WorldWideScience

Sample records for widely targeted metabolomics

  1. Retinal metabolic events in preconditioning light stress as revealed by wide-spectrum targeted metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Barca, Juan Manuel Chao; Huang, Nuan-Ting; Jiao, Haihan; Tessier, Lydie; Gadras, Cédric; Simard, Gilles; Natoli, Riccardo; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Reynier, Pascal; Valter, Krisztina

    2017-01-01

    Light is the primary stimulus for vision, but may also cause damage to the retina. Pre-exposing the retina to sub-lethal amount of light (or preconditioning) improves chances for retinal cells to survive acute damaging light stress. This study aims at exploring the changes in retinal metabolome after mild light stress and identifying mechanisms that may be involved in preconditioning. Retinas from 12 rats exposed to mild light stress (1000 lux × for 12 h) and 12 controls were collected one and seven days after light stress (LS). One retina was used for targeted metabolomics analysis using the Biocrates p180 kit while the fellow retina was used for histological and immunohistochemistry analysis. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that in this experiment, a mild LS with retinal immune response and minimal photoreceptor loss occurred. Compared to controls, LS induced an increased concentration in phosphatidylcholines. The concentration in some amino acids and biogenic amines, particularly those related to the nitric oxide pathway (like asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), arginine and citrulline) also increased 1 day after LS. 7 days after LS, the concentration in two sphingomyelins and phenylethylamine was found to be higher. We further found that in controls, retina metabolome was different between males and females: male retinas had an increased concentration in tyrosine, acetyl-ornithine, phosphatidylcholines and (acyl)-carnitines. Besides retinal sexual metabolic dimorphism, this study shows that preconditioning is mostly associated with re-organisation of lipid metabolism and changes in amino acid composition, likely reflecting the involvement of arginine-dependent NO signalling.

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study with Targeted and Non-targeted NMR Metabolomics Identifies 15 Novel Loci of Urinary Human Metabolic Individuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Raffler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies with metabolic traits (mGWAS uncovered many genetic variants that influence human metabolism. These genetically influenced metabotypes (GIMs contribute to our metabolic individuality, our capacity to respond to environmental challenges, and our susceptibility to specific diseases. While metabolic homeostasis in blood is a well investigated topic in large mGWAS with over 150 known loci, metabolic detoxification through urinary excretion has only been addressed by few small mGWAS with only 11 associated loci so far. Here we report the largest mGWAS to date, combining targeted and non-targeted 1H NMR analysis of urine samples from 3,861 participants of the SHIP-0 cohort and 1,691 subjects of the KORA F4 cohort. We identified and replicated 22 loci with significant associations with urinary traits, 15 of which are new (HIBCH, CPS1, AGXT, XYLB, TKT, ETNPPL, SLC6A19, DMGDH, SLC36A2, GLDC, SLC6A13, ACSM3, SLC5A11, PNMT, SLC13A3. Two-thirds of the urinary loci also have a metabolite association in blood. For all but one of the 6 loci where significant associations target the same metabolite in blood and urine, the genetic effects have the same direction in both fluids. In contrast, for the SLC5A11 locus, we found increased levels of myo-inositol in urine whereas mGWAS in blood reported decreased levels for the same genetic variant. This might indicate less effective re-absorption of myo-inositol in the kidneys of carriers. In summary, our study more than doubles the number of known loci that influence urinary phenotypes. It thus allows novel insights into the relationship between blood homeostasis and its regulation through excretion. The newly discovered loci also include variants previously linked to chronic kidney disease (CPS1, SLC6A13, pulmonary hypertension (CPS1, and ischemic stroke (XYLB. By establishing connections from gene to disease via metabolic traits our results provide novel hypotheses about molecular

  3. Targeting of the hydrophobic metabolome by pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, J Bernd; Kaloyanova, Dora V; Strating, Jeroen R P; van Hellemond, Jaap J; van der Schaar, Hilde M; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Brouwers, Jos F

    2015-05-01

    The hydrophobic molecules of the metabolome - also named the lipidome - constitute a major part of the entire metabolome. Novel technologies show the existence of a staggering number of individual lipid species, the biological functions of which are, with the exception of only a few lipid species, unknown. Much can be learned from pathogens that have evolved to take advantage of the complexity of the lipidome to escape the immune system of the host organism and to allow their survival and replication. Different types of pathogens target different lipids as shown in interaction maps, allowing visualization of differences between different types of pathogens. Bacterial and viral pathogens target predominantly structural and signaling lipids to alter the cellular phenotype of the host cell. Fungal and parasitic pathogens have complex lipidomes themselves and target predominantly the release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from the host cell lipidome, resulting in the generation of eicosanoids by either the host cell or the pathogen. Thus, whereas viruses and bacteria induce predominantly alterations in lipid metabolites at the host cell level, eukaryotic pathogens focus on interference with lipid metabolites affecting systemic inflammatory reactions that are part of the immune system. A better understanding of the interplay between host-pathogen interactions will not only help elucidate the fundamental role of lipid species in cellular physiology, but will also aid in the generation of novel therapeutic drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A targeted metabolomics approach for clinical diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Minnie; Malkawi, Abeer; Albast, Nour; Al Bougha, Salam; Lopata, Andreas; Dasouki, Majed; Abdel Rahman, Anas M

    2018-09-26

    Metabolome, the ultimate functional product of the genome, can be studied through identification and quantification of small molecules. The global metabolome influences the individual phenotype through clinical and environmental interventions. Metabolomics has become an integral part of clinical research and allowed for another dimension of better understanding of disease pathophysiology and mechanism. More than 95% of the clinical biochemistry laboratory routine workload is based on small molecular identification, which can potentially be analyzed through metabolomics. However, multiple challenges in clinical metabolomics impact the entire workflow and data quality, thus the biological interpretation needs to be standardized for a reproducible outcome. Herein, we introduce the establishment of a comprehensive targeted metabolomics method for a panel of 220 clinically relevant metabolites using Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) standardized for clinical research. The sensitivity, reproducibility and molecular stability of each targeted metabolite (amino acids, organic acids, acylcarnitines, sugars, bile acids, neurotransmitters, polyamines, and hormones) were assessed under multiple experimental conditions. The metabolic tissue distribution was determined in various rat organs. Furthermore, the method was validated in dry blood spot (DBS) samples collected from patients known to have various inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs). Using this approach, our panel appears to be sensitive and robust as it demonstrated differential and unique metabolic profiles in various rat tissues. Also, as a prospective screening method, this panel of diverse metabolites has the ability to identify patients with a wide range of IEMs who otherwise may need multiple, time-consuming and expensive biochemical assays causing a delay in clinical management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identifying biomarkers for asthma diagnosis using targeted metabolomics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkley, William; Deza, Maria P; Klawitter, Jost; Romero, Karina M; Klawitter, Jelena; Pollard, Suzanne L; Wise, Robert A; Christians, Uwe; Hansel, Nadia N

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of asthma in children is challenging and relies on a combination of clinical factors and biomarkers including methacholine challenge, lung function, bronchodilator responsiveness, and presence of airway inflammation. No single test is diagnostic. We sought to identify a pattern of inflammatory biomarkers that was unique to asthma using a targeted metabolomics approach combined with data science methods. We conducted a nested case-control study of 100 children living in a peri-urban community in Lima, Peru. We defined cases as children with current asthma, and controls as children with no prior history of asthma and normal lung function. We further categorized enrollment following a factorial design to enroll equal numbers of children as either overweight or not. We obtained a fasting venous blood sample to characterize a comprehensive panel of targeted markers using a metabolomics approach based on high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A statistical comparison of targeted metabolites between children with asthma (n = 50) and healthy controls (n = 49) revealed distinct patterns in relative concentrations of several metabolites: children with asthma had approximately 40-50% lower relative concentrations of ascorbic acid, 2-isopropylmalic acid, shikimate-3-phosphate, and 6-phospho-d-gluconate when compared to children without asthma, and 70% lower relative concentrations of reduced glutathione (all p  13 077 normalized counts/second and betaine ≤ 16 47 121 normalized counts/second). By using a metabolomics approach applied to serum, we were able to discriminate between children with and without asthma by revealing different metabolic patterns. These results suggest that serum metabolomics may represent a diagnostic tool for asthma and may be helpful for distinguishing asthma phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup-Nielsen, Maja Hermann

    Metabolomics is the analysis of the whole metabolome and the focus in metabolomics studies is to measure as many metabolites as possible. The use of chemometrics in metabolomics studies is widespread, but there is a clear lack of validation in the developed models. The focus in this thesis has been...... how to properly handle complex metabolomics data, in order to achieve reliable and valid multivariate models. This has been illustrated by three case studies with examples of forecasting breast cancer and early detection of colorectal cancer based on data from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR...... is a presentation of a core consistency diagnostic aiding in determining the number of components in a PARAFAC2 model. It is of great importance to validate especially PLS-DA models and if not done properly, the developed models might reveal spurious groupings. Furthermore, data from metabolomics studies contain...

  7. Targeted metabolomics profiles are strongly correlated with nutritional patterns in women

    OpenAIRE

    Menni, Cristina; Zhai, Guangju; MacGregor, Alexander; Prehn, Cornelia; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Suhre, Karsten; Adamski, Jerzy; Cassidy, Aedin; Illig, Thomas; Spector, Tim D.; Valdes, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in human metabolism and health. Metabolomics is a promising tool for clinical, genetic and nutritional studies. A key question is to what extent metabolomic profiles reflect nutritional patterns in an epidemiological setting. We assessed the relationship between metabolomic profiles and nutritional intake in women from a large cross-sectional community study. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) were applied to 1,003 women from the TwinsUK cohort with targete...

  8. Deconstructing the pig sex metabolome: Targeted metabolomics in heavy pigs revealed sexual dimorphisms in plasma biomarkers and metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovo, S; Mazzoni, G; Calò, D G; Galimberti, G; Fanelli, F; Mezzullo, M; Schiavo, G; Scotti, E; Manisi, A; Samoré, A B; Bertolini, F; Trevisi, P; Bosi, P; Dall'Olio, S; Pagotto, U; Fontanesi, L

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics has opened new possibilities to investigate metabolic differences among animals. In this study, we applied a targeted metabolomic approach to deconstruct the pig sex metabolome as defined by castrated males and entire gilts. Plasma from 545 performance-tested Italian Large White pigs (172 castrated males and 373 females) sampled at about 160 kg live weight were analyzed for 186 metabolites using the Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ p180 Kit. After filtering, 132 metabolites (20 AA, 11 biogenic amines, 1 hexose, 13 acylcarnitines, 11 sphingomyelins, 67 phosphatidylcholines, and 9 lysophosphatidylcholines) were retained for further analyses. The multivariate approach of the sparse partial least squares discriminant analysis was applied, together with a specifically designed statistical pipeline, that included a permutation test and a 10 cross-fold validation procedure that produced stability and effect size statistics for each metabolite. Using this approach, we identified 85 biomarkers (with metabolites from all analyzed chemical families) that contributed to the differences between the 2 groups of pigs ( metabolic shift in castrated males toward energy storage and lipid production. Similar general patterns were observed for most sphingomyelins, phosphatidylcholines, and lysophosphatidylcholines. Metabolomic pathway analysis and pathway enrichment identified several differences between the 2 sexes. This metabolomic overview opened new clues on the biochemical mechanisms underlying sexual dimorphism that, on one hand, might explain differences in terms of economic traits between castrated male pigs and entire gilts and, on the other hand, could strengthen the pig as a model to define metabolic mechanisms related to fat deposition.

  9. A Metabolome-Wide Study of Dry Eye Disease Reveals Serum Androgens as Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehof, Jelle; Hysi, Pirro G; Hammond, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    To test the association between serum metabolites and dry eye disease (DED) using a hypothesis-free metabolomics approach. Cross-sectional association study. A total of 2819 subjects from the population-representative TwinsUK cohort in the United Kingdom, with a mean age of 57 years (range, 17-82 years). We tested associations between 222 known serum metabolites and DED. All subjects underwent nontargeted metabolomic analysis of plasma samples using gas and liquid chromatography in combination with mass spectrometry (Metabolon Inc., Durham, NC). Dry eye disease was defined from the validated Short Questionnaire for Dry Eye Syndrome (SQDES) as a previous diagnosis of DED by a clinician or "often" or "constant" symptoms of dryness and irritation. Analyses were performed with linear mixed effect models that included age, BMI, and sex as covariates, corrected for multiple testing. Primary outcome was DED as defined by the SQDES, and secondary outcomes were symptom score of DED and a clinical diagnosis of DED. Prevalence of DED as defined by the SQDES was 15.5% (n = 436). A strong and metabolome-wide significant association with DED was found with decreased levels of the metabolites androsterone sulfate (P = 0.00030) and epiandrosterone sulfate (P = 0.00036). Three other metabolites involved in androgen metabolism, 4-androsten-3beta,17beta-diol disulfate 1 and 2, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, were the next most strongly associated of the 222 metabolites, but did not reach metabolome-wide significance. Dryness and irritation symptoms, as opposed to a clinical diagnosis, were particularly strongly associated with decreased androgen steroid metabolites, with all reaching metabolome-wide significance (androsterone sulfate, P = 0.000000029; epiandrosterone sulfate, P = 0.0000040; 4-androsten-3beta,17beta-diol disulfate 1, P = 0.000016; 4-androsten-3beta,17beta-diol disulfate 2, P = 0.000064; and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, P = 0.00011). Of these 5

  10. The effect of antibiotics and diet on enterolactone concentration and metabolome studied by targeted and non-targeted LC-MS metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolvig, Anne Katrine; Nørskov, Natalja; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2017-01-01

    with lower levels of ENL. Here, we investigate the link between antibiotic use and lignan metabolism in pigs using LC-MS/MS. The effect of lignan intake and antibiotic use on the gut microbial community and the pig metabolome is studied by 16S rRNA sequencing and non-targeted LC-MS. Treatment...

  11. Identification of drug targets by chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Manhong

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To advance our understanding of disease biology, the characterization of the molecular target for clinically proven or new drugs is very important. Because of its simplicity and the availability of strains with individual deletions in all of its genes, chemogenomic profiling in yeast has been used to identify drug targets. As measurement of drug-induced changes in cellular metabolites can yield considerable information about the effects of a drug, we investigated whether combining chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast could improve the characterization of drug targets. BASIC METHODS: We used chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast to characterize the target for five drugs acting on two biologically important pathways. A novel computational method that uses a curated metabolic network was also developed, and it was used to identify the genes that are likely to be responsible for the metabolomic differences found. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The combination of metabolomic and chemogenomic profiling, along with data analyses carried out using a novel computational method, could robustly identify the enzymes targeted by five drugs. Moreover, this novel computational method has the potential to identify genes that are causative of metabolomic differences or drug targets. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  12. Targeted metabolomics and medication classification data from participants in the ADNI1 cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John-Williams, Lisa; Blach, Colette; Toledo, Jon B.; Rotroff, Daniel M.; Kim, Sungeun; Klavins, Kristaps; Baillie, Rebecca; Han, Xianlin; Mahmoudiandehkordi, Siamak; Jack, John; Massaro, Tyler J.; Lucas, Joseph E.; Louie, Gregory; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.; Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Arnold, Matthias; Koal, Therese; Moseley, M. Arthur; Mangravite, Lara M.; Peters, Mette A.; Tenenbaum, Jessica D.; Thompson, J. Will; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease presenting major health and economic challenges that continue to grow. Mechanisms of disease are poorly understood but significant data point to metabolic defects that might contribute to disease pathogenesis. The Alzheimer Disease Metabolomics Consortium (ADMC) in partnership with Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is creating a comprehensive biochemical database for AD. Using targeted and non- targeted metabolomics and lipidomics platforms we are mapping metabolic pathway and network failures across the trajectory of disease. In this report we present quantitative metabolomics data generated on serum from 199 control, 356 mild cognitive impairment and 175 AD subjects enrolled in ADNI1 using AbsoluteIDQ-p180 platform, along with the pipeline for data preprocessing and medication classification for confound correction. The dataset presented here is the first of eight metabolomics datasets being generated for broad biochemical investigation of the AD metabolome. We expect that these collective metabolomics datasets will provide valuable resources for researchers to identify novel molecular mechanisms contributing to AD pathogenesis and disease phenotypes. PMID:29039849

  13. Targeted metabolomics and medication classification data from participants in the ADNI1 cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John-Williams, Lisa; Blach, Colette; Toledo, Jon B; Rotroff, Daniel M; Kim, Sungeun; Klavins, Kristaps; Baillie, Rebecca; Han, Xianlin; Mahmoudiandehkordi, Siamak; Jack, John; Massaro, Tyler J; Lucas, Joseph E; Louie, Gregory; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Arnold, Matthias; Koal, Therese; Moseley, M Arthur; Mangravite, Lara M; Peters, Mette A; Tenenbaum, Jessica D; Thompson, J Will; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima

    2017-10-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease presenting major health and economic challenges that continue to grow. Mechanisms of disease are poorly understood but significant data point to metabolic defects that might contribute to disease pathogenesis. The Alzheimer Disease Metabolomics Consortium (ADMC) in partnership with Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is creating a comprehensive biochemical database for AD. Using targeted and non- targeted metabolomics and lipidomics platforms we are mapping metabolic pathway and network failures across the trajectory of disease. In this report we present quantitative metabolomics data generated on serum from 199 control, 356 mild cognitive impairment and 175 AD subjects enrolled in ADNI1 using AbsoluteIDQ-p180 platform, along with the pipeline for data preprocessing and medication classification for confound correction. The dataset presented here is the first of eight metabolomics datasets being generated for broad biochemical investigation of the AD metabolome. We expect that these collective metabolomics datasets will provide valuable resources for researchers to identify novel molecular mechanisms contributing to AD pathogenesis and disease phenotypes.

  14. Blood Metabolic Signatures of Body Mass Index: A Targeted Metabolomics Study in the EPIC Cohort.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carayol, Marion; Leitzmann, Michael F; Ferrari, Pietro; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Achaintre, David; Stepien, Magdalena; Schmidt, Julie A; Travis, Ruth C; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Bachlechner, Ursula; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Palli, Domenico; Agnoli, Claudia; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J Ramón; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Huerta, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Arriola, Larraitz; Agudo, Antonio; Nilsson, Jan; Melander, Olle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peeters, Petra H; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Jenab, Mazda; Key, Timothy J; Scalbert, Augustin; Rinaldi, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics is now widely used to characterize metabolic phenotypes associated with lifestyle risk factors such as obesity. The objective of the present study was to explore the associations of body mass index (BMI) with 145 metabolites measured in blood samples in the European Prospective

  15. Non-targeted plasma metabolome of early and late lactation gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Female pigs nursing their first litter (first-parity gilts) have increased energy requirements not only to support their piglets, but they themselves are still maturing. Non-targeted plasma metabolomics were used to investigate the differences between (1) post-farrowing and weaning (early or late l...

  16. The Uses and Future Prospects of Metabolomics and Targeted Metabolite Profiling in Cell Factory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Scott James; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    , these broader measurements of the cellular metabolic state are now becoming part of the toolbox used to characterize cell factories. In this review we briefly summarize the benefits and challenges of global metabolomics and targeted metabolite profiling methods and discuss the application of these methods...

  17. Targeted metabolomics profiles are strongly correlated with nutritional patterns in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menni, Cristina; Zhai, Guangju; Macgregor, Alexander; Prehn, Cornelia; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Suhre, Karsten; Adamski, Jerzy; Cassidy, Aedin; Illig, Thomas; Spector, Tim D; Valdes, Ana M

    2013-04-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in human metabolism and health. Metabolomics is a promising tool for clinical, genetic and nutritional studies. A key question is to what extent metabolomic profiles reflect nutritional patterns in an epidemiological setting. We assessed the relationship between metabolomic profiles and nutritional intake in women from a large cross-sectional community study. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) were applied to 1,003 women from the TwinsUK cohort with targeted metabolomic analyses of serum samples using the Biocrates Absolute-IDQ™ Kit p150 (163 metabolites). We analyzed seven nutritional parameters: coffee intake, garlic intake and nutritional scores derived from the FFQs summarizing fruit and vegetable intake, alcohol intake, meat intake, hypo-caloric dieting and a "traditional English" diet. We studied the correlation between metabolite levels and dietary intake patterns in the larger population and identified for each trait between 14 and 20 independent monozygotic twins pairs discordant for nutritional intake and replicated results in this set. Results from both analyses were then meta-analyzed. For the metabolites associated with nutritional patterns, we calculated heritability using structural equation modelling. 42 metabolite nutrient intake associations were statistically significant in the discovery samples (Bonferroni P  hypo-caloric dieting. Using the twin study design we find that two thirds the metabolites associated with nutritional patterns have a significant genetic contribution, and the remaining third are solely environmentally determined. Our data confirm the value of metabolomic studies for nutritional epidemiologic research.

  18. Recent Advances in Targeted and Untargeted Metabolomics by NMR and MS/NMR Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingol, Kerem

    2018-04-18

    Metabolomics has made significant progress in multiple fronts in the last 18 months. This minireview aimed to give an overview of these advancements in the light of their contribution to targeted and untargeted metabolomics. New computational approaches have emerged to overcome manual absolute quantitation step of metabolites in 1D 1H NMR spectra. This provides more consistency between inter-laboratory comparisons. Integration of 2D NMR metabolomics databases under a unified web server allowed very accurate identification of the metabolites that have been catalogued in these databases. For the remaining uncatalogued and unknown metabolites, new cheminformatics approaches have been developed by combining NMR and mass spectrometry. These hybrid NMR/MS approaches accelerated the identification of unknowns in untargeted studies, and now they are allowing to profile ever larger number of metabolites in application studies.

  19. Metabolomic and Genome-wide Association Studies Reveal Potential Endogenous Biomarkers for OATP1B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, S W; Giacomini, M M; Hsueh, C-H; Weitz, D; Liang, X; Goswami, S; Kinchen, J M; Coelho, A; Zur, A A; Mertsch, K; Brian, W; Kroetz, D L; Giacomini, K M

    2016-11-01

    Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major cause of drug toxicities. Using published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the human metabolome, we identified 20 metabolites associated with genetic variants in organic anion transporter, OATP1B1 (P acids and fatty acid dicarboxylates were among the metabolites discovered using both GWAS and CSA administration. In vitro studies confirmed tetradecanedioate (TDA) and hexadecanedioate (HDA) were novel substrates of OATP1B1 as well as OAT1 and OAT3. This study highlights the use of multiple datasets for the discovery of endogenous metabolites that represent potential in vivo biomarkers for transporter-mediated DDIs. Future studies are needed to determine whether these metabolites can serve as qualified biomarkers for organic anion transporters. Quantitative relationships between metabolite levels and modulation of transporters should be established. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. On the hypothesis-free testing of metabolite ratios in genome-wide and metabolome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Ann-Kristin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS with metabolic traits and metabolome-wide association studies (MWAS with traits of biomedical relevance are powerful tools to identify the contribution of genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors to the etiology of complex diseases. Hypothesis-free testing of ratios between all possible metabolite pairs in GWAS and MWAS has proven to be an innovative approach in the discovery of new biologically meaningful associations. The p-gain statistic was introduced as an ad-hoc measure to determine whether a ratio between two metabolite concentrations carries more information than the two corresponding metabolite concentrations alone. So far, only a rule of thumb was applied to determine the significance of the p-gain. Results Here we explore the statistical properties of the p-gain through simulation of its density and by sampling of experimental data. We derive critical values of the p-gain for different levels of correlation between metabolite pairs and show that B/(2*α is a conservative critical value for the p-gain, where α is the level of significance and B the number of tested metabolite pairs. Conclusions We show that the p-gain is a well defined measure that can be used to identify statistically significant metabolite ratios in association studies and provide a conservative significance cut-off for the p-gain for use in future association studies with metabolic traits.

  1. Metabolomics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: the combination of targeted and untargeted profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics is ideal for identifying and quantitating small molecular metabolites (metabolomics easily allows integrating targeted assays for absolute quantification of specific metabolites with untargeted metabolomics to discover novel compounds. Complemented by database annotations using large spectral libraries and validated, standardized standard operating procedures, GC-MS can identify and semi-quantify over 200 compounds per study in human body fluids (e.g., plasma, urine or stool) samples. Deconvolution software enables detection of more than 300 additional unidentified signals that can be annotated through accurate mass instruments with appropriate data processing workflows, similar to liquid chromatography-MS untargeted profiling (LC-MS). Hence, GC-MS is a mature technology that not only uses classic detectors (‘quadrupole’) but also target mass spectrometers (‘triple quadrupole’) and accurate mass instruments (‘quadrupole-time of flight’). This unit covers the following aspects of GC-MS-based metabolomics: (i) sample preparation from mammalian samples, (ii) acquisition of data, (iii) quality control, and (iv) data processing. PMID:27038389

  2. SWATHtoMRM: Development of High-Coverage Targeted Metabolomics Method Using SWATH Technology for Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Haihong; Cai, Yuping; Yin, Yandong; Wang, Zhuozhong; Li, Kang; Zhu, Zheng-Jiang

    2018-03-20

    The complexity of metabolome presents a great analytical challenge for quantitative metabolite profiling, and restricts the application of metabolomics in biomarker discovery. Targeted metabolomics using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) technique has excellent capability for quantitative analysis, but suffers from the limited metabolite coverage. To address this challenge, we developed a new strategy, namely, SWATHtoMRM, which utilizes the broad coverage of SWATH-MS technology to develop high-coverage targeted metabolomics method. Specifically, SWATH-MS technique was first utilized to untargeted profile one pooled biological sample and to acquire the MS 2 spectra for all metabolites. Then, SWATHtoMRM was used to extract the large-scale MRM transitions for targeted analysis with coverage as high as 1000-2000 metabolites. Then, we demonstrated the advantages of SWATHtoMRM method in quantitative analysis such as coverage, reproducibility, sensitivity, and dynamic range. Finally, we applied our SWATHtoMRM approach to discover potential metabolite biomarkers for colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis. A high-coverage targeted metabolomics method with 1303 metabolites in one injection was developed to profile colorectal cancer tissues from CRC patients. A total of 20 potential metabolite biomarkers were discovered and validated for CRC diagnosis. In plasma samples from CRC patients, 17 out of 20 potential biomarkers were further validated to be associated with tumor resection, which may have a great potential in assessing the prognosis of CRC patients after tumor resection. Together, the SWATHtoMRM strategy provides a new way to develop high-coverage targeted metabolomics method, and facilitates the application of targeted metabolomics in disease biomarker discovery. The SWATHtoMRM program is freely available on the Internet ( http://www.zhulab.cn/software.php ).

  3. Metabolomics - A wide-open door to personalized treatment in chronic heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz-Siemion, M; Ciborowski, M; Kretowski, A; Musial, W J; Kaminski, K A

    2016-09-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome representing a final stage of various cardiovascular diseases. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and treatment (e.g. ACE-inhibitors, β-blockers, aldosterone antagonists, cardiac resynchronization therapy) of the disease, prognosis of optimally treated patients remains very serious and HF mortality is still unacceptably high. Therefore there is a strong need for further exploration of novel analytical methods, predictive and prognostic biomarkers and more personalized treatment. The metabolism of the failing heart being significantly impaired from its baseline state may be a future target not only for biomarker discovery but also for the pharmacologic intervention. However, an assessment of a particular, isolated metabolite or protein cannot be fully informative and makes a correct interpretation difficult. On the other hand, metabolites profile analysis may greatly assist investigator in an interpretation of the altered pathway dynamics, especially when combined with other lines of evidence (e.g. metabolites from the same pathway, transcriptomics, proteomics). Despite many prior studies on metabolism, the knowledge of peripheral and cardiac pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the metabolic imbalance and progression of the disease is still insufficient. Metabolomics enabling comprehensive characterization of low molecular weight metabolites (e.g. lipids, sugars, organic acids, amino acids) that reflects the complete metabolic phenotype seems to be the key for further potential improvement in HF treatment (diet-based or biochemical-based). Will this -omics technique one day open a door to easy patients identification before they have a heart failure onset or its decompensation? Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics: Targeting the crosstalk between gut microbiota and brain in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hemi; Wang, Xian; Cai, Zongwei

    2017-11-12

    Metabolomics seeks to take a "snapshot" in a time of the levels, activities, regulation and interactions of all small molecule metabolites in response to a biological system with genetic or environmental changes. The emerging development in mass spectrometry technologies has shown promise in the discovery and quantitation of neuroactive small molecule metabolites associated with gut microbiota and brain. Significant progress has been made recently in the characterization of intermediate role of small molecule metabolites linked to neural development and neurodegenerative disorder, showing its potential in understanding the crosstalk between gut microbiota and the host brain. More evidence reveals that small molecule metabolites may play a critical role in mediating microbial effects on neurotransmission and disease development. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics is uniquely suitable for obtaining the metabolic signals in bidirectional communication between gut microbiota and brain. In this review, we summarized major mass spectrometry technologies including liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and imaging mass spectrometry for metabolomics studies of neurodegenerative disorders. We also reviewed the recent advances in the identification of new metabolites by mass spectrometry and metabolic pathways involved in the connection of intestinal microbiota and brain. These metabolic pathways allowed the microbiota to impact the regular function of the brain, which can in turn affect the composition of microbiota via the neurotransmitter substances. The dysfunctional interaction of this crosstalk connects neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. The mass spectrometry-based metabolomics analysis provides information for targeting dysfunctional pathways of small molecule metabolites in the development of the neurodegenerative diseases, which may be valuable for the

  5. Metabolomic Profiling of the Malaria Box Reveals Antimalarial Target Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, Erik L.; Painter, Heather J.; Samra, Jasmeet; Carrasquilla, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The threat of widespread drug resistance to frontline antimalarials has renewed the urgency for identifying inexpensive chemotherapeutic compounds that are effective against Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite species responsible for the greatest number of malaria-related deaths worldwide. To aid in the fight against malaria, a recent extensive screening campaign has generated thousands of lead compounds with low micromolar activity against blood stage parasites. A subset of these leads has been compiled by the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) into a collection of structurally diverse compounds known as the MMV Malaria Box. Currently, little is known regarding the activity of these Malaria Box compounds on parasite metabolism during intraerythrocytic development, and a majority of the targets for these drugs have yet to be defined. Here we interrogated the in vitro metabolic effects of 189 drugs (including 169 of the drug-like compounds from the Malaria Box) using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). The resulting metabolic fingerprints provide information on the parasite biochemical pathways affected by pharmacologic intervention and offer a critical blueprint for selecting and advancing lead compounds as next-generation antimalarial drugs. Our results reveal several major classes of metabolic disruption, which allow us to predict the mode of action (MoA) for many of the Malaria Box compounds. We anticipate that future combination therapies will be greatly informed by these results, allowing for the selection of appropriate drug combinations that simultaneously target multiple metabolic pathways, with the aim of eliminating malaria and forestalling the expansion of drug-resistant parasites in the field. PMID:27572391

  6. Livestock metabolomics and the livestock metabolome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldansaz, Seyed Ali; Guo, An Chi; Sajed, Tanvir; Steele, Michael A; Plastow, Graham S; Wishart, David S

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics uses advanced analytical chemistry techniques to comprehensively measure large numbers of small molecule metabolites in cells, tissues and biofluids. The ability to rapidly detect and quantify hundreds or even thousands of metabolites within a single sample is helping scientists paint a far more complete picture of system-wide metabolism and biology. Metabolomics is also allowing researchers to focus on measuring the end-products of complex, hard-to-decipher genetic, epigenetic and environmental interactions. As a result, metabolomics has become an increasingly popular "omics" approach to assist with the robust phenotypic characterization of humans, crop plants and model organisms. Indeed, metabolomics is now routinely used in biomedical, nutritional and crop research. It is also being increasingly used in livestock research and livestock monitoring. The purpose of this systematic review is to quantitatively and objectively summarize the current status of livestock metabolomics and to identify emerging trends, preferred technologies and important gaps in the field. In conducting this review we also critically assessed the applications of livestock metabolomics in key areas such as animal health assessment, disease diagnosis, bioproduct characterization and biomarker discovery for highly desirable economic traits (i.e., feed efficiency, growth potential and milk production). A secondary goal of this critical review was to compile data on the known composition of the livestock metabolome (for 5 of the most common livestock species namely cattle, sheep, goats, horses and pigs). These data have been made available through an open access, comprehensive livestock metabolome database (LMDB, available at http://www.lmdb.ca). The LMDB should enable livestock researchers and producers to conduct more targeted metabolomic studies and to identify where further metabolome coverage is needed.

  7. Livestock metabolomics and the livestock metabolome: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, An Chi; Sajed, Tanvir; Steele, Michael A.; Plastow, Graham S.; Wishart, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics uses advanced analytical chemistry techniques to comprehensively measure large numbers of small molecule metabolites in cells, tissues and biofluids. The ability to rapidly detect and quantify hundreds or even thousands of metabolites within a single sample is helping scientists paint a far more complete picture of system-wide metabolism and biology. Metabolomics is also allowing researchers to focus on measuring the end-products of complex, hard-to-decipher genetic, epigenetic and environmental interactions. As a result, metabolomics has become an increasingly popular “omics” approach to assist with the robust phenotypic characterization of humans, crop plants and model organisms. Indeed, metabolomics is now routinely used in biomedical, nutritional and crop research. It is also being increasingly used in livestock research and livestock monitoring. The purpose of this systematic review is to quantitatively and objectively summarize the current status of livestock metabolomics and to identify emerging trends, preferred technologies and important gaps in the field. In conducting this review we also critically assessed the applications of livestock metabolomics in key areas such as animal health assessment, disease diagnosis, bioproduct characterization and biomarker discovery for highly desirable economic traits (i.e., feed efficiency, growth potential and milk production). A secondary goal of this critical review was to compile data on the known composition of the livestock metabolome (for 5 of the most common livestock species namely cattle, sheep, goats, horses and pigs). These data have been made available through an open access, comprehensive livestock metabolome database (LMDB, available at http://www.lmdb.ca). The LMDB should enable livestock researchers and producers to conduct more targeted metabolomic studies and to identify where further metabolome coverage is needed. PMID:28531195

  8. System-Wide Hypersensitive Response-Associated Transcriptome and Metabolome Reprogramming in Tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etalo, D.W.; Stulemeijer, I.J.E.; Esse, van H.P.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is considered to be the hallmark of the resistance response of plants to pathogens. To study HR-associated transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), we used plants that express both a resistance gene to Cladosporium fulvum and the

  9. A Metabolome-Wide Study of Dry Eye Disease Reveals Serum Androgens as Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Hysi, Pirro G.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    Purpose: To test the association between serum metabolites and dry eye disease (DED) using a hypothesisfree metabolomics approach. Design: Cross-sectional association study. Participants: A total of 2819 subjects from the population-representative TwinsUK cohort in the United Kingdom, with a mean

  10. Acclimation to UV-B radiation and visible light in Lactuca sativa involves up-regulation of photosynthetic performance and orchestration of metabolome-wide responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargent, J J; Nelson, B C W; McGhie, T K; Barnes, P W

    2015-05-01

    UV-B radiation is often viewed as a source of stress for higher plants. In particular, photosynthetic function has been described as a common target for UV-B impairment; yet as our understanding of UV-B photomorphogenesis increases, there are opportunities to expand the emerging paradigm of regulatory UV response. Lactuca sativa is an important dietary crop species and is often subjected to rapid sunlight exposure at field transfer. Acclimation to UV-B and visible light conditions in L. sativa was dissected using gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, in addition to non-destructive assessments of UV epidermal shielding (SUV ). After UV-B treatment, seedlings were subjected to wide-range metabolomic analysis using liquid chromatography hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-HRMS). During the acclimation period, net photosynthetic rate increased in UV-treated plants, epidermal UV shielding increased in both subsets of plants transferred to the acclimatory conditions (UV+/UV- plants) and Fv /Fm declined slightly in UV+/UV- plants. Metabolomic analysis revealed that a key group of secondary compounds was up-regulated by higher light conditions, yet several of these compounds were elevated further by UV-B radiation. In conclusion, acclimation to UV-B radiation involves co-protection from the effects of visible light, and responses to UV-B radiation at a photosynthetic level may not be consistently viewed as damaging to plant development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Plant metabolomics and its potential application for human nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.; Brouwer, I.D.; Fitzgerald, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    With the growing interest in the use of metabolomic technologies for a wide range of biological targets, food applications related to nutrition and quality are rapidly emerging. Metabolomics offers us the opportunity to gain deeper insights into, and have better control of, the fundamental

  12. AICAR stimulation metabolome widely mimics electrical contraction in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Licht; Egawa, Tatsuro; Oshima, Rieko; Kurogi, Eriko; Tomida, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2013-12-15

    Physical exercise has potent therapeutic and preventive effects against metabolic disorders. A number of studies have suggested that 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a pivotal role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in contracting skeletal muscles, while several genetically manipulated animal models revealed the significance of AMPK-independent pathways. To elucidate significance of AMPK and AMPK-independent signals in contracting skeletal muscles, we conducted a metabolomic analysis that compared the metabolic effects of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribonucleoside (AICAR) stimulation with the electrical contraction ex vivo in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscles, in which both α1- and α2-isoforms of AMPK and glucose uptake were equally activated. The metabolomic analysis using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry detected 184 peaks and successfully annotated 132 small molecules. AICAR stimulation exhibited high similarity to the electrical contraction in overall metabolites. Principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that the major principal component characterized common effects whereas the minor principal component distinguished the difference. PCA and a factor analysis suggested a substantial change in redox status as a result of AMPK activation. We also found a decrease in reduced glutathione levels in both AICAR-stimulated and contracting muscles. The muscle contraction-evoked influences related to the metabolism of amino acids, in particular, aspartate, alanine, or lysine, are supposed to be independent of AMPK activation. Our results substantiate the significance of AMPK activation in contracting skeletal muscles and provide novel evidence that AICAR stimulation closely mimics the metabolomic changes in the contracting skeletal muscles.

  13. TARGETED, LCMS-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF NAD+ METABOLITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel AJ Trammell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ is a coenzyme for hydride transfer reactions and a substrate for sirtuins and other NAD+-consuming enzymes. The abundance of NAD+, NAD+ biosynthetic intermediates, and related nucleotides reflects the metabolic state of cells and tissues. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC followed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis of NAD+ metabolites does not offer the specificity and sensitivity necessary for robust quantification of complex samples. Thus, we developed a targeted, quantitative assay of the NAD+ metabolome with the use of HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. Here we discuss NAD+ metabolism as well as the technical challenges required for reliable quantification of the NAD+ metabolites. The new method incorporates new separations and improves upon a previously published method that suffered from the problem of ionization suppression for particular compounds.

  14. Metabolomics reveals metabolic targets and biphasic responses in breast cancer cells treated by curcumin alone and in association with docetaxel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Bayet-Robert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Curcumin (CUR has deserved extensive research due to its anti-inflammatory properties, of interest in human diseases including cancer. However, pleiotropic even paradoxical responses of tumor cells have been reported, and the mechanisms of action of CUR remain uncompletely elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics was applied to get novel insight into responses of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to CUR alone, and MCF7 cells to CUR in cotreatment with docetaxel (DTX. In both cell types, a major target of CUR was glutathione metabolism. Total glutathione (GSx increased at low dose CUR (≤ 10 mg.l(-1-28 µM- (up to +121% in MCF7 cells, P<0.01, and +138% in MDA-MB-231 cells, P<0.01, but decreased at high dose (≥ 25 mg.l(-1 -70 µM- (-49%, in MCF7 cells, P<0.02, and -56% in MDA-MB-231 cells, P<0.025. At high dose, in both cell types, GSx-related metabolites decreased, including homocystein, creatine and taurine (-60 to -80%, all, P<0.05. Together with glutathione-S-transferase actvity, data established that GSx biosynthesis was upregulated at low dose, and GSx consumption activated at high dose. Another major target, in both cell types, was lipid metabolism involving, at high doses, accumulation of polyunsaturated and total free fatty acids (between ×4.5 and ×11, P<0.025, and decrease of glycerophospho-ethanolamine and -choline (about -60%, P<0.025. Multivariate statistical analyses showed a metabolic transition, even a biphasic behavior of some metabolites including GSx, between low and high doses. In addition, CUR at 10 mg.l(-1 in cotreatment with DTX induced modifications in glutathione metabolism, lipid metabolism, and glucose utilization. Some of these changes were biphasic depending on the duration of exposure to CUR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Metabolomics reveals major metabolic targets of CUR in breast cancer cells, and biphasic responses that challenge the widely accepted

  15. Genetics meets metabolomics: a genome-wide association study of metabolite profiles in human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gieger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly evolving field of metabolomics aims at a comprehensive measurement of ideally all endogenous metabolites in a cell or body fluid. It thereby provides a functional readout of the physiological state of the human body. Genetic variants that associate with changes in the homeostasis of key lipids, carbohydrates, or amino acids are not only expected to display much larger effect sizes due to their direct involvement in metabolite conversion modification, but should also provide access to the biochemical context of such variations, in particular when enzyme coding genes are concerned. To test this hypothesis, we conducted what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first GWA study with metabolomics based on the quantitative measurement of 363 metabolites in serum of 284 male participants of the KORA study. We found associations of frequent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with considerable differences in the metabolic homeostasis of the human body, explaining up to 12% of the observed variance. Using ratios of certain metabolite concentrations as a proxy for enzymatic activity, up to 28% of the variance can be explained (p-values 10(-16 to 10(-21. We identified four genetic variants in genes coding for enzymes (FADS1, LIPC, SCAD, MCAD where the corresponding metabolic phenotype (metabotype clearly matches the biochemical pathways in which these enzymes are active. Our results suggest that common genetic polymorphisms induce major differentiations in the metabolic make-up of the human population. This may lead to a novel approach to personalized health care based on a combination of genotyping and metabolic characterization. These genetically determined metabotypes may subscribe the risk for a certain medical phenotype, the response to a given drug treatment, or the reaction to a nutritional intervention or environmental challenge.

  16. Identification of serum metabolites associated with risk of type 2 diabetes using a targeted metabolomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floegel, Anna; Stefan, Norbert; Yu, Zhonghao; Mühlenbruch, Kristin; Drogan, Dagmar; Joost, Hans-Georg; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Prehn, Cornelia; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Illig, Thomas; Schulze, Matthias B; Adamski, Jerzy; Boeing, Heiner; Pischon, Tobias

    2013-02-01

    Metabolomic discovery of biomarkers of type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk may reveal etiological pathways and help to identify individuals at risk for disease. We prospectively investigated the association between serum metabolites measured by targeted metabolomics and risk of T2D in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam (27,548 adults) among all incident cases of T2D (n = 800, mean follow-up 7 years) and a randomly drawn subcohort (n = 2,282). Flow injection analysis tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify 163 metabolites, including acylcarnitines, amino acids, hexose, and phospholipids, in baseline serum samples. Serum hexose; phenylalanine; and diacyl-phosphatidylcholines C32:1, C36:1, C38:3, and C40:5 were independently associated with increased risk of T2D and serum glycine; sphingomyelin C16:1; acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines C34:3, C40:6, C42:5, C44:4, and C44:5; and lysophosphatidylcholine C18:2 with decreased risk. Variance of the metabolites was largely explained by two metabolite factors with opposing risk associations (factor 1 relative risk in extreme quintiles 0.31 [95% CI 0.21-0.44], factor 2 3.82 [2.64-5.52]). The metabolites significantly improved T2D prediction compared with established risk factors. They were further linked to insulin sensitivity and secretion in the Tübingen Family study and were partly replicated in the independent KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) cohort. The data indicate that metabolic alterations, including sugar metabolites, amino acids, and choline-containing phospholipids, are associated early on with a higher risk of T2D.

  17. Targeted metabolomic profiling indicates structure-based perturbations in serum phospholipids in children with acetaminophen overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeepa Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available Phospholipids are an important class of lipids that act as building blocks of biological cell membranes and participate in a variety of vital cellular functions including cell signaling. Previous studies have reported alterations in phosphatidylcholine (PC and lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC metabolism in acetaminophen (APAP-treated animals or cell cultures. However, little is known about phospholipid perturbations in humans with APAP toxicity. In the current study, targeted metabolomic analysis of 180 different metabolites including 14 lysoPCs and 73 PCs was performed in serum samples from children and adolescents hospitalized for APAP overdose. Metabolite profiles in the overdose group were compared to those of healthy controls and hospitalized children receiving low dose APAP for treatment of pain or fever (therapeutic group. PCs and lysoPCs with very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs were significantly decreased in the overdose group, while those with comparatively shorter chain lengths were increased in the overdose group compared to the therapeutic and control groups. All ether linked PCs were decreased in the overdose group compared to the controls. LysoPC-C26:1 was highly reduced in the overdose group and could discriminate between the overdose and control groups with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The PCs and lysoPCs with VLCFAs showed significant associations with changes in clinical indicators of drug metabolism (APAP protein adducts and liver injury (alanine aminotransferase, or ALT. Thus, a structure-dependent reduction in PCs and lysoPCs was observed in the APAP-overdose group, which may suggest a structure-activity relationship in inhibition of enzymes involved in phospholipid metabolism in APAP toxicity. Keywords: Metabolomics, Phospholipids, Acetaminophen, Hepatotoxicity, Drug

  18. Metabolome-genome-wide association study dissects genetic architecture for generating natural variation in rice secondary metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Fumio; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Yang, Zhigang; Okazaki, Yozo; Yonemaru, Jun-ichi; Ebana, Kaworu; Yano, Masahiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce structurally diverse secondary (specialized) metabolites to increase their fitness for survival under adverse environments. Several bioactive compounds for new drugs have been identified through screening of plant extracts. In this study, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were conducted to investigate the genetic architecture behind the natural variation of rice secondary metabolites. GWAS using the metabolome data of 175 rice accessions successfully identified 323 associations among 143 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 89 metabolites. The data analysis highlighted that levels of many metabolites are tightly associated with a small number of strong quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The tight association may be a mechanism generating strains with distinct metabolic composition through the crossing of two different strains. The results indicate that one plant species produces more diverse phytochemicals than previously expected, and plants still contain many useful compounds for human applications. PMID:25267402

  19. Effect of Antibiotics and Diet on Enterolactone Concentration and Metabolome Studied by Targeted and Nontargeted LC-MS Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolvig, Anne K; Nørskov, Natalja P; Hedemann, Mette S; Foldager, Leslie; McCarthy-Sinclair, Brendan; Marco, Maria L; Lærke, Helle N; Bach Knudsen, Knud E

    2017-06-02

    High plant lignan intake is associated with a number of health benefits, possibly induced by the lignan metabolite enterolactone (ENL). The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in converting dietary lignans into ENL, and epidemiological studies have shown that use of antibiotics is associated with lower levels of ENL. Here we investigate the link between antibiotic use and lignan metabolism in pigs using LC-MS/MS. The effect of lignan intake and antibiotic use on the gut microbial community and the pig metabolome is studied by 16S rRNA sequencing and nontargeted LC-MS. Treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially lower concentrations of ENL compared with concentrations detected in untreated animals, whereas the plasma concentrations of plant lignans were unchanged. Both diet and antibiotic treatment affected the clustering of urinary metabolites and significantly altered the proportions of taxa in the gut microbiota. Diet, but not antibiotic treatment, affected the plasma lipid profile, and a lower concentration of LDL cholesterol was observed in the pigs fed a high lignan diet. This study provides solid support for the associations between ENL concentrations and use of antibiotics found in humans and indicates that the lower ENL concentration may be a consequence of the ecological changes in the microbiota.

  20. Comparative analysis of targeted metabolomics: dominance-based rough set approach versus orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, H; Błaszczyński, J; Billaut, J C; Nadal-Desbarats, L; Pradat, P F; Devos, D; Moreau, C; Andres, C R; Emond, P; Corcia, P; Słowiński, R

    2015-02-01

    Metabolomics is an emerging field that includes ascertaining a metabolic profile from a combination of small molecules, and which has health applications. Metabolomic methods are currently applied to discover diagnostic biomarkers and to identify pathophysiological pathways involved in pathology. However, metabolomic data are complex and are usually analyzed by statistical methods. Although the methods have been widely described, most have not been either standardized or validated. Data analysis is the foundation of a robust methodology, so new mathematical methods need to be developed to assess and complement current methods. We therefore applied, for the first time, the dominance-based rough set approach (DRSA) to metabolomics data; we also assessed the complementarity of this method with standard statistical methods. Some attributes were transformed in a way allowing us to discover global and local monotonic relationships between condition and decision attributes. We used previously published metabolomics data (18 variables) for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and non-ALS patients. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) allowed satisfactory discrimination (72.7%) between ALS and non-ALS patients. Some discriminant metabolites were identified: acetate, acetone, pyruvate and glutamine. The concentrations of acetate and pyruvate were also identified by univariate analysis as significantly different between ALS and non-ALS patients. DRSA correctly classified 68.7% of the cases and established rules involving some of the metabolites highlighted by OPLS-DA (acetate and acetone). Some rules identified potential biomarkers not revealed by OPLS-DA (beta-hydroxybutyrate). We also found a large number of common discriminating metabolites after Bayesian confirmation measures, particularly acetate, pyruvate, acetone and ascorbate, consistent with the pathophysiological pathways involved in ALS. DRSA provides

  1. Benznidazole biotransformation and multiple targets in Trypanosoma cruzi revealed by metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Trochine

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The first line treatment for Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, involves administration of benznidazole (Bzn. Bzn is a 2-nitroimidazole pro-drug which requires nitroreduction to become active, although its mode of action is not fully understood. In the present work we used a non-targeted MS-based metabolomics approach to study the metabolic response of T. cruzi to Bzn.Parasites treated with Bzn were minimally altered compared to untreated trypanosomes, although the redox active thiols trypanothione, homotrypanothione and cysteine were significantly diminished in abundance post-treatment. In addition, multiple Bzn-derived metabolites were detected after treatment. These metabolites included reduction products, fragments and covalent adducts of reduced Bzn linked to each of the major low molecular weight thiols: trypanothione, glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteine, glutathionylspermidine, cysteine and ovothiol A. Bzn products known to be generated in vitro by the unusual trypanosomal nitroreductase, TcNTRI, were found within the parasites, but low molecular weight adducts of glyoxal, a proposed toxic end-product of NTRI Bzn metabolism, were not detected.Our data is indicative of a major role of the thiol binding capacity of Bzn reduction products in the mechanism of Bzn toxicity against T. cruzi.

  2. PLS-based and regularization-based methods for the selection of relevant variables in non-targeted metabolomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bujak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-targeted metabolomics constitutes a part of systems biology and aims to determine many metabolites in complex biological samples. Datasets obtained in non-targeted metabolomics studies are multivariate and high-dimensional due to the sensitivity of mass spectrometry-based detection methods as well as complexity of biological matrices. Proper selection of variables which contribute into group classification is a crucial step, especially in metabolomics studies which are focused on searching for disease biomarker candidates. In the present study, three different statistical approaches were tested using two metabolomics datasets (RH and PH study. Orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA without and with multiple testing correction as well as least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO were tested and compared. For the RH study, OPLS-DA model built without multiple testing correction, selected 46 and 218 variables based on VIP criteria using Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. In the case of the PH study, 217 and 320 variables were selected based on VIP criteria using Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. In the RH study, OPLS-DA model built with multiple testing correction, selected 4 and 19 variables as statistically significant in terms of Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. For PH study, 14 and 18 variables were selected based on VIP criteria in terms of Pareto and UV scaling, respectively. Additionally, the concept and fundaments of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO with bootstrap procedure evaluating reproducibility of results, was demonstrated. In the RH and PH study, the LASSO selected 14 and 4 variables with reproducibility between 99.3% and 100%. However, apart from the popularity of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA methods in metabolomics, it should be highlighted that they do not control type I or type II error, but only arbitrarily establish a cut-off value for PLS-DA loadings

  3. Informatics for Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusonmano, Kanthida; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Chumnanpuen, Pramote

    2016-01-01

    Metabolome profiling of biological systems has the powerful ability to provide the biological understanding of their metabolic functional states responding to the environmental factors or other perturbations. Tons of accumulative metabolomics data have thus been established since pre-metabolomics era. This is directly influenced by the high-throughput analytical techniques, especially mass spectrometry (MS)- and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based techniques. Continuously, the significant numbers of informatics techniques for data processing, statistical analysis, and data mining have been developed. The following tools and databases are advanced for the metabolomics society which provide the useful metabolomics information, e.g., the chemical structures, mass spectrum patterns for peak identification, metabolite profiles, biological functions, dynamic metabolite changes, and biochemical transformations of thousands of small molecules. In this chapter, we aim to introduce overall metabolomics studies from pre- to post-metabolomics era and their impact on society. Directing on post-metabolomics era, we provide a conceptual framework of informatics techniques for metabolomics and show useful examples of techniques, tools, and databases for metabolomics data analysis starting from preprocessing toward functional interpretation. Throughout the framework of informatics techniques for metabolomics provided, it can be further used as a scaffold for translational biomedical research which can thus lead to reveal new metabolite biomarkers, potential metabolic targets, or key metabolic pathways for future disease therapy.

  4. Differentiating signals to make biological sense - A guide through databases for MS-based non-targeted metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil de la Fuente, Alberto; Grace Armitage, Emily; Otero, Abraham; Barbas, Coral; Godzien, Joanna

    2017-09-01

    Metabolite identification is one of the most challenging steps in metabolomics studies and reflects one of the greatest bottlenecks in the entire workflow. The success of this step determines the success of the entire research, therefore the quality at which annotations are given requires special attention. A variety of tools and resources are available to aid metabolite identification or annotation, offering different and often complementary functionalities. In preparation for this article, almost 50 databases were reviewed, from which 17 were selected for discussion, chosen for their online ESI-MS functionality. The general characteristics and functions of each database is discussed in turn, considering the advantages and limitations of each along with recommendations for optimal use of each tool, as derived from experiences encountered at the Centre for Metabolomics and Bioanalysis (CEMBIO) in Madrid. These databases were evaluated considering their utility in non-targeted metabolomics, including aspects such as identifier assignment, structural assignment and interpretation of results. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Targeted Metabolomics Approach To Detect the Misuse of Steroidal Aromatase Inhibitors in Equine Sports by Biomarker Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George Ho Man; Ho, Emmie Ngai Man; Leung, David Kwan Kon; Wong, Kin Sing; Wan, Terence See Ming

    2016-01-05

    The use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is prohibited in both human and equine sports. The conventional approach in doping control testing for AAS (as well as other prohibited substances) is accomplished by the direct detection of target AAS or their characteristic metabolites in biological samples using hyphenated techniques such as gas chromatography or liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Such an approach, however, falls short when dealing with unknown designer steroids where reference materials and their pharmacokinetics are not available. In addition, AASs with fast elimination times render the direct detection approach ineffective as the detection window is short. A targeted metabolomics approach is a plausible alternative to the conventional direct detection approach for controlling the misuse of AAS in sports. Because the administration of AAS of the same class may trigger similar physiological responses or effects in the body, it may be possible to detect such administrations by monitoring changes in the endogenous steroidal expression profile. This study attempts to evaluate the viability of using the targeted metabolomics approach to detect the administration of steroidal aromatase inhibitors, namely androst-4-ene-3,6,17-trione (6-OXO) and androsta-1,4,6-triene-3,17-dione (ATD), in horses. Total (free and conjugated) urinary concentrations of 31 endogenous steroids were determined by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for a group of 2 resting and 2 in-training thoroughbred geldings treated with either 6-OXO or ATD. Similar data were also obtained from a control (untreated) group of in-training thoroughbred geldings (n = 28). Statistical processing and chemometric procedures using principle component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) have highlighted 7 potential biomarkers that could be used to differentiate urine samples obtained from the control and the treated groups

  6. Metabolomic Studies in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James E; Thummel, Carl S; Tennessen, Jason M

    2017-07-01

    Metabolomic analysis provides a powerful new tool for studies of Drosophila physiology. This approach allows investigators to detect thousands of chemical compounds in a single sample, representing the combined contributions of gene expression, enzyme activity, and environmental context. Metabolomics has been used for a wide range of studies in Drosophila , often providing new insights into gene function and metabolic state that could not be obtained using any other approach. In this review, we survey the uses of metabolomic analysis since its entry into the field. We also cover the major methods used for metabolomic studies in Drosophila and highlight new directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. An initial non-targeted analysis of the peanut seed metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are likely a large number of compounds that constitute the peanut seed metabolome that have yet to be elucidated. Although the proximate composition and nutrients such as vitamins and minerals are well known, the composition of many other small molecule metabolites present have not been syste...

  8. Targeted Metabolomics of Serum Acylcarnitines Evaluates Hepatoprotective Effect of Wuzhi Tablet (Schisandra sphenanthera Extract against Acute Acetaminophen Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichang Bi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible prevention and therapeutic intervention strategies to counteract acetaminophen (APAP hepatotoxicity would be of great value. Wuzhi tablet (WZ, extract of Schisandrae sphenanthera possesses hepatoprotective effects against hepatitis and the hepatic dysfunction induced by various chemical hepatotoxins. In this study, the protective effect of WZ on APAP-induced hepatic injury was evaluated and targeted metabolomics by LC-MS-based metabolomics was used to examine whether WZ influences hepatic metabolism. The results demonstrated significant hepatoprotection of WZ against APAP-induced liver injury; pretreatment with WZ prior to APAP administration blocks the increase in serum palmitoylcarnitine and oleoylcarnitine and thus restores the APAP-impaired fatty acid β-oxidation to normal levels. These studies further revealed a significant and prolonged upregulation of the PPARα target genes Cpt1 and Acot1 by WZ mainly contributing to the maintenance of normal fatty acid metabolism and thus potentially contributing to the hepatic protection of WZ against APAP-induced hepatic toxicity. Taken together, the current study provides new insights into understanding the hepatoprotective effect of WZ against APAP-induced liver toxicity.

  9. Brain and blood metabolite signatures of pathology and progression in Alzheimer disease: A targeted metabolomics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay R Varma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD is poorly understood, and the relationships between systemic abnormalities in metabolism and AD pathogenesis are unclear. Understanding how global perturbations in metabolism are related to severity of AD neuropathology and the eventual expression of AD symptoms in at-risk individuals is critical to developing effective disease-modifying treatments. In this study, we undertook parallel metabolomics analyses in both the brain and blood to identify systemic correlates of neuropathology and their associations with prodromal and preclinical measures of AD progression.Quantitative and targeted metabolomics (Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ [identification and quantification] p180 assays were performed on brain tissue samples from the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA (N = 44, mean age = 81.33, % female = 36.36 from AD (N = 15, control (CN; N = 14, and "asymptomatic Alzheimer's disease" (ASYMAD, i.e., individuals with significant AD pathology but no cognitive impairment during life; N = 15 participants. Using machine-learning methods, we identified a panel of 26 metabolites from two main classes-sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids-that discriminated AD and CN samples with accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 83.33%, 86.67%, and 80%, respectively. We then assayed these 26 metabolites in serum samples from two well-characterized longitudinal cohorts representing prodromal (Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative [ADNI], N = 767, mean age = 75.19, % female = 42.63 and preclinical (BLSA (N = 207, mean age = 78.68, % female = 42.63 AD, in which we tested their associations with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI measures of AD-related brain atrophy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers of AD pathology, risk of conversion to incident AD, and trajectories of cognitive performance. We developed an integrated blood and brain endophenotype score that summarized the relative importance of

  10. Brain and blood metabolite signatures of pathology and progression in Alzheimer disease: A targeted metabolomics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen, Anup M.; Varma, Sudhir; Casanova, Ramon; An, Yang; O’Brien, Richard; Pletnikova, Olga; Kastenmueller, Gabi; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2018-01-01

    Background The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is poorly understood, and the relationships between systemic abnormalities in metabolism and AD pathogenesis are unclear. Understanding how global perturbations in metabolism are related to severity of AD neuropathology and the eventual expression of AD symptoms in at-risk individuals is critical to developing effective disease-modifying treatments. In this study, we undertook parallel metabolomics analyses in both the brain and blood to identify systemic correlates of neuropathology and their associations with prodromal and preclinical measures of AD progression. Methods and findings Quantitative and targeted metabolomics (Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ [identification and quantification] p180) assays were performed on brain tissue samples from the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) (N = 44, mean age = 81.33, % female = 36.36) from AD (N = 15), control (CN; N = 14), and “asymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease” (ASYMAD, i.e., individuals with significant AD pathology but no cognitive impairment during life; N = 15) participants. Using machine-learning methods, we identified a panel of 26 metabolites from two main classes—sphingolipids and glycerophospholipids—that discriminated AD and CN samples with accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 83.33%, 86.67%, and 80%, respectively. We then assayed these 26 metabolites in serum samples from two well-characterized longitudinal cohorts representing prodromal (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative [ADNI], N = 767, mean age = 75.19, % female = 42.63) and preclinical (BLSA) (N = 207, mean age = 78.68, % female = 42.63) AD, in which we tested their associations with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of AD-related brain atrophy, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology, risk of conversion to incident AD, and trajectories of cognitive performance. We developed an integrated blood and brain endophenotype score that

  11. Genome-wide identification of KANADI1 target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz Merelo

    Full Text Available Plant organ development and polarity establishment is mediated by the action of several transcription factors. Among these, the KANADI (KAN subclade of the GARP protein family plays important roles in polarity-associated processes during embryo, shoot and root patterning. In this study, we have identified a set of potential direct target genes of KAN1 through a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation/DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq and genome-wide transcriptional profiling using tiling arrays. Target genes are over-represented for genes involved in the regulation of organ development as well as in the response to auxin. KAN1 affects directly the expression of several genes previously shown to be important in the establishment of polarity during lateral organ and vascular tissue development. We also show that KAN1 controls through its target genes auxin effects on organ development at different levels: transport and its regulation, and signaling. In addition, KAN1 regulates genes involved in the response to abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, ethylene, cytokinins and gibberellins. The role of KAN1 in organ polarity is antagonized by HD-ZIPIII transcription factors, including REVOLUTA (REV. A comparison of their target genes reveals that the REV/KAN1 module acts in organ patterning through opposite regulation of shared targets. Evidence of mutual repression between closely related family members is also shown.

  12. Systematic Applications of Metabolomics in Metabolic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Dromms

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The goals of metabolic engineering are well-served by the biological information provided by metabolomics: information on how the cell is currently using its biochemical resources is perhaps one of the best ways to inform strategies to engineer a cell to produce a target compound. Using the analysis of extracellular or intracellular levels of the target compound (or a few closely related molecules to drive metabolic engineering is quite common. However, there is surprisingly little systematic use of metabolomics datasets, which simultaneously measure hundreds of metabolites rather than just a few, for that same purpose. Here, we review the most common systematic approaches to integrating metabolite data with metabolic engineering, with emphasis on existing efforts to use whole-metabolome datasets. We then review some of the most common approaches for computational modeling of cell-wide metabolism, including constraint-based models, and discuss current computational approaches that explicitly use metabolomics data. We conclude with discussion of the broader potential of computational approaches that systematically use metabolomics data to drive metabolic engineering.

  13. Targeted and Untargeted Metabolomics to Explore the Bioavailability of the Secoiridoids from a Seed/Fruit Extract (Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl in Human Healthy Volunteers: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío García-Villalba

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The bark, seeds, fruits and leaves of the genus Fraxinus (Oleaceae which contain a wide range of phytochemicals, mostly secoiridoid glucosides, have been widely used in folk medicine against a number of ailments, yet little is known about the metabolism and uptake of the major Fraxinus components. The aim of this work was to advance in the knowledge on the bioavailability of the secoiridoids present in a Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl seed/fruit extract using both targeted and untargeted metabolomic analyses. Plasma and urine samples from nine healthy volunteers were taken at specific time intervals following the intake of the extract and analyzed by UPLC-ESI-QTOF. Predicted metabolites such as tyrosol and ligstroside-aglycone glucuronides and sulfates were detected at low intensity. These compounds reached peak plasma levels 2 h after the intake and exhibited high variability among the participants. The ligstroside-aglycone conjugates may be considered as potential biomarkers of the Fraxinus secoiridoids intake. Using the untargeted approach we additionally detected phenolic conjugates identified as ferulic acid and caffeic acid sulfates, as well as hydroxybenzyl and hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde sulfate derivatives which support further metabolism of the secoiridoids by phase I and (or microbial enzymes. Overall, the results of this study suggest low uptake of intact secoiridoids from a Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl extract in healthy human volunteers and metabolic conversion by esterases, glycosidases, and phase II sulfo- and glucuronosyl transferases to form smaller conjugated derivatives.

  14. Improving Visualization and Interpretation of Metabolome-Wide Association Studies: An Application in a Population-Based Cohort Using Untargeted 1H NMR Metabolic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagné, Raphaële; Boulangé, Claire Laurence; Karaman, Ibrahim; Campanella, Gianluca; Santos Ferreira, Diana L; Kaluarachchi, Manuja R; Lehne, Benjamin; Moayyeri, Alireza; Lewis, Matthew R; Spagou, Konstantina; Dona, Anthony C; Evangelos, Vangelis; Tracy, Russell; Greenland, Philip; Lindon, John C; Herrington, David; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Elliott, Paul; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc

    2017-10-06

    1 H NMR spectroscopy of biofluids generates reproducible data allowing detection and quantification of small molecules in large population cohorts. Statistical models to analyze such data are now well-established, and the use of univariate metabolome wide association studies (MWAS) investigating the spectral features separately has emerged as a computationally efficient and interpretable alternative to multivariate models. The MWAS rely on the accurate estimation of a metabolome wide significance level (MWSL) to be applied to control the family wise error rate. Subsequent interpretation requires efficient visualization and formal feature annotation, which, in-turn, call for efficient prioritization of spectral variables of interest. Using human serum 1 H NMR spectroscopic profiles from 3948 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), we have performed a series of MWAS for serum levels of glucose. We first propose an extension of the conventional MWSL that yields stable estimates of the MWSL across the different model parameterizations and distributional features of the outcome. We propose both efficient visualization methods and a strategy based on subsampling and internal validation to prioritize the associations. Our work proposes and illustrates practical and scalable solutions to facilitate the implementation of the MWAS approach and improve interpretation in large cohort studies.

  15. Genome-wide identification of direct HBx genomic targets

    KAUST Repository

    Guerrieri, Francesca

    2017-02-17

    Background The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) HBx regulatory protein is required for HBV replication and involved in HBV-related carcinogenesis. HBx interacts with chromatin modifying enzymes and transcription factors to modulate histone post-translational modifications and to regulate viral cccDNA transcription and cellular gene expression. Aiming to identify genes and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) directly targeted by HBx, we performed a chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to analyse HBV recruitment on host cell chromatin in cells replicating HBV. Results ChIP-Seq high throughput sequencing of HBx-bound fragments was used to obtain a high-resolution, unbiased, mapping of HBx binding sites across the genome in HBV replicating cells. Protein-coding genes and ncRNAs involved in cell metabolism, chromatin dynamics and cancer were enriched among HBx targets together with genes/ncRNAs known to modulate HBV replication. The direct transcriptional activation of genes/miRNAs that potentiate endocytosis (Ras-related in brain (RAB) GTPase family) and autophagy (autophagy related (ATG) genes, beclin-1, miR-33a) and the transcriptional repression of microRNAs (miR-138, miR-224, miR-576, miR-596) that directly target the HBV pgRNA and would inhibit HBV replication, contribute to HBx-mediated increase of HBV replication. Conclusions Our ChIP-Seq analysis of HBx genome wide chromatin recruitment defined the repertoire of genes and ncRNAs directly targeted by HBx and led to the identification of new mechanisms by which HBx positively regulates cccDNA transcription and HBV replication.

  16. Impact of targeted UPLC-MS/MS metabolomics on chemical and biochemical characterisation of MAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of natural product pattern (metabolites; metabolomics and its formation (pathway; biosynthesis in plants, especially in non-model or crop plants such as medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs, is a research field with significant potential for breeders, growers and consumers. There is an increasing importance for constant and sustainable quality of MAPs final products. Polyphenols are one of the most important compounds for the antioxidant properties of MAPs and are often, if not identified as active principle, used as lead compounds in quality assessment of herbal drugs and related preparation (herbal tea, alcoholic extracts etc.. Therefore, offering an efficient, robust and reliable fast tool to determine these quality features of MAPs will guarantee the growers, industrial users and the consumers from possible frauds.

  17. The Human Serum Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  18. Targeted Metabolomics Reveals Early Dominant Optic Atrophy Signature in Optic Nerves of Opa1delTTAG/+ Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Simard, Gilles; Sarzi, Emmanuelle; Chaumette, Tanguy; Rousseau, Guillaume; Chupin, Stéphanie; Gadras, Cédric; Tessier, Lydie; Ferré, Marc; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Gueguen, Naïg; Leruez, Stéphanie; Verny, Christophe; Miléa, Dan; Bonneau, Dominique; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Procaccio, Vincent; Hamel, Christian; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal; Prunier-Mirebeau, Delphine

    2017-02-01

    Dominant optic atrophy (MIM No. 165500) is a blinding condition related to mutations in OPA1, a gene encoding a large GTPase involved in mitochondrial inner membrane dynamics. Although several mouse models mimicking the disease have been developed, the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for retinal ganglion cell degeneration remain poorly understood. Using a targeted metabolomic approach, we measured the concentrations of 188 metabolites in nine tissues, that is, brain, three types of skeletal muscle, heart, liver, retina, optic nerve, and plasma in symptomatic 11-month-old Opa1delTTAG/+ mice. Significant metabolic signatures were found only in the optic nerve and plasma of female mice. The optic nerve signature was characterized by altered concentrations of phospholipids, amino acids, acylcarnitines, and carnosine, whereas the plasma signature showed decreased concentrations of amino acids and sarcosine associated with increased concentrations of several phospholipids. In contrast, the investigation of 3-month-old presymptomatic Opa1delTTAG/+ mice showed no specific plasma signature but revealed a significant optic nerve signature in both sexes, although with a sex effect. The Opa1delTTAG/+ versus wild-type optic nerve signature was characterized by the decreased concentrations of 10 sphingomyelins and 10 lysophosphatidylcholines, suggestive of myelin sheath alteration, and by alteration in the concentrations of metabolites involved in neuroprotection, such as dimethylarginine, carnitine, spermine, spermidine, carnosine, and glutamate, suggesting a concomitant axonal metabolic dysfunction. Our comprehensive metabolomic investigations revealed in symptomatic as well as in presymptomatic Opa1delTTAG/+ mice, a specific sensitiveness of the optic nerve to Opa1 insufficiency, opening new routes for protective therapeutic strategies.

  19. Metabolomics strategy for the mapping of volatile exometabolome from Saccharomyces spp. widely used in the food industry based on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Cátia; Brandão, Tiago; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2017-05-01

    Saccharomyces spp. are widely used in the food and beverages industries. Their cellular excreted metabolites are important for general quality of products and can contribute to product differentiation. This exploratory study presents a metabolomics strategy for the comprehensive mapping of cellular metabolites of two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pastorianus (both collected in an industrial context) through a multidimensional chromatography platform. Solid-phase microextraction was used as a sample preparation method. The yeast viability, a specific technological quality parameter, was also assessed. This untargeted analysis allowed the putative identification of 525 analytes, distributed over 14 chemical families, the origin of which may be explained through the pathways network associated with yeasts metabolism. The expression of the different metabolic pathways was similar for both species, event that seems to be yeast genus dependent. Nevertheless, these species showed different growth rates, which led to statistically different metabolites content. This was the first in-depth approach that characterizes the headspace content of S. cerevisiae and S. pastorianus species cultures. The combination of a sample preparation method capable of providing released volatile metabolites directly from yeast culture headspace with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography was successful in uncovering a specific metabolomic pattern for each species. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A targeted metabolomic protocol for short-chain fatty acids and branched-chain amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaojiao; Qiu, Yunping; Zhong, Wei; Baxter, Sarah; Su, Mingming; Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Ore, Brandon M; Qiao, Shanlei; Spencer, Melanie D; Zeisel, Steven H; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zhao, Aihua; Jia, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Research in obesity and metabolic disorders that involve intestinal microbiota demands reliable methods for the precise measurement of the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) concentration. Here, we report a rapid method of simultaneously determining SCFAs and BCAAs in biological samples using propyl chloroformate (PCF) derivatization followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. A one-step derivatization using 100 µL of PCF in a reaction system of water, propanol, and pyridine (v/v/v = 8:3:2) at pH 8 provided the optimal derivatization efficiency. The best extraction efficiency of the derivatized products was achieved by a two-step extraction with hexane. The method exhibited good derivatization efficiency and recovery for a wide range of concentrations with a low limit of detection for each compound. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of all targeted compounds showed good intra- and inter-day (within 7 days) precision (< 10%), and good stability (< 20%) within 4 days at room temperature (23-25 °C), or 7 days when stored at -20 °C. We applied our method to measure SCFA and BCAA levels in fecal samples from rats administrated with different diet. Both univariate and multivariate statistics analysis of the concentrations of these target metabolites could differentiate three groups with ethanol intervention and different oils in diet. This method was also successfully employed to determine SCFA and BCAA in the feces, plasma and urine from normal humans, providing important baseline information of the concentrations of these metabolites. This novel metabolic profile study has great potential for translational research.

  1. Metabolomics studies in brain tissue: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Riano, Carolina; Garcia, Antonia; Barbas, Coral

    2016-10-25

    Brain is still an organ with a composition to be discovered but beyond that, mental disorders and especially all diseases that curse with dementia are devastating for the patient, the family and the society. Metabolomics can offer an alternative tool for unveiling new insights in the discovery of new treatments and biomarkers of mental disorders. Until now, most of metabolomic studies have been based on biofluids: serum/plasma or urine, because brain tissue accessibility is limited to animal models or post mortem studies, but even so it is crucial for understanding the pathological processes. Metabolomics studies of brain tissue imply several challenges due to sample extraction, along with brain heterogeneity, sample storage, and sample treatment for a wide coverage of metabolites with a wide range of concentrations of many lipophilic and some polar compounds. In this review, the current analytical practices for target and non-targeted metabolomics are described and discussed with emphasis on critical aspects: sample treatment (quenching, homogenization, filtration, centrifugation and extraction), analytical methods, as well as findings considering the used strategies. Besides that, the altered analytes in the different brain regions have been associated with their corresponding pathways to obtain a global overview of their dysregulation, trying to establish the link between altered biological pathways and pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Perturbations in amino acids and metabolic pathways in osteoarthritis patients determined by targeted metabolomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Han, Su; Liu, Xuefeng; Wang, Kunpeng; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Chundong; Zhang, Xi

    2018-05-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative synovial joint disease affecting people worldwide. However, the exact pathogenesis of OA remains unclear. Metabolomics analysis was performed to obtain insight into possible pathogenic mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers of OA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC-TQ-MS), followed by multivariate statistical analysis, was used to determine the serum amino acid profiles of 32 OA patients and 35 healthy controls. Variable importance for project values and Student's t-test were used to determine the metabolic abnormalities in OA. Another 30 OA patients were used as independent samples to validate the alterations in amino acids. MetaboAnalyst was used to identify the key amino acid pathways and construct metabolic networks describing their relationships. A total of 25 amino acids and four biogenic amines were detected by UPLC-TQ-MS. Differences in amino acid profiles were found between the healthy controls and OA patients. Alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and 4-hydroxy-l-proline were important biomarkers distinguishing OA patients from healthy controls. The metabolic pathways with the most significant effects were involved in metabolism of alanine, aspartate, glutamate, arginine and proline. The results of this study improve understanding of the amino acid metabolic abnormalities and pathogenic mechanisms of OA at the molecular level. The metabolic perturbations may be important for the diagnosis and prevention of OA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial metabolomics: Replacing trial-and-error by the unbiased selection and ranking of targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, M.J. van der; Jellema, R.H.; Hankemeier, T.

    2005-01-01

    Microbial production strains are currently improved using a combination of random and targeted approaches. In the case of a targeted approach, potential bottlenecks, feed-back inhibition, and side-routes are removed, and other processes of interest are targeted by overexpressing or knocking-out the

  4. The MetabolomeExpress Project: enabling web-based processing, analysis and transparent dissemination of GC/MS metabolomics datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Adam J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardization of analytical approaches and reporting methods via community-wide collaboration can work synergistically with web-tool development to result in rapid community-driven expansion of online data repositories suitable for data mining and meta-analysis. In metabolomics, the inter-laboratory reproducibility of gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS makes it an obvious target for such development. While a number of web-tools offer access to datasets and/or tools for raw data processing and statistical analysis, none of these systems are currently set up to act as a public repository by easily accepting, processing and presenting publicly submitted GC/MS metabolomics datasets for public re-analysis. Description Here, we present MetabolomeExpress, a new File Transfer Protocol (FTP server and web-tool for the online storage, processing, visualisation and statistical re-analysis of publicly submitted GC/MS metabolomics datasets. Users may search a quality-controlled database of metabolite response statistics from publicly submitted datasets by a number of parameters (eg. metabolite, species, organ/biofluid etc.. Users may also perform meta-analysis comparisons of multiple independent experiments or re-analyse public primary datasets via user-friendly tools for t-test, principal components analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis and correlation analysis. They may interact with chromatograms, mass spectra and peak detection results via an integrated raw data viewer. Researchers who register for a free account may upload (via FTP their own data to the server for online processing via a novel raw data processing pipeline. Conclusions MetabolomeExpress https://www.metabolome-express.org provides a new opportunity for the general metabolomics community to transparently present online the raw and processed GC/MS data underlying their metabolomics publications. Transparent sharing of these data will allow researchers to

  5. The food metabolome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scalbert, Augustin; Brennan, Lorraine; Manach, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    to the diet. By its very nature it represents a considerable and still largely unexploited source of novel dietary biomarkers that could be used to measure dietary exposures with a high level of detail and precision. Most dietary biomarkers currently have been identified on the basis of our knowledge of food......The food metabolome is defined as the part of the human metabolome directly derived from the digestion and biotransformation of foods and their constituents. With >25,000 compounds known in various foods, the food metabolome is extremely complex, with a composition varying widely according...... by the recent identification of novel biomarkers of intakes for fruit, vegetables, beverages, meats, or complex diets. Moreover, examples also show how the scrutiny of the food metabolome can lead to the discovery of bioactive molecules and dietary factors associated with diseases. However, researchers still...

  6. System-Wide Hypersensitive Response-Associated Transcriptome and Metabolome Reprogramming in Tomato1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etalo, Desalegn W.; Stulemeijer, Iris J.E.; Peter van Esse, H.; de Vos, Ric C.H.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Joosten, Matthieu H.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is considered to be the hallmark of the resistance response of plants to pathogens. To study HR-associated transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), we used plants that express both a resistance gene to Cladosporium fulvum and the matching avirulence gene of this pathogen. In these plants, massive reprogramming occurred, and we found that the HR and associated processes are highly energy demanding. Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, hydrolysis of sugars, and lipid catabolism are used as alternative sources of amino acids, energy, and carbon skeletons, respectively. We observed strong accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as hydroxycinnamic acid amides. Coregulated expression of WRKY transcription factors and genes known to be involved in the HR, in addition to a strong enrichment of the W-box WRKY-binding motif in the promoter sequences of the coregulated genes, point to WRKYs as the most prominent orchestrators of the HR. Our study has revealed several novel HR-related genes, and reverse genetics tools will allow us to understand the role of each individual component in the HR. PMID:23719893

  7. Discovery of safety biomarkers for atorvastatin in rat urine using mass spectrometry based metabolomics combined with global and targeted approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Bhowmik Salil; Lee, Young-Joo; Yi, Hong Jae; Chung, Bong Chul; Jung, Byung Hwa

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a safety biomarker for atorvastatin, this drug was orally administrated to hyperlipidemic rats, and a metabolomic study was performed. Atorvastatin was given in doses of either 70 mg kg -1 day -1 or 250 mg kg -1 day -1 for a period of 7 days (n = 4 for each group). To evaluate any abnormal effects of the drug, physiological and plasma biochemical parameters were measured and histopathological tests were carried out. Safety biomarkers were derived by comparing these parameters and using both global and targeted metabolic profiling. Global metabolic profiling was performed using liquid chromatography/time of flight/mass spectrometry (LC/TOF/MS) with multivariate data analysis. Several safety biomarker candidates that included various steroids and amino acids were discovered as a result of global metabolic profiling, and they were also confirmed by targeted metabolic profiling using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (CE/MS). Serum biochemical and histopathological tests were used to detect abnormal drug reactions in the liver after repeating oral administration of atorvastatin. The metabolic differences between control and the drug-treated groups were compared using PLS-DA score plots. These results were compared with the physiological and plasma biochemical parameters and the results of a histopathological test. Estrone, cortisone, proline, cystine, 3-ureidopropionic acid and histidine were proposed as potential safety biomarkers related with the liver toxicity of atorvastatin. These results indicate that the combined application of global and targeted metabolic profiling could be a useful tool for the discovery of drug safety biomarkers.

  8. Discovery of safety biomarkers for atorvastatin in rat urine using mass spectrometry based metabolomics combined with global and targeted approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Bhowmik Salil [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, (305-333) 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Joo; Yi, Hong Jae [College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Bong Chul [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Byung Hwa, E-mail: jbhluck@kist.re.kr [Bioanalysis and Biotransformation Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, (305-333) 113 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-19

    In order to develop a safety biomarker for atorvastatin, this drug was orally administrated to hyperlipidemic rats, and a metabolomic study was performed. Atorvastatin was given in doses of either 70 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} or 250 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} for a period of 7 days (n = 4 for each group). To evaluate any abnormal effects of the drug, physiological and plasma biochemical parameters were measured and histopathological tests were carried out. Safety biomarkers were derived by comparing these parameters and using both global and targeted metabolic profiling. Global metabolic profiling was performed using liquid chromatography/time of flight/mass spectrometry (LC/TOF/MS) with multivariate data analysis. Several safety biomarker candidates that included various steroids and amino acids were discovered as a result of global metabolic profiling, and they were also confirmed by targeted metabolic profiling using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (CE/MS). Serum biochemical and histopathological tests were used to detect abnormal drug reactions in the liver after repeating oral administration of atorvastatin. The metabolic differences between control and the drug-treated groups were compared using PLS-DA score plots. These results were compared with the physiological and plasma biochemical parameters and the results of a histopathological test. Estrone, cortisone, proline, cystine, 3-ureidopropionic acid and histidine were proposed as potential safety biomarkers related with the liver toxicity of atorvastatin. These results indicate that the combined application of global and targeted metabolic profiling could be a useful tool for the discovery of drug safety biomarkers.

  9. Identification of drug targets by chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Manhong; Zheng, Ming; Zhang, Weiruo; Suresh, Sundari; Schlecht, Ulrich; Fitch, William L.; Aronova, Sofia; Baumann, Stephan; Davis, Ronald; St.Onge, Robert; Dill, David L.; Peltz, Gary

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To advance our understanding of disease biology, the characterization of the molecular target for clinically proven or new drugs is very important. Because of its simplicity and the availability of strains with individual deletions in all

  10. Characterisation of genome-wide PLZF/RARA target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Spicuglia

    Full Text Available The PLZF/RARA fusion protein generated by the t(11;17(q23;q21 translocation in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL is believed to act as an oncogenic transcriptional regulator recruiting epigenetic factors to genes important for its transforming potential. However, molecular mechanisms associated with PLZF/RARA-dependent leukaemogenesis still remain unclear.We searched for specific PLZF/RARA target genes by ChIP-on-chip in the haematopoietic cell line U937 conditionally expressing PLZF/RARA. By comparing bound regions found in U937 cells expressing endogenous PLZF with PLZF/RARA-induced U937 cells, we isolated specific PLZF/RARA target gene promoters. We next analysed gene expression profiles of our identified target genes in PLZF/RARA APL patients and analysed DNA sequences and epigenetic modification at PLZF/RARA binding sites. We identify 413 specific PLZF/RARA target genes including a number encoding transcription factors involved in the regulation of haematopoiesis. Among these genes, 22 were significantly down regulated in primary PLZF/RARA APL cells. In addition, repressed PLZF/RARA target genes were associated with increased levels of H3K27me3 and decreased levels of H3K9K14ac. Finally, sequence analysis of PLZF/RARA bound sequences reveals the presence of both consensus and degenerated RAREs as well as enrichment for tissue-specific transcription factor motifs, highlighting the complexity of targeting fusion protein to chromatin. Our study suggests that PLZF/RARA directly targets genes important for haematopoietic development and supports the notion that PLZF/RARA acts mainly as an epigenetic regulator of its direct target genes.

  11. Quality assurance procedures for mass spectrometry untargeted metabolomics. a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzik, Danuta; Barbas-Bernardos, Cecilia; García, Antonia; Barbas, Coral

    2018-01-05

    Untargeted metabolomics, as a global approach, has already proven its great potential and capabilities for the investigation of health and disease, as well as the wide applicability for other research areas. Although great progress has been made on the feasibility of metabolomics experiments, there are still some challenges that should be faced and that includes all sources of fluctuations and bias affecting every step involved in multiplatform untargeted metabolomics studies. The identification and reduction of the main sources of unwanted variation regarding the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phase of metabolomics experiments is essential to ensure high data quality. Nowadays, there is still a lack of information regarding harmonized guidelines for quality assurance as those available for targeted analysis. In this review, sources of variations to be considered and minimized along with methodologies and strategies for monitoring and improvement the quality of the results are discussed. The given information is based on evidences from different groups among our own experiences and recommendations for each stage of the metabolomics workflow. The comprehensive overview with tools presented here might serve other researchers interested in monitoring, controlling and improving the reliability of their findings by implementation of good experimental quality practices in the untargeted metabolomics study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome-wide analysis of Polycomb targets in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Kahn, Tatyana G.; Nix, David A.; Li,Xiao-Yong; Bourgon, Richard; Biggin, Mark; Pirrotta, Vincenzo

    2006-04-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) complexes are multiprotein assemblages that bind to chromatin and establish chromatin states leading to epigenetic silencing. PcG proteins regulate homeotic genes in flies and vertebrates but little is known about other PcG targets and the role of the PcG in development, differentiation and disease. We have determined the distribution of the PcG proteins PC, E(Z) and PSC and of histone H3K27 trimethylation in the Drosophila genome. At more than 200 PcG target genes, binding sites for the three PcG proteins colocalize to presumptive Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). In contrast, H3 me3K27 forms broad domains including the entire transcription unit and regulatory regions. PcG targets are highly enriched in genes encoding transcription factors but receptors, signaling proteins, morphogens and regulators representing all major developmental pathways are also included.

  13. In-silico Metabolome Target Analysis Towards PanC-based Antimycobacterial Agent Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshkholgh-Sima, Baharak; Sardari, Soroush; Izadi Mobarakeh, Jalal; Khavari-Nejad, Ramezan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main cause of tuberculosis (TB), has still remained a global health crisis especially in developing countries. Tuberculosis treatment is a laborious and lengthy process with high risk of noncompliance, cytotoxicity adverse events and drug resistance in patient. Recently, there has been an alarming rise of drug resistant in TB. In this regard, it is an unmet need to develop novel antitubercular medicines that target new or more effective biochemical pathways to prevent drug resistant Mycobacterium. Integrated study of metabolic pathways through in-silico approach played a key role in antimycobacterial design process in this study. Our results suggest that pantothenate synthetase (PanC), anthranilate phosphoribosyl transferase (TrpD) and 3-isopropylmalate dehydratase (LeuD) might be appropriate drug targets. In the next step, in-silico ligand analysis was used for more detailed study of chemical tractability of targets. This was helpful to identify pantothenate synthetase (PanC, Rv3602c) as the best target for antimycobacterial design procedure. Virtual library screening on the best ligand of PanC was then performed for inhibitory ligand design. At the end, five chemical intermediates showed significant inhibition of Mycobacterium bovis with good selectivity indices (SI) ≥10 according to Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition & Coordinating Facility of US criteria for antimycobacterial screening programs.

  14. Target and Non-target metabolomics profiling of different barley varieties affected by enhanced ultraviolet radiation and various C:N stoichiometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oravec, Michal; Novotná, Kateřina; Rajsnerová, P.; Veselá, B.; Urban, Otmar; Holub, Petr; Klem, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2015), s. 887.7 ISSN 0892-6638 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : metabolomic profiling * different barley varieties * ultraviolet radiation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Biological effect of aqueous C60 aggregates on Scenedesmus obliquus revealed by transcriptomics and non-targeted metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunlei; Zhang, Bo; He, Yiliang; Hu, Chaoyang; Ng, Qin Xiang; Zhang, Hui; Ong, Choon Nam; ZhifenLin

    2017-02-15

    This work evaluated biological effect of nC 60 on Scenedesmus obliquus. The cells were exposed to various concentrations of nC 60 for 7days. Low-dose of nC 60 was found to have a minor growth inhibitory effect. The transcriptomics and metabolomics were integrated to examine intricate molecular and cellular effects of nC 60 on Scenedesmus obliquus. We found that Scenedesmus obliquus cells exposed to nC 60 had several significant alterations in cellular transcription and biochemical processes. During the 7-day exposure to nC 60 , 2234 and 2,448 unigenes were differentially expressed by 0.1mg/L and 1mg/L nC 60 -treated groups compared with the control, including 2085 or 2247 up-regulated genes and 149 or 201 down-regulated genes, respectively. We successfully identified 22 metabolites, including 6 significantly changed metabolites, such as sucrose, d-glucose, and malic acid. The citrate cycle (TCA cycle) (ko00020) was the main target of both differentially expressed genes and metabolic change. However, accumulation of sucrose (end-product) could have induced feedback inhibition of photosynthesis in Scenedesmus obliquus, explaining the slight growth inhibition observed. The results provided a mechanistic understanding of the growth inhibition of nC 60 toxicity. These genes and metabolites are useful biomarkers for future studies and offer new insights into the early detectable changes in Scenedesmus obliquus with nC 60 exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Non-targeted metabolomics and lipidomics LC-MS data from maternal plasma of 180 healthy pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luan, Hemi; Meng, Nan; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolomics has the potential to be a powerful and sensitive approach for investigating the low molecular weight metabolite profiles present in maternal fluids and their role in pregnancy.Findings: In this Data Note, LC-MS metabolome, lipidome and carnitine profiling data were...... collected from 180 healthy pregnant women, representing six time points spanning all three trimesters, and providing sufficient coverage to model the progression of normal pregnancy.Conclusions: As a relatively large scale, real-world dataset with robust numbers of quality control samples, the data...

  17. Screening for biomarkers of liver injury induced by Polygonum multiflorum: a targeted metabolomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin eDong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heshouwu (HSW, the dry roots of Polygonum multiflorum, a classical traditional Chinese medicine is used as a tonic for a wide range of conditions,particularly those associated with aging. However, it tends to be taken overdose or long term in these years, which has resulted in liver damage reported in many countries. In this study, the indicative roles of nine bile acids (BAs were evaluated to offer potential biomarkers for HSW induced liver injury. Nine BAs including cholic acid (CA and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA, taurocholic acid (TCA, glycocholic acid (GCA, glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA, deoxycholic acid (DCA, glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA in rat bile and serum were detected by a developed LC-MS method after 42 days treatment. Partial least square-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA was applied to evaluate the indicative roles of the nine BAs, and metabolism of the nine BAs was summarized. Significant change was observed for the concentrations of nine BAs in treatment groups compared with normal control; In the PLS-DA plots of nine BAs in bile, normal control and raw HSW groups were separately clustered and could be clearly distinguished, GDCA was selected as the distinguished components for raw HSW overdose treatment group. In the PLS-DA plots of nine BAs in serum, the normal control and raw HSW overdose treatment group were separately clustered and could be clearly distinguished, and HDCA was selected as the distinguished components for raw HSW overdose treatment group. The results indicated the perturbation of nine BAs was associated with HSW induced liver injury; GDCA in bile, as well as HDCA in serum could be selected as potential biomarkers for HSW induced liver injury; it also laid the foundation for the further search on the mechanisms of liver injury induced by HSW .

  18. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simó

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  19. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  20. Targeted metabolomics reveals reduced levels of polyunsaturated choline plasmalogens and a smaller dimethylarginine/arginine ratio in the follicular fluid of patients with a diminished ovarian reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Barca, J M Chao; Boueilh, T; Simard, G; Boucret, L; Ferré-L'Hotellier, V; Tessier, L; Gadras, C; Bouet, P E; Descamps, P; Procaccio, V; Reynier, P; May-Panloup, P

    2017-11-01

    Does the metabolomic profile of the follicular fluid (FF) of patients with a diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) differ from that of patients with a normal ovarian reserve (NOR)? The metabolomic signature of the FF reveals a significant decrease in polyunsaturated choline plasmalogens and methyl arginine transferase activity in DOR patients compared to NOR patients. The composition of the FF reflects the exchanges between the oocyte and its microenvironment during its acquisition of gametic competence. Studies of the FF have allowed identification of biomarkers and metabolic pathways involved in various pathologies affecting oocyte quality, but no large metabolomic analysis in the context of ovarian ageing and DOR has been undertaken so far. This was an observational study of the FF retrieved from 57 women undergoing in vitro fertilization at the University Hospital of Angers, France, from November 2015 to September 2016. The women were classified in two groups: one including 28 DOR patients, and the other including 29 NOR patients, serving as controls. Patients were enrolled in the morning of oocyte retrieval after ovarian stimulation. Once the oocytes were isolated for fertilization and culture, the FF was pooled and centrifuged for analysis. A targeted quantitative metabolomic analysis was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, and the Biocrates Absolute IDQ p180 kit. The FF levels of 188 metabolites and several sums and ratios of metabolic significance were assessed by multivariate and univariate analyses. A total of 136 metabolites were accurately quantified and used for calculating 23 sums and ratios. Samples were randomly divided into training and validation sets. The training set, allowed the construction of multivariate statistical models with a projection-supervised method, i.e. orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), applied to the full set of metabolites, or the penalized

  1. LC-MS-BASED METABOLOMICS OF XENOBIOTIC-INDUCED TOXICITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenobiotic exposure, especially high-dose or repeated exposure of xenobiotics, can elicit detrimental effects on biological systems through diverse mechanisms. Changes in metabolic systems, including formation of reactive metabolites and disruption of endogenous metabolism, are not only the common consequences of toxic xenobiotic exposure, but in many cases are the major causes behind development of xenobiotic-induced toxicities (XIT. Therefore, examining the metabolic events associated with XIT generates mechanistic insights into the initiation and progression of XIT, and provides guidance for prevention and treatment. Traditional bioanalytical platforms that target only a few suspected metabolites are capable of validating the expected outcomes of xenobiotic exposure. However, these approaches lack the capacity to define global changes and to identify unexpected events in the metabolic system. Recent developments in high-throughput metabolomics have dramatically expanded the scope and potential of metabolite analysis. Among all analytical techniques adopted for metabolomics, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS has been most widely used for metabolomic investigations of XIT due to its versatility and sensitivity in metabolite analysis. In this review, technical platform of LC-MS-based metabolomics, including experimental model, sample preparation, instrumentation, and data analysis, are discussed. Applications of LC-MS-based metabolomics in exploratory and hypothesis-driven investigations of XIT are illustrated by case studies of xenobiotic metabolism and endogenous metabolism associated with xenobiotic exposure.

  2. A description of a wide beam saddle field ion source used for nuclear target applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Schiel, S.L.; Thomas, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    A description is given of a new, wide beam saddle field sputter source used for the preparation of targets applied in nuclear physics experiments. The ion source characteristics are presented and compared with published results obtained with other sources. Deposition rates acquired utilizing this source are given for a variety of target materials encountered in nuclear target production. New applications involving target thinning and ion milling are discussed

  3. Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Metabolic Profiles in Brain and Liver of Mouse Revealed by a High-throughput Targeted Metabolomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Li, Meiying; Yang, Jingping; Li, Kan; Jin, Ling; Xie, Yuwei; Giesy, John P.; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a perfluoroalkyl acid, can result in hepatotoxicity and neurobehavioral effects in animals. The metabolome, which serves as a connection among transcriptome, proteome and toxic effects, provides pathway-based insights into effects of PFOA. Since understanding of changes in the metabolic profile during hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were still incomplete, a high-throughput targeted metabolomics approach (278 metabolites) was used to investigate effects of exposure to PFOA for 28 d on brain and liver of male Balb/c mice. Results of multivariate statistical analysis indicated that PFOA caused alterations in metabolic pathways in exposed individuals. Pathway analysis suggested that PFOA affected metabolism of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates and energetics. Ten and 18 metabolites were identified as potential unique biomarkers of exposure to PFOA in brain and liver, respectively. In brain, PFOA affected concentrations of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and glutamate in brain, which provides novel insights into mechanisms of PFOA-induced neurobehavioral effects. In liver, profiles of lipids revealed involvement of β-oxidation and biosynthesis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in PFOA-induced hepatotoxicity, while alterations in metabolism of arachidonic acid suggesting potential of PFOA to cause inflammation response in liver. These results provide insight into the mechanism and biomarkers for PFOA-induced effects.

  4. Nutritional Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürdeniz, Gözde

    strategy influences the patterns identified as important for the nutritional question under study. Therefore, in depth understanding of the study design and the specific effects of the analytical technology on the produced data is extremely important to achieve high quality data handling. Besides data......Metabolomics provides a holistic approach to investigate the perturbations in human metabolism with respect to a specific exposure. In nutritional metabolomics, the research question is generally related to the effect of a specific food intake on metabolic profiles commonly of plasma or urine....... Application of multiple analytical strategies may provide comprehensive information to reach a valid answer to these research questions. In this thesis, I investigated several analytical technologies and data handling strategies in order to evaluate their effects on the biological answer. In metabolomics, one...

  5. NMR-based metabolomics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iaccarino, Nunzia

    Metabolomics is the scientific discipline that identifies and quantifies endogenous and exogenous metabolites in different biological samples. Metabolites are crucial components of a biological system and they are highly informative about its functional state, due to their closeness to the organism...... focused on the analysis of various samples covering a wide range of fields, namely, food and nutraceutical sciences, cell metabolomics and medicine using a metabolomics approach. Indeed, the first part of the thesis describes two exploratory studies performed on Algerian extra virgin olive oil and apple...... juice from ancient Danish apple cultivars. Both studies revealed variety-related peculiarities that would have been difficult to detect by means of traditional analysis. The second part of the project includes four metabolomics studies performed on samples of biological origin. In particular, the first...

  6. Endocrinology Meets Metabolomics: Achievements, Pitfalls, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Janina; Haid, Mark; Cecil, Alexander; Prehn, Cornelia; Artati, Anna; Möller, Gabriele; Adamski, Jerzy

    2017-10-01

    The metabolome, although very dynamic, is sufficiently stable to provide specific quantitative traits related to health and disease. Metabolomics requires balanced use of state-of-the-art study design, chemical analytics, biostatistics, and bioinformatics to deliver meaningful answers to contemporary questions in human disease research. The technology is now frequently employed for biomarker discovery and for elucidating the mechanisms underlying endocrine-related diseases. Metabolomics has also enriched genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in this area by providing functional data. The contributions of rare genetic variants to metabolome variance and to the human phenotype have been underestimated until now. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The need and necessity of an EU-wide renewable energy target for 2030. Discussion paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vos, R.; Winkel, T.; Klessmann, C. [Ecofys Netherlands, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    In 2020, some leading EU energy and climate policies will expire. At present, the EU and its Member States are discussing the design of a post-2020 policy portfolio. In a discussion paper commissioned by the European Copper Institute, Ecofys shows that an EU-wide renewable energy target is a necessary part of a 2030 portfolio. The paper analyses, in detail, two realistic policy portfolio options for renewable energy, target-setting in particular: one 'decarbonisation-only' EU target with voluntary national targets for renewable energy, and one that includes an EU-wide renewable energy target, broken down into binding national targets. The analysis shows that the latter option, when supported by appropriate and improved EU and Member States' policies and measures, is most suitable in facilitating a European low-carbon economy.

  8. Metabolomics in Toxicology and Preclinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Daneshian, Mardas; Kamp, Hennicke; Bois, Frederic Y.; Clench, Malcolm R.; Coen, Muireann; Donley, Beth; Fischer, Steven M.; Ekman, Drew R.; Fabian, Eric; Guillou, Claude; Heuer, Joachim; Hogberg, Helena T.; Jungnickel, Harald; Keun, Hector C.; Krennrich, Gerhard; Krupp, Eckart; Luch, Andreas; Noor, Fozia; Peter, Erik; Riefke, Bjoern; Seymour, Mark; Skinner, Nigel; Smirnova, Lena; Verheij, Elwin; Wagner, Silvia; Hartung, Thomas; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Leist, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of metabolites in a biological system, provides detailed information about the biochemical/physiological status of a biological system, and about the changes caused by chemicals. Metabolomics analysis is used in many fields, ranging from the analysis of the physiological status of genetically modified organisms in safety science to the evaluation of human health conditions. In toxicology, metabolomics is the -omics discipline that is most closely related to classical knowledge of disturbed biochemical pathways. It allows rapid identification of the potential targets of a hazardous compound. It can give information on target organs and often can help to improve our understanding regarding the mode-of-action of a given compound. Such insights aid the discovery of biomarkers that either indicate pathophysiological conditions or help the monitoring of the efficacy of drug therapies. The first toxicological applications of metabolomics were for mechanistic research, but different ways to use the technology in a regulatory context are being explored. Ideally, further progress in that direction will position the metabolomics approach to address the challenges of toxicology of the 21st century. To address these issues, scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory bodies came together in a workshop to discuss the current status of applied metabolomics and its potential in the safety assessment of compounds. We report here on the conclusions of three working groups addressing questions regarding 1) metabolomics for in vitro studies 2) the appropriate use of metabolomics in systems toxicology, and 3) use of metabolomics in a regulatory context. PMID:23665807

  9. Error Analysis of Fast Moving Target Geo-location in Wide Area Surveillance Ground Moving Target Indication Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Shi-chao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As an important mode in airborne radar systems, Wide Area Surveillance Ground Moving Target Indication (WAS-GMTI mode has the ability of monitoring a large area in a short time, and then the detected moving targets can be located quickly. However, in real environment, many factors introduce considerable errors into the location of moving targets. In this paper, a fast location method based on the characteristics of the moving targets in WAS-GMTI mode is utilized. And in order to improve the location performance, those factors that introduce location errors are analyzed and moving targets are relocated. Finally, the analysis of those factors is proved to be reasonable by simulation and real data experiments.

  10. A non-targeted metabolomic approach to identify food markers to support discrimination between organic and conventional tomato crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Bueno, María Jesús; Díaz-Galiano, Francisco José; Rajski, Łukasz; Cutillas, Víctor; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2018-04-20

    In the last decade, the consumption trend of organic food has increased dramatically worldwide. However, the lack of reliable chemical markers to discriminate between organic and conventional products makes this market susceptible to food fraud in products labeled as "organic". Metabolomic fingerprinting approach has been demonstrated as the best option for a full characterization of metabolome occurring in plants, since their pattern may reflect the impact of both endogenous and exogenous factors. In the present study, advanced technologies based on high performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRAMS) has been used for marker search in organic and conventional tomatoes grown in greenhouse under controlled agronomic conditions. The screening of unknown compounds comprised the retrospective analysis of all tomato samples throughout the studied period and data processing using databases (mzCloud, ChemSpider and PubChem). In addition, stable nitrogen isotope analysis (δ 15 N) was assessed as a possible indicator to support discrimination between both production systems using crop/fertilizer correlations. Pesticide residue analyses were also applied as a well-established way to evaluate the organic production. Finally, the evaluation by combined chemometric analysis of high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (HRAMS) and δ 15 N data provided a robust classification model in accordance with the agricultural practices. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed a sample clustering according to farming systems and significant differences in the sample profile was observed for six bioactive components (L-tyrosyl-L-isoleucyl-L-threonyl-L-threonine, trilobatin, phloridzin, tomatine, phloretin and echinenone). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. New biomarkers of coffee consumption identified by the non-targeted metabolomic profiling of cohort study subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Rothwell

    Full Text Available Coffee contains various bioactives implicated with human health and disease risk. To accurately assess the effects of overall consumption upon health and disease, individual intake must be measured in large epidemiological studies. Metabolomics has emerged as a powerful approach to discover biomarkers of intake for a large range of foods. Here we report the profiling of the urinary metabolome of cohort study subjects to search for new biomarkers of coffee intake. Using repeated 24-hour dietary records and a food frequency questionnaire, 20 high coffee consumers (183-540 mL/d and 19 low consumers were selected from the French SU.VI.MAX2 cohort. Morning spot urine samples from each subject were profiled by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Partial least-square discriminant analysis of multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data clearly distinguished high consumers from low via 132 significant (p-value<0.05 discriminating features. Ion clusters whose intensities were most elevated in the high consumers were annotated using online and in-house databases and their identities checked using commercial standards and MS-MS fragmentation. The best discriminants, and thus potential markers of coffee consumption, were the glucuronide of the diterpenoid atractyligenin, the diketopiperazine cyclo(isoleucyl-prolyl, and the alkaloid trigonelline. Some caffeine metabolites, such as 1-methylxanthine, were also among the discriminants, however caffeine may be consumed from other sources and its metabolism is subject to inter-individual variation. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed that the biomarkers identified could be used effectively in combination for increased sensitivity and specificity. Once validated in other cohorts or intervention studies, these specific single or combined biomarkers will become a valuable alternative to assessment of coffee intake by dietary survey and finally lead to a better understanding of

  12. Metabolomics Approach to Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Identification of Possible Biomarkers and Potential Targets for New Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Kira, Satoru; Ihara, Tatsuya; Sawada, Norifumi; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Shimura, Hiroshi; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Masayuki

    2018-05-01

    We identified metabolites using a metabolomics approach and investigated the association between these metabolites and lower urinary tract symptoms. We used a 24-hour bladder diary and I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) to assess micturition behavior and lower urinary tract symptoms in 58 male patients without apparent neurological disease. Lower urinary tract symptoms were defined as a total I-PSS score of 8 or greater. Patients with a score of 7 or less were placed in the control group. A comprehensive study of plasma metabolites was also performed by capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Metabolites were compared between the lower urinary tract symptoms and control groups using the Mann-Whitney U test. Biomarkers of male lower urinary tract symptoms from the metabolites were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine the OR. Of the 58 men 32 were in the lower urinary tract symptoms group and the remaining 26 were in the control group. The 24-hour bladder diary showed that nocturnal urine volume, 24-hour micturition frequency, nocturnal micturition frequency and the nocturia index were significantly higher in the lower urinary tract symptoms group. Metabolomics analysis identified 60 metabolites from patient plasma. Multivariate analysis revealed that increased glutamate and decreased arginine, asparagine and inosine monophosphate were significantly associated with lower urinary tract symptoms in males. Decreases in citrulline and glutamine could also be associated with male lower urinary tract symptoms. Male lower urinary tract symptoms may develop due to abnormal metabolic processes in some pathways. Potential new treatments for lower urinary tract symptoms can be developed by identifying changes in the amino acid profiles. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-Targeted Metabolomics Analysis of the Effects of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Sunitinib and Erlotinib on Heart, Muscle, Liver and Serum Metabolism In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Jensen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 90 tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of malignant transformation and tumor angiogenesis. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs have emerged as effective therapies in treating cancer by exploiting this kinase dependency. The TKI erlotinib targets the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, whereas sunitinib targets primarily vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR.TKIs that impact the function of non-malignant cells and have on- and off-target toxicities, including cardiotoxicities. Cardiotoxicity is very rare in patients treated with erlotinib, but considerably more common after sunitinib treatment. We hypothesized that the deleterious effects of TKIs on the heart were related to their impact on cardiac metabolism. Methods: Female FVB/N mice (10/group were treated with therapeutic doses of sunitinib (40 mg/kg, erlotinib (50 mg/kg, or vehicle daily for two weeks. Echocardiographic assessment of the heart in vivo was performed at baseline and on Day 14. Heart, skeletal muscle, liver and serum were flash frozen and prepped for non-targeted GC-MS metabolomics analysis. Results: Compared to vehicle-treated controls, sunitinib-treated mice had significant decreases in systolic function, whereas erlotinib-treated mice did not. Non-targeted metabolomics analysis of heart identified significant decreases in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, arachidonic acid (AA/ eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, O-phosphocolamine, and 6-hydroxynicotinic acid after sunitinib treatment. DHA was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle (quadriceps femoris, while elevated cholesterol was identified in liver and elevated ethanolamine identified in serum. In contrast, erlotinib affected only one metabolite (spermidine significantly increased. Conclusions: Mice treated with sunitinib exhibited systolic dysfunction within two weeks, with significantly lower heart and skeletal muscle

  14. Off-target effects of psychoactive drugs revealed by genome-wide assays in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Ericson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 compounds that inhibited wild-type yeast growth and were thus selected for genome-wide fitness profiling. Many of these drugs had a propensity to affect multiple cellular functions. The sensitivity profiles of half of the analyzed drugs were enriched for core cellular processes such as secretion, protein folding, RNA processing, and chromatin structure. Interestingly, fluoxetine (Prozac interfered with establishment of cell polarity, cyproheptadine (Periactin targeted essential genes with chromatin-remodeling roles, while paroxetine (Paxil interfered with essential RNA metabolism genes, suggesting potential secondary drug targets. We also found that the more recently developed atypical antipsychotic clozapine (Clozaril had no fewer off-target effects in yeast than the typical antipsychotics haloperidol (Haldol and pimozide (Orap. Our results suggest that model organism pharmacogenetic studies provide a rational foundation for understanding the off-target effects of clinically important psychoactive agents and suggest a rational means both for devising compound derivatives with fewer side effects and for tailoring drug treatment to individual patient genotypes.

  15. Applied metabolomics in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperlovic-Culf, M; Culf, A S

    2016-08-01

    The metabolic profile is a direct signature of phenotype and biochemical activity following any perturbation. Metabolites are small molecules present in a biological system including natural products as well as drugs and their metabolism by-products depending on the biological system studied. Metabolomics can provide activity information about possible novel drugs and drug scaffolds, indicate interesting targets for drug development and suggest binding partners of compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics can be used for the discovery of novel natural products and in drug development. Metabolomics can enhance the discovery and testing of new drugs and provide insight into the on- and off-target effects of drugs. This review focuses primarily on the application of metabolomics in the discovery of active drugs from natural products and the analysis of chemical libraries and the computational analysis of metabolic networks. Metabolomics methodology, both experimental and analytical is fast developing. At the same time, databases of compounds are ever growing with the inclusion of more molecular and spectral information. An increasing number of systems are being represented by very detailed metabolic network models. Combining these experimental and computational tools with high throughput drug testing and drug discovery techniques can provide new promising compounds and leads.

  16. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding...

  17. The Human Urine Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouatra, Souhaila; Aziat, Farid; Mandal, Rupasri; Guo, An Chi; Wilson, Michael R.; Knox, Craig; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Saleem, Fozia; Liu, Philip; Dame, Zerihun T.; Poelzer, Jenna; Huynh, Jessica; Yallou, Faizath S.; Psychogios, Nick; Dong, Edison; Bogumil, Ralf; Roehring, Cornelia; Wishart, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Urine has long been a “favored” biofluid among metabolomics researchers. It is sterile, easy-to-obtain in large volumes, largely free from interfering proteins or lipids and chemically complex. However, this chemical complexity has also made urine a particularly difficult substrate to fully understand. As a biological waste material, urine typically contains metabolic breakdown products from a wide range of foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, endogenous waste metabolites and bacterial by-products. Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine. This involved both computer-aided literature mining and comprehensive, quantitative experimental assessment/validation. The experimental portion employed NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), direct flow injection mass spectrometry (DFI/LC-MS/MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiments performed on multiple human urine samples. This multi-platform metabolomic analysis allowed us to identify 445 and quantify 378 unique urine metabolites or metabolite species. The different analytical platforms were able to identify (quantify) a total of: 209 (209) by NMR, 179 (85) by GC-MS, 127 (127) by DFI/LC-MS/MS, 40 (40) by ICP-MS and 10 (10) by HPLC. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to identify several previously unknown urine metabolites and to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage. It also allowed us to critically assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of different platforms or technologies. The literature review led to the identification and annotation of another 2206 urinary compounds and was used to help guide the subsequent experimental studies. An online database containing

  18. Serum metabolites and risk of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke: a targeted metabolomic approach in two German prospective cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floegel, Anna; Kühn, Tilman; Sookthai, Disorn; Johnson, Theron; Prehn, Cornelia; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Otto, Wolfgang; Weikert, Cornelia; Illig, Thomas; von Bergen, Martin; Adamski, Jerzy; Boeing, Heiner; Kaaks, Rudolf; Pischon, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches in prospective cohorts may offer a unique snapshot into early metabolic perturbations that are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in healthy people. We investigated the association of 105 serum metabolites, including acylcarnitines, amino acids, phospholipids and hexose, with risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam (27,548 adults) and Heidelberg (25,540 adults) cohorts. Using case-cohort designs, we measured metabolites among individuals who were free of CVD and diabetes at blood draw but developed MI (n = 204 and n = 228) or stroke (n = 147 and n = 121) during follow-up (mean, 7.8 and 7.3 years) and among randomly drawn subcohorts (n = 2214 and n = 770). We used Cox regression analysis and combined results using meta-analysis. Independent of classical CVD risk factors, ten metabolites were associated with risk of MI in both cohorts, including sphingomyelins, diacyl-phosphatidylcholines and acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines with pooled relative risks in the range of 1.21-1.40 per one standard deviation increase in metabolite concentrations. The metabolites showed positive correlations with total- and LDL-cholesterol (r ranged from 0.13 to 0.57). When additionally adjusting for total-, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein, acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholine C36:3 and diacyl-phosphatidylcholines C38:3 and C40:4 remained associated with risk of MI. When added to classical CVD risk models these metabolites further improved CVD prediction (c-statistics increased from 0.8365 to 0.8384 in EPIC-Potsdam and from 0.8344 to 0.8378 in EPIC-Heidelberg). None of the metabolites was consistently associated with stroke risk. Alterations in sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine metabolism, and particularly metabolites of the arachidonic acid pathway are independently associated with risk of MI in

  19. Veterinary Medicine and Multi-Omics Research for Future Nutrition Targets: Metabolomics and Transcriptomics of the Common Degenerative Mitral Valve Disease in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghong; Freeman, Lisa M; Rush, John E; Huggins, Gordon S; Kennedy, Adam D; Labuda, Jeffrey A; Laflamme, Dorothy P; Hannah, Steven S

    2015-08-01

    Canine degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD) is the most common form of heart disease in dogs. The objective of this study was to identify cellular and metabolic pathways that play a role in DMVD by performing metabolomics and transcriptomics analyses on serum and tissue (mitral valve and left ventricle) samples previously collected from dogs with DMVD or healthy hearts. Gas or liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrophotometry were used to identify metabolites in serum. Transcriptomics analysis of tissue samples was completed using RNA-seq, and selected targets were confirmed by RT-qPCR. Random Forest analysis was used to classify the metabolites that best predicted the presence of DMVD. Results identified 41 known and 13 unknown serum metabolites that were significantly different between healthy and DMVD dogs, representing alterations in fat and glucose energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and other pathways. The three metabolites with the greatest single effect in the Random Forest analysis were γ-glutamylmethionine, oxidized glutathione, and asymmetric dimethylarginine. Transcriptomics analysis identified 812 differentially expressed transcripts in left ventricle samples and 263 in mitral valve samples, representing changes in energy metabolism, antioxidant function, nitric oxide signaling, and extracellular matrix homeostasis pathways. Many of the identified alterations may benefit from nutritional or medical management. Our study provides evidence of the growing importance of integrative approaches in multi-omics research in veterinary and nutritional sciences.

  20. Targeted metabolomics analysis reveals the association between maternal folic acid supplementation and fatty acids and amino acids profiles in rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhipeng; Liu, Rui; Chou, Jing; Yu, Jiaying; Liu, Xiaowei; Sun, Changhao; Li, Ying; Liu, Liyan

    2018-07-15

    Maternal diet during pregnancy can influence offspring's health by affecting development and metabolism. This study aimed to analyze the influence of maternal folic acid (FA) supplementation on the metabolism of rat pups using targeted metabolomics. Twenty female rats were randomly assigned to a FA supplementation (FAS group, n = 10) or control group (n = 10), which were fed AIN93G diet with 2 or 10 mg/kg FA, respectively. We then measured amino acids and their derivatives, biogenic amines, and fatty acids in the female rats and their pups by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS). In maternal rats, the significant changes of three metabolites (proline, γ-aminobutyric acid and esterified octadecatetraenoic acid, P acids (leucine, isoleucine, serine, proline) were obtained in FAS pups. Furthermore, there were the decreased esterified fatty acids (arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosatetraenoic acid) and free fatty acids (oleic acid, linoleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, octadecatetraenoic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and selacholeic acid) in FAS pups. Metabolic changes in the FAS pups were characterized by changes in fatty acids and amino acids. These results suggested that FA supplementation during pregnancy influenced amino acids and fatty acids metabolism in rat pups. This study provides new insights into the regulation of amino acids and fatty acids metabolism during early life. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeted metabolomic analysis reveals the association between the postprandial change in palmitic acid, branched-chain amino acids and insulin resistance in young obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyan; Feng, Rennan; Guo, Fuchuan; Li, Ying; Jiao, Jundong; Sun, Changhao

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is the result of a positive energy balance and often leads to difficulties in maintaining normal postprandial metabolism. The changes in postprandial metabolites after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in young obese Chinese men are unclear. In this work, the aim is to investigate the complex metabolic alterations in obesity provoked by an OGTT using targeted metabolomics. We used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry to analyze serum fatty acids, amino acids and biogenic amines profiles from 15 control and 15 obese subjects at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min during an OGTT. Metabolite profiles from 30 obese subjects as independent samples were detected in order to validate the change of metabolites. There were the decreased levels of fatty acid, amino acids and biogenic amines after OGTT in obesity. At 120 min, percent change of 20 metabolites in obesity has statistical significance when comparing with the controls. The obese parameters was positively associated with changes in arginine and histidine (Pchange in palmitic acid (PA), branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and phenylalanine between 1 and 120 min were positively associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (all Presistance in obesity. Our findings offer new insights in the complex physiological regulation of the metabolism during an OGTT in obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Pamela J. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  3. Ground target geolocation based on digital elevation model for airborne wide-area reconnaissance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Chuan; Ding, Yalin; Xu, Yongsen; Xiu, Jihong

    2018-01-01

    To obtain the geographical position of the ground target accurately, a geolocation algorithm based on the digital elevation model (DEM) is developed for an airborne wide-area reconnaissance system. According to the platform position and attitude information measured by the airborne position and orientation system and the gimbal angles information from the encoder, the line-of-sight pointing vector in the Earth-centered Earth-fixed coordinate frame is solved by the homogeneous coordinate transformation. The target longitude and latitude can be solved with the elliptical Earth model and the global DEM. The influences of the systematic error and measurement error on ground target geolocation calculation accuracy are analyzed by the Monte Carlo method. The simulation results show that this algorithm can improve the geolocation accuracy of ground target in rough terrain area obviously. The geolocation accuracy of moving ground target can be improved by moving average filtering (MAF). The validity of the geolocation algorithm is verified by the flight test in which the plane flies at a geodetic height of 15,000 m and the outer gimbal angle is <47°. The geolocation root mean square error of the target trajectory is <45 and <7 m after MAF.

  4. A wide temperature range irradiation cryostat for reasearch on solid state targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeve, Scott; Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Runkel, Stefan; Voge, Thomas [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    To qualitatively improve the data obtained in asymmetry measurements of scattering experiments the figure of merit (FOM) plays a major role and can reduce the data acquisition time when a certain precision in the measurement is needed. One of the defining factors for the improvement of the polarised experiment lies in the target choice and preparation, in particular the method employed to introduce the paramagnetic defects for the use of dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP). To this end the Polarized Target Group in Bonn has developed a wide range temperature cryostat for the irradiation of potential target materials in which materials can be irradiated to varying doses at specified temperatures. The stable irradiation temperature of the materials can be controlled to within {+-}1 K over a range of 90 K

  5. Collaborative 3D Target Tracking in Distributed Smart Camera Networks for Wide-Area Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenofon Koutsoukos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the evolution and fusion of wireless sensor network and embedded camera technologies, distributed smart camera networks have emerged as a new class of systems for wide-area surveillance applications. Wireless networks, however, introduce a number of constraints to the system that need to be considered, notably the communication bandwidth constraints. Existing approaches for target tracking using a camera network typically utilize target handover mechanisms between cameras, or combine results from 2D trackers in each camera into 3D target estimation. Such approaches suffer from scale selection, target rotation, and occlusion, drawbacks typically associated with 2D tracking. In this paper, we present an approach for tracking multiple targets directly in 3D space using a network of smart cameras. The approach employs multi-view histograms to characterize targets in 3D space using color and texture as the visual features. The visual features from each camera along with the target models are used in a probabilistic tracker to estimate the target state. We introduce four variations of our base tracker that incur different computational and communication costs on each node and result in different tracking accuracy. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed trackers by comparing their performance to a 3D tracker that fuses the results of independent 2D trackers. We also present performance analysis of the base tracker along Quality-of-Service (QoS and Quality-of-Information (QoI metrics, and study QoS vs. QoI trade-offs between the proposed tracker variations. Finally, we demonstrate our tracker in a real-life scenario using a camera network deployed in a building.

  6. Genome-wide gene expression dataset used to identify potential therapeutic targets in androgenetic alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dey-Rao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The microarray dataset attached to this report is related to the research article with the title: “A genomic approach to susceptibility and pathogenesis leads to identifying potential novel therapeutic targets in androgenetic alopecia” (Dey-Rao and Sinha, 2017 [1]. Male-pattern hair loss that is induced by androgens (testosterone in genetically predisposed individuals is known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA. The raw dataset is being made publicly available to enable critical and/or extended analyses. Our related research paper utilizes the attached raw dataset, for genome-wide gene-expression associated investigations. Combined with several in silico bioinformatics-based analyses we were able to delineate five strategic molecular elements as potential novel targets towards future AGA-therapy.

  7. Multi-targeted priming for genome-wide gene expression assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adomas Aleksandra B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary approaches to assaying global gene expression are needed to assess gene expression in regions that are poorly assayed by current methodologies. A key component of nearly all gene expression assays is the reverse transcription of transcribed sequences that has traditionally been performed by priming the poly-A tails on many of the transcribed genes in eukaryotes with oligo-dT, or by priming RNA indiscriminately with random hexamers. We designed an algorithm to find common sequence motifs that were present within most protein-coding genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of Neurospora crassa, but that were not present within their ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA genes. We then experimentally tested whether degenerately priming these motifs with multi-targeted primers improved the accuracy and completeness of transcriptomic assays. Results We discovered two multi-targeted primers that would prime a preponderance of genes in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa while avoiding priming ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA. Examining the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen deficiency and profiling Neurospora crassa early sexual development, we demonstrated that using multi-targeted primers in reverse transcription led to superior performance of microarray profiling and next-generation RNA tag sequencing. Priming with multi-targeted primers in addition to oligo-dT resulted in higher sensitivity, a larger number of well-measured genes and greater power to detect differences in gene expression. Conclusions Our results provide the most complete and detailed expression profiles of the yeast nitrogen starvation response and N. crassa early sexual development to date. Furthermore, our multi-targeting priming methodology for genome-wide gene expression assays provides selective targeting of multiple sequences and counter-selection against undesirable sequences, facilitating a more complete and

  8. Metabolomic Profiles of Dinophysis acuminata and Dinophysis acuta Using Non-Targeted High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry: Effect of Nutritional Status and Prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María García-Portela

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic species of the genus Dinophysis are obligate mixotrophs with temporary plastids (kleptoplastids that are acquired from the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum, which feeds on cryptophytes of the Teleaulax-Plagioselmis-Geminigera clade. A metabolomic study of the three-species food chain Dinophysis-Mesodinium-Teleaulax was carried out using mass spectrometric analysis of extracts of batch-cultured cells of each level of that food chain. The main goal was to compare the metabolomic expression of Galician strains of Dinophysis acuminata and D. acuta that were subjected to different feeding regimes (well-fed and prey-limited and feeding on two Mesodinium (Spanish and Danish strains. Both Dinophysis species were able to grow while feeding on both Mesodinium strains, although differences in growth rates were observed. Toxin and metabolomic profiles of the two Dinophysis species were significantly different, and also varied between different feeding regimes and different prey organisms. Furthermore, significantly different metabolomes were expressed by a strain of D. acuminata that was feeding on different strains of the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum. Both species-specific metabolites and those common to D. acuminata and D. acuta were tentatively identified by screening of METLIN and Marine Natural Products Dictionary databases. This first metabolomic study applied to Dinophysis acuminata and D.acuta in culture establishes a basis for the chemical inventory of these species.

  9. Metabolomic Profiles of Dinophysis acuminata and Dinophysis acuta Using Non-Targeted High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry: Effect of Nutritional Status and Prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Portela, María; Reguera, Beatriz; Sibat, Manoella; Altenburger, Andreas; Rodríguez, Francisco; Hess, Philipp

    2018-04-26

    Photosynthetic species of the genus Dinophysis are obligate mixotrophs with temporary plastids (kleptoplastids) that are acquired from the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum , which feeds on cryptophytes of the Teleaulax-Plagioselmis-Geminigera clade. A metabolomic study of the three-species food chain Dinophysis-Mesodinium-Teleaulax was carried out using mass spectrometric analysis of extracts of batch-cultured cells of each level of that food chain. The main goal was to compare the metabolomic expression of Galician strains of Dinophysis acuminata and D. acuta that were subjected to different feeding regimes (well-fed and prey-limited) and feeding on two Mesodinium (Spanish and Danish) strains. Both Dinophysis species were able to grow while feeding on both Mesodinium strains, although differences in growth rates were observed. Toxin and metabolomic profiles of the two Dinophysis species were significantly different, and also varied between different feeding regimes and different prey organisms. Furthermore, significantly different metabolomes were expressed by a strain of D. acuminata that was feeding on different strains of the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum . Both species-specific metabolites and those common to D. acuminata and D. acuta were tentatively identified by screening of METLIN and Marine Natural Products Dictionary databases. This first metabolomic study applied to Dinophysis acuminata and D.acuta in culture establishes a basis for the chemical inventory of these species.

  10. Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis for Metabolomic Data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nyamundanda, Gift

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background Data from metabolomic studies are typically complex and high-dimensional. Principal component analysis (PCA) is currently the most widely used statistical technique for analyzing metabolomic data. However, PCA is limited by the fact that it is not based on a statistical model. Results Here, probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA) which addresses some of the limitations of PCA, is reviewed and extended. A novel extension of PPCA, called probabilistic principal component and covariates analysis (PPCCA), is introduced which provides a flexible approach to jointly model metabolomic data and additional covariate information. The use of a mixture of PPCA models for discovering the number of inherent groups in metabolomic data is demonstrated. The jackknife technique is employed to construct confidence intervals for estimated model parameters throughout. The optimal number of principal components is determined through the use of the Bayesian Information Criterion model selection tool, which is modified to address the high dimensionality of the data. Conclusions The methods presented are illustrated through an application to metabolomic data sets. Jointly modeling metabolomic data and covariates was successfully achieved and has the potential to provide deeper insight to the underlying data structure. Examination of confidence intervals for the model parameters, such as loadings, allows for principled and clear interpretation of the underlying data structure. A software package called MetabolAnalyze, freely available through the R statistical software, has been developed to facilitate implementation of the presented methods in the metabolomics field.

  11. A novel approach to the simultaneous extraction and non-targeted analysis of the small molecules metabolome and lipidome using 96-well solid phase extraction plates with column-switching technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubo; Zhang, Zhenzhu; Liu, Xinyu; Li, Aizhu; Hou, Zhiguo; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Yanjun

    2015-08-28

    This study combines solid phase extraction (SPE) using 96-well plates with column-switching technology to construct a rapid and high-throughput method for the simultaneous extraction and non-targeted analysis of small molecules metabolome and lipidome based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This study first investigated the columns and analytical conditions for small molecules metabolome and lipidome, separated by an HSS T3 and BEH C18 columns, respectively. Next, the loading capacity and actuation duration of SPE were further optimized. Subsequently, SPE and column switching were used together to rapidly and comprehensively analyze the biological samples. The experimental results showed that the new analytical procedure had good precision and maintained sample stability (RSDmetabolome and lipidome to test the throughput. The resulting method represents a new analytical approach for biological samples, and a highly useful tool for researches in metabolomics and lipidomics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Amino Acid and Biogenic Amine Profile Deviations in an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: A Comparison between Healthy and Hyperlipidaemia Individuals Based on Targeted Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia (HLP is characterized by a disturbance in lipid metabolism and is a primary risk factor for the development of insulin resistance (IR and a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. The aim of this work was to investigate the changes in postprandial amino acid and biogenic amine profiles provoked by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in HLP patients using targeted metabolomics. We used ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry to analyze the serum amino acid and biogenic amine profiles of 35 control and 35 HLP subjects during an OGTT. The amino acid and biogenic amine profiles from 30 HLP subjects were detected as independent samples to validate the changes in the metabolites. There were differences in the amino acid and biogenic amine profiles between the HLP individuals and the healthy controls at baseline and after the OGTT. The per cent changes of 13 metabolites from fasting to the 2 h samples during the OGTT in the HLP patients were significantly different from those of the healthy controls. The lipid parameters were associated with the changes in valine, isoleucine, creatine, creatinine, dimethylglycine, asparagine, serine, and tyrosine (all p < 0.05 during the OGTT in the HLP group. The postprandial changes in isoleucine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA during the OGTT were positively associated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; all p < 0.05 in the HLP group. Elevated oxidative stress and disordered energy metabolism during OGTTs are important characteristics of metabolic perturbations in HLP. Our findings offer new insights into the complex physiological regulation of metabolism during the OGTT in HLP.

  13. Interacting Environmental Stress Factors Affects Targeted Metabolomic Profiles in Stored Natural Wheat and That Inoculated with F. graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Garcia-Cela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in environmental stress impact on secondary metabolite (SM production profiles. Few studies have examined targeted SM production patterns in relation to interacting environmental conditions in stored cereals. The objectives were to examine the effect of water activity (aw; 0.95–0.90 x temperature (10–25 °C on SM production on naturally contaminated stored wheat and that inoculated with Fusarium graminearum. Samples were analysed using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS on (a total number of known SMs, (b their concentrations and (c changes under environmental stress. 24 Fusarium metabolites were quantified. Interestingly, statistical differences (ChisSq., p < 0.001 were observed in the number of SMs produced under different sets of interacting environmental conditions. The dominant metabolites in natural stored grain were deoxynivalenol (DON and nivalenol (NIV followed by a range of enniatins (A, A1, B, B1, apicidin and DON-3-glucoside at 10 °C. Increasing temperature promoted the biosynthesis of other SMs such as aurofusarin, moniliformin, zearalenone (ZEN and their derivatives. Natural wheat + F. graminearum inoculation resulted in a significant increase in the number of metabolites produced (ChisSq., p < 0.001. For ZEN and its derivatives, more was produced under cooler storage conditions. Fusarin C was enhanced in contrast to that for the enniatin group. The relative ratios of certain groups of targeted SM changed with environmental stress. Both temperature and aw affected the amounts of metabolites present, especially of DON and ZEN. This study suggests that the dominant SMs produced in stored temperate cereals are the mycotoxins for which legislation exists. However, there are changes in the ratios of key metabolites which could influence the relative contamination with individual compounds. Thus, in the future, under more extreme environmental stresses, different dominant SMs may be formed which could

  14. Metabolomics for laboratory diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Renata; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Markuszewski, Michał J; Kaliszan, Roman

    2015-09-10

    Metabolomics is an emerging approach in a systems biology field. Due to continuous development in advanced analytical techniques and in bioinformatics, metabolomics has been extensively applied as a novel, holistic diagnostic tool in clinical and biomedical studies. Metabolome's measurement, as a chemical reflection of a current phenotype of a particular biological system, is nowadays frequently implemented to understand pathophysiological processes involved in disease progression as well as to search for new diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of various organism's disorders. In this review, we discussed the research strategies and analytical platforms commonly applied in the metabolomics studies. The applications of the metabolomics in laboratory diagnostics in the last 5 years were also reviewed according to the type of biological sample used in the metabolome's analysis. We also discussed some limitations and further improvements which should be considered taking in mind potential applications of metabolomic research and practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-target metabolomic profiling of the marine microalgae dunaliella tertiolecta after exposure to diuron using complementary high-resolution analytical techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, P; Lamoree, M.H.; Sjollema, S.B.; de Voogt, P.; Schollée, J.E.; Vethaak, A.D.; Leonards, P.E.G.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, bioassays are used to assess the toxicity of chemicals. Bioassays often focus on one specific mode of action or end point and their responses offer a limited understanding of the health status and underlying pathways of the species under consideration. Metabolomics can be used to

  16. Metabolomic Profiles of Dinophysis acuminata and Dinophysis acuta Using Non-Targeted High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Portela, María; Reguera, Beatriz; Sibat, Manoella

    2018-01-01

    Photosynthetic species of the genus Dinophysis are obligate mixotrophs with temporary plastids (kleptoplastids) that are acquired from the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum, which feeds on cryptophytes of the Teleaulax-Plagioselmis-Geminigera clade. A metabolomic study of the three-species food chain Din...

  17. Selectivity issues in targeted metabolomics: Separation of phosphorylated carbohydrate isomers by mixed-mode hydrophilic interaction/weak anion exchange chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinterwirth, Helmut; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Preinerstorfer, Beatrix; Gargano, Andrea; Reischl, Roland; Bicker, Wolfgang; Trapp, Oliver; Brecker, Lothar; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylated carbohydrates are important intracellular metabolites and thus of prime interest in metabolomics research. Complications in their analysis arise from the existence of structural isomers that do have similar fragmentation patterns in MS/MS and are hard to resolve chromatographically.

  18. Kinome-wide transcriptional profiling of uveal melanoma reveals new vulnerabilities to targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Fiona P; Clarke, Kim; Kalirai, Helen; Kenyani, Jenna; Shahidipour, Haleh; Falciani, Francesco; Coulson, Judy M; Sacco, Joseph J; Coupland, Sarah E; Eyers, Patrick A

    2018-03-01

    Metastatic uveal melanoma (UM) is invariably fatal, usually within a year of diagnosis. There are currently no effective therapies, and clinical studies employing kinase inhibitors have so far demonstrated limited success. This is despite common activating mutations in GNAQ/11 genes, which trigger signalling pathways that might predispose tumours to a variety of targeted drugs. In this study, we have profiled kinome expression network dynamics in various human ocular melanomas. We uncovered a shared transcriptional profile in human primary UM samples and across a variety of experimental cell-based models. The poor overall response of UM cells to FDA-approved kinase inhibitors contrasted with much higher sensitivity to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1, a broad transcriptional repressor. Mechanistically, we identified a repressed FOXM1-dependent kinase subnetwork in JQ1-exposed cells that contained multiple cell cycle-regulated protein kinases. Consistently, we demonstrated vulnerability of UM cells to inhibitors of mitotic protein kinases within this network, including the investigational PLK1 inhibitor BI6727. We conclude that analysis of kinome-wide signalling network dynamics has the potential to reveal actionable drug targets and inhibitors of potential therapeutic benefit for UM patients. © 2017 The Authors. Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research Published by John Wiley & Sons.

  19. Metabolomics to study functional consequences in peroxisomal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herzog, K.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis focusses on metabolomics approaches performed in cultured cells and blood samples from patients with peroxisomal disorders. By applying both targeted and untargeted metabolomics, the aim of these approaches was to study the functional consequences of the primary genetic defects causing

  20. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  1. Tissue Multiplatform-Based Metabolomics/Metabonomics for Enhanced Metabolome Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Abellona U, M R; Li, Jia V

    2018-01-01

    The use of tissue as a matrix to elucidate disease pathology or explore intervention comes with several advantages. It allows investigation of the target alteration directly at the focal location and facilitates the detection of molecules that could become elusive after secretion into biofluids. However, tissue metabolomics/metabonomics comes with challenges not encountered in biofluid analyses. Furthermore, tissue heterogeneity does not allow for tissue aliquoting. Here we describe a multiplatform, multi-method workflow which enables metabolic profiling analysis of tissue samples, while it can deliver enhanced metabolome coverage. After applying a dual consecutive extraction (organic followed by aqueous), tissue extracts are analyzed by reversed-phase (RP-) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-) ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This pipeline incorporates the required quality control features, enhances versatility, allows provisional aliquoting of tissue extracts for future guided analyses, expands the range of metabolites robustly detected, and supports data integration. It has been successfully employed for the analysis of a wide range of tissue types.

  2. Metabolomics window into diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Qiao, Shuxuan; Shi, Chenze; Wang, Shuya; Ji, Guang

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes has become a major global health problem. The elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during the diabetic progression is critical for better understanding its pathogenesis, and identifying potential biomarkers and drug targets. Metabolomics is a promising tool to reveal the metabolic changes and the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The present review provides an update on the application of metabolomics in diabetic complications, including diabetic coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy, and this review provides notes on the prevention and prediction of diabetic complications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Binary similarity measures for fingerprint analysis of qualitative metabolomic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, Anita; Andrić, Filip; Bajusz, Dávid; Héberger, Károly

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary metabolomic fingerprinting is based on multiple spectrometric and chromatographic signals, used either alone or combined with structural and chemical information of metabolic markers at the qualitative and semiquantitative level. However, signal shifting, convolution, and matrix effects may compromise metabolomic patterns. Recent increase in the use of qualitative metabolomic data, described by the presence (1) or absence (0) of particular metabolites, demonstrates great potential in the field of metabolomic profiling and fingerprint analysis. The aim of this study is a comprehensive evaluation of binary similarity measures for the elucidation of patterns among samples of different botanical origin and various metabolomic profiles. Nine qualitative metabolomic data sets covering a wide range of natural products and metabolomic profiles were applied to assess 44 binary similarity measures for the fingerprinting of plant extracts and natural products. The measures were analyzed by the novel sum of ranking differences method (SRD), searching for the most promising candidates. Baroni-Urbani-Buser (BUB) and Hawkins-Dotson (HD) similarity coefficients were selected as the best measures by SRD and analysis of variance (ANOVA), while Dice (Di1), Yule, Russel-Rao, and Consonni-Todeschini 3 ranked the worst. ANOVA revealed that concordantly and intermediately symmetric similarity coefficients are better candidates for metabolomic fingerprinting than the asymmetric and correlation based ones. The fingerprint analysis based on the BUB and HD coefficients and qualitative metabolomic data performed equally well as the quantitative metabolomic profile analysis. Fingerprint analysis based on the qualitative metabolomic profiles and binary similarity measures proved to be a reliable way in finding the same/similar patterns in metabolomic data as that extracted from quantitative data.

  4. Impact of anesthesia and euthanasia on metabolomics of mammalian tissues: studies in a C57BL/6J mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmyer, Katherine A; Thonusin, Chanisa; Qi, Nathan R; Burant, Charles F; Evans, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    A critical application of metabolomics is the evaluation of tissues, which are often the primary sites of metabolic dysregulation in disease. Laboratory rodents have been widely used for metabolomics studies involving tissues due to their facile handing, genetic manipulability and similarity to most aspects of human metabolism. However, the necessary step of administration of anesthesia in preparation for tissue sampling is not often given careful consideration, in spite of its potential for causing alterations in the metabolome. We examined, for the first time using untargeted and targeted metabolomics, the effect of several commonly used methods of anesthesia and euthanasia for collection of skeletal muscle, liver, heart, adipose and serum of C57BL/6J mice. The data revealed dramatic, tissue-specific impacts of tissue collection strategy. Among many differences observed, post-euthanasia samples showed elevated levels of glucose 6-phosphate and other glycolytic intermediates in skeletal muscle. In heart and liver, multiple nucleotide and purine degradation metabolites accumulated in tissues of euthanized compared to anesthetized animals. Adipose tissue was comparatively less affected by collection strategy, although accumulation of lactate and succinate in euthanized animals was observed in all tissues. Among methods of tissue collection performed pre-euthanasia, ketamine showed more variability compared to isoflurane and pentobarbital. Isoflurane induced elevated liver aspartate but allowed more rapid initiation of tissue collection. Based on these findings, we present a more optimal collection strategy mammalian tissues and recommend that rodent tissues intended for metabolomics studies be collected under anesthesia rather than post-euthanasia.

  5. Impact of Anesthesia and Euthanasia on Metabolomics of Mammalian Tissues: Studies in a C57BL/6J Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmyer, Katherine A.; Thonusin, Chanisa; Qi, Nathan R.; Burant, Charles F.; Evans, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    A critical application of metabolomics is the evaluation of tissues, which are often the primary sites of metabolic dysregulation in disease. Laboratory rodents have been widely used for metabolomics studies involving tissues due to their facile handing, genetic manipulability and similarity to most aspects of human metabolism. However, the necessary step of administration of anesthesia in preparation for tissue sampling is not often given careful consideration, in spite of its potential for causing alterations in the metabolome. We examined, for the first time using untargeted and targeted metabolomics, the effect of several commonly used methods of anesthesia and euthanasia for collection of skeletal muscle, liver, heart, adipose and serum of C57BL/6J mice. The data revealed dramatic, tissue-specific impacts of tissue collection strategy. Among many differences observed, post-euthanasia samples showed elevated levels of glucose 6-phosphate and other glycolytic intermediates in skeletal muscle. In heart and liver, multiple nucleotide and purine degradation metabolites accumulated in tissues of euthanized compared to anesthetized animals. Adipose tissue was comparatively less affected by collection strategy, although accumulation of lactate and succinate in euthanized animals was observed in all tissues. Among methods of tissue collection performed pre-euthanasia, ketamine showed more variability compared to isoflurane and pentobarbital. Isoflurane induced elevated liver aspartate but allowed more rapid initiation of tissue collection. Based on these findings, we present a more optimal collection strategy mammalian tissues and recommend that rodent tissues intended for metabolomics studies be collected under anesthesia rather than post-euthanasia. PMID:25658945

  6. Metabolomics Workbench: An international repository for metabolomics data and metadata, metabolite standards, protocols, tutorials and training, and analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Manish; Fahy, Eoin; Cotter, Dawn; Azam, Kenan; Vadivelu, Ilango; Burant, Charles; Edison, Arthur; Fiehn, Oliver; Higashi, Richard; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Sumner, Susan; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2016-01-04

    The Metabolomics Workbench, available at www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, is a public repository for metabolomics metadata and experimental data spanning various species and experimental platforms, metabolite standards, metabolite structures, protocols, tutorials, and training material and other educational resources. It provides a computational platform to integrate, analyze, track, deposit and disseminate large volumes of heterogeneous data from a wide variety of metabolomics studies including mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) data spanning over 20 different species covering all the major taxonomic categories including humans and other mammals, plants, insects, invertebrates and microorganisms. Additionally, a number of protocols are provided for a range of metabolite classes, sample types, and both MS and NMR-based studies, along with a metabolite structure database. The metabolites characterized in the studies available on the Metabolomics Workbench are linked to chemical structures in the metabolite structure database to facilitate comparative analysis across studies. The Metabolomics Workbench, part of the data coordinating effort of the National Institute of Health (NIH) Common Fund's Metabolomics Program, provides data from the Common Fund's Metabolomics Resource Cores, metabolite standards, and analysis tools to the wider metabolomics community and seeks data depositions from metabolomics researchers across the world. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Genome-wide identification of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor using biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Emmitt R

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in computational genomics is the development of methodologies that allow accurate genome-wide prediction of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor. We present a method for target identification that combines experimental characterization of binding requirements with computational genomic analysis. Results Our method identified potential target genes of the transcription factor Ndt80, a key transcriptional regulator involved in yeast sporulation, using the combined information of binding affinity, positional distribution, and conservation of the binding sites across multiple species. We have also developed a mathematical approach to compute the false positive rate and the total number of targets in the genome based on the multiple selection criteria. Conclusion We have shown that combining biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis leads to accurate identification of the genome-wide targets of a transcription factor. The method can be extended to other transcription factors and can complement other genomic approaches to transcriptional regulation.

  8. Genome-wide dynamics of a bacterial response to antibiotics that target the cell envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Ngat

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A decline in the discovery of new antibacterial drugs, coupled with a persistent rise in the occurrence of drug-resistant bacteria, has highlighted antibiotics as a diminishing resource. The future development of new drugs with novel antibacterial activities requires a detailed understanding of adaptive responses to existing compounds. This study uses Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2 as a model system to determine the genome-wide transcriptional response following exposure to three antibiotics (vancomycin, moenomycin A and bacitracin that target distinct stages of cell wall biosynthesis. Results A generalised response to all three antibiotics was identified which involves activation of transcription of the cell envelope stress sigma factor σE, together with elements of the stringent response, and of the heat, osmotic and oxidative stress regulons. Attenuation of this system by deletion of genes encoding the osmotic stress sigma factor σB or the ppGpp synthetase RelA reduced resistance to both vancomycin and bacitracin. Many antibiotic-specific transcriptional changes were identified, representing cellular processes potentially important for tolerance to each antibiotic. Sensitivity studies using mutants constructed on the basis of the transcriptome profiling confirmed a role for several such genes in antibiotic resistance, validating the usefulness of the approach. Conclusions Antibiotic inhibition of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis induces both common and compound-specific transcriptional responses. Both can be exploited to increase antibiotic susceptibility. Regulatory networks known to govern responses to environmental and nutritional stresses are also at the core of the common antibiotic response, and likely help cells survive until any specific resistance mechanisms are fully functional.

  9. The metabolomic profile of umbilical cord blood in neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Walsh

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE in newborns can cause significant long-term neurological disability. The insult is a complex injury characterised by energy failure and disruption of cellular homeostasis, leading to mitochondrial damage. The importance of individual metabolic pathways, and their interaction in the disease process is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to describe and quantify the metabolomic profile of umbilical cord blood samples in a carefully defined population of full-term infants with HIE.The injury severity was defined using both the modified Sarnat score and continuous multichannel electroencephalogram. Using these classification systems, our population was divided into those with confirmed HIE (n = 31, asphyxiated infants without encephalopathy (n = 40 and matched controls (n = 71. All had umbilical cord blood drawn and biobanked at -80 °C within 3 hours of delivery. A combined direct injection and LC-MS/MS assay (AbsolutIDQ p180 kit, Biocrates Life Sciences AG, Innsbruck, Austria was used for the metabolomic analyses of the samples. Targeted metabolomic analysis showed a significant alteration between study groups in 29 metabolites from 3 distinct classes (Amino Acids, Acylcarnitines, and Glycerophospholipids. 9 of these metabolites were only significantly altered between neonates with Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy and matched controls, while 14 were significantly altered in both study groups. Multivariate Discriminant Analysis models developed showed clear multifactorial metabolite associations with both asphyxia and HIE. A logistic regression model using 5 metabolites clearly delineates severity of asphyxia and classifies HIE infants with AUC = 0.92. These data describe wide-spread disruption to not only energy pathways, but also nitrogen and lipid metabolism in both asphyxia and HIE.This study shows that a multi-platform targeted approach to metabolomic analyses using accurately phenotyped and

  10. Metabolomics in plants and humans: applications in the prevention and diagnosis of diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Zanor, Maria I; Busi, María V

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, there has been an increase in the number of metabolomic approaches used, in parallel with proteomic and functional genomic studies. The wide variety of chemical types of metabolites available has also accelerated the use of different techniques in the investigation of the metabolome. At present, metabolomics is applied to investigate several human diseases, to improve their diagnosis and prevention, and to design better therapeutic strategies. In addition, metabolomic studies are also being carried out in areas such as toxicology and pharmacology, crop breeding, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the use and application of metabolomics in human diseases and plant research to improve human health.

  11. Metabolomics: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Locasale, Jason W

    2017-04-01

    Metabolomics generates a profile of small molecules that are derived from cellular metabolism and can directly reflect the outcome of complex networks of biochemical reactions, thus providing insights into multiple aspects of cellular physiology. Technological advances have enabled rapid and increasingly expansive data acquisition with samples as small as single cells; however, substantial challenges in the field remain. In this primer we provide an overview of metabolomics, especially mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics, which uses liquid chromatography (LC) for separation, and discuss its utilities and limitations. We identify and discuss several areas at the frontier of metabolomics. Our goal is to give the reader a sense of what might be accomplished when conducting a metabolomics experiment, now and in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome-Wide Identification of Polycomb Target Genes Reveals a Functional Association of Pho with Scm in Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhiqing; Cheng, Daojun; Mon, Hiroaki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Zhu, Li; Xu, Jian; Lee, Jae Man; Xia, Qingyou; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers and act together in three multimeric complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and Pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC), to repress transcription of the target genes. Here, we identified Polycomb target genes in Bombyx mori with holocentric centromere using genome-wide expression screening based on the knockdown of BmSCE, BmESC, BmPHO, or BmSCM gene, which represent ...

  13. Untargeted Metabolomics Strategies—Challenges and Emerging Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpe-Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Sherrod, Stacy D.; McLean, John A.

    2016-12-01

    Metabolites are building blocks of cellular function. These species are involved in enzyme-catalyzed chemical reactions and are essential for cellular function. Upstream biological disruptions result in a series of metabolomic changes and, as such, the metabolome holds a wealth of information that is thought to be most predictive of phenotype. Uncovering this knowledge is a work in progress. The field of metabolomics is still maturing; the community has leveraged proteomics experience when applicable and developed a range of sample preparation and instrument methodology along with myriad data processing and analysis approaches. Research focuses have now shifted toward a fundamental understanding of the biology responsible for metabolomic changes. There are several types of metabolomics experiments including both targeted and untargeted analyses. While untargeted, hypothesis generating workflows exhibit many valuable attributes, challenges inherent to the approach remain. This Critical Insight comments on these challenges, focusing on the identification process of LC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics studies—specifically in mammalian systems. Biological interpretation of metabolomics data hinges on the ability to accurately identify metabolites. The range of confidence associated with identifications that is often overlooked is reviewed, and opportunities for advancing the metabolomics field are described.

  14. Metabolomics in chemical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlisch, Constanze; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Chemical ecology elucidates the nature and role of natural products as mediators of organismal interactions. The emerging techniques that can be summarized under the concept of metabolomics provide new opportunities to study such environmentally relevant signaling molecules. Especially comparative tools in metabolomics enable the identification of compounds that are regulated during interaction situations and that might play a role as e.g. pheromones, allelochemicals or in induced and activated defenses. This approach helps overcoming limitations of traditional bioassay-guided structure elucidation approaches. But the power of metabolomics is not limited to the comparison of metabolic profiles of interacting partners. Especially the link to other -omics techniques helps to unravel not only the compounds in question but the entire biosynthetic and genetic re-wiring, required for an ecological response. This review comprehensively highlights successful applications of metabolomics in chemical ecology and discusses existing limitations of these novel techniques. It focuses on recent developments in comparative metabolomics and discusses the use of metabolomics in the systems biology of organismal interactions. It also outlines the potential of large metabolomics initiatives for model organisms in the field of chemical ecology.

  15. E-Cigarette Affects the Metabolome of Primary Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aug, Argo; Altraja, Siiri; Kilk, Kalle; Porosk, Rando; Soomets, Ursel; Altraja, Alan

    2015-01-01

    E-cigarettes are widely believed to be safer than conventional cigarettes and have been even suggested as aids for smoking cessation. However, while reasonable with some regards, this judgment is not yet supported by adequate biomedical research data. Since bronchial epithelial cells are the immediate target of inhaled toxicants, we hypothesized that exposure to e-cigarettes may affect the metabolome of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and that the changes are, at least in part, induced by oxidant-driven mechanisms. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of e-cigarette liquid (ECL) on the metabolome of HBEC and examined the potency of antioxidants to protect the cells. We assessed the changes of the intracellular metabolome upon treatment with ECL in comparison of the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) with mass spectrometry and principal component analysis on air-liquid interface model of normal HBEC. Thereafter, we evaluated the capability of the novel antioxidant tetrapeptide O-methyl-l-tyrosinyl-γ-l-glutamyl-l-cysteinylglycine (UPF1) to attenuate the effect of ECL. ECL caused a significant shift in the metabolome that gradually gained its maximum by the 5th hour and receded by the 7th hour. A second alteration followed at the 13th hour. Treatment with CSC caused a significant initial shift already by the 1st hour. ECL, but not CSC, significantly increased the concentrations of arginine, histidine, and xanthine. ECL, in parallel with CSC, increased the content of adenosine diphosphate and decreased that of three lipid species from the phosphatidylcholine family. UPF1 partially counteracted the ECL-induced deviations, UPF1's maximum effect occurred at the 5th hour. The data support our hypothesis that ECL profoundly alters the metabolome of HBEC in a manner, which is comparable and partially overlapping with the effect of CSC. Hence, our results do not support the concept of harmlessness of e-cigarettes.

  16. E-Cigarette Affects the Metabolome of Primary Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argo Aug

    Full Text Available E-cigarettes are widely believed to be safer than conventional cigarettes and have been even suggested as aids for smoking cessation. However, while reasonable with some regards, this judgment is not yet supported by adequate biomedical research data. Since bronchial epithelial cells are the immediate target of inhaled toxicants, we hypothesized that exposure to e-cigarettes may affect the metabolome of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC and that the changes are, at least in part, induced by oxidant-driven mechanisms. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of e-cigarette liquid (ECL on the metabolome of HBEC and examined the potency of antioxidants to protect the cells. We assessed the changes of the intracellular metabolome upon treatment with ECL in comparison of the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC with mass spectrometry and principal component analysis on air-liquid interface model of normal HBEC. Thereafter, we evaluated the capability of the novel antioxidant tetrapeptide O-methyl-l-tyrosinyl-γ-l-glutamyl-l-cysteinylglycine (UPF1 to attenuate the effect of ECL. ECL caused a significant shift in the metabolome that gradually gained its maximum by the 5th hour and receded by the 7th hour. A second alteration followed at the 13th hour. Treatment with CSC caused a significant initial shift already by the 1st hour. ECL, but not CSC, significantly increased the concentrations of arginine, histidine, and xanthine. ECL, in parallel with CSC, increased the content of adenosine diphosphate and decreased that of three lipid species from the phosphatidylcholine family. UPF1 partially counteracted the ECL-induced deviations, UPF1's maximum effect occurred at the 5th hour. The data support our hypothesis that ECL profoundly alters the metabolome of HBEC in a manner, which is comparable and partially overlapping with the effect of CSC. Hence, our results do not support the concept of harmlessness of e-cigarettes.

  17. Metabolomic studies in pulmonology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Furina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review shows the results of metabolomic studies in pulmonology. The key idea of metabolomics is to detect specific biomarkers in a biological sample for the diagnosis of diseases of the bronchi and lung. Main methods for the separation and identification of volatile organic substances as biomarkers (gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry used in metabolomics are given. A solid-phase microextraction method used to pre-prepare a sample is also covered. The results of laboratory tests for biomarkers for lung cancer, acute respiratory distress syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, chronic infections, and pulmonary tuberculosis are presented. In addition, emphasis is placed on the possibilities of metabolomics used in experimental medicine, including to the study of asthma. The information is of interest to both theorists and practitioners.

  18. Current metabolomics: technological advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Sastia P; Yamamoto, Shinya; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-07-01

    Metabolomics, the global quantitative assessment of metabolites in a biological system, has played a pivotal role in various fields of science in the post-genomic era. Metabolites are the result of the interaction of the system's genome with its environment and are not merely the end product of gene expression, but also form part of the regulatory system in an integrated manner. Therefore, metabolomics is often considered a powerful tool to provide an instantaneous snapshot of the physiology of a cell. The power of metabolomics lies on the acquisition of analytical data in which metabolites in a cellular system are quantified, and the extraction of the most meaningful elements of the data by using various data analysis tool. In this review, we discuss the latest development of analytical techniques and data analyses methods in metabolomics study. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolomics er fremtiden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersern, Birger

    2010-01-01

    Forskningen i fødevarer har fået et potent redskab i hånden. Metabolomics er vejen frem, mener professor Søren Balling Engelsen fra Københavns Universitet......Forskningen i fødevarer har fået et potent redskab i hånden. Metabolomics er vejen frem, mener professor Søren Balling Engelsen fra Københavns Universitet...

  20. Quality assurance of metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Beger, Richard; Flynn, Thomas; Guo, Lining; Harris, Georgina; Hogberg, Helena; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Kamp, Hennicke; Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Odwin-DaCosta, Shelly; Pamies, David; Robertson, Donald; Smirnova, Lena; Sun, Jinchun; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics promises a holistic phenotypic characterization of biological responses to toxicants. This technology is based on advanced chemical analytical tools with reasonable throughput, including mass-spectroscopy and NMR. Quality assurance, however - from experimental design, sample preparation, metabolite identification, to bioinformatics data-mining - is urgently needed to assure both quality of metabolomics data and reproducibility of biological models. In contrast to microarray-based transcriptomics, where consensus on quality assurance and reporting standards has been fostered over the last two decades, quality assurance of metabolomics is only now emerging. Regulatory use in safety sciences, and even proper scientific use of these technologies, demand quality assurance. In an effort to promote this discussion, an expert workshop discussed the quality assurance needs of metabolomics. The goals for this workshop were 1) to consider the challenges associated with metabolomics as an emerging science, with an emphasis on its application in toxicology and 2) to identify the key issues to be addressed in order to establish and implement quality assurance procedures in metabolomics-based toxicology. Consensus has still to be achieved regarding best practices to make sure sound, useful, and relevant information is derived from these new tools.

  1. Transcriptome-wide identification of Rauvolfia serpentina microRNAs and prediction of their potential targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Pravin; Rajakani, Raja; Gupta, Vikrant

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs of ∼ 19-24 nucleotides (nt) in length and considered as potent regulators of gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here we report the identification and characterization of 15 conserved miRNAs belonging to 13 families from Rauvolfia serpentina through in silico analysis of available nucleotide dataset. The identified mature R. serpentina miRNAs (rse-miRNAs) ranged between 20 and 22nt in length, and the average minimal folding free energy index (MFEI) value of rse-miRNA precursor sequences was found to be -0.815 kcal/mol. Using the identified rse-miRNAs as query, their potential targets were predicted in R. serpentina and other plant species. Gene Ontology (GO) annotation showed that predicted targets of rse-miRNAs include transcription factors as well as genes involved in diverse biological processes such as primary and secondary metabolism, stress response, disease resistance, growth, and development. Few rse-miRNAs were predicted to target genes of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolic pathways such as alkaloids and anthocyanin biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis showed the evolutionary relationship of rse-miRNAs and their precursor sequences to homologous pre-miRNA sequences from other plant species. The findings under present study besides giving first hand information about R. serpentina miRNAs and their targets, also contributes towards the better understanding of miRNA-mediated gene regulatory processes in plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of metabolomics to toxicology of drugs of abuse: A mini review of metabolomics approach to acute and chronic toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsu, Kei; Hayashi, Yumi; Kusano, Maiko; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi; Ishii, Akira

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomics has been widely applied to toxicological fields, especially to elucidate the mechanism of action of toxicity. In this review, metabolomics application with focus on the studies of chronic and acute toxicities of drugs of abuse like stimulants, opioids and the recently-distributed designer drugs will be presented in addition to an outline of basic analytical techniques used in metabolomics. Limitation of metabolomics studies and future perspectives will be also provided. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Truck-mounted Area-wide Application of Pyriproxyfen Targeting Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in Northeast Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    TRUCK-MOUNTED AREA-WIDE APPLICATION OF PYRIPROXYFEN TARGETING AEDES AEGYPTI AND AEDES ALBOPICTUS IN NORTHEAST FLORIDA1 CARL W. DOUD,2,3 ANTHONY M...truck-mounted ultra-low volume applications of pyriproxyfen against Aedes aegypti larvae in artificial water containers and wild adult Ae. albopictus...larval control, Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus INTRODUCTION Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Asian tiger mosquito) and Ae. aegypti (L.) (yellow fever

  4. Metabolomics approach for discovering disease biomarkers and understanding metabolic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeeyoun Jung

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics, the multi-targeted analysis of endogenous metabolites from biological samples, can be efficiently applied to screen disease biomarkers and investigate pathophysiological processes. Metabolites change rapidly in response to physiological perturbations, making them the closest link to disease phenotypes. This study explored the role of metabolomics in gaining mechanistic insight into disease processes and in searching for novel biomarkers of human diseases

  5. Genome-wide analysis of PDX1 target genes in human pancreatic progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene coding for the homeobox transcription factor (TF PDX1 leads to pancreatic agenesis, whereas heterozygous mutations can cause Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young 4 (MODY4. Although the function of Pdx1 is well studied in pre-clinical models during insulin-producing β-cell development and homeostasis, it remains elusive how this TF controls human pancreas development by regulating a downstream transcriptional program. Also, comparative studies of PDX1 binding patterns in pancreatic progenitors and adult β-cells have not been conducted so far. Furthermore, many studies reported the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and T2DM, and it has been shown that islet enhancers are enriched in T2DM-associated SNPs. Whether regions, harboring T2DM-associated SNPs are PDX1 bound and active at the pancreatic progenitor stage has not been reported so far. Methods: In this study, we have generated a novel induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line that efficiently differentiates into human pancreatic progenitors (PPs. Furthermore, PDX1 and H3K27ac chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq was used to identify PDX1 transcriptional targets and active enhancer and promoter regions. To address potential differences in the function of PDX1 during development and adulthood, we compared PDX1 binding profiles from PPs and adult islets. Moreover, combining ChIP-seq and GWAS meta-analysis data we identified T2DM-associated SNPs in PDX1 binding sites and active chromatin regions. Results: ChIP-seq for PDX1 revealed a total of 8088 PDX1-bound regions that map to 5664 genes in iPSC-derived PPs. The PDX1 target regions include important pancreatic TFs, such as PDX1 itself, RFX6, HNF1B, and MEIS1, which were activated during the differentiation process as revealed by the active chromatin mark H3K27ac and mRNA expression profiling, suggesting that auto-regulatory feedback regulation

  6. Genome-wide search for miRNA-target interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana with an integrated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jiandong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MiRNA are about 22nt long small noncoding RNAs that post transcriptionally regulate gene expression in animals, plants and protozoa. Confident identification of MiRNA-Target Interactions (MTI is vital to understand their function. Currently, several integrated computational programs and databases are available for animal miRNAs, the mechanisms of which are significantly different from plant miRNAs. Methods Here we present an integrated MTI prediction and analysis toolkit (imiRTP for Arabidopsis thaliana. It features two important functions: (i combination of several effective plant miRNA target prediction methods provides a sufficiently large MTI candidate set, and (ii different filters allow for an efficient selection of potential targets. The modularity of imiRTP enables the prediction of high quality targets on genome-wide scale. Moreover, predicted MTIs can be presented in various ways, which allows for browsing through the putative target sites as well as conducting simple and advanced analyses. Results Results show that imiRTP could always find high quality candidates compared with single method by choosing appropriate filter and parameter. And we also reveal that a portion of plant miRNA could bind target genes out of coding region. Based on our results, imiRTP could facilitate the further study of Arabidopsis miRNAs in real use. All materials of imiRTP are freely available under a GNU license at (http://admis.fudan.edu.cn/projects/imiRTP.htm.

  7. Targeting 160 candidate genes for blood pressure regulation with a genome-wide genotyping array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siim Sõber

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS has challenged the field of blood pressure (BP genetics as previous candidate genes have not been among the top loci in these scans. We used Affymetrix 500K genotyping data of KORA S3 cohort (n = 1,644; Southern-Germany to address (i SNP coverage in 160 BP candidate genes; (ii the evidence for associations with BP traits in genome-wide and replication data, and haplotype analysis. In total, 160 gene regions (genic region+/-10 kb covered 2,411 SNPs across 11.4 Mb. Marker densities in genes varied from 0 (n = 11 to 0.6 SNPs/kb. On average 52.5% of the HAPMAP SNPs per gene were captured. No evidence for association with BP was obtained for 1,449 tested SNPs. Considerable associations (P50% of HAPMAP SNPs were tagged. In general, genes with higher marker density (>0.2 SNPs/kb revealed a better chance to reach close to significance associations. Although, none of the detected P-values remained significant after Bonferroni correction (P<0.05/2319, P<2.15 x 10(-5, the strength of some detected associations was close to this level: rs10889553 (LEPR and systolic BP (SBP (P = 4.5 x 10(-5 as well as rs10954174 (LEP and diastolic BP (DBP (P = 5.20 x 10(-5. In total, 12 markers in 7 genes (ADRA2A, LEP, LEPR, PTGER3, SLC2A1, SLC4A2, SLC8A1 revealed considerable association (P<10(-3 either with SBP, DBP, and/or hypertension (HYP. None of these were confirmed in replication samples (KORA S4, HYPEST, BRIGHT. However, supportive evidence for the association of rs10889553 (LEPR and rs11195419 (ADRA2A with BP was obtained in meta-analysis across samples stratified either by body mass index, smoking or alcohol consumption. Haplotype analysis highlighted LEPR and PTGER3. In conclusion, the lack of associations in BP candidate genes may be attributed to inadequate marker coverage on the genome-wide arrays, small phenotypic effects of the loci and/or complex interaction with life-style and metabolic parameters.

  8. Genome-wide identification of Bcl11b gene targets reveals role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    Full Text Available B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 11B (Bcl11b is a transcription factor showing predominant expression in the striatum. To date, there are no known gene targets of Bcl11b in the nervous system. Here, we define targets for Bcl11b in striatal cells by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq in combination with genome-wide expression profiling. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed that 694 genes were significantly altered in striatal cells over-expressing Bcl11b, including genes showing striatal-enriched expression similar to Bcl11b. ChIP-seq analysis demonstrated that Bcl11b bound a mixture of coding and non-coding sequences that were within 10 kb of the transcription start site of an annotated gene. Integrating all ChIP-seq hits with the microarray expression data, 248 direct targets of Bcl11b were identified. Functional analysis on the integrated gene target list identified several zinc-finger encoding genes as Bcl11b targets, and further revealed a significant association of Bcl11b to brain-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin signaling. Analysis of ChIP-seq binding regions revealed significant consensus DNA binding motifs for Bcl11b. These data implicate Bcl11b as a novel regulator of the BDNF signaling pathway, which is disrupted in many neurological disorders. Specific targeting of the Bcl11b-DNA interaction could represent a novel therapeutic approach to lowering BDNF signaling specifically in striatal cells.

  9. Genome-wide identification of microRNA targets in the neglected disease pathogens of the genus Echinococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchiaroli, Natalia; Maldonado, Lucas L; Zarowiecki, Magdalena; Cucher, Marcela; Gismondi, María Inés; Kamenetzky, Laura; Rosenzvit, Mara Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, are key regulators of gene expression at post-transcriptional level and play essential roles in biological processes such as development. MiRNAs silence target mRNAs by binding to complementary sequences in the 3'untranslated regions (3'UTRs). The parasitic helminths of the genus Echinococcus are the causative agents of echinococcosis, a zoonotic neglected disease. In previous work, we performed a comprehensive identification and characterization of Echinococcus miRNAs. However, current knowledge about their targets is limited. Since target prediction algorithms rely on complementarity between 3'UTRs and miRNA sequences, a major limitation is the lack of accurate sequence information of 3'UTR for most species including parasitic helminths. We performed RNA-seq and developed a pipeline that integrates the transcriptomic data with available genomic data of this parasite in order to identify 3'UTRs of Echinococcus canadensis. The high confidence set of 3'UTRs obtained allowed the prediction of miRNA targets in Echinococcus through a bioinformatic approach. We performed for the first time a comparative analysis of miRNA targets in Echinococcus and Taenia. We found that many evolutionarily conserved target sites in Echinococcus and Taenia may be functional and under selective pressure. Signaling pathways such as MAPK and Wnt were among the most represented pathways indicating miRNA roles in parasite growth and development. Genome-wide identification and characterization of miRNA target genes in Echinococcus provide valuable information to guide experimental studies in order to understand miRNA functions in the parasites biology. miRNAs involved in essential functions, especially those being absent in the host or showing sequence divergence with respect to host orthologs, might be considered as novel therapeutic targets for echinococcosis control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Systematic Identification and Assessment of Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer Based on Genome-Wide RNA Interference Transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With accumulating public omics data, great efforts have been made to characterize the genetic heterogeneity of breast cancer. However, identifying novel targets and selecting the best from the sizeable lists of candidate targets is still a key challenge for targeted therapy, largely owing to the lack of economical, efficient and systematic discovery and assessment to prioritize potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe an approach that combines the computational evaluation and objective, multifaceted assessment to systematically identify and prioritize targets for biological validation and therapeutic exploration. We first establish the reference gene expression profiles from breast cancer cell line MCF7 upon genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi of a total of 3689 genes, and the breast cancer query signatures using RNA-seq data generated from tissue samples of clinical breast cancer patients in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Based on gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a set of 510 genes that when knocked down could significantly reverse the transcriptome of breast cancer state. We then perform multifaceted assessment to analyze the gene set to prioritize potential targets for gene therapy. We also propose drug repurposing opportunities and identify potentially druggable proteins that have been poorly explored with regard to the discovery of small-molecule modulators. Finally, we obtained a small list of candidate therapeutic targets for four major breast cancer subtypes, i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2+ and triple negative breast cancer. This RNAi transcriptome-based approach can be a helpful paradigm for relevant researches to identify and prioritize candidate targets for experimental validation.

  11. The influence of different diets on metabolism and atherosclerosis processes-A porcine model: Blood serum, urine and tissues 1H NMR metabolomics targeted analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Zabek

    Full Text Available The global epidemic of cardiovascular diseases leads to increased morbidity and mortality caused mainly by myocardial infarction and stroke. Atherosclerosis is the major pathological process behind this epidemic. We designed a novel model of atherosclerosis in swine. Briefly, the first group (11 pigs received normal pig feed (balanced diet group-BDG for 12 months, the second group (9 pigs was fed a Western high-calorie diet (unbalanced diet group-UDG for 12 months, the third group (8 pigs received a Western type high-calorie diet for 9 months later replaced by a normal diet for 3 months (regression group-RG. Clinical measurements included zoometric data, arterial blood pressure, heart rate and ultrasonographic evaluation of femoral arteries. Then, the animals were sacrificed and the blood serum, urine and skeletal muscle tissue were collected and 1H NMR based metabolomics studies with the application of fingerprinting PLS-DA and univariate analysis were done. Our results have shown that the molecular disturbances might overlap with other diseases such as onset of diabetes, sleep apnea and other obesity accompanied diseases. Moreover, we revealed that once initiated, molecular changes did not return to homeostatic equilibrium, at least for the duration of this experiment.

  12. Nanoparticle-Assisted Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and harnessing the interactions between nanoparticles and biological molecules is at the forefront of applications of nanotechnology to modern biology. Metabolomics has emerged as a prominent player in systems biology as a complement to genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Its focus is the systematic study of metabolite identities and concentration changes in living systems. Despite significant progress over the recent past, important challenges in metabolomics remain, such as the deconvolution of the spectra of complex mixtures with strong overlaps, the sensitive detection of metabolites at low abundance, unambiguous identification of known metabolites, structure determination of unknown metabolites and standardized sample preparation for quantitative comparisons. Recent research has demonstrated that some of these challenges can be substantially alleviated with the help of nanoscience. Nanoparticles in particular have found applications in various areas of bioanalytical chemistry and metabolomics. Their chemical surface properties and increased surface-to-volume ratio endows them with a broad range of binding affinities to biomacromolecules and metabolites. The specific interactions of nanoparticles with metabolites or biomacromolecules help, for example, simplify metabolomics spectra, improve the ionization efficiency for mass spectrometry or reveal relationships between spectral signals that belong to the same molecule. Lessons learned from nanoparticle-assisted metabolomics may also benefit other emerging areas, such as nanotoxicity and nanopharmaceutics.

  13. Clinical Metabolomics and Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Breda, João; Himmelreich, Uwe; Ghesquière, Bart; Rocha-Sousa, Amândio; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2018-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide. However, there are no biomarkers that accurately help clinicians perform an early diagnosis or detect patients with a high risk of progression. Metabolomics is the study of all metabolites in an organism, and it has the potential to provide a biomarker. This review summarizes the findings of metabolomics in glaucoma patients and explains why this field is promising for new research. We identified published studies that focused on metabolomics and ophthalmology. After providing an overview of metabolomics in ophthalmology, we focused on human glaucoma studies. Five studies have been conducted in glaucoma patients and all compared patients to healthy controls. Using mass spectrometry, significant differences were found in blood plasma in the metabolic pathways that involve palmitoylcarnitine, sphingolipids, vitamin D-related compounds, and steroid precursors. For nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a high glutamine-glutamate/creatine ratio was found in the vitreous and lateral geniculate body; no differences were detected in the optic radiations, and a lower N-acetylaspartate/choline ratio was observed in the geniculocalcarine and striate areas. Metabolomics can move glaucoma care towards a personalized approach and provide new knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of glaucoma, which can lead to new therapeutic options. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. A Latitudinal Metabolome of the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W.; Kido Soule, M. C.; Longnecker, K.; Kujawinski, E. B.

    2016-02-01

    Microbial consortia function via the exchange and transformation of small organic molecules or metabolites. These metabolites make up a pool of rapidly cycling organic matter in the ocean that is challenging to characterize due to its low concentrations. We seek to determine the distribution of these molecules and the factors that shape their abundance and flux. Through measurements of the abundance of a core set of metabolites, including nucleic acids, amino acids, sugars, vitamins, and signaling molecules, we gain a real-time snapshot of microbial activity. We used a targeted metabolomics technique to profile metabolite abundance in particulate and dissolved organic matter extracts collected from a 14,000 km transect running from 38˚S to 55˚N in the Western Atlantic Ocean. This extensive dataset is the first of its kind in the Atlantic Ocean and allows us to explore connections among metabolites as well as latitudinal trends in metabolite abundance. We found changes in the intracellular abundance of certain metabolites between low and high nutrient regions and a wide distribution of certain dissolved vitamins in the surface ocean. These measurements give us baseline data on the distribution of these metabolites and allow us to extend our understanding of microbial community activity in different regions of the ocean.

  15. DMS-MaPseq for genome-wide or targeted RNA structure probing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubradt, Meghan; Gupta, Paromita; Persad, Sitara; Lambowitz, Alan M; Weissman, Jonathan S; Rouskin, Silvi

    2017-01-01

    Coupling of structure-specific in vivo chemical modification to next-generation sequencing is transforming RNA secondary structure studies in living cells. The dominant strategy for detecting in vivo chemical modifications uses reverse transcriptase truncation products, which introduce biases and necessitate population-average assessments of RNA structure. Here we present dimethyl sulfate (DMS) mutational profiling with sequencing (DMS-MaPseq), which encodes DMS modifications as mismatches using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase. DMS-MaPseq yields a high signal-to-noise ratio, can report multiple structural features per molecule, and allows both genome-wide studies and focused in vivo investigations of even low-abundance RNAs. We apply DMS-MaPseq for the first analysis of RNA structure within an animal tissue and to identify a functional structure involved in noncanonical translation initiation. Additionally, we use DMS-MaPseq to compare the in vivo structure of pre-mRNAs with their mature isoforms. These applications illustrate DMS-MaPseq's capacity to dramatically expand in vivo analysis of RNA structure.

  16. Revised annotation of Plutella xylostella microRNAs and their genome-wide target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etebari, K; Asgari, S

    2016-12-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is the most devastating pest of brassica crops worldwide. Although 128 mature microRNAs (miRNAs) have been annotated from this species in miRBase, there is a need to extend and correct the current P. xylostella miRNA repertoire as a result of its recently improved genome assembly and more available small RNA sequence data. We used our new ultra-deep sequence data and bioinformatics to re-annotate the P. xylostella genome for high confidence miRNAs with the correct 5p and 3p arm features. Furthermore, all the P. xylostella annotated genes were also screened to identify potential miRNA binding sites using three target-predicting algorithms. In total, 203 mature miRNAs were annotated, including 33 novel miRNAs. We identified 7691 highly confident binding sites for 160 pxy-miRNAs. The data provided here will facilitate future studies involving functional analyses of P. xylostella miRNAs as a platform to introduce novel approaches for sustainable management of this destructive pest. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  17. Metabolome analysis of Drosophila melanogaster during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Phan Nguyen Thuy; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster embryo has been widely utilized as a model for genetics and developmental biology due to its small size, short generation time, and large brood size. Information on embryonic metabolism during developmental progression is important for further understanding the mechanisms of Drosophila embryogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the changes in embryos' metabolome that occur at different stages of the Drosophila embryonic development. Time course samples of Drosophila embryos were subjected to GC/MS-based metabolome analysis for profiling of low molecular weight hydrophilic metabolites, including sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. The results showed that the metabolic profiles of Drosophila embryo varied during the course of development and there was a strong correlation between the metabolome and different embryonic stages. Using the metabolome information, we were able to establish a prediction model for developmental stages of embryos starting from their high-resolution quantitative metabolite composition. Among the important metabolites revealed from our model, we suggest that different amino acids appear to play distinct roles in different developmental stages and an appropriate balance in trehalose-glucose ratio is crucial to supply the carbohydrate source for the development of Drosophila embryo.

  18. Circadian Metabolomics in Time and Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Dyar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are widely known to govern human health and disease, but specific pathogenic mechanisms linking circadian disruption to metabolic diseases are just beginning to come to light. This is thanks in part to the development and application of various “omics”-based tools in biology and medicine. Current high-throughput technologies allow for the simultaneous monitoring of multiple dynamic cellular events over time, ranging from gene expression to metabolite abundance and sub-cellular localization. These fundamental temporal and spatial perspectives have allowed for a more comprehensive understanding of how various dynamic cellular events and biochemical processes are related in health and disease. With advances in technology, metabolomics has become a more routine “omics” approach for studying metabolism, and “circadian metabolomics” (i.e., studying the 24-h metabolome has recently been undertaken by several groups. To date, circadian metabolomes have been reported for human serum, saliva, breath, and urine, as well as tissues from several species under specific disease or mutagenesis conditions. Importantly, these studies have consistently revealed that 24-h rhythms are prevalent in almost every tissue and metabolic pathway. Furthermore, these circadian rhythms in tissue metabolism are ultimately linked to and directed by internal 24-h biological clocks. In this review, we will attempt to put these data-rich circadian metabolomics experiments into perspective to find out what they can tell us about metabolic health and disease, and what additional biomarker potential they may reveal.

  19. Microbial metabolomics in open microscale platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkal, Layla J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Guo, Chun-Jun; Spraker, Joe; Rappert, Lucas; Berthier, Jean; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Wang, Clay C. C.; Beebe, David J.; Keller, Nancy P.; Berthier, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The microbial secondary metabolome encompasses great synthetic diversity, empowering microbes to tune their chemical responses to changing microenvironments. Traditional metabolomics methods are ill-equipped to probe a wide variety of environments or environmental dynamics. Here we introduce a class of microscale culture platforms to analyse chemical diversity of fungal and bacterial secondary metabolomes. By leveraging stable biphasic interfaces to integrate microculture with small molecule isolation via liquid–liquid extraction, we enable metabolomics-scale analysis using mass spectrometry. This platform facilitates exploration of culture microenvironments (including rare media typically inaccessible using established methods), unusual organic solvents for metabolite isolation and microbial mutants. Utilizing Aspergillus, a fungal genus known for its rich secondary metabolism, we characterize the effects of culture geometry and growth matrix on secondary metabolism, highlighting the potential use of microscale systems to unlock unknown or cryptic secondary metabolites for natural products discovery. Finally, we demonstrate the potential for this class of microfluidic systems to study interkingdom communication between fungi and bacteria. PMID:26842393

  20. Metabolomics in the fight against malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L Salinas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics uses high-resolution mass spectrometry to provide a chemical fingerprint of thousands of metabolites present in cells, tissues or body fluids. Such metabolic phenotyping has been successfully used to study various biologic processes and disease states. High-resolution metabolomics can shed new light on the intricacies of host-parasite interactions in each stage of the Plasmodium life cycle and the downstream ramifications on the host’s metabolism, pathogenesis and disease. Such data can become integrated with other large datasets generated using top-down systems biology approaches and be utilised by computational biologists to develop and enhance models of malaria pathogenesis relevant for identifying new drug targets or intervention strategies. Here, we focus on the promise of metabolomics to complement systems biology approaches in the quest for novel interventions in the fight against malaria. We introduce the Malaria Host-Pathogen Interaction Center (MaHPIC, a new systems biology research coalition. A primary goal of the MaHPIC is to generate systems biology datasets relating to human and non-human primate (NHP malaria parasites and their hosts making these openly available from an online relational database. Metabolomic data from NHP infections and clinical malaria infections from around the world will comprise a unique global resource.

  1. Targeted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of ovarian granulosa cells from women with PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Sagvekar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrinopathy of obscure pathophysiologic origins, globally affecting 6-15% women of childbearing age. Emerging evidence on repercussions of environmental insults and changing lifestyles on fecundity and reproductive health have necessitated the study of tissue-specific epigenetic alterations in PCOS development. In semblance to follicular and oocyte defects observed in PCOS ovaries, targeted bisulfite sequencing was performed to generate the methylome signatures of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs obtained from age-BMI matched women with PCOS (n=3 and healthy, regularly menstruating controls (n=3 using next generation sequencing approach. Paired end sequencing of samples was carried out on Illumina HiSeq 2500 ® platform and data were analyzed using the Bismark tool. Methylation levels of a few selected genes relevant to ovarian function were further validated in GCs obtained from 10 controls and 10 women with PCOS by pyrosequencing.  Relative transcript levels of these genes were assessed by q-RT PCR using Taqman assays. In the methylome analysis, a total of 6486 CpG sites representing 3840 genes associated with pathways such as Wnt signaling, G-protein receptor signaling, angiogenesis, chemokine and cytokine mediated inflammation and integrin signaling showed differential methylation in PCOS. Of these, a total of 2977 CpG sites representing 2063 genes were identified as hypomethylated while 3509 CpG sites in 1777 genes were found to be hypermethylated. Additionally, differential methylation was also noted in several non-coding RNAs regulating vital ovarian functions and which are reported to be dysregulated in PCOS. This data provides compelling evidence in support of epigenetic alterations as etiopathogenic factors associated with ovarian dysfunction in PCOS.

  2. Investigation on wide-band scattering of a 2-D target above 1-D randomly rough surface by FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Guo, Li-Xin; Jiao, Yong-Chang; Li, Ke

    2011-01-17

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm with a pulse wave excitation is used to investigate the wide-band composite scattering from a two-dimensional(2-D) infinitely long target with arbitrary cross section located above a one-dimensional(1-D) randomly rough surface. The FDTD calculation is performed with a pulse wave incidence, and the 2-D representative time-domain scattered field in the far zone is obtained directly by extrapolating the currently calculated data on the output boundary. Then the 2-D wide-band scattering result is acquired by transforming the representative time-domain field to the frequency domain with a Fourier transform. Taking the composite scattering of an infinitely long cylinder above rough surface as an example, the wide-band response in the far zone by FDTD with the pulsed excitation is computed and it shows a good agreement with the numerical result by FDTD with the sinusoidal illumination. Finally, the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) from a 2-D target above 1-D rough surface versus the incident frequency, and the representative scattered fields in the far zone versus the time are analyzed in detail.

  3. Better Targeting, Better Efficiency for Wide-Scale Neuronal Transduction with the Synapsin Promoter and AAV-PHP.B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kasey L; Dayton, Robert D; Deverman, Benjamin E; Klein, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Widespread genetic modification of cells in the central nervous system (CNS) with a viral vector has become possible and increasingly more efficient. We previously applied an AAV9 vector with the cytomegalovirus/chicken beta-actin (CBA) hybrid promoter and achieved wide-scale CNS transduction in neonatal and adult rats. However, this method transduces a variety of tissues in addition to the CNS. Thus we studied intravenous AAV9 gene transfer with a synapsin promoter to better target the neurons. We noted in systematic comparisons that the synapsin promoter drives lower level expression than does the CBA promoter. The engineered adeno-associated virus (AAV)-PHP.B serotype was compared with AAV9, and AAV-PHP.B did enhance the efficiency of expression. Combining the synapsin promoter with AAV-PHP.B could therefore be advantageous in terms of combining two refinements of targeting and efficiency. Wide-scale expression was used to model a disease with widespread pathology. Vectors encoding the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related protein transactive response DNA-binding protein, 43 kDa (TDP-43) with the synapsin promoter and AAV-PHP.B were used for efficient CNS-targeted TDP-43 expression. Intracerebroventricular injections were also explored to limit TDP-43 expression to the CNS. The neuron-selective promoter and the AAV-PHP.B enhanced gene transfer and ALS disease modeling in adult rats.

  4. Better Targeting, Better Efficiency for Wide-scale Neuronal Transduction with the Synapsin Promoter and AAV-PHP.B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasey L Jackson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Widespread genetic modification of cells in the central nervous system (CNS with a viral vector has become possible and increasingly more efficient. We previously applied an AAV9 vector with the cytomegalovirus/chicken beta-actin hybrid (CBA promoter and achieved wide-scale CNS transduction in neonatal and adult rats. However, this method transduces a variety of tissues in addition to the CNS. Thus we studied intravenous AAV9 gene transfer with a synapsin promoter to better target the neurons. We noted in systematic comparisons that the synapsin promoter drives lower level expression than does the CBA promoter. The engineered AAV-PHP.B serotype was compared with AAV9, and AAV-PHP.B did enhance the efficiency of expression. Combining the synapsin promoter with AAV-PHP.B could therefore be advantageous in terms of combining two refinements of targeting and efficiency. Wide-scale expression was used to model a disease with widespread pathology. Vectors encoding the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-related protein TDP-43 with the synapsin promoter and AAV-PHP.B were used for efficient CNS-targeted TDP-43 expression. Intracerebroventricular injections were also explored to limit TDP-43 expression to the CNS. The neuron-selective promoter and the AAV-PHP.B enhanced gene transfer and ALS disease modeling in adult rats.

  5. Gut metabolome meets microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamichhane, Santosh; Sen, Partho; Dickens, Alex M

    2018-01-01

    It is well established that gut microbes and their metabolic products regulate host metabolism. The interactions between the host and its gut microbiota are highly dynamic and complex. In this review we present and discuss the metabolomic strategies to study the gut microbial ecosystem. We...... highlight the metabolic profiling approaches to study faecal samples aimed at deciphering the metabolic product derived from gut microbiota. We also discuss how metabolomics data can be integrated with metagenomics data derived from gut microbiota and how such approaches may lead to better understanding...

  6. A Review of Applications of Metabolomics in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D. Beger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a devastating disease that alters the metabolism of a cell and the surrounding milieu. Metabolomics is a growing and powerful technology capable of detecting hundreds to thousands of metabolites in tissues and biofluids. The recent advances in metabolomics technologies have enabled a deeper investigation into the metabolism of cancer and a better understanding of how cancer cells use glycolysis, known as the “Warburg effect,” advantageously to produce the amino acids, nucleotides and lipids necessary for tumor proliferation and vascularization. Currently, metabolomics research is being used to discover diagnostic cancer biomarkers in the clinic, to better understand its complex heterogeneous nature, to discover pathways involved in cancer that could be used for new targets and to monitor metabolic biomarkers during therapeutic intervention. These metabolomics approaches may also provide clues to personalized cancer treatments by providing useful information to the clinician about the cancer patient’s response to medical interventions.

  7. xMSanalyzer: automated pipeline for improved feature detection and downstream analysis of large-scale, non-targeted metabolomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppal Karan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of low abundance metabolites is important for de novo mapping of metabolic pathways related to diet, microbiome or environmental exposures. Multiple algorithms are available to extract m/z features from liquid chromatography-mass spectral data in a conservative manner, which tends to preclude detection of low abundance chemicals and chemicals found in small subsets of samples. The present study provides software to enhance such algorithms for feature detection, quality assessment, and annotation. Results xMSanalyzer is a set of utilities for automated processing of metabolomics data. The utilites can be classified into four main modules to: 1 improve feature detection for replicate analyses by systematic re-extraction with multiple parameter settings and data merger to optimize the balance between sensitivity and reliability, 2 evaluate sample quality and feature consistency, 3 detect feature overlap between datasets, and 4 characterize high-resolution m/z matches to small molecule metabolites and biological pathways using multiple chemical databases. The package was tested with plasma samples and shown to more than double the number of features extracted while improving quantitative reliability of detection. MS/MS analysis of a random subset of peaks that were exclusively detected using xMSanalyzer confirmed that the optimization scheme improves detection of real metabolites. Conclusions xMSanalyzer is a package of utilities for data extraction, quality control assessment, detection of overlapping and unique metabolites in multiple datasets, and batch annotation of metabolites. The program was designed to integrate with existing packages such as apLCMS and XCMS, but the framework can also be used to enhance data extraction for other LC/MS data software.

  8. Correlation of microRNA levels during hypoxia with predicted target mRNAs through genome-wide microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Grier P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of oxygen in tissues, seen in situations such as chronic lung disease, necrotic tumors, and high altitude exposures, initiate a signaling pathway that results in active transcription of genes possessing a hypoxia response element (HRE. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a change in miRNA expression following hypoxia could account for changes in the cellular transcriptome based on currently available miRNA target prediction tools. Methods To identify changes induced by hypoxia, we conducted mRNA- and miRNA-array-based experiments in HT29 cells, and performed comparative analysis of the resulting data sets based on multiple target prediction algorithms. To date, few studies have investigated an environmental perturbation for effects on genome-wide miRNA levels, or their consequent influence on mRNA output. Results Comparison of miRNAs with predicted mRNA targets indicated a lower level of concordance than expected. We did, however, find preliminary evidence of combinatorial regulation of mRNA expression by miRNA. Conclusion Target prediction programs and expression profiling techniques do not yet adequately represent the complexity of miRNA-mediated gene repression, and new methods may be required to better elucidate these pathways. Our data suggest the physiologic impact of miRNAs on cellular transcription results from a multifaceted network of miRNA and mRNA relationships, working together in an interconnected system and in context of hundreds of RNA species. The methods described here for comparative analysis of cellular miRNA and mRNA will be useful for understanding genome wide regulatory responsiveness and refining miRNA predictive algorithms.

  9. Near-term technology policies for long-term climate targets--economy wide versus technology specific approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, B.A.; Azar, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer suggestions when it comes to near-term technology policies for long-term climate targets based on some insights into the nature of technical change. We make a distinction between economy wide and technology specific policy instruments and put forward two key hypotheses: (i) Near-term carbon targets such as the Kyoto protocol can be met by economy wide price instruments (carbon taxes, or a cap-and-trade system) changing the technologies we pick from the shelf (higher energy efficiency in cars, buildings and industry, wind, biomass for heat and electricity, natural gas instead of coal, solar thermal, etc.). (ii) Technology specific policies are needed to bring new technologies to the shelf. Without these new technologies, stricter emission reduction targets may be considered impossible to meet by the government, industry and the general public, and therefore not adopted. The policies required to bring these more advanced technologies to the shelf are more complex and include increased public research and development, demonstration, niche market creation, support for networks within the new industries, standard settings and infrastructure policies (e.g., when it comes to hydrogen distribution). There is a risk that the society in its quest for cost-efficiency in meeting near-term emissions targets, becomes blindfolded when it comes to the more difficult, but equally important issue of bringing more advanced technologies to the shelf. The paper presents mechanisms that cause technology look in, how these very mechanisms can be used to get out of the current 'carbon lock-in' and the risk with premature lock-ins into new technologies that do not deliver what they currently promise. We then review certain climate policy proposals with regards to their expected technology impact, and finally we present a let-a-hundred-flowers-bloom strategy for the next couple of decades

  10. Metabolomics: An Essential Tool to Understand the Function of Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanez, Jessica E.; Peters, Jeffrey M.; Correll, Jared B.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Patterson, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR) family of nuclear hormone transcription factors (PPARα, PPARβ/δ, and PPARγ) is regulated by a wide array of ligands including natural and synthetic chemicals. PPARs have important roles in control of energy metabolism and are known to influence inflammation, differentiation, carcinogenesis, and chemical toxicity. As such, PPARs have been targeted as therapy for common disorders such as cancer, metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes. The recent application of metabolomics, or the global, unbiased measurement of small molecules found in biofluids, or extracts from cells, tissues, or organisms, has advanced our understanding of the varied and important roles that the PPARs have in normal physiology as well as in pathophysiological processes. Continued development and refinement of analytical platforms, and the application of new bioinformatics strategies, have accelerated the widespread use of metabolomics and have allowed further integration of small molecules into systems biology. Recent studies using metabolomics to understand PPARα function, as well as to identify PPARα biomarkers associated with drug efficacy/toxicity and drug-induced liver injury, will be discussed. PMID:23197196

  11. Genome-wide analysis of murine renal distal convoluted tubular cells for the target genes of mineralocorticoid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Kohei [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiki, Katsunori; Shirahige, Katsuhiko [Research Center for Epigenetic Disease, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E. [Endocrine Section, G.V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center, MS (United States); Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, MS (United States); Fujita, Toshiro [Division of Clinical Epigenetics, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nangaku, Masaomi [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nagase, Miki, E-mail: mnagase-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Anatomy and Life Structure, School of Medicine Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • We define a target gene of MR as that with MR-binding to the adjacent region of DNA. • We use ChIP-seq analysis in combination with microarray. • We, for the first time, explore the genome-wide binding profile of MR. • We reveal 5 genes as the direct target genes of MR in the renal epithelial cell-line. - Abstract: Background and objective: Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a member of nuclear receptor family proteins and contributes to fluid homeostasis in the kidney. Although aldosterone-MR pathway induces several gene expressions in the kidney, it is often unclear whether the gene expressions are accompanied by direct regulations of MR through its binding to the regulatory region of each gene. The purpose of this study is to identify the direct target genes of MR in a murine distal convoluted tubular epithelial cell-line (mDCT). Methods: We analyzed the DNA samples of mDCT cells overexpressing 3xFLAG-hMR after treatment with 10{sup −7} M aldosterone for 1 h by chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep-sequence (ChIP-seq) and mRNA of the cell-line with treatment of 10{sup −7} M aldosterone for 3 h by microarray. Results: 3xFLAG-hMR overexpressed in mDCT cells accumulated in the nucleus in response to 10{sup −9} M aldosterone. Twenty-five genes were indicated as the candidate target genes of MR by ChIP-seq and microarray analyses. Five genes, Sgk1, Fkbp5, Rasl12, Tns1 and Tsc22d3 (Gilz), were validated as the direct target genes of MR by quantitative RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR. MR binding regions adjacent to Ctgf and Serpine1 were also validated. Conclusions: We, for the first time, captured the genome-wide distribution of MR in mDCT cells and, furthermore, identified five MR target genes in the cell-line. These results will contribute to further studies on the mechanisms of kidney diseases.

  12. metaMS: An open-source pipeline for GC–MS-based untargeted metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wehrens, H.R.M.J.; Weingart, G.; Mattivi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics are rapidly becoming an important tool for studying complex biological samples. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) is the most widely used analytical technology for metabolomic analysis of compounds that are volatile or can be chemically derivatised into volatile

  13. Metabolomics and Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, Nadia; Du Preez, Ilse; Loots, Du Toit

    2016-01-01

    Current clinical practice strongly relies on the prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases using methods determined and averaged for the specific diseased cohort/population. Although this approach complies positively with most patients, misdiagnosis, treatment failure, relapse, and adverse drug effects are common occurrences in many individuals, which subsequently hamper the control and eradication of a number of diseases. These incidences can be explained by individual variation in the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of a patient. Various "omics" approaches have investigated the influence of these factors on a molecular level, with the intention of developing personalized approaches to disease diagnosis and treatment. Metabolomics, the newest addition to the "omics" domain and the closest to the observed phenotype, reflects changes occurring at all molecular levels, as well as influences resulting from other internal and external factors. By comparing the metabolite profiles of two or more disease phenotypes, metabolomics can be applied to identify biomarkers related to the perturbation being investigated. These biomarkers can, in turn, be used to develop personalized prognostic, diagnostic, and treatment approaches, and can also be applied to the monitoring of disease progression, treatment efficacy, predisposition to drug-related side effects, and potential relapse. In this review, we discuss the contributions that metabolomics has made, and can potentially still make, towards the field of personalized medicine. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Single cell metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Matthias; Zenobi, Renato

    Recent discoveries suggest that cells of a clonal population often display multiple metabolic phenotypes at the same time. Motivated by the success of mass spectrometry (MS) in the investigation of population-level metabolomics, the analytical community has initiated efforts towards MS-based single

  15. Impact of anesthesia and euthanasia on metabolomics of mammalian tissues: studies in a C57BL/6J mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Overmyer

    Full Text Available A critical application of metabolomics is the evaluation of tissues, which are often the primary sites of metabolic dysregulation in disease. Laboratory rodents have been widely used for metabolomics studies involving tissues due to their facile handing, genetic manipulability and similarity to most aspects of human metabolism. However, the necessary step of administration of anesthesia in preparation for tissue sampling is not often given careful consideration, in spite of its potential for causing alterations in the metabolome. We examined, for the first time using untargeted and targeted metabolomics, the effect of several commonly used methods of anesthesia and euthanasia for collection of skeletal muscle, liver, heart, adipose and serum of C57BL/6J mice. The data revealed dramatic, tissue-specific impacts of tissue collection strategy. Among many differences observed, post-euthanasia samples showed elevated levels of glucose 6-phosphate and other glycolytic intermediates in skeletal muscle. In heart and liver, multiple nucleotide and purine degradation metabolites accumulated in tissues of euthanized compared to anesthetized animals. Adipose tissue was comparatively less affected by collection strategy, although accumulation of lactate and succinate in euthanized animals was observed in all tissues. Among methods of tissue collection performed pre-euthanasia, ketamine showed more variability compared to isoflurane and pentobarbital. Isoflurane induced elevated liver aspartate but allowed more rapid initiation of tissue collection. Based on these findings, we present a more optimal collection strategy mammalian tissues and recommend that rodent tissues intended for metabolomics studies be collected under anesthesia rather than post-euthanasia.

  16. Enzymatically Modified Starch Ameliorates Postprandial Serum Triglycerides and Lipid Metabolome in Growing Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Eberspächer, Eva; Grüll, Dietmar; Kowalczyk, Lidia; Molnar, Timea; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-01-01

    Developing host digestion-resistant starches to promote human health is of great research interest. Chemically modified starches (CMS) are widely used in processed foods and although the modification of the starch molecule allows specific reduction in digestibility, the metabolic effects of CMS have been less well described. This short-term study evaluated the impact of enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on fasting and postprandial profiles of blood glucose, insulin and lipids, and serum metabolome in growing pigs. Eight jugular-vein catheterized pigs (initial body weight, 37.4 kg; 4 months of age) were fed 2 diets containing 72% purified starch (EMS or waxy corn starch (control)) in a cross-over design for 7 days. On day 8, an 8-hour meal tolerance test (MTT) was performed with serial blood samplings. Besides biochemical analysis, serum was analysed for 201 metabolites through targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approaches. Pigs fed the EMS diet showed increased (Pmetabolome profiling identified characteristic changes in glycerophospholipid, lysophospholipids, sphingomyelins and amino acid metabolome profiles with EMS diet compared to control diet. Results showed rapid adaptations of blood metabolites to dietary starch shifts within 7 days. In conclusion, EMS ingestion showed potential to attenuate postprandial raise in serum lipids and suggested constant alteration in the synthesis or breakdown of sphingolipids and phospholipids which might be a health benefit of EMS consumption. Because serum insulin was not lowered, more research is warranted to reveal possible underlying mechanisms behind the observed changes in the profile of serum lipid metabolome in response to EMS consumption.

  17. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics for tuberculosis meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peixu; Zhang, Weiguanliu; Lang, Yue; Qu, Yan; Chu, Fengna; Chen, Jiafeng; Cui, Li

    2018-04-18

    Tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) is a prevalent form of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis that causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of TBM is difficult because of the limited sensitivity of existing laboratory techniques. A metabolomics approach can be used to investigate the sets of metabolites of both bacteria and host, and has been used to clarify the mechanisms underlying disease development, and identify metabolic changes, leadings to improved methods for diagnosis, treatment, and prognostication. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a major analysis platform used in metabolomics, and MS-based metabolomics provides wide metabolite coverage, because of its high sensitivity, and is useful for the investigation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and related diseases. It has been used to investigate TBM diagnosis; however, the processes involved in the MS-based metabolomics approach are complex and flexible, and often consist of several steps, and small changes in the methods used can have a huge impact on the final results. Here, the process of MS-based metabolomics is summarized and its applications in Mtb and Mtb-related diseases discussed. Moreover, the current status of TBM metabolomics is described. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Metabolomics through the lens of precision cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sin Man; Wang, Yuan; Li, Bowen; Du, Jie; Shui, Guanghou

    2017-03-20

    Metabolomics, which targets at the extensive characterization and quantitation of global metabolites from both endogenous and exogenous sources, has emerged as a novel technological avenue to advance the field of precision medicine principally driven by genomics-oriented approaches. In particular, metabolomics has revealed the cardinal roles that the environment exerts in driving the progression of major diseases threatening public health. Herein, the existent and potential applications of metabolomics in two key areas of precision cardiovascular medicine will be critically discussed: 1) the use of metabolomics in unveiling novel disease biomarkers and pathological pathways; 2) the contribution of metabolomics in cardiovascular drug development. Major issues concerning the statistical handling of big data generated by metabolomics, as well as its interpretation, will be briefly addressed. Finally, the need for integration of various omics branches and adopting a multi-omics approach to precision medicine will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The food metabolome: a window over dietary exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalbert, Augustin; Brennan, Lorraine; Manach, Claudine; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Dragsted, Lars O; Draper, John; Rappaport, Stephen M; van der Hooft, Justin J J; Wishart, David S

    2014-06-01

    The food metabolome is defined as the part of the human metabolome directly derived from the digestion and biotransformation of foods and their constituents. With >25,000 compounds known in various foods, the food metabolome is extremely complex, with a composition varying widely according to the diet. By its very nature it represents a considerable and still largely unexploited source of novel dietary biomarkers that could be used to measure dietary exposures with a high level of detail and precision. Most dietary biomarkers currently have been identified on the basis of our knowledge of food compositions by using hypothesis-driven approaches. However, the rapid development of metabolomics resulting from the development of highly sensitive modern analytic instruments, the availability of metabolite databases, and progress in (bio)informatics has made agnostic approaches more attractive as shown by the recent identification of novel biomarkers of intakes for fruit, vegetables, beverages, meats, or complex diets. Moreover, examples also show how the scrutiny of the food metabolome can lead to the discovery of bioactive molecules and dietary factors associated with diseases. However, researchers still face hurdles, which slow progress and need to be resolved to bring this emerging field of research to maturity. These limits were discussed during the First International Workshop on the Food Metabolome held in Glasgow. Key recommendations made during the workshop included more coordination of efforts; development of new databases, software tools, and chemical libraries for the food metabolome; and shared repositories of metabolomic data. Once achieved, major progress can be expected toward a better understanding of the complex interactions between diet and human health. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomics and applications for drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Sellers, Katherine; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), during the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly cancer. The metabolome is the functional readout of the genome, functional genome, and proteome; it is also an integral partner in molecular regulations for homeostasis. The interrogation of the metabolome, or metabolomics, is now being applied to numerous diseases, largely by metabolite profiling for biomarker discovery, but also in pharmacology and therapeutics. Recent advances in stable isotope tracer-based metabolomic approaches enable unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks directly in human subjects, which promises to decipher the complexity of the human metabolome at an unprecedented pace. This knowledge will revolutionize our understanding of complex human diseases, clinical diagnostics, as well as individualized therapeutics and drug response. In this review, we focus on the use of stable isotope tracers with metabolomics technologies for understanding metabolic network dynamics in both model systems and in clinical applications. Atom-resolved isotope tracing via the two major analytical platforms, NMR and MS, has the power to determine novel metabolic reprogramming in diseases, discover new drug targets, and facilitates ADME studies. We also illustrate new metabolic tracer-based imaging technologies, which enable direct visualization of metabolic processes in vivo. We further outline current practices and future requirements for biochemoinformatics development, which is an integral part of translating stable isotope-resolved metabolomics into clinical reality. PMID:22212615

  1. NMR-based milk metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundekilde, Ulrik; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Bertram, Hanne Christine S.

    2013-01-01

    and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking...... compounds. Furthermore, metabolomics applications elucidating how the differential regulated genes affects milk composition are also reported. This review will highlight the recent advances in NMR-based metabolomics on milk, as well as give a brief summary of when NMR spectroscopy can be useful for gaining...

  2. Genome-Wide Identification of the Target Genes of AP2-O, a Plasmodium AP2-Family Transcription Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Kaneko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stage-specific transcription is a fundamental biological process in the life cycle of the Plasmodium parasite. Proteins containing the AP2 DNA-binding domain are responsible for stage-specific transcriptional regulation and belong to the only known family of transcription factors in Plasmodium parasites. Comprehensive identification of their target genes will advance our understanding of the molecular basis of stage-specific transcriptional regulation and stage-specific parasite development. AP2-O is an AP2 family transcription factor that is expressed in the mosquito midgut-invading stage, called the ookinete, and is essential for normal morphogenesis of this stage. In this study, we identified the genome-wide target genes of AP2-O by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing and elucidate how this AP2 family transcription factor contributes to the formation of this motile stage. The analysis revealed that AP2-O binds specifically to the upstream genomic regions of more than 500 genes, suggesting that approximately 10% of the parasite genome is directly regulated by AP2-O. These genes are involved in distinct biological processes such as morphogenesis, locomotion, midgut penetration, protection against mosquito immunity and preparation for subsequent oocyst development. This direct and global regulation by AP2-O provides a model for gene regulation in Plasmodium parasites and may explain how these parasites manage to control their complex life cycle using a small number of sequence-specific AP2 transcription factors.

  3. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of Botrytis cinerea genes targeting plant cell walls during infections of different hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBlanco-Ulate

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell walls are barriers that impair colonization of host tissues, but also are important reservoirs of energy-rich sugars. Growing hyphae of necrotrophic fungal pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (Botrytis, henceforth, secrete enzymes that disassemble cell wall polysaccharides. In this work we describe the annotation of 275 putative secreted Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes identified in the Botrytis B05.10 genome. Using RNAseq we determined which Botrytis CAZymes were expressed during infections of lettuce leaves, ripe tomato fruit, and grape berries. On the three hosts, Botrytis expressed a common group of 229 potentially secreted CAZymes, including 28 pectin backbone-modifying enzymes, 21 hemicellulose-modifying proteins, 18 enzymes that might target pectin and hemicellulose side-branches, and 16 enzymes predicted to degrade cellulose. The diversity of the Botrytis CAZymes may be partly responsible for its wide host range. Thirty-six candidate CAZymes with secretion signals were found exclusively when Botrytis interacted with ripe tomato fruit and grape berries. Pectin polysaccharides are notably abundant in grape and tomato cell walls, but lettuce leaf walls have less pectin and are richer in hemicelluloses and cellulose. The results of this study not only suggest that Botrytis targets similar wall polysaccharide networks on fruit and leaves, but also that it may selectively attack host wall polysaccharide substrates depending on the host tissue.

  4. Genome-wide identification of polycomb target genes reveals a functional association of Pho with Scm in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqing; Cheng, Daojun; Mon, Hiroaki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Zhu, Li; Xu, Jian; Lee, Jae Man; Xia, Qingyou; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers and act together in three multimeric complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and Pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC), to repress transcription of the target genes. Here, we identified Polycomb target genes in Bombyx mori with holocentric centromere using genome-wide expression screening based on the knockdown of BmSCE, BmESC, BmPHO, or BmSCM gene, which represent the distinct complexes. As a result, the expressions of 29 genes were up-regulated after knocking down 4 PcG genes. Particularly, there is a significant overlap between targets of BmPho (331 out of 524) and BmScm (331 out of 532), and among these, 190 genes function as regulator factors playing important roles in development. We also found that BmPho, as well as BmScm, can interact with other Polycomb components examined in this study. Further detailed analysis revealed that the C-terminus of BmPho containing zinc finger domain is involved in the interaction between BmPho and BmScm. Moreover, the zinc finger domain in BmPho contributes to its inhibitory function and ectopic overexpression of BmScm is able to promote transcriptional repression by Gal4-Pho fusions including BmScm-interacting domain. Loss of BmPho expression causes relocalization of BmScm into the cytoplasm. Collectively, we provide evidence of a functional link between BmPho and BmScm, and propose two Polycomb-related repression mechanisms requiring only BmPho associated with BmScm or a whole set of PcG complexes.

  5. Genome-wide identification of polycomb target genes reveals a functional association of Pho with Scm in Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Li

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers and act together in three multimeric complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2, and Pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC, to repress transcription of the target genes. Here, we identified Polycomb target genes in Bombyx mori with holocentric centromere using genome-wide expression screening based on the knockdown of BmSCE, BmESC, BmPHO, or BmSCM gene, which represent the distinct complexes. As a result, the expressions of 29 genes were up-regulated after knocking down 4 PcG genes. Particularly, there is a significant overlap between targets of BmPho (331 out of 524 and BmScm (331 out of 532, and among these, 190 genes function as regulator factors playing important roles in development. We also found that BmPho, as well as BmScm, can interact with other Polycomb components examined in this study. Further detailed analysis revealed that the C-terminus of BmPho containing zinc finger domain is involved in the interaction between BmPho and BmScm. Moreover, the zinc finger domain in BmPho contributes to its inhibitory function and ectopic overexpression of BmScm is able to promote transcriptional repression by Gal4-Pho fusions including BmScm-interacting domain. Loss of BmPho expression causes relocalization of BmScm into the cytoplasm. Collectively, we provide evidence of a functional link between BmPho and BmScm, and propose two Polycomb-related repression mechanisms requiring only BmPho associated with BmScm or a whole set of PcG complexes.

  6. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions. © 2015 AABB.

  7. Diagnosis of adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency by metabolomic profiling in plasma reveals a phenotypic spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder that presents with a broad-spectrum of neurological and physiological symptoms. The ADSL gene produces an enzyme with binary molecular roles in de novo purine synthesis and purine nucleotide recycling. The biochemical phenotype of ADSL deficiency, accumulation of SAICAr and succinyladenosine (S-Ado in biofluids of affected individuals, serves as the traditional target for diagnosis with targeted quantitative urine purine analysis employed as the predominate method of detection. In this study, we report the diagnosis of ADSL deficiency using an alternative method, untargeted metabolomic profiling, an analytical scheme capable of generating semi-quantitative z-score values for over 1000 unique compounds in a single analysis of a specimen. Using this method to analyze plasma, we diagnosed ADSL deficiency in four patients and confirmed these findings with targeted quantitative biochemical analysis and molecular genetic testing. ADSL deficiency is part of a large a group of neurometabolic disorders, with a wide range of severity and sharing a broad differential diagnosis. This phenotypic similarity among these many inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs has classically stood as a hurdle in their initial diagnosis and subsequent treatment. The findings presented here demonstrate the clinical utility of metabolomic profiling in the diagnosis of ADSL deficiency and highlights the potential of this technology in the diagnostic evaluation of individuals with neurologic phenotypes.

  8. Metabolomics as an emerging strategy for the investigation of yogurt components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Settachaimongkon, S.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Smid, E.J.

    2017-01-01

    The advanced development in metabolomics allows discovery of a wide range of metabolites in complex biological systems including food matrices. This analytical approach provides opportunities to attain a global metabolite profile and discover potential biomarkers and various chemical contaminants

  9. Novel uses of a wide beam saddle field ion source for producing targets used in nuclear physics experiments at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The wide beam ion sputter source has several unique characteristics which make it very useful for producing, reducing the thickness or cleaning the surface of targets needed for nuclear physics experiments. A discussion of these techniques as well as the sputter source characteristics will be given. Sputter yields obtained utilizing the source are presented for a variety of materials common to nuclear target production

  10. Non-Targeted Metabolomics Analysis of Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy-Affected Muscles Reveals Alterations in Arginine and Proline Metabolism, and Elevations in Glutamic and Oleic Acid In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Muhammad; Kornegay, Joe N.; Honcoop, Aubree; Parry, Traci L.; Balog-Alvarez, Cynthia J.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Patterson, Cam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog model of DMD is characterized by muscle necrosis, progressive paralysis, and pseudohypertrophy in specific skeletal muscles. This severe GRMD phenotype includes moderate atrophy of the biceps femoris (BF) as compared to unaffected normal dogs, while the long digital extensor (LDE), which functions to flex the tibiotarsal joint and serves as a digital extensor, undergoes the most pronounced atrophy. A recent microarray analysis of GRMD identified alterations in genes associated with lipid metabolism and energy production. Methods: We, therefore, undertook a non-targeted metabolomics analysis of the milder/earlier stage disease GRMD BF muscle versus the more severe/chronic LDE using GC-MS to identify underlying metabolic defects specific for affected GRMD skeletal muscle. Results: Untargeted metabolomics analysis of moderately-affected GRMD muscle (BF) identified eight significantly altered metabolites, including significantly decreased stearamide (0.23-fold of controls, p = 2.89 × 10−3), carnosine (0.40-fold of controls, p = 1.88 × 10−2), fumaric acid (0.40-fold of controls, p = 7.40 × 10−4), lactamide (0.33-fold of controls, p = 4.84 × 10−2), myoinositol-2-phosphate (0.45-fold of controls, p = 3.66 × 10−2), and significantly increased oleic acid (1.77-fold of controls, p = 9.27 × 10−2), glutamic acid (2.48-fold of controls, p = 2.63 × 10−2), and proline (1.73-fold of controls, p = 3.01 × 10−2). Pathway enrichment analysis identified significant enrichment for arginine/proline metabolism (p = 5.88 × 10−4, FDR 4.7 × 10−2), where alterations in L-glutamic acid, proline, and carnosine were found. Additionally, multiple Krebs cycle intermediates were significantly decreased (e.g., malic acid, fumaric acid, citric/isocitric acid, and succinic acid), suggesting that altered energy metabolism may be underlying the observed GRMD BF muscle

  11. Widely-targeted quantitative lipidomics methodology by supercritical fluid chromatography coupled with fast-scanning triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroaki; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masatomo; Paxton, Thanai; Tamura, Shohei; Koike, Tomonari; Yu, Ying; Kato, Noriko; Nagase, Katsutoshi; Shiomi, Masashi; Bamba, Takeshi

    2018-05-03

    Lipidomics, the mass spectrometry-based comprehensive analysis of lipids, has attracted attention as an analytical approach to provide novel insight into lipid metabolism and to search for biomarkers. However, an ideal method for both comprehensive and quantitative analysis of lipids has not been fully developed. Herein, we have proposed a practical methodology for widely-targeted quantitative lipidome analysis using supercritical fluid chromatography fast-scanning triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (SFC/QqQMS) and theoretically calculated a comprehensive lipid multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) library. Lipid classes can be separated by SFC with a normal phase diethylamine-bonded silica column with high-resolution, high-throughput, and good repeatability. Structural isomers of phospholipids can be monitored by mass spectrometric separation with fatty acyl-based MRM transitions. SFC/QqQMS analysis with an internal standard-dilution method offers quantitative information for both lipid class and individual lipid molecular species in the same lipid class. Additionally, data acquired using this method has advantages including reduction of misidentification and acceleration of data analysis. Using the SFC/QqQMS system, alteration of plasma lipid levels in myocardial infarction-prone rabbits to the supplementation of eicosapentaenoic acid was first observed. Our developed SFC/QqQMS method represents a potentially useful tool for in-depth studies focused on complex lipid metabolism and biomarker discovery. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. High-resolution metabolomics of occupational exposure to trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Douglas I; Uppal, Karan; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Smith, Martyn; Hu, Wei; Purdue, Mark P; Tang, Xiaojiang; Reiss, Boris; Kim, Sungkyoon; Li, Laiyu; Huang, Hanlin; Pennell, Kurt D; Jones, Dean P; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Occupational exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) has been linked to adverse health outcomes including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and kidney and liver cancer; however, TCE's mode of action for development of these diseases in humans is not well understood. Non-targeted metabolomics analysis of plasma obtained from 80 TCE-exposed workers [full shift exposure range of 0.4 to 230 parts-per-million of air (ppm a )] and 95 matched controls were completed by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. Biological response to TCE exposure was determined using a metabolome-wide association study (MWAS) framework, with metabolic changes and plasma TCE metabolites evaluated by dose-response and pathway enrichment. Biological perturbations were then linked to immunological, renal and exposure molecular markers measured in the same population. Metabolic features associated with TCE exposure included known TCE metabolites, unidentifiable chlorinated compounds and endogenous metabolites. Exposure resulted in a systemic response in endogenous metabolism, including disruption in purine catabolism and decreases in sulphur amino acid and bile acid biosynthesis pathways. Metabolite associations with TCE exposure included uric acid (β = 0.13, P-value = 3.6 × 10 -5 ), glutamine (β = 0.08, P-value = 0.0013), cystine (β = 0.75, P-value = 0.0022), methylthioadenosine (β = -1.6, P-value = 0.0043), taurine (β = -2.4, P-value = 0.0011) and chenodeoxycholic acid (β = -1.3, P-value = 0.0039), which are consistent with known toxic effects of TCE, including immunosuppression, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Correlation with additional exposure markers and physiological endpoints supported known disease associations. High-resolution metabolomics correlates measured occupational exposure to internal dose and metabolic response, providing insight into molecular mechanisms of exposure-related disease aetiology. © The Author 2016; all rights

  13. The application of skin metabolomics in the context of transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinling; Xu, Weitong; Liang, Yibiao; Wang, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Metabolomics is a powerful emerging tool for the identification of biomarkers and the exploration of metabolic pathways in a high-throughput manner. As an administration site for percutaneous absorption, the skin has a variety of metabolic enzymes, except other than hepar. However, technologies to fully detect dermal metabolites remain lacking. Skin metabolomics studies have mainly focused on the regulation of dermal metabolites by drugs or on the metabolism of drugs themselves. Skin metabolomics techniques include collection and preparation of skin samples, data collection, data processing and analysis. Furthermore, studying dermal metabolic effects via metabolomics can provide novel explanations for the pathogenesis of some dermatoses and unique insights for designing targeted prodrugs, promoting drug absorption and controlling drug concentration. This paper reviews current progress in the field of skin metabolomics, with a specific focus on dermal drug delivery systems and dermatosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  14. High-resolution metabolomics of occupational exposure to trichloroethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, Douglas I; Uppal, Karan; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Smith, Martyn; Hu, Wei; Purdue, Mark P; Tang, Xiaojiang; Reiss, Boris; Kim, Sungkyoon; Li, Laiyu; Huang, Hanlin; Pennell, Kurt D; Jones, Dean P; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) has been linked to adverse health outcomes including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and kidney and liver cancer; however, TCE's mode of action for development of these diseases in humans is not well understood. METHODS: Non-targeted metabolomics

  15. Meat and Seafood Consumption in Relation to Plasma Metabolic Profiles in a Chinese Population: A Combined Untargeted and Targeted Metabolomics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonghai; Zou, Li; Su, Jin; Tai, E Shyong; Whitton, Clare; Dam, Rob M van; Ong, Choon Nam

    2017-06-30

    We examined the relationship between different patterns of meat and seafood consumption and plasma metabolic profiles in an Asian population. We selected 270 ethnic Chinese men and women from the Singapore Prospective Study Program based on their dietary habits assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Participants were divided into four subgroups: high meat and high seafood ( n = 60), high meat and low seafood ( n = 64), low meat and high seafood ( n = 60), and low meat and low seafood ( n = 86) consumers. Plasma metabolites were measured using both targeted and untargeted mass spectroscopy-based analyses. A total of 42 metabolites differed significantly by dietary group. Higher concentrations of essential amino acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and d-glucose were found in high meat and/or seafood consumers as compared with the group with a low consumption of these animal foods. Red meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, soy products, and dairy were each correlated with at least one differential metabolite ( r = -0.308 to 0.448). Some observations, such as the correlation between fish and 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropanoic acid (CMPF), confirmed previous studies. Other observations, such as the correlation between shellfish and phosphatidylethanolamine (p36:4), were novel. We also observed significant correlations between plasma metabolites and clinical characteristics, such as CMPF with fasting blood glucose ( r = 0.401). These findings demonstrate a significant influence of meat and seafood consumption on metabolic profiles in the Asian population.

  16. Untargeted metabolomics reveals specific withanolides and fatty acyl glycoside as tentative metabolites to differentiate organic and conventional Physalis peruviana fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llano, Sandra M; Muñoz-Jiménez, Ana M; Jiménez-Cartagena, Claudio; Londoño-Londoño, Julián; Medina, Sonia

    2018-04-01

    The agronomic production systems may affect the levels of food metabolites. Metabolomics approaches have been applied as useful tool for the characterization of fruit metabolome. In this study, metabolomics techniques were used to assess the differences in phytochemical composition between goldenberry samples produced by organic and conventional systems. To verify that the organic samples were free of pesticides, individual pesticides were analyzed. Principal component analysis showed a clear separation of goldenberry samples from two different farming systems. Via targeted metabolomics assays, whereby carotenoids and ascorbic acid were analyzed, not statistical differences between both crops were found. Conversely, untargeted metabolomics allowed us to identify two withanolides and one fatty acyl glycoside as tentative metabolites to differentiate goldenberry fruits, recording organic fruits higher amounts of these compounds than conventional samples. Hence, untargeted metabolomics technology could be suitable to research differences on phytochemicals under different agricultural management practices and to authenticate organic products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, G.A. Nagana; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact biospecimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory. PMID:26476597

  18. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory.

  19. Mass spectrometry as a quantitative tool in plant metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Tiago F.; Mata, Ana T.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a research field used to acquire comprehensive information on the composition of a metabolite pool to provide a functional screen of the cellular state. Studies of the plant metabolome include the analysis of a wide range of chemical species with very diverse physico-chemical properties, and therefore powerful analytical tools are required for the separation, characterization and quantification of this vast compound diversity present in plant matrices. In this review, challenges in the use of mass spectrometry (MS) as a quantitative tool in plant metabolomics experiments are discussed, and important criteria for the development and validation of MS-based analytical methods provided. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644967

  20. Metabolomics Workbench (MetWB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Metabolomics Program's Data Repository and Coordinating Center (DRCC), housed at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), University of California, San Diego,...

  1. The biology of plant metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Following a general introduction, this book includes details of metabolomics of model species including Arabidopsis and tomato. Further chapters provide in-depth coverage of abiotic stress, data integration, systems biology, genetics, genomics, chemometrics and biostatisitcs. Applications of plant

  2. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-14

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women's bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the "interactive metabolome", which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI.

  3. Medicinal Plants: A Public Resource for Metabolomics and Hypothesis Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Syrkin Wurtele

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Specialized compounds from photosynthetic organisms serve as rich resources for drug development. From aspirin to atropine, plant-derived natural products have had a profound impact on human health. Technological advances provide new opportunities to access these natural products in a metabolic context. Here, we describe a database and platform for storing, visualizing and statistically analyzing metabolomics data from fourteen medicinal plant species. The metabolomes and associated transcriptomes (RNAseq for each plant species, gathered from up to twenty tissue/organ samples that have experienced varied growth conditions and developmental histories, were analyzed in parallel. Three case studies illustrate different ways that the data can be integrally used to generate testable hypotheses concerning the biochemistry, phylogeny and natural product diversity of medicinal plants. Deep metabolomics analysis of Camptotheca acuminata exemplifies how such data can be used to inform metabolic understanding of natural product chemical diversity and begin to formulate hypotheses about their biogenesis. Metabolomics data from Prunella vulgaris, a species that contains a wide range of antioxidant, antiviral, tumoricidal and anti-inflammatory constituents, provide a case study of obtaining biosystematic and developmental fingerprint information from metabolite accumulation data in a little studied species. Digitalis purpurea, well known as a source of cardiac glycosides, is used to illustrate how integrating metabolomics and transcriptomics data can lead to identification of candidate genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes in the cardiac glycoside pathway. Medicinal Plant Metabolomics Resource (MPM [1] provides a framework for generating experimentally testable hypotheses about the metabolic networks that lead to the generation of specialized compounds, identifying genes that control their biosynthesis and establishing a basis for modeling metabolism in less

  4. Metabolomics Society’s International Affiliations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessner, U.; Rolin, D.; Rijswijk, van M.E.C.; Hall, R.D.; Hankemeier, T.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 the Metabolomics Society established a more formal system for national and regional metabolomics initiatives, interest groups, societies and networks to become an International Affiliate of the Society. A number of groups (http://metabolomicssociety.org/international-affilia

  5. Identification of a novel FGFRL1 MicroRNA target site polymorphism for bone mineral density in meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Niu (Tianhua); N. Liu (Ning); M. Zhao (Ming); G. Xie (Guie); L. Zhang (Lei); J. Li (Jian); Y.-F. Pei (Yu-Fang); H. Shen (Hui); X. Fu (Xiaoying); H. He (Hao); S. Lu (Shan); X. Chen (Xiangding); L. Tan (Lijun); T.-L. Yang (Tie-Lin); Y. Guo (Yan); P.J. Leo (Paul); E.L. Duncan (Emma); J. Shen (Jie); Y.-F. Guo (Yan-fang); G.C. Nicholson (Geoffrey); R.L. Prince (Richard L.); J.A. Eisman (John); G. Jones (Graeme); P.N. Sambrook (Philip); X. Hu (Xiang); P.M. Das (Partha M.); Q. Tian (Qing); X.-Z. Zhu (Xue-Zhen); C.J. Papasian (Christopher J.); M.A. Brown (Matthew); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Y.-P. Wang (Yu-Ping); S. Xiang (Shuanglin); H.-W. Deng

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical post-transcriptional regulators. Based on a previous genome-wide association (GWA) scan, we conducted a polymorphism in microRNAs' Target Sites (poly-miRTS)-centric multistage meta-analysis for lumbar spine (LS)-, total hip (HIP)-, and femoral neck

  6. Role of metabolomics in TBI research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolahan, Stephanie M.; Hirt, Daniel; Braas, Daniel; Glenn, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Metabolomics is an important member of the omics community in that it defines which small molecules may be responsible for disease states. This article reviews the essential principles of metabolomics from specimen preparation, chemical analysis, and advanced statistical methods. Metabolomics in TBI has so far been underutilized. Future metabolomics based studies focused on the diagnoses, prognoses, and treatment effects, need to be conducted across all types of TBI. PMID:27637396

  7. ECMDB: The E. coli Metabolome Database

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, An Chi; Jewison, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Liu, Yifeng; Knox, Craig; Djoumbou, Yannick; Lo, Patrick; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Metabolome Database (ECMDB, http://www.ecmdb.ca) is a comprehensively annotated metabolomic database containing detailed information about the metabolome of E. coli (K-12). Modelled closely on the Human and Yeast Metabolome Databases, the ECMDB contains >2600 metabolites with links to ?1500 different genes and proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in the ECMDB has been collected from dozens of textbooks, journal articles and electronic databases. E...

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabolomics and liver diseases: Recent advances and future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed Nawfal; Goossens, Corentine; Bouchemal, Nadia; Nahon, Pierre; Savarin, Philippe; Le Moyec, Laurence

    2016-01-07

    Metabolomics is defined as the quantitative measurement of the dynamic multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. It is an "omics" technique that is situated downstream of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Metabolomics is recognized as a promising technique in the field of systems biology for the evaluation of global metabolic changes. During the last decade, metabolomics approaches have become widely used in the study of liver diseases for the detection of early biomarkers and altered metabolic pathways. It is a powerful technique to improve our pathophysiological knowledge of various liver diseases. It can be a useful tool to help clinicians in the diagnostic process especially to distinguish malignant and non-malignant liver disease as well as to determine the etiology or severity of the liver disease. It can also assess therapeutic response or predict drug induced liver injury. Nevertheless, the usefulness of metabolomics is often not understood by clinicians, especially the concept of metabolomics profiling or fingerprinting. In the present work, after a concise description of the different techniques and processes used in metabolomics, we will review the main research on this subject by focusing specifically on in vitro proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics approaches in human studies. We will first consider the clinical point of view enlighten physicians on this new approach and emphasis its future use in clinical "routine".

  9. Deep Learning Accurately Predicts Estrogen Receptor Status in Breast Cancer Metabolomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakwaa, Fadhl M; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Garmire, Lana X

    2018-01-05

    Metabolomics holds the promise as a new technology to diagnose highly heterogeneous diseases. Conventionally, metabolomics data analysis for diagnosis is done using various statistical and machine learning based classification methods. However, it remains unknown if deep neural network, a class of increasingly popular machine learning methods, is suitable to classify metabolomics data. Here we use a cohort of 271 breast cancer tissues, 204 positive estrogen receptor (ER+), and 67 negative estrogen receptor (ER-) to test the accuracies of feed-forward networks, a deep learning (DL) framework, as well as six widely used machine learning models, namely random forest (RF), support vector machines (SVM), recursive partitioning and regression trees (RPART), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), prediction analysis for microarrays (PAM), and generalized boosted models (GBM). DL framework has the highest area under the curve (AUC) of 0.93 in classifying ER+/ER- patients, compared to the other six machine learning algorithms. Furthermore, the biological interpretation of the first hidden layer reveals eight commonly enriched significant metabolomics pathways (adjusted P-value learning methods. Among them, protein digestion and absorption and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters pathways are also confirmed in integrated analysis between metabolomics and gene expression data in these samples. In summary, deep learning method shows advantages for metabolomics based breast cancer ER status classification, with both the highest prediction accuracy (AUC = 0.93) and better revelation of disease biology. We encourage the adoption of feed-forward networks based deep learning method in the metabolomics research community for classification.

  10. Metabolomics: the chemistry between ecology and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macel, M.; Van Dam, N.M.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolomics is a fast developing field of comprehensive untargeted chemical analyses. It has many applications and can in principle be used on any organism without prior knowledge of the metabolome or genome. The amount of functional information that is acquired with metabolomics largely depends on

  11. The Emerging Field of Quantitative Blood Metabolomics for Biomarker Discovery in Critical Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkova, Natalie J.; Standiford, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics, a science of systems biology, is the global assessment of endogenous metabolites within a biologic system and represents a “snapshot” reading of gene function, enzyme activity, and the physiological landscape. Metabolite detection, either individual or grouped as a metabolomic profile, is usually performed in cells, tissues, or biofluids by either nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry followed by sophisticated multivariate data analysis. Because loss of metabolic homeostasis is common in critical illness, the metabolome could have many applications, including biomarker and drug target identification. Metabolomics could also significantly advance our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of acute illnesses, such as sepsis and acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite this potential, the clinical community is largely unfamiliar with the field of metabolomics, including the methodologies involved, technical challenges, and, most importantly, clinical uses. Although there is evidence of successful preclinical applications, the clinical usefulness and application of metabolomics in critical illness is just beginning to emerge, the advancement of which hinges on linking metabolite data to known and validated clinically relevant indices. In addition, other important aspects, such as patient selection, sample collection, and processing, as well as the needed multivariate data analysis, have to be taken into consideration before this innovative approach to biomarker discovery can become a reliable tool in the intensive care unit. The purpose of this review is to begin to familiarize clinicians with the field of metabolomics and its application for biomarker discovery in critical illnesses such as sepsis. PMID:21680948

  12. Transcriptomic-Wide Discovery of Direct and Indirect HuR RNA Targets in Activated CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsharaporn Techasintana

    Full Text Available Due to poor correlation between steady state mRNA levels and protein product, purely transcriptomic profiling methods may miss genes posttranscriptionally regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP methods developed to identify in vivo targets of RBPs have greatly elucidated those mRNAs which may be regulated via transcript stability and translation. The RBP HuR (ELAVL1 and family members are major stabilizers of mRNA. Many labs have identified HuR mRNA targets; however, many of these analyses have been performed in cell lines and oftentimes are not independent biological replicates. Little is known about how HuR target mRNAs behave in conditional knock-out models. In the present work, we performed HuR RIP-Seq and RNA-Seq to investigate HuR direct and indirect targets using a novel conditional knock-out model of HuR genetic ablation during CD4+ T activation and Th2 differentiation. Using independent biological replicates, we generated a high coverage RIP-Seq data set (>160 million reads that was analyzed using bioinformatics methods specifically designed to find direct mRNA targets in RIP-Seq data. Simultaneously, another set of independent biological replicates were sequenced by RNA-Seq (>425 million reads to identify indirect HuR targets. These direct and indirect targets were combined to determine canonical pathways in CD4+ T cell activation and differentiation for which HuR plays an important role. We show that HuR may regulate genes in multiple canonical pathways involved in T cell activation especially the CD28 family signaling pathway. These data provide insights into potential HuR-regulated genes during T cell activation and immune mechanisms.

  13. Genome wide identification of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-encoded microRNA targets against Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweta; Akhter, Yusuf; Khan, Jawaid Ahmad

    2018-01-05

    Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBV, genus Begomovirus) causes devastating cotton leaf curl disease. Among various known virus controlling strategies, RNAi-mediated one has shown potential to protect host crop plants. Micro(mi) RNAs, are the endogenous small RNAs and play a key role in plant development and stress resistance. In the present study we have identified cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-encoded miRNAs targeting the CLCuBV. Based on threshold free energy and maximum complementarity scores of host miRNA-viral mRNA target pairs, a number of potential miRNAs were annotated. Among them, ghr-miR168 was selected as the most potent candidate, capable of targeting several vital genes namely C1, C3, C4, V1 and V2 of CLCuBV genome. In addition, ghr-miR395a and ghr-miR395d were observed to target the overlapping transcripts of C1 and C4 genes. We have verified the efficacy of these miRNA targets against CLCuBV following suppression of RNAi-mediated virus control through translational inhibition or cleavage of viral mRNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The SPOR Domain, a Widely Conserved Peptidoglycan Binding Domain That Targets Proteins to the Site of Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Jorgenson, Matthew A; Weiss, David S

    2017-07-15

    Sporulation-related repeat (SPOR) domains are small peptidoglycan (PG) binding domains found in thousands of bacterial proteins. The name "SPOR domain" stems from the fact that several early examples came from proteins involved in sporulation, but SPOR domain proteins are quite diverse and contribute to a variety of processes that involve remodeling of the PG sacculus, especially with respect to cell division. SPOR domains target proteins to the division site by binding to regions of PG devoid of stem peptides ("denuded" glycans), which in turn are enriched in septal PG by the intense, localized activity of cell wall amidases involved in daughter cell separation. This targeting mechanism sets SPOR domain proteins apart from most other septal ring proteins, which localize via protein-protein interactions. In addition to SPOR domains, bacteria contain several other PG-binding domains that can exploit features of the cell wall to target proteins to specific subcellular sites. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. An overview of renal metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalim, Sahir; Rhee, Eugene P

    2017-01-01

    The high-throughput, high-resolution phenotyping enabled by metabolomics has been applied increasingly to a variety of questions in nephrology research. This article provides an overview of current metabolomics methodologies and nomenclature, citing specific considerations in sample preparation, metabolite measurement, and data analysis that investigators should understand when examining the literature or designing a study. Furthermore, we review several notable findings that have emerged in the literature that both highlight some of the limitations of current profiling approaches, as well as outline specific strengths unique to metabolomics. More specifically, we review data on the following: (i) tryptophan metabolites and chronic kidney disease onset, illustrating the interpretation of metabolite data in the context of established biochemical pathways; (ii) trimethylamine-N-oxide and cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease, illustrating the integration of exogenous and endogenous inputs to the blood metabolome; and (iii) renal mitochondrial function in diabetic kidney disease and acute kidney injury, illustrating the potential for rapid translation of metabolite data for diagnostic or therapeutic aims. Finally, we review future directions, including the need to better characterize interperson and intraperson variation in the metabolome, pool existing data sets to identify the most robust signals, and capitalize on the discovery potential of emerging nontargeted methods. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subf......, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology....

  17. Food metabolomics: from farm to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomics, one of the latest components in the suite of systems biology, has been used to understand the metabolism and physiology of living systems, including microorganisms, plants, animals and humans. Food metabolomics can be defined as the application of metabolomics in food systems, including food resources, food processing and diet for humans. The study of food metabolomics has increased gradually in the recent years, because food systems are directly related to nutrition and human health. This review describes the recent trends and applications of metabolomics to food systems, from farm to human, including food resource production, industrial food processing and food intake by humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of Metabolomics to Study Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Samczuk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery was born in the 1950s at the University of Minnesota. From this time, it continues to evolve and, by the same token, gives new or better possibilities to treat not only obesity but also associated comorbidities. Metabolomics is also a relatively young science discipline, and similarly, it shows great potential for the comprehensive study of the dynamic alterations of the metabolome. It has been widely used in medicine, biology studies, biomarker discovery, and prognostic evaluations. Currently, several dozen metabolomics studies were performed to study the effects of bariatric surgery. LC-MS and NMR are the most frequently used techniques to study main effects of RYGB or SG. Research has yield many interesting results involving not only clinical parameters but also molecular modulations. Detected changes pertain to amino acid, lipids, carbohydrates, or gut microbiota alterations. It proves that including bariatric surgery to metabolic surgery is warranted. However, many molecular modulations after those procedures remain unexplained. Therefore, application of metabolomics to study this field seems to be a proper solution. New findings can suggest new directions of surgery technics modifications, contribute to broadening knowledge about obesity and diseases related to it, and perhaps develop nonsurgical methods of treatment in the future.

  19. Radiation Metabolomics: Current Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smrithi eSugumaran Menon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to ionizing radiation disrupts normal metabolic processes in cells and organs by inducing complex biological responses that interfere with gene and protein expression. Conventional dosimetry, monitoring of prodromal symptoms and peripheral lymphocyte counts are of limited value as organ and tissue specific biomarkers for personnel exposed to radiation, particularly, weeks or months after exposure. Analysis of metabolites generated in known stress-responsive pathways by molecular profiling helps to predict the physiological status of an individual in response to environmental or genetic perturbations. Thus, a multi-metabolite profile obtained from a high resolution mass spectrometry-based metabolomics platform offers potential for identification of robust biomarkers to predict radiation toxicity of organs and tissues resulting from exposures to therapeutic or non-therapeutic ionizing radiation. Here, we review the status of radiation metabolomics and explore applications as a standalone technology, as well as its integration in systems biology, to facilitate a better understanding of the molecular basis of radiation response. Finally, we draw attention to the identification of specific pathways that can be targeted for the development of therapeutics to alleviate or mitigate harmful effects of radiation exposure.

  20. A genome-wide analysis of lentivector integration sites using targeted sequence capture and next generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustek, Duran; Sirma, Sema; Gumus, Ergun; Arikan, Muzaffer; Cakiris, Aris; Abaci, Neslihan; Mathew, Jaicy; Emrence, Zeliha; Azakli, Hulya; Cosan, Fulya; Cakar, Atilla; Parlak, Mahmut; Kursun, Olcay

    2012-10-01

    One application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) is the targeted resequencing of interested genes which has not been used in viral integration site analysis of gene therapy applications. Here, we combined targeted sequence capture array and next generation sequencing to address the whole genome profiling of viral integration sites. Human 293T and K562 cells were transduced with a HIV-1 derived vector. A custom made DNA probe sets targeted pLVTHM vector used to capture lentiviral vector/human genome junctions. The captured DNA was sequenced using GS FLX platform. Seven thousand four hundred and eighty four human genome sequences flanking the long terminal repeats (LTR) of pLVTHM fragment sequences matched with an identity of at least 98% and minimum 50 bp criteria in both cells. In total, 203 unique integration sites were identified. The integrations in both cell lines were totally distant from the CpG islands and from the transcription start sites and preferentially located in introns. A comparison between the two cell lines showed that the lentiviral-transduced DNA does not have the same preferred regions in the two different cell lines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome-wide mapping of the RNA targets of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa riboregulatory protein RsmN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Manuel; Silistre, Hazel; Lovelock, Laura; Wright, Victoria J; Chan, Kok-Gan; Hong, Kar-Wai; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel; Heeb, Stephan

    2018-04-30

    Pseudomonads typically carry multiple non-identical alleles of the post-transcriptional regulator rsmA. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, RsmN is notable in that its structural rearrangement confers distinct and overlapping functions with RsmA. However, little is known about the specificities of RsmN for its target RNAs and overall impact on the biology of this pathogen. We purified and mapped 503 transcripts directly bound by RsmN in P. aeruginosa. About 200 of the mRNAs identified encode proteins of demonstrated function including some determining acute and chronic virulence traits. For example, RsmN reduces biofilm development both directly and indirectly via multiple pathways, involving control of Pel exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and c-di-GMP levels. The RsmN targets identified are also shared with RsmA, although deletion of rsmN generally results in less pronounced phenotypes than those observed for ΔrsmA or ΔrsmArsmNind mutants, probably as a consequence of different binding affinities. Targets newly identified for the Rsm system include the small non-coding RNA CrcZ involved in carbon catabolite repression, for which differential binding of RsmN and RsmA to specific CrcZ regions is demonstrated. The results presented here provide new insights into the intricacy of riboregulatory networks involving multiple but distinct RsmA homologues.

  2. Gut Microbiota Profiling: Metabolomics Based Approach to Unravel Compounds Affecting Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernocchi, Pamela; Del Chierico, Federica; Putignani, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is composed of a huge number of different bacteria, that produce a large amount of compounds playing a key role in microbe selection and in the construction of a metabolic signaling network. The microbial activities are affected by environmental stimuli leading to the generation of a wide number of compounds, that influence the host metabolome and human health. Indeed, metabolite profiles related to the gut microbiota can offer deep insights on the impact of lifestyle and dietary factors on chronic and acute diseases. Metagenomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics are some of the meta-omics approaches to study the modulation of the gut microbiota. Metabolomic research applied to biofluids allows to: define the metabolic profile; identify and quantify classes and compounds of interest; characterize small molecules produced by intestinal microbes; and define the biochemical pathways of metabolites. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are the principal technologies applied to metabolomics in terms of coverage, sensitivity and quantification. Moreover, the use of biostatistics and mathematical approaches coupled with metabolomics play a key role in the extraction of biologically meaningful information from wide datasets. Metabolomic studies in gut microbiota-related research have increased, focusing on the generation of novel biomarkers, which could lead to the development of mechanistic hypotheses potentially applicable to the development of nutritional and personalized therapies.

  3. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Wagner, Sebastian A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of proteins modified by SUMO2 in response to DNA replication stress in S phase in human cells. We have identified a panel of 22 SUMO2 targets with increased SUMOylation during DNA replication stress, many of which play key functions within the DNA replication machinery and/or in the cellular response to DNA damage. Interestingly, POLD3 was found modified most significantly in response to a low dose aphidicolin treatment protocol that promotes common fragile site (CFS) breakage. POLD3 is the human ortholog of POL32 in budding yeast, and has been shown to act during break-induced recombinational repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A genome-wide screen for genetic variants that modify the recruitment of REST to its target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory Johnson

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of human diseases are being linked to genetic variants, but our understanding of the mechanistic links leading from DNA sequence to disease phenotype is limited. The majority of disease-causing nucleotide variants fall within the non-protein-coding portion of the genome, making it likely that they act by altering gene regulatory sequences. We hypothesised that SNPs within the binding sites of the transcriptional repressor REST alter the degree of repression of target genes. Given that changes in the effective concentration of REST contribute to several pathologies-various cancers, Huntington's disease, cardiac hypertrophy, vascular smooth muscle proliferation-these SNPs should alter disease-susceptibility in carriers. We devised a strategy to identify SNPs that affect the recruitment of REST to target genes through the alteration of its DNA recognition element, the RE1. A multi-step screen combining genetic, genomic, and experimental filters yielded 56 polymorphic RE1 sequences with robust and statistically significant differences of affinity between alleles. These SNPs have a considerable effect on the the functional recruitment of REST to DNA in a range of in vitro, reporter gene, and in vivo analyses. Furthermore, we observe allele-specific biases in deeply sequenced chromatin immunoprecipitation data, consistent with predicted differenes in RE1 affinity. Amongst the targets of polymorphic RE1 elements are important disease genes including NPPA, PTPRT, and CDH4. Thus, considerable genetic variation exists in the DNA motifs that connect gene regulatory networks. Recently available ChIP-seq data allow the annotation of human genetic polymorphisms with regulatory information to generate prior hypotheses about their disease-causing mechanism.

  5. A Genome-Wide Screen for Genetic Variants That Modify the Recruitment of REST to Its Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rory; Richter, Nadine; Bogu, Gireesh K.; Bhinge, Akshay; Teng, Siaw Wei; Choo, Siew Hua; Andrieux, Lise O.; de Benedictis, Cinzia; Jauch, Ralf; Stanton, Lawrence W.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of human diseases are being linked to genetic variants, but our understanding of the mechanistic links leading from DNA sequence to disease phenotype is limited. The majority of disease-causing nucleotide variants fall within the non-protein-coding portion of the genome, making it likely that they act by altering gene regulatory sequences. We hypothesised that SNPs within the binding sites of the transcriptional repressor REST alter the degree of repression of target genes. Given that changes in the effective concentration of REST contribute to several pathologies—various cancers, Huntington's disease, cardiac hypertrophy, vascular smooth muscle proliferation—these SNPs should alter disease-susceptibility in carriers. We devised a strategy to identify SNPs that affect the recruitment of REST to target genes through the alteration of its DNA recognition element, the RE1. A multi-step screen combining genetic, genomic, and experimental filters yielded 56 polymorphic RE1 sequences with robust and statistically significant differences of affinity between alleles. These SNPs have a considerable effect on the the functional recruitment of REST to DNA in a range of in vitro, reporter gene, and in vivo analyses. Furthermore, we observe allele-specific biases in deeply sequenced chromatin immunoprecipitation data, consistent with predicted differenes in RE1 affinity. Amongst the targets of polymorphic RE1 elements are important disease genes including NPPA, PTPRT, and CDH4. Thus, considerable genetic variation exists in the DNA motifs that connect gene regulatory networks. Recently available ChIP–seq data allow the annotation of human genetic polymorphisms with regulatory information to generate prior hypotheses about their disease-causing mechanism. PMID:22496669

  6. The yeast metabolome addressed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: Initiation of a mass spectral library and its applications for metabolic footprinting by direct infusion mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer-Pedersen, Jesper Juul; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a major driver for metabolomics, and gas chromatography (GC)-MS has been one of the primary techniques used for microbial metabolomics. The use of liquid chromatography (LC)-MS has however been limited, but electrospray ionization (ESI) is very well suited...... for ionization of microbial metabolites without any previous derivatization needed. To address the capabilities of ESI-MS in detecting the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the in silico metabolome of this organism was used as a template to present a theoretical metabolome. This showed that in combination......, which could be assigned using the in silico metabolome. By this approach metabolic footprinting can advance from a classification method that is used to derive biological information based on guilt-by-association, to a tool for extraction of metabolic differences, which can guide new targeted biological...

  7. Cis-regulatory element based targeted gene finding: genome-wide identification of abscisic acid- and abiotic stress-responsive genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixiong; Ruan, Jianhua; Ho, Tuan-Hua David; You, Youngsook; Yu, Taotao; Quatrano, Ralph S

    2005-07-15

    A fundamental problem of computational genomics is identifying the genes that respond to certain endogenous cues and environmental stimuli. This problem can be referred to as targeted gene finding. Since gene regulation is mainly determined by the binding of transcription factors and cis-regulatory DNA sequences, most existing gene annotation methods, which exploit the conservation of open reading frames, are not effective in finding target genes. A viable approach to targeted gene finding is to exploit the cis-regulatory elements that are known to be responsible for the transcription of target genes. Given such cis-elements, putative target genes whose promoters contain the elements can be identified. As a case study, we apply the above approach to predict the genes in model plant Arabidopsis thaliana which are inducible by a phytohormone, abscisic acid (ABA), and abiotic stress, such as drought, cold and salinity. We first construct and analyze two ABA specific cis-elements, ABA-responsive element (ABRE) and its coupling element (CE), in A.thaliana, based on their conservation in rice and other cereal plants. We then use the ABRE-CE module to identify putative ABA-responsive genes in A.thaliana. Based on RT-PCR verification and the results from literature, this method has an accuracy rate of 67.5% for the top 40 predictions. The cis-element based targeted gene finding approach is expected to be widely applicable since a large number of cis-elements in many species are available.

  8. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel targets of neratinib sensitivity leading to neratinib and paclitaxel combination drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Attila A; Varadarajan, Usha; Choe, Sung; Liu, Yan; McGraw, John; Woods, Matthew; Murray, Stuart; Eckert, Amy; Liu, Wei; Ryan, Terence E

    2011-06-01

    ErbB2 is frequently activated in tumors, and influences a wide array of cellular functions, including proliferation, apoptosis, cell motility and adhesion. HKI-272 (neratinib) is a small molecule pan-kinase inhibitor of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and shows strong antiproliferative activity in ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. We undertook a genome-wide pooled lentiviral RNAi screen to identify synthetic lethal or enhancer (synthetic modulator screen) genes that interact with neratinib in a human breast cancer cell line (SKBR-3). These genes upon knockdown would modulate cell viability in the presence of subeffective concentrations of neratinib. We discovered a diverse set of genes whose depletion selectively impaired or enhanced the viability of SKBR-3 cells in the presence of neratinib. We observed diverse pathways including EGFR, hypoxia, cAMP, and protein ubiquitination that, when co-treated with RNAi and neratinib, resulted in arrest of cell proliferation. Examining the changes of these genes and their protein products also led to a rationale for clinically relevant drug combination treatments. Treatment of cells with either paclitaxel or cytarabine in combination with neratinib resulted in a strong antiproliferative effect. The identification of novel mediators of cellular response to neratinib and the development of potential drug combination treatments have expanded our understanding of neratinib's mode-of-action for the development of more effective therapeutic regimens. Notably, our findings support a paclitaxel and neratinib phase III clinical trial in breast cancer patients.

  9. An untargeted metabolomic assessment of cocoa beans during fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorga Gross, Ana Lucía; Quirós Guerrero, Luis Manuel; Fourny, G.; Vaillant Barka, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation is a critical step in the processing of high quality cocoa; however, the biochemistry behind is still not well understood at a molecular level. In this research, using a non-targeted approach, the main metabolomic changes that occur throughout the fermentation process were explored. Genetically undefined cocoa varieties from Trinidad and Tobago (n = 3), Costa Rica (n = 1) and one clone IMC-67 (n = 3) were subjected to spontaneous fermentation using farm-based and pilot plant cont...

  10. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Vitamins, metabolomics, and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondul, Alison M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Albanes, Demetrius

    2017-06-01

    How micronutrients might influence risk of developing adenocarcinoma of the prostate has been the focus of a large body of research (especially regarding vitamins E, A, and D). Metabolomic profiling has the potential to discover molecular species relevant to prostate cancer etiology, early detection, and prevention, and may help elucidate the biologic mechanisms through which vitamins influence prostate cancer risk. Prostate cancer risk data related to vitamins E, A, and D and metabolomic profiling from clinical, cohort, and nested case-control studies, along with randomized controlled trials, are examined and summarized, along with recent metabolomic data of the vitamin phenotypes. Higher vitamin E serologic status is associated with lower prostate cancer risk, and vitamin E genetic variant data support this. By contrast, controlled vitamin E supplementation trials have had mixed results based on differing designs and dosages. Beta-carotene supplementation (in smokers) and higher circulating retinol and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations appear related to elevated prostate cancer risk. Our prospective metabolomic profiling of fasting serum collected 1-20 years prior to clinical diagnoses found reduced lipid and energy/TCA cycle metabolites, including inositol-1-phosphate, lysolipids, alpha-ketoglutarate, and citrate, significantly associated with lower risk of aggressive disease. Several active leads exist regarding the role of micronutrients and metabolites in prostate cancer carcinogenesis and risk. How vitamins D and A may adversely impact risk, and whether low-dose vitamin E supplementation remains a viable preventive approach, require further study.

  12. The metabolomics standards initiative (MSI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiehn, O.; Robertson, D.; Griffin, J.; Werf, M. van der; Nikolau, B.; Morrison, N.; Sumner, L.W.; Goodacre, R.; Hardy, N.W.; Taylor, C.; Fostel, J.; Kristal, B.; Kaddurah-Daouk, R.; Mendes, P.; Ommen, B. van; Lindon, J.C.; Sansone, S.-A.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the Metabolomics Standards Initiative has been formed. An outline and general introduction is provided to inform about the history, structure, working plan and intentions of this initiative. Comments on any of the suggested minimal reporting standards are welcome to be sent to the open

  13. Impact of external pneumatic compression target inflation pressure on transcriptome-wide RNA expression in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey S; Kephart, Wesley C; Haun, Cody T; McCloskey, Anna E; Shake, Joshua J; Mobley, Christopher B; Goodlett, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas; Pascoe, David D; Zhang, Lee; Roberts, Michael D

    2016-11-01

    Next-generation RNA sequencing was employed to determine the acute and subchronic impact of peristaltic pulse external pneumatic compression (PEPC) of different target inflation pressures on global gene expression in human vastus lateralis skeletal muscle biopsy samples. Eighteen (N = 18) male participants were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: (1) sham (n = 6), 2) EPC at 30-40 mmHg (LP-EPC; n = 6), and 3) EPC at 70-80 mmHg (MP-EPC; n = 6). One hour treatment with sham/EPC occurred for seven consecutive days. Vastus lateralis skeletal muscle biopsies were performed at baseline (before first treatment; PRE), 1 h following the first treatment (POST1), and 24 h following the last (7th) treatment (POST2). Changes from PRE in gene expression were analyzed via paired comparisons within each group. Genes were filtered to include only those that had an RPKM ≥ 1.0, a fold-change of ≥1.5 and a paired t-test value of <0.01. For the sham condition, two genes at POST1 and one gene at POST2 were significantly altered. For the LP-EPC condition, nine genes were up-regulated and 0 genes were down-regulated at POST1 while 39 genes were up-regulated and one gene down-regulated at POST2. For the MP-EPC condition, two genes were significantly up-regulated and 21 genes were down-regulated at POST1 and 0 genes were altered at POST2. Both LP-EPC and MP-EPC acutely alter skeletal muscle gene expression, though only LP-EPC appeared to affect gene expression with subchronic application. Moreover, the transcriptome response to EPC demonstrated marked heterogeneity (i.e., genes and directionality) with different target inflation pressures. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  14. Proviral HIV-genome-wide and pol-gene specific zinc finger nucleases: usability for targeted HIV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayengera, Misaki

    2011-07-22

    Infection with HIV, which culminates in the establishment of a latent proviral reservoir, presents formidable challenges for ultimate cure. Building on the hypothesis that ex-vivo or even in-vivo abolition or disruption of HIV-gene/genome-action by target mutagenesis or excision can irreversibly abrogate HIV's innate fitness to replicate and survive, we previously identified the isoschizomeric bacteria restriction enzymes (REases) AcsI and ApoI as potent cleavers of the HIV-pol gene (11 and 9 times in HIV-1 and 2, respectively). However, both enzymes, along with others found to cleave across the entire HIV-1 genome, slice (SX) at palindromic sequences that are prevalent within the human genome and thereby pose the risk of host genome toxicity. A long-term goal in the field of R-M enzymatic therapeutics has thus been to generate synthetic restriction endonucleases with longer recognition sites limited in specificity to HIV. We aimed (i) to assemble and construct zinc finger arrays and nucleases (ZFN) with either proviral-HIV-pol gene or proviral-HIV-1 whole-genome specificity respectively, and (ii) to advance a model for pre-clinically testing lentiviral vectors (LV) that deliver and transduce either ZFN genotype. First, we computationally generated the consensus sequences of (a) 114 dsDNA-binding zinc finger (Zif) arrays (ZFAs or ZifHIV-pol) and (b) two zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) which, unlike the AcsI and ApoI homeodomains, possess specificity to >18 base-pair sequences uniquely present within the HIV-pol gene (ZifHIV-polFN). Another 15 ZFNs targeting >18 bp sequences within the complete HIV-1 proviral genome were constructed (ZifHIV-1FN). Second, a model for constructing lentiviral vectors (LVs) that deliver and transduce a diploid copy of either ZifHIV-polFN or ZifHIV-1FN chimeric genes (termed LV- 2xZifHIV-polFN and LV- 2xZifHIV-1FN, respectively) is proposed. Third, two preclinical models for controlled testing of the safety and efficacy of either of these

  15. YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Yeast Metabolome Database (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated ‘metabolomic’ database containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome Database, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855

  16. New approaches for metabolomics by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertes, Akos [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Small molecules constitute a large part of the world around us, including fossil and some renewable energy sources. Solar energy harvested by plants and bacteria is converted into energy rich small molecules on a massive scale. Some of the worst contaminants of the environment and compounds of interest for national security also fall in the category of small molecules. The development of large scale metabolomic analysis methods lags behind the state of the art established for genomics and proteomics. This is commonly attributed to the diversity of molecular classes included in a metabolome. Unlike nucleic acids and proteins, metabolites do not have standard building blocks, and, as a result, their molecular properties exhibit a wide spectrum. This impedes the development of dedicated separation and spectroscopic methods. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a strong contender in the quest for a quantitative analytical tool with extensive metabolite coverage. Although various MS-based techniques are emerging for metabolomics, many of these approaches include extensive sample preparation that make large scale studies resource intensive and slow. New ionization methods are redefining the range of analytical problems that can be solved using MS. This project developed new approaches for the direct analysis of small molecules in unprocessed samples, as well as pushed the limits of ultratrace analysis in volume limited complex samples. The projects resulted in techniques that enabled metabolomics investigations with enhanced molecular coverage, as well as the study of cellular response to stimuli on a single cell level. Effectively individual cells became reaction vessels, where we followed the response of a complex biological system to external perturbation. We established two new analytical platforms for the direct study of metabolic changes in cells and tissues following external perturbation. For this purpose we developed a novel technique, laser ablation electrospray

  17. Fast analysis of wide-band scattering from electrically large targets with time-domain parabolic equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zi; Chen, Ru-Shan

    2016-03-01

    An efficient three-dimensional time domain parabolic equation (TDPE) method is proposed to fast analyze the narrow-angle wideband EM scattering properties of electrically large targets. The finite difference (FD) of Crank-Nicolson (CN) scheme is used as the traditional tool to solve the time-domain parabolic equation. However, a huge computational resource is required when the meshes become dense. Therefore, the alternating direction implicit (ADI) scheme is introduced to discretize the time-domain parabolic equation. In this way, the reduced transient scattered fields can be calculated line by line in each transverse plane for any time step with unconditional stability. As a result, less computational resources are required for the proposed ADI-based TDPE method when compared with both the traditional CN-based TDPE method and the finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method. By employing the rotating TDPE method, the complete bistatic RCS can be obtained with encouraging accuracy for any observed angle. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  18. Genome-wide computational identification of microRNAs and their targets in the deep-branching eukaryote Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Qiong; Chen, Dong-Liang; Tian, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Bao-Hong; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2009-10-01

    Using a combined computational program, we identified 50 potential microRNAs (miRNAs) in Giardia lamblia, one of the most primitive unicellular eukaryotes. These miRNAs are unique to G. lamblia and no homologues have been found in other organisms; miRNAs, currently known in other species, were not found in G. lamblia. This suggests that miRNA biogenesis and miRNA-mediated gene regulation pathway may evolve independently, especially in evolutionarily distant lineages. A majority (43) of the predicted miRNAs are located at one single locus; however, some miRNAs have two or more copies in the genome. Among the 58 miRNA genes, 28 are located in the intergenic regions whereas 30 are present in the anti-sense strands of the protein-coding sequences. Five predicted miRNAs are expressed in G. lamblia trophozoite cells evidenced by expressed sequence tags or RT-PCR. Thirty-seven identified miRNAs may target 50 protein-coding genes, including seven variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs). Our findings provide a clue that miRNA-mediated gene regulation may exist in the early stage of eukaryotic evolution, suggesting that it is an important regulation system ubiquitous in eukaryotes.

  19. Computational prediction of the Crc regulon identifies genus-wide and species-specific targets of catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Gara Fergal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catabolite repression control (CRC is an important global control system in Pseudomonas that fine tunes metabolism in order optimise growth and metabolism in a range of different environments. The mechanism of CRC in Pseudomonas spp. centres on the binding of a protein, Crc, to an A-rich motif on the 5' end of an mRNA resulting in translational down-regulation of target genes. Despite the identification of several Crc targets in Pseudomonas spp. the Crc regulon has remained largely unexplored. Results In order to predict direct targets of Crc, we used a bioinformatics approach based on detection of A-rich motifs near the initiation of translation of all protein-encoding genes in twelve fully sequenced Pseudomonas genomes. As expected, our data predict that genes related to the utilisation of less preferred nutrients, such as some carbohydrates, nitrogen sources and aromatic carbon compounds are targets of Crc. A general trend in this analysis is that the regulation of transporters is conserved across species whereas regulation of specific enzymatic steps or transcriptional activators are often conserved only within a species. Interestingly, some nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs such as HU and IHF are predicted to be regulated by Crc. This finding indicates a possible role of Crc in indirect control over a subset of genes that depend on the DNA bending properties of NAPs for expression or repression. Finally, some virulence traits such as alginate and rhamnolipid production also appear to be regulated by Crc, which links nutritional status cues with the regulation of virulence traits. Conclusions Catabolite repression control regulates a broad spectrum of genes in Pseudomonas. Some targets are genus-wide and are typically related to central metabolism, whereas other targets are species-specific, or even unique to particular strains. Further study of these novel targets will enhance our understanding of how Pseudomonas

  20. Computational prediction of the Crc regulon identifies genus-wide and species-specific targets of catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Patrick; Barret, Matthieu; O'Gara, Fergal; Morrissey, John P

    2010-11-25

    Catabolite repression control (CRC) is an important global control system in Pseudomonas that fine tunes metabolism in order optimise growth and metabolism in a range of different environments. The mechanism of CRC in Pseudomonas spp. centres on the binding of a protein, Crc, to an A-rich motif on the 5' end of an mRNA resulting in translational down-regulation of target genes. Despite the identification of several Crc targets in Pseudomonas spp. the Crc regulon has remained largely unexplored. In order to predict direct targets of Crc, we used a bioinformatics approach based on detection of A-rich motifs near the initiation of translation of all protein-encoding genes in twelve fully sequenced Pseudomonas genomes. As expected, our data predict that genes related to the utilisation of less preferred nutrients, such as some carbohydrates, nitrogen sources and aromatic carbon compounds are targets of Crc. A general trend in this analysis is that the regulation of transporters is conserved across species whereas regulation of specific enzymatic steps or transcriptional activators are often conserved only within a species. Interestingly, some nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) such as HU and IHF are predicted to be regulated by Crc. This finding indicates a possible role of Crc in indirect control over a subset of genes that depend on the DNA bending properties of NAPs for expression or repression. Finally, some virulence traits such as alginate and rhamnolipid production also appear to be regulated by Crc, which links nutritional status cues with the regulation of virulence traits. Catabolite repression control regulates a broad spectrum of genes in Pseudomonas. Some targets are genus-wide and are typically related to central metabolism, whereas other targets are species-specific, or even unique to particular strains. Further study of these novel targets will enhance our understanding of how Pseudomonas bacteria integrate nutritional status cues with the regulation

  1. Genome-wide target profiling of piggyBac and Tol2 in HEK 293: pros and cons for gene discovery and gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA transposons have emerged as indispensible tools for manipulating vertebrate genomes with applications ranging from insertional mutagenesis and transgenesis to gene therapy. To fully explore the potential of two highly active DNA transposons, piggyBac and Tol2, as mammalian genetic tools, we have conducted a side-by-side comparison of the two transposon systems in the same setting to evaluate their advantages and disadvantages for use in gene therapy and gene discovery. Results We have observed that (1) the Tol2 transposase (but not piggyBac) is highly sensitive to molecular engineering; (2) the piggyBac donor with only the 40 bp 3'-and 67 bp 5'-terminal repeat domain is sufficient for effective transposition; and (3) a small amount of piggyBac transposases results in robust transposition suggesting the piggyBac transpospase is highly active. Performing genome-wide target profiling on data sets obtained by retrieving chromosomal targeting sequences from individual clones, we have identified several piggyBac and Tol2 hotspots and observed that (4) piggyBac and Tol2 display a clear difference in targeting preferences in the human genome. Finally, we have observed that (5) only sites with a particular sequence context can be targeted by either piggyBac or Tol2. Conclusions The non-overlapping targeting preference of piggyBac and Tol2 makes them complementary research tools for manipulating mammalian genomes. PiggyBac is the most promising transposon-based vector system for achieving site-specific targeting of therapeutic genes due to the flexibility of its transposase for being molecularly engineered. Insights from this study will provide a basis for engineering piggyBac transposases to achieve site-specific therapeutic gene targeting. PMID:21447194

  2. Computational prediction of the Crc regulon identifies genus-wide and species-specific targets of catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas bacteria

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, Patrick

    2010-11-25

    Abstract Background Catabolite repression control (CRC) is an important global control system in Pseudomonas that fine tunes metabolism in order optimise growth and metabolism in a range of different environments. The mechanism of CRC in Pseudomonas spp. centres on the binding of a protein, Crc, to an A-rich motif on the 5\\' end of an mRNA resulting in translational down-regulation of target genes. Despite the identification of several Crc targets in Pseudomonas spp. the Crc regulon has remained largely unexplored. Results In order to predict direct targets of Crc, we used a bioinformatics approach based on detection of A-rich motifs near the initiation of translation of all protein-encoding genes in twelve fully sequenced Pseudomonas genomes. As expected, our data predict that genes related to the utilisation of less preferred nutrients, such as some carbohydrates, nitrogen sources and aromatic carbon compounds are targets of Crc. A general trend in this analysis is that the regulation of transporters is conserved across species whereas regulation of specific enzymatic steps or transcriptional activators are often conserved only within a species. Interestingly, some nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) such as HU and IHF are predicted to be regulated by Crc. This finding indicates a possible role of Crc in indirect control over a subset of genes that depend on the DNA bending properties of NAPs for expression or repression. Finally, some virulence traits such as alginate and rhamnolipid production also appear to be regulated by Crc, which links nutritional status cues with the regulation of virulence traits. Conclusions Catabolite repression control regulates a broad spectrum of genes in Pseudomonas. Some targets are genus-wide and are typically related to central metabolism, whereas other targets are species-specific, or even unique to particular strains. Further study of these novel targets will enhance our understanding of how Pseudomonas bacteria integrate

  3. Proviral HIV-genome-wide and pol-gene specific Zinc Finger Nucleases: Usability for targeted HIV gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HIV, which culminates in the establishment of a latent proviral reservoir, presents formidable challenges for ultimate cure. Building on the hypothesis that ex-vivo or even in-vivo abolition or disruption of HIV-gene/genome-action by target mutagenesis or excision can irreversibly abrogate HIV's innate fitness to replicate and survive, we previously identified the isoschizomeric bacteria restriction enzymes (REases AcsI and ApoI as potent cleavers of the HIV-pol gene (11 and 9 times in HIV-1 and 2, respectively. However, both enzymes, along with others found to cleave across the entire HIV-1 genome, slice (SX at palindromic sequences that are prevalent within the human genome and thereby pose the risk of host genome toxicity. A long-term goal in the field of R-M enzymatic therapeutics has thus been to generate synthetic restriction endonucleases with longer recognition sites limited in specificity to HIV. We aimed (i to assemble and construct zinc finger arrays and nucleases (ZFN with either proviral-HIV-pol gene or proviral-HIV-1 whole-genome specificity respectively, and (ii to advance a model for pre-clinically testing lentiviral vectors (LV that deliver and transduce either ZFN genotype. Methods and Results First, we computationally generated the consensus sequences of (a 114 dsDNA-binding zinc finger (Zif arrays (ZFAs or ZifHIV-pol and (b two zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs which, unlike the AcsI and ApoI homeodomains, possess specificity to >18 base-pair sequences uniquely present within the HIV-pol gene (ZifHIV-polFN. Another 15 ZFNs targeting >18 bp sequences within the complete HIV-1 proviral genome were constructed (ZifHIV-1FN. Second, a model for constructing lentiviral vectors (LVs that deliver and transduce a diploid copy of either ZifHIV-polFN or ZifHIV-1FN chimeric genes (termed LV- 2xZifHIV-polFN and LV- 2xZifHIV-1FN, respectively is proposed. Third, two preclinical models for controlled testing of

  4. NMR and pattern recognition methods in metabolomics: From data acquisition to biomarker discovery: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolinska, Agnieszka; Blanchet, Lionel; Buydens, Lutgarde M.C.; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Procedures for acquisition of different biofluids by NMR. ► Recent developments in metabolic profiling of different biofluids by NMR are presented. ► The crucial steps involved in data preprocessing and multivariate chemometric analysis are reviewed. ► Emphasis is given on recent findings on Multiple Sclerosis via NMR and pattern recognition methods. - Abstract: Metabolomics is the discipline where endogenous and exogenous metabolites are assessed, identified and quantified in different biological samples. Metabolites are crucial components of biological system and highly informative about its functional state, due to their closeness to functional endpoints and to the organism's phenotypes. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, next to Mass Spectrometry (MS), is one of the main metabolomics analytical platforms. The technological developments in the field of NMR spectroscopy have enabled the identification and quantitative measurement of the many metabolites in a single sample of biofluids in a non-targeted and non-destructive manner. Combination of NMR spectra of biofluids and pattern recognition methods has driven forward the application of metabolomics in the field of biomarker discovery. The importance of metabolomics in diagnostics, e.g. in identifying biomarkers or defining pathological status, has been growing exponentially as evidenced by the number of published papers. In this review, we describe the developments in data acquisition and multivariate analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data, with particular emphasis on the metabolomics of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) and biomarker discovery in Multiple Sclerosis (MScl).

  5. MetaboLights: An Open-Access Database Repository for Metabolomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Namrata S; Haug, Kenneth; Conesa, Pablo; Jayseelan, Kalaivani; Moreno, Pablo; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Nainala, Venkata Chandrasekhar; Spicer, Rachel A; Williams, Mark; Li, Xuefei; Salek, Reza M; Griffin, Julian L; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2016-03-24

    MetaboLights is the first general purpose, open-access database repository for cross-platform and cross-species metabolomics research at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI). Based upon the open-source ISA framework, MetaboLights provides Metabolomics Standard Initiative (MSI) compliant metadata and raw experimental data associated with metabolomics experiments. Users can upload their study datasets into the MetaboLights Repository. These studies are then automatically assigned a stable and unique identifier (e.g., MTBLS1) that can be used for publication reference. The MetaboLights Reference Layer associates metabolites with metabolomics studies in the archive and is extensively annotated with data fields such as structural and chemical information, NMR and MS spectra, target species, metabolic pathways, and reactions. The database is manually curated with no specific release schedules. MetaboLights is also recommended by journals for metabolomics data deposition. This unit provides a guide to using MetaboLights, downloading experimental data, and depositing metabolomics datasets using user-friendly submission tools. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. The next wave in metabolome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Oliver, S.

    2005-01-01

    The metabolome of a cell represents the amplification and integration of signals from other functional genomic levels, such as the transcriptome and the proteome. Although this makes metabolomics a useful tool for the high-throughput analysis of phenotypes, the lack of a direct connection...... to the genome makes it difficult to interpret metabolomic data. Nevertheless, functional genomics has produced examples of the use of metabolomics to elucidate the phenotypes of otherwise silent mutations. Despite several successes, we believe that future metabolomic studies must focus on the accurate...... measurement of the concentrations of unambiguously identified metabolites. The research community must develop databases of metabolite concentrations in cells that are grown in several well-defined conditions if metabolomic data are to be integrated meaningfully with data from the other levels of functional...

  7. Metabolomics of Clostridial Biofuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Aristilde, Ludmilla [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Amador-Noguez, Daniel [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Members of the genus Clostridium collectively have the ideal set of the metabolic capabilities for fermentative biofuel production: cellulose degradation, hydrogen production, and solvent excretion. No single organism, however, can effectively convert cellulose into biofuels. Here we developed, using metabolomics and isotope tracers, basic science knowledge of Clostridial metabolism of utility for future efforts to engineer such an organism. In glucose fermentation carried out by the biofuel producer Clostridium acetobutylicum, we observed a remarkably ordered series of metabolite concentration changes as the fermentation progressed from acidogenesis to solventogenesis. In general, high-energy compounds decreased while low-energy species increased during solventogenesis. These changes in metabolite concentrations were accompanied by large changes in intracellular metabolic fluxes, with pyruvate directed towards acetyl-CoA and solvents instead of oxaloacetate and amino acids. Thus, the solventogenic transition involves global remodeling of metabolism to redirect resources from biomass production into solvent production. In contrast to C. acetobutylicum, which is an avid fermenter, C. cellulolyticum metabolizes glucose only slowly. We find that glycolytic intermediate concentrations are radically different from fast fermenting organisms. Associated thermodynamic and isotope tracer analysis revealed that the full glycolytic pathway in C. cellulolyticum is reversible. This arises from changes in cofactor utilization for phosphofructokinase and an alternative pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. The net effect is to increase the high-energy phosphate bond yield of glycolysis by 150% (from 2 to 5) at the expense of lower net flux. Thus, C. cellulolyticum prioritizes glycolytic energy efficiency over speed. Degradation of cellulose results in other sugars in addition to glucose. Simultaneous feeding of stable isotope-labeled glucose and unlabeled pentose sugars

  8. Metabolomics Application in Maternal-Fetal Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Fanos, Vassilios; Atzori, Luigi; Makarenko, Karina; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Ferrazzi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics in maternal-fetal medicine is still an “embryonic” science. However, there is already an increasing interest in metabolome of normal and complicated pregnancies, and neonatal outcomes. Tissues used for metabolomics interrogations of pregnant women, fetuses and newborns are amniotic fluid, blood, plasma, cord blood, placenta, urine, and vaginal secretions. All published papers highlight the strong correlation between biomarkers found in these tissues and fetal malformations, prete...

  9. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Daniel E.; McClay, Joseph L.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Vann, Robert E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Souza, Renan P.; Crowley, James J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate < 0.05). Results implicated homocarnosine, a dipeptide of GABA and histidine, in total distance sensitization, GABA metabolite 4-guanidinobutanoate and pantothenate in stereotypy sensitization, and myo-inositol in margin time sensitization. Secondary analyses indicated that these associations were independent of concurrent methamphetamine levels and, with the exception of the myo-inositol association, suggest a mechanism whereby strain-based genetic variation produces specific baseline neurochemical differences that substantially influence the magnitude of MA-induced sensitization. These findings demonstrate the utility of mouse metabolomics for identifying novel biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization. PMID:24034544

  10. Genome-wide Analysis of RARβ Transcriptional Targets in Mouse Striatum Links Retinoic Acid Signaling with Huntington's Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomska-Cimicka, Anna; Krzyżosiak, Agnieszka; Ye, Tao; Podleśny-Drabiniok, Anna; Dembélé, Doulaye; Dollé, Pascal; Krężel, Wojciech

    2017-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) signaling through retinoic acid receptors (RARs), known for its multiple developmental functions, emerged more recently as an important regulator of adult brain physiology. How RAR-mediated regulation is achieved is poorly known, partly due to the paucity of information on critical target genes in the brain. Also, it is not clear how reduced RA signaling may contribute to pathophysiology of diverse neuropsychiatric disorders. We report the first genome-wide analysis of RAR transcriptional targets in the brain. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing and transcriptomic analysis of RARβ-null mutant mice, we identified genomic targets of RARβ in the striatum. Characterization of RARβ transcriptional targets in the mouse striatum points to mechanisms through which RAR may control brain functions and display neuroprotective activity. Namely, our data indicate with statistical significance (FDR 0.1) a strong contribution of RARβ in controlling neurotransmission, energy metabolism, and transcription, with a particular involvement of G-protein coupled receptor (p = 5.0e -5 ), cAMP (p = 4.5e -4 ), and calcium signaling (p = 3.4e -3 ). Many identified RARβ target genes related to these pathways have been implicated in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease (HD), raising the possibility that compromised RA signaling in the striatum may be a mechanistic link explaining the similar affective and cognitive symptoms in these diseases. The RARβ transcriptional targets were particularly enriched for transcripts affected in HD. Using the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of HD, we show that partial sequestration of RARβ in huntingtin protein aggregates may account for reduced RA signaling reported in HD.

  11. Transcriptome-Wide Analysis of Botrytis elliptica Responsive microRNAs and Their Targets in Lilium Regale Wilson by High-Throughput Sequencing and Degradome Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs, as master regulators of gene expression, have been widely identified and play crucial roles in plant-pathogen interactions. A fatal pathogen, Botrytis elliptica, causes the serious folia disease of lily, which reduces production because of the high susceptibility of most cultivated species. However, the miRNAs related to Botrytis infection of lily, and the miRNA-mediated gene regulatory networks providing resistance to B. elliptica in lily remain largely unexplored. To systematically dissect B. elliptica-responsive miRNAs and their target genes, three small RNA libraries were constructed from the leaves of Lilium regale, a promising Chinese wild Lilium species, which had been subjected to mock B. elliptica treatment or B. elliptica infection for 6 and 24 h. By high-throughput sequencing, 71 known miRNAs belonging to 47 conserved families and 24 novel miRNA were identified, of which 18 miRNAs were downreguleted and 13 were upregulated in response to B. elliptica. Moreover, based on the lily mRNA transcriptome, 22 targets for 9 known and 1 novel miRNAs were identified by the degradome sequencing approach. Most target genes for elliptica-responsive miRNAs were involved in metabolic processes, few encoding different transcription factors, including ELONGATION FACTOR 1 ALPHA (EF1a and TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR 2 (TCP2. Furthermore, the expression patterns of a set of elliptica-responsive miRNAs and their targets were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. This study represents the first transcriptome-based analysis of miRNAs responsive to B. elliptica and their targets in lily. The results reveal the possible regulatory roles of miRNAs and their targets in B. elliptica interaction, which will extend our understanding of the mechanisms of this disease in lily.

  12. Bridging the gap: basic metabolomics methods for natural product chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Oliver A H; Hügel, Helmut M

    2013-01-01

    Natural products and their derivatives often have potent physiological activities and therefore play important roles as both frontline treatments for many diseases and as the inspiration for chemically synthesized therapeutics. However, the detection and synthesis of new therapeutic compounds derived from, or inspired by natural compounds has declined in recent years due to the increased difficulty of identifying and isolating novel active compounds. A new strategy is therefore necessary to jumpstart this field of research. Metabolomics, including both targeted and global metabolite profiling strategies, has the potential to be instrumental in this effort since it allows a systematic study of complex mixtures (such as plant extracts) without the need for prior isolation of active ingredients (or mixtures thereof). Here we describe the basic steps for conducting metabolomics experiments and analyzing the results using some of the more commonly used analytical and statistical methodologies.

  13. Genome-wide Investigation of microRNAs and Their Targets in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis Root with Plasmodiophora brassicae Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Wei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has revealed that microRNAs play a pivotal role in the post transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to pathogens in plants. However, there is little information available about the expression patterns of miRNAs and their targets in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis under Plasmodiophora brassicae stress. In the present study, using deep sequencing and degradome analysis, a genome-wide identification of miRNAs and their targets during P. brassicae stress was performed. A total of 221 known and 93 potentially novel miRNAs were successfully identified from two root libraries of one control (635-10CK and P. brassicae-treated Chinese cabbage samples (635-10T. Of these, 14 known and 10 potentially novel miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed after P. brassicae treatment. Degradome analysis revealed that the 223 target genes of the 75 miRNAs could be potentially cleaved. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis suggested that the putative target genes of the miRNAs were predominately involved in selenocompound metabolism and plant hormone signal transduction. Then the expression of 12 miRNAs was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. These results provide insights into the miRNA-mediated regulatory networks underlying the stress response to the plant pathogen P. brassicae.

  14. Applications of Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) and Orbitrap Based High Resolution Mass Spectrometry in Metabolomics and Lipidomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaste, Manoj; Mistrik, Robert; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics, along with other “omics” approaches, is rapidly becoming one of the major approaches aimed at understanding the organization and dynamics of metabolic networks. Mass spectrometry is often a technique of choice for metabolomics studies due to its high sensitivity, reproducibility and wide dynamic range. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is a widely practiced technique in analytical and bioanalytical sciences. It offers exceptionally high resolution and the highest degree of structural confirmation. Many metabolomics studies have been conducted using HRMS over the past decade. In this review, we will explore the latest developments in Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) and Orbitrap based metabolomics technology, its advantages and drawbacks for using in metabolomics and lipidomics studies, and development of novel approaches for processing HRMS data. PMID:27231903

  15. Functional metabolomics reveals novel active products in the DHA metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu eShinohara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous mechanisms for successful resolution of an acute inflammatory response and the local return to homeostasis are of interest because excessive inflammation underlies many human diseases. In this review, we provide an update and overview of functional metabolomics that identified a new bioactive metabolome of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Systematic studies revealed that DHA was converted to DHEA-derived novel bioactive products as well as aspirin-triggered (AT forms of protectins. The new oxygenated DHEA derived products blocked PMN chemotaxis, reduced P-selectin expression and platelet-leukocyte adhesion, and showed organ protection in ischemia/reperfusion injury. These products activated cannabinoid receptor (CB2 receptor and not CB1 receptors. The AT-PD1 reduced neutrophil (PMN recruitment in murine peritonitis. With human cells, AT-PD1 decreased transendothelial PMN migration as well as enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic human PMN by macrophages. The recent findings reviewed here indicate that DHEA oxidative metabolism and aspirin-triggered conversion of DHA produce potent novel molecules with anti-inflammatory and organ-protective properties, opening the DHA metabolome functional roles.

  16. Metabolomics investigation of whey intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan

    syndrome are complex disorders and are not caused by a high-calorie diet and low exercise level alone. The specific nature of the nutrients, independent of their caloric value, also play a role. The question is which. In the quest to answer this question the qualitative intake of protein is of special...... and prevention of the metabolic syndrome related to obesity and diabetes. In this thesis the effects of whey intake on the human metabolome was investigated using a metabolomics approach. We demonstrated that intake of whey causes a decreased rate of gastric emptying compared to other protein sources....... Therefore this thesis will also present and discuss state-of-the-art tools for computer-assisted compound identification, including: annotation of adducts and fragments, determination of the molecular ion, in silico fragmentation, retention time mapping between analytical systems and de novo retention time...

  17. Metabolomics techniques for nanotoxicity investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Mengying; Huang, Wanqiu; Chen, Zhipeng; Jiang, Hulin; Chen, Jiaqing; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zunjian; Xu, Fengguo

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are commonly defined as engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nm or less. Investigations of their potential toxicological impact on biological systems and the environment have yet to catch up with the rapid development of nanotechnology and extensive production of nanoparticles. High-throughput methods are necessary to assess the potential toxicity of nanoparticles. The omics techniques are well suited to evaluate toxicity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Besides genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling, metabolomics holds great promises for globally evaluating and understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-organism interaction. This manuscript presents a general overview of metabolomics techniques, summarizes its early application in nanotoxicology and finally discusses opportunities and challenges faced in nanotoxicology.

  18. An ML-Based Radial Velocity Estimation Algorithm for Moving Targets in Spaceborne High-Resolution and Wide-Swath SAR Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Jin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel synthetic aperture radar (SAR is a significant breakthrough to the inherent limitation between high-resolution and wide-swath (HRWS compared with conventional SAR. Moving target indication (MTI is an important application of spaceborne HRWS SAR systems. In contrast to previous studies of SAR MTI, the HRWS SAR mainly faces the problem of under-sampled data of each channel, causing single-channel imaging and processing to be infeasible. In this study, the estimation of velocity is equivalent to the estimation of the cone angle according to their relationship. The maximum likelihood (ML based algorithm is proposed to estimate the radial velocity in the existence of Doppler ambiguities. After that, the signal reconstruction and compensation for the phase offset caused by radial velocity are processed for a moving target. Finally, the traditional imaging algorithm is applied to obtain a focused moving target image. Experiments are conducted to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of the estimator under different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR. Furthermore, the performance is analyzed with respect to the motion ship that experiences interference due to different distributions of sea clutter. The results verify that the proposed algorithm is accurate and efficient with low computational complexity. This paper aims at providing a solution to the velocity estimation problem in the future HRWS SAR systems with multiple receive channels.

  19. Genome-wide identification of microRNA targets in human ES cells reveals a role for miR-302 in modulating BMP response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchina, Inna; Elkabetz, Yechiel; Hafner, Markus; Sheridan, Robert; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Tuschl, Thomas; Sander, Chris; Studer, Lorenz; Betel, Doron

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are important regulators in many cellular processes, including stem cell self-renewal. Recent studies demonstrated their function as pluripotency factors with the capacity for somatic cell reprogramming. However, their role in human embryonic stem (ES) cells (hESCs) remains poorly understood, partially due to the lack of genome-wide strategies to identify their targets. Here, we performed comprehensive microRNA profiling in hESCs and in purified neural and mesenchymal derivatives. Using a combination of AGO cross-linking and microRNA perturbation experiments, together with computational prediction, we identified the targets of the miR-302/367 cluster, the most abundant microRNAs in hESCs. Functional studies identified novel roles of miR-302/367 in maintaining pluripotency and regulating hESC differentiation. We show that in addition to its role in TGF-β signaling, miR-302/367 promotes bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by targeting BMP inhibitors TOB2, DAZAP2, and SLAIN1. This study broadens our understanding of microRNA function in hESCs and is a valuable resource for future studies in this area. PMID:22012620

  20. Mass Spectrometry Strategies for Clinical Metabolomics and Lipidomics in Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuro-Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed. PMID:23842599

  1. Sweat: a sample with limited present applications and promising future in metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Bravo, A; Luque de Castro, M D

    2014-03-01

    Sweat is a biofluid with present scant use as clinical sample. This review tries to demonstrate the advantages of sweat over other biofluids such as blood or urine for routine clinical analyses and the potential when related to metabolomics. With this aim, critical discussion of sweat samplers and equipment for analysis of target compounds in this sample is made. Well established routine analyses in sweat as is that to diagnose cystic fibrosis, and the advantages and disadvantages of sweat versus urine or blood for doping control have also been discussed. Methods for analytes such as essential metals and xenometals, ethanol and electrolytes in sweat in fact constitute target metabolomics approaches or belong to any metabolomics subdiscipline such as metallomics, ionomics or xenometabolomics. The higher development of biomarkers based on genomics or proteomics as omics older than metabolomics is discussed and also the potential role of metabolomics in systems biology taking into account its emergent implementation. Normalization of the volume of sampled sweat constitutes a present unsolved shortcoming that deserves investigation. Foreseeable trends in this area are outlined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrated and global pseudotargeted metabolomics strategy applied to screening for quality control markers of Citrus TCMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yisong; Liu, Zhenli; Zhao, Siyu; Song, Zhiqian; He, Dan; Wang, Menglei; Zeng, Honglian; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Liu, Yuanyan

    2017-08-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) exerts its therapeutic effect in a holistic fashion with the synergistic function of multiple characteristic constituents. The holism philosophy of TCM is coincident with global and systematic theories of metabolomics. The proposed pseudotargeted metabolomics methodologies were employed for the establishment of reliable quality control markers for use in the screening strategy of TCMs. Pseudotargeted metabolomics integrates the advantages of both targeted and untargeted methods. In the present study, targeted metabolomics equipped with the gold standard RRLC-QqQ-MS method was employed for in vivo quantitative plasma pharmacochemistry study of characteristic prototypic constituents. Meanwhile, untargeted metabolomics using UHPLC-QE Orbitrap HRMS with better specificity and selectivity was employed for identification of untargeted metabolites in the complex plasma matrix. In all, 32 prototypic metabolites were quantitatively determined, and 66 biotransformed metabolites were convincingly identified after being orally administered with standard extracts of four labeled Citrus TCMs. The global absorption and metabolism process of complex TCMs was depicted in a systematic manner.

  3. Mass spectrometry strategies for clinical metabolomics and lipidomics in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed.

  4. Influence of exposure to pesticide mixtures on the metabolomic profile in post-metamorphic green frogs (Lithobates clamitans)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide use in agricultural areas requires the application of numerous chemicals to control target organisms, leaving non-target organisms at risk. The present study evaluates the hepatic metabolomic profile of one group of non-target organisms, amphibians, after exposure to a ...

  5. The future of metabolomics in ELIXIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijswijk, Merlijn; Beirnaert, Charlie; Caron, Christophe; Cascante, Marta; Dominguez, Victoria; Dunn, Warwick B.; Ebbels, Timothy M. D.; Giacomoni, Franck; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hankemeier, Thomas; Haug, Kenneth; Izquierdo-Garcia, Jose L.; Jimenez, Rafael C.; Jourdan, Fabien; Kale, Namrata; Klapa, Maria I.; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Koort, Kairi; Kultima, Kim; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Moreno, Pablo; Moschonas, Nicholas K.; Neumann, Steffen; O’Donovan, Claire; Reczko, Martin; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Rosato, Antonio; Salek, Reza M.; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Satagopam, Venkata; Schober, Daniel; Shimmo, Ruth; Spicer, Rachel A.; Spjuth, Ola; Thévenot, Etienne A.; Viant, Mark R.; Weber, Ralf J. M.; Willighagen, Egon L.; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics, the youngest of the major omics technologies, is supported by an active community of researchers and infrastructure developers across Europe. To coordinate and focus efforts around infrastructure building for metabolomics within Europe, a workshop on the “Future of metabolomics in ELIXIR” was organised at Frankfurt Airport in Germany. This one-day strategic workshop involved representatives of ELIXIR Nodes, members of the PhenoMeNal consortium developing an e-infrastructure that supports workflow-based metabolomics analysis pipelines, and experts from the international metabolomics community. The workshop established metabolite identification as the critical area, where a maximal impact of computational metabolomics and data management on other fields could be achieved. In particular, the existing four ELIXIR Use Cases, where the metabolomics community - both industry and academia - would benefit most, and which could be exhaustively mapped onto the current five ELIXIR Platforms were discussed. This opinion article is a call for support for a new ELIXIR metabolomics Use Case, which aligns with and complements the existing and planned ELIXIR Platforms and Use Cases. PMID:29043062

  6. The future of metabolomics in ELIXIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijswijk, Merlijn; Beirnaert, Charlie; Caron, Christophe; Cascante, Marta; Dominguez, Victoria; Dunn, Warwick B; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Giacomoni, Franck; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hankemeier, Thomas; Haug, Kenneth; Izquierdo-Garcia, Jose L; Jimenez, Rafael C; Jourdan, Fabien; Kale, Namrata; Klapa, Maria I; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Koort, Kairi; Kultima, Kim; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Moreno, Pablo; Moschonas, Nicholas K; Neumann, Steffen; O'Donovan, Claire; Reczko, Martin; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Rosato, Antonio; Salek, Reza M; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Satagopam, Venkata; Schober, Daniel; Shimmo, Ruth; Spicer, Rachel A; Spjuth, Ola; Thévenot, Etienne A; Viant, Mark R; Weber, Ralf J M; Willighagen, Egon L; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics, the youngest of the major omics technologies, is supported by an active community of researchers and infrastructure developers across Europe. To coordinate and focus efforts around infrastructure building for metabolomics within Europe, a workshop on the "Future of metabolomics in ELIXIR" was organised at Frankfurt Airport in Germany. This one-day strategic workshop involved representatives of ELIXIR Nodes, members of the PhenoMeNal consortium developing an e-infrastructure that supports workflow-based metabolomics analysis pipelines, and experts from the international metabolomics community. The workshop established metabolite identification as the critical area, where a maximal impact of computational metabolomics and data management on other fields could be achieved. In particular, the existing four ELIXIR Use Cases, where the metabolomics community - both industry and academia - would benefit most, and which could be exhaustively mapped onto the current five ELIXIR Platforms were discussed. This opinion article is a call for support for a new ELIXIR metabolomics Use Case, which aligns with and complements the existing and planned ELIXIR Platforms and Use Cases.

  7. Symbiosis of chemometrics and metabolomics: past, present, and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Greef, J.; Smilde, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Metabolomics is a growing area in the field of systems biology. Metabolomics has already a long history and also the connection of metabolomics with chemometrics goes back some time. This review discusses the symbiosis of metabolomics and chemometrics with emphasis on the medical domain, puts the

  8. Metabolomics in cancer biomarker discovery: current trends and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Emily G; Barbas, Coral

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most devastating human diseases that causes a vast number of mortalities worldwide each year. Cancer research is one of the largest fields in the life sciences and despite many astounding breakthroughs and contributions over the past few decades, there is still a considerable amount to unveil on the function of cancer. It is well known that cancer metabolism differs from that of normal tissue and an important hypothesis published in the 1950s by Otto Warburg proposed that cancer cells rely on anaerobic metabolism as the source for energy, even under physiological oxygen levels. Following this, cancer central carbon metabolism has been researched extensively and beyond respiration, cancer has been found to involve a wide range of metabolic processes, and many more are still to be unveiled. Studying cancer through metabolomics could reveal new biomarkers for cancer that could be useful for its future prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Metabolomics is becoming an increasingly popular tool in the life sciences since it is a relatively fast and accurate technique that can be applied with either a particular focus or in a global manner to reveal new knowledge about biological systems. There have been many examples of its application to reveal potential biomarkers in different cancers that have employed a range of different analytical platforms. In this review, approaches in metabolomics that have been employed in cancer biomarker discovery are discussed and some of the most noteworthy research in the field is highlighted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. NMR metabolomics of thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) resistance in Senecio hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiss, Kirsten A; Choi, Young H; Abdel-Farid, Ibrahim B; Verpoorte, Robert; Klinkhamer, Peter G L

    2009-02-01

    Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) has become a key insect pest of agricultural and horticultural crops worldwide. Little is known about host plant resistance to thrips. In this study, we investigated thrips resistance in F (2) hybrids of Senecio jacobaea and Senecio aquaticus. We identified thrips-resistant hybrids applying three different bioassays. Subsequently, we compared the metabolomic profiles of these hybrids applying nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The new developments of NMR facilitate a wide range coverage of the metabolome. This makes NMR especially suitable if there is no a priori knowledge of the compounds related to herbivore resistance and allows a holistic approach analyzing different chemical compounds simultaneously. We show that the metabolomes of thrips-resistant and -susceptible hybrids differed considerably. Thrips-resistant hybrids contained higher amounts of the pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA), jacobine, and jaconine, especially in younger leaves. Also, a flavanoid, kaempferol glucoside, accumulated in the resistant plants. Both PAs and kaempferol are known for their inhibitory effect on herbivores. In resistant and susceptible F (2) hybrids, young leaves showed less thrips damage than old leaves. Consistent with the optimal plant defense theory, young leaves contained increased levels of primary metabolites such as sucrose, raffinose, and stachyose, but also accumulated jacaranone as a secondary plant defense compound. Our results prove NMR as a promising tool to identify different metabolites involved in herbivore resistance. It constitutes a significant advance in the study of plant-insect relationships, providing key information on the implementation of herbivore resistance breeding strategies in plants.

  10. Metabolomic biomarkers correlating with hepatic lipidosis in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhasly, Sandro; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Baumann, Sven; von Bergen, Martin; Luch, Andreas; Jungnickel, Harald; Potratz, Sarah; Gerspach, Christian

    2014-06-02

    Hepatic lipidosis or fatty liver disease is a major metabolic disorder of high-producing dairy cows that compromises animal performance and, hence, causes heavy economic losses worldwide. This syndrome, occurring during the critical transition from gestation to early lactation, leads to an impaired health status, decreased milk yield, reduced fertility and shortened lifetime. Because the prevailing clinical chemistry parameters indicate advanced liver damage independently of the underlying disease, currently, hepatic lipidosis can only be ascertained by liver biopsy. We hypothesized that the condition of fatty liver disease may be accompanied by an altered profile of endogenous metabolites in the blood of affected animals. To identify potential small-molecule biomarkers as a novel diagnostic alternative, the serum samples of diseased dairy cows were subjected to a targeted metabolomics screen by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. A subsequent multivariate test involving principal component and linear discriminant analyses yielded 29 metabolites (amino acids, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelines) that, in conjunction, were able to distinguish between dairy cows with no hepatic lipidosis and those displaying different stages of the disorder. This proof-of-concept study indicates that metabolomic profiles, including both amino acids and lipids, distinguish hepatic lipidosis from other peripartal disorders and, hence, provide a promising new tool for the diagnosis of hepatic lipidosis. By generating insights into the molecular pathogenesis of hepatic lipidosis, metabolomics studies may also facilitate the prevention of this syndrome.

  11. Metabolomics and bioactive substances in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khakimov, Bekzod

    Metabolomic analysis of plants broadens understanding of how plants may benefit humans, animals and the environment, provide sustainable food and energy, and improve current agricultural, pharmacological and medicinal practices in order to bring about healthier and longer life. The quality...... and amount of the extractible biological information is largely determined by data acquisition, data processing and analysis methodologies of the plant metabolomics studies. This PhD study focused mainly on the development and implementation of new metabolomics methodologies for improved data acquisition...... and data processing. The study mainly concerned the three most commonly applied analytical techniques in plant metabolomics, GC-MS, LC-MS and NMR. In addition, advanced chemometrics methods e.g. PARAFAC2 and ASCA have been extensively used for development of complex metabolomics data processing...

  12. A Metabolomic Perspective on Coeliac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is an “omic” science that is now emerging with the purpose of elaborating a comprehensive analysis of the metabolome, which is the complete set of metabolites (i.e., small molecules intermediates) in an organism, tissue, cell, or biofluid. In the past decade, metabolomics has already proved to be useful for the characterization of several pathological conditions and offers promises as a clinical tool. A metabolomics investigation of coeliac disease (CD) revealed that a metabolic fingerprint for CD can be defined, which accounts for three different but complementary components: malabsorption, energy metabolism, and alterations in gut microflora and/or intestinal permeability. In this review, we will discuss the major advancements in metabolomics of CD, in particular with respect to the role of gut microbiome and energy metabolism. PMID:24665364

  13. Metabolomics to unveil and understand phenotypic diversity between pathogen populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben t'Kindt

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a debilitating disease caused by the parasite Leishmania. There is extensive clinical polymorphism, including variable responsiveness to treatment. We study Leishmania donovani parasites isolated from visceral leishmaniasis patients in Nepal that responded differently to antimonial treatment due to differing intrinsic drug sensitivity of the parasites. Here, we present a proof-of-principle study in which we applied a metabolomics pipeline specifically developed for L. donovani to characterize the global metabolic differences between antimonial-sensitive and antimonial-resistant L. donovani isolates. Clones of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant parasite isolates from clinical samples were cultured in vitro and harvested for metabolomics analysis. The relative abundance of 340 metabolites was determined by ZIC-HILIC chromatography coupled to LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Our measurements cover approximately 20% of the predicted core metabolome of Leishmania and additionally detected a large number of lipids. Drug-sensitive and drug-resistant parasites showed distinct metabolic profiles, and unsupervised clustering and principal component analysis clearly distinguished the two phenotypes. For 100 metabolites, the detected intensity differed more than three-fold between the 2 phenotypes. Many of these were in specific areas of lipid metabolism, suggesting that the membrane composition of the drug-resistant parasites is extensively modified. Untargeted metabolomics has been applied on clinical Leishmania isolates to uncover major metabolic differences between drug-sensitive and drug-resistant isolates. The identified major differences provide novel insights into the mechanisms involved in resistance to antimonial drugs, and facilitate investigations using targeted approaches to unravel the key changes mediating drug resistance.

  14. Metabolomics study of human urinary metabolome modifications after intake of almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb) skin polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorach, Rafael; Garrido, Ignacio; Monagas, Maria; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Tulipani, Sara; Bartolome, Begona; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2010-11-05

    Almond, as a part of the nut family, is an important source of biological compounds, and specifically, almond skins have been considered an important source of polyphenols, including flavan-3-ols and flavonols. Polyphenol metabolism may produce several classes of metabolites that could often be more biologically active than their dietary precursor and could also become a robust new biomarker of almond polyphenol intake. In order to study urinary metabolome modifications during the 24 h after a single dose of almond skin extract, 24 volunteers (n = 24), who followed a polyphenol-free diet for 48 h before and during the study, ingested a dietary supplement of almond skin phenolic compounds (n = 12) or a placebo (n = 12). Urine samples were collected before ((-2)-0 h) and after (0-2 h, 2-6 h, 6-10 h, and 10-24 h) the intake and were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-q-TOF) and multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS)). Putative identification of relevant biomarkers revealed a total of 34 metabolites associated with the single dose of almond extract, including host and, in particular, microbiota metabolites. As far as we know, this is the first time that conjugates of hydroxyphenylvaleric, hydroxyphenylpropionic, and hydroxyphenylacetic acids have been identified in human samples after the consumption of flavan-3-ols through a metabolomic approach. The results showed that this non-targeted approach could provide new intake biomarkers, contributing to the development of the food metabolome as an important part of the human urinary metabolome.

  15. Deciphering the genome and secondary metabolome of the plant pathogen Fusarium culmorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, R.L.; Durling, M.; de Jager, V.C.L.; Menezes, R. C.; Nordkvist, E.; Svatos, A.; Dubey, Mohit; Lauterbach, L.; Dikschat, J.S.; Karlsson, M.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2018-01-01

    Fusarium culmorum is one of the most important fungal plant pathogens that causes diseases on a wide diversity of cereal and non-cereal crops. We report herein for the first time the genome sequence of F. culmorum strain PV and its associated secondary metabolome that plays a role in the interaction

  16. Mechanism of cisplatin proximal tubule toxicity revealed by integrating transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and biokinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilmes, Anja; Bielow, Chris; Ranninger, Christina; Bellwon, Patricia; Aschauer, Lydia; Limonciel, Alice; Chassaigne, Hubert; Kristl, Theresa; Aiche, Stephan; Huber, Christian G; Guillou, Claude; Hewitt, Philipp; Leonard, Martin O; Dekant, Wolfgang; Bois, Frederic Y; Jennings, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of solid tumours. The major dose-limiting factor is nephrotoxicity, in particular in the proximal tubule. Here, we use an integrated omics approach, including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics coupled to

  17. Towards the Fecal Metabolome Derived from Moderate Red Wine Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Jiménez-Girón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dietary polyphenols, including red wine phenolic compounds, are extensively metabolized during their passage through the gastrointestinal tract; and their biological effects at the gut level (i.e., anti-inflammatory activity, microbiota modulation, interaction with cells, among others seem to be due more to their microbial-derived metabolites rather than to the original forms found in food. In an effort to improve our understanding of the biological effects that phenolic compounds exert at the gut level, this paper summarizes the changes observed in the human fecal metabolome after an intervention study consisting of a daily consumption of 250 mL of wine during four weeks by healthy volunteers (n = 33. It assembles data from two analytical approaches: (1 UPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of phenolic metabolites in fecal solutions (targeted analysis; and (2 UHPLC-TOF MS analysis of the fecal solutions (non-targeted analysis. Both approaches revealed statistically-significant changes in the concentration of several metabolites as a consequence of the wine intake. Similarity and complementarity between targeted and non-targeted approaches in the analysis of the fecal metabolome are discussed. Both strategies allowed the definition of a complex metabolic profile derived from wine intake. Likewise, the identification of endogenous markers could lead to new hypotheses to unravel the relationship between moderate wine consumption and the metabolic functionality of gut microbiota.

  18. NMR-based metabolomics for identification of α-amylase inhibitors in rowan berries (Sorbus spp.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Sofie L.; Gramsbergen, Simone; Nyberg, Nils

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder estimated to affect millions of people all over the world.1 One way of reducing diabetes-related complications is to control postprandial glucose.2 Inhibition of the carbohydrate digestive enzyme α-amylase is a therapeutic target for maintaining low blood g...... a 1H-NMR method suitable for NMR-based metabolomics...

  19. Comparative transcriptomic and metabolomic analysis of fenofibrate and fish oil treatments in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Wopereis, S.; Muller, M.R.; Kersten, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated circulating triglycerides, which are considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, can be targeted by treatment with fenofibrate or fish oil. To gain insight into underlying mechanisms, we carried out a comparative transcriptomics and metabolomics analysis of the effect of 2 wk

  20. Comparative transcriptomics and metabolomic analysis of fenofibrate and fish oil treatments in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu Yingchang (Kevin), Y.; Boekschoten, Mark; Wopereis, Suzan; Muller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2011-01-01

    Elevated circulating triglycerides, which are considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, can be targeted by treatment with fenofibrate or fish oil. To gain insight into underlying mechanisms, we carried out a comparative transcriptomics and metabolomics analysis of the effect of 2 week

  1. Comprehensive metabolomics to evaluate the impact of industrial processing on the phytochemical composition of vegetable purees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Sanchez, P.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Jonker, H.H.; Mumm, R.; Hall, R.D.; Bialek, L.; Leenman, R.; Strassburg, K.; Vreeken, R.; Hankemeier, T.; Schumm, S.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of conventional industrial processing steps on global phytochemical composition of broccoli, tomato and carrot purees were investigated by using a range of complementary targeted and untargeted metabolomics approaches including LC–PDA for vitamins, 1H NMR for polar metabolites, accurate

  2. Functional Analysis of Metabolomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagoyen, Mónica; López-Ibáñez, Javier; Pazos, Florencio

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics aims at characterizing the repertory of small chemical compounds in a biological sample. As it becomes more massive and larger sets of compounds are detected, a functional analysis is required to convert these raw lists of compounds into biological knowledge. The most common way of performing such analysis is "annotation enrichment analysis," also used in transcriptomics and proteomics. This approach extracts the annotations overrepresented in the set of chemical compounds arisen in a given experiment. Here, we describe the protocols for performing such analysis as well as for visualizing a set of compounds in different representations of the metabolic networks, in both cases using free accessible web tools.

  3. Assessment of protein modifications in liver of rats under chronic treatment with paracetamol (acetaminophen) using two complementary mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Carole; Lyan, Bernard; Joly, Charlotte; Centeno, Delphine; Giacomoni, Franck; Martin, Jean-François; Mosoni, Laurent; Dardevet, Dominique; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Papet, Isabelle

    2015-04-29

    Liver protein can be altered under paracetamol (APAP) treatment. APAP-protein adducts and other protein modifications (oxidation/nitration, expression) play a role in hepatotoxicity induced by acute overdoses, but it is unknown whether liver protein modifications occur during long-term treatment with non-toxic doses of APAP. We quantified APAP-protein adducts and assessed other protein modifications in the liver from rats under chronic (17 days) treatment with two APAP doses (0.5% or 1% of APAP in the diet w/w). A targeted metabolomic method was validated and used to quantify APAP-protein adducts as APAP-cysteine adducts following proteolytic hydrolysis. The limit of detection was found to be 7ng APAP-cysteine/mL hydrolysate i.e. an APAP-Cys to tyrosine ratio of 0.016‰. Other protein modifications were assessed on the same protein hydrolysate by untargeted metabolomics including a new strategy to process the data and identify discriminant molecules. These two complementary mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolic approaches enabled the assessment of a wide range of protein modifications induced by chronic treatment with APAP. APAP-protein adducts were detected even in the absence of glutathione depletion and hepatotoxicity, i.e. in the 0.5% APAP group, and increased by 218% in the 1% APAP group compared to the 0.5% APAP group. At the same time, the untargeted metabolomic method revealed a decrease in the binding of cysteine, cysteinyl-glycine and GSH to thiol groups of protein cysteine residues, an increase in the oxidation of tryptophan and proline residues and a modification in protein expression. This wide range of modifications in liver proteins occurred in rats under chronic treatment with APAP that did not induce hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing Alzheimer's disease through metabolomics and investigating anti-Alzheimer's disease effects of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lunzhao; Liu, Wenbin; Wang, Zhe; Ren, Dabing; Peng, Weijun

    2017-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in elderly people and is among the greatest healthcare challenges of the 21st century. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of AD remain poorly understood, and no curative treatments are available to slow down or stop the degenerative effects of AD. As a high-throughput approach, metabolomics is gaining significant attention in AD research, because it has a powerful potential to discover novel biomarkers, unravel new therapeutic targets for AD, and identify perturbed metabolic pathways involved in AD progression. Here, we systematically review metabolomics with regard to its recent advances and applications in the identification of potential biomarkers for early AD diagnosis and pathogenesis research. In addition, we illustrate the developments in metabolomics as an effective tool for understanding the anti-AD mechanisms of natural products. We believe that the insights from these advances can narrow the gap between metabolomics research and clinical applications of laboratory findings. Moreover, we discuss some limitations and perspectives of biomarker identification in metabolomics. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. A Plasma Metabolomic Signature of the Exfoliation Syndrome Involves Amino Acids, Acylcarnitines, and Polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leruez, Stéphanie; Bresson, Thomas; Chao de la Barca, Juan M; Marill, Alexandre; de Saint Martin, Grégoire; Buisset, Adrien; Muller, Jeanne; Tessier, Lydie; Gadras, Cédric; Verny, Christophe; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Lenaers, Guy; Gohier, Philippe; Bonneau, Dominique; Simard, Gilles; Milea, Dan; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal

    2018-02-01

    To determine the plasma metabolomic signature of the exfoliative syndrome (XFS), the most common cause worldwide of secondary open-angle glaucoma. We performed a targeted metabolomic study, using the standardized p180 Biocrates Absolute IDQ p180 kit with a QTRAP 5500 mass spectrometer, to compare the metabolomic profiles of plasma from individuals with XFS (n = 16), and an age- and sex-matched control group with cataract (n = 18). A total of 151 metabolites were detected correctly, 16 of which allowed for construction of an OPLS-DA model with a good predictive capability (Q2cum = 0.51) associated with a low risk of over-fitting (permQ2 = -0.48, CV-ANOVA P-value <0.001). The metabolites contributing the most to the signature were octanoyl-carnitine (C8) and decanoyl-carnitine (C10), the branched-chain amino acids (i.e., isoleucine, leucine, and valine), and tyrosine, all of which were at higher concentrations in the XFS group, whereas spermine and spermidine, together with their precursor acetyl-ornithine, were at lower concentrations than in the control group. We identified a significant metabolomic signature in the plasma of individuals with XFS. Paradoxically, this signature, characterized by lower concentrations of the neuroprotective spermine and spermidine polyamines than in controls, partially overlaps the plasma metabolomic profile associated with insulin resistance, despite the absence of evidence of insulin resistance in XFS.

  6. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Plant Chemical Defence: Effects of Colonisation on Aboveground and Belowground Metabolomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Elizabeth M; Robinson, Lynne A; Abdul-Sada, Ali; Vanbergen, Adam J; Hodge, Angela; Hartley, Sue E

    2018-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonisation of plant roots is one of the most ancient and widespread interactions in ecology, yet the systemic consequences for plant secondary chemistry remain unclear. We performed the first metabolomic investigation into the impact of AMF colonisation by Rhizophagus irregularis on the chemical defences, spanning above- and below-ground tissues, in its host-plant ragwort (Senecio jacobaea). We used a non-targeted metabolomics approach to profile, and where possible identify, compounds induced by AMF colonisation in both roots and shoots. Metabolomics analyses revealed that 33 compounds were significantly increased in the root tissue of AMF colonised plants, including seven blumenols, plant-derived compounds known to be associated with AMF colonisation. One of these was a novel structure conjugated with a malonyl-sugar and uronic acid moiety, hitherto an unreported combination. Such structural modifications of blumenols could be significant for their previously reported functional roles associated with the establishment and maintenance of AM colonisation. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), key anti-herbivore defence compounds in ragwort, dominated the metabolomic profiles of root and shoot extracts. Analyses of the metabolomic profiles revealed an increase in four PAs in roots (but not shoots) of AMF colonised plants, with the potential to protect colonised plants from below-ground organisms.

  7. Short overview on metabolomic approach and redox changes in psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Nedic Erjavec

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD are severe mental disorders and complicated diagnostic entities, due to their phenotypic, biological and genetic heterogeneity, unknown etiology, and poorly understood alterations in biological pathways and biological mechanisms. Disturbed homeostasis between overproduction of oxidant species, overcoming redox regulation and a lack of cellular antioxidant defenses, resulting in free radical-mediated pathology and subsequent neurotoxicity contributes to development of depression, schizophrenia and PTSD, their heterogeneous clinical presentation and resistance to treatment. Metabolomics is a discipline that combines different strategies with the aim to extract, detect, identify and quantify all metabolites that are present in a biological sample and might provide mechanistic insights into the etiology of various psychiatric disorders. Therefore, oxidative stress research combined with metabolomics might offer a novel approach in dissecting psychiatric disorders, since these data-driven but not necessarily hypothesis-driven methods might identify new targets, molecules and pathways responsible for development of schizophrenia, depression or PTSD. Findings from the oxidative research in psychiatry together with metabolomics data might facilitate development of specific and validated prognostic, therapeutic and clinical biomarkers. These methods might reveal bio-signatures of individual patients, leading to individualized treatment approach. In reviewing findings related to oxidative stress and metabolomics in selected psychiatric disorders, we have highlighted how these novel approaches might make a unique contribution to deeper understanding of psychopathological alterations underlying schizophrenia, depression and PTSD. Keywords: Schizophrenia, Depression, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Oxidative stress, Lipid peroxidation, Metabolomics, Biomarkers

  8. Using MetaboAnalyst 3.0 for Comprehensive Metabolomics Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianguo; Wishart, David S

    2016-09-07

    MetaboAnalyst (http://www.metaboanalyst.ca) is a comprehensive Web application for metabolomic data analysis and interpretation. MetaboAnalyst handles most of the common metabolomic data types from most kinds of metabolomics platforms (MS and NMR) for most kinds of metabolomics experiments (targeted, untargeted, quantitative). In addition to providing a variety of data processing and normalization procedures, MetaboAnalyst also supports a number of data analysis and data visualization tasks using a range of univariate, multivariate methods such as PCA (principal component analysis), PLS-DA (partial least squares discriminant analysis), heatmap clustering and machine learning methods. MetaboAnalyst also offers a variety of tools for metabolomic data interpretation including MSEA (metabolite set enrichment analysis), MetPA (metabolite pathway analysis), and biomarker selection via ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analysis, as well as time series and power analysis. This unit provides an overview of the main functional modules and the general workflow of the latest version of MetaboAnalyst (MetaboAnalyst 3.0), followed by eight detailed protocols. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Metabolomics and Integrative Omics for the Development of Thai Traditional Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoomrung, Sakda; Wanichthanarak, Kwanjeera; Nookaew, Intawat; Thamsermsang, Onusa; Seubnooch, Patcharamon; Laohapand, Tawee; Akarasereenont, Pravit

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, interest in studies of traditional medicine in Asian and African countries has gradually increased due to its potential to complement modern medicine. In this review, we provide an overview of Thai traditional medicine (TTM) current development, and ongoing research activities of TTM related to metabolomics. This review will also focus on three important elements of systems biology analysis of TTM including analytical techniques, statistical approaches and bioinformatics tools for handling and analyzing untargeted metabolomics data. The main objective of this data analysis is to gain a comprehensive understanding of the system wide effects that TTM has on individuals. Furthermore, potential applications of metabolomics and systems medicine in TTM will also be discussed. PMID:28769804

  10. An introduction to metabolomics and its potential application in veterinary science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Oliver A H; Cheung, Victoria L

    2007-10-01

    Metabolomics has been found to be applicable to a wide range of fields, including the study of gene function, toxicology, plant sciences, environmental analysis, clinical diagnostics, nutrition, and the discrimination of organism genotypes. This approach combines high-throughput sample analysis with computer-assisted multivariate pattern-recognition techniques. It is increasingly being deployed in toxico- and pharmacokinetic studies in the pharmaceutical industry, especially during the safety assessment of candidate drugs in human medicine. However, despite the potential of this technique to reduce both costs and the numbers of animals used for research, examples of the application of metabolomics in veterinary research are, thus far, rare. Here we give an introduction to metabolomics and discuss its potential in the field of veterinary science.

  11. Combined genome-wide expression profiling and targeted RNA interference in primary mouse macrophages reveals perturbation of transcriptional networks associated with interferon signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craigon Marie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons (IFNs are potent antiviral cytokines capable of reprogramming the macrophage phenotype through the induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs. Here we have used targeted RNA interference to suppress the expression of a number of key genes associated with IFN signalling in murine macrophages prior to stimulation with interferon-gamma. Genome-wide changes in transcript abundance caused by siRNA activity were measured using exon-level microarrays in the presence or absence of IFNγ. Results Transfection of murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs with a non-targeting (control siRNA and 11 sequence-specific siRNAs was performed using a cationic lipid transfection reagent (Lipofectamine2000 prior to stimulation with IFNγ. Total RNA was harvested from cells and gene expression measured on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Network-based analysis of these data revealed six siRNAs to cause a marked shift in the macrophage transcriptome in the presence or absence IFNγ. These six siRNAs targeted the Ifnb1, Irf3, Irf5, Stat1, Stat2 and Nfkb2 transcripts. The perturbation of the transcriptome by the six siRNAs was highly similar in each case and affected the expression of over 600 downstream transcripts. Regulated transcripts were clustered based on co-expression into five major groups corresponding to transcriptional networks associated with the type I and II IFN response, cell cycle regulation, and NF-KB signalling. In addition we have observed a significant non-specific immune stimulation of cells transfected with siRNA using Lipofectamine2000, suggesting use of this reagent in BMDMs, even at low concentrations, is enough to induce a type I IFN response. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that the type I IFN response in murine BMDMs is dependent on Ifnb1, Irf3, Irf5, Stat1, Stat2 and Nfkb2, and that siRNAs targeted to these genes results in perturbation of key transcriptional networks associated

  12. Metabolomics: beyond biomarkers and towards mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H.; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Siuzdak, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics, which is the profiling of metabolites in biofluids, cells and tissues, is routinely applied as a tool for biomarker discovery. Owing to innovative developments in informatics and analytical technologies, and the integration of orthogonal biological approaches, it is now possible to expand metabolomic analyses to understand the systems-level effects of metabolites. Moreover, because of the inherent sensitivity of metabolomics, subtle alterations in biological pathways can be detected to provide insight into the mechanisms that underlie various physiological conditions and aberrant processes, including diseases. PMID:26979502

  13. Metabolomics applied to the pancreatic islet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Jessica R; Jensen, Mette V; Newgard, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics, the characterization of the set of small molecules in a biological system, is advancing research in multiple areas of islet biology. Measuring a breadth of metabolites simultaneously provides a broad perspective on metabolic changes as the islets respond dynamically to metabolic fuels, hormones, or environmental stressors. As a result, metabolomics has the potential to provide new mechanistic insights into islet physiology and pathophysiology. Here we summarize advances in our understanding of islet physiology and the etiologies of type-1 and type-2 diabetes gained from metabolomics studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mathematical Modeling Approaches in Plant Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürtauer, Lisa; Weiszmann, Jakob; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Nägele, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The experimental analysis of a plant metabolome typically results in a comprehensive and multidimensional data set. To interpret metabolomics data in the context of biochemical regulation and environmental fluctuation, various approaches of mathematical modeling have been developed and have proven useful. In this chapter, a general introduction to mathematical modeling is presented and discussed in context of plant metabolism. A particular focus is laid on the suitability of mathematical approaches to functionally integrate plant metabolomics data in a metabolic network and combine it with other biochemical or physiological parameters.

  15. Impact of a western diet on the ovarian and serum metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Suraj; Carlson, James E; Pathmasiri, Wimal; McRitchie, Susan; Davis, Matt; Sumner, Susan; Appt, Susan E

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine differences in the profiles of endogenous metabolites (metabolomics) among ovaries and serum derived from Old World nonhuman primates fed prudent or Western diets. A retrospective, observational study was done using archived ovarian tissue and serum from midlife cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fasicularis). Targeted and broad spectrum metabolomics analysis was used to compare ovarian tissue and serum from monkeys that had been exposed to a prudent diet or a Western diet. Monkeys in the prudent diet group (n=13) were research naïve and had been exposed only to a commercial monkey chow diet (low in cholesterol and saturated fats, high in complex carbohydrates). Western diet monkeys (n=8) had consumed a diet that was high in cholesterol, saturated animal fats and soluble carbohydrates for 2 years prior to ovarian tissue and serum collection. Metabolomic analyses were done on extracts of homogenized ovary tissue samples, and extracts of serum. Targeted analysis was conducted using the Biocrates p180 kit and broad spectrum analysis was conducted using UPLC-TOF-MS, resulting in the detection of 3500 compound ions. Using metabolomics methods, which capture thousands of signals for metabolites, 64 metabolites were identified in serum and 47 metabolites were identified in ovarian tissue that differed by diet. Quantitative targeted analysis revealed 13 amino acids, 6 acrylcarnitines, and 2 biogenic amines that were significantly (pmetabolome, and demonstrated perturbation in carnitine, lipids/fatty acid, and amino acid metabolic pathways. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Chromosomal aberrations in bladder cancer: fresh versus formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue and targeted FISH versus wide microarray-based CGH analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Panzeri

    Full Text Available Bladder carcinogenesis is believed to follow two alternative pathways driven by the loss of chromosome 9 and the gain of chromosome 7, albeit other nonrandom copy number alterations (CNAs were identified. However, confirmation studies are needed since many aspects of this model remain unclear and considerable heterogeneity among cases has emerged. One of the purposes of this study was to evaluate the performance of a targeted test (UroVysion assay widely used for the detection of Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC of the bladder, in two different types of material derived from the same tumor. We compared the results of UroVysion test performed on Freshly Isolated interphasic Nuclei (FIN and on Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE tissues from 22 TCCs and we didn't find substantial differences. A second goal was to assess the concordance between array-CGH profiles and the targeted chromosomal profiles of UroVysion assay on an additional set of 10 TCCs, in order to evaluate whether UroVysion is an adequately sensitive method for the identification of selected aneuploidies and nonrandom CNAs in TCCs. Our results confirmed the importance of global genomic screening methods, that is array based CGH, to comprehensively determine the genomic profiles of large series of TCCs tumors. However, this technique has yet some limitations, such as not being able to detect low level mosaicism, or not detecting any change in the number of copies for a kind of compensatory effect due to the presence of high cellular heterogeneity. Thus, it is still advisable to use complementary techniques such as array-CGH and FISH, as the former is able to detect alterations at the genome level not excluding any chromosome, but the latter is able to maintain the individual data at the level of single cells, even if it focuses on few genomic regions.

  17. The Development of Metabolomic Sampling Procedures for Pichia pastoris, and Baseline Metabolome Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredwell, Gregory D.; Edwards-Jones, Bryn; Leak, David J.; Bundy, Jacob G.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic profiling is increasingly being used to investigate a diverse range of biological questions. Due to the rapid turnover of intracellular metabolites it is important to have reliable, reproducible techniques for sampling and sample treatment. Through the use of non-targeted analytical techniques such as NMR and GC-MS we have performed a comprehensive quantitative investigation of sampling techniques for Pichia pastoris. It was clear that quenching metabolism using solutions based on the standard cold methanol protocol caused some metabolite losses from P. pastoris cells. However, these were at a low level, with the NMR results indicating metabolite increases in the quenching solution below 5% of their intracellular level for 75% of metabolites identified; while the GC-MS results suggest a slightly higher level with increases below 15% of their intracellular values. There were subtle differences between the four quenching solutions investigated but broadly, they all gave similar results. Total culture extraction of cells + broth using high cell density cultures typical of P. pastoris fermentations, was an efficient sampling technique for NMR analysis and provided a gold standard of intracellular metabolite levels; however, salts in the media affected the GC-MS analysis. Furthermore, there was no benefit in including an additional washing step in the quenching process, as the results were essentially identical to those obtained just by a single centrifugation step. We have identified the major high-concentration metabolites found in both the extra- and intracellular locations of P. pastoris cultures by NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS. This has provided us with a baseline metabolome for P. pastoris for future studies. The P. pastoris metabolome is significantly different from that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the most notable difference being the production of high concentrations of arabitol by P. pastoris. PMID:21283710

  18. Using metabolomics to evaluate food intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manach, Claudine; Brennan, Lorraine; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2015-01-01

    Improving dietary assessment is essential for modern nutritional epidemiology. This chapter discusses the potential of metabolomics for the identification of new biomarkers of intake and presents the first candidate biomarkers discovered using this approach. It then describes the challenges...

  19. Metabolomics in Population-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolomics is the study of small molecules of both endogenous and exogenous origin, such as metabolic substrates and their products, lipids, small peptides, vitamins and other protein cofactors generated by metabolism, which are downstream from genes.

  20. Proteomic and metabolomic approaches to biomarker discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Issaq, Haleem J

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic and Metabolomic Approaches to Biomarker Discovery demonstrates how to leverage biomarkers to improve accuracy and reduce errors in research. Disease biomarker discovery is one of the most vibrant and important areas of research today, as the identification of reliable biomarkers has an enormous impact on disease diagnosis, selection of treatment regimens, and therapeutic monitoring. Various techniques are used in the biomarker discovery process, including techniques used in proteomics, the study of the proteins that make up an organism, and metabolomics, the study of chemical fingerprints created from cellular processes. Proteomic and Metabolomic Approaches to Biomarker Discovery is the only publication that covers techniques from both proteomics and metabolomics and includes all steps involved in biomarker discovery, from study design to study execution.  The book describes methods, and presents a standard operating procedure for sample selection, preparation, and storage, as well as data analysis...

  1. Metabolomics Application in Maternal-Fetal Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Fanos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics in maternal-fetal medicine is still an “embryonic” science. However, there is already an increasing interest in metabolome of normal and complicated pregnancies, and neonatal outcomes. Tissues used for metabolomics interrogations of pregnant women, fetuses and newborns are amniotic fluid, blood, plasma, cord blood, placenta, urine, and vaginal secretions. All published papers highlight the strong correlation between biomarkers found in these tissues and fetal malformations, preterm delivery, premature rupture of membranes, gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, neonatal asphyxia, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The aim of this review is to summarize and comment on original data available in relevant published works in order to emphasize the clinical potential of metabolomics in obstetrics in the immediate future.

  2. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel targets of neratinib resistance leading to identification of potential drug resistant genetic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Attila A; Varadarajan, Usha; Choe, Sung; Liu, Wei; Ryan, Terence E

    2012-04-01

    Neratinib (HKI-272) is a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the ErbB receptor family currently in Phase III clinical trials. Despite its efficacy, the mechanism of potential cellular resistance to neratinib and genes involved with it remains unknown. We have used a pool-based lentiviral genome-wide functional RNAi screen combined with a lethal dose of neratinib to discover chemoresistant interactions with neratinib. Our screen has identified a collection of genes whose inhibition by RNAi led to neratinib resistance including genes involved in oncogenesis (e.g. RAB33A, RAB6A and BCL2L14), transcription factors (e.g. FOXP4, TFEC, ZNF), cellular ion transport (e.g. CLIC3, TRAPPC2P1, P2RX2), protein ubiquitination (e.g. UBL5), cell cycle (e.g. CCNF), and genes known to interact with breast cancer-associated genes (e.g. CCNF, FOXP4, TFEC, several ZNF factors, GNA13, IGFBP1, PMEPA1, SOX5, RAB33A, RAB6A, FXR1, DDO, TFEC, OLFM2). The identification of novel mediators of cellular resistance to neratinib could lead to the identification of new or neoadjuvant drug targets. Their use as patient or treatment selection biomarkers could make the application of anti-ErbB therapeutics more clinically effective.

  3. Genome-wide miRNA screening reveals miR-310 family members negatively regulate the immune response in Drosophila melanogaster via co-targeting Drosomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Li, Shengjie; Li, Ruimin; Xu, Jiao; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2017-03-01

    Although innate immunity mediated by Toll signaling has been extensively studied in Drosophila melanogaster, the role of miRNAs in regulating the Toll-mediated immune response remains largely unknown. In this study, following Gram-positive bacterial challenge, we identified 93 differentially expressed miRNAs via genome-wide miRNA screening. These miRNAs were regarded as immune response related (IRR). Eight miRNAs were confirmed to be involved in the Toll-mediated immune response upon Gram-positive bacterial infection through genetic screening of 41 UAS-miRNA lines covering 60 miRNAs of the 93 IRR miRNAs. Interestingly, four out of these eight miRNAs, miR-310, miR-311, miR-312 and miR-313, are clustered miRNAs and belong to the miR-310 family. These miR-310 family members were shown to target and regulate the expression of Drosomycin, an antimicrobial peptide produced by Toll signaling. Taken together, our study implies important regulatory roles of miRNAs in the Toll-mediated innate immune response of Drosophila upon Gram-positive bacterial infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Serial Metabolome Changes in a Prospective Cohort of Subjects with Influenza Viral Infection and Comparison with Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liang; Fang, Jinling; Ooi, Eng Eong; Lee, Yie Hou

    2017-07-07

    Influenza virus infection (IVI) and dengue virus infection (DVI) are major public health threats. Between IVI and DVI, clinical symptoms can be overlapping yet infection-specific, but host metabolome changes are not well-described. Untargeted metabolomics and targeted oxylipinomic analyses were performed on sera serially collected at three phases of infection from a prospective cohort study of adult subjects with either H3N2 influenza infection or dengue fever. Untargeted metabolomics identified 26 differential metabolites, and major perturbed pathways included purine metabolism, fatty acid biosynthesis and β-oxidation, tryptophan metabolism, phospholipid catabolism, and steroid hormone pathway. Alterations in eight oxylipins were associated with the early symptomatic phase of H3N2 flu infection, were mostly arachidonic acid-derived, and were enriched in the lipoxygenase pathway. There was significant overlap in metabolome profiles in both infections. However, differences specific to IVI and DVI were observed. DVI specifically attenuated metabolites including serotonin, bile acids and biliverdin. Additionally, metabolome changes were more persistent in IVI in which metabolites such as hypoxanthine, inosine, and xanthine of the purine metabolism pathway remained significantly elevated at 21-27 days after fever onset. This study revealed the dynamic metabolome changes in IVI subjects and provided biochemical insights on host physiological similarities and differences between IVI and DVI.

  5. Sample normalization methods in quantitative metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiman; Li, Liang

    2016-01-22

    To reveal metabolomic changes caused by a biological event in quantitative metabolomics, it is critical to use an analytical tool that can perform accurate and precise quantification to examine the true concentration differences of individual metabolites found in different samples. A number of steps are involved in metabolomic analysis including pre-analytical work (e.g., sample collection and storage), analytical work (e.g., sample analysis) and data analysis (e.g., feature extraction and quantification). Each one of them can influence the quantitative results significantly and thus should be performed with great care. Among them, the total sample amount or concentration of metabolites can be significantly different from one sample to another. Thus, it is critical to reduce or eliminate the effect of total sample amount variation on quantification of individual metabolites. In this review, we describe the importance of sample normalization in the analytical workflow with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based platforms, discuss a number of methods recently reported in the literature and comment on their applicability in real world metabolomics applications. Sample normalization has been sometimes ignored in metabolomics, partially due to the lack of a convenient means of performing sample normalization. We show that several methods are now available and sample normalization should be performed in quantitative metabolomics where the analyzed samples have significant variations in total sample amounts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterizing Blood Metabolomics Profiles Associated with Self-Reported Food Intakes in Female Twins

    OpenAIRE

    Pallister, Tess; Jennings, Amy; Mohney, Robert P.; Yarand, Darioush; Mangino, Massimo; Cassidy, Aedin; MacGregor, Alexander; Spector, Tim D.; Menni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Using dietary biomarkers in nutritional epidemiological studies may better capture exposure and improve the level at which diet-disease associations can be established and explored. Here, we aimed to identify and evaluate reproducibility of novel biomarkers of reported habitual food intake using targeted and non-targeted metabolomic blood profiling in a large twin cohort. Reported intakes of 71 food groups, determined by FFQ, were assessed against 601 fasting blood metabolites in over 3500 ad...

  7. Influence of the collection tube on metabolomic changes in serum and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bascón, M A; Priego-Capote, F; Peralbo-Molina, A; Calderón-Santiago, M; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-04-01

    Major threats in metabolomics clinical research are biases in sampling and preparation of biological samples. Bias in sample collection is a frequently forgotten aspect responsible for uncontrolled errors in metabolomics analysis. There is a great diversity of blood collection tubes for sampling serum or plasma, which are widely used in metabolomics analysis. Most of the existing studies dealing with the influence of blood collection on metabolomics analysis have been restricted to comparison between plasma and serum. However, polymeric gel tubes, which are frequently proposed to accelerate the separation of serum and plasma, have not been studied. In the present research, samples of serum or plasma collected in polymeric gel tubes were compared with those taken in conventional tubes from a metabolomics perspective using an untargeted GC-TOF/MS approach. The main differences between serum and plasma collected in conventional tubes affected to critical pathways such as the citric acid cycle, metabolism of amino acids, fructose and mannose metabolism and that of glycerolipids, and pentose and glucuronate interconversion. On the other hand, the polymeric gel only promoted differences at the metabolite level in serum since no critical differences were observed between plasma collected with EDTA tubes and polymeric gel tubes. Thus, the main changes were attributable to serum collected in gel and affected to the metabolism of amino acids such as alanine, proline and threonine, the glycerolipids metabolism, and two primary metabolites such as aconitic acid and lactic acid. Therefore, these metabolite changes should be taken into account in planning an experimental protocol for metabolomics analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MetabR: an R script for linear model analysis of quantitative metabolomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ben

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolomics is an emerging high-throughput approach to systems biology, but data analysis tools are lacking compared to other systems level disciplines such as transcriptomics and proteomics. Metabolomic data analysis requires a normalization step to remove systematic effects of confounding variables on metabolite measurements. Current tools may not correctly normalize every metabolite when the relationships between each metabolite quantity and fixed-effect confounding variables are different, or for the effects of random-effect confounding variables. Linear mixed models, an established methodology in the microarray literature, offer a standardized and flexible approach for removing the effects of fixed- and random-effect confounding variables from metabolomic data. Findings Here we present a simple menu-driven program, “MetabR”, designed to aid researchers with no programming background in statistical analysis of metabolomic data. Written in the open-source statistical programming language R, MetabR implements linear mixed models to normalize metabolomic data and analysis of variance (ANOVA to test treatment differences. MetabR exports normalized data, checks statistical model assumptions, identifies differentially abundant metabolites, and produces output files to help with data interpretation. Example data are provided to illustrate normalization for common confounding variables and to demonstrate the utility of the MetabR program. Conclusions We developed MetabR as a simple and user-friendly tool for implementing linear mixed model-based normalization and statistical analysis of targeted metabolomic data, which helps to fill a lack of available data analysis tools in this field. The program, user guide, example data, and any future news or updates related to the program may be found at http://metabr.r-forge.r-project.org/.

  9. NMR and pattern recognition methods in metabolomics: From data acquisition to biomarker discovery: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolinska, Agnieszka, E-mail: A.Smolinska@science.ru.nl [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Blanchet, Lionel [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Department of Biochemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Buydens, Lutgarde M.C.; Wijmenga, Sybren S. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Procedures for acquisition of different biofluids by NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recent developments in metabolic profiling of different biofluids by NMR are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crucial steps involved in data preprocessing and multivariate chemometric analysis are reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emphasis is given on recent findings on Multiple Sclerosis via NMR and pattern recognition methods. - Abstract: Metabolomics is the discipline where endogenous and exogenous metabolites are assessed, identified and quantified in different biological samples. Metabolites are crucial components of biological system and highly informative about its functional state, due to their closeness to functional endpoints and to the organism's phenotypes. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, next to Mass Spectrometry (MS), is one of the main metabolomics analytical platforms. The technological developments in the field of NMR spectroscopy have enabled the identification and quantitative measurement of the many metabolites in a single sample of biofluids in a non-targeted and non-destructive manner. Combination of NMR spectra of biofluids and pattern recognition methods has driven forward the application of metabolomics in the field of biomarker discovery. The importance of metabolomics in diagnostics, e.g. in identifying biomarkers or defining pathological status, has been growing exponentially as evidenced by the number of published papers. In this review, we describe the developments in data acquisition and multivariate analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data, with particular emphasis on the metabolomics of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) and biomarker discovery in Multiple Sclerosis (MScl).

  10. Biomarker Discovery in Human Prostate Cancer: an Update in Metabolomics Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Lima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among men in Western countries. Current screening techniques are based on the measurement of serum prostate specific antigen (PSA levels and digital rectal examination. A decisive diagnosis of PCa is based on prostate biopsies; however, this approach can lead to false-positive and false-negative results. Therefore, it is important to discover new biomarkers for the diagnosis of PCa, preferably noninvasive ones. Metabolomics is an approach that allows the analysis of the entire metabolic profile of a biological system. As neoplastic cells have a unique metabolic phenotype related to cancer development and progression, the identification of dysfunctional metabolic pathways using metabolomics can be used to discover cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this study, we review several metabolomics studies performed in prostatic fluid, blood plasma/serum, urine, tissues and immortalized cultured cell lines with the objective of discovering alterations in the metabolic phenotype of PCa and thus discovering new biomarkers for the diagnosis of PCa. Encouraging results using metabolomics have been reported for PCa, with sarcosine being one of the most promising biomarkers identified to date. However, the use of sarcosine as a PCa biomarker in the clinic remains a controversial issue within the scientific community. Beyond sarcosine, other metabolites are considered to be biomarkers for PCa, but they still need clinical validation. Despite the lack of metabolomics biomarkers reaching clinical practice, metabolomics proved to be a powerful tool in the discovery of new biomarkers for PCa detection.

  11. Structured plant metabolomics for the simultaneous exploration of multiple factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilev, Nikolay; Boccard, Julien; Lang, Gerhard; Grömping, Ulrike; Fischer, Rainer; Goepfert, Simon; Rudaz, Serge; Schillberg, Stefan

    2016-11-17

    Multiple factors act simultaneously on plants to establish complex interaction networks involving nutrients, elicitors and metabolites. Metabolomics offers a better understanding of complex biological systems, but evaluating the simultaneous impact of different parameters on metabolic pathways that have many components is a challenging task. We therefore developed a novel approach that combines experimental design, untargeted metabolic profiling based on multiple chromatography systems and ionization modes, and multiblock data analysis, facilitating the systematic analysis of metabolic changes in plants caused by different factors acting at the same time. Using this method, target geraniol compounds produced in transgenic tobacco cell cultures were grouped into clusters based on their response to different factors. We hypothesized that our novel approach may provide more robust data for process optimization in plant cell cultures producing any target secondary metabolite, based on the simultaneous exploration of multiple factors rather than varying one factor each time. The suitability of our approach was verified by confirming several previously reported examples of elicitor-metabolite crosstalk. However, unravelling all factor-metabolite networks remains challenging because it requires the identification of all biochemically significant metabolites in the metabolomics dataset.

  12. Comprehensive metabolomic profiling and incident cardiovascular disease: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Metabolomics is a promising tool of cardiovascular biomarker discovery. We systematically reviewed the literature on comprehensive metabolomic profiling in association with incident cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods and Results: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to Janua...

  13. Plant Metabolomics : the missiong link in functional genomics strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.; Beale, M.; Fiehn, O.; Hardy, N.; Summer, L.; Bino, R.

    2002-01-01

    After the establishment of technologies for high-throughput DNA sequencing (genomics), gene expression analysis (transcriptomics), and protein analysis (proteomics), the remaining functional genomics challenge is that of metabolomics. Metabolomics is the term coined for essentially comprehensive,

  14. Metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hans

    fusion where data from different platforms can be combined. Complex data are obtained when samples are analysed using NMR, fluorescence and GC-MS. Chemometrics methods which can be used to extract the relevant information from the obtained data are presented. Focus has been on principal component...... based on NMR data with RRV and known risk markers. The sensitivity and specificity values are 0.80 and 0.79, respectively, for a test set validated model. The second case study is based on plasma samples with verified colorectal cancer and three types of control samples analysed by fluorescence...

  15. Metabolomic profiles as reliable biomarkers of dietary composition123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esko, Tõnu; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Feldman, Henry A; Hsu, Yu-Han H; Deik, Amy A; Clish, Clary B; Ebbeling, Cara B; Ludwig, David S

    2017-01-01

    Background: Clinical nutrition research often lacks robust markers of compliance, complicating the interpretation of clinical trials and observational studies of free-living subjects. Objective: We aimed to examine metabolomics profiles in response to 3 diets that differed widely in macronutrient composition during a controlled feeding protocol. Design: Twenty-one adults with a high body mass index (in kg/m2; mean ± SD: 34.4 ± 4.9) were given hypocaloric diets to promote weight loss corresponding to 10–15% of initial body weight. They were then studied during weight stability while consuming 3 test diets, each for a 4-wk period according to a crossover design: low fat (60% carbohydrate, 20% fat, 20% protein), low glycemic index (40% carbohydrate, 40% fat, 20% protein), or very-low carbohydrate (10% carbohydrate, 60% fat, 30% protein). Plasma samples were obtained at baseline and at the end of each 4-wk period in the fasting state for metabolomics analysis by using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Statistical analyses included adjustment for multiple comparisons. Results: Of 333 metabolites, we identified 152 whose concentrations differed for ≥1 diet compared with the others, including diacylglycerols and triacylglycerols, branched-chain amino acids, and markers reflecting metabolic status. Analysis of groups of related metabolites, with the use of either principal components or pathways, revealed coordinated metabolic changes affected by dietary composition, including pathways related to amino acid metabolism. We constructed a classifier using the metabolites that differed between diets and were able to correctly identify the test diet from metabolite profiles in 60 of 63 cases (>95% accuracy). Analyses also suggest differential effects by diet on numerous cardiometabolic disease risk factors. Conclusions: Metabolomic profiling may be used to assess compliance during clinical nutrition trials and the validity of dietary assessment in

  16. Haystack, a web-based tool for metabolomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Stephen C; Embry, Stephen; Luo, Heng

    2014-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LCMS) has become a widely used technique in metabolomics research for differential profiling, the broad screening of biomolecular constituents across multiple samples to diagnose phenotypic differences and elucidate relevant features. However, a significant limitation in LCMS-based metabolomics is the high-throughput data processing required for robust statistical analysis and data modeling for large numbers of samples with hundreds of unique chemical species. To address this problem, we developed Haystack, a web-based tool designed to visualize, parse, filter, and extract significant features from LCMS datasets rapidly and efficiently. Haystack runs in a browser environment with an intuitive graphical user interface that provides both display and data processing options. Total ion chromatograms (TICs) and base peak chromatograms (BPCs) are automatically displayed, along with time-resolved mass spectra and extracted ion chromatograms (EICs) over any mass range. Output files in the common .csv format can be saved for further statistical analysis or customized graphing. Haystack's core function is a flexible binning procedure that converts the mass dimension of the chromatogram into a set of interval variables that can uniquely identify a sample. Binned mass data can be analyzed by exploratory methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) to model class assignment and identify discriminatory features. The validity of this approach is demonstrated by comparison of a dataset from plants grown at two light conditions with manual and automated peak detection methods. Haystack successfully predicted class assignment based on PCA and cluster analysis, and identified discriminatory features based on analysis of EICs of significant bins. Haystack, a new online tool for rapid processing and analysis of LCMS-based metabolomics data is described. It offers users a range of data visualization options and supports non

  17. Metabolomics data normalization with EigenMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V Karpievitch

    Full Text Available Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry has become one of the analytical platforms of choice for metabolomics studies. However, LC-MS metabolomics data can suffer from the effects of various systematic biases. These include batch effects, day-to-day variations in instrument performance, signal intensity loss due to time-dependent effects of the LC column performance, accumulation of contaminants in the MS ion source and MS sensitivity among others. In this study we aimed to test a singular value decomposition-based method, called EigenMS, for normalization of metabolomics data. We analyzed a clinical human dataset where LC-MS serum metabolomics data and physiological measurements were collected from thirty nine healthy subjects and forty with type 2 diabetes and applied EigenMS to detect and correct for any systematic bias. EigenMS works in several stages. First, EigenMS preserves the treatment group differences in the metabolomics data by estimating treatment effects with an ANOVA model (multiple fixed effects can be estimated. Singular value decomposition of the residuals matrix is then used to determine bias trends in the data. The number of bias trends is then estimated via a permutation test and the effects of the bias trends are eliminated. EigenMS removed bias of unknown complexity from the LC-MS metabolomics data, allowing for increased sensitivity in differential analysis. Moreover, normalized samples better correlated with both other normalized samples and corresponding physiological data, such as blood glucose level, glycated haemoglobin, exercise central augmentation pressure normalized to heart rate of 75, and total cholesterol. We were able to report 2578 discriminatory metabolite peaks in the normalized data (p<0.05 as compared to only 1840 metabolite signals in the raw data. Our results support the use of singular value decomposition-based normalization for metabolomics data.

  18. Fish mucus metabolome reveals fish life-history traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverter, M.; Sasal, P.; Banaigs, B.; Lecchini, D.; Lecellier, G.; Tapissier-Bontemps, N.

    2017-06-01

    Fish mucus has important biological and ecological roles such as defense against fish pathogens and chemical mediation among several species. A non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomic approach was developed to study gill mucus of eight butterflyfish species in Moorea (French Polynesia), and the influence of several fish traits (geographic site and reef habitat, species taxonomy, phylogeny, diet and parasitism levels) on the metabolic variability was investigated. A biphasic extraction yielding two fractions (polar and apolar) was used. Fish diet (obligate corallivorous, facultative corallivorous or omnivorous) arose as the main driver of the metabolic differences in the gill mucus in both fractions, accounting for 23% of the observed metabolic variability in the apolar fraction and 13% in the polar fraction. A partial least squares discriminant analysis allowed us to identify the metabolites (variable important in projection, VIP) driving the differences between fish with different diets (obligate corallivores, facultative corallivores and omnivorous). Using accurate mass data and fragmentation data, we identified some of these VIP as glycerophosphocholines, ceramides and fatty acids. Level of monogenean gill parasites was the second most important factor shaping the gill mucus metabolome, and it explained 10% of the metabolic variability in the polar fraction and 5% in the apolar fraction. A multiple regression tree revealed that the metabolic variability due to parasitism in the polar fraction was mainly due to differences between non-parasitized and parasitized fish. Phylogeny and butterflyfish species were factors contributing significantly to the metabolic variability of the apolar fraction (10 and 3%, respectively) but had a less pronounced effect in the polar fraction. Finally, geographic site and reef habitat of butterflyfish species did not influence the gill mucus metabolome of butterflyfishes.

  19. Metabolomic variation of brassica rapa var. rapa (var. raapstelen) and raphanus sativus l. at different developmental stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahangir, M.; Farid, I.B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Brassica rapa (var. raapstelen) and Raphanus sativus (red radish) are being used as food and fodder while also known as model in recent plant research due to the diversity of metabolites as well as genetic resemblance to Arabidopsis. This study explains the change in metabolites (amino acids, organic acids, chlorophyll, carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbic acid, sucrose, phenylpropanoids and glucosinolates) during plant development. In present study the metabolomic variation in relation to plant growth has been evaluated, for Brassica rapa (var. raapstelen) and red radish (Raphanus sativus) at three different developmental stages. A non-targeted and targeted metabolomic approach by NMR and HPLC in combination with Principal component analysis (PCA) of the data was used to identify phytochemicals being influenced by plant growth. The results lead to the better understanding of metabolic changes during plant development and show the importance of plant age with respect to the metabolomic profile of vegetables. (author)

  20. Fusion of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, Age K.; van der Werf, Mariët J.; Bijlsma, Sabina; van der Werff-van der Vat, Bianca J. C.; Jellema, Renger H.

    2005-01-01

    A general method is presented for combining mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data. Such data are becoming more and more abundant, and proper tools for fusing these types of data sets are needed. Fusion of metabolomics data leads to a comprehensive view on the metabolome of an organism or

  1. The Impact of GFP Reporter Gene Transduction and Expression on Metabolomics of Placental Mesenchymal Stem Cells Determined by UHPLC-Q/TOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Green fluorescent protein (GFP is widely used as a reporter gene in regenerative medicine research to label and track stem cells. Here, we examined whether expressing GFP gene may impact the metabolism of human placental mesenchymal stem cells (hPMSCs. Methods. The GFP gene was transduced into hPMSCs using lentiviral-based infection to establish GFP+hPMSCs. A sensitive 13C/12C-dansyl labeling LC-MS method targeting the amine/phenol submetabolome was used for in-depth cell metabolome profiling. Results. A total of 1151 peak pairs or metabolites were detected from 12 LC-MS runs. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis showed poor separation, and the volcano plots demonstrated that most of the metabolites were not significantly changed when hPMSCs were tagged with GFP. Overall, 739 metabolites were positively or putatively identified. Only 11 metabolites showed significant changes. Metabolic pathway analyses indicated that three of the identified metabolites were involved in nine pathways. However, these metabolites are unlikely to have a large impact on the metabolic pathways due to their nonessential roles and limited hits in pathway analysis. Conclusion. This study indicated that the expression of ectopic GFP reporter gene did not significantly alter the metabolomics pathways covered by the amine/phenol submetabolome.

  2. Best-Matched Internal Standard Normalization in Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics Applied to Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Angela K; Heal, Katherine R; Carlson, Laura T; Ingalls, Anitra E

    2018-01-16

    The goal of metabolomics is to measure the entire range of small organic molecules in biological samples. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, formidable analytical challenges remain in removing the nonbiological factors that affect chromatographic peak areas. These factors include sample matrix-induced ion suppression, chromatographic quality, and analytical drift. The combination of these factors is referred to as obscuring variation. Some metabolomics samples can exhibit intense obscuring variation due to matrix-induced ion suppression, rendering large amounts of data unreliable and difficult to interpret. Existing normalization techniques have limited applicability to these sample types. Here we present a data normalization method to minimize the effects of obscuring variation. We normalize peak areas using a batch-specific normalization process, which matches measured metabolites with isotope-labeled internal standards that behave similarly during the analysis. This method, called best-matched internal standard (B-MIS) normalization, can be applied to targeted or untargeted metabolomics data sets and yields relative concentrations. We evaluate and demonstrate the utility of B-MIS normalization using marine environmental samples and laboratory grown cultures of phytoplankton. In untargeted analyses, B-MIS normalization allowed for inclusion of mass features in downstream analyses that would have been considered unreliable without normalization due to obscuring variation. B-MIS normalization for targeted or untargeted metabolomics is freely available at https://github.com/IngallsLabUW/B-MIS-normalization .

  3. Causal Genetic Variation Underlying Metabolome Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain-Lenz, Devjanee; Nikolskiy, Igor; Cheng, Jiye; Sudarsanam, Priya; Nayler, Darcy; Staller, Max V; Cohen, Barak A

    2017-08-01

    An ongoing challenge in biology is to predict the phenotypes of individuals from their genotypes. Genetic variants that cause disease often change an individual's total metabolite profile, or metabolome. In light of our extensive knowledge of metabolic pathways, genetic variants that alter the metabolome may help predict novel phenotypes. To link genetic variants to changes in the metabolome, we studied natural variation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We used an untargeted mass spectrometry method to identify dozens of metabolite Quantitative Trait Loci (mQTL), genomic regions containing genetic variation that control differences in metabolite levels between individuals. We mapped differences in urea cycle metabolites to genetic variation in specific genes known to regulate amino acid biosynthesis. Our functional assays reveal that genetic variation in two genes, AUA1 and ARG81 , cause the differences in the abundance of several urea cycle metabolites. Based on knowledge of the urea cycle, we predicted and then validated a new phenotype: sensitivity to a particular class of amino acid isomers. Our results are a proof-of-concept that untargeted mass spectrometry can reveal links between natural genetic variants and metabolome diversity. The interpretability of our results demonstrates the promise of using genetic variants underlying natural differences in the metabolome to predict novel phenotypes from genotype. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Application of Metabolomics in Thyroid Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wojakowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy with four major types distinguished on the basis of histopathological features: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Classification of thyroid cancer is the primary step in the assessment of prognosis and selection of the treatment. However, in some cases, cytological and histological patterns are inconclusive; hence, classification based on histopathology could be supported by molecular biomarkers, including markers identified with the use of high-throughput “omics” techniques. Beside genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, metabolomic approach emerges as the most downstream attitude reflecting phenotypic changes and alterations in pathophysiological states of biological systems. Metabolomics using mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques allows qualitative and quantitative profiling of small molecules present in biological systems. This approach can be applied to reveal metabolic differences between different types of thyroid cancer and to identify new potential candidates for molecular biomarkers. In this review, we consider current results concerning application of metabolomics in the field of thyroid cancer research. Recent studies show that metabolomics can provide significant information about the discrimination between different types of thyroid lesions. In the near future, one could expect a further progress in thyroid cancer metabolomics leading to development of molecular markers and improvement of the tumor types classification and diagnosis.

  5. NMR and MS Methods for Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberg, Alexander; Riefke, Björn; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Ross, Alfred; Senn, Hans; Dieterle, Frank; Keck, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics, also often referred as "metabolic profiling," is the systematic profiling of metabolites in biofluids or tissues of organisms and their temporal changes. In the last decade, metabolomics has become more and more popular in drug development, molecular medicine, and other biotechnology fields, since it profiles directly the phenotype and changes thereof in contrast to other "-omics" technologies. The increasing popularity of metabolomics has been possible only due to the enormous development in the technology and bioinformatics fields. In particular, the analytical technologies supporting metabolomics, i.e., NMR, UPLC-MS, and GC-MS, have evolved into sensitive and highly reproducible platforms allowing the determination of hundreds of metabolites in parallel. This chapter describes the best practices of metabolomics as seen today. All important steps of metabolic profiling in drug development and molecular medicine are described in great detail, starting from sample preparation to determining the measurement details of all analytical platforms, and finally to discussing the corresponding specific steps of data analysis.

  6. MetaboAnalyst 3.0--making metabolomics more meaningful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianguo; Sinelnikov, Igor V; Han, Beomsoo; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    MetaboAnalyst (www.metaboanalyst.ca) is a web server designed to permit comprehensive metabolomic data analysis, visualization and interpretation. It supports a wide range of complex statistical calculations and high quality graphical rendering functions that require significant computational resources. First introduced in 2009, MetaboAnalyst has experienced more than a 50X growth in user traffic (>50 000 jobs processed each month). In order to keep up with the rapidly increasing computational demands and a growing number of requests to support translational and systems biology applications, we performed a substantial rewrite and major feature upgrade of the server. The result is MetaboAnalyst 3.0. By completely re-implementing the MetaboAnalyst suite using the latest web framework technologies, we have been able substantially improve its performance, capacity and user interactivity. Three new modules have also been added including: (i) a module for biomarker analysis based on the calculation of receiver operating characteristic curves; (ii) a module for sample size estimation and power analysis for improved planning of metabolomics studies and (iii) a module to support integrative pathway analysis for both genes and metabolites. In addition, popular features found in existing modules have been significantly enhanced by upgrading the graphical output, expanding the compound libraries and by adding support for more diverse organisms. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Metabolomic applications to decipher gut microbial metabolic influence in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois-Pierre eMartin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary preferences and nutrients composition have been shown to influence human and gut microbial metabolism, which ultimately has specific effects on health and diseases’ risk. Increasingly, results from molecular biology and microbiology demonstrate the key role of the gut microbiota metabolic interface to the overall mammalian host’s health status. There is therefore raising interest in nutrition research to characterize the molecular foundations of the gut microbial mammalian cross-talk at both physiological and biochemical pathway levels. Tackling these challenges can be achieved through systems biology approaches, such as metabolomics, to underpin the highly complex metabolic exchanges between diverse biological compartments, including organs, systemic biofluids and microbial symbionts. By the development of specific biomarkers for prediction of health and disease, metabolomics is increasingly used in clinical applications as regard to disease aetiology, diagnostic stratification and potentially mechanism of action of therapeutical and nutraceutical solutions. Surprisingly, an increasing number of metabolomics investigations in pre-clinical and clinical studies based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS provided compelling evidence that system wide and organ-specific biochemical processes are under the influence of gut microbial metabolism. This review aims at describing recent applications of metabolomics in clinical fields where main objective is to discern the biochemical mechanisms under the influence of the gut microbiota, with insight into gastrointestinal health and diseases diagnostics and improvement of homeostasis metabolic regulation.

  8. Sulfites and the wine metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roullier-Gall, Chloé; Hemmler, Daniel; Gonsior, Michael; Li, Yan; Nikolantonaki, Maria; Aron, Alissa; Coelho, Christian; Gougeon, Régis D; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2017-12-15

    In a context of societal concern about food preservation, the reduction of sulfite input plays a major role in the wine industry. To improve the understanding of the chemistry involved in the SO 2 protection, a series of bottle aged Chardonnay wines made from the same must, but with different concentrations of SO 2 added at pressing were analyzed by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and excitation emission matrix fluorescence (EEMF). Metabolic fingerprints from FT-ICR-MS data could discriminate wines according to the added concentration to the must but they also revealed chemistry-related differences according to the type of stopper, providing a wine metabolomics picture of the impact of distinct stopping strategies. Spearman rank correlation was applied to link the statistically modeled EEMF components (parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)) and the exact mass information from FT-ICR-MS, and thus revealing the extent of sulfur-containing compounds which could show some correlation with fluorescence fingerprints. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization and Discrimination of Ancient Grains: A Metabolomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Righetti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hulled, or ancient, wheats were the earliest domesticated wheats by mankind and the ancestors of current wheats. Their cultivation drastically decreased during the 1960s; however, the increasing demand for a healthy and equilibrated diet led to rediscovering these grains. Our aim was to use a non-targeted metabolomic approach to discriminate and characterize similarities and differences between ancient Triticum varieties. For this purpose, 77 hulled wheat samples from three different varieties were collected: Garfagnana T. turgidum var. dicoccum L. (emmer, ID331 T. monococcum L. (einkorn and Rouquin T. spelta L. (spelt. The ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF metabolomics approach highlighted a pronounced sample clustering according to the wheat variety, with an excellent predictability (Q2, for all the models built. Fifteen metabolites were tentatively identified based on accurate masses, isotopic pattern, and product ion spectra. Among these, alkylresorcinols (ARs were found to be significantly higher in spelt and emmer, showing different homologue composition. Furthermore, phosphatidylcholines (PC and lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPC levels were higher in einkorn variety. The results obtained in this study confirmed the importance of ARs as markers to distinguish between Triticum species and revealed their values as cultivar markers, being not affected by the environmental influences.

  10. Comparative metabolomics of drought acclimation in model and forage legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Diego H; Schwabe, Franziska; Erban, Alexander; Udvardi, Michael K; Kopka, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Water limitation has become a major concern for agriculture. Such constraints reinforce the urgent need to understand mechanisms by which plants cope with water deprivation. We used a non-targeted metabolomic approach to explore plastic systems responses to non-lethal drought in model and forage legume species of the Lotus genus. In the model legume Lotus. japonicus, increased water stress caused gradual increases of most of the soluble small molecules profiled, reflecting a global and progressive reprogramming of metabolic pathways. The comparative metabolomic approach between Lotus species revealed conserved and unique metabolic responses to drought stress. Importantly, only few drought-responsive metabolites were conserved among all species. Thus we highlight a potential impediment to translational approaches that aim to engineer traits linked to the accumulation of compatible solutes. Finally, a broad comparison of the metabolic changes elicited by drought and salt acclimation revealed partial conservation of these metabolic stress responses within each of the Lotus species, but only few salt- and drought-responsive metabolites were shared between all. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to the current insights into legume water stress physiology. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Metabolomic applications in radiation biodosimetry: exploring radiation effects through small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fornace, Albert J; Laiakis, Evagelia C

    2017-10-01

    Exposure of the general population to ionizing radiation has increased in the past decades, primarily due to long distance travel and medical procedures. On the other hand, accidental exposures, nuclear accidents, and elevated threats of terrorism with the potential detonation of a radiological dispersal device or improvised nuclear device in a major city, all have led to increased needs for rapid biodosimetry and assessment of exposure to different radiation qualities and scenarios. Metabolomics, the qualitative and quantitative assessment of small molecules in a given biological specimen, has emerged as a promising technology to allow for rapid determination of an individual's exposure level and metabolic phenotype. Advancements in mass spectrometry techniques have led to untargeted (discovery phase, global assessment) and targeted (quantitative phase) methods not only to identify biomarkers of radiation exposure, but also to assess general perturbations of metabolism with potential long-term consequences, such as cancer, cardiovascular, and pulmonary disease. Metabolomics of radiation exposure has provided a highly informative snapshot of metabolic dysregulation. Biomarkers in easily accessible biofluids and biospecimens (urine, blood, saliva, sebum, fecal material) from mouse, rat, and minipig models, to non-human primates and humans have provided the basis for determination of a radiation signature to assess the need for medical intervention. Here we provide a comprehensive description of the current status of radiation metabolomic studies for the purpose of rapid high-throughput radiation biodosimetry in easily accessible biofluids and discuss future directions of radiation metabolomics research.

  12. A 'Foodomic' Approach for the Evaluation of Food Quality and its Impact on the Human Metabolome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trimigno, Alessia

    In recent years, omic sciences have been increasingly employed in a multitude of research fields thanks to their high-throughput capabilities and holistic approach. Among the omic sciences, metabolomics and foodomics have recently emerged in the investigation of food and nutrition and their relat......In recent years, omic sciences have been increasingly employed in a multitude of research fields thanks to their high-throughput capabilities and holistic approach. Among the omic sciences, metabolomics and foodomics have recently emerged in the investigation of food and nutrition...... and their relation to the individual health and wellness status (Chapter 1). The analytical platforms used are ideal for non-targeted analysis, due to their capability of detecting and identifying a large set of variables (or metabolites) in complex biological samples. The most employed metabolomics techniques...... carried out both in Italy and in Denmark, outlines the analytical pipeline of the foodomic approach and highlights the current challenges in the field (Chapter 2.3). The thesis traces the path of modern foodomics and metabolomics from the definition and description of food quality (Chapters 3 to 6...

  13. Dynamic metabolome profiling reveals significant metabolic changes during grain development of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Shoumin; Dong, Kun; Deng, Xiong; Zhou, Jiaxing; Xu, Xuexin; Han, Caixia; Zhang, Wenying; Xu, Yanhao; Wang, Zhimin; Yan, Yueming

    2016-08-01

    Metabolites in wheat grains greatly influence nutritional values. Wheat provides proteins, minerals, B-group vitamins and dietary fiber to humans. These metabolites are important to human health. However, the metabolome of the grain during the development of bread wheat has not been studied so far. In this work the first dynamic metabolome of the developing grain of the elite Chinese bread wheat cultivar Zhongmai 175 was analyzed, using non-targeted gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for metabolite profiling. In total, 74 metabolites were identified over the grain developmental stages. Metabolite-metabolite correlation analysis revealed that the metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, amines and lipids was interrelated. An integrated metabolic map revealed a distinct regulatory profile. The results provide information that can be used by metabolic engineers and molecular breeders to improve wheat grain quality. The present metabolome approach identified dynamic changes in metabolite levels, and correlations among such levels, in developing seeds. The comprehensive metabolic map may be useful when breeding programs seek to improve grain quality. The work highlights the utility of GC/MS-based metabolomics, in conjunction with univariate and multivariate data analysis, when it is sought to understand metabolic changes in developing seeds. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Phenotyping of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Based on the Integration of Metabolomes and Clinical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Kilk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Apart from the refined management-oriented clinical stratification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the molecular pathologies behind this highly prevalent disease have remained obscure. The aim of this study was the characterization of patients with COPD, based on the metabolomic profiling of peripheral blood and exhaled breath condensate (EBC within the context of defined clinical and demographic variables. Mass-spectrometry-based targeted analysis of serum metabolites (mainly amino acids and lipid species, untargeted profiles of serum and EBC of patients with COPD of different clinical characteristics (n = 25 and control individuals (n = 21 were performed. From the combined clinical/demographic and metabolomics data, associations between clinical/demographic and metabolic parameters were searched and a de novo phenotyping for COPD was attempted. Adjoining the clinical parameters, sphingomyelins were the best to differentiate COPD patients from controls. Unsaturated fatty acid-containing lipids, ornithine metabolism and plasma protein composition-associated signals from the untargeted analysis differentiated the Global Initiative for COPD (GOLD categories. Hierarchical clustering did not reveal a clinical-metabolomic stratification superior to the strata set by the GOLD consensus. We conclude that while metabolomics approaches are good for finding biomarkers and clarifying the mechanism of the disease, there are no distinct co-variate independent clinical-metabolic phenotypes.

  15. Metabolomic unveiling of a diverse range of green tea (Camellia sinensis) metabolites dependent on geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang-Eun; Lee, Bum-Jin; Chung, Jin-Oh; Kim, Hak-Nam; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jung, Sungheuk; Lee, Hyosang; Lee, Sang-Jun; Hong, Young-Shick

    2015-05-01

    Numerous factors such as geographical origin, cultivar, climate, cultural practices, and manufacturing processes influence the chemical compositions of tea, in the same way as growing conditions and grape variety affect wine quality. However, the relationships between these factors and tea chemical compositions are not well understood. In this study, a new approach for non-targeted or global analysis, i.e., metabolomics, which is highly reproducible and statistically effective in analysing a diverse range of compounds, was used to better understand the metabolome of Camellia sinensis and determine the influence of environmental factors, including geography, climate, and cultural practices, on tea-making. We found a strong correlation between environmental factors and the metabolome of green, white, and oolong teas from China, Japan, and South Korea. In particular, multivariate statistical analysis revealed strong inter-country and inter-city relationships in the levels of theanine and catechin derivatives found in green and white teas. This information might be useful for assessing tea quality or producing distinct tea products across different locations, and highlights simultaneous identification of diverse tea metabolites through an NMR-based metabolomics approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolomics After Natural Product Treatment in an Experimental Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Tao; Xian, Jia Wen; Leung, Wing Nang; Li, Liang; Chan, Chun Wai

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an important biofluid for diagnosis of and research on neurological diseases. However, in-depth metabolomic profiling of CSF remains an analytical challenge due to the small volume of samples, particularly in small animal models. In this work, we report the application of a high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) workflow for CSF metabolomics in Gastrodia elata and Uncaria rhynchophylla water extract (GUW)-treated experimental cerebral ischemia model of rat. The GUW is a commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for hypertension and brain disease. This study investigated the amine- and phenol-containing biomarkers in the CSF metabolome. After GUW treatment for 7 days, the neurological deficit score was significantly improved with infarct volume reduction, while the integrity of brain histological structure was preserved. Over 1957 metabolites were quantified in CSF by dansylation LC-MS. The analysis of this comprehensive list of metabolites suggests that metabolites associated with oxidative stress, inflammatory response, and excitotoxicity change during GUW-induced alleviation of ischemic injury. This work is significant in that (1) it shows CIL LC-MS can be used for in-depth profiling of the CSF metabolome in experimental ischemic stroke and (2) identifies several potential molecular targets (that might mediate the central nervous system) and associate with pharmacodynamic effects of some frequently used TCMs.

  17. Metabolomics: Definitions and Significance in Systems Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Aline; Faccio, Andréa Tedesco; Canuto, Gisele André Baptista; da Cruz, Pedro Luis Rocha; Ribeiro, Henrique Caracho; Tavares, Marina Franco Maggi; Sussulini, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a growing interest in deeply understanding biological mechanisms not only at the molecular level (biological components) but also the effects of an ongoing biological process in the organism as a whole (biological functionality), as established by the concept of systems biology. Within this context, metabolomics is one of the most powerful bioanalytical strategies that allow obtaining a picture of the metabolites of an organism in the course of a biological process, being considered as a phenotyping tool. Briefly, metabolomics approach consists in identifying and determining the set of metabolites (or specific metabolites) in biological samples (tissues, cells, fluids, or organisms) under normal conditions in comparison with altered states promoted by disease, drug treatment, dietary intervention, or environmental modulation. The aim of this chapter is to review the fundamentals and definitions used in the metabolomics field, as well as to emphasize its importance in systems biology and clinical studies.

  18. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishfaq Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC, two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis.

  19. Metabolomics to Explore Impact of Dairy Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dairy products are an important component in the Western diet and represent a valuable source of nutrients for humans. However, a reliable dairy intake assessment in nutrition research is crucial to correctly elucidate the link between dairy intake and human health. Metabolomics is considered a potential tool for assessment of dietary intake instead of traditional methods, such as food frequency questionnaires, food records, and 24-h recalls. Metabolomics has been successfully applied to discriminate between consumption of different dairy products under different experimental conditions. Moreover, potential metabolites related to dairy intake were identified, although these metabolites need to be further validated in other intervention studies before they can be used as valid biomarkers of dairy consumption. Therefore, this review provides an overview of metabolomics for assessment of dairy intake in order to better clarify the role of dairy products in human nutrition and health.

  20. Blood transcriptomics and metabolomics for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuzhao; Todor, Andrei; Luo, Ruiyan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of blood samples is pivotal to clinical diagnosis and has been intensively investigated since the rise of systems biology. Recent developments have opened new opportunities to utilize transcriptomics and metabolomics for personalized and precision medicine. Efforts from human immunology have infused into this area exquisite characterizations of subpopulations of blood cells. It is now possible to infer from blood transcriptomics, with fine accuracy, the contribution of immune activation and of cell subpopulations. In parallel, high-resolution mass spectrometry has brought revolutionary analytical capability, detecting > 10,000 metabolites, together with environmental exposure, dietary intake, microbial activity, and pharmaceutical drugs. Thus, the re-examination of blood chemicals by metabolomics is in order. Transcriptomics and metabolomics can be integrated to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the human biological states. We will review these new data and methods and discuss how they can contribute to personalized medicine.

  1. Postprandial metabolomics: A pilot mass spectrometry and NMR study of the human plasma metabolome in response to a challenge meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimpour, Masoumeh; Surowiec, Izabella; Wu, Junfang; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Pinto, Rui; Trygg, Johan; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Nording, Malin L.

    2016-01-01

    multi-platform metabolomics approach followed by multivariate and univariate data analysis for a broad-scale screen of the individual metabolome, particularly for studies using repeated measures to determine dietary response phenotype. - Highlights: • GC-MS, LC-MS and NMR platforms to cover a wide range of metabolites in plasma. • Univariate and multivariate data analysis. • Stable postprandial response over time largely independent of the background diet.

  2. Postprandial metabolomics: A pilot mass spectrometry and NMR study of the human plasma metabolome in response to a challenge meal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimpour, Masoumeh; Surowiec, Izabella; Wu, Junfang [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden); Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden); Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Pinto, Rui [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden); Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Life Sciences (Sweden); Trygg, Johan [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden); Zivkovic, Angela M. [Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, One Shields Ave, CA 95616 (United States); Nording, Malin L., E-mail: malin.nording@umu.se [Computational Life Science Cluster (CLiC), Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, 90187 Umeå (Sweden)

    2016-02-18

    multi-platform metabolomics approach followed by multivariate and univariate data analysis for a broad-scale screen of the individual metabolome, particularly for studies using repeated measures to determine dietary response phenotype. - Highlights: • GC-MS, LC-MS and NMR platforms to cover a wide range of metabolites in plasma. • Univariate and multivariate data analysis. • Stable postprandial response over time largely independent of the background diet.

  3. Linking metabolomics data to underlying metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eNägele

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive experimental analysis of a metabolic constitution plays a central role in approaches of organismal systems biology.Quantifying the impact of a changing environment on the homeostasis of cellular metabolism has been the focus of numerous studies applying various metabolomics techniques. It has been proven that approaches which integrate different analytical techniques, e.g. LC-MS, GC-MS, CE-MS and H-NMR, can provide a comprehensive picture of a certain metabolic homeostasis. Identification of metabolic compounds and quantification of metabolite levels represent the groundwork for the analysis of regulatory strategies in cellular metabolism. This significantly promotes our current understanding of the molecular organization and regulation of cells, tissues and whole organisms.Nevertheless, it is demanding to elicit the pertinent information which is contained in metabolomics data sets.Based on the central dogma of molecular biology, metabolite levels and their fluctuations are the result of a directed flux of information from gene activation over transcription to translation and posttranslational modification.Hence, metabolomics data represent the summed output of a metabolic system comprising various levels of molecular organization.As a consequence, the inverse assignment of metabolomics data to underlying regulatory processes should yield information which-if deciphered correctly-provides comprehensive insight into a metabolic system.Yet, the deduction of regulatory principles is complex not only due to the high number of metabolic compounds, but also because of a high level of cellular compartmentalization and differentiation.Motivated by the question how metabolomics approaches can provide a representative view on regulatory biochemical processes, this article intends to present and discuss current metabolomics applications, strategies of data analysis and their limitations with respect to the interpretability in context of

  4. Changes in the Metabolome in Response to Low-Dose Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Used in Personal Care Products during Different Windows of Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houten, Sander M; Chen, Jia; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Manservisi, Fabiana; Sánchez-Guijo, Alberto; Wudy, Stefan A; Teitelbaum, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of ubiquitous exposure to environmental chemicals remain poorly defined. Non-targeted metabolomic profiling is an emerging method to identify biomarkers of the physiological response to such exposures. We investigated the effect of three commonly used ingredients in personal care products, diethyl phthalate (DEP), methylparaben (MPB) and triclosan (TCS), on the blood metabolome of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were treated with low levels of these chemicals comparable to human exposures during prepubertal and pubertal windows as well as chronically from birth to adulthood. Non-targeted metabolomic profiling revealed that most of the variation in the metabolites was associated with developmental stage. The low-dose exposure to DEP, MPB and TCS had a relatively small, but detectable impact on the metabolome. Multiple metabolites that were affected by chemical exposure belonged to the same biochemical pathways including phenol sulfonation and metabolism of pyruvate, lyso-plasmalogens, unsaturated fatty acids and serotonin. Changes in phenol sulfonation and pyruvate metabolism were most pronounced in rats exposed to DEP during the prepubertal period. Our metabolomics analysis demonstrates that human level exposure to personal care product ingredients has detectable effects on the rat metabolome. We highlight specific pathways such as sulfonation that warrant further study.

  5. COordination of Standards in MetabOlomicS (COSMOS): facilitating integrated metabolomics data access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salek, R.M.; Neumann, S.; Schober, D.; Hummel, J.; Billiau, K.; Kopka, J.; Correa, E.; Reijmers, T.; Rosato, A.; Tenori, L.; Turano, P.; Marin, S.; Deborde, C.; Jacob, D.; Rolin, D.; Dartigues, B.; Conesa, P.; Haug, K.; Rocca-Serra, P.; O’Hagan, S.; Hao, J.; Vliet, M. van; Sysi-Aho, M.; Ludwig, C.; Bouwman, J.; Cascante, M.; Ebbels, T.; Griffin, J.L.; Moing, A.; Nikolski, M.; Oresic, M.; Sansone, S.A.; Viant, M.R.; Goodacre, R.; Günther, U.L.; Hankemeier, T.; Luchinat, C.; Walther, D.; Steinbeck, C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics has become a crucial phenotyping technique in a range of research fields including medicine, the life sciences, biotechnology and the environmental sciences. This necessitates the transfer of experimental information between research groups, as well as potentially to publishers and

  6. Metabolomics as a tool to identify biomarkers to predict and improve outcomes in reproductive medicine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracewell-Milnes, Timothy; Saso, Srdjan; Abdalla, Hossam; Nikolau, Dimitrios; Norman-Taylor, Julian; Johnson, Mark; Holmes, Elaine; Thum, Meen-Yau

    2017-11-01

    reproductive tract, with a summary of the current findings, promise and pitfalls in metabolomic techniques. The approaches discussed can be adapted by other metabolomic studies. A range of sophisticated modern metabolomic techniques are now more widely available and have been applied to the analysis of the female reproductive tract. However, this review has revealed the paucity of metabolomic studies in the field of fertility and the inconsistencies of findings between different studies, as well as a lack of research examining the metabolic effects of various gynecological diseases. By incorporating metabolomic technology into an increased number of well designed studies, a much greater understanding of infertility at a molecular level could be achieved. However, there is currently no evidence for the use of metabolomics in clinical practice to improve fertility outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Gut microbiome and serum metabolome alterations in obesity and after weight-loss intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ruixin; Hong, Jie; Xu, Xiaoqiang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence has linked the gut microbiome to human obesity. We performed a metagenome-wide association study and serum metabolomics profiling in a cohort of lean and obese, young, Chinese individuals. We identified obesity-associated gut microbial species linked to changes in circulating...... metabolites. The abundance of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a glutamate-fermenting commensal, was markedly decreased in obese individuals and was inversely correlated with serum glutamate concentration. Consistently, gavage with B. thetaiotaomicron reduced plasma glutamate concentration and alleviated diet...

  8. An Innovative Approach for The Integration of Proteomics and Metabolomics Data In Severe Septic Shock Patients Stratified for Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiaghi, Alice; Díaz, Ramón; Martinez, Julia Bauzá; Odena, Antonia; Brunelli, Laura; Caironi, Pietro; Masson, Serge; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Gattinoni, Luciano; de Oliveira, Eliandre; Pastorelli, Roberta; Ferrario, Manuela

    2018-04-27

    In this work, we examined plasma metabolome, proteome and clinical features in patients with severe septic shock enrolled in the multicenter ALBIOS study. The objective was to identify changes in the levels of metabolites involved in septic shock progression and to integrate this information with the variation occurring in proteins and clinical data. Mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics and untargeted proteomics allowed us to quantify absolute metabolites concentration and relative proteins abundance. We computed the ratio D7/D1 to take into account their variation from day 1 (D1) to day 7 (D7) after shock diagnosis. Patients were divided into two groups according to 28-day mortality. Three different elastic net logistic regression models were built: one on metabolites only, one on metabolites and proteins and one to integrate metabolomics and proteomics data with clinical parameters. Linear discriminant analysis and Partial least squares Discriminant Analysis were also implemented. All the obtained models correctly classified the observations in the testing set. By looking at the variable importance (VIP) and the selected features, the integration of metabolomics with proteomics data showed the importance of circulating lipids and coagulation cascade in septic shock progression, thus capturing a further layer of biological information complementary to metabolomics information.

  9. NMR-based metabolomics in human disease diagnosis: Applications, limitations, and recommendations

    KAUST Repository

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.

    2013-04-03

    Metabolomics is a dynamic and emerging research field, similar to proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics in affording global understanding of biological systems. It is particularly useful in functional genomic studies in which metabolism is thought to be perturbed. Metabolomics provides a snapshot of the metabolic dynamics that reflect the response of living systems to both pathophysiological stimuli and/or genetic modification. Because this approach makes possible the examination of interactions between an organism and its diet or environment, it is particularly useful for identifying biomarkers of disease processes that involve the environment. For example, the interaction of a high fat diet with cardiovascular disease can be studied via such a metabolomics approach by modeling the interaction between genes and diet. The high reproducibility of NMR-based techniques gives this method a number of advantages over other analytical techniques in large-scale and long-term metabolomic studies, such as epidemiological studies. This approach has been used to study a wide range of diseases, through the examination of biofluids, including blood plasma/serum, urine, blister fluid, saliva and semen, as well as tissue extracts and intact tissue biopsies. However, complicating the use of NMR spectroscopy in biomarker discovery is the fact that numerous variables can effect metabolic composition including, fasting, stress, drug administration, diet, gender, age, physical activity, life style and the subject\\'s health condition. To minimize the influence of these variations in the datasets, all experimental conditions including sample collection, storage, preparation as well as NMR spectroscopic parameters and data analysis should be optimized carefully and conducted in an identical manner as described by the local standard operating protocol. This review highlights the potential applications of NMR-based metabolomics studies and gives some recommendations to improve sample

  10. Metabolomic approach: postharvest storage stability of red radish (raphanus sativus l.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahangir, M.; Farid, J.B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Post harvest storage of vegetables at different temperature for consumption is commonly practiced that need standardization. Among vegetables, red radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is a well known and commonly consumed vegetable all over the world. Its bioactive or nutritional constituents include a wide range of metabolites including, glucosinolates, phenolics, amino acids, organic acids, and sugars. However, many of these metabolites are not stable and can easily be degraded or modified during storage. In order to investigate the metabolomic changes during post harvest storage, radish samples (intact roots and aerial parts) were subjected to four different storage temperatures above and below 0 degree C (20 degree C, 4 degree C, -20 degree C, and -80 degree C), for a maximum of 28 days. 1H-NMR and two-dimensional NMR spectra data resulting from the analysis of the different samples were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) to investigate any possible metabolomic changes. A profound chemical alteration was observed in primary and secondary metabolites. Glucosinolates, phenylpropanoids, organic acids, amino acids, and sugars were found to be the discriminating metabolites for the storage effect. Initially, an increase in secondary metabolites (phenolics and glucosinolates) was observed, but levels of these compounds decreased in later stages, probably due to the breakdown of these products. Whereas late storage samples contained high amounts of amino acids (alanine, valine, threonine, (gama-amino-butyric acid / GABA)) and some glucosinolates (glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin). This phenomenon was pronounced at room temperature as compared to other storage temperatures. Interestingly even at lower and freezing temperatures metabolomic changes in these biological samples were observed. The least metabolomic changes were observed at samples stored at -80 degree C. While studying temperature dependent metabolomic changes, high levels of glucose, adenine, alanine

  11. Impact of Soil Warming on the Plant Metabolome of Icelandic Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo-Garriga, Albert; Ayala-Roque, Marta; Granda, Victor; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Leblans, Niki I. W.; Oravec, Michal; Urban, Otmar; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is stronger at high than at temperate and tropical latitudes. The natural geothermal conditions in southern Iceland provide an opportunity to study the impact of warming on plants, because of the geothermal bedrock channels that induce stable gradients of soil temperature. We studied two valleys, one where such gradients have been present for centuries (long-term treatment), and another where new gradients were created in 2008 after a shallow crustal earthquake (short-term treatment). We studied the impact of soil warming (0 to +15 °C) on the foliar metabolomes of two common plant species of high northern latitudes: Agrostis capillaris, a monocotyledon grass; and Ranunculus acris, a dicotyledonous herb, and evaluated the dependence of shifts in their metabolomes on the length of the warming treatment. The two species responded differently to warming, depending on the length of exposure. The grass metabolome clearly shifted at the site of long-term warming, but the herb metabolome did not. The main up-regulated compounds at the highest temperatures at the long-term site were saccharides and amino acids, both involved in heat-shock metabolic pathways. Moreover, some secondary metabolites, such as phenolic acids and terpenes, associated with a wide array of stresses, were also up-regulated. Most current climatic models predict an increase in annual average temperature between 2–8 °C over land masses in the Arctic towards the end of this century. The metabolomes of A. capillaris and R. acris shifted abruptly and nonlinearly to soil warming >5 °C above the control temperature for the coming decades. These results thus suggest that a slight warming increase may not imply substantial changes in plant function, but if the temperature rises more than 5 °C, warming may end up triggering metabolic pathways associated with heat stress in some plant species currently dominant in this region. PMID:28832555

  12. The exo-metabolome in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Ulf; Andersen, Birgitte; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are a diverse group of eukaryotic microorganisms that have a significant impact on human life as spoilers of food and feed by degradation and toxin production. They are also most useful as a source of bulk and fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. This chapter focuses on the exo-metabolome...

  13. Exploring the analysis of structured metabolomics data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verouden, M.P.H.; Westerhuis, J.A.; van der Werf, M.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    In metabolomics research a large number of metabolites are measured that reflect the cellular state under the experimental conditions studied. In many occasions the experiments are performed according to an experimental design to make sure that sufficient variation is induced in the metabolite

  14. Analysis of metabolomics data from twin families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draisma, Hermanus Henricus Maria

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive analysis of small molecules involved in metabolism, on the basis of samples that have been obtained from organisms in a given physiological state. Data obtained from measurements of trait levels in twin families can be used to elucidate the importance of genetic and

  15. Data-processing strategies for metabolomics studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, M.M.W.B.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Jellema, R.H.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Reijmers, T.H.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics studies aim at a better understanding of biochemical processes by studying relations between metabolites and between metabolites and other types of information (e.g., sensory and phenotypic features). The objectives of these studies are diverse, but the types of data generated and the

  16. Untargeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling of pleural effusions: fatty acids as novel cancer biomarkers for malignant pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching-Wan; Law, Chun-Yiu

    2014-09-05

    Untargeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling is a powerful analytical method used for broad-spectrum identification and quantification of metabolites in biofluids in human health and disease states. In this study, we exploit metabolomic profiling for cancer biomarker discovery for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions. We envisage the result will be clinically useful since currently there are no cancer biomarkers that are accurate enough for the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions. Metabolomes of 32 malignant pleural effusions from lung cancer patients and 18 benign effusions from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were analyzed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using AB SCIEX TripleTOF 5600. MS spectra were analyzed using XCMS, PeakView, and LipidView. Metabolome-Wide Association Study (MWAS) was performed by Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Explorer and Tester (ROCCET). Insignificant markers were filtered out using a metabolome-wide significance level (MWSL) with p-value pleural effusions. Using a ratio of FFA 18:1-to-ceramide (d18:1/16:0), the area-under-ROC was further increased to 0.99 (95% CI = 0.91-1.00) with sensitivity 93.8% and specificity 100.0%. Using untargeted metabolomic profiling, the diagnostic cancer biomarker with the largest area-under-ROC can be determined objectively. This lipogenic phenotype could be explained by overexpression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) in cancer cells. The diagnostic performance of FFA 18:1-to-ceramide (d18:1/16:0) ratio supports its use for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions.

  17. Quantitative metabolomics based on gas chromatography mass spectrometry: Status and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, M.M.; Jellema, R.H.; Greef, J. van der; Tas, A.C.; Hankemeier, T.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics involves the unbiased quantitative and qualitative analysis of the complete set of metabolites present in cells, body fluids and tissues (the metabolome). By analyzing differences between metabolomes using biostatistics (multivariate data analysis; pattern recognition), metabolites

  18. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  19. Metabolomics reveals distinct neurochemical profiles associated with stress resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke N. Dulka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute social defeat represents a naturalistic form of conditioned fear and is an excellent model in which to investigate the biological basis of stress resilience. While there is growing interest in identifying biomarkers of stress resilience, until recently, it has not been feasible to associate levels of large numbers of neurochemicals and metabolites to stress-related phenotypes. The objective of the present study was to use an untargeted metabolomics approach to identify known and unknown neurochemicals in select brain regions that distinguish susceptible and resistant individuals in two rodent models of acute social defeat. In the first experiment, male mice were first phenotyped as resistant or susceptible. Then, mice were subjected to acute social defeat, and tissues were immediately collected from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, basolateral/central amygdala (BLA/CeA, nucleus accumbens (NAc, and dorsal hippocampus (dHPC. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS was used for the detection of water-soluble neurochemicals. In the second experiment, male Syrian hamsters were paired in daily agonistic encounters for 2 weeks, during which they formed stable dominant-subordinate relationships. Then, 24 h after the last dominance encounter, animals were exposed to acute social defeat stress. Immediately after social defeat, tissue was collected from the vmPFC, BLA/CeA, NAc, and dHPC for analysis using UPLC-HRMS. Although no single biomarker characterized stress-related phenotypes in both species, commonalities were found. For instance, in both model systems, animals resistant to social defeat stress also show increased concentration of molecules to protect against oxidative stress in the NAc and vmPFC. Additionally, in both mice and hamsters, unidentified spectral features were preliminarily annotated as potential targets for future experiments. Overall, these findings

  20. System-wide Analysis of SUMOylation Dynamics in Response to Replication Stress Reveals Novel Small Ubiquitin-like Modified Target Proteins and Acceptor Lysines Relevant for Genome Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chang, Jer-Gung; Hendriks, Ivo A

    2015-01-01

    . Following statistical analysis on five biological replicates, a total of 566 SUMO-2 targets were identified. After 2 hours of Hydroxyurea treatment, 10 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation and 2 proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation, whereas after 24 hours, 35 proteins were up...

  1. Metabolome classification of Brassica napus L. organs via UPLC-QTOF-PDA-MS and their anti-oxidant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A; Sharaf Eldin, Mohamed G; Kassem, Hanaa; Abou el Fetouh, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Brassica napus L. is a crop widely grown for its oil production and other nutritional components in the seed. In addition to the seed, other organs contain a wide range of phenolic metabolites although they have not been investigated to the same extent as in seeds. To define and compare the phytochemical composition of B. napus L. organs, namely the root, stem, leaf, inflorescence and seeds. Non-targeted metabolomic analysis via UPLC-QTOF-MS was utilised in order to localise compounds belonging to various chemical classes (i.e. oxygenated fatty acids, flavonols, phenolic acids and sinapoyl choline derivatives). The vast majority of identified metabolites were flavonol glycosides that accumulated in most of the plant organs. Whereas other classes were detected predominantly in specific organs, i.e. sinapoyl cholines were present uniquely in seeds. Furthermore, variation in the accumulation pattern of metabolites from the same class was observed, particularly in the case of quercetin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin flavonols. Anti-oxidant activity, based on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhdrazyl analysis was observed for all extracts, and correlated to some extent with total flavonoid content. This study provides the most complete map for polyphenol composition in B. napus L. organs. By describing the metabolites profile in B. napus L., this study provides the basis for future investigations of seeds for potential health and/or medicinal use. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Metabolomics analysis of metabolic effects of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT inhibition on human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tolstikov

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT plays an important role in cellular bioenergetics. It is responsible for converting nicotinamide to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, an essential molecule in cellular metabolism. NAMPT has been extensively studied over the past decade due to its role as a key regulator of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-consuming enzymes. NAMPT is also known as a potential target for therapeutic intervention due to its involvement in disease. In the current study, we used a global mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to investigate the effects of FK866, a small molecule inhibitor of NAMPT currently in clinical trials, on metabolic perturbations in human cancer cells. We treated A2780 (ovarian cancer and HCT-116 (colorectal cancer cell lines with FK866 in the presence and absence of nicotinic acid. Significant changes were observed in the amino acids metabolism and the purine and pyrimidine metabolism. We also observed metabolic alterations in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (TCA, and the pentose phosphate pathway. To expand the range of the detected polar metabolites and improve data confidence, we applied a global metabolomics profiling platform by using both non-targeted and targeted hydrophilic (HILIC-LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. We used Ingenuity Knowledge Base to facilitate the projection of metabolomics data onto metabolic pathways. Several metabolic pathways showed differential responses to FK866 based on several matches to the list of annotated metabolites. This study suggests that global metabolomics can be a useful tool in pharmacological studies of the mechanism of action of drugs at a cellular level.

  3. An Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Metabolomic Approach to Studying the Impact of Moderate Red-Wine Consumption on Urinary Metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Ibañez, Clara; Simó, Carolina; Bartolomé, Begoña; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria

    2018-04-06

    Moderate red-wine consumption has been widely described to exert several benefits in human health. This is mainly due to its unique content of bioactive polyphenols, which suffer several modifications along their pass through the digestive system, including microbial transformation in the colon and phase-II metabolism, until they are finally excreted in urine and feces. To determine the impact of moderate wine consumption in the overall urinary metabolome of healthy volunteers ( n = 41), samples from a red-wine interventional study (250 mL/day, 28 days) were investigated. Urine (24 h) was collected before and after intervention and analyzed by an untargeted ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry metabolomics approach. 94 compounds linked to wine consumption, including specific wine components (tartaric acid), microbial-derived phenolic metabolites (5-(dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactones and 4-hydroxyl-5-(phenyl)-valeric acids), and endogenous compounds were identified. Also, some relationships between parallel fecal and urinary metabolomes are discussed.

  4. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeepkiran JA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jangampalli Adi Pradeepkiran,1* Sri Bhashyam Sainath,2,3* Konidala Kranthi Kumar,1 Matcha Bhaskar1 1Division of Animal Biotechnology, Department of Zoology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, India; 2CIMAR/CIIMAR, Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, Porto, Portugal, 3Department of Biotechnology, Vikrama Simhapuri University, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50% to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3. A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the

  5. Genome-wide identification and characterization of microRNA genes and their targets in flax (Linum usitatissimum): Characterization of flax miRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barvkar, Vitthal T; Pardeshi, Varsha C; Kale, Sandip M; Qiu, Shuqing; Rollins, Meaghen; Datla, Raju; Gupta, Vidya S; Kadoo, Narendra Y

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-24 nucleotide long) endogenous regulatory RNAs that play important roles in plant growth and development. They regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by translational repression or target degradation and gene silencing. In this study, we identified 116 conserved miRNAs belonging to 23 families from the flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) genome using a computational approach. The precursor miRNAs varied in length; while most of the mature miRNAs were 21 nucleotide long, intergenic and showed conserved signatures of RNA polymerase II transcripts in their upstream regions. Promoter region analysis of the flax miRNA genes indicated prevalence of MYB transcription factor binding sites. Four miRNA gene clusters containing members of three phylogenetic groups were identified. Further, 142 target genes were predicted for these miRNAs and most of these represent transcriptional regulators. The miRNA encoding genes were expressed in diverse tissues as determined by digital expression analysis as well as real-time PCR. The expression of fourteen miRNAs and nine target genes was independently validated using the quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). This study suggests that a large number of conserved plant miRNAs are also found in flax and these may play important roles in growth and development of flax.

  6. From models to crop species: caveats and solutions for translational metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki eTohge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Although plant metabolomics is largely carried out on Arabidopsis it is essentially genome-independent, and thus potentially applicable to a wide range of species. However, transfer of between species, or even between different tissues of the same species, is not facile. This is because the reliability of protocols for harvesting, handling and analysis depends on the biological features and chemical composition of the plant tissue. In parallel with the diversification of model species it is important to establish good handling and analytic practice, in order to augment computational comparisons between tissues and species. LC-MS-based metabolomics is one of the powerful approaches for metabolite profiling. By using a combination of different extraction methods, separation columns and ion detection, a very wide range of metabolites can be analysed. However, its application requires careful attention to exclude potential pitfalls, including artifactual changes in metabolite levels during sample preparation and analytic errors due to ion-suppression. Here we provide case studies with two different LC-MS-based metabolomics platforms and four species (Arabidopsis thaliana, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Solanum lycopersicum and Oryza sativa that illustrate how such dangers can be detected and circumvented.

  7. Rescue of HIV-1 release by targeting widely divergent NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases and isolated catalytic HECT domains to Gag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Weiss

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses engage the ESCRT pathway through late assembly (L domains in Gag to promote virus release. HIV-1 uses a PTAP motif as its primary L domain, which interacts with the ESCRT-I component Tsg101. In contrast, certain other retroviruses primarily use PPxY-type L domains, which constitute ligands for NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases. Surprisingly, although HIV-1 Gag lacks PPxY motifs, the release of HIV-1 L domain mutants is potently enhanced by ectopic NEDD4-2s, a native isoform with a naturally truncated C2 domain that appears to account for the residual titer of L domain-defective HIV-1. The reason for the unique potency of the NEDD4-2s isoform has remained unclear. We now show that the naturally truncated C2 domain of NEDD4-2s functions as an autonomous Gag-targeting module that can be functionally replaced by the unrelated Gag-binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA. The residual C2 domain of NEDD4-2s was sufficient to transfer the ability to stimulate HIV-1 budding to other NEDD4 family members, including the yeast homologue Rsp5, and even to isolated catalytic HECT domains. The isolated catalytic domain of NEDD4-2s also efficiently promoted HIV-1 budding when targeted to Gag via CypA. We conclude that the regions typically required for substrate recognition by HECT ubiquitin ligases are all dispensable to stimulate HIV-1 release, implying that the relevant target for ubiquitination is Gag itself or can be recognized by divergent isolated HECT domains. However, the mere ability to ubiquitinate Gag was not sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Rather, our results indicate that the synthesis of K63-linked ubiquitin chains is critical for ubiquitin ligase-mediated virus release.

  8. Genome-Wide Mapping Targets of the Metazoan Chromatin Remodeling Factor NURF Reveals Nucleosome Remodeling at Enhancers, Core Promoters and Gene Insulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available NURF is a conserved higher eukaryotic ISWI-containing chromatin remodeling complex that catalyzes ATP-dependent nucleosome sliding. By sliding nucleosomes, NURF is able to alter chromatin dynamics to control transcription and genome organization. Previous biochemical and genetic analysis of the specificity-subunit of Drosophila NURF (Nurf301/Enhancer of Bithorax (E(bx has defined NURF as a critical regulator of homeotic, heat-shock and steroid-responsive gene transcription. It has been speculated that NURF controls pathway specific transcription by co-operating with sequence-specific transcription factors to remodel chromatin at dedicated enhancers. However, conclusive in vivo demonstration of this is lacking and precise regulatory elements targeted by NURF are poorly defined. To address this, we have generated a comprehensive map of in vivo NURF activity, using MNase-sequencing to determine at base pair resolution NURF target nucleosomes, and ChIP-sequencing to define sites of NURF recruitment. Our data show that, besides anticipated roles at enhancers, NURF interacts physically and functionally with the TRF2/DREF basal transcription factor to organize nucleosomes downstream of active promoters. Moreover, we detect NURF remodeling and recruitment at distal insulator sites, where NURF functionally interacts with and co-localizes with DREF and insulator proteins including CP190 to establish nucleosome-depleted domains. This insulator function of NURF is most apparent at subclasses of insulators that mark the boundaries of chromatin domains, where multiple insulator proteins co-associate. By visualizing the complete repertoire of in vivo NURF chromatin targets, our data provide new insights into how chromatin remodeling can control genome organization and regulatory interactions.

  9. Assessing Heterogeneity of Osteolytic Lesions in Multiple Myeloma by 1H HR-MAS NMR Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurette Tavel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a malignancy of plasma cells characterized by multifocal osteolytic bone lesions. Macroscopic and genetic heterogeneity has been documented within MM lesions. Understanding the bases of such heterogeneity may unveil relevant features of MM pathobiology. To this aim, we deployed unbiased 1H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR metabolomics to analyze multiple biopsy specimens of osteolytic lesions from one case of pathological fracture caused by MM. Multivariate analyses on normalized metabolite peak integrals allowed clusterization of samples in accordance with a posteriori histological findings. We investigated the relationship between morphological and NMR features by merging morphological data and metabolite profiling into a single correlation matrix. Data-merging addressed tissue heterogeneity, and greatly facilitated the mapping of lesions and nearby healthy tissues. Our proof-of-principle study reveals integrated metabolomics and histomorphology as a promising approach for the targeted study of osteolytic lesions.

  10. Targeting natural antioxidant compounds to the brain: a metabolomic assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Fornasaro, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    2013/2014 A diet rich in fruits and vegetables has been associated with a decreased risk of brain diseases. Some plant-specific compounds occurring in fruits and vegetables, such as flavonoids, have been found to exert neuroprotection, thus decreasing neurological disease risk. The current hypothesis is that neuroprotection is due to the antioxidant properties of flavonoids. The main aims of this PhD thesis were: i) to assess whether some flavonoids are transported from the blood into the ...

  11. Comprehensive metabolomics identified lipid peroxidation as a prominent feature in human plasma of patients with coronary heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD is a complex human disease associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The underlying mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers for the different types of CHD remain poorly defined. Metabolomics has been increasingly recognized as an enabling technique with the potential to identify key metabolomic features in an attempt to understand the pathophysiology and differentiate different stages of CHD. We performed comprehensive metabolomic analysis in human plasma from 28 human subjects with stable angina (SA, myocardial infarction (MI, and healthy control (HC. Subsequent analysis demonstrated a uniquely altered metabolic profile in these CHD: a total of 18, 37 and 36 differential metabolites were identified to distinguish SA from HC, MI from SA, and MI from HC groups respectively. Among these metabolites, glycerophospholipid (GPL metabolism emerged as the most significantly disturbed pathway. Next, we used a targeted metabolomic approach to systematically analyze GPL, oxidized phospholipid (oxPL, and downstream metabolites derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, such as arachidonic acid and linoleic acid. Surprisingly, lipids associated with lipid peroxidation (LPO pathways including oxidized PL and isoprostanes, isomers of prostaglandins, were significantly elevated in plasma of MI patients comparing to HC and SA, consistent with the notion that oxidative stress-induced LPO is a prominent feature in CHD. Our studies using the state-of-the-art metabolomics help to understand the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CHD; LPO metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers to differentiation MI from SA and HC. Keywords: Metabolomics, Lipid peroxidation, Lipidomics, Myocardial infarction, Isoprostanes, Coronary heart disease (CHD

  12. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids.

  13. Towards automatic metabolomic profiling of high-resolution one-dimensional proton NMR spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, Pascal; Lewis, Michael J.; Chang, David, E-mail: dchang@chenomx.com [Chenomx Inc (Canada); Baker, David [Pfizer Inc (United States); Wishart, David S. [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science and Biological Sciences (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Mass Spectroscopy (MS) are the two most common spectroscopic analytical techniques employed in metabolomics. The large spectral datasets generated by NMR and MS are often analyzed using data reduction techniques like Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Although rapid, these methods are susceptible to solvent and matrix effects, high rates of false positives, lack of reproducibility and limited data transferability from one platform to the next. Given these limitations, a growing trend in both NMR and MS-based metabolomics is towards targeted profiling or 'quantitative' metabolomics, wherein compounds are identified and quantified via spectral fitting prior to any statistical analysis. Despite the obvious advantages of this method, targeted profiling is hindered by the time required to perform manual or computer-assisted spectral fitting. In an effort to increase data analysis throughput for NMR-based metabolomics, we have developed an automatic method for identifying and quantifying metabolites in one-dimensional (1D) proton NMR spectra. This new algorithm is capable of using carefully constructed reference spectra and optimizing thousands of variables to reconstruct experimental NMR spectra of biofluids using rules and concepts derived from physical chemistry and NMR theory. The automated profiling program has been tested against spectra of synthetic mixtures as well as biological spectra of urine, serum and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Our results indicate that the algorithm can correctly identify compounds with high fidelity in each biofluid sample (except for urine). Furthermore, the metabolite concentrations exhibit a very high correlation with both simulated and manually-detected values.

  14. Towards automatic metabolomic profiling of high-resolution one-dimensional proton NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Pascal; Lewis, Michael J.; Chang, David; Baker, David; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Mass Spectroscopy (MS) are the two most common spectroscopic analytical techniques employed in metabolomics. The large spectral datasets generated by NMR and MS are often analyzed using data reduction techniques like Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Although rapid, these methods are susceptible to solvent and matrix effects, high rates of false positives, lack of reproducibility and limited data transferability from one platform to the next. Given these limitations, a growing trend in both NMR and MS-based metabolomics is towards targeted profiling or “quantitative” metabolomics, wherein compounds are identified and quantified via spectral fitting prior to any statistical analysis. Despite the obvious advantages of this method, targeted profiling is hindered by the time required to perform manual or computer-assisted spectral fitting. In an effort to increase data analysis throughput for NMR-based metabolomics, we have developed an automatic method for identifying and quantifying metabolites in one-dimensional (1D) proton NMR spectra. This new algorithm is capable of using carefully constructed reference spectra and optimizing thousands of variables to reconstruct experimental NMR spectra of biofluids using rules and concepts derived from physical chemistry and NMR theory. The automated profiling program has been tested against spectra of synthetic mixtures as well as biological spectra of urine, serum and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Our results indicate that the algorithm can correctly identify compounds with high fidelity in each biofluid sample (except for urine). Furthermore, the metabolite concentrations exhibit a very high correlation with both simulated and manually-detected values.

  15. Metabolomic analysis of three Mollicute species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A Vanyushkina

    Full Text Available We present a systematic study of three bacterial species that belong to the class Mollicutes, the smallest and simplest bacteria, Spiroplasma melliferum, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and Acholeplasma laidlawii. To understand the difference in the basic principles of metabolism regulation and adaptation to environmental conditions in the three species, we analyzed the metabolome of these bacteria. Metabolic pathways were reconstructed using the proteogenomic annotation data provided by our lab. The results of metabolome, proteome and genome profiling suggest a fundamental difference in the adaptation of the three closely related Mollicute species to stress conditions. As the transaldolase is not annotated in Mollicutes, we propose variants of the pentose phosphate pathway catalyzed by annotated enzymes for three species. For metabolite detection we employed high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. We used liquid chromatography method - hydrophilic interaction chromatography with silica column - as it effectively separates highly polar cellular metabolites prior to their detection by mass spectrometer.

  16. Metabolomics for Quality and food security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diretto, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    By the term 'Metabolomics' means the discipline which allows you to determine the set of small molecules (metabolites) produced by an organism in a given time. The metabolomic analysis requires complex technological platforms that allow, in the first place, the separation (chromatography liquid or gaseous) of the different molecules and, subsequently, the identification of the same on the basis of characteristic ratio between their mass and charge (m / z). This study arises by estimates that, between climate change planned for the coming decades, there will also be quick increasing the concentration of Co2 in the atmosphere. In this context, it is essential to predict how these changes weather will impact on product quality plant at the base of our diet. [it

  17. Genome-wide targeted prediction of ABA responsive genes in rice based on over-represented cis-motif in co-expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenka, Sangram K; Lohia, Bikash; Kumar, Abhay; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Bansal, Kailash C

    2009-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), the popular plant stress hormone, plays a key role in regulation of sub-set of stress responsive genes. These genes respond to ABA through specific transcription factors which bind to cis-regulatory elements present in their promoters. We discovered the ABA Responsive Element (ABRE) core (ACGT) containing CGMCACGTGB motif as over-represented motif among the promoters of ABA responsive co-expressed genes in rice. Targeted gene prediction strategy using this motif led to the identification of 402 protein coding genes potentially regulated by ABA-dependent molecular genetic network. RT-PCR analysis of arbitrarily chosen 45 genes from the predicted 402 genes confirmed 80% accuracy of our prediction. Plant Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of ABA responsive genes showed enrichment of signal transduction and stress related genes among diverse functional categories.

  18. Blood Transcriptomics and Metabolomics for Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-31

    involved in rheumatoid arthritis . PLoS Comput Biol 2011;7. [100] Zhu J. Stitching together multiple data dimensions reveals interacting metabolomic...capability, detecting N10,000 metabo- lites, together with environmental exposure, dietary intake, microbial activity, and pharmaceutical drugs. Thus...research to clinical care has constantly seen huge disap- pointments. With the accumulation of detailed, information-rich data, human subjects start to

  19. Data fusion in metabolomic cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Rasmus; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Savorani, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We have recently shown that fluorescence spectroscopy of plasma samples has promising abilities regarding early detection of colorectal cancer. In the present paper, these results were further developed by combining fluorescence with the biomarkers, CEA and TIMP-1 and traditional metabolomic meas...... measurements in the form of (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that using an extensive profile established by combining such measurements together with the biomarkers is better than using single markers....

  20. Metabolomic Analysis in Brain Research: Opportunities & Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine G Vasilopoulou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism being a fundamental part of molecular physiology, elucidating the structure and regulation of metabolic pathways is crucial for obtaining a comprehensive perspective of cellular function and understanding the underlying mechanisms of its dysfunction(s. Therefore, quantifying an accurate metabolic network activity map under various physiological conditions is among the major objectives of systems biology in the context of many biological applications. Especially for CNS, metabolic network activity analysis can substantially enhance our knowledge about the complex structure of the mammalian brain and the mechanisms of neurological disorders, leading to the design of effective therapeutic treatments. Metabolomics has emerged as the high-throughput quantitative analysis of the concentration profile of small molecular weight metabolites, which act as reactants and products in metabolic reactions and as regulatory molecules of proteins participating in many biological processes. Thus, the metabolic profile provides a metabolic activity fingerprint, through the simultaneous analysis of tens to hundreds of molecules of pathophysiological and pharmacological interest. The application of metabolomics is at its standardization phase in general, and the challenges for paving a standardized procedure are even more pronounced in brain studies. In this review, we support the value of metabolomics in brain research. Moreover, we demonstrate the challenges of designing and setting up a reliable brain metabolomic study, which, among other parameters, has to take into consideration the sex differentiation and the complexity of brain physiology manifested in its regional variation. We finally propose ways to overcome these challenges and design a study that produces reproducible and consistent results.

  1. PAMDB: a comprehensive Pseudomonas aeruginosa metabolome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weiliang; Brewer, Luke K; Jones, Jace W; Nguyen, Angela T; Marcu, Ana; Wishart, David S; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G; Kane, Maureen A; Wilks, Angela

    2018-01-04

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosaMetabolome Database (PAMDB, http://pseudomonas.umaryland.edu) is a searchable, richly annotated metabolite database specific to P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa is a soil organism and significant opportunistic pathogen that adapts to its environment through a versatile energy metabolism network. Furthermore, P. aeruginosa is a model organism for the study of biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and bioremediation processes, each of which are dependent on unique pathways and metabolites. The PAMDB is modelled on the Escherichia coli (ECMDB), yeast (YMDB) and human (HMDB) metabolome databases and contains >4370 metabolites and 938 pathways with links to over 1260 genes and proteins. The database information was compiled from electronic databases, journal articles and mass spectrometry (MS) metabolomic data obtained in our laboratories. For each metabolite entered, we provide detailed compound descriptions, names and synonyms, structural and physiochemical information, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MS spectra, enzymes and pathway information, as well as gene and protein sequences. The database allows extensive searching via chemical names, structure and molecular weight, together with gene, protein and pathway relationships. The PAMBD and its future iterations will provide a valuable resource to biologists, natural product chemists and clinicians in identifying active compounds, potential biomarkers and clinical diagnostics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Integration of metabolomics data into metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpfer, Nadine; Kleessen, Sabrina; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite levels together with their corresponding metabolic fluxes are integrative outcomes of biochemical transformations and regulatory processes and they can be used to characterize the response of biological systems to genetic and/or environmental changes. However, while changes in transcript or to some extent protein levels can usually be traced back to one or several responsible genes, changes in fluxes and particularly changes in metabolite levels do not follow such rationale and are often the outcome of complex interactions of several components. The increasing quality and coverage of metabolomics technologies have fostered the development of computational approaches for integrating metabolic read-outs with large-scale models to predict the physiological state of a system. Constraint-based approaches, relying on the stoichiometry of the considered reactions, provide a modeling framework amenable to analyses of large-scale systems and to the integration of high-throughput data. Here we review the existing approaches that integrate metabolomics data in variants of constrained-based approaches to refine model reconstructions, to constrain flux predictions in metabolic models, and to relate network structural properties to metabolite levels. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in the developments of constraint-based modeling approaches driven by metabolomics data.

  3. Impact of a cafeteria diet and daily physical training on the rat serum metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-García, Susana; Del Bas, Josep M; Caimari, Antoni; Escorihuela, Rosa M; Arola, Lluís; Suárez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Regular physical activity and healthy dietary patterns are commonly recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is diagnosed at an alarmingly increasing rate, especially among adolescents. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the relevance of physical exercise on the modulation of the metabolome in healthy people and those with MetS. We have previously shown that treadmill exercise ameliorated different symptoms of MetS. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a MetS-inducing diet and different intensities of aerobic training on the overall serum metabolome of adolescent rats. For 8 weeks, young rats were fed either standard chow (ST) or cafeteria diet (CAF) and were subjected to a daily program of training on a treadmill at different speeds. Non-targeted metabolomics was used to identify changes in circulating metabolites, and a combination of multivariate analysis techniques was implemented to achieve a holistic understanding of the metabolome. Among all the identified circulating metabolites influenced by CAF, lysophosphatidylcholines were the most represented family. Serum sphingolipids, bile acids, acylcarnitines, unsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E and A derivatives also changed significantly in CAF-fed rats. These findings suggest that an enduring systemic inflammatory state is induced by CAF. The impact of physical training on the metabolome was less striking than the impact of diet and mainly altered circulating bile acids and glycerophospholipids. Furthermore, the serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were increased in CAF-fed rats, and C-reactive protein was decreased in trained groups. The leptin/adiponectin ratio, a useful marker of MetS, was increased in CAF groups, but decreased in proportion to training intensity. Multivariate analysis revealed that ST-fed animals were more susceptible to exercise-induced changes in metabolites than animals with MetS, in which moderate

  4. Impact of a cafeteria diet and daily physical training on the rat serum metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Suárez-García

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity and healthy dietary patterns are commonly recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome (MetS, which is diagnosed at an alarmingly increasing rate, especially among adolescents. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the relevance of physical exercise on the modulation of the metabolome in healthy people and those with MetS. We have previously shown that treadmill exercise ameliorated different symptoms of MetS. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a MetS-inducing diet and different intensities of aerobic training on the overall serum metabolome of adolescent rats. For 8 weeks, young rats were fed either standard chow (ST or cafeteria diet (CAF and were subjected to a daily program of training on a treadmill at different speeds. Non-targeted metabolomics was used to identify changes in circulating metabolites, and a combination of multivariate analysis techniques was implemented to achieve a holistic understanding of the metabolome. Among all the identified circulating metabolites influenced by CAF, lysophosphatidylcholines were the most represented family. Serum sphingolipids, bile acids, acylcarnitines, unsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E and A derivatives also changed significantly in CAF-fed rats. These findings suggest that an enduring systemic inflammatory state is induced by CAF. The impact of physical training on the metabolome was less striking than the impact of diet and mainly altered circulating bile acids and glycerophospholipids. Furthermore, the serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were increased in CAF-fed rats, and C-reactive protein was decreased in trained groups. The leptin/adiponectin ratio, a useful marker of MetS, was increased in CAF groups, but decreased in proportion to training intensity. Multivariate analysis revealed that ST-fed animals were more susceptible to exercise-induced changes in metabolites than animals with MetS, in which

  5. A Genome-Wide Identification of the WRKY Family Genes and a Survey of Potential WRKY Target Genes in Dendrobium officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunmei; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Tan, Jianwen; Zhang, Jianxia; Pan, Xiaoping; Li, Mingzhi; Luo, Jianping; Duan, Jun

    2017-08-23

    The WRKY family, one of the largest families of transcription factors, plays important roles in the regulation of various biological processes, including growth, development and stress responses in plants. In the present study, 63 DoWRKY genes were identified from the Dendrobium officinale genome. These were classified into groups I, II, III and a non-group, each with 14, 28, 10 and 11 members, respectively. ABA-responsive, sulfur-responsive and low temperature-responsive elements were identified in the 1-k upstream regulatory region of DoWRKY genes. Subsequently, the expression of the 63 DoWRKY genes under cold stress was assessed, and the expression profiles of a large number of these genes were regulated by low temperature in roots and stems. To further understand the regulatory mechanism of DoWRKY genes in biological processes, potential WRKY target genes were investigated. Among them, most stress-related genes contained multiple W-box elements in their promoters. In addition, the genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and hydrolysis contained W-box elements in their 1-k upstream regulatory regions, suggesting that DoWRKY genes may play a role in polysaccharide metabolism. These results provide a basis for investigating the function of WRKY genes and help to understand the downstream regulation network in plants within the Orchidaceae.

  6. Genome-wide placental DNA methylation analysis of severely growth-discordant monochorionic twins reveals novel epigenetic targets for intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roifman, Maian; Choufani, Sanaa; Turinsky, Andrei L; Drewlo, Sascha; Keating, Sarah; Brudno, Michael; Kingdom, John; Weksberg, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which refers to reduced fetal growth in the context of placental insufficiency, is etiologically heterogeneous. IUGR is associated not only with perinatal morbidity and mortality but also with adult-onset disorders, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, posing a major health burden. Placental epigenetic dysregulation has been proposed as one mechanism that causes IUGR; however, the spectrum of epigenetic pathophysiological mechanisms leading to IUGR remains to be elucidated. Monozygotic monochorionic twins are particularly affected by IUGR, in the setting of severe discordant growth. Because monozygotic twins have the same genotype at conception and a shared maternal environment, they provide an ideal model system for studying epigenetic dysregulation of the placenta. We compared genome-wide placental DNA methylation patterns of severely growth-discordant twins to identify novel candidate genes for IUGR. Snap-frozen placental samples for eight severely growth-discordant monozygotic monochorionic twin pairs were obtained at delivery from each twin. A high-resolution DNA methylation array platform was used to identify methylation differences between IUGR and normal twins. Our analysis revealed differentially methylated regions in the promoters of eight genes: DECR1, ZNF300, DNAJA4, CCL28, LEPR, HSPA1A/L, GSTO1, and GNE. The largest methylation differences between the two groups were in the promoters of DECR1 and ZNF300. The significance of these group differences was independently validated by bisulfite pyrosequencing, implicating aberrations in fatty acid beta oxidation and transcriptional regulation, respectively. Further analysis of the array data identified methylation changes most prominently affecting the Wnt and cadherin pathways in the IUGR cohort. Our results suggest that IUGR in monozygotic twins is associated with impairments in lipid metabolism and transcriptional regulation as well as cadherin and Wnt

  7. The LCO/Gemini-South campaign for Deep Impact target Comet 9P/Tempel 1: Temporally resolved wide-field narrowband imaging results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, S. M.; Osip, D. J.; Thomas-Osip, J. E.; DeBuizer, J. M.; Mondragon, L. A.; Schweiger, D. L.; Viehweg, J.; SB Collaboration

    2005-08-01

    An extensive observing campaign to monitor Comet 9P/Tempel 1 will be conducted from 20 June to 19 July, 2005 at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. These observations will precede and follow the impact of the Deep Impact projectile, which is likely to create a crater on the nucleus that will act as a fresh active area on the surface of the comet. Discreet nucleus active areas, believed to be the source of coma gas and dust jets, will likely result in changing morphology in the coma. We present the initial results of the wide-field narrowband visible imaging of the comet. Data will be taken with the 2.5m DuPont telescope from 27 June - 9 July, following the comet from 4 rotations prior to impact, to 4 rotations after impact using the narrowband Hale-Bopp filters, including CN, C2, and two continuum filters. These data will allow an accurate determination of the rotation state of the embedded nucleus immediately preceding the impact event as well as a measure of any changes to the rotation state due to the impact. In addition, modeling of these data will provide the total dust and gas production rates from the unaltered nucleus compared to the enhanced dust and gas emission from the newly created active region and freely sublimating pieces of mantle material ejected into the coma by the impactor. We will monitor temporal changes (on hours and days time-scales) in the morphology of both the gas and refractory components. We will use coma morphology studies to estimate the dust and gas outflow velocities and infer the presence of discreet nucleus source regions (pre- and post-impact). Of particular interest is the study of the gas-to-dust ratio and the ratio of the minor carbon species emitted from the newly created active region relative to the pre-impact coma environment.

  8. Identification of new therapeutic targets by genome-wide analysis of gene expression in the ipsilateral cortex of aged rats after stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Buga

    Full Text Available Because most human stroke victims are elderly, studies of experimental stroke in the aged rather than the young rat model may be optimal for identifying clinically relevant cellular responses, as well for pinpointing beneficial interventions.We employed the Affymetrix platform to analyze the whole-gene transcriptome following temporary ligation of the middle cerebral artery in aged and young rats. The correspondence, heat map, and dendrogram analyses independently suggest a differential, age-group-specific behaviour of major gene clusters after stroke. Overall, the pattern of gene expression strongly suggests that the response of the aged rat brain is qualitatively rather than quantitatively different from the young, i.e. the total number of regulated genes is comparable in the two age groups, but the aged rats had great difficulty in mounting a timely response to stroke. Our study indicates that four genes related to neuropathic syndrome, stress, anxiety disorders and depression (Acvr1c, Cort, Htr2b and Pnoc may have impaired response to stroke in aged rats. New therapeutic options in aged rats may also include Calcrl, Cyp11b1, Prcp, Cebpa, Cfd, Gpnmb, Fcgr2b, Fcgr3a, Tnfrsf26, Adam 17 and Mmp14. An unexpected target is the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A synthase 1 in aged rats, a key enzyme in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. Post-stroke axonal growth was compromised in both age groups.We suggest that a multi-stage, multimodal treatment in aged animals may be more likely to produce positive results. Such a therapeutic approach should be focused on tissue restoration but should also address other aspects of patient post-stroke therapy such as neuropathic syndrome, stress, anxiety disorders, depression, neurotransmission and blood pressure.

  9. Middle-aged human apoE4 targeted-replacement mice show retention deficits on a wide range of spatial memory tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Alexandra; Grootendorst, Jeannette; Vogel, Elise; Kelche, Christian; Dodart, Jean-Cosme; Bales, Kelly; Moreau, Pierre-Henri; Sullivan, Patrick M; Mathis, Chantal

    2008-11-21

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4, one of three human apoE (h-apoE) isoforms, has been identified as a major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and for cognitive deficits associated with aging. However, the biological mechanisms involving apoE in learning and memory processes are unclear. A potential isoform-dependent role of apoE in cognitive processes was studied in human apoE targeted-replacement (TR) mice. These mice express either the human apoE3 or apoE4 gene under the control of endogenous murine apoE regulatory sequences, resulting in physiological expression of h-apoE in both a temporal and spatial pattern similar to humans. Male and female apoE3-TR, apoE4-TR, apoE-knockout and C57BL/6J mice (15-18 months) were tested with spatial memory and avoidance conditioning tasks. Compared to apoE3-TR mice, spatial memory in female apoE4-TR mice was impaired based on their poor performances in; (i) the probe test of the water-maze reference memory task, (ii) the water-maze working memory task and (iii) an active avoidance Y-maze task. Retention performance on a passive avoidance task was also impaired in apoE4-TR mice, but not in other genotypes. These deficits in both spatial and avoidance memory tasks may be related to the anatomical and functional abnormalities previously reported in the hippocampus and the amygdala of apoE4-TR mice. We conclude that the apoE4-TR mice provide an excellent model for understanding the mechanisms underlying apoE4-dependent susceptibility to cognitive decline.

  10. Metabolome analysis for discovering biomarkers of gastroenterological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Nishiumi, Shin; Matsubara, Atsuki; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru

    2014-09-01

    Improvements in analytical technologies have made it possible to rapidly determine the concentrations of thousands of metabolites in any biological sample, which has resulted in metabolome analysis being applied to various types of research, such as clinical, cell biology, and plant/food science studies. The metabolome represents all of the end products and by-products of the numerous complex metabolic pathways operating in a biological system. Thus, metabolome analysis allows one to survey the global changes in an organism's metabolic profile and gain a holistic understanding of the changes that occur in organisms during various biological processes, e.g., during disease development. In clinical metabolomic studies, there is a strong possibility that differences in the metabolic profiles of human specimens reflect disease-specific states. Recently, metabolome analysis of biofluids, e.g., blood, urine, or saliva, has been increasingly used for biomarker discovery and disease diagnosis. Mass spectrometry-based techniques have been extensively used for metabolome analysis because they exhibit high selectivity and sensitivity during the identification and quantification of metabolites. Here, we describe metabolome analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the findings of studies that attempted to discover biomarkers of gastroenterological cancer are also outlined. Finally, we discuss metabolome analysis-based disease diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A metabolomics study on human dietary intervention with apples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Kristensen, M.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics is a promising tool for searching out new biomarkers and the development of hypotheses in nutrition research. This chapter will describe the design of human dietary intervention studies where samples are collected for metabolomics analyses as well as the analytical issues and data...

  12. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry : key technology in metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, Maud Marijtje

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics involves the unbiased quantitative and qualitative analysis of the complete set of metabolites present in cells, body fluids and tissues. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is very suitable for metabolomics analysis, as it combines high separation power with

  13. Metabolomics for Undergraduates: Identification and Pathway Assignment of Mitochondrial Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ana Patrícia; Serralheiro, Maria Luisa; Ferreira, António E. N.; Freire, Ana Ponces; Cordeiro, Carlos; Silva, Marta Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is a key discipline in systems biology, together with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics. In this omics cascade, the metabolome represents the biochemical products that arise from cellular processes and is often regarded as the final response of a biological system to environmental or genetic changes. The overall screening…

  14. Environmental metabolomics: a SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marion G

    2007-02-01

    Metabolomic approaches have the potential to make an exceptional contribution to understanding how chemicals and other environmental stressors can affect both human and environmental health. However, the application of metabolomics to environmental exposures, although getting underway, has not yet been extensively explored. This review will use a SWOT analysis model to discuss some of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that are apparent to an investigator venturing into this relatively new field. SWOT has been used extensively in business settings to uncover new outlooks and identify problems that would impede progress. The field of environmental metabolomics provides great opportunities for discovery, and this is recognized by a high level of interest in potential applications. However, understanding the biological consequence of environmental exposures can be confounded by inter- and intra-individual differences. Metabolomic profiles can yield a plethora of data, the interpretation of which is complex and still being evaluated and researched. The development of the field will depend on the availability of technologies for data handling and that permit ready access metabolomic databases. Understanding the relevance of metabolomic endpoints to organism health vs adaptation vs variation is an important step in understanding what constitutes a substantive environmental threat. Metabolomic applications in reproductive research are discussed. Overall, the development of a comprehensive mechanistic-based interpretation of metabolomic changes offers the possibility of providing information that will significantly contribute to the protection of human health and the environment.

  15. Comparative proteomic and metabolomic analysis reveal the antiosteoporotic molecular mechanism of icariin from Epimedium brevicornu maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liming; Jiang, Yiping; Han, Ting; Zhang, Naidan; Qin, Luping; Xin, Hailiang; Zhang, Qiaoyan

    2016-11-04

    Icariin, a principal flavonoid glycoside of Epimedium brevicornu Maxim, has been widely proved to possess antiosteoporotic activity with promoting bone formation and decreasing bone resorption. However, the involving mechanisms remain unclear. To clear a global insight of signal pathways involved in anti-osteoporotic mechanism of icariin at proteins and metabolites level by integrating the proteomics and NMR metabonomics, in a systems biology approach. Mice were divided into sham, OVX model and icariin-treated OVX group, after 90 days treatment, difference gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF proteomics analysis on bone femur and serum metabolomics were carried out for monitor intracellular processes and elucidate anti-osteoporotic mechanism of icariin. Osteoblast and osteoclast were applied to evaluate the potential signal pathways. Twenty three proteins in bone femur, and 8 metabolites in serum, were significantly altered and identified, involving in bone remodeling, energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, lipid metabolism, MAPK signaling, Ca 2+ signaling et, al. Furthermore, animal experiment show icariin could enhance the BMD and BMC, decrease CTX-I level in ovariectomized mice. The mitochondrial membrane potential and the intracellular ATP levels were increased significantly, and the cytoskeleton were improved in icariin-treatment osteoblast and osteoclast. Icariin also increased mRNA expression of Runx2 and osterix of OB, decreased CTR and CAII mRNA expression and protein expression of P38 and JNK. However, icariin did not reveal any inhibition of the collagenolytic activity of cathepsin K, mRNA expression of MMP-9 and protein expression of ERK in osteoclast. we consider icariin as multi-targeting compounds for treating with osteoporosis, involve initiating osteoblastogenesis, inhibiting adipogenesis, and preventing osteoclast differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Integration of datasets from different analytical techniques to assess the impact of nutrition on human metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eVernocchi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria colonizing the human intestinal tract exhibit a high phylogenetic diversity that reflects their immense metabolic potentials. The catalytic activity of gut microbes has an important impact on gastrointestinal (GI functions and host health. The microbial conversion of carbohydrates and other food components leads to the formation of a large number of compounds that affect the host metabolome and have beneficial or adverse effects on human health. Meabolomics is a metabolic-biology system approach focused on the metabolic responses understanding of living systems to physio-pathological stimuli by using multivariate statistical data on human body fluids obtained by different instrumental techniques. A metabolomic approach based on an analytical platform could be able to separate, detect, characterize and quantify a wide range of metabolites and its metabolic pathways. This approach has been recently applied to study the metabolic changes triggered in the gut microbiota by specific diet components and diet variations, specific diseases, probiotic and synbiotic food intake.This review describes the metabolomic data obtained by analyzing human fluids by using different techniques and particularly Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Solid-phase Micro Extraction (GC-MS/SPME, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR Spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR Spectroscopy. This instrumental approach have a good potential in the identification and detection of specific food intake and diseases biomarkers.

  17. NMR Techniques in Metabolomic Studies: A Quick Overview on Examples of Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Joanna; Doskocz, Marek; Jodłowska, Elżbieta; Zacharzewska, Anna; Łakomiec, Joanna; Czaja, Kornelia; Kujawski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics is a rapidly developing branch of science that concentrates on identifying biologically active molecules with potential biomarker properties. To define the best biomarkers for diseases, metabolomics uses both models (in vitro, animals) and human, as well as, various techniques such as mass spectroscopy, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, infrared and UV-VIS spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. The last one takes advantage of the magnetic properties of certain nuclei, such as 1 H, 13 C, 31 P, 19 F, especially their ability to absorb and emit energy, what is crucial for analyzing samples. Among many spectroscopic NMR techniques not only one-dimensional (1D) techniques are known, but for many years two-dimensional (2D, for example, COSY, DOSY, JRES, HETCORE, HMQS), three-dimensional (3D, DART-MS, HRMAS, HSQC, HMBC) and solid-state NMR have been used. In this paper, authors taking apart fundamental division of nuclear magnetic resonance techniques intend to shown their wide application in metabolomic studies, especially in identifying biomarkers.

  18. A review of blood sample handling and pre-processing for metabolomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Vinicius Veri; Barbas, Coral; Dudzik, Danuta

    2017-09-01

    Metabolomics has been found to be applicable to a wide range of clinical studies, bringing a new era for improving clinical diagnostics, early disease detection, therapy prediction and treatment efficiency monitoring. A major challenge in metabolomics, particularly untargeted studies, is the extremely diverse and complex nature of biological specimens. Despite great advances in the field there still exist fundamental needs for considering pre-analytical variability that can introduce bias to the subsequent analytical process and decrease the reliability of the results and moreover confound final research outcomes. Many researchers are mainly focused on the instrumental aspects of the biomarker discovery process, and sample related variables sometimes seem to be overlooked. To bridge the gap, critical information and standardized protocols regarding experimental design and sample handling and pre-processing are highly desired. Characterization of a range variation among sample collection methods is necessary to prevent results misinterpretation and to ensure that observed differences are not due to an experimental bias caused by inconsistencies in sample processing. Herein, a systematic discussion of pre-analytical variables affecting metabolomics studies based on blood derived samples is performed. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations concerning experimental design, collection, pre-processing procedures and storage conditions as a practical review that can guide and serve for the standardization of protocols and reduction of undesirable variation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Metabolome and proteome profiling of complex I deficiency induced by rotenone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielisch, Ina; Meierhofer, David

    2015-01-02

    Complex I (CI; NADH dehydrogenase) deficiency causes mitochondrial diseases, including Leigh syndrome. A variety of clinical symptoms of CI deficiency are known, including neurodegeneration. Here, we report an integrative study combining liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based metabolome and proteome profiling in CI deficient HeLa cells. We report a rapid LC-MS-based method for the relative quantification of targeted metabolome profiling with an additional layer of confidence by applying multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) ion ratios for further identity confirmation and robustness. The proteome was analyzed by label-free quantification (LFQ). More than 6000 protein groups were identified. Pathway and network analyses revealed that the respiratory chain was highly deregulated, with metabolites such as FMN, FAD, NAD(+), and ADP, direct players of the OXPHOS system, and metabolites of the TCA cycle decreased up to 100-fold. Synthesis of functional iron-sulfur clusters, which are of central importance for the electron transfer chain, and degradation products like bilirubin were also significantly reduced. Glutathione metabolism on the pathway level, as well as individual metabolite components such as NADPH, glutathione (GSH), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), was downregulated. Overall, metabolome and proteome profiles in CI deficient cells correlated well, supporting our integrated approach.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of NAD metabolome in aged mice tissue using liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaku, Keisuke; Okabe, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Takashi

    2018-06-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is a major co-factor that mediates multiple biological processes including redox reaction and gene expression. Recently, NAD metabolism has received considerable attention because administration of NAD precursors exhibited beneficial effects against aging-related metabolic disorders in animals. Although numerous studies have reported that NAD levels decline with aging in multiple animal tissues, the pathway and kinetics of NAD metabolism in aged organs are not completely understood. To determine the NAD metabolism upon aging, we developed targeted metabolomics based on an LC/MS/MS system. Our method is simple and applicable to crude biological samples, including culture cells and animal tissues. Unlike a conventional enzymatic cycling assay, our approach can determine NAD and NADH (reduced form of NAD) by performing a single sample preparation. Further, we validated our method using biological samples and investigated the alteration of the NAD metabolome during aging. Consistent with previous reports, the NAD levels in the liver and skeletal muscle decreased with aging. Further, we detected a significant increase in nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside in the kidney upon aging. The LC/MS/MS-based NAD metabolomics that we have developed is extensively applicable to biomedical studies, and the results will present innovative ideas for the aging studies, especially for that of NAD metabolism. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Short overview on metabolomics approach to study pathophysiology of oxidative stress in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Andrisic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Association of oxidative stress with carcinogenesis is well known, but not understood well, as is pathophysiology of oxidative stress generated during different types of anti-cancer treatments. Moreover, recent findings indicate that cancer associated lipid peroxidation might eventually help defending adjacent nonmalignant cells from cancer invasion. Therefore, untargeted metabolomics studies designed for advanced translational and clinical studies are needed to understand the existing paradoxes in oncology, including those related to controversial usage of antioxidants aiming to prevent or treat cancer. In this short review we have tried to put emphasis on the importance of pathophysiology of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in cancer development in relation to metabolic adaptation of particular types of cancer allowing us to conclude that adaptation to oxidative stress is one of the main driving forces of cancer pathophysiology. With the help of metabolomics many novel findings are being achieved thus encouraging further scientific breakthroughs. Combined with targeted qualitative and quantitative methods, especially immunochemistry, further research might reveal bio-signatures of individual patients and respective malignant diseases, leading to individualized treatment approach, according to the concepts of modern integrative medicine. Keywords: Carcinogenesis, Cancer, Oxidative stress, Lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxynonenal, Glutathione, Metabolomics, Immunochemistry, Biomarkers, Omics science

  2. Metabolomics reveals variation and correlation among different tissues of olive (Olea europaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Guodong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolites in olives are associated with nutritional value and physiological properties. However, comprehensive information regarding the olive metabolome is limited. In this study, we identified 226 metabolites from three different tissues of olive using a non-targeted metabolomic profiling approach, of which 76 named metabolites were confirmed. Further statistical analysis revealed that these 76 metabolites covered different types of primary metabolism and some of the secondary metabolism pathways. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA statistical assay was performed to calculate the variations within the detected metabolites, and levels of 65 metabolites were differentially expressed in different samples. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA dendrograms showed variations among different tissues that were similar to the metabolite profiles observed in new leaves and fruit. Additionally, 5776 metabolite-metabolite correlations were detected by a Pearson correlation coefficient approach. Screening of the calculated correlations revealed 3136, 3025, and 5184 were determined to metabolites and had significant correlations in three different combinations, respectively. This work provides the first comprehensive metabolomic of olive, which will provide new insights into understanding the olive metabolism, and potentially help advance studies in olive metabolic engineering.

  3. Tools for the functional interpretation of metabolomic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagoyen, Monica; Pazos, Florencio

    2013-11-01

    The so-called 'omics' approaches used in modern biology aim at massively characterizing the molecular repertories of living systems at different levels. Metabolomics is one of the last additions to the 'omics' family and it deals with the characterization of the set of metabolites in a given biological system. As metabolomic techniques become more massive and allow characterizing larger sets of metabolites, automatic methods for analyzing these sets in order to obtain meaningful biological information are required. Only recently the first tools specifically designed for this task in metabolomics appeared. They are based on approaches previously used in transcriptomics and other 'omics', such as annotation enrichment analysis. These, together with generic tools for metabolic analysis and visualization not specifically designed for metabolomics will for sure be in the toolbox of the researches doing metabolomic experiments in the near future.

  4. Metabolomics in Sepsis and Its Impact on Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelatos, Nikolaos; Bauer, Pia; Reumann, Matthias; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Lehrach, Hans; Brand, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis, with its often devastating consequences for patients and their families, remains a major public health concern that poses an increasing financial burden. Early resuscitation together with the elucidation of the biological pathways and pathophysiological mechanisms with the use of "-omics" technologies have started changing the clinical and research landscape in sepsis. Metabolomics (i.e., the study of the metabolome), an "-omics" technology further down in the "-omics" cascade between the genome and the phenome, could be particularly fruitful in sepsis research with the potential to alter the clinical practice. Apart from its benefit for the individual patient, metabolomics has an impact on public health that extends beyond its applications in medicine. In this review, we present recent developments in metabolomics research in sepsis, with a focus on pneumonia, and we discuss the impact of metabolomics on public health, with a focus on free/libre open source software. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. New tools and resources in metabolomics: 2016-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Biswapriya B

    2018-04-01

    Rapid advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based platforms for metabolomics have led to an upsurge of data every single year. Newer high-throughput platforms, hyphenated technologies, miniaturization, and tool kits in data acquisition efforts in metabolomics have led to additional challenges in metabolomics data pre-processing, analysis, interpretation, and integration. Thanks to the informatics, statistics, and computational community, new resources continue to develop for metabolomics researchers. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the metabolomics tools, software, and databases that were developed or improved during 2016-2017, thus, enabling readers, developers, and researchers access to a succinct but thorough list of resources for further improvisation, implementation, and application in due course of time. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Compliance with minimum information guidelines in public metabolomics repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Rachel A; Salek, Reza; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2017-09-26

    The Metabolomics Standards Initiative (MSI) guidelines were first published in 2007. These guidelines provided reporting standards for all stages of metabolomics analysis: experimental design, biological context, chemical analysis and data processing. Since 2012, a series of public metabolomics databases and repositories, which accept the deposition of metabolomic datasets, have arisen. In this study, the compliance of 399 public data sets, from four major metabolomics data repositories, to the biological context MSI reporting standards was evaluated. None of the reporting standards were complied with in every publicly available study, although adherence rates varied greatly, from 0 to 97%. The plant minimum reporting standards were the most complied with and the microbial and in vitro were the least. Our results indicate the need for reassessment and revision of the existing MSI reporting standards.

  7. Multi-platform metabolomics assays for human lung lavage fluids in an air pollution exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowiec, Izabella; Karimpour, Masoumeh; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Wu, Junfang; Unosson, Jon; Bosson, Jenny A; Blomberg, Anders; Pourazar, Jamshid; Sandström, Thomas; Behndig, Annelie F; Trygg, Johan; Nording, Malin L

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomics protocols are used to comprehensively characterize the metabolite content of biological samples by exploiting cutting-edge analytical platforms, such as gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) assays, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. We have developed novel sample preparation procedures combined with GC-MS, LC-MS, and NMR metabolomics profiling for analyzing bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 15 healthy volunteers following exposure to biodiesel exhaust and filtered air. Our aim was to investigate the responsiveness of metabolite profiles in the human lung to air pollution exposure derived from combustion of biofuels, such as rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel, which are increasingly being promoted as alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Our multi-platform approach enabled us to detect the greatest number of unique metabolites yet reported in BW and BAL fluid (82 in total). All of the metabolomics assays indicated that the metabolite profiles of the BW and BAL fluids differed appreciably, with 46 metabolites showing significantly different levels in the corresponding lung compartments. Furthermore, the GC-MS assay revealed an effect of biodiesel exhaust exposure on the levels of 1-monostearylglycerol, sucrose, inosine, nonanoic acid, and ethanolamine (in BAL) and pentadecanoic acid (in BW), whereas the LC-MS assay indicated a shift in the levels of niacinamide (in BAL). The NMR assay only identified lactic acid (in BW) as being responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Our findings demonstrate that the proposed multi-platform approach is useful for wide metabolomics screening of BW and BAL fluids and can facilitate elucidation of metabolites responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract illustrating the study workflow. NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, LC-TOFMS Liquid chromatography-Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry, GC Gas

  8. Metabolomic Elucidation of the Effects of Curcumin on Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Kyong Ahn

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation and joint disability. Curcumin is known to be effective in ameliorating joint inflammation in RA. To obtain new insights into the effect of curcumin on primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS, N = 3, which are key effector cells in RA, we employed gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS-based metabolomics. Metabolomic profiling of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-stimulated and curcumin-treated FLS was performed using GC/TOF-MS in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 119 metabolites were identified. Metabolomic analysis revealed that metabolite profiles were clearly distinct between TNF-α-stimulated vs. the control group (not stimulated by TNF-α or curcumin. Treatment of FLS with curcumin showed that the metabolic perturbation by TNF-α could be reversed to that of the control group to a considerable extent. Curcumin-treated FLS had higher restoration of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by the prominent metabolic restoration of intermediates of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, compared with that observed in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. In particular, the abundance of glycine, citrulline, arachidonic acid, and saturated fatty acids in TNF-α-stimulated FLS was restored to the control level after treatment with curcumin, suggesting that the effect of curcumin on preventing joint inflammation may be elucidated with the levels of these metabolites. Our results suggest that GC/TOF-MS-based metabolomic investigation using FLS has the potential for discovering the mechanism of action of curcumin and new targets for therapeutic drugs in RA.

  9. Metabolomic Elucidation of the Effects of Curcumin on Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Kim, Sooah; Hwang, Jiwon; Kim, Jungyeon; Lee, You Sun; Koh, Eun-Mi; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation and joint disability. Curcumin is known to be effective in ameliorating joint inflammation in RA. To obtain new insights into the effect of curcumin on primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS, N = 3), which are key effector cells in RA, we employed gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS)-based metabolomics. Metabolomic profiling of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated and curcumin-treated FLS was performed using GC/TOF-MS in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 119 metabolites were identified. Metabolomic analysis revealed that metabolite profiles were clearly distinct between TNF-α-stimulated vs. the control group (not stimulated by TNF-α or curcumin). Treatment of FLS with curcumin showed that the metabolic perturbation by TNF-α could be reversed to that of the control group to a considerable extent. Curcumin-treated FLS had higher restoration of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by the prominent metabolic restoration of intermediates of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, compared with that observed in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. In particular, the abundance of glycine, citrulline, arachidonic acid, and saturated fatty acids in TNF-α-stimulated FLS was restored to the control level after treatment with curcumin, suggesting that the effect of curcumin on preventing joint inflammation may be elucidated with the levels of these metabolites. Our results suggest that GC/TOF-MS-based metabolomic investigation using FLS has the potential for discovering the mechanism of action of curcumin and new targets for therapeutic drugs in RA.

  10. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quantitative, reproducible, untargeted and unbiased method that requires no or minimal sample preparation, and is one of the leading analytical tools for metabonomics research [1-3]. The easy quantification and the no need of prior knowledge about compounds present in a sample associated with NMR are advantageous over other techniques [1,4]. 1H NMR is especially attractive because protons are present in virtually all metabolites and its NMR sensitivity is high, enabling the simultaneous identification and monitoring of a wide range of low molecular weight metabolites.

  11. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  12. Metabolic pathways of lung inflammation revealed by high-resolution metabolomics (HRM) of H1N1 influenza virus infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Joshua D; Hu, Xin; Ko, Eun-Ju; Park, Soojin; Lee, Young-Tae; Orr, Michael; Fernandes, Jolyn; Uppal, Karan; Kang, Sang-Moo; Jones, Dean P; Go, Young-Mi

    2016-11-01

    Influenza is a significant health concern worldwide. Viral infection induces local and systemic activation of the immune system causing attendant changes in metabolism. High-resolution metabolomics (HRM) uses advanced mass spectrometry and computational methods to measure thousands of metabolites inclusive of most metabolic pathways. We used HRM to identify metabolic pathways and clusters of association related to inflammatory cytokines in lungs of mice with H1N1 influenza virus infection. Infected mice showed progressive weight loss, decreased lung function, and severe lung inflammation with elevated cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon (IFN)-γ] and increased oxidative stress via cysteine oxidation. HRM showed prominent effects of influenza virus infection on tryptophan and other amino acids, and widespread effects on pathways including purines, pyrimidines, fatty acids, and glycerophospholipids. A metabolome-wide association study (MWAS) of the aforementioned inflammatory cytokines was used to determine the relationship of metabolic responses to inflammation during infection. This cytokine-MWAS (cMWAS) showed that metabolic associations consisted of distinct and shared clusters of 396 metabolites highly correlated with inflammatory cytokines. Strong negative associations of selected glycosphingolipid, linoleate, and tryptophan metabolites with IFN-γ contrasted strong positive associations of glycosphingolipid and bile acid metabolites with IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-10. Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 had strong positive associations with vitamin D, purine, and vitamin E metabolism. The detailed metabolic interactions with cytokines indicate that targeted metabolic interventions may be useful during life-threatening crises related to severe acute infection and inflammation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Relationships between drought, heat and air humidity responses revealed by transcriptome-metabolome co-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgii, Elisabeth; Jin, Ming; Zhao, Jin; Kanawati, Basem; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Albert, Andreas; Winkler, J Barbro; Schäffner, Anton R

    2017-07-10

    Elevated temperature and reduced water availability are frequently linked abiotic stresses that may provoke distinct as well as interacting molecular responses. Based on non-targeted metabolomic and transcriptomic measurements from Arabidopsis rosettes, this study aims at a systematic elucidation of relevant components in different drought and heat scenarios as well as relationships between molecular players of stress response. In combined drought-heat stress, the majority of single stress responses are maintained. However, interaction effects between drought and heat can be discovered as well; these relate to protein folding, flavonoid biosynthesis and growth inhibition, which are enhanced, reduced or specifically induced in combined stress, respectively. Heat stress experiments with and without supplementation of air humidity for maintenance of vapor pressure deficit suggest that decreased relative air humidity due to elevated temperature is an important component of heat stress, specifically being responsible for hormone-related responses to water deprivation. Remarkably, this "dry air effect" is the primary trigger of the metabolomic response to heat. In contrast, the transcriptomic response has a substantial temperature component exceeding the dry air component and including up-regulation of many transcription factors and protein folding-related genes. Data level integration independent of prior knowledge on pathways and condition labels reveals shared drought and heat responses between transcriptome and metabolome, biomarker candidates and co-regulation between genes and metabolic compounds, suggesting novel players in abiotic stress response pathways. Drought and heat stress interact both at transcript and at metabolite response level. A comprehensive, non-targeted view of this interaction as well as non-interacting processes is important to be taken into account when improving tolerance to abiotic stresses in breeding programs. Transcriptome and metabolome

  14. Changes in the Metabolome in Response to Low-Dose Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Used in Personal Care Products during Different Windows of Susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, Sander M.; Chen, Jia; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Manservisi, Fabiana; Sánchez-Guijo, Alberto; Wudy, Stefan A.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of ubiquitous exposure to environmental chemicals remain poorly defined. Non-targeted metabolomic profiling is an emerging method to identify biomarkers of the physiological response to such exposures. We investigated the effect of three commonly used ingredients in personal care

  15. The urinary metabolome in female mink (Mustela neovison) shows distinct changes in protein and lipid metabolism during the transition from diapause to implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The mink exhibit an obligatory diapause. The metabolic changes during the transition from diapause to implantation and established pregnancy are currently unknown. Objectives The study aimed to characterize changes in the urinary metabolome in mink during the period from mating...... to early gestation and to identify the metabolites involved. Methods Urine samples were collected from 56 female mink on March 24, April 8, and April 15, covering the period from mating to early pregnancy. The urine samples were subjected to non-targeted LC-MS metabolomics. Processed data were evaluated...

  16. Investigation of the effect of genotype and agronomic conditions on metabolomic profiles of selected strawberry cultivars with different sensitivity to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhatou, Ikram; González-Domínguez, Raúl; Fernández-Recamales, Ángeles

    2016-04-01

    Strawberry is one of the most economically important and widely cultivated fruit crops across the world, so that there is a growing need to develop new analytical methodologies for the authentication of variety and origin, as well as the assessment of agricultural and processing practices. In this work, an untargeted metabolomic strategy based on gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) combined with multivariate statistical techniques was used for the first time to characterize the primary metabolome of different strawberry cultivars and to study metabolite alterations in response to multiple agronomic conditions. For this purpose, we investigated three varieties of strawberries with different sensitivity to environmental stress (Camarosa, Festival and Palomar), cultivated in soilless systems using various electrical conductivities, types of coverage and substrates. Metabolomic analysis revealed significant alterations in primary metabolites between the three strawberry cultivars grown under different crop conditions, including sugars (fructose, glucose), organic acids (malic acid, citric acid) and amino acids (alanine, threonine, aspartic acid), among others. Therefore, it could be concluded that GC-MS based metabolomics is a suitable tool to differentiate strawberry cultivars and characterize metabolomic changes associated with environmental and agronomic conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Updates in metabolomics tools and resources: 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Biswapriya B; van der Hooft, Justin J J

    2016-01-01

    Data processing and interpretation represent the most challenging and time-consuming steps in high-throughput metabolomic experiments, regardless of the analytical platforms (MS or NMR spectroscopy based) used for data acquisition. Improved machinery in metabolomics generates increasingly complex datasets that create the need for more and better processing and analysis software and in silico approaches to understand the resulting data. However, a comprehensive source of information describing the utility of the most recently developed and released metabolomics resources--in the form of tools, software, and databases--is currently lacking. Thus, here we provide an overview of freely-available, and open-source, tools, algorithms, and frameworks to make both upcoming and established metabolomics researchers aware of the recent developments in an attempt to advance and facilitate data processing workflows in their metabolomics research. The major topics include tools and researches for data processing, data annotation, and data visualization in MS and NMR-based metabolomics. Most in this review described tools are dedicated to untargeted metabolomics workflows; however, some more specialist tools are described as well. All tools and resources described including their analytical and computational platform dependencies are summarized in an overview Table. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Challenges of metabolomics in human gut microbiota research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Kirill S; Maier, Tanja V; Walker, Alesia; Heinzmann, Silke S; Forcisi, Sara; Martinez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The review highlights the role of metabolomics in studying human gut microbial metabolism. Microbial communities in our gut exert a multitude of functions with huge impact on human health and disease. Within the meta-omics discipline, gut microbiome is studied by (meta)genomics, (meta)transcriptomics, (meta)proteomics and metabolomics. The goal of metabolomics research applied to fecal samples is to perform their metabolic profiling, to quantify compounds and classes of interest, to characterize small molecules produced by gut microbes. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are main technologies that are applied in fecal metabolomics. Metabolomics studies have been increasingly used in gut microbiota related research regarding health and disease with main focus on understanding inflammatory bowel diseases. The elucidated metabolites in this field are summarized in this review. We also addressed the main challenges of metabolomics in current and future gut microbiota research. The first challenge reflects the need of adequate analytical tools and pipelines, including sample handling, selection of appropriate equipment, and statistical evaluation to enable meaningful biological interpretation. The second challenge is related to the choice of the right animal model for studies on gut microbiota. We exemplified this using NMR spectroscopy for the investigation of cross-species comparison of fecal metabolite profiles. Finally, we present the problem of variability of human gut microbiota and metabolome that has important consequences on the concepts of personalized nutrition and medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Washio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  20. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  1. Knowns and unknowns in metabolomics identified by multidimensional NMR and hybrid MS/NMR methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingol, Kerem; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    Metabolomics continues to make rapid progress through the development of new and better methods and their applications to gain insight into the metabolism of a wide range of different biological systems from a systems biology perspective. Customization of NMR databases and search tools allows the faster and more accurate identification of known metabolites, whereas the identification of unknowns, without a need for extensive purification, requires new strategies to integrate NMR with mass spectrometry, cheminformatics, and computational methods. For some applications, the use of covalent and non-covalent attachments in the form of labeled tags or nanoparticles can significantly reduce the complexity of these tasks.

  2. ROMANCE: A new software tool to improve data robustness and feature identification in CE-MS metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ruiz, Víctor; Gagnebin, Yoric; Drouin, Nicolas; Codesido, Santiago; Rudaz, Serge; Schappler, Julie

    2018-05-01

    The use of capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS) in metabolomics remains an oddity compared to the widely adopted use of liquid chromatography. This technique is traditionally regarded as lacking the reproducibility to adequately identify metabolites by their migration times. The major reason is the variability of the velocity of the background electrolyte, mainly coming from shifts in the magnitude of the electroosmotic flow and from the suction caused by electrospray interfaces. The use of the effective electrophoretic mobility is one solution to overcome this issue as it is a characteristic feature of each compound. To date, such an approach has not been applied to metabolomics due to the complexity and size of CE-MS data obtained in such studies. In this paper, ROMANCE (RObust Metabolomic Analysis with Normalized CE) is introduced as a new software for CE-MS-based metabolomics. It allows the automated conversion of batches of CE-MS files with minimal user intervention. ROMANCE converts the x-axis of each MS file from the time into the effective mobility scale and the resulting files are already pseudo-aligned, present normalized peak areas and improved reproducibility, and can eventually follow existing metabolomic workflows. The software was developed in Scala, so it is multi-platform and computationally-efficient. It is available for download under a CC license. In this work, the versatility of ROMANCE was demonstrated by using data obtained in the same and in different laboratories, as well as its application to the analysis of human plasma samples. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Metabolomics, a promising approach to translational research in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Deidda

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we will provide a description of metabolomics in comparison with other, better known “omics” disciplines such as genomics and proteomics. In addition, we will review the current rationale for the implementation of metabolomics in cardiology, its basic methodology and the available data from human studies in this discipline. The topics covered will delineate the importance of being able to use the metabolomic information to understand the mechanisms of diseases from the perspective of systems biology, and as a non-invasive approach to the diagnosis, grading and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Introduction to metabolomics and its applications in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S Z; Begley, P; Mullard, G; Hollywood, K A; Bishop, P N

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is the study of endogenous and exogenous metabolites in biological systems, which aims to provide comparative semi-quantitative information about all metabolites in the system. Metabolomics is an emerging and potentially powerful tool in ophthalmology research. It is therefore important for health professionals and researchers involved in the speciality to understand the basic principles of metabolomics experiments. This article provides an overview of the experimental workflow and examples of its use in ophthalmology research from the study of disease metabolism and pathogenesis to identification of biomarkers. PMID:26987591

  5. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Katharina; Adamski, Jerzy; Gieger, Christian; Herder, Christian; Carstensen, Maren; Peters, Annette; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Roden, Michael; Strauch, Konstantin; Suhre, Karsten; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Prokisch, Holger; Theis, Fabian J.

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the ‘human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface’ (BMTI). Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease. PMID:26086077

  6. The Human Blood Metabolome-Transcriptome Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Bartel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems consist of multiple organizational levels all densely interacting with each other to ensure function and flexibility of the system. Simultaneous analysis of cross-sectional multi-omics data from large population studies is a powerful tool to comprehensively characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms on a physiological scale. In this study, we systematically analyzed the relationship between fasting serum metabolomics and whole blood transcriptomics data from 712 individuals of the German KORA F4 cohort. Correlation-based analysis identified 1,109 significant associations between 522 transcripts and 114 metabolites summarized in an integrated network, the 'human blood metabolome-transcriptome interface' (BMTI. Bidirectional causality analysis using Mendelian randomization did not yield any statistically significant causal associations between transcripts and metabolites. A knowledge-based interpretation and integration with a genome-scale human metabolic reconstruction revealed systematic signatures of signaling, transport and metabolic processes, i.e. metabolic reactions mainly belonging to lipid, energy and amino acid metabolism. Moreover, the construction of a network based on functional categories illustrated the cross-talk between the biological layers at a pathway level. Using a transcription factor binding site enrichment analysis, this pathway cross-talk was further confirmed at a regulatory level. Finally, we demonstrated how the constructed networks can be used to gain novel insights into molecular mechanisms associated to intermediate clinical traits. Overall, our results demonstrate the utility of a multi-omics integrative approach to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying both normal physiology and disease.

  7. The co-feature ratio, a novel method for the measurement of chromatographic and signal selectivity in LC-MS-based metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmsjö, Albert; Haglöf, Jakob; Engskog, Mikael K.R.; Nestor, Marika; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of analytical procedures, especially in regards to measuring chromatographic and signal selectivity, is highly challenging in untargeted metabolomics. The aim of this study was to suggest a new straightforward approach for a systematic examination of chromatographic and signal selectivity in LC-MS-based metabolomics. By calculating the ratio between each feature and its co-eluting features (the co-features), a measurement of the chromatographic selectivity (i.e. extent of co-elution) as well as the signal selectivity (e.g. amount of adduct formation) of each feature could be acquired, the co-feature ratio. This approach was used to examine possible differences in chromatographic and signal selectivity present in samples exposed to three different sample preparation procedures. The capability of the co-feature ratio was evaluated both in a classical targeted setting using isotope labelled standards as well as without standards in an untargeted setting. For the targeted analysis, several metabolites showed a skewed quantitative signal due to poor chromatographic selectivity and/or poor signal selectivity. Moreover, evaluation of the untargeted approach through multivariate analysis of the co-feature ratios demonstrated the possibility to screen for metabolites displaying poor chromatographic and/or signal selectivity characteristics. We conclude that the co-feature ratio can be a useful tool in the development and evaluation of analytical procedures in LC-MS-based metabolomics investigations. Increased selectivity through proper choice of analytical procedures may decrease the false positive and false negative discovery rate and thereby increase the validity of any metabolomic investigation. - Highlights: • The co-feature ratio (CFR) is introduced. • CFR measures chromatographic and signal selectivity of a feature. • CFR can be used for evaluating experimental procedures in metabolomics. • CFR can aid in locating features with poor selectivity.

  8. An overview of plant volatile metabolomics, sample treatment and reporting considerations with emphasis on mechanical damage and biological control of weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, John J; Smith, Lincoln; Baig, Nausheena

    2014-01-01

    The technology for the collection and analysis of plant-emitted volatiles for understanding chemical cues of plant-plant, plant-insect or plant-microbe interactions has increased over the years. Consequently, the in situ collection, analysis and identification of volatiles are considered integral to elucidation of complex plant communications. Due to the complexity and range of emissions the conditions for consistent emission of volatiles are difficult to standardise. To discuss: evaluation of emitted volatile metabolites as a means of screening potential target- and non-target weeds/plants for insect biological control agents; plant volatile metabolomics to analyse resultant data; importance of considering volatiles from damaged plants; and use of a database for reporting experimental conditions and results. Recent literature relating to plant volatiles and plant volatile metabolomics are summarised to provide a basic understanding of how metabolomics can be applied to the study of plant volatiles. An overview of plant secondary metabolites, plant volatile metabolomics, analysis of plant volatile metabolomics data and the subsequent input into a database, the roles of plant volatiles, volatile emission as a function of treatment, and the application of plant volatile metabolomics to biological control of invasive weeds. It is recommended that in addition to a non-damaged treatment, plants be damaged prior to collecting volatiles to provide the greatest diversity of odours. For the model system provided, optimal volatile emission occurred when the leaf was punctured with a needle. Results stored in a database should include basic environmental conditions or treatments. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The co-feature ratio, a novel method for the measurement of chromatographic and signal selectivity in LC-MS-based metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmsjö, Albert, E-mail: Albert.Elmsjo@farmkemi.uu.se [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Uppsala University (Sweden); Haglöf, Jakob; Engskog, Mikael K.R. [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Uppsala University (Sweden); Nestor, Marika [Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University (Sweden); Arvidsson, Torbjörn [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Uppsala University (Sweden); Medical Product Agency, Uppsala (Sweden); Pettersson, Curt [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Uppsala University (Sweden)

    2017-03-01

    Evaluation of analytical procedures, especially in regards to measuring chromatographic and signal selectivity, is highly challenging in untargeted metabolomics. The aim of this study was to suggest a new straightforward approach for a systematic examination of chromatographic and signal selectivity in LC-MS-based metabolomics. By calculating the ratio between each feature and its co-eluting features (the co-features), a measurement of the chromatographic selectivity (i.e. extent of co-elution) as well as the signal selectivity (e.g. amount of adduct formation) of each feature could be acquired, the co-feature ratio. This approach was used to examine possible differences in chromatographic and signal selectivity present in samples exposed to three different sample preparation procedures. The capability of the co-feature ratio was evaluated both in a classical targeted setting using isotope labelled standards as well as without standards in an untargeted setting. For the targeted analysis, several metabolites showed a skewed quantitative signal due to poor chromatographic selectivity and/or poor signal selectivity. Moreover, evaluation of the untargeted approach through multivariate analysis of the co-feature ratios demonstrated the possibility to screen for metabolites displaying poor chromatographic and/or signal selectivity characteristics. We conclude that the co-feature ratio can be a useful tool in the development and evaluation of analytical procedures in LC-MS-based metabolomics investigations. Increased selectivity through proper choice of analytical procedures may decrease the false positive and false negative discovery rate and thereby increase the validity of any metabolomic investigation. - Highlights: • The co-feature ratio (CFR) is introduced. • CFR measures chromatographic and signal selectivity of a feature. • CFR can be used for evaluating experimental procedures in metabolomics. • CFR can aid in locating features with poor selectivity.

  10. Evaluation of Classifier Performance for Multiclass Phenotype Discrimination in Untargeted Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Patrick J; DeFilippis, Andrew P; Rai, Shesh N

    2017-06-21

    Statistical classification is a critical component of utilizing metabolomics data for examining the molecular determinants of phenotypes. Despite this, a comprehensive and rigorous evaluation of the accuracy of classification techniques for phenotype discrimination given metabolomics data has not been conducted. We conducted such an evaluation using both simulated and real metabolomics datasets, comparing Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), Sparse PLS-DA, Random Forests, Support Vector Machines (SVM), Artificial Neural Network, k -Nearest Neighbors ( k -NN), and Naïve Bayes classification techniques for discrimination. We evaluated the techniques on simulated data generated to mimic global untargeted metabolomics data by incorporating realistic block-wise correlation and partial correlation structures for mimicking the correlations and metabolite clustering generated by biological processes. Over the simulation studies, covariance structures, means, and effect sizes were stochastically varied to provide consistent estimates of classifier performance over a wide range of possible scenarios. The effects of the presence of non-normal error distributions, the introduction of biological and technical outliers, unbalanced phenotype allocation, missing values due to abundances below a limit of detection, and the effect of prior-significance filtering (dimension reduction) were evaluated via simulation. In each simulation, classifier parameters, such as the number of hidden nodes in a Neural Network, were optimized by cross-validation to minimize the probability of detecting spurious results due to poorly tuned classifiers. Classifier performance was then evaluated using real metabolomics datasets of varying sample medium, sample size, and experimental design. We report that in the most realistic simulation studies that incorporated non-normal error distributions, unbalanced phenotype allocation, outliers, missing values, and dimension reduction

  11. A genome-wide metabolic QTL analysis in Europeans implicates two loci shaped by recent positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Nicholson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a metabolite quantitative trait locus (mQTL study of the (1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H NMR metabolome in humans, building on recent targeted knowledge of genetic drivers of metabolic regulation. Urine and plasma samples were collected from two cohorts of individuals of European descent, with one cohort comprised of female twins donating samples longitudinally. Sample metabolite concentrations were quantified by (1H NMR and tested for association with genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Four metabolites' concentrations exhibited significant, replicable association with SNP variation (8.6×10(-11targeted mQTL study of metabolites in serum using the targeted-metabolomics Biocrates platform. By re-analysing our plasma samples using the Biocrates platform, we replicated the mQTL findings of the previous study and discovered a previously uncharacterized yet substantial familial component of variation in metabolite levels in addition to the heritability contribution from

  12. Environmental metabolomics with data science for investigating ecosystem homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Jun; Ito, Kengo; Date, Yasuhiro

    2018-02-01

    A natural ecosystem can be viewed as the interconnections between complex metabolic reactions and environments. Humans, a part of these ecosystems, and their activities strongly affect the environments. To account for human effects within ecosystems, understanding what benefits humans receive by facilitating the maintenance of environmental homeostasis is important. This review describes recent applications of several NMR approaches to the evaluation of environmental homeostasis by metabolic profiling and data science. The basic NMR strategy used to evaluate homeostasis using big data collection is similar to that used in human health studies. Sophisticated metabolomic approaches (metabolic profiling) are widely reported in the literature. Further challenges include the analysis of complex macromolecular structures, and of the compositions and interactions of plant biomass, soil humic substances, and aqueous particulate organic matter. To support the study of these topics, we also discuss sample preparation techniques and solid-state NMR approaches. Because NMR approaches can produce a number of data with high reproducibility and inter-institution compatibility, further analysis of such data using machine learning approaches is often worthwhile. We also describe methods for data pretreatment in solid-state NMR and for environmental feature extraction from heterogeneously-measured spectroscopic data by machine learning approaches. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Metabolomics of the tumor microenvironment in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Tiziani

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is emerging as an important therapeutic target. Most studies, however, are focused on the protein components, and relatively little is known of how the microenvironmental metabolome might influence tumor survival. In this study, we examined the metabolic profiles of paired bone marrow (BM and peripheral blood (PB samples from 10 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. BM and PB samples from the same patient were collected at the time of diagnosis and after 29 days of induction therapy, at which point all patients were in remission. We employed two analytical platforms, high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to identify and quantify 102 metabolites in the BM and PB. Standard ALL therapy, which includes l-asparaginase, completely removed circulating asparagine, but not glutamine. Statistical analyses of metabolite correlations and network reconstructions showed that the untreated BM microenvironment was characterized by a significant network-level signature: a cluster of highly correlated lipids and metabolites involved in lipid metabolism (p<0.006. In contrast, the strongest correlations in the BM upon remission were observed among amino acid metabolites and derivatives (p<9.2 × 10(-10. This study provides evidence that metabolic characterization of the cancer niche could generate new hypotheses for the development of cancer therapies.

  14. Linking diet to acne metabolomics, inflammation, and comedogenesis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnik BC

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bodo C Melnik Department of Dermatology, Environmental Medicine and Health Theory, University of Osnabrück, Germany Abstract: Acne vulgaris, an epidemic inflammatory skin disease of adolescence, is closely related to Western diet. Three major food classes that promote acne are: 1 hyperglycemic carbohydrates, 2 milk and dairy products, 3 saturated fats including trans-fats and deficient ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. Diet-induced insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1-signaling is superimposed on elevated IGF-1 levels during puberty, thereby unmasking the impact of aberrant nutrigenomics on sebaceous gland homeostasis. Western diet provides abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs, glutamine, and palmitic acid. Insulin and IGF-1 suppress the activity of the metabolic transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1. Insulin, IGF-1, BCAAs, glutamine, and palmitate activate the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, the key regulator of anabolism and lipogenesis. FoxO1 is a negative coregulator of androgen receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ, liver X receptor-α, and sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c, crucial transcription factors of sebaceous lipogenesis. mTORC1 stimulates the expression of PPARγ and SREBP-1c, promoting sebum production. SREBP-1c upregulates stearoyl-CoA- and Δ6-desaturase, enhancing the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids in sebum triglycerides. Diet-mediated aberrations in sebum quantity (hyperseborrhea and composition (dysseborrhea promote Propionibacterium acnes overgrowth and biofilm formation with overexpression of the virulence factor triglyceride lipase increasing follicular levels of free palmitate and oleate. Free palmitate functions as a “danger signal,” stimulating toll-like receptor-2-mediated inflammasome activation with interleukin-1β release, Th17 differentiation, and interleukin-17-mediated keratinocyte

  15. Microbial metabolomics with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, M.M.; Muilwijk, B.; Werf, M.J. van der; Hankemeier, T.

    2006-01-01

    An analytical method was set up suitable for the analysis of microbial metabolomes, consisting of an oximation and silylation derivatization reaction and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Microbial matrixes contain many compounds that potentially interfere with

  16. Impact of Intestinal Microbiota on Intestinal Luminal Metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kibe, Ryoko; Ooga, Takushi; Aiba, Yuji; Kurihara, Shin; Sawaki, Emiko; Koga, Yasuhiro; Benno, Yoshimi

    2012-01-01

    Low–molecular-weight metabolites produced by intestinal microbiota play a direct role in health and disease. In this study, we analyzed the colonic luminal metabolome using capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry with time-of-flight (CE-TOFMS) —a novel technique for analyzing and differentially displaying metabolic profiles— in order to clarify the metabolite profiles in the intestinal lumen. CE-TOFMS identified 179 metabolites from the colonic luminal metabolome and 48 metabolites were present in significantly higher concentrations and/or incidence in the germ-free (GF) mice than in the Ex-GF mice (p metabolome and a comprehensive understanding of intestinal luminal metabolome is critical for clarifying host-intestinal bacterial interactions. PMID:22724057

  17. Sparse Mbplsr for Metabolomics Data and Biomarker Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karaman, İbrahim

    2014-01-01

    the link between high throughput metabolomics data generated on different analytical platforms, discover important metabolites deriving from the digestion processes in the gut, and automate metabolic pathway discovery from mass spectrometry. PLS (partial least squares) based chemometric methods were...

  18. International NMR-based Environmental Metabolomics Intercomparison Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several fundamental requirements must be met so that NMR-based metabolomics and the related technique of metabonomics can be formally adopted into environmental monitoring and chemical risk assessment. Here we report an intercomparison exercise which has evaluated the effectivene...

  19. Spectral Relative Standard Deviation: A Practical Benchmark in Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolomics datasets, by definition, comprise of measurements of large numbers of metabolites. Both technical (analytical) and biological factors will induce variation within these measurements that is not consistent across all metabolites. Consequently, criteria are required to...

  20. NMR-based metabolomic profiling of overweight adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hong; Yde, Christian C; Arnberg, Karina

    2014-01-01

    The plasma and urine metabolome of 192 overweight 12-15-year-old adolescents (BMI of 25.4 ± 2.3 kg/m(2)) were examined in order to elucidate gender, pubertal development measured as Tanner stage, physical activity measured as number of steps taken daily, and intra-/interindividual differences...... and the metabolome could be identified. The present study for the first time provides comprehensive information about associations between the metabolome and gender, pubertal development, and physical activity in overweight adolescents, which is an important subject group to approach in the prevention of obesity...... affecting the metabolome detected by proton NMR spectroscopy. Higher urinary excretion of citrate, creatinine, hippurate, and phenylacetylglutamine and higher plasma level of phosphatidylcholine and unsaturated lipid were found for girls compared with boys. The results suggest that gender differences...

  1. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant individ......Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin......-resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus...

  2. Metabolomic profiling of Green Frogs exposed to Mixed Pesticides

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — GC/MS data from the metabolomic profiling of green frog livers after exposure to pesticides and their mixtures. This dataset is associated with the following...

  3. QCScreen: a software tool for data quality control in LC-HRMS based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simader, Alexandra Maria; Kluger, Bernhard; Neumann, Nora Katharina Nicole; Bueschl, Christoph; Lemmens, Marc; Lirk, Gerald; Krska, Rudolf; Schuhmacher, Rainer

    2015-10-24

    Metabolomics experiments often comprise large numbers of biological samples resulting in huge amounts of data. This data needs to be inspected for plausibility before data evaluation to detect putative sources of error e.g. retention time or mass accuracy shifts. Especially in liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) based metabolomics research, proper quality control checks (e.g. for precision, signal drifts or offsets) are crucial prerequisites to achieve reliable and comparable results within and across experimental measurement sequences. Software tools can support this process. The software tool QCScreen was developed to offer a quick and easy data quality check of LC-HRMS derived data. It allows a flexible investigation and comparison of basic quality-related parameters within user-defined target features and the possibility to automatically evaluate multiple sample types within or across different measurement sequences in a short time. It offers a user-friendly interface that allows an easy selection of processing steps and parameter settings. The generated results include a coloured overview plot of data quality across all analysed samples and targets and, in addition, detailed illustrations of the stability and precision of the chromatographic separation, the mass accuracy and the detector sensitivity. The use of QCScreen is demonstrated with experimental data from metabolomics experiments using selected standard compounds in pure solvent. The application of the software identified problematic features, samples and analytical parameters and suggested which data files or compounds required closer manual inspection. QCScreen is an open source software tool which provides a useful basis for assessing the suitability of LC-HRMS data prior to time consuming, detailed data processing and subsequent statistical analysis. It accepts the generic mzXML format and thus can be used with many different LC-HRMS platforms to process both multiple

  4. Biomarker Discovery Using New Metabolomics Software for Automated Processing of High Resolution LC-MS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatyshyn, S.; Reily, M.; Shipkova, P.; McClure, T.; Sanders, M.; Peake, D.

    2011-01-01

    Robust biomarkers of target engagement and efficacy are required in different stages of drug discovery. Liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry provides sensitivity, accuracy and wide dynamic range required for identification of endogenous metabolites in biological matrices. LCMS is widely-used tool for biomarker identification and validation. Typical high resolution LCMS profiles from biological samples may contain greater than a million mass spectral peaks corresponding to several thousand endogenous metabolites. Reduction of the total number of peaks, component identification and statistical comparison across sample groups remains to be a difficult and time consuming challenge. Blood samples from four groups of rats (male vs. female, fully satiated and food deprived) were analyzed using high resolution accurate mass (HRAM) LCMS. All samples were separated using a 15 minute reversed-phase C18 LC gradient and analyzed in both positive and negative ion modes. Data was acquired using 15K resolution and 5ppm mass measurement accuracy. The entire data set was analyzed using software developed in collaboration between Bristol Meyers Squibb and Thermo Fisher Scientific to determine the metabolic effects of food deprivation on rats. Metabolomic LC-MS data files are extraordinarily complex and appropriate reduction of the number of spectral peaks via identification of related peaks and background removal is essential. A single component such as hippuric acid generates more than 20 related peaks including isotopic clusters, adducts and dimers. Plasma and urine may contain 500-1500 unique quantifiable metabolites. Noise filtering approaches including blank subtraction were used to reduce the number of irrelevant peaks. By grouping related signals such as isotopic peaks and alkali adducts, data processing was greatly simplified by reducing the total number of components by 10-fold. The software processes 48 samples in under 60minutes. Principle

  5. Metabolomic NMR fingerprinting: an exploratory and predictive tool

    OpenAIRE

    Lauri, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive assessment of low molecular weight organic metabolites within biological system. The identification and characterization of several chemical species, or metabolic fingerprinting, is an emergent approach in metabolomics field that provides a valuable “snapshot” of metabolic profiles. This approach is finding an increasing number of applications in many areas including cancer research, drug discovery and food science. The combined use of NMR spectroscopy, data ...

  6. Metabolomics and Metabolic Diseases: Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgard, Christopher B

    2017-01-10

    Metabolomics, or the comprehensive profiling of small molecule metabolites in cells, tissues, or whole organisms, has undergone a rapid technological evolution in the past two decades. These advances have led to the application of metabolomics to defining predictive biomarkers for incident cardiometabolic diseases and, increasingly, as a blueprint for understanding those diseases' pathophysiologic mechanisms. Progress in this area and challenges for the future are reviewed here. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pediatric obesity: could metabolomics be a useful tool?

    OpenAIRE

    Angelica Dessì; Vassilios Fanos

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric obesity represents an important health issue. In recent years applications of metabolomics have led to evaluation of responses to the various nutrients (nutrigenomics), in particular to lipids, in diseases such as obesity and diabetes. The experimental data and the studies in pediatrics  that evaluated the metabolic condition in infant obesity are presented. It is thus to be hoped that future progress in connection with this new technique, together with a metabolomic study of mother...

  8. Ultrasound: a subexploited tool for sample preparation in metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque de Castro, M D; Delgado-Povedano, M M

    2014-01-02

    Metabolomics, one of the most recently emerged "omics", has taken advantage of ultrasound (US) to improve sample preparation (SP) steps. The metabolomics-US assisted SP step binomial has experienced a dissimilar development that has depended on the area (vegetal or animal) and the SP step. Thus, vegetal metabolomics and US assisted leaching has received the greater attention (encompassing subdisciplines such as metallomics, xenometabolomics and, mainly, lipidomics), but also liquid-liquid extraction and (bio)chemical reactions in metabolomics have taken advantage of US energy. Also clinical and animal samples have benefited from US assisted SP in metabolomics studies but in a lesser extension. The main effects of US have been shortening of the time required for the given step, and/or increase of its efficiency or availability for automation; nevertheless, attention paid to potential degradation caused by US has been scant or nil. Achievements and weak points of the metabolomics-US assisted SP step binomial are discussed and possible solutions to the present shortcomings are exposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. SECIMTools: a suite of metabolomics data analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpich, Alexander S; Ibarra, Miguel; Moskalenko, Oleksandr; Fear, Justin M; Gerken, Joseph; Mi, Xinlei; Ashrafi, Ali; Morse, Alison M; McIntyre, Lauren M

    2018-04-20

    Metabolomics has the promise to transform the area of personalized medicine with the rapid development of high throughput technology for untargeted analysis of metabolites. Open access, easy to use, analytic tools that are broadly accessible to the biological community need to be developed. While technology used in metabolomics varies, most metabolomics studies have a set of features identified. Galaxy is an open access platform that enables scientists at all levels to interact with big data. Galaxy promotes reproducibility by saving histories and enabling the sharing workflows among scientists. SECIMTools (SouthEast Center for Integrated Metabolomics) is a set of Python applications that are available both as standalone tools and wrapped for use in Galaxy. The suite includes a comprehensive set of quality control metrics (retention time window evaluation and various peak evaluation tools), visualization techniques (hierarchical cluster heatmap, principal component analysis, modular modularity clustering), basic statistical analysis methods (partial least squares - discriminant analysis, analysis of variance, t-test, Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test), advanced classification methods (random forest, support vector machines), and advanced variable selection tools (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator LASSO and Elastic Net). SECIMTools leverages the Galaxy platform and enables integrated workflows for metabolomics data analysis made from building blocks designed for easy use and interpretability. Standard data formats and a set of utilities allow arbitrary linkages between tools to encourage novel workflow designs. The Galaxy framework enables future data integration for metabolomics studies with other omics data.

  10. Comparative metabolomics in vanilla pod and vanilla bean revealing the biosynthesis of vanillin during the curing process of vanilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Fenglin; Chen, Yonggan; Hong, Yinghua; Fang, Yiming; Tan, Lehe

    2017-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used for comprehensive metabolomic fingerprinting of vanilla fruits prepared from the curing process. In this study, the metabolic changes of vanilla pods and vanilla beans were characterized using MS-based metabolomics to elucidate the biosynthesis of vanillin. The vanilla pods were significantly different from vanilla beans. Seven pathways of vanillin biosynthesis were constructed, namely, glucovanillin, glucose, cresol, capsaicin, vanillyl alcohol, tyrosine, and phenylalanine pathways. Investigations demonstrated that glucose, cresol, capsaicin, and vanillyl alcohol pathway were detected in a wide range of distribution in microbial metabolism. Thus, microorganisms might have participated in vanillin biosynthesis during vanilla curing. Furthermore, the ion strength of glucovanillin was stable, which indicated that glucovanillin only participated in the vanillin biosynthesis during the curing of vanilla.

  11. Galaxy-M: a Galaxy workflow for processing and analyzing direct infusion and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Robert L; Weber, Ralf J M; Liu, Haoyu; Sharma-Oates, Archana; Viant, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is increasingly recognized as an invaluable tool in the biological, medical and environmental sciences yet lags behind the methodological maturity of other omics fields. To achieve its full potential, including the integration of multiple omics modalities, the accessibility, standardization and reproducibility of computational metabolomics tools must be improved significantly. Here we present our end-to-end mass spectrometry metabolomics workflow in the widely used platform, Galaxy. Named Galaxy-M, our workflow has been developed for both direct infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics. The range of tools presented spans from processing of raw data, e.g. peak picking and alignment, through data cleansing, e.g. missing value imputation, to preparation for statistical analysis, e.g. normalization and scaling, and principal components analysis (PCA) with associated statistical evaluation. We demonstrate the ease of using these Galaxy workflows via the analysis of DIMS and LC-MS datasets, and provide PCA scores and associated statistics to help other users to ensure that they can accurately repeat the processing and analysis of these two datasets. Galaxy and data are all provided pre-installed in a virtual machine (VM) that can be downloaded from the GigaDB repository. Additionally, source code, executables and installation instructions are available from GitHub. The Galaxy platform has enabled us to produce an easily accessible and reproducible computational metabolomics workflow. More tools could be added by the community to expand its functionality. We recommend that Galaxy-M workflow files are included within the supplementary information of publications, enabling metabolomics studies to achieve greater reproducibility.

  12. Metabolomics: A potential way to know the role of vitamin D on multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Córdoba, Diego; Luque de Castro, María D

    2017-03-20

    The literature about the influence of vitamin D on multiple sclerosis (MS) is very controversial, possibly as a result of the way through which the research on the subject has been conducted. The studies developed so far have been focused exclusively on gene expression: the effect of a given vitamin D metabolite on target receptors. The influence of the vitamin D status (either natural or after supplementation) on MS has been studied by measurement of the 25 monohydroxylated metabolite (also known as circulating form), despite the 1,25 dihydroxylated metabolite is considered the active form. In the light of the multiple metabolic pathways in which both forms of vitamin D (D 2 and D 3 ) are involved, monitoring of the metabolites is crucial to know the activity of the target enzymes as a function of both the state of the MS patient and the clinical treatment applied. The study of metabolomics aspects is here proposed to clarify the present controversy. In "omics" terms, our proposal is to take profit from up-stream information-thus is, from metabolomics to genomics-with a potential subsequent step to systems biology, if required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The omics era: what can nuclear magnetic resonance tell us on metabolomics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Castiglione

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview of the potentiality and use of the metabolic fingerprint of a system or biological process is here proposed. The information on the type, quantity and variation of the pool of metabolites and its relationship with a given biological process is commonly referred to as metabolomics. One powerful analytical approach to the detection and quantitation of metabolites is by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR. Additionally, the recently introduced High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS NMR approach improved dramatically the potentiality of the method allowing direct sampling of ex vivo specimens, such as tissues and cells, without any pre-treatment or extraction steps. The NMR data can be processed towards the target or non-target analysis of the metabolites. The former passes through the identification of all the metabolites, the latter adopts a multivariate statistical approach such as Principal Components Analysis. In this article, the main methodological points of NMR analysis with multivariate statistics are briefly outlined and discussed. A final case-study on the discrimination of healthy and neoplastic tissues via HR-MAS NMR metabolomics is reported as a paradigmatic application.

  14. Effects of a prolonged standardized diet on normalizing the human metabolome123

    OpenAIRE

    Winnike, Jason H; Busby, Marjorie G; Watkins, Paul B; O'Connell, Thomas M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although the effects of acute dietary interventions on the human metabolome have been studied, the extent to which the metabolome can be normalized by extended dietary standardization has not yet been examined.

  15. An improved pseudotargeted metabolomics approach using multiple ion monitoring with time-staggered ion lists based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Fang; Li, Peng; He, Chengwei; Wang, Ruibing; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotargeted metabolomics is a novel strategy integrating the advantages of both untargeted and targeted methods. The conventional pseudotargeted metabolomics required two MS instruments, i.e., ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time- of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC/Q-TOF MS) and UHPLC/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC/QQQ-MS), which makes method transformation inevitable. Furthermore, the picking of ion pairs from thousands of candidates and the swapping of the data between two instruments are the most labor-intensive steps, which greatly limit its application in metabolomic analysis. In the present study, we proposed an improved pseudotargeted metabolomics method that could be achieved on an UHPLC/Q-TOF/MS instrument operated in the multiple ion monitoring (MIM) mode with time-staggered ion lists (tsMIM). Full scan-based untargeted analysis was applied to extract the target ions. After peak alignment and ion fusion, a stepwise ion picking procedure was used to generate the ion lists for subsequent single MIM and tsMIM. The UHPLC/Q-TOF tsMIM MS-based pseudotargeted approach exhibited better repeatability and a wider linear range than the UHPLC/Q-TOF MS-based untargeted metabolomics method. Compared to the single MIM mode, the tsMIM significantly increased the coverage of the metabolites detected. The newly developed method was successfully applied to discover plasma biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver injury in mice, which indicated its practicability and great potential in future metabolomics studies. - Highlights: • An UHPLC/Q-TOF tsMIM MS-based pseudotargeted metabolomics was proposed. • Compared to full scan, the improved method exhibits better repeatability and a wider linear range. • The proposed method could achieve pseudotargeted analysis on one UHPLC/Q-TOF/MS instrument. • The developed method was successfully used to discover biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver injury.

  16. An improved pseudotargeted metabolomics approach using multiple ion monitoring with time-staggered ion lists based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Fang; Li, Peng; He, Chengwei; Wang, Ruibing; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo, E-mail: jbwan@umac.mo

    2016-07-13

    Pseudotargeted metabolomics is a novel strategy integrating the advantages of both untargeted and targeted methods. The conventional pseudotargeted metabolomics required two MS instruments, i.e., ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time- of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC/Q-TOF MS) and UHPLC/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC/QQQ-MS), which makes method transformation inevitable. Furthermore, the picking of ion pairs from thousands of candidates and the swapping of the data between two instruments are the most labor-intensive steps, which greatly limit its application in metabolomic analysis. In the present study, we proposed an improved pseudotargeted metabolomics method that could be achieved on an UHPLC/Q-TOF/MS instrument operated in the multiple ion monitoring (MIM) mode with time-staggered ion lists (tsMIM). Full scan-based untargeted analysis was applied to extract the target ions. After peak alignment and ion fusion, a stepwise ion picking procedure was used to generate the ion lists for subsequent single MIM and tsMIM. The UHPLC/Q-TOF tsMIM MS-based pseudotargeted approach exhibited better repeatability and a wider linear range than the UHPLC/Q-TOF MS-based untargeted metabolomics method. Compared to the single MIM mode, the tsMIM significantly increased the coverage of the metabolites detected. The newly developed method was successfully applied to discover plasma biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver injury in mice, which indicated its practicability and great potential in future metabolomics studies. - Highlights: • An UHPLC/Q-TOF tsMIM MS-based pseudotargeted metabolomics was proposed. • Compared to full scan, the improved method exhibits better repeatability and a wider linear range. • The proposed method could achieve pseudotargeted analysis on one UHPLC/Q-TOF/MS instrument. • The developed method was successfully used to discover biomarkers for alcohol-induced liver injury.

  17. Proteomic and metabolomic responses in hepatopancreas of Mytilus galloprovincialis challenged by Micrococcus luteus and Vibrio anguillarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huifeng; Ji, Chenglong; Wei, Lei; Zhao, Jianmin; Lu, Hongjian

    2013-12-06

    The outbreak of pathogens can induce diseases and lead to massive mortalities of aquaculture animals including fish, mollusk and shrimp. In this work, the responses induced by Micrococcus luteus and Vibrio anguillarum were investigated in hepatopancreas of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis using proteomics and metabolomics. Metabolic biomarkers demonstrated that M. luteus and V. anguillarum injections could induce osmotic stress and disturbance in energy metabolism. And the uniquely and more markedly altered metabolic biomarkers (glutamine, succinate, aspartate, glucose, ATP, homarine and tyrosine) indicated that V. anguillarum could cause more severe disturbances in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism. The differentially altered proteins meant that M. luteus and V. anguillarum induced different effects in mussels. However, the common proteomic biomarkers, arginine kinase and small heat shock protein, demonstrated that these two bacteria induced similar effects including oxidative stress and disturbance in energy metabolism in M. galloprovincialis. In addition, some metabolic biomarkers, ATP and glutamine, were confirmed by related proteins including arginine kinase, ATP synthase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase and glutamine synthetase in bacteria-challenged mussels. This study demonstrated that proteomics and metabolomics could provide an insightful view into the effects of environmental pathogens to the marine mussel M. galloprovincialis. The outbreak of pathogens can lead to diseases and massive mortalities of aquaculture animals including fish, mollusk and shrimp. The mussel M. galloprovincialis distributes widely along the Bohai coast and is popularly consumed as delicious seafood by local residents. This bivalve has become one of the important species in marine aquaculture industry in China. Therefore a study on pathogen-induced effects is necessary. In the present study, an integrated metabolomic and proteomic approach was used to elucidate the

  18. Metabolomics As a Tool for the Characterization of Drug-Resistant Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Federica; Muroni, Antonella; Puligheddu, Monica; Polizzi, Lorenzo; Barberini, Luigi; Orofino, Gianni; Solla, Paolo; Poddighe, Simone; Del Carratore, Francesco; Griffin, Julian L; Atzori, Luigi; Marrosu, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is a critical issue in the treatment of epilepsy, contributing to clinical emergencies and increasing both serious social and economic burdens on the health system. The wide variety of potential drug combinations followed by often failed consecutive attempts to match drugs to an individual patient may mean that this treatment stage may last for years with suboptimal benefit to the patient. Given these challenges, it is valuable to explore the availability of new methodologies able to shorten the period of determining a rationale pharmacologic treatment. Metabolomics could provide such a tool to investigate possible markers of drug resistance in subjects with epilepsy. Blood samples were collected from (1) controls (C) ( n  = 35), (2) patients with epilepsy "responder" (R) ( n  = 18), and (3) patients with epilepsy "non-responder" (NR) ( n  = 17) to the drug therapy. The samples were analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, followed by multivariate statistical analysis. A different metabolic profile based on metabolomics analysis of the serum was observed between C and patients with epilepsy and also between R and NR patients. It was possible to identify the discriminant metabolites for the three classes under investigation. Serum from patients with epilepsy were characterized by increased levels of 3-OH-butyrate, 2-OH-valerate, 2-OH-butyrate, acetoacetate, acetone, acetate, choline, alanine, glutamate, scyllo-inositol (C lactate, and citrate compared to C (C > R > NR). In conclusion, metabolomics may represent an important tool for discovery of differences between subjects affected by epilepsy responding or resistant to therapies and for the study of its pathophysiology, optimizing the therapeutic resources and the quality of life of patients.

  19. Metabolomics As a Tool for the Characterization of Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Murgia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PurposeDrug resistance is a critical issue in the treatment of epilepsy, contributing to clinical emergencies and increasing both serious social and economic burdens on the health system. The wide variety of potential drug combinations followed by often failed consecutive attempts to match drugs to an individual patient may mean that this treatment stage may last for years with suboptimal benefit to the patient. Given these challenges, it is valuable to explore the availability of new methodologies able to shorten the period of determining a rationale pharmacologic treatment. Metabolomics could provide such a tool to investigate possible markers of drug resistance in subjects with epilepsy.MethodsBlood samples were collected from (1 controls (C (n = 35, (2 patients with epilepsy “responder” (R (n = 18, and (3 patients with epilepsy “non-responder” (NR (n = 17 to the drug therapy. The samples were analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, followed by multivariate statistical analysis.Key findingsA different metabolic profile based on metabolomics analysis of the serum was observed between C and patients with epilepsy and also between R and NR patients. It was possible to identify the discriminant metabolites for the three classes under investigation. Serum from patients with epilepsy were characterized by increased levels of 3-OH-butyrate, 2-OH-valerate, 2-OH-butyrate, acetoacetate, acetone, acetate, choline, alanine, glutamate, scyllo-inositol (C < R < NR, and decreased concentration of glucose, lactate, and citrate compared to C (C > R > NR.SignificanceIn conclusion, metabolomics may represent an important tool for discovery of differences between subjects affected by epilepsy responding or resistant to therapies and for the study of its pathophysiology, optimizing the therapeutic resources and the quality of life of patients.

  20. Large-scale neurochemical metabolomics analysis identifies multiple compounds associated with methamphetamine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, Joseph L; Adkins, Daniel E; Vunck, Sarah A; Batman, Angela M; Vann, Robert E; Clark, Shaunna L; Beardsley, Patrick M; van den Oord, Edwin J C G

    2013-04-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is an illegal stimulant drug of abuse with serious negative health consequences. The neurochemical effects of MA have been partially characterized, with a traditional focus on classical neurotransmitter systems. However, these directions have not yet led to novel drug treatments for MA abuse or toxicity. As an alternative approach, we describe here the first application of metabolomics to investigate the neurochemical consequences of MA exposure in the rodent brain. We examined single exposures at 3 mg/kg and repeated exposures at 3 mg/kg over 5 days in eight common inbred mouse strains. Brain tissue samples were assayed using high-throughput gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, yielding quantitative data on >300 unique metabolites. Association testing and false discovery rate control yielded several metabolome-wide significant associations with acute MA exposure, including compounds such as lactate ( p = 4.4 × 10 -5 , q = 0.013), tryptophan ( p = 7.0 × 10 -4 , q = 0.035) and 2-hydroxyglutarate ( p = 1.1 × 10 -4 , q = 0.022). Secondary analyses of MA-induced increase in locomotor activity showed associations with energy metabolites such as succinate ( p = 3.8 × 10 -7 ). Associations specific to repeated (5 day) MA exposure included phosphocholine ( p = 4.0 × 10 -4 , q = 0.087) and ergothioneine ( p = 3.0 × 10 -4 , q = 0.087). Our data appear to confirm and extend existing models of MA action in the brain, whereby an initial increase in energy metabolism, coupled with an increase in behavioral locomotion, gives way to disruption of mitochondria and phospholipid pathways and increased endogenous antioxidant response. Our study demonstrates the power of comprehensive MS-based metabolomics to identify drug-induced changes to brain metabolism and to develop neurochemical models of drug effects.

  1. MetaboLab - advanced NMR data processing and analysis for metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Ulrich L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite wide-spread use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR in metabolomics for the analysis of biological samples there is a lack of graphically driven, publicly available software to process large one and two-dimensional NMR data sets for statistical analysis. Results Here we present MetaboLab, a MATLAB based software package that facilitates NMR data processing by providing automated algorithms for processing series of spectra in a reproducible fashion. A graphical user interface provides easy access to all steps of data processing via a script builder to generate MATLAB scripts, providing an option to alter code manually. The analysis of two-dimensional spectra (1H,13C-HSQC spectra is facilitated by the use of a spectral library derived from publicly available databases which can be extended readily. The software allows to display specific metabolites in small regions of interest where signals can be picked. To facilitate the analysis of series of two-dimensional spectra, different spectra can be overlaid and assignments can be transferred between spectra. The software includes mechanisms to account for overlapping signals by highlighting neighboring and ambiguous assignments. Conclusions The MetaboLab software is an integrated software package for NMR data processing and analysis, closely linked to the previously developed NMRLab software. It includes tools for batch processing and gives access to a wealth of algorithms available in the MATLAB framework. Algorithms within MetaboLab help to optimize the flow of metabolomics data preparation for statistical analysis. The combination of an intuitive graphical user interface along with advanced data processing algorithms facilitates the use of MetaboLab in a broader metabolomics context.

  2. Proteomics and metabolomics in ageing research: from biomarkers to systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jessica M; Lyu, Yang; Pletcher, Scott D; Promislow, Daniel E L

    2017-07-15

    Age is the single greatest risk factor for a wide range of diseases, and as the mean age of human populations grows steadily older, the impact of this risk factor grows as well. Laboratory studies on the basic biology of ageing have shed light on numerous genetic pathways that have strong effects on lifespan. However, we still do not know the degree to which the pathways that affect ageing in the lab also influence variation in rates of ageing and age-related disease in human populations. Similarly, despite considerable effort, we have yet to identify reliable and reproducible 'biomarkers', which are predictors of one's biological as opposed to chronological age. One challenge lies in the enormous mechanistic distance between genotype and downstream ageing phenotypes. Here, we consider the power of studying 'endophenotypes' in the context of ageing. Endophenotypes are the various molecular domains that exist at intermediate levels of organization between the genotype and phenotype. We focus our attention specifically on proteins and metabolites. Proteomic and metabolomic profiling has the potential to help identify the underlying causal mechanisms that link genotype to phenotype. We present a brief review of proteomics and metabolomics in ageing research with a focus on the potential of a systems biology and network-centric perspective in geroscience. While network analyses to study ageing utilizing proteomics and metabolomics are in their infancy, they may be the powerful model needed to discover underlying biological processes that influence natural variation in ageing, age-related disease, and longevity. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Rice Bran Metabolome Contains Amino Acids, Vitamins & Cofactors, and Phytochemicals with Medicinal and Nutritional Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Iman; Brown, Dustin G; Nealon, Nora Jean; Ryan, Elizabeth P

    2017-12-01

    Rice bran is a functional food that has shown protection against major chronic diseases (e.g. obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer) in animals and humans, and these health effects have been associated with the presence of bioactive phytochemicals. Food metabolomics uses multiple chromatography and mass spectrometry platforms to detect and identify a diverse range of small molecules with high sensitivity and precision, and has not been completed for rice bran. This study utilized global, non-targeted metabolomics to identify small molecules in rice bran, and conducted a comprehensive search of peer-reviewed literature to determine bioactive compounds. Three U.S. rice varieties (Calrose, Dixiebelle, and Neptune), that have been used for human dietary intervention trials, were assessed herein for bioactive compounds that have disease control and prevention properties. The profiling of rice bran by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) identified 453 distinct phytochemicals, 209 of which were classified as amino acids, cofactors & vitamins, and secondary metabolites, and were further assessed for bioactivity. A scientific literature search revealed 65 compounds with health properties, 16 of which had not been previously identified in rice bran. This suite of amino acids, cofactors & vitamins, and secondary metabolites comprised 46% of the identified rice bran metabolome, which substantially enhanced our knowledge of health-promoting rice bran compounds provided during dietary supplementation. Rice bran metabolite profiling revealed a suite of biochemical molecules that can be further investigated and exploited for multiple nutritional therapies and medical food applications. These bioactive compounds may also be biomarkers of dietary rice bran intake. The medicinal compounds associated with rice bran can function as a network across metabolic pathways and this

  4. Metabolomics reveals metabolic alterations by intrauterine growth restriction in the fetal rabbit brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin van Vliet

    Full Text Available Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5-10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development.At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40-50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR.IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty acid profiles and oxidative stress

  5. Metabolomics Analysis of the Toxic Effects of the Production of Lycopene and Its Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April M. Miguez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Using cells as microbial factories enables highly specific production of chemicals with many advantages over chemical syntheses. A number of exciting new applications of this approach are in the area of precision metabolic engineering, which focuses on improving the specificity of target production. In recent work, we have used precision metabolic engineering to design lycopene-producing Escherichia coli for use as a low-cost diagnostic biosensor. To increase precursor availability and thus the rate of lycopene production, we heterologously expressed the mevalonate pathway. We found that simultaneous induction of these pathways increases lycopene production, but induction of the mevalonate pathway before induction of the lycopene pathway decreases both lycopene production and growth rate. Here, we aim to characterize the metabolic changes the cells may be undergoing during expression of either or both of these heterologous pathways. After establishing an improved method for quenching E. coli for metabolomics analysis, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS to characterize the metabolomic profile of our lycopene-producing strains in growth conditions characteristic of our biosensor application. We found that the metabolic impacts of producing low, non-toxic levels of lycopene are of much smaller magnitude than the typical metabolic changes inherent to batch growth. We then used metabolomics to study differences in metabolism caused by the time of mevalonate pathway induction and the presence of the lycopene biosynthesis genes. We found that overnight induction of the mevalonate pathway was toxic to cells, but that the cells could recover if the lycopene pathway was not also heterologously expressed. The two pathways appeared to have an antagonistic metabolic effect that was clearly reflected in the cells’ metabolic profiles. The metabolites homocysteine and homoserine exhibited particularly interesting

  6. Metabolomic markers of fatigue: Association between circulating metabolome and fatigue in women with chronic widespread pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidin, Maxim B; Wells, Helena R R; Potter, Tilly; Livshits, Gregory; Menni, Cristina; Williams, Frances M K

    2018-02-01

    Fatigue is a sensation of unbearable tiredness that frequently accompanies chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (CWP) and inflammatory joint disease. Its mechanisms are poorly understood and there is a lack of effective biomarkers for diagnosis and onset prediction. We studied the circulating metabolome in a population sample characterised for CWP to identify biomarkers showing specificity for fatigue. Untargeted metabolomic profiling was conducted on fasting plasma and serum samples of 1106 females with and without CWP from the TwinsUK cohort. Linear mixed-effects models accounting for covariates were used to determine relationships between fatigue and metabolites. Receiver operating curve (ROC)-analysis was used to determine predictive value of metabolites for fatigue. While no association between fatigue and metabolites was identified in twins without CWP (n=711), in participants with CWP (n=395), levels of eicosapentaenoate (EPA) ω-3 fatty acid were significantly reduced in those with fatigue (β=-0.452±0.116; p=1.2×10 -4 ). A significant association between fatigue and two other metabolites also emerged when BMI was excluded from the model: 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropanoate (CMPF), and C-glycosyltryptophan (p=1.5×10 -4 and p=3.1×10 -4 , respectively). ROC analysis has identified a combination of 15 circulating metabolites with good predictive potential for fatigue in CWP (AUC=75%; 95% CI 69-80%). The results of this agnostic metabolomics screening show that fatigue is metabolically distinct from CWP, and is associated with a decrease in circulating levels of EPA. Our panel of circulating metabolites provides the starting point for a diagnostic test for fatigue in CWP. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolomics of Small Numbers of Cells: Metabolomic Profiling of 100, 1000, and 10000 Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xian; Li, Liang

    2017-11-07

    In cellular metabolomics, it is desirable to carry out metabolomic profiling using a small number of cells in order to save time and cost. In some applications (e.g., working with circulating tumor cells in blood), only a limited number of cells are available for analysis. In this report, we describe a method based on high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) nanoflow liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) for high-coverage metabolomic analysis of small numbers of cells (i.e., ≤10000 cells). As an example, 12 C-/ 13 C-dansyl labeling of the metabolites in lysates of 100, 1000, and 10000 MCF-7 breast cancer cells was carried out using a new labeling protocol tailored to handle small amount