shrub and tree cover is a robust feature across inter-annual differences in meteorological conditions and will likely play an important role in land–atmosphere feedback processes in the future.

  12. Site specificity of biosphere parameter values in performance assessments of near-surface repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, Th.; Volckaert, G.; Vandecasleele

    1993-01-01

    The contribution is dealing with the performance assessment model for near surface repositories in Belgium. It consists of four submodels called: site, aquifer, biosphere and dose. For some characteristic radionuclides, results of the study are shown for a typical site, and differences in doses assessed with the generic approach discussed. Shortcomings are indicated

  13. The IAEA research project on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Vidal, C.; Graham, D.; Batandjieva, B.

    2002-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Research Coordinated Project on Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities (ISAM) was launched in November 1997 and it has been underway for three years. The ISAM project was developed to provide a critical evaluation of the approaches and tools used in long-term safety assessment of near surface repositories. It resulted in the development of a harmonised approach and illustrated its application by way of three test cases - vault, borehole and Radon (a particular range of repository designs developed within the former Soviet Union) type repositories. As a consequence, the ISAM project had over 70 active participants and attracted considerable interest involving around 700 experts from 72 Member States. The methodology developed, the test cases, the main lessons learnt and the conclusions have been documented and will be published in the form of an IAEA TECDOC. This paper presents the work of the IAEA on improvement of safety assessment methodologies for near surface waste disposal facilities and the application of these methodologies for different purposes in the individual stages of the repository development. The paper introduces the main objectives, activities and outcome of the ISAM project and summarizes the work performed by the six working groups within the ISAM programme, i.e. Scenario Generation and Justification, Modelling, Confidence Building, Vault, Radon Type Facility and Borehole test cases. (author)

  14. Simulating damage for wind storms in the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (revision 4262)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ying; Gardiner, Barry; Pasztor, Ferenc; Blennow, Kristina; Ryder, James; Valade, Aude; Naudts, Kim; Otto, Juliane; McGrath, Matthew J.; Planque, Carole; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2018-03-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) are currently the most advanced tools with which to study the interactions among humans, ecosystem productivity, and the climate. The inclusion of storm damage in ESMs has long been hampered by their big-leaf approach, which ignores the canopy structure information that is required for process-based wind-throw modelling. Recently the big-leaf assumptions in the large-scale land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN were replaced by a three-dimensional description of the canopy structure. This opened the way to the integration of the processes from the small-scale wind damage risk model ForestGALES into ORCHIDEE-CAN. The integration of ForestGALES into ORCHIDEE-CAN required, however, developing numerically efficient solutions to deal with (1) landscape heterogeneity, i.e. account for newly established forest edges for the parameterization of gusts; (2) downscaling spatially and temporally aggregated wind fields to obtain more realistic wind speeds that would represents gusts; and (3) downscaling storm damage within the 2500 km2 pixels of ORCHIDEE-CAN. This new version of ORCHIDEE-CAN was parameterized over Sweden. Subsequently, the performance of the model was tested against data for historical storms in southern Sweden between 1951 and 2010 and south-western France in 2009. In years without big storms, here defined as a storm damaging less than 15 × 106 m3 of wood in Sweden, the model error is 1.62 × 106 m3, which is about 100 % of the observed damage. For years with big storms, such as Gudrun in 2005, the model error increased to 5.05 × 106 m3, which is between 10 and 50 % of the observed damage. When the same model parameters were used over France, the model reproduced a decrease in leaf area index and an increase in albedo, in accordance with SPOT-VGT and MODIS records following the passing of Cyclone Klaus in 2009. The current version of ORCHIDEE-CAN (revision 4262) is therefore expected to have the capability to capture the dynamics of

  15. Surface-based reconstruction and diffusion MRI in the assessment of gray and white matter damage in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffini, Matteo; Bergsland, Niels; LaganÃ, Marcella; Tavazzi, Eleonora; Tortorella, Paola; Rovaris, Marco; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Despite advances in the application of nonconventional MRI techniques in furthering the understanding of multiple sclerosis pathogenic mechanisms, there are still many unanswered questions, such as the relationship between gray and white matter damage. We applied a combination of advanced surface-based reconstruction and diffusion tensor imaging techniques to address this issue. We found significant relationships between white matter tract integrity indices and corresponding cortical structures. Our results suggest a direct link between damage in white and gray matter and contribute to the notion of gray matter loss relating to clinical disability.

  16. Study of non-spherical bubble oscillations near a surface in a weak acoustic standing wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoyu; Cegla, Frederic; Mettin, Robert; Holsteyns, Frank; Lippert, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of acoustically driven bubbles with a wall is important in many applications of ultrasound and cavitation, as the close boundary can severely alter the bubble dynamics. In this paper, the non-spherical surface oscillations of bubbles near a surface in a weak acoustic standing wave field are investigated experimentally and numerically. The translation, the volume, and surface mode oscillations of bubbles near a flat glass surface were observed by a high speed camera in a standing wave cell at 46.8 kHz. The model approach is based on a modified Keller-Miksis equation coupled to surface mode amplitude equations in the first order, and to the translation equations. Modifications are introduced due to the adjacent wall. It was found that a bubble's oscillation mode can change in the presence of the wall, as compared to the bubble in the bulk liquid. In particular, the wall shifts the instability pressure thresholds to smaller driving frequencies for fixed bubble equilibrium radii, or to smaller equilibrium radii for fixed excitation frequency. This can destabilize otherwise spherical bubbles, or stabilize bubbles undergoing surface oscillations in the bulk. The bubble dynamics observed in experiment demonstrated the same trend as the theoretical results.

  17. The Clinical Test of Nano gold Cosmetic for Recovering Skin Damage Due to Chemicals: Special Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufikurohmah, T.; Wardana, A. P.; Tjahjani, S.; Sanjaya, I. G. M.; Baktir, A.; Syahrani, A.

    2018-01-01

    Manufacturing of Nano gold cosmetics was done at PT. Gizi Indonesia. Clinical trials to cosmetics data supported that cosmetics are able to treat skin health which has been reported partially. For special cases, the recovery process of facial skin damage should also receive attention including cases of facial skin damage caused by chemicals such as phenol, HCl, aqua regia or other harsh chemicals. The problem determined whether the Nano gold is able to recover skin damage due to the harsh chemicals. This clinical trial data on the forms of early skin damage caused by phenol was delivered in the forms of facial photos patients. The recovery progress of facial skin condition was obtained every week for two months. The data included the forms of widespread wounds during the recovery process. This statement supported by anova statistical analysis of the widespread wound changing every week for 8 times. The conclusion is skin damage due to Phenol impregnation can be recovered with the use of Nano gold cosmetics for 8 weeks. This results support the manufacturing of Nano gold cosmetics for the needs of society. It also suggest that Nano gold material can be used for medicine manufacturing in the future.

  18. Chemical etching of GaAs with a novel low energy ion beam source: a low damage process for device fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, J.; Jackman, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    If the advantages of physics (anisotropy) can be combined with the advantages of chemistry (damage-free perturbation of the lattice) then an excellent, near damage-free, etching reaction can result. In this context, the promise for ultra-low energy ( -1 . The source does, however, give rise to a coating, derived from the source liner, which must be washed from all etched samples. The presence of such a coating is likely to be the origin of the slow etch rate achieved. After removal of the coating, smooth, mirror-like etched surfaces are apparent. These surfaces perform very well when Schottky diodes are constructed from them showing no deviation from the behaviour of control samples. (author)

  19. Characterization of thermomechanical damage on tungsten surfaces during long-duration plasma transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, David, E-mail: david.rivera.ucla@gmail.com; Crosby, Tamer; Sheng, Andrew; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2014-12-15

    A new experimental facility constructed at UCLA for the simulation of high heat flux effects on plasma-facing materials is described. The High Energy Flux Test Facility (HEFTY) is equipped with a Praxair model SG-100 plasma gun, which is nominally rated at 80 kW of continuous operation, of which approximately 30 kW reaches the target due to thermal losses. The gun is used to impart high intermittent heat flux to metal samples mounted within a cylindrical chamber. The system is capable of delivering an instantaneous heat flux in the range of 30–300 MW/m{sup 2}, depending on sample proximity to the gun. The duration of the plasma heat flux is in the range of 1–1000 s, making it ideal for studies of mild plasma transients of relatively long duration. Tungsten and tungsten-copper alloy metal samples are tested in these transient heat flux conditions, and the surface is characterized for damage evaluation using optical, SEM, XRD, and micro-fabrication techniques. Results from a Finite Element (FE) thermo-elastoplasticity model indicate that during the heat-up phase of a plasma transient pulse, the majority of the sample surface is under compressive stresses leading to plastic deformation of the surface. Upon sample cooling, the recovered elastic strain of cooler parts of the sample exceeds that from parts that deformed plastically, resulting in a tensile surface self-stress (residual surface stress). The intensity of the residual tensile surface stress is experimentally correlated with the onset of complex surface fracture morphology on the tungsten surface, and extending below the surface region. Micro-compression mechanical tests of W micro-pillars show that the material has significant plasticity, failing by a “barreling” mode before plasma exposure, and by normal dislocation slip and localized shear after plasma exposure. Ongoing modeling of the complex thermo-fracture process, coupled with elasto-plasticity is based on a phase field approach for distributed

  20. Effects of prior surface damage on high-temperature oxidation of Fe-, Ni-, and Co-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Lowe, Tracie M [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Multi-component metallic alloys have been developed to withstand high-temperature service in corrosive environments. Some of these applications, like exhaust valve seats in internal combustion engines, must also resist sliding, impact, and abrasion. The conjoint effects of temperature, oxidation, and mechanical contact can result in accelerated wear and the formation of complex surface layers whose properties differ from those of the base metal and the oxide scale that forms in the absence of mechanical contact. The authors have investigated the effects of prior surface damage, produced by scratch tests, on the localized reformation of oxide layers. Three high-performance commercial alloys, based on iron, nickel, and cobalt, were used as model materials. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine their static oxidation rates at elevated temperature (850o C). A micro-abrasion, ball-cratering technique was used to measure oxide layer thickness and to compare it with TGA results. By using taper-sectioning techniques and energy-dispersive elemental mapping, a comparison was made between oxide compositions grown on non-damaged surfaces and oxides that formed on grooves produced by a diamond stylus. Microindentation and scratch hardness data revealed the effects of high temperature exposure on both the substrate hardness and the nature of oxide scale disruption. There were significant differences in elemental distribution between statically-formed oxides and those that formed on scratched regions

  1. Widespread pain: is an improved classification possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, G J; Croft, P R; Schollum, J; Silman, A J

    1996-09-01

    The classification of widespread pain, proposed by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) for use in the clinic as a screen for fibromyalgia, as described, does not require truly widespread pain. Studies considering the epidemiology of widespread pain per se may therefore require a definition with greater face validity, which might also show enhanced associations with other physical and psychological measures. We aimed to develop a more coherent definition of widespread pain for use in epidemiological studies and to compare performance in identifying individuals with significant morbidity. A group of 172 subjects who had participated in a community based study on the occurrence of pain were identified and categorized by their pain experience as indicated on line drawings of the body according to ACR definition and to a new, more stringent definition that required the presence of more diffuse limb pain. A number of other clinical and psychological measures were recorded for these individuals and the association between their pain status measures and these other variables was assessed and compared. Persons satisfying the newly proposed definition for chronic widespread pain, in comparison with those who satisfied only the present ACR definition, had a significantly higher score on the General Health Questionnaire [median difference (MD) 7.95% CI 1.13], a higher score on the Health and Fatigue Questionnaire (MD 10.95% CI 0.15), and greater problems with sleep (sleep problem score MD 4.95% CI 0.9). Those satisfying the new definition also had a greater number of tender points on examination (MD 3.95% CI -1.7). The morbidity of those satisfying only the present ACR definition was closer to persons who had regional pain. A redefinition of widespread pain has produced a group of subjects whose pain is (a) likely to be more "widespread" and (b) is associated more strongly with factors such as psychological disturbance, fatigue, sleep problems, and tender points, and

  2. Nearly Perfect Durable Superhydrophobic Surfaces Fabricated by a Simple One-Step Plasma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jeongeun; Kim, Kiwoong; Park, JooYoung; Hwang, Bae Geun; Ko, YoungChul; Kim, HyunJoo; Han, JeongSu; Seo, EungRyeol; Park, YongJong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-05-16

    Fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces is an area of great interest because it can be applicable to various engineering fields. A simple, safe and inexpensive fabrication process is required to fabricate applicable superhydrophobic surfaces. In this study, we developed a facile fabrication method of nearly perfect superhydrophobic surfaces through plasma treatment with argon and oxygen gases. A polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sheet was selected as a substrate material. We optimized the fabrication parameters to produce superhydrophobic surfaces of superior performance using the Taguchi method. The contact angle of the pristine PTFE surface is approximately 111.0° ± 2.4°, with a sliding angle of 12.3° ± 6.4°. After the plasma treatment, nano-sized spherical tips, which looked like crown-structures, were created. This PTFE sheet exhibits the maximum contact angle of 178.9°, with a sliding angle less than 1°. As a result, this superhydrophobic surface requires a small external force to detach water droplets dripped on the surface. The contact angle of the fabricated superhydrophobic surface is almost retained, even after performing an air-aging test for 80 days and a droplet impacting test for 6 h. This fabrication method can provide superb superhydrophobic surface using simple one-step plasma etching.

  3. ASAM - The international programme on application of safety assessment methodologies for near surface radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, B.

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA has launched a new Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Application of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Waste Disposal Facilities (ASAM). The CRP will focus on the practical application of the safety assessment methodology, developed under the ISAM programme, for different purposes, such as developing design concepts, licensing, upgrading existing repositories, reassessment of operating disposal facilities. The overall aim of the programme is to assist safety assessors, regulators and other specialists involved in the development and review of safety assessment for near surface disposal facilities in order to achieve transparent, traceable and defendable evaluation of safety of these facilities. (author)

  4. Assessing soil water repellency of a sandy field with visible near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Masis Melendez, Federico; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2016-01-01

    . A lower prediction error of the WR model for soils dried at 105°C (1.93 mN m–1) than at 60°C (2.52 mN m–1) can be explained by a lower range of WR values for the soils dried at 105°C. Moreover, a higher temperature reduced the number of absorption bands related to OM, indicating a degradation......Soil water repellency (WR) is a widespread phenomenon caused by aggregated organic matter (OM) and layers of hydrophobic organic substances coating the surface of soil particles. These substances have a very low surface free energy, reducing a soil’s water attraction. There is focus on WR due...... to its effects on germination, root growth, liquid–vapour dynamics, surface erosion and leaching of chemicals through fingered flow paths. However, common techniques for measuring WR are time-consuming and expensive. Meanwhile, it is well established that visible near infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy...

  5. Enamel cracks evaluation - A method to predict tooth surface damage during the debonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbryte, Irma; Jonavicius, Tomas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Linkevicius, Tomas; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the enamel cracks on the tooth damage during the debonding. Measurements of the cracks characteristics (visibility, direction, length, and location) were performed utilizing a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique and mathematically derived formulas (x=h/30, l=n*x) before and following the removal of mechanically retained metal and ceramic brackets. The likelihood of having greater extent enamel defects was higher for the teeth with pronounced cracks (odds vatios, OR=3.728), increased when the crack was located in more than one zone of the tooth (OR=1.998), and the inclination did not exceed 30-45° (OR=0.505). Using ceramic brackets the risk of greater amount tooth structure defects raised 1.45 times (OR=1.450). Enamel crack showing all these characteristics at the beginning of the orthodontic treatment and the use of ceramic brackets might predispose to higher risk of greater extent tooth surface damage after the debonding by 20.4%.

  6. Personality disparity in chronic regional and widespread pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Chung; Chen, Po-Fei; Lung, For-Wey

    2017-08-01

    Chronic pain has high comorbidity with psychiatric disorders, therefore, better understanding of the relationship between chronic pain and mental illness is needed. This study aimed to investigate the pathway relationships among parental attachment, personality characteristics, alexithymic trait and mental health in patients with chronic widespread pain, those with chronic regional pain, and controls. Two hundred and thirty participants were recruited. The parental Bonding Inventory, Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), Chinese Health Questionnaire, and Short-Form 36 were filled out. The pathway relationships revealed that patients of mothers who were more protective were more neurotic, had more difficulty identifying feelings (DIF), worse mental health, and a higher association with chronic widespread pain. No differences were found between patients with chronic regional pain and the controls. The predisposing factors for chronic widespread pain, when compared with chronic regional pain, may be more closely related to psychiatric disorders. The pathways to chronic regional pain and chronic widespread pain differ, with neuroticism and the alexithymic DIF trait being the main factors defining chronic widespread pain. Therefore, besides therapies targeting pain symptoms, psychiatric consultation, medication and psychotherapy are also recommended for those with chronic widespread pain to alleviate their mental health conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Heater test planning for the Near Surface Test Facility at the Hanford reservation. Volume II. Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBois, A.; Binnall, E.; Chan, T.; McEvoy, M.; Nelson, P.; Remer, J.

    1979-04-01

    Volume II contains the following information: theoretical support for radioactive waste storage projects - development of data analysis methods and numerical models; injectivity temperature profiling as a means of permeability characterization; geophysical holes at the Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), Hanford; proposed geophysical and hydrological measurements at NSTF; suggestions for characterization of the discontinuity system at NSTF; monitoring rock property changes caused by radioactive waste storage using the electrical resistivity method; microseismic detection system for heated rock; Pasco Basin groundwater contamination study; a letter to Mark Board on Gable Mountain Faulting; report on hydrofracturing tests for in-situ stress measurement, NSTF, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation; and borehole instrumentation layout for Hanford Near Surface Test Facility

  8. Pre-treatment of bituminized NPP wastes for disposal in near-surface repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Clédola Cássia Oliveira de, E-mail: vanessamotavieira@gmail.com, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The implementation of the national repository is an important technical requirement, and a legal requirement for the entry into operation of the nuclear power plant Angra 3. The Brazilian repository is being planned to be a near-surface one. In Brazil the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes are immobilized using cement and bitumen for Angra 1 and Angra 2 NPP, respectively. The main problems due to the disposal of bituminized wastes in repositories are swelling of the waste products and their degradation in the long term. To accommodate the swelling of the bituminized wastes, the drums are filled up to 70 - 90% of their volume, which reduces the structural the repository stability and the disposal availability. Countries, which use bitumen in the solidification of NPP's radioactive waste and have near-surface repositories, need to immobilize this bituminized waste within other drums containing cement pastes or mortars to disposal them. This study aims to find solutions for the storage in surface repository of bituminized radioactive waste products, making them compatible with the acceptance criteria of cemented waste products. It was also performed a modeling with the results obtained in the leaching test using the ALT program and defined the transport model of the cesium leachate element and it was verified that in the early times the leaching was governed by the diffusion model and later by the partition model. The results obtained in this study can be used in the evaluation of performance of repositories. (author)

  9. Pre-treatment of bituminized NPP wastes for disposal in near-surface repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Vanessa Mota; Tello, Clédola Cássia Oliveira de

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of the national repository is an important technical requirement, and a legal requirement for the entry into operation of the nuclear power plant Angra 3. The Brazilian repository is being planned to be a near-surface one. In Brazil the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes are immobilized using cement and bitumen for Angra 1 and Angra 2 NPP, respectively. The main problems due to the disposal of bituminized wastes in repositories are swelling of the waste products and their degradation in the long term. To accommodate the swelling of the bituminized wastes, the drums are filled up to 70 - 90% of their volume, which reduces the structural the repository stability and the disposal availability. Countries, which use bitumen in the solidification of NPP's radioactive waste and have near-surface repositories, need to immobilize this bituminized waste within other drums containing cement pastes or mortars to disposal them. This study aims to find solutions for the storage in surface repository of bituminized radioactive waste products, making them compatible with the acceptance criteria of cemented waste products. It was also performed a modeling with the results obtained in the leaching test using the ALT program and defined the transport model of the cesium leachate element and it was verified that in the early times the leaching was governed by the diffusion model and later by the partition model. The results obtained in this study can be used in the evaluation of performance of repositories. (author)

  10. Time lag between the tropopause height and the levels of 7Be concentration in near surface air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, A.; Vasileiadis, A.; Melas, D.

    2012-04-01

    The concentration of 7Be at near surface air has been determined over 2009, a year of a deep solar minimum, in the region of Thessaloniki, Greece at 40°62' N, 22°95'E. In geomagnetic latitudes over 40° N, the elevation of the tropopause during the warm summer months and the vertical exchange of air masses within the troposphere cause greater mixture of the air masses resulting in higher concentration levels for 7Be in surface air. The positive correlation between the monthly activity concentration of 7Be and the tropopause height (0.94, p rate of vertical transport within the troposphere, especially during warmer summer months, has as a result the descent to surface of air masses enriched in 7Be. However, the 7Be concentration levels in near surface air are not expected to respond immediately to the change of elevation of the tropopause. It was found that there's a time lag of ~ 3 days between the change in the daily surface concentrations of 7Be the change in the elevation of the tropopause.

  11. Compression of laminated composite beams with initial damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Nicole L.; Gurdal, Zafer; Griffin, O. H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of isolated damage modes on the compressive strength and failure characteristics of laminated composite test specimens were evaluated experimentally and numerically. In addition to specimens without initial damage, specimens with three types of initial damage were considered: (1) specimens with short delaminations distributed evenly through the specimen thickness, (2) specimens with few long delaminations, and (3) specimens with local fiber damage in the surface plies under the three-point bend contact point. It was found that specimens with short multiple delamination experienced the greatest reduction in compression strength compared to the undamaged specimens. Single delaminations far from the specimen surface had little effect on the final compression strength, and moderate strength reduction was observed for specimens with localized surface ply damage.

  12. Relationship between Deck Level, Body Surface Temperature and Carcass Damages in Italian Heavy Pigs after Short Journeys at Different Unloading Environmental Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Agnese; Redaelli, Veronica; Luzi, Fabio; Dall'Olio, Stefania; Pace, Vincenzo; Nanni Costa, Leonardo

    2017-02-10

    In order to evaluate the relationships between deck level, body surface temperature and carcass damages after a short journey (30 min), 10 deliveries of Italian heavy pigs, including a total of 1400 animals from one farm, were examined. Within 5 min after the arrival at the abattoir, the vehicles were unloaded. Environmental temperature and relative humidity were recorded and a Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was calculated. After unloading, maximum temperatures of dorsal and ocular regions were measured by a thermal camera on groups of pigs from each of the unloaded decks. After dehairing, quarters and whole carcasses were evaluated subjectively by a trained operator for skin damage using a four-point scale. On the basis of THI at unloading, deliveries were grouped into three classes. Data of body surface temperature and skin damage score were analysed in a model including THI class, deck level and their interaction. Regardless of pig location in the truck, the maximum temperature of the dorsal and ocular regions increased with increasing THI class. Within each THI class, the highest and lowest body surface temperatures were found in pigs located on the middle and upper decks, respectively. Only THI class was found to affect the skin damage score ( p trucks, even at relatively low temperature and THI, in order to improve welfare and reduce loss of carcass value.

  13. Radiation damage in materials. Primary knock-on atom energy analyses of cascade damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimura, Naoto

    1995-01-01

    To understand cascade damage formation as a function of primary recoil energy, thin foils of gold were irradiated with 20 - 400 keV self-ions to 1.0 x 10 14 ions/m 2 at 300 K. Yield of groups of vacancy clusters saturated at ion energy higher than 100 keV. Number of clusters in a group had variation even from the same energy ions. Size distribution of the clusters was not strongly dependent on number of clusters in a group and ion energy. Density of vacancy clusters in a group formed near the specimen surface was calibrated to estimate vacancy cluster formation in neutron-irradiated material. A model was proposed to predict distribution of defect clusters in the irradiated materials based on a primary recoil spectrum. Examples of recomposed distribution of vacancy clusters in a group in irradiated gold were compared with the measured data. (author)

  14. Importance of 3D Processes Near the Ocean's Surface for Material Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    There are a number of practical problems that demand an accurate knowledge of ocean currents near the surface of the ocean. It is known that oceanic coherent features transport heat and carry out vertical exchange of biogeochemical tracers. Ocean currents can affect biological primary production, air-sea gas exchanges and global tracer budgets. Ocean currents are also important for the dispersion of substances that pose a danger to society, economy and human health. Examples of such events include algal blooms, the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011, and repeated large oil spills in the Gulf of Mexico, namely the IXTOC in 1978 and the Deepwater Horizon event in 2010. Such incidents demand accurate answers to questions such as ``where will the pollutant go?", ``how fast will it get there?" and ``how much pollutant will arrive there?", and in some instances ``where did the pollutant come from?". The answers to these questions are critical to the allocation of limited response resources, and in determining the overall impact of the events. We will summarize the efforts by the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE). One of the primary objectives of CARTHE is to improve predictive modeling capability for flows near the air-sea interface. In particular, two large experiments, Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) and Surf-zone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE), coordinated with real-time modeling were instructive on processes influencing near-surface material transport. Findings on submesoscale flows as well as model deficiencies to capture processes relevant to transport will be discussed. Insight into future modeling and observational plans will be provided.

  15. Study on the Fire Damage Characteristics of the New Qidaoliang Highway Tunnel: Field Investigation with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Back Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hongpeng; Wang, Shuyong; Xie, Yongli

    2016-10-15

    In the New Qidaoliang Tunnel (China), a rear-end collision of two tanker trunks caused a fire. To understand the damage characteristics of the tunnel lining structure, in situ investigation was performed. The results show that the fire in the tunnel induced spallation of tunnel lining concrete covering 856 m³; the length of road surface damage reached 650 m; the sectional area had a maximum 4% increase, and the mechanical and electrical facilities were severely damaged. The maximum area loss happened at the fire spot with maximum observed concrete spallation up to a thickness of 35.4 cm. The strength of vault and side wall concrete near the fire source was significantly reduced. The loss of concrete strength of the side wall near the inner surface of tunnel was larger than that near the surrounding rock. In order to perform back analysis of the effect of thermal load on lining structure, simplified numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was also performed, repeating the fire scenario. The simulated results showed that from the fire breaking out to the point of becoming steady, the tunnel experienced processes of small-scale warming, swirl around fire, backflow, and longitudinal turbulent flow. The influence range of the tunnel internal temperature on the longitudinal downstream was far greater than on the upstream, while the high temperature upstream and downstream of the transverse fire source mainly centered on the vault or the higher vault waist. The temperature of each part of the tunnel near the fire source had no obvious stratification phenomenon. The temperature of the vault lining upstream and downstream near the fire source was the highest. The numerical simulation is found to be in good agreement with the field observations.

  16. Near 7-day response of ocean bottom pressure to atmospheric surface pressure and winds in the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Zhao, Ruixiang

    2018-02-01

    Ocean bottom pressures, observed by five pressure-recording inverted echo sounders (PIESs) from October 2012 to July 2014, exhibit strong near 7-day variability in the northern South China Sea (SCS) where long-term in situ bottom pressure observations are quite sparse. This variability was strongest in October 2013 during the near two years observation period. By joint analysis with European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data, it is shown that the near 7-day ocean bottom pressure variability is closely related to the local atmospheric surface pressure and winds. Within a period band near 7 days, there are high coherences, exceeding 95% significance level, of observed ocean bottom pressure with local atmospheric surface pressure and with both zonal and meridional components of the wind. Ekman pumping/suction caused by the meridional component of the wind in particular, is suggested as one driving mechanism. A Kelvin wave response to the near 7-day oscillation would propagate down along the continental slope, observed at the Qui Nhon in the Vietnam. By multiple and partial coherence analyses, we find that local atmospheric surface pressure and Ekman pumping/suction show nearly equal influence on ocean bottom pressure variability at near 7-day periods. A schematic diagram representing an idealized model gives us a possible mechanism to explain the relationship between ocean bottom pressure and local atmospheric forcing at near 7-day periods in the northern SCS.

  17. Surface damage studies of ETFE polymer bombarded with low energy Si ions (≤100 keV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamisawa, Renato Amaral; Almeida, Adelaide De; Budak, Satilmis; Abidzina, Volha; Ila, Daryush

    2007-01-01

    Surface studies of ethylenetetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), bombarded with Si in a high-energy tandem Pelletron accelerator, have recently been reported. Si ion bombardment with a few MeV to a few hundred keV energies was shown to be sufficient to produce damage on ETFE film. We report here the use of a low energy implanter with Si ion energies lower than 100 keV, to induce changes on ETFE films. In order to determine the radiation damage, ETFE bombarded films were simulated with SRIM software and analyzed with optical absorption photometry (OAP), Raman and Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy to show quantitatively the physical and chemical property changes. Carbonization occurs following higher dose implantation, and hydroperoxides were formed following dehydroflorination of the polymer

  18. Sensitivity of Rayleigh wave ellipticity and implications for surface wave inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercato, Michele

    2018-04-01

    The use of Rayleigh wave ellipticity has gained increasing popularity in recent years for investigating earth structures, especially for near-surface soil characterization. In spite of its widespread application, the sensitivity of the ellipticity function to the soil structure has been rarely explored in a comprehensive and systematic manner. To this end, a new analytical method is presented for computing the sensitivity of Rayleigh wave ellipticity with respect to the structural parameters of a layered elastic half-space. This method takes advantage of the minor decomposition of the surface wave eigenproblem and is numerically stable at high frequency. This numerical procedure allowed to retrieve the sensitivity for typical near surface and crustal geological scenarios, pointing out the key parameters for ellipticity interpretation under different circumstances. On this basis, a thorough analysis is performed to assess how ellipticity data can efficiently complement surface wave dispersion information in a joint inversion algorithm. The results of synthetic and real-world examples are illustrated to analyse quantitatively the diagnostic potential of the ellipticity data with respect to the soil structure, focusing on the possible sources of misinterpretation in data inversion.

  19. Standard test method for damage to contacting solid surfaces under fretting conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the studying or ranking the susceptibility of candidate materials to fretting corrosion or fretting wear for the purposes of material selection for applications where fretting corrosion or fretting wear can limit serviceability. 1.2 This test method uses a tribological bench test apparatus with a mechanism or device that will produce the necessary relative motion between a contacting hemispherical rider and a flat counterface. The rider is pressed against the flat counterface with a loading mass. The test method is intended for use in room temperature air, but future editions could include fretting in the presence of lubricants or other environments. 1.3 The purpose of this test method is to rub two solid surfaces together under controlled fretting conditions and to quantify the damage to both surfaces in units of volume loss for the test method. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5...

  20. Development of damage probability matrices based on Greek earthquake damage data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadou, Anastasia K.; Karabinis, Athanasios I.

    2011-03-01

    A comprehensive study is presented for empirical seismic vulnerability assessment of typical structural types, representative of the building stock of Southern Europe, based on a large set of damage statistics. The observational database was obtained from post-earthquake surveys carried out in the area struck by the September 7, 1999 Athens earthquake. After analysis of the collected observational data, a unified damage database has been created which comprises 180,945 damaged buildings from/after the near-field area of the earthquake. The damaged buildings are classified in specific structural types, according to the materials, seismic codes and construction techniques in Southern Europe. The seismic demand is described in terms of both the regional macroseismic intensity and the ratio α g/ a o, where α g is the maximum peak ground acceleration (PGA) of the earthquake event and a o is the unique value PGA that characterizes each municipality shown on the Greek hazard map. The relative and cumulative frequencies of the different damage states for each structural type and each intensity level are computed in terms of damage ratio. Damage probability matrices (DPMs) and vulnerability curves are obtained for specific structural types. A comparison analysis is fulfilled between the produced and the existing vulnerability models.

  1. Modeling of Ground Deformation and Shallow Surface Waves Generated by Martian Dust Devils and Perspectives for Near-Surface Structure Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenda, Balthasar; Lognonné, Philippe; Spiga, Aymeric; Kawamura, Taichi; Kedar, Sharon; Banerdt, William Bruce; Lorenz, Ralph; Banfield, Don; Golombek, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the possible seismic signatures of dust devils on Mars, both at long and short period, based on the analysis of Earth data and on forward modeling for Mars. Seismic and meteorological data collected in the Mojave Desert, California, recorded the signals generated by dust devils. In the 10-100 s band, the quasi-static surface deformation triggered by pressure fluctuations resulted in detectable ground-tilt effects: these are in good agreement with our modeling based on Sorrells' theory. In addition, high-frequency records also exhibit a significant excitation in correspondence to dust devil episodes. Besides wind noise, this signal includes shallow surface waves due to the atmosphere-surface coupling and is used for a preliminary inversion of the near-surface S-wave profile down to 50 m depth. In the case of Mars, we modeled the long-period signals generated by the pressure field resulting from turbulence-resolving Large-Eddy Simulations. For typical dust-devil-like vortices with pressure drops of a couple Pascals, the corresponding horizontal acceleration is of a few nm/s2 for rocky subsurface models and reaches 10-20 nm/s2 for weak regolith models. In both cases, this signal can be detected by the Very-Broad Band seismometers of the InSight/SEIS experiment up to a distance of a few hundred meters from the vortex, the amplitude of the signal decreasing as the inverse of the distance. Atmospheric vortices are thus expected to be detected at the InSight landing site; the analysis of their seismic and atmospheric signals could lead to additional constraints on the near-surface structure, more precisely on the ground compliance and possibly on the seismic velocities.

  2. Near-surface energy transfers from internal tide beams to smaller vertical scale motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, S.; Staquet, C.; Carter, G. S.; Luther, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical energy capable of causing diapycnal mixing in the ocean is transferred to the internal wave field when barotropic tides pass over underwater topography and generate internal tides. The resulting internal tide energy is confined in vertically limited structures, or beams. As internal tide beams (ITBs) propagate through regions of non-uniform stratification in the upper ocean, wave energy can be scattered through multiple reflections and refractions, be vertically trapped, or transferred to non-tidal frequencies through different nonlinear processes. Various observations have shown that ITBs are no longer detectable in horizontal kinetic energy beyond the first surface reflection. Importantly, this implies that some of the internal tide energy no longer propagates in to the abyssal ocean and consequently will not be available to maintain the density stratification. Using the NHM, a nonlinear and nonhydrostatic model based on the MITgcm, simulations of an ITB propagating up to the sea surface are examined in order to quantify the transformation of ITB energy to other motions. We compare and contrast the transformations enabled by idealized, smoothly-varying stratification with transformations enabled by realistic stratification containing a broad-band vertical wavenumber spectrum of variations. Preliminary two-dimensional results show that scattering due to small-scale structure in realistic stratification profiles from Hawaii can lead to energy being vertically trapped near the surface. Idealized simulations of "locally" generated internal solitary waves are analyzed in terms of energy flux transfers from the ITB to solitary waves, higher harmonics, and mean flow. The amount of internal tide energy which propagates back down after near-surface reflection of the ITB in different environments is quantified.

  3. Timing fire to minimize damage in managing oak ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel C. Dey; Callie Jo Schweitzer

    2015-01-01

    The long history of fire in North America spans millennia and is recognized as an important driver in the widespread and long-term dominance of oak species. Early European settlers intensified the occurrence of fire from about 1850 to 1950, with dates varying by region. This resulted in much forest damage and gained fire a negative reputation. The lack of fire for the...

  4. Geometry and surface damage in micro electrical discharge machining of micro-holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Bülent; Sayar, Atakan; Tecelli Öpöz, Tahsin; Erden, Abdulkadir

    2009-10-01

    Geometry and subsurface damage of blind micro-holes produced by micro electrical discharge machining (micro-EDM) is investigated experimentally to explore the relational dependence with respect to pulse energy. For this purpose, micro-holes are machined with various pulse energies on plastic mold steel samples using a tungsten carbide tool electrode and a hydrocarbon-based dielectric liquid. Variations in the micro-hole geometry, micro-hole depth and over-cut in micro-hole diameter are measured. Then, unconventional etching agents are applied on the cross sections to examine micro structural alterations within the substrate. It is observed that the heat-damaged segment is composed of three distinctive layers, which have relatively high thicknesses and vary noticeably with respect to the drilling depth. Crack formation is identified on some sections of the micro-holes even by utilizing low pulse energies during machining. It is concluded that the cracking mechanism is different from cracks encountered on the surfaces when machining is performed by using the conventional EDM process. Moreover, an electrically conductive bridge between work material and debris particles is possible at the end tip during machining which leads to electric discharges between the piled segments of debris particles and the tool electrode during discharging.

  5. Geometry and surface damage in micro electrical discharge machining of micro-holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekmekci, Bülent; Sayar, Atakan; Öpöz, Tahsin Tecelli; Erden, Abdulkadir

    2009-01-01

    Geometry and subsurface damage of blind micro-holes produced by micro electrical discharge machining (micro-EDM) is investigated experimentally to explore the relational dependence with respect to pulse energy. For this purpose, micro-holes are machined with various pulse energies on plastic mold steel samples using a tungsten carbide tool electrode and a hydrocarbon-based dielectric liquid. Variations in the micro-hole geometry, micro-hole depth and over-cut in micro-hole diameter are measured. Then, unconventional etching agents are applied on the cross sections to examine micro structural alterations within the substrate. It is observed that the heat-damaged segment is composed of three distinctive layers, which have relatively high thicknesses and vary noticeably with respect to the drilling depth. Crack formation is identified on some sections of the micro-holes even by utilizing low pulse energies during machining. It is concluded that the cracking mechanism is different from cracks encountered on the surfaces when machining is performed by using the conventional EDM process. Moreover, an electrically conductive bridge between work material and debris particles is possible at the end tip during machining which leads to electric discharges between the piled segments of debris particles and the tool electrode during discharging

  6. Near-field observation of spatial phase shifts associated with Goos-Hänschen and surface plasmon resonance effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2008-01-01

    We report the near-field observation of the phase shifts associated with total internal reflection on a glass-air interface and surface plasmon resonance on a glass-gold-air system. The phase of the evanescent waves on glass and gold surfaces, as a function of incident angle, is measured using a

  7. Erosion and foreign object damage of thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.R.; Jaslier, Y.; Rickerby, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating technology is used in the hot sections of gas turbines to extend component life. To maximise these benefits, the thermal barrier coating has to remain intact throughout the life of the turbine. High velocity ballistic damage can lead to total thermal barrier removal, while erosion may lead to progressive loss of thickness during operation. This paper particularly addresses the erosion resistance and resistance to foreign object damage of thermal barrier coatings. It was found that EB-PVD thermal barriers are significantly more erosion resistant when impacted with alumina or silica, than the equivalent plasma spray coating, both at room temperature and 910 C. Examination of tested hardware, reveals that cracking occurs within the near surface region of the columns for EB-PVD ceramic and that erosion occurs by removal of these small blocks of material. In stark contrast, removal of material for plasma sprayed ceramic occurs through poorly bonded splat boundaries. Large particle impact results in severe damage to the EB-PVD thermal barrier, with cracks penetrating through the ceramic coating to the ceramic/bond coat interface. Material removal, per particle impact, increases with increased particle size. (orig.)

  8. Spontaneous and Widespread Electricity Generation in Natural Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Kasaya, Takafumi; Kumagai, Hidenori; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Takai, Ken

    2017-05-15

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents discharge abundant reductive energy into oxidative seawater. Herein, we demonstrated that in situ measurements of redox potentials on the surfaces of active hydrothermal mineral deposits were more negative than the surrounding seawater potential, driving electrical current generation. We also demonstrated that negative potentials in the surface of minerals were widespread in the hydrothermal fields, regardless of the proximity to hydrothermal fluid discharges. Lab experiments verified that the negative potential of the mineral surface was induced by a distant electron transfer from the hydrothermal fluid through the metallic and catalytic properties of minerals. These results indicate that electric current is spontaneously and widely generated in natural mineral deposits in deep-sea hydrothermal fields. Our discovery provides important insights into the microbial communities that are supported by extracellular electron transfer and the prebiotic chemical and metabolic evolution of the ocean hydrothermal systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Surface modification study of borate materials from B K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasrai, Masoud; Fleet, Michael E.; Muthupari, Swaminathan; Li, D.; Bancroft, G. M.

    The B K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of two borates with tetrahedrally-coordinated B [[4]B; natural danburite (CaB2Si2O8) and synthetic boron phosphate (BPO4)] have been recorded in total electron yield (TEY) and fluorescence yield (FY) modes to investigate the surface and bulk structure of these materials. The TEY XANES measurement shows that danburite is susceptible to surface damage involving conversion of [4]B sites to [3]B sites by reaction with moisture and/or mechanical abrasion (grinding, polishing, etc.). The bulk of the mineral is essentially unaffected. Commercial boron phosphate powder exhibits more extensive surface and bulk damage, which increases with air exposure but is recovered on heating at 650°C. In contrast to ELNES, the XANES technique is not affected by beam damage and when collected in the FY mode is capable of yielding meaningful information on the coordination and intermediate-range structure of B in borate and borosilicate materials.

  10. Effects of Surface Roughness and Mechanical Properties of Cover-Layer on Near-Field Optical Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hong; Lee, Jun-Seok; Lim, Jungshik; Seo, Jung-Kyo

    2009-03-01

    Narrow gap distance in cover-layer incident near-field recording (NFR) configuration causes a collision problem in the interface between a solid immersion lens and a disk surface. A polymer cover-layer with smooth surface results in a stable gap servo while a nanocomposite cover-layer with high refractive index shows a collision problem during the gap servo test. Even though a dielectric cover-layer, in which the surface is rougher than the polymer, supplements the mechanical properties, an unclear eye pattern due to an unstable gap servo can be obtained after a chemical mechanical polishing. Not only smooth surface but also good mechanical properties of cover-layer are required for the stable gap servo in the NFR.

  11. Seasonal cyclogenesis and the role of near-surface stratified layer in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, M.S.S.; Tilvi, V.

    The role of the near-surface stratified layer developed due to the spread of low salinity waters under the influence of freshwater influx on the cyclogenesis over the Bay of Bengal is addressed. The seasonal variation of the Effective Oceanic Layer...

  12. Catalytic Micromotors Moving Near Polyelectrolyte-Modified Substrates: The Roles of Surface Charges, Morphology, and Released Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mengshi; Zhou, Chao; Tang, Jinyao; Wang, Wei

    2018-01-24

    Synthetic microswimmers, or micromotors, are finding potential uses in a wide range of applications, most of which involve boundaries. However, subtle yet important effects beyond physical confinement on the motor dynamics remain less understood. In this letter, glass substrates were functionalized with positively and negatively charged polyelectrolytes, and the dynamics of micromotors moving close to the modified surfaces was examined. Using acoustic levitation and numerical simulation, we reveal how the speed of a chemically propelled micromotor slows down significantly near a polyelectrolyte-modified surface by the combined effects of surface charges, surface morphology, and ions released from the films.

  13. Red-Shift Effects in Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Spectral or Intensity Dependence of the Near-Field?

    KAUST Repository

    Colas, Florent; Cottat, Maximilien; Gillibert, Raymond; Guillot, Nicolas; Djaker, Nadia; Lidgi-Guigui, Nathalie; Toury, Timothé e; Barchiesi, Dominique; Toma, Andrea; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Gucciardi, Pietro Giuseppe; de la Chapelle, Marc Lamy

    2016-01-01

    Optimum amplification in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) from individual nanoantennas is expected when the excitation is slightly blue-shifted with respect to the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR), so that the LSPR peak falls in the middle between the laser and the Stokes Raman emission. Recent experiments have shown when moving the excitation from the visible to the near-infrared that this rule of thumb is no more valid. The excitation has to be red-shifted with respect to the LSPR peak, up to 80nm, to obtain highest SERS. Such discrepancy is usually attributed to a Near-Field (NF) to Far-Field (FF) spectral shift. Here we critically discuss this hypothesis for the case of gold nanocylinders. By combining multi-wavelength excitation SERS experiments with numerical calculations, we show that the red-shift of the excitation energy does not originate from a spectral shift between the extinction (FF) and the near-field distribution (NF), which is found to be not larger than 10nm. Rather, it can be accounted for by looking at the peculiar spectral dependence of the near-field intensity on the cylinders diameter, characterized by an initial increase, up to 180nm diameter, followed by a decrease and a pronounced skewness.

  14. Red-Shift Effects in Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Spectral or Intensity Dependence of the Near-Field?

    KAUST Repository

    Colas, Florent

    2016-06-06

    Optimum amplification in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) from individual nanoantennas is expected when the excitation is slightly blue-shifted with respect to the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR), so that the LSPR peak falls in the middle between the laser and the Stokes Raman emission. Recent experiments have shown when moving the excitation from the visible to the near-infrared that this rule of thumb is no more valid. The excitation has to be red-shifted with respect to the LSPR peak, up to 80nm, to obtain highest SERS. Such discrepancy is usually attributed to a Near-Field (NF) to Far-Field (FF) spectral shift. Here we critically discuss this hypothesis for the case of gold nanocylinders. By combining multi-wavelength excitation SERS experiments with numerical calculations, we show that the red-shift of the excitation energy does not originate from a spectral shift between the extinction (FF) and the near-field distribution (NF), which is found to be not larger than 10nm. Rather, it can be accounted for by looking at the peculiar spectral dependence of the near-field intensity on the cylinders diameter, characterized by an initial increase, up to 180nm diameter, followed by a decrease and a pronounced skewness.

  15. Ground penetrating radar documents short-term near-surface hydrological changes around Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne, Bridget Y.; Heasler, Henry; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Smith, Gary J.; Smith, Isaac J.; Foley, Duncan

    2018-04-01

    In April 2015, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was used to characterize the shallow subsurface (images were collected between two eruptions of Old Faithful Geyser. Each set of time-sequence GPR recordings consisted of four transects aligned to provide coverage near the potential location of the inferred 15 m deep geyser chamber. However, the deepest penetration we could achieve with a 200 MHz GPR antennae was 5 m. Seven time-sequence events were collected over a 48-minute interval to image changes in the near-surface, during pre- and post-eruptive cycles. Time-sequence GPR images revealed a series of possible micro-fractures in a highly porous siliceous sinter in the near-surface that fill and drain repetitively, immediately after an eruption and during the recharge period prior to the next main eruptive event.

  16. Zero-phonon lines and electron–phonon interaction characteristics of near-surface layer radiation color centers in lithium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voitovich, A.P., E-mail: voitovich@ifanbel.bas-net.by [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 68 Nezavisimosti Avenue, 220072 Minsk (Belarus); Kalinov, V.S. [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 68 Nezavisimosti Avenue, 220072 Minsk (Belarus); Mudryi, A.V. [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Center, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 19 Brovka Street, 220072 Minsk (Belarus); Pavlovskii, V.N.; Runets, L.P.; Svitsiankou, I.E. [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 68 Nezavisimosti Avenue, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2016-04-15

    Zero-phonon lines have been registered in photoluminescence spectra of near-surface layer radiation color centers in lithium fluoride nanocrystals. They have been assigned to transitions of the definite types centers. The frequencies of phonons participating in the transitions of the different type centers located both in the near-surface layer and in the crystal bulk have been measured and compared. The Huang-Rhys parameters for the transitions of these centers have been determined. It has been found that the Huang-Rhys parameters for the studied transitions in the near-surface layer centers of the certain composition are less than for those in the crystal bulk centers of the same composition. This feature is connected with the difference of the electron density distribution in defects. Temperature dependences of the zero-phonon lines widths and shifts have been measured. It has been determined that both widths and shifts grow faster with the increase of a temperature for the defects transitions with the lesser Huang-Rhys parameters. Phonons lifetimes are estimated from the experimental data.

  17. Zero-phonon lines and electron–phonon interaction characteristics of near-surface layer radiation color centers in lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitovich, A.P.; Kalinov, V.S.; Mudryi, A.V.; Pavlovskii, V.N.; Runets, L.P.; Svitsiankou, I.E.

    2016-01-01

    Zero-phonon lines have been registered in photoluminescence spectra of near-surface layer radiation color centers in lithium fluoride nanocrystals. They have been assigned to transitions of the definite types centers. The frequencies of phonons participating in the transitions of the different type centers located both in the near-surface layer and in the crystal bulk have been measured and compared. The Huang-Rhys parameters for the transitions of these centers have been determined. It has been found that the Huang-Rhys parameters for the studied transitions in the near-surface layer centers of the certain composition are less than for those in the crystal bulk centers of the same composition. This feature is connected with the difference of the electron density distribution in defects. Temperature dependences of the zero-phonon lines widths and shifts have been measured. It has been determined that both widths and shifts grow faster with the increase of a temperature for the defects transitions with the lesser Huang-Rhys parameters. Phonons lifetimes are estimated from the experimental data.

  18. Surface-Exposed Lipoproteins: An Emerging Secretion Phenomenon in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marlena M; Bernstein, Harris D

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are hydrophilic proteins that are anchored to a cell membrane by N-terminally linked fatty acids. It is widely believed that nearly all lipoproteins produced by Gram-negative bacteria are either retained in the inner membrane (IM) or transferred to the inner leaflet of the outer membrane (OM). Lipoproteins that are exposed on the cell surface have also been reported but are generally considered to be rare. Results from a variety of recent studies, however, now suggest that the prevalence of surface-exposed lipoproteins has been underestimated. In this review we describe the evidence that the surface exposure of lipoproteins in Gram-negative bacteria is a widespread phenomenon and discuss possible mechanisms by which these proteins might be transported across the OM. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m 3 ) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time

  20. AFM assessment of the surface nano/microstructure on chemically damaged historical and model glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Noemi; Kowal, Andrzej; Rincon, Jesus-Maria; Villegas, Maria-Angeles

    2010-01-01

    Surface chemical damage on selected historical glasses from 13th to 19th centuries was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nano- and microstructure, roughness and topography of ancient glass samples have been compared with those of model glasses prepared by conventional melting at the laboratory with similar compositions to those most frequently found in historical glass pieces. The results obtained allow discussing the chemical degradation mechanisms in terms of the acid and/or basic chemical attack carried out by the combination of gaseous pollutants and environmental humidity. Even though deep corrosion features escape to the observation order of magnitude of the AF microscope used, the AFM technique proves to be quite useful for the study and evaluation of the most common surface pathologies of historical glasses with different compositions once submitted to natural weathering.

  1. AFM assessment of the surface nano/microstructure on chemically damaged historical and model glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Noemi [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kowal, Andrzej [Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, PAN, ul. Niezapominajek 8, 30239 Cracow (Poland); Rincon, Jesus-Maria [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion, CSIC, C. Serrano Galvache s/n, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Villegas, Maria-Angeles, E-mail: mariangeles.villegas@cchs.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C. Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Surface chemical damage on selected historical glasses from 13th to 19th centuries was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nano- and microstructure, roughness and topography of ancient glass samples have been compared with those of model glasses prepared by conventional melting at the laboratory with similar compositions to those most frequently found in historical glass pieces. The results obtained allow discussing the chemical degradation mechanisms in terms of the acid and/or basic chemical attack carried out by the combination of gaseous pollutants and environmental humidity. Even though deep corrosion features escape to the observation order of magnitude of the AF microscope used, the AFM technique proves to be quite useful for the study and evaluation of the most common surface pathologies of historical glasses with different compositions once submitted to natural weathering.

  2. Detection of tundra trail damage near Barrow, Alaska using remote imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Eisner, W. R.; Kim, C. J.

    2017-09-01

    In the past several decades, the use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) has proliferated in many Arctic communities in North America. One example is the village of Barrow, Alaska. This coastal community has only local roads, so all access to the interior utilizes off-road machines. These 4-wheel vehicles are the primary means of tundra traverse and transport in summer by hunters and berry-pickers, and by village residents accessing summer camps. Traveling cross-country is difficult due to the large number of thermokarst lakes, wetlands, and streams, and tundra trails tend to follow dryer higher ground while avoiding areas of high microrelief such as high-centered ice-wedge polygons. Thus, modern ATV trails tend to follow the margins of drained or partially drained thermokarst lake basins where it is flat and relatively dry, and these trails are heavily used. The deeply-ribbed tires of the heavy and powerful ATVs cause damage by destroying the vegetation and disturbing the underlying organic soil. Exposure of the dark soil enhances summer thaw and leads to local thermokarst of the ice-rich upper permafrost. The damage increases over time as vehicles continue to follow the same track, and sections eventually become unusable; this is especially true where the trail crosses ice-wedge troughs. Deep subsidence in the ponded troughs results in ATV users veering to avoid the wettest area, which leads to a widening of the damaged area. Helicopter surveys, site visits, and collection of ground penetrating radar data were combined with time series analysis of high-resolution aerial and satellite imagery for the period 1955-2014. The analysis reveals that there are 507 km of off-road trails on the Barrow Peninsula. About 50% of the total trail length was developed before 1955 in association with resource extraction, and an additional 40% were formed between 1979 and 2005 by ATVs. Segments of the more modern trail are up to 100 m wide. Damage to the tundra is especially pronounced

  3. Characterization of power induced heating and damage in fiber optic probes for near-field scanning optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Erickson, Elizabeth S.; Mooren, Olivia L.; Dunn, Robert C.

    2007-05-01

    Tip-induced sample heating in near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is studied for fiber optic probes fabricated using the chemical etching technique. To characterize sample heating from etched NSOM probes, the spectra of a thermochromic polymer sample are measured as a function of probe output power, as was previously reported for pulled NSOM probes. The results reveal that sample heating increases rapidly to ˜55-60°C as output powers reach ˜50nW. At higher output powers, the sample heating remains approximately constant up to the maximum power studied of ˜450nW. The sample heating profiles measured for etched NSOM probes are consistent with those previously measured for NSOM probes fabricated using the pulling method. At high powers, both pulled and etched NSOM probes fail as the aluminum coating is damaged. For probes fabricated in our laboratory we find failure occurring at input powers of 3.4±1.7 and 20.7±6.9mW for pulled and etched probes, respectively. The larger half-cone angle for etched probes (˜15° for etched and ˜6° for pulled probes) enables more light delivery and also apparently leads to a different failure mechanism. For pulled NSOM probes, high resolution images of NSOM probes as power is increased reveal the development of stress fractures in the coating at a taper diameter of ˜6μm. These stress fractures, arising from the differential heating expansion of the dielectric and the metal coating, eventually lead to coating removal and probe failure. For etched tips, the absence of clear stress fractures and the pooled morphology of the damaged aluminum coating following failure suggest that thermal damage may cause coating failure, although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out.

  4. Increased dose near the skin due to electromagnetic surface beacon transponder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Manger, Ryan; Halpern, Howard J; Aydogan, Bulent

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the increased dose near the skin from an electromagnetic surface beacon transponder, which is used for localization and tracking organ motion. The bolus effect due to the copper coil surface beacon was evaluated with radiographic film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Various beam incidence angles were evaluated for both 6 MV and 18 MV experimentally. We performed simulations using a general-purpose Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle) to supplement the experimental data. We modeled the surface beacon geometry using the actual mass of the glass vial and copper coil placed in its L-shaped polyethylene terephthalate tubing casing. Film dosimetry measured factors of 2.2 and 3.0 enhancement in the surface dose for normally incident 6 MV and 18 MV beams, respectively. Although surface dose further increased with incidence angle, the relative contribution from the bolus effect was reduced at the oblique incidence. The enhancement factors were 1.5 and 1.8 for 6 MV and 18 MV, respectively, at an incidence angle of 60°. Monte Carlo simulation confirmed the experimental results and indicated that the epidermal skin dose can reach approximately 50% of the dose at dmax at normal incidence. The overall effect could be acceptable considering the skin dose enhancement is confined to a small area (~ 1 cm2), and can be further reduced by using an opposite beam technique. Further clinical studies are justified in order to study the dosimetric benefit versus possible cosmetic effects of the surface beacon. One such clinical situation would be intact breast radiation therapy, especially large-breasted women.

  5. Near-UV Transmittance of Basalt Dust as an Analog of the Martian Regolith: Implications for Sensor Calibration and Astrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Martínez-Frías

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The Martian regolith is exposed to solar irradiation in the near-UV (200-390 nm.Basalt is one of the main components of the dust on Mars surface. The near-UV irradiationof basalt dust on Mars is simulated experimentally in order to determine the transmittance asa function of the mass and thickness of the dust. This data can serve to quantify theabsorption of dust deposited on sensors aiming to measure the UV intensity on Marssurface. The minimum thickness of the dust that corresponds to near-zero-transmittance inthe near-UV is measured. Hypothetical Martian microorganisms living on the dusty regolithat deeper layers would be preserved from the damaging solar UV irradiation.

  6. Sensitivity analysis and development of calibration methodology for near-surface hydrogeology model of Forsmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneljung, Maria; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran

    2007-04-01

    The hydrological modelling system MIKE SHE has been used to describe near-surface groundwater flow, transport mechanisms and the contact between ground- and surface water at the Forsmark site. The surface water system at Forsmark is described with the 1D modelling tool MIKE 11, which is fully and dynamically integrated with MIKE SHE. In spring 2007, a new data freeze will be available and a process of updating, rebuilding and calibrating the MIKE SHE model will start, based on the latest data set. Prior to this, it is important to gather as much knowledge as possible on calibration methods and to define critical calibration parameters and areas within the model. In this project, an optimization of the numerical description and an initial calibration of the MIKE SHE model has been made, and an updated base case has been defined. Data from 5 surface water level monitoring stations, 4 surface water discharge monitoring stations and 32 groundwater level monitoring stations (SFM soil boreholes) has been used for model calibration and evaluation. The base case simulations generally show a good agreement between calculated and measured water levels and discharges, indicating that the total runoff from the area is well described by the model. Moreover, with two exceptions (SFM0012 and SFM0022) the base case results show very good agreement between calculated and measured groundwater head elevations for boreholes installed below lakes. The model also shows a reasonably good agreement between calculated and measured groundwater head elevations or depths to phreatic surfaces in many other points. The following major types of calculation-measurement differences can be noted: Differences in groundwater level amplitudes due to transpiration processes. Differences in absolute mean groundwater head, due to differences between borehole casing levels and the interpolated DEM. Differences in absolute mean head elevations, due to local errors in hydraulic conductivity values

  7. Sensitivity analysis and development of calibration methodology for near-surface hydrogeology model of Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aneljung, Maria; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran [DHI Water and Environment AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2007-04-15

    The hydrological modelling system MIKE SHE has been used to describe near-surface groundwater flow, transport mechanisms and the contact between ground- and surface water at the Forsmark site. The surface water system at Forsmark is described with the 1D modelling tool MIKE 11, which is fully and dynamically integrated with MIKE SHE. In spring 2007, a new data freeze will be available and a process of updating, rebuilding and calibrating the MIKE SHE model will start, based on the latest data set. Prior to this, it is important to gather as much knowledge as possible on calibration methods and to define critical calibration parameters and areas within the model. In this project, an optimization of the numerical description and an initial calibration of the MIKE SHE model has been made, and an updated base case has been defined. Data from 5 surface water level monitoring stations, 4 surface water discharge monitoring stations and 32 groundwater level monitoring stations (SFM soil boreholes) has been used for model calibration and evaluation. The base case simulations generally show a good agreement between calculated and measured water levels and discharges, indicating that the total runoff from the area is well described by the model. Moreover, with two exceptions (SFM0012 and SFM0022) the base case results show very good agreement between calculated and measured groundwater head elevations for boreholes installed below lakes. The model also shows a reasonably good agreement between calculated and measured groundwater head elevations or depths to phreatic surfaces in many other points. The following major types of calculation-measurement differences can be noted: Differences in groundwater level amplitudes due to transpiration processes. Differences in absolute mean groundwater head, due to differences between borehole casing levels and the interpolated DEM. Differences in absolute mean head elevations, due to local errors in hydraulic conductivity values

  8. U-tube based near-surface environmental monitoring in the Shenhua carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Song, Ranran; Shi, Hui; Ma, Jianli; Liu, Xuehao; Li, Xiaochun

    2018-04-01

    The CO 2 injected into deep formations during implementation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage (CCS) technology may leak and migrate into shallow aquifers or ground surfaces through a variety of pathways over a long period. The leaked CO 2 can threaten shallow environments as well as human health. Therefore, almost all monitoring programs for CCS projects around the world contain near-surface monitoring. This paper presents a U-tube based near-surface monitoring technology focusing on its first application in the Shenhua CCS demonstration project, located in the Ordos Basin, Inner Mongolia, China. First, background information on the site monitoring program of the Shenhua CCS demonstration project was provided. Then, the principle of fluid sampling and the monitoring methods were summarized for the U-tube sampler system, and the monitoring data were analyzed in detail. The U-tube based monitoring results showed that the U-tube sampler system is accurate, flexible, and representative of the subsurface fluid sampling process. The monitoring indicators for the subsurface water and soil gas at the Shenhua CCS site indicate good stratification characteristics. The concentration level of each monitoring indicator decreases with increasing depth. Finally, the significance of this near-surface environmental monitoring technology for CO 2 leakage assessments was preliminarily confirmed at the Shenhua CCS site. The application potential of the U-tube based monitoring technology was also demonstrated during the subsurface environmental monitoring of other CCS projects.

  9. 3D Dynamics of the Near-Surface Layer of the Ocean in the Presence of Freshwater Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, C.; Soloviev, A.

    2015-12-01

    Freshwater inflow due to convective rains or river runoff produces lenses of freshened water in the near surface layer of the ocean. These lenses are localized in space and typically involve both salinity and temperature anomalies. Due to significant density anomalies, strong pressure gradients develop, which result in lateral spreading of freshwater lenses in a form resembling gravity currents. Gravity currents inherently involve three-dimensional dynamics. The gravity current head can include the Kelvin-Helmholtz billows with vertical density inversions. In this work, we have conducted a series of numerical experiments using computational fluid dynamics tools. These numerical simulations were designed to elucidate the relationship between vertical mixing and horizontal advection of salinity under various environmental conditions and potential impact on the pollution transport including oil spills. The near-surface data from the field experiments in the Gulf of Mexico during the SCOPE experiment were available for validation of numerical simulations. In particular, we observed a freshwater layer within a few-meter depth range and, in some cases, a density inversion at the edge of the freshwater lens, which is consistent with the results of numerical simulations. In conclusion, we discuss applicability of these results to the interpretation of Aquarius and SMOS sea surface salinity satellite measurements. The results of this study indicate that 3D dynamics of the near-surface layer of the ocean are essential in the presence of freshwater inflow.

  10. Formation of plasma induced surface damage in silica glass etching for optical waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, D.Y.; Lee, J.H.; Kim, D.S.; Jung, S.T.

    2004-01-01

    Ge, B, P-doped silica glass films are widely used as optical waveguides because of their low losses and inherent compatibility with silica optical fibers. These films were etched by ICP (inductively coupled plasma) with chrome etch masks, which were patterned by reactive ion etching (RIE) using chlorine-based gases. In some cases, the etched surfaces of silica glass were very rough (root-mean square roughness greater than 100 nm) and we call this phenomenon plasma induced surface damage (PISD). Rough surface cannot be used as a platform for hybrid integration because of difficulty in alignment and bonding of active devices. PISD reduces the etch rate of glass and it is very difficult to remove residues on a rough surface. The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of PISD formation. To achieve this goal, PISD formation during different etching conditions of chrome etch mask and silica glass was investigated. In most cases, PISD sources are formed on a glass surface after chrome etching, and metal compounds are identified in theses sources. Water rinse after chrome etching reduces the PISD, due to the water solubility of metal chlorides. PISD is decreased or even disappeared at high power and/or low pressure in glass etching, even if PISD sources were present on the glass surface before etching. In conclusion, PISD sources come from the chrome etching process, and polymer deposition on these sources during the silica etching cause the PISD sources to grow. In the area close to the PISD source there is a higher ion flux, which causes an increase in the etch rate, and results in the formation of a pit

  11. Detection of sunn pest-damaged wheat samples using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy based on pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basati, Zahra; Jamshidi, Bahareh; Rasekh, Mansour; Abbaspour-Gilandeh, Yousef

    2018-05-30

    The presence of sunn pest-damaged grains in wheat mass reduces the quality of flour and bread produced from it. Therefore, it is essential to assess the quality of the samples in collecting and storage centers of wheat and flour mills. In this research, the capability of visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy combined with pattern recognition methods was investigated for discrimination of wheat samples with different percentages of sunn pest-damaged. To this end, various samples belonging to five classes (healthy and 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% unhealthy) were analyzed using Vis/NIR spectroscopy (wavelength range of 350-1000 nm) based on both supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition methods. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) as the unsupervised techniques and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) as supervised methods were used. The results showed that Vis/NIR spectra of healthy samples were correctly clustered using both PCA and HCA. Due to the high overlapping between the four unhealthy classes (5%, 10%, 15% and 20%), it was not possible to discriminate all the unhealthy samples in individual classes. However, when considering only the two main categories of healthy and unhealthy, an acceptable degree of separation between the classes can be obtained after classification with supervised pattern recognition methods of SIMCA and PLS-DA. SIMCA based on PCA modeling correctly classified samples in two classes of healthy and unhealthy with classification accuracy of 100%. Moreover, the power of the wavelengths of 839 nm, 918 nm and 995 nm were more than other wavelengths to discriminate two classes of healthy and unhealthy. It was also concluded that PLS-DA provides excellent classification results of healthy and unhealthy samples (R 2  = 0.973 and RMSECV = 0.057). Therefore, Vis/NIR spectroscopy based on pattern recognition techniques

  12. Incubation behaviour in triazenepolymer thin films upon near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, J; Wiggins, S M; Solis, J; Sturm, H; Urech, L; Wokaun, A; Lippert, T

    2007-01-01

    The effects of laser radiation induced by a sequence of ultrashort (130 fs), near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser pulses in ∼1 μm thick triazenepolymer films on glass substrates have been investigated by means of in-situ real-time reflectivity measurements featuring a ps-resolution streak camera and a ns-resolution photodiode set-up. The polymer films show incubation effects when each laser pulse in the sequence has a fluence below the single-pulse damage threshold. Non-damage conditions are maintained for several incubation pulses such that the reflectivity of the film shows a rapid decrease of up to 30% within 1 ns but subsequently recovers to its initial value on a ms timescale. Additional pulses lead to a permanent film damage. The critical number of laser pulses needed to generate a permanent damage of the film has been studied as a function of the laser fluence. Once damage is created, further laser pulses cause a partial removal of the film material from the glass substrate. Scanning force microscopy has been used to characterise ex-situ the irradiated surface areas. Based on these complementary measurements possible incubation mechanisms are discussed

  13. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of self–damaged ITER–grade tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A. I., E-mail: aibelyaeva@mail.ru; Savchenko, A. A. [National Technical University “Kharkov Politechnical Institute”, Kharkov, 61002 (Ukraine); Galuza, A. A.; Kolenov, I. V. [Institute of Electrophysics and Radiation Technologies, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kharkov, 61024 (Ukraine)

    2014-07-15

    Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and long–term sputtering on the surface relief of ITER–grade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutron–induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W{sup 6+} ions of 20 MeV energy. Ar{sup +} ions with energy 600 eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJ–IG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  14. Workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation: Source-domain full-traveltime inversion followed by waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lu; Fei, Tong; Luo, Yi; Guo, Bowen

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a workflow for near-surface velocity automatic estimation using the early arrivals of seismic data. This workflow comprises two methods, source-domain full traveltime inversion (FTI) and early-arrival waveform inversion. Source

  15. Surface and near surface defect detection in thick copper EB-welds using eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Lipponen, A.

    2010-01-01

    The surface inspection of thick copper electron beam (EB) welds plays an important role in the acceptance of nuclear fuel disposal. The main reasons to inspect these components are related to potential manufacturing and handling defects. In this work the data acquisition software, visualising tools for eddy current (EC) measurements and eddy current sensors were developed for detection of unwanted defects. The eddy current equipment was manufactured by IZFP and the visualising software in active co-operation with Posiva and IZFP for the inspections. The inspection procedure was produced during the development of the inspection techniques. The inspection method development aims to qualify the method for surface and near surface defect detection and sizing according to ENIQ. The study includes technical justification to be carried out, and compilation of a defect catalogue and experience from measurements within the Posiva's research on issues related to manufacturing. The depth of penetration in copper components in eddy current testing is rather small. To detect surface breaking defects the eddy current inspection is a good solution. A simple approach was adopted using two techniques: higher frequency was used to detect surface defects and to determine the dimensions of the defects except depth, lower frequency was used to detect defects having a ligament and for sizing of deeper surface breaking defects. The higher frequency was 30 kHz and the lower frequency was 200 Hz. The higher frequency probes were absolute bobbing coils and lower frequency probes combined transmitter - several receiver coils. To evaluate both methods, calibration blocks were manufactured by FNS for weld inspections. These calibration specimens mainly consisted of electron discharge machined notches and holes of varying shapes, lengths and diameters in the range of 1 mm to 20 mm of depth. Also one copper lid specimen with 152 defects was manufactured and used for evaluation of weld inspection

  16. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Stephenson, D.E.; Zandt, G.; Bouchon, M.; Hustrulid, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    In order to assess the seismic risk for an underground facility, a data base was established and analyzed to evaluate the potential for seismic disturbance. Substantial damage to underground facilities is usually the result of displacements primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures, or at the surface entrance to these facilities. Evidence of this comes from both earthquakes and large explosions. Therefore, the displacement due to earthquakes as a function of depth is important in the evaluation of the hazard to underground facilities. To evaluate potential displacements due to seismic effects of block motions along pre-existing or induced fractures, the displacement fields surrounding two types of faults were investigated. Analytical models were used to determine relative displacements of shafts and near-surface displacement of large rock masses. Numerical methods were used to determine the displacement fields associated with pure strike-slip and vertical normal faults. Results are presented as displacements for various fault lengths as a function of depth and distance. This provides input to determine potential displacements in terms of depth and distance for underground facilities, important for assessing potential sites and design parameters

  17. Pion-induced damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, S; Glaser, M; Lemeilleur, F; León-Florián, E; Gössling, C; Kaiser, B; Rolf, A; Wunstorf, R; Feick, H; Fretwurst, E; Lindström, G; Moll, Michael; Taylor, G; Chilingarov, A G

    1995-01-01

    The damage induced by pions in silicon detectors is studied for positive and negative pions for fluence up to 10(14)cm-2 and 10(13) cm-2 respectively. Results on the energy dependence of the damage in the region of 65-330 MeV near to the  resonance are presented. The change in detector characteristics such as leakage current, charge collection efficiency and effective impurity concentration including long-term annealing effects have been studied. Comparisons to neutron and proton-induced damage are presented and discussed.

  18. Near Space Hypersonic Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Dynamic Surface Backstepping Control Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyong YU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional aircraft, the near space hypersonic unmanned aerial vehicle control system design must deal with the extra prominent dynamics characters, which are differ from the traditional aircrafts control system design. A new robust adaptive control design method is proposed for one hypersonic unmanned aerial vehicle (HSUAV uncertain MIMO nonaffine block control system by using multilayer neural networks, feedback linearization technology, and dynamic surface backstepping. Multilayer neural networks are used to compensate the influence from the uncertain, which designs the robust terms to solve the problem from approach error. Adaptive backstepping is adopted designed to ensure control law, the dynamic surface control strategy to eliminate “the explosion of terms” by introducing a series of first order filters to obtain the differentiation of the virtual control inputs. Finally, nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF numerical simulation results for a HSUAV model are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Near-surface eddy dynamics in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilisa Trani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC is a crucial component of the global ocean conveyor belt, acting as a zonal link among the major ocean basins but, to some extent, limiting meridional exchange and tending to isolate the ocean south of it from momentum and heat income. In this work we investigate one of the most important mechanisms contributing to the poleward transfer of properties in the Southern Ocean, that is the eddy component of the dynamics. For this particular purpose, observations obtained from near-surface drifters have been used: they represent a very useful data set to analyse the eddy field because of their ability to catch a large number of scales of motion while providing a quasi-synoptic coverage of the investigated area. Estimates of the eddy heat and momentum fluxes are carried out using data taken from the Global Drifter Program databank; they refer to Surface Velocity Program drifter trajectories collected in the area south of 35°S between 1995 and 2006. Eddy kinetic energies, variance ellipses, momentum and heat fluxes have been calculated using the pseudo-Eulerian method, showing patterns in good agreement with those present in the literature based on observational and model data, although there are some quantitative differences. The eddy fluxes have been separated into their rotational and divergent portions, the latter being responsible for the meridional transports. The associated zonal and depth-exponentially integrated meridional heat transport exhibits values spanning over a range between -0.4 PW and –1.1 PW in the ACC region, consistent with previous estimates.

  20. Estimation of the near surface soil water content during evaporation using air-launched ground-penetrating radar

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2014-01-01

    Evaporation is an important process in the global water cycle and its variation affects the near sur-face soil water content, which is crucial for surface hydrology and climate modelling. Soil evaporation rate is often characterized by two distinct phases, namely, the energy limited phase (stage-I) and the soil hydraulic limited period (stage-II). In this paper, a laboratory experiment was conducted using a sand box filled with fine sand, which was subject to evaporation for a period of twenty three days. The setup was equipped with a weighting system to record automatically the weight of the sand box with a constant time-step. Furthermore, time-lapse air-launched ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements were performed to monitor the evaporation process. The GPR model involves a full-waveform frequency-domain solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for wave propagation in three-dimensional multilayered media. The accuracy of the full-waveform GPR forward modelling with respect to three different petrophysical models was investigated. Moreover, full-waveform inversion of the GPR data was used to estimate the quantitative information, such as near surface soil water content. The two stages of evaporation can be clearly observed in the radargram, which indicates qualitatively that enough information is contained in the GPR data. The full-waveform GPR inversion allows for accurate estimation of the near surface soil water content during extended evaporation phases, when a wide frequency range of GPR (0.8-5.0 GHz) is taken into account. In addition, the results indicate that the CRIM model may constitute a relevant alternative in solving the frequency-dependency issue for full waveform GPR modelling.

  1. Recent Improvements in Retrieving Near-Surface Air Temperature and Humidity Using Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent

    2010-01-01

    Detailed studies of the energy and water cycles require accurate estimation of the turbulent fluxes of moisture and heat across the atmosphere-ocean interface at regional to basin scale. Providing estimates of these latent and sensible heat fluxes over the global ocean necessitates the use of satellite or reanalysis-based estimates of near surface variables. Recent studies have shown that errors in the surface (10 meter)estimates of humidity and temperature are currently the largest sources of uncertainty in the production of turbulent fluxes from satellite observations. Therefore, emphasis has been placed on reducing the systematic errors in the retrieval of these parameters from microwave radiometers. This study discusses recent improvements in the retrieval of air temperature and humidity through improvements in the choice of algorithms (linear vs. nonlinear) and the choice of microwave sensors. Particular focus is placed on improvements using a neural network approach with a single sensor (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) and the use of combined sensors from the NASA AQUA satellite platform. The latter algorithm utilizes the unique sampling available on AQUA from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A). Current estimates of uncertainty in the near-surface humidity and temperature from single and multi-sensor approaches are discussed and used to estimate errors in the turbulent fluxes.

  2. Evaluation of light detector surface area for functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Ayaz, Hasan; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Onaral, Banu

    2017-10-01

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging neuroimaging technique that utilizes near infrared light to detect cortical concentration changes of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin non-invasively. Using light sources and detectors over the scalp, multi-wavelength light intensities are recorded as time series and converted to concentration changes of hemoglobin via modified Beer-Lambert law. Here, we describe a potential source for systematic error in the calculation of hemoglobin changes and light intensity measurements. Previous system characterization and analysis studies looked into various fNIRS parameters such as type of light source, number and selection of wavelengths, distance between light source and detector. In this study, we have analyzed the contribution of light detector surface area to the overall outcome. Results from Monte Carlo based digital phantoms indicated that selection of detector area is a critical system parameter in minimizing the error in concentration calculations. The findings here can guide the design of future fNIRS sensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structurally Integrated, Damage-Tolerant, Thermal Spray Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vackel, Andrew; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Thermal spray coatings are used extensively for the protection and life extension of engineering components exposed to harsh wear and/or corrosion during service in aerospace, energy, and heavy machinery sectors. Cermet coatings applied via high-velocity thermal spray are used in aggressive wear situations almost always coupled with corrosive environments. In several instances (e.g., landing gear), coatings are considered as part of the structure requiring system-level considerations. Despite their widespread use, the technology has lacked generalized scientific principles for robust coating design, manufacturing, and performance analysis. Advances in process and in situ diagnostics have provided significant insights into the process-structure-property-performance correlations providing a framework-enhanced design. In this overview, critical aspects of materials, process, parametrics, and performance are discussed through exemplary studies on relevant compositions. The underlying connective theme is understanding and controlling residual stresses generation, which not only addresses process dynamics but also provides linkage for process-property relationship for both the system (e.g., fatigue) and the surface (wear and corrosion). The anisotropic microstructure also invokes the need for damage-tolerant material design to meet future goals.

  4. The Role of the Mean State of Arctic Sea Ice on Near-Surface Temperature Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.C.; Bintanja, R.; Hazeleger, W.; Katsman, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Century-scale global near-surface temperature trends in response to rising greenhouse gas concentrations in climate models vary by almost a factor of 2, with greatest intermodel spread in the Arctic region where sea ice is a key climate component. Three factors contribute to the intermodel spread:

  5. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2016-03-02

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.

  6. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan Vivian, E-mail: yan.li@colostate.edu [Colorado State University, Department of Design and Merchandising (United States); Cathles, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmc19@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.Graphical Abstract.

  7. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl_2, and MgCl_2) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl_2 and MgCl_2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl_2 and MgCl_2 solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.Graphical Abstract

  8. Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P.

    1989-10-01

    For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs

  9. Near-surface neotectonic deformation associated with seismicity in the northeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, S.S.; Gold, D.P.; Gardner, T.W.; Slingerland, R.L.; Thornton, C.P. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1989-10-01

    For the Lancaster, PA seismic zone a multifaceted investigation revealed several manifestations of near-surface, neotectonic deformation. Remote sensing data together with surface geological and geophysical observations, and recent seismicity reveal that the neotectonic deformation is concentrated in a NS-trending fault zone some 50 km in length and 10--20 km in width. Anomalies associated with this zone include distinctive lineament and surface erosional patterns; geologically recent uplift evidenced by elevations of stream terraces along the Susquehanna River; and localized contemporary travertine deposits in streams down-drainage from the inferred active fault zone. In the Moodus seismic zone the frequency of tectonically-controlled lineaments was observed to increase in the Moodus quadrangle compared to adjacent areas and dominant lineament directions were observed that are perpendicular and parallel to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress direction (N80-85E) recently determined from in-situ stress measurements in a 1.5 km-deep borehole in the seismic zone and from well-constrained earthquake focal mechanisms. 284 refs., 33 figs.

  10. Performance of engineered barrier materials in near surface disposal facilities for radioactive waste. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The primary objectives of the CRP were to: promote the sharing of experiences of the Member States in their application of engineered barrier materials for near surface disposal facilities; help enhance their use of engineered barriers by improving techniques and methods for selecting, planning and testing performance of various types of barrier materials for near surface disposal facilities. The objective of this publication is to provide and overview of technical issues related to the engineered barrier systems and a summary of the major findings of each individual research project that was carried out within the framework of the CRP. This publication deals with a general overview of engineered barriers in near surface disposal facilities, key technical information obtained within the CRP and overall conclusions and recommendations for future research and development activities. Appendices presenting individual research accomplishments are also provided. Each of the 13 appendices was indexed separately

  11. Effects of Near Soil Surface Characteristics on the Soil Detachment Process in a Chronological Series of Vegetation Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing

    2017-04-01

    The effects of near soil surface characteristics on the soil detachment process might be different at different stages of vegetation restoration. This study was performed to investigate the effects of the near soil surface factors of plant litter, biological soil crusts (BSCs), dead roots and live roots on the soil detachment process by overland flow at different stages of restoration. Soil samples (1 m long, 0.1 m wide, and 0.05 m high) under four treatment conditions were collected from 1-yr-old and 24-yr-old natural grasslands and subjected to flow scouring under five different shear stresses ranging from 5.3 to 14.6 Pa. The results indicated that the effects of near soil surface characteristics on soil detachment were substantial during the process of vegetation restoration. The total reduction in the soil detachment capacity of the 1-yr-old grassland was 98.1%, and of this total, 7.9%, 30.0% and 60.2% was attributed to the litter, BSCs and plant roots, respectively. In the 24-yr-old grassland, the soil detachment capacity decreased by 99.0%, of which 13.2%, 23.5% and 62.3% was caused by the litter, BSCs and plant roots, respectively. Combined with the previously published data of a 7-yr-old grassland, the influence of plant litter on soil detachment was demonstrated to increase with restoration time, but soil detachment was also affected by the litter type and composition. The role of BSCs was greater than that of plant litter in reducing soil detachment during the early stages of vegetation recovery. However, its contribution weakened with time since restoration. The influence of plant roots accounted for at least half or up to two-thirds of the total near soil surface factors, of which more than 72.6% was attributed to the physical binding effects of the roots. The chemical bonding effect of the roots increased with time since restoration and was greater than the effect of the litter on soil detachment in the late stages of vegetation restoration. The

  12. Surface protection in bio-shields via a functional soft skin layer: Lessons from the turtle shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Yaniv; Bar-On, Benny

    2017-09-01

    The turtle shell is a functional bio-shielding element, which has evolved naturally to provide protection against predator attacks that involve biting and clawing. The near-surface architecture of the turtle shell includes a soft bi-layer skin coating - rather than a hard exterior - which functions as a first line of defense against surface damage. This architecture represents a novel type of bio-shielding configuration, namely, an inverse structural-mechanical design, rather than the hard-coated bio-shielding elements identified so far. In the current study, we used experimentally based structural modeling and FE simulations to analyze the mechanical significance of this unconventional protection architecture in terms of resistance to surface damage upon extensive indentations. We found that the functional bi-layer skin of the turtle shell, which provides graded (soft-softer-hard) mechanical characteristics to the bio-shield exterior, serves as a bumper-buffer mechanism. This material-level adaptation protects the inner core from the highly localized indentation loads via stress delocalization and extensive near-surface plasticity. The newly revealed functional bi-layer coating architecture can potentially be adapted, using synthetic materials, to considerably enhance the surface load-bearing capabilities of various engineering configurations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Shear-wave seismic reflection imaging and impedance inversion for a near-surface point-bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, N. W.; Morrison, M.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Odom, B.; Clift, P. D.; Olson, E.; Gostic, A.

    2017-12-01

    Imaging and inversion of SH-waves are useful to detect, map, and quantitatively characterize near-surface point-bar strata. We conduct a horizontally-polarized (SH) reflection survey across and along a near-surface (9 - 40 m) downstream point-bar. We invert for shear-impedance profiles and correlate our interpretation to electrical conductivity (EC) logs in adjacent wells to study the internal architecture and lithology of point-bars. We acquire two common-midpoint (CMP) SH-wave seismic reflection lines at False River (Point Coupee Parish, Louisiana). A 104 m long seismic line (L1) is oriented orthogonal (NW - SE) to point-bar strike. A second line (L2) is 48 m long and set parallel to point-bar strike (NE - SW). Two EC wells lie 33 m apart. Both wells are parallel with respect to the L1 survey and offset from it by 15 m. EC log measurements range from 1 - 25 m depth. Interference of Love-waves prevents seismic imaging at depths less than 9 m. The L1 and L2 data sets are inverted for shear-impedance using a model-based band-limited impedance (BLIMP) algorithm that incorporates a low-frequency velocity model. This model is also used for the depthing processing. The L1 cross-section shows coherent dipping reflection events ( 4 - 7º) from 0.15 - 0.35 s (10 - 40 m). The corresponding shear-impedance profile also reveals coherent and dipping impedance contrasts that grow in magnitude with increasing depth. The L2 cross-section shows comparatively less dip ( 1º) as well as sharper and shallower continuity of reflection events (0.1 - 0.28 s TWT or 9 - 25 m). Depth-converted (TVD) seismic amplitudes and impedance values correlate to near-surface point-bar geology via superposition of log data. The first well (W5) shows distinct EC local maxima (+50 - 70 mS/m) at 14.5 and 15.5 m depth that correlate well with the seismic amplitudes and impedance values from both L1 and L2 data sets. The second well (W7) shows comparatively lower local maxima (+40 - 60 mS/m) but at greater

  14. The modal surface interpolation method for damage localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina Limongelli, Maria

    2017-05-01

    The Interpolation Method (IM) has been previously proposed and successfully applied for damage localization in plate like structures. The method is based on the detection of localized reductions of smoothness in the Operational Deformed Shapes (ODSs) of the structure. The IM can be applied to any type of structure provided the ODSs are estimated accurately in the original and in the damaged configurations. If the latter circumstance fails to occur, for example when the structure is subjected to an unknown input(s) or if the structural responses are strongly corrupted by noise, both false and missing alarms occur when the IM is applied to localize a concentrated damage. In order to overcome these drawbacks a modification of the method is herein investigated. An ODS is the deformed shape of a structure subjected to a harmonic excitation: at resonances the ODS are dominated by the relevant mode shapes. The effect of noise at resonance is usually lower with respect to other frequency values hence the relevant ODS are estimated with higher reliability. Several methods have been proposed to reliably estimate modal shapes in case of unknown input. These two circumstances can be exploited to improve the reliability of the IM. In order to reduce or eliminate the drawbacks related to the estimation of the ODSs in case of noisy signals, in this paper is investigated a modified version of the method based on a damage feature calculated considering the interpolation error relevant only to the modal shapes and not to all the operational shapes in the significant frequency range. Herein will be reported the comparison between the results of the IM in its actual version (with the interpolation error calculated summing up the contributions of all the operational shapes) and in the new proposed version (with the estimation of the interpolation error limited to the modal shapes).

  15. Improved Overpressure Recording and Modeling for Near-Surface Explosion Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Schnurr, J.; Garces, M. A.; Rodgers, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    The accurate recording and analysis of air-blast acoustic waveforms is a key component of the forensic analysis of explosive events. Smartphone apps can enhance traditional technologies by providing scalable, cost-effective ubiquitous sensor solutions for monitoring blasts, undeclared activities, and inaccessible facilities. During a series of near-surface chemical high explosive tests, iPhone 6's running the RedVox infrasound recorder app were co-located with high-fidelity Hyperion overpressure sensors, allowing for direct comparison of the resolution and frequency content of the devices. Data from the traditional sensors is used to characterize blast signatures and to determine relative iPhone microphone amplitude and phase responses. A Wiener filter based source deconvolution method is applied, using a parameterized source function estimated from traditional overpressure sensor data, to estimate system responses. In addition, progress on a new parameterized air-blast model is presented. The model is based on the analysis of a large set of overpressure waveforms from several surface explosion test series. An appropriate functional form with parameters determined empirically from modern air-blast and acoustic data will allow for better parameterization of signals and the improved characterization of explosive sources.

  16. Damage Localization of Severely Damaged RC-Structures Based on Measured Eigenperiods from a Single Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Cakmak, A. S.

    This paper deals with the estimation of the damage location of severely damaged Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures excited by earthquakes. It is assumed that the building is instrumented with a sensor measuring the earthquake acceleration signal at ground surface and a sensor measuring only...

  17. Yield Estimation for Semipalatinsk Underground Nuclear Explosions Using Seismic Surface-wave Observations at Near-regional Distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adushkin, V. V.

    - A statistical procedure is described for estimating the yields of underground nuclear tests at the former Soviet Semipalatinsk test site using the peak amplitudes of short-period surface waves observed at near-regional distances (Δ Semipalatinsk explosions, including the Soviet JVE explosion of September 14, 1988, and it is demonstrated that it provides seismic estimates of explosion yield which are typically within 20% of the yields determined for these same explosions using more accurate, non-seismic techniques based on near-source observations.

  18. Time lag between the tropopause height and the levels of 7Be concentration in near surface air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melas D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of 7Be at near surface air has been determined over 2009, a year of a deep solar minimum, in the region of Thessaloniki, Greece at 40°62′ N, 22°95'E. In geomagnetic latitudes over 40° N, the elevation of the tropopause during the warm summer months and the vertical exchange of air masses within the troposphere cause greater mixture of the air masses resulting in higher concentration levels for 7Be in surface air. The positive correlation between the monthly activity concentration of 7Be and the tropopause height (0.94, p < 0.0001, and also between 7Be concentration and the temperature T (°C (R = 0.97, p < 0.001, confirm that the increased rate of vertical transport within the troposphere, especially during warmer summer months, has as a result the descent to surface of air masses enriched in 7Be. However, the 7Be concentration levels in near surface air are not expected to respond immediately to the change of elevation of the tropopause. It was found that there's a time lag of ~ 3 days between the change in the daily surface concentrations of 7Be the change in the elevation of the tropopause.

  19. Calibration and combination of monthly near-surface temperature and precipitation predictions over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luis R. L.; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.; Coelho, Caio A. S.

    2018-02-01

    A Bayesian method known as the Forecast Assimilation (FA) was used to calibrate and combine monthly near-surface temperature and precipitation outputs from seasonal dynamical forecast systems. The simple multimodel (SMM), a method that combines predictions with equal weights, was used as a benchmark. This research focuses on Europe and adjacent regions for predictions initialized in May and November, covering the boreal summer and winter months. The forecast quality of the FA and SMM as well as the single seasonal dynamical forecast systems was assessed using deterministic and probabilistic measures. A non-parametric bootstrap method was used to account for the sampling uncertainty of the forecast quality measures. We show that the FA performs as well as or better than the SMM in regions where the dynamical forecast systems were able to represent the main modes of climate covariability. An illustration with the near-surface temperature over North Atlantic, the Mediterranean Sea and Middle-East in summer months associated with the well predicted first mode of climate covariability is offered. However, the main modes of climate covariability are not well represented in most situations discussed in this study as the seasonal dynamical forecast systems have limited skill when predicting the European climate. In these situations, the SMM performs better more often.

  20. Relationship between Deck Level, Body Surface Temperature and Carcass Damages in Italian Heavy Pigs after Short Journeys at Different Unloading Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese Arduini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the relationships between deck level, body surface temperature and carcass damages after a short journey (30 min, 10 deliveries of Italian heavy pigs, including a total of 1400 animals from one farm, were examined. Within 5 min after the arrival at the abattoir, the vehicles were unloaded. Environmental temperature and relative humidity were recorded and a Temperature Humidity Index (THI was calculated. After unloading, maximum temperatures of dorsal and ocular regions were measured by a thermal camera on groups of pigs from each of the unloaded decks. After dehairing, quarters and whole carcasses were evaluated subjectively by a trained operator for skin damage using a four-point scale. On the basis of THI at unloading, deliveries were grouped into three classes. Data of body surface temperature and skin damage score were analysed in a model including THI class, deck level and their interaction. Regardless of pig location in the truck, the maximum temperature of the dorsal and ocular regions increased with increasing THI class. Within each THI class, the highest and lowest body surface temperatures were found in pigs located on the middle and upper decks, respectively. Only THI class was found to affect the skin damage score (p < 0.05, which increased on quarters and whole carcasses with increasing THI class. The results of this study on short-distance transport of Italian heavy pigs highlighted the need to control and ameliorate the environmental conditions in the trucks, even at relatively low temperature and THI, in order to improve welfare and reduce loss of carcass value.

  1. The plane elasticity problem for a crack near the curved surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, M. V.

    2018-05-01

    The unconventional approach to the plane elasticity problem for a crack near the curved surface is presented. The solution of the problem is considered in the form of the sum of solutions of two auxiliary problems. The first one describes the plane with a crack, whose surfaces are loaded by some unknown self-balanced force p(x). The second problem is dealing with the semi-infinite region with the boundary conditions equal to the difference of boundary conditions of the problem to be sought and the solution of the first problem on the region border. The unknown function p(x) is supposed to be approximated with the sufficient level of accuracy by N order polynomial with complex coefficients. This paper is aimed to determine the critical loads causing the spontaneous growth of cracks. The angles of propagation of the stationary cracks located in the region with a ledge or a cut are found. The influence of length of a crack on the bearing ability of an elastic body with the curved surface is investigated. The effect of a form of the concentrator and orientation of a crack to the fracture load subject to the different combinations of forces acting both on a surface of a crack and at infinity is analysed. The results of this research can be applied for calculation of the durability of thin-walled vessels of pressure, e.g., chemical reactors, in order to ensure their ecological safety.

  2. Near-surface traveltime tomographic inversion using multiple first break picks

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos; Choi, Yun Seok; Keho, T.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-01-01

    The input data for refraction traveltime tomography are the traveltimes of the first breaks, which are picked using automatic pickers. Although automatic pickers perform satisfactorily overall, no one automatic picker can be characterized as the best one; one picker might fail for traces for which other pickers are accurate and vice versa for other traces. We introduce an iterative method for traveltime tomography, which takes as input traveltimes from a number of pickers. During the inversion scheme inconsistent traveltimes are replaced with more meaningful ones to obtain a smooth near-surface velocity model. The scheme is easily parallelizable and a byproduct of the inversion scheme is a set of consistent traveltimes which is close to the actual traveltimes of the first breaks.

  3. Terahertz-wave near-field imaging with subwavelength resolution using surface-wave-assisted bow-tie aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kunihiko; Ohashi, Keishi; Ikari, Tomofumi; Minamide, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2006-11-01

    We demonstrate the terahertz-wave near-field imaging with subwavelength resolution using a bow-tie shaped aperture surrounded by concentric periodic structures in a metal film. A subwavelength aperture with concentric periodic grooves, which are known as a bull's eye structure, shows extremely large enhanced transmission beyond the diffraction limit caused by the resonant excitation of surface waves. Additionally, a bow-tie aperture exhibits extraordinary field enhancement at the sharp tips of the metal, which enhances the transmission and the subwavelength spatial resolution. We introduced a bow-tie aperture to the bull's eye structure and achieved high spatial resolution (˜λ/17) in the near-field region. The terahertz-wave near-field image of the subwavelength metal pattern (pattern width=20μm) was obtained for the wavelength of 207μm.

  4. Stimulated emission of surface plasmon polaritons by lead-sulphide quantum dots at near infra-red wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, Ilya P.; Nielsen, Michael Grøndahl; Albrektsen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Amplification of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in planar metal-dielectric structure through stimulated emission is investigated using leakage-radiation microscopy configuration. The gain medium is a thin polymethylmethacrylate layer doped with lead-sulphide nanocrystals emitting at near-infrared...

  5. Damage symptoms of plants due to PAN exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouchi, I; Sawada, T; Ohashi, T; Odaira, T

    1974-11-01

    In order to identify the cause of plant damage which differed from that by ozone, a series of exposure experiments was carried out on Beta vulgaris, Japanese radish, French bean, luthern, tomato, and spinach in a controlled weather room by artificially synthesized PAN (peroxyacetyl nitrate). The damage appeared generally on younger leaves as a lustering and bronzing on the lower surface; there was a specific symptom in which the interveinary part of the lower surface depressed, leaving the veins in relief. At higher concentrations of PAN, damages appeared on the upper surface of leaves, however, bronzing and lustering were clearer during exposure to lower concentrations of PAN. The position of the leaves and the part of a leaf which was damaged were constant in the petunia, morning glory, and tobacco. There was a hyperbolic relationship between the concentration of PAN and the time period of appearance of the damage as was seen during sulfur dioxide and ozone exposures.

  6. Laser induced damage threshold on metallic surfaces during laser cleaning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Labuschagne, K

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available laser paint removal. Laser induced damage on 316L stainless steel was studied, with the target subjected to single and multiple pulse irradiations using a Q-switched Nd:YAG, with fluences between 0.15 and 11.8 J/cm2. Several different damage morphologies...

  7. Cell surface damage and morphological changes in Oenococcus oeni after freeze-drying and incubation in synthetic wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Ferrada, Bárbara Mercedes; Gonçalves, Sónia; Semorile, Liliana; Santos, Nuno C; Brizuela, Natalia; Elizabeth Tymczyszyn, E; Hollmann, Axel

    2018-04-28

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of freeze-drying in the presence of trehalose as a cryoprotectant, followed by incubation in synthetic wine, on surface damage, viability and l-malic acid consumption of the oenological strain Oenococcus oeni UNQOe 73.2. After freeze-drying, no significant differences were observed in the number of viable cells (for both acclimated and non-acclimated cultures) respect to the fresh culture. In contrast, loss of viability was observed after wine incubation for 24 h, being acclimated freeze-dried cells the best conditions for this. After the preservation process, small changes in cell morphology were observed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The Zeta potential and AFM showed that 24 h of wine incubation was enough to induce several cell surface modifications. Plate count data allowed us to establish that surface damage is an important factor for loss of viability, regardless of the acclimation treatment. Although the number of surviving O. oeni cells decreased dramatically after incubation in synthetic wine for 15 days, the consumption of l-malic acid was higher than 70%, with freeze-dried cells showing a better performance than fresh cultures. These results demonstrate that O. oeni freeze-dried cultures could be applied to direct wine inoculation, to conduct malolactic fermentation, maintaining its technological properties and reducing the time and costs of the winemaking process. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Near-surface 3D reflections seismic survey; Sanjigen senso hanshaho jishin tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahigashi, H; Mitsui, H; Nakano, O; Kobayashi, T [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Faults are being actively investigated across Japan since the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake. Discussed in this report is the application of the 3D near-surface reflection seismic survey in big cities. Data from trenching and drilling is used for the geological interpretation of the surroundings of a fault, and the reflection seismic survey is used to identify the position, etc., of the fault. In this article, when the results obtained from the experimental field are examined, it is found that the conventional 2D imaging reflection survey betrays the limit of its capability when the geological structure is complicated, that the 3D reflection seismic survey, on the contrary, is capable of high-precision imaging and, when augmented by drilling, etc., becomes capable of a more detailed interpretation, and that it also contributes effectively to the improvement of local disaster prevention in big cities. Using as the model the Tachikawa fault that runs near JR Tachikawa Station, embodiment of the 3D reflection seismic survey is reviewed. For the acquisition of data excellent in quality in a 3D reflection seismic survey conducted utilizing the roads in the sector chosen for experiment in the urban area, the shock generating points and receiving points should be positioned by taking into account the parameters in the bin arranging process so that the mid-points will be regularly distributed on the surface. 3 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Investigating Deliquescence of Mars-like Soils from the Atacama Desert and Implications for Liquid Water Near the Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alstyne, A. M.; Tolbert, M. A.; Gough, R. V.; Primm, K.

    2017-12-01

    Recent images obtained from orbiters have shown that the Martian surface is more dynamic than previously thought. These images, showing dark features that resemble flowing water near the surface, have called into question the habitability of the Mars today. Recurring slope lineae (RSL), or the dark features seen in these images, are characterized as narrow, dark streaks that form and grow in the warm season, fade in the cold season, and recur seasonally. It is widely hypothesized that the movement of liquid water near the surface is what causes the appearance of RSL. However, the origin of the water and the potential for water to be stable near the surface is a question of great debate. Here, we investigate the potential for stable or metastable liquid water via deliquescence and efflorescence. The deliquescent properties of salts from the Atacama Desert, a popular terrestrial analog for Martian environments, were investigated using a Raman microscope outfitted with an environmental cell. The salts were put under Mars-relevant conditions and spectra were obtained to determine the presence or absence of liquid phases. The appearance of liquid phases under Mars-relevant conditions would demonstrate that liquid water could be available to cause or play a role in the formations of RSL.

  10. Andromeda (M31) optical and infrared disk survey. I. Insights in wide-field near-IR surface photometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sick, Jonathan; Courteau, Stéphane; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; McDonald, Michael; De Jong, Roelof; Tully, R. Brent

    2014-01-01

    We present wide-field near-infrared J and K s images of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) taken with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope as part of the Andromeda Optical and Infrared Disk Survey. This data set allows simultaneous observations of resolved stars and near-infrared (NIR) surface brightness across M31's entire bulge and disk (within R = 22 kpc), permitting a direct test of the stellar composition of near-infrared light in a nearby galaxy. Here we develop NIR observation and reduction methods to recover a uniform surface brightness map across the 3° × 1° disk of M31 with 27 WIRCam fields. Two sky-target nodding strategies are tested, and we find that strictly minimizing sky sampling latency cannot improve background subtraction accuracy to better than 2% of the background level due to spatio-temporal variations in the NIR skyglow. We fully describe our WIRCam reduction pipeline and advocate using flats built from night-sky images over a single night, rather than dome flats that do not capture the WIRCam illumination field. Contamination from scattered light and thermal background in sky flats has a negligible effect on the surface brightness shape compared to the stochastic differences in background shape between sky and galaxy disk fields, which are ∼0.3% of the background level. The most dramatic calibration step is the introduction of scalar sky offsets to each image that optimizes surface brightness continuity. Sky offsets reduce the mean surface brightness difference between observation blocks from 1% to <0.1% of the background level, though the absolute background level remains statistically uncertain to 0.15% of the background level. We present our WIRCam reduction pipeline and performance analysis to give specific recommendations for the improvement of NIR wide-field imaging methods.

  11. Frequency shifts of resonant modes of the Sun due to near-surface convective scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S. M.; Antia, H. M.

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the ``surface term.'' The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary 3D flows, can be reduced to an effective ``quiet-Sun'' wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt-Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  12. Surface roughness and gloss study of prints: application of specular reflection at near infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silfsten, P; Dutta, R; Pääkkönen, P; Peiponen, K-E; Tåg, C-M; Gane, P A C

    2012-01-01

    Absolute reflectance data were measured with a spectrophotometer in the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral range. The specular reflectance data in the NIR were used for the assessment of the surface roughness of magenta, yellow, cyan and black prints on paper. In addition, surface roughness data obtained from the prints with a mechanical diamond stylus, an optical profiling system and the spectrophotometer are compared with each other. The surface roughness obtained with the aid of the spectrophotometer data suggests a smoother surface than when measured with the diamond stylus and the optical profiling system. The gloss of the prints can be obtained from the absolute specular reflectance spectra in the spectral region of visible light. It is shown that specular reflection data at a fixed wavelength in the NIR are useful also in the interpretation of gloss in the visible spectral range, but using an unconventional grazing angle of incidence. (paper)

  13. Estimation of muscle fatigue using surface electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taelman, Joachim; Vanderhaegen, Joke; Robijns, Mieke; Naulaers, Gunnar; Spaepen, Arthur; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    This study looks at various parameters, derived from surface electromyography (sEMG) and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) and their relationship in muscle fatigue during a static elbow flexion until exhaustion as well as during a semidynamic exercise.We found a linear increasing trend for a corrected amplitude parameter and a linear decreasing slope for the frequency content of the sEMG signal. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) extracted from NIRS recordings showed a four-phase response for all the subjects. A strong correlation between frequency content of the sEMG signal and TOI was established. We can conclude that both sEMG and NIRS give complementary information concerning muscle fatigue.

  14. The Dose Assessment in the Vault Test Case of Near-Surface Disposal Facility for Drinking Water Scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Seon; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Woo [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    It is generally accepted that the radionuclides contained in the radioactive wastes will be eventually released and these will be transported to the accessible environment (near-field, far-field, biosphere). Therefore, the long-term safety assessment of near-surface radioactive waste disposal should be required by modeling the expected release of radionuclides from the repository, far-field area, and biosphere. Finally, the effective dose rate should be estimated through the released radionuclides. In this study, the radiological dose was evaluated for the reference near-surface radioactive waste disposal facility in Vaalputs, South Africa, which has been selected as a part of IAEA coordinated research program on improvement of safety assessment methodologies(ISAM). The assessment of radiological dose was performed for drinking water scenario from a well. The release and transport of radionuclides in disposal system were simulated by GoldSim. This approach suggested the time variation of effective dose over long-term period. And the results from this approach were compared with another approach method for the same facility and scenario

  15. The Dose Assessment in the Vault Test Case of Near-Surface Disposal Facility for Drinking Water Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Seon; Moon, Jei Kwon; Park, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the radionuclides contained in the radioactive wastes will be eventually released and these will be transported to the accessible environment (near-field, far-field, biosphere). Therefore, the long-term safety assessment of near-surface radioactive waste disposal should be required by modeling the expected release of radionuclides from the repository, far-field area, and biosphere. Finally, the effective dose rate should be estimated through the released radionuclides. In this study, the radiological dose was evaluated for the reference near-surface radioactive waste disposal facility in Vaalputs, South Africa, which has been selected as a part of IAEA coordinated research program on improvement of safety assessment methodologies(ISAM). The assessment of radiological dose was performed for drinking water scenario from a well. The release and transport of radionuclides in disposal system were simulated by GoldSim. This approach suggested the time variation of effective dose over long-term period. And the results from this approach were compared with another approach method for the same facility and scenario

  16. Near-surface ozone content at the Molodezhnaia and Mirnyi Antarctic stations, according to measurements made during spring 1987 to autumn 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruzdev, A.N.; Elokhov, A.S. (Rossiiskaia Akademiia Nauk, Institut Fiziki Atmosfery, Moscow (Russian Federation))

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of near-surface ozone measurements at the Molodezhnaia and Mirnyi Antarctic stations, conducted from the spring of 1987 to the autumn of 1988, as well as of measurements by an aircraft flying along the Mirnyi-Vostok-Mirnyi path (one flight). Mechanisms of diurnal, day-to-day, and annual ozone variability are examined. It is found that, during synoptically active periods, the near-surface ozone correlates positively with the temperature above the atmosphere-land boundary layer, while during the synoptically quiet period the ozone concentrations correlate with the direction of the surface katabatic wind. 29 refs.

  17. Near-Surface Profiles of Water Stable Isotope Components and Indicated Transitional History of Ice-Wedge Polygons Near Barrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahana, G.; Wilson, C.; Newman, B. D.; Heikoop, J. M.; Busey, R.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands associated with ice-wedge polygons are commonly distributed across the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska, a region underlain by continuous permafrost. Micro-topography of the ice-wedge polygons controls local hydrology, and the micro-topography could be altered due to factors such like surface vegetation, wetness, freeze-thaw cycles, and permafrost degradation/aggradation under climate change. Understanding status of the wetlands in the near future is important because it determines biogeochemical cycle, which drives release of greenhouse gases from the ground. However, transitional regime of the ice-wedge polygons under the changing climate is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed geochemistry of water extracted from frozen soil cores sampled down to about 1m depth in 2014 March at NGEE-Arctic sites in the Barrow Environmental Observatory. The cores were sampled from troughs/rims/centers of five different low-centered or flat-centered polygons. The frozen cores are divided into 5-10cm cores for each location, thawed in sealed plastic bags, and then extracted water was stored in vials. Comparison between the profiles of geochemistry indicated connection of soil water in the active layer at different location in a polygon, while it revealed that distinctly different water has been stored in permafrost layer at troughs/rims/centers of some polygons. Profiles of volumetric water content (VWC) showed clear signals of freeze-up desiccation in the middle of saturated active layers as low VWC anomalies at most sampling points. Water in the active layer and near-surface permafrost was classified into four categories: ice wedge / fresh meteoric / transitional / highly fractionated water. The overall results suggested prolonged separation of water in the active layer at the center of low-centered polygons without lateral connection in water path in the past.

  18. Coseismic landslides reveal near-surface rock strength in a high-relief tectonically active setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallen, Sean F.; Clark, Marin K.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    We present quantitative estimates of near-surface rock strength relevant to landscape evolution and landslide hazard assessment for 15 geologic map units of the Longmen Shan, China. Strength estimates are derived from a novel method that inverts earthquake peak ground acceleration models and coseismic landslide inventories to obtain material proper- ties and landslide thickness. Aggregate rock strength is determined by prescribing a friction angle of 30° and solving for effective cohesion. Effective cohesion ranges are from 70 kPa to 107 kPa for 15 geologic map units, and are approximately an order of magnitude less than typical laboratory measurements, probably because laboratory tests on hand-sized specimens do not incorporate the effects of heterogeneity and fracturing that likely control near-surface strength at the hillslope scale. We find that strength among the geologic map units studied varies by less than a factor of two. However, increased weakening of units with proximity to the range front, where precipitation and active fault density are the greatest, suggests that cli- matic and tectonic factors overwhelm lithologic differences in rock strength in this high-relief tectonically active setting.

  19. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwitz, Andreas; Gupta, Prasanth; Mohr, Berit; Hübner, René; Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert; Becker, Hans-Werner

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction 1H(15N, αγ)12C (Eres = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0-10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp2 hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  20. On the relationship between the snowflake type aloft and the surface precipitation types at temperatures near 0 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaré, Housseyni; Thériault, Julie M.

    2016-11-01

    Winter precipitation types can have major consequences on power outages, road conditions and air transportation. The type of precipitation reaching the surface depends strongly on the vertical temperature of the atmosphere, which is often composed of a warm layer aloft and a refreezing layer below it. A small variation of the vertical structure can lead to a change in the type of precipitation near the surface. It has been shown in previous studies that the type of precipitation depends also on the precipitation rate, which is directly linked to the particle size distribution and that a difference as low as 0.5 °C in the vertical temperature profile could change the type of precipitation near the surface. Given the importance of better understanding the formation of winter precipitation type, the goal of this study is to assess the impact of the snowflake habit aloft on the type of precipitation reaching the surface when the vertical temperature is near 0 °C. To address this, a one dimensional cloud model coupled with a bulk microphysics scheme was used. Four snowflake types (dendrite, bullet, column and graupel) have been added to the scheme. The production of precipitation at the surface from these types of snow has been compared to available observations. The results showed that the thickness of the snow-rain transition is four times deeper when columns and graupel only fall through the atmosphere compared to dendrites. Furthermore, a temperature of the melting layer that is three (four) times warmer is required to completely melt columns and graupel (dendrites). Finally, the formation of freezing rain is associated with the presence of lower density snowflakes (dendrites) aloft compared to the production of ice pellets (columns). Overall, this study demonstrated that the type of snowflakes has an impact on the type of precipitation reaching the surface when the temperature is near 0 °C.

  1. Dark Material at the Surface of Polar Crater Deposits on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Sun, Xiaoli; Mazarico, Erwan; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.; Paige, Daid A.

    2012-01-01

    Earth-based radar measurements [1-3] have yielded images of radar-bright material at the poles of Mercury postulated to be near-surface water ice residing in cold traps on the permanently shadowed floors of polar impact craters. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on board the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has now mapped much of the north polar region of Mercury [4] (Fig. 1). Radar-bright zones lie within polar craters or along poleward-facing scarps lying mainly in shadow. Calculations of illumination with respect to solid-body motion [5] show that at least 0.5% of the surface area north of 75deg N lies in permanent shadow, and that most such permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) coincide with radar-bright regions. MLA transmits a 1064-nm-wavelength laser pulse at 8 Hz, timing the leading and trailing edges of the return pulse. MLA can in some cases infer energy and thereby surface reflectance at the laser wavelength from the returned pulses. Surficial exposures of water ice would be optically brighter than the surroundings, but persistent surface water ice would require temperatures over all seasons to remain extremely low (Mercury s eccentric orbit, 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, and near-zero obliquity generally do not support such conditions in all permanently shadowed craters but suggest that water ice buried near the surface ( 1 Gy. We describe measurements of reflectivity derived from MLA pulse returns. These reflectivity data show that surface materials in the shadowed regions are darker than their surroundings, enough to strongly attenuate or extinguish laser returns. Such measurements appear to rule out widespread surface exposures of water ice. We consider explanations for the apparent low reflectivity of these regions involving other types of volatile deposit.

  2. Distribution of acidic and neutral drugs in surface waters near sewage treatment plants in the lower Great Lakes, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Chris D; Miao, Xiu-Sheng; Koenig, Brenda G; Struger, John

    2003-12-01

    Prescription and nonprescription drugs have been detected in rivers and streams in Europe and the United States. Sewage treatment plants (STPs) are an important source of these contaminants, but few data exist on the spatial distribution of drugs in surface waters near STPs. Samples of surface water were collected in the summer and fall of 2000 at open-water sites in the lower Great Lakes (Lake Ontario and Lake Erie), at sites near the two STPs for the city of Windsor (ON, Canada), and at sites in Hamilton Harbour (ON, Canada), an embayment of western Lake Ontario that receives discharges from several STPs. In a follow-up study in the summer of 2002, samples of surface water and final effluent from adjacent STPs were collected from sites in Hamilton Harbour and Windsor. In addition, surface water and STP effluent samples were collected in Peterborough (ON, Canada). All samples of surface water and STP effluents were analyzed for selected acidic and neutral drugs. In the survey of Hamilton Harbour and Windsor conducted in 2000, acidic drugs and the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine were detected at ng/L concentrations at sites that were up to 500 m away from the STP, but the hydrological conditions of the receiving waters strongly influenced the spatial distribution of these compounds. Drugs were not detected at open-water locations in western Lake Erie or in the Niagara River near the municipality of Niagara-on-the-Lake (ON, Canada). However, clofibric acid, ketoprofen, fenoprofen, and carbamazepine were detected in samples collected in the summer of 2000 at sites in Lake Ontario and at a site in the Niagara River (Fort Erie, ON, Canada) that were relatively remote from STP discharges. Follow-up studies in the summer of 2002 indicated that concentrations of acidic and neutral drugs in surface waters near the point of sewage discharge into the Little River (ON, Canada) STP were approximately equal to the concentrations in the final effluent from the STP. Caffeine and

  3. Study of laser-induced damage on the exit surface of silica components in the nanosecond regime in a multiple wavelengths configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambonneau, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, laser-induced damage phenomenon on the surface of fused silica components is investigated in the nanosecond regime. This phenomenon consists in an irreversible modification of the material. In the nanosecond regime, laser damage is tightly correlated to the presence of non-detectable precursor defects which are a consequence of the synthesis and the polishing of the components. In this thesis, we investigate laser damage in a multiple wavelengths configuration. In order to better understand this phenomenon in these conditions of irradiation, three studies are conducted. The first one focuses on damage initiation. The results obtained in the single wavelength configurations highlight a coupling in the multiple wavelengths one. A comparison between the experiments and a model developed during this thesis enables us to improve the knowledge of the fundamental processes involved during this damage phase. Then, we show that post mortem characterizations of damage morphology coupled to an accurate metrology allow us to understand both the nature and also the chronology of the physical mechanisms involved during damage formation. The proposed theoretical scenario is confirmed through various experiments. Finally, we study damage growth in both the single and the multiple wavelengths cases. Once again, this last configuration highlights a coupling between the wavelengths. We show the necessity to account for the spatial characteristics of the laser beams during a growth session. (author) [fr

  4. Investigation of the near-surface structures of polar InN films by chemical-state-discriminated hard X-ray photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, A. L.; Yamashita, Y.; Kobata, M.; Yoshikawa, H.; Sakata, O.; Kobayashi, K.; Matsushita, T.; Píš, I.; Imura, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Near-surface structures of polar InN films were investigated by laboratory-based hard X-ray photoelectron diffraction (HXPD) with chemical-state-discrimination. HXPD patterns from In 3d 5/2 and N 1s core levels of the In-polar and N-polar InN films were different from each other and compared with the simulation results using a multiple-scattering cluster model. It was found that the near-surface structure of the In-polar InN film was close to the ideal wurtzite structure. On the other hand, on the N-polar InN film, defects-rich surface was formed. In addition, the existence of the In-polar domains was observed in the HXPD patterns.

  5. The impact of grid and spectral nudging on the variance of the near-surface wind speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Claire Louise; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    2015-01-01

    Grid and spectral nudging are effective ways of preventing drift from large scale weather patterns in regional climate models. However, the effect of nudging on the wind-speed variance is unclear. In this study, the impact of grid and spectral nudging on near-surface and upper boundary layer wind...... nudging at and above 1150 m above ground level (AGL). Nested 5 km simulations are not nudged directly, but inherit boundary conditions from the 15 km experiments. Spatial and temporal spectra show that grid nudging causes smoothing of the wind in the 15 km domain at all wavenumbers, both at 1150 m AGL...... and near the surface where nudging is not applied directly, while spectral nudging mainly affects longer wavenumbers. Maps of mesoscale variance show spatial smoothing for both grid and spectral nudging, although the effect is less pronounced for spectral nudging. On the inner, 5 km domain, an indirect...

  6. Correlation of damage threshold and surface geometry of nodular defects in HR coatings as determined by in-situ atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staggs, M.C.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Balooch, M.

    1992-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine in-situ the correlation between the surface dimensions of defects in dielectric multilayer optical coatings and their susceptibility to damage by pulsed laser illumination. The primary surface defects studied were μm-scale domes associated with the classic nodule defect. The optical film studied was a highly reflective dielectric multilayer consisting of pairs of alternating HfO 2 and SiO 2 layers of quarter wave thickness at 1.06 μm. Nodule defect height and width dimensions were measured prior to laser illumination on two different samples. Correlation between these dimensions supported a simple model for the defect geometry. Defects with high nodule heights (> 0.6 μm) were found to be most susceptible to laser damage over a range of fluences between 0-35 J/cm 2 (1.06 μm, 10 ns, and 1/e 2 diam. of 1.3 mm). Crater defects, formed by nodules ejected from the coating prior to illumination, were also studied. None of the crater defects damaged when illuminated over the same range of fluences that the nodule defects were subjected to

  7. Copper in the sediment and sea surface microlayer near a fallowed, open-net fish farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, Clyde V; Fisher, E Brian

    2012-09-01

    Sediment and sea surface microlayer samples near an open-net salmon farm in Nova Scotia, were analysed for copper. Copper is a constituent of the feed and is an active ingredient of anti-foulants. The salmon farm was placed in fallow after 15 years of production. Sampling was pursued over 27 months. Elevated copper concentrations in the sediments indicated the farm site as a source. Bubble flotation due to gas-emitting sediments from eutrophication is a likely process for accumulating copper in the sea surface microlayer at enriched concentrations. Elevated and enriched concentrations in the sea surface microlayer over distance from the farm site led, as a result of wind-drift, to an enlarged farm footprint. The levels of copper in both sediments and sea surface microlayer exceeded guidelines for protection of marine life. Over the 27 months period, copper levels persisted in the sediments and decreased gradually in the sea surface microlayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pollution Damage and Protection of Asian Hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Qu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke was used to simulate a polluted environment and an experiment was performed to reveal how virgin and bleached hair are damaged by a polluted environment. The dry/wet combability, surface contact angle, tryptophan content, and cuticle morphology of the smoke exposed hair were evaluated, and compared to unexposed virgin hair. The results showed that pollution exposure can cause significant chemical damage to hair. In particular, virgin hair exposure to pollution can cause damage to the hair cuticles (higher wet/dry combing, protein degradation, and a more hydrophilic hair surface. The experiment also demonstrated that the styling polymer, polyimide-1 (isobutylene/dimethyl amino propyl maleimide/ethoxylated maleimide/maleic acid copolymer, can provide effective protection against such hair damage.

  9. A near-UV-converted LiMgBO3:Dy3+ nanophosphor: Surface and spectral investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedyal, A.K.; Kumar, Vinay; Prakash, Ram; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Swart, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Combustion method was employed to synthesize LiMgBO 3 :Dy 3+ nanophosphors. • The phosphor can be efficiently excited by near-UV chips. • XPS was done to investigate the chemical constitution and chemical bonding state of elements in the LiMgBO 3 : Dy 3+ nanophosphor. • The calculated CIE coordinates (0.45, 0.46) were found to be in the white spectrum region. - Abstract: A near-ultra violet (UV) converted LiMgBO 3 :Dy 3+ nanophosphors have been synthesized by the combustion method. The structural, spectral and optical properties were examined by powder X-ray diffraction, fluorescent spectrophotometry and UV–vis spectroscopy. The excitation spectra of the phosphors contain sharp peaks at 294, 323, 348 and 385 nm due to the 4f–4f transition of the Dy 3+ ion. The phosphor is efficiently excited by near-UV chips. Upon near-UV excitation the phosphor emits intense blue and yellow with a weak red band centered at 484, 573 and 669 nm respectively, ascribed to the transition of Dy 3+ ion from 4 F 9/2 → 6 H 15/2 , 6 H 13/2 , 6 H 11/2 . The diffuse reflectance spectra of the phosphors were consistent with the excitation spectra and were used to calculate the band gap of the material, approximated to be 5.4 eV. The calculated CIE coordinates (0.45, 0.46) under 348 nm excitation were found to be in the white spectrum region. For surface investigation, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used which confirms the presence of all the elements on the surface of the material

  10. Near-surface geothermal potential assessment of the region Leogang - Saalbach-Hinterglemm in Salzburg, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottig, Magdalena; Rupprecht, Doris; Hoyer, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Within the EU-funded Alpine Space project GRETA (Near-surface Geothermal Resources in the Territory of the Alpine space), a potential assessment for the use of near-surface geothermal energy is being performed. The focus region for Austria is represented by the two communities Leogang and Saalbach-Hinterglemm where settlements are located in altitudes of about 800 - 1.000 m. In these communities, as well as in large parts of the alpine space region in Austria, winter sports tourism is an important economic factor. The demand for heating and domestic hot water in this region of about 6.000 inhabitants rises significantly in the winter months due to around 2 million guest nights per year. This makes clear why the focus is on touristic infrastructure like alpine huts or hotels. It is a high-altitude area with a large number of remote houses, thus district-heating is not ubiquitous - thus, near-surface geothermal energy can be a useful solution for a self-sufficient energy supply. The objective of detailed investigation within the project is, to which extent the elevation, the gradient and the orientation of the hillside influence the geothermal usability of the shallow underground. To predict temperatures in depths of up to 100 m and therefore make statements on the geothermal usability of a certain piece of land, it is necessary to attain a precise ground-temperature map which reflects the upper model boundary. As there are no ground temperature measurement stations within the region, the GBA has installed four monitoring stations. Two are located in the valley, at altitudes of about 800 m, and two in higher altitudes of about 1.200 m, one on a south- and one on a north-slope. Using a software invented by the University of Soil Sciences in Vienna a ground-temperature map will be calculated. The calculation is based on climatic data con