WorldWideScience

Sample records for wide-field imaging facility

  1. Wide Field Imager for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Rau, Arne; Plattner, Markus; WFI proto-Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The Wide Field Imager focal plane instrument on ATHENA will combine unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arcmin with a high count-rate capability (> 1 Crab). The energy resolution of the silicon sensor is state-of-the-art in the energy band of interest from 0.1 keV to 15 keV. At energy of 6 keV for example, the full width at half maximum of the line shall be not worse than 150 eV until the end of the mission. The performance is accomplished by a set of DEPFET active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size well suited to the angular resolution of 5 arc sec (on-axis) of the mirror system.Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 micron thick silicon bulk. Two different types of DEPFET sensors are planned for the WFI instrument: A set of large-area sensors to cover the physical size of 14 cm x 14 cm in the focal plane and a single gateable DEPFET sensor matrix optimized for the high count rate capability of the instrument. An overview will be given about the presently developed instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the expected performance. An outline of the project organization, the model philosophy as well as the schedule will complete the presentation about the Wide Field Imager for Athena.

  2. Wide-Field Imaging Using Nitrogen Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Dirk Robert (Inventor); Trusheim, Matthew Edwin (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen vacancies in bulk diamonds and nanodiamonds can be used to sense temperature, pressure, electromagnetic fields, and pH. Unfortunately, conventional sensing techniques use gated detection and confocal imaging, limiting the measurement sensitivity and precluding wide-field imaging. Conversely, the present sensing techniques do not require gated detection or confocal imaging and can therefore be used to image temperature, pressure, electromagnetic fields, and pH over wide fields of view. In some cases, wide-field imaging supports spatial localization of the NVs to precisions at or below the diffraction limit. Moreover, the measurement range can extend over extremely wide dynamic range at very high sensitivity.

  3. IOT Overview: Wide-Field Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, F. J.

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) instrument at La Silla has been the workhorse of wide-field imaging instruments at ESO for several years. In this contribution I will summarize the issues relating to its productivity for the community both in terms of the quality and quantity of data that has come out of it. Although only surveys of limited scope have been completed using WFI, it is ESO's stepping-stone to the new generation of survey telescopes.

  4. Wide field imaging problems in radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, T. J.; Golap, K.; Bhatnagar, S.

    2005-03-01

    The new generation of synthesis radio telescopes now being proposed, designed, and constructed face substantial problems in making images over wide fields of view. Such observations are required either to achieve the full sensitivity limit in crowded fields or for surveys. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA Consortium, Tech. Rep., 2004), now being developed by an international consortium of 15 countries, will require advances well beyond the current state of the art. We review the theory of synthesis radio telescopes for large fields of view. We describe a new algorithm, W projection, for correcting the non-coplanar baselines aberration. This algorithm has improved performance over those previously used (typically an order of magnitude in speed). Despite the advent of W projection, the computing hardware required for SKA wide field imaging is estimated to cost up to $500M (2015 dollars). This is about half the target cost of the SKA. Reconfigurable computing is one way in which the costs can be decreased dramatically.

  5. The Wide Field Imager for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, A.; Nandra, K.; Meidinger, N.; Plattner, M.

    2017-10-01

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of the two scientific instruments of Athena, ESA's next large X-ray Observatory with launch in 2028. The instrument will provide two defining capabilities to the mission sensitive wide-field imaging spectroscopy and excellent high-count rate performance. It will do so with the use of two separate detectors systems, the Large Detector Array (LDA) optimized for its field of view (40'×40') with a 100 fold survey speed increase compared to existing X-ray missions, and the Fast Detector (FD) tweaked for high throughput and low pile-up for point sources as bright as the Crab. In my talk I will present the key performance parameters of the instrument and their links to the scientific goals of Athena and summarize the status of the ongoing development activities.

  6. The Wide Field Imager Instrument for Athena

    OpenAIRE

    Meidinger, Norbert; Eder, Josef; Eraerds, Tanja; Nandra, Kirpal; Pietschner, Daniel; Plattner, Markus; Rau, Arne; Strecker, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The WFI (Wide Field Imager) instrument is planned to be one of two complementary focal plane cameras on ESA's next X-ray observatory Athena. It combines unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 amin x 40 amin together with excellent count rate capability (larger than 1 Crab). The energy resolution of the silicon sensor is state-of-the-art in the energy band of interest from 0.2 keV to 15 keV, e.g. the full width at half maximum of a line at 7 keV will be better than 17...

  7. Athena Wide Field Imager key science drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Arne; Nandra, Kirpal; Aird, James; Comastri, Andrea; Dauser, Thomas; Merloni, Andrea; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Reiprich, Thomas H.; Fabian, Andy C.; Georgakakis, Antonis; Güdel, Manuel; RóŻańska, Agata; Sanders, Jeremy S.; Sasaki, Manami; Vaughan, Simon; Wilms, Jörn; Meidinger, Norbert

    2016-07-01

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) is one of two instruments for the Advanced Telescope for High-ENergy Astrophysics (Athena). In this paper we summarise three of the many key science objectives for the WFI { the formation and growth of supermassive black holes, non-gravitational heating in clusters of galaxies, and spin measurements of stellar mass black holes { and describe their translation into the science requirements and ultimately instrument requirements. The WFI will be designed to provide excellent point source sensitivity and grasp for performing wide area surveys, surface brightness sensitivity, survey power, and absolute temperature and density calibration for in-depth studies of the outskirts of nearby clusters of galaxies and very good high-count rate capability, throughput, and low pile-up, paired with very good spectral resolution, for detailed explorations of bright Galactic compact objects.

  8. The Wide Field Imager instrument for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Barbera, Marco; Emberger, Valentin; Fürmetz, Maria; Manhart, Markus; Müller-Seidlitz, Johannes; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Rau, Arne; Treberspurg, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    ESA's next large X-ray mission ATHENA is designed to address the Cosmic Vision science theme 'The Hot and Energetic Universe'. It will provide answers to the two key astrophysical questions how does ordinary matter assemble into the large-scale structures we see today and how do black holes grow and shape the Universe. The ATHENA spacecraft will be equipped with two focal plane cameras, a Wide Field Imager (WFI) and an X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU). The WFI instrument is optimized for state-of-the-art resolution spectroscopy over a large field of view of 40 amin x 40 amin and high count rates up to and beyond 1 Crab source intensity. The cryogenic X-IFU camera is designed for high-spectral resolution imaging. Both cameras share alternately a mirror system based on silicon pore optics with a focal length of 12 m and large effective area of about 2 m2 at an energy of 1 keV. Although the mission is still in phase A, i.e. studying the feasibility and developing the necessary technology, the definition and development of the instrumentation made already significant progress. The herein described WFI focal plane camera covers the energy band from 0.2 keV to 15 keV with 450 μm thick fully depleted back-illuminated silicon active pixel sensors of DEPFET type. The spatial resolution will be provided by one million pixels, each with a size of 130 μm x 130 μm. The time resolution requirement for the WFI large detector array is 5 ms and for the WFI fast detector 80 μs. The large effective area of the mirror system will be completed by a high quantum efficiency above 90% for medium and higher energies. The status of the various WFI subsystems to achieve this performance will be described and recent changes will be explained here.

  9. The wide field imager instrument for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea E.; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-07-01

    The "Hot and Energetic Universe" has been selected as the science theme for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. The proposed Athena X-ray observatory provides the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme. The X-ray mirrors are based on silicon pore optics technology and will have a 12 m focal length. Two complementary camera systems are foreseen which can be moved in and out of the focal plane by an interchange mechanism. These instruments are the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the Wide Field Imager (WFI). The WFI will combine an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arcmin with a high countrate capability (approx. 1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 keV to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g. FWHM serial analog output. The architecture of sensor and readout ASIC allows readout in full frame mode and window mode as well by addressing selectively arbitrary sub-areas of the sensor allowing time resolution in the order of 10 μs. The further detector electronics has mainly the following tasks: digitization, pre-processing and telemetry of event data as well as supply and control of the detector system. Although the sensor will already be equipped with an on-chip light blocking filter, a filter wheel is necessary to provide an additional external filter, an on-board calibration source, an open position for outgassing, and a closed position for protection of the sensor. The sensor concept provides high quantum efficiency over the entire energy band and we intend to keep the instrumental background as low as possible by designing a graded Z-shield around the sensor. All these properties make the WFI a very powerful survey instrument, significantly surpassing currently existing observatories and in addition allow high-time resolution of the brightest X-ray sources with low pile-up and high efficiency. This

  10. The wide field imager instrument for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Eder, Josef; Eraerds, Tanja; Nandra, Kirpal; Pietschner, Daniel; Plattner, Markus; Rau, Arne; Strecker, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    The WFI (Wide Field Imager) instrument is planned to be one of two complementary focal plane cameras on ESA's next X-ray observatory Athena. It combines unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 amin x 40 amin together with excellent count rate capability (>= 1 Crab). The energy resolution of the silicon sensor is state-of-the-art in the energy band of interest from 0.2 keV to 15 keV, e.g. the full width at half maximum of a line at 7 keV will be MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 μm thick silicon bulk. Two detectors are planned for the WFI instrument: A large-area detector comprising four sensors with a total of 1024 x 1024 pixels and a fast detector optimized for high count rate observations. This high count rate capable detector permits for bright point sources with an intensity of 1 Crab a throughput of more than 80% and a pile-up of less than 1%. The fast readout of the DEPFET pixel matrices is facilitated by an ASIC development, called VERITAS-2. Together with the Switcher-A, a control ASIC that allows for operation of the DEPFET in rolling shutter mode, these elements form the key components of the WFI detectors. The detectors are surrounded by a graded-Z shield, which has in particular the purpose to avoid fluorescence lines that would contribute to the instrument background. Together with ultra-thin coating of the sensor and particle identification by the detector itself, the particle induced background shall be minimized in order to achieve the scientific requirement of a total instrumental background value smaller than 5 x 10-3 cts/cm2/s/keV. Each detector has its dedicated detector electronics (DE) for supply and data acquisition. Due to the high frame rate in combination with the large pixel array, signal correction and event filtering have to be done on-board and in real-time as the raw data rate would by far exceed the feasible telemetry rate. The data streams are merged and compressed in the Instrument Control and

  11. Wide-Field, Deep UV Raman Hyperspectral Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS), teaming with the University of South Carolina, proposes a revolutionary wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging system capable of...

  12. Ultra-wide-field imaging in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi Falavarjani, Khalil; Tsui, Irena; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-10-01

    Since 1991, 7-field images captured with 30-50 degree cameras in the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study were the gold standard for fundus imaging to study diabetic retinopathy. Ultra-wide-field images cover significantly more area (up to 82%) of the fundus and with ocular steering can in many cases image 100% of the fundus ("panretinal"). Recent advances in image analysis of ultra-wide-field imaging allow for precise measurements of the peripheral retinal lesions. There is a growing consensus in the literature that ultra-wide-field imaging improves detection of peripheral lesions in diabetic retinopathy and leads to more accurate classification of the disease. There is discordance among studies, however, on the correlation between peripheral diabetic lesions and diabetic macular edema and optimal management strategies to treat diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. WFIRST: Astrometry with the Wide-Field Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Andrea; WFIRST Astrometry Working Group

    2018-01-01

    The wide field of view and stable, sharp images delivered by WFIRST's Wide-Field Imager make it an excellent instrument for astrometry, one of five major discovery areas identified in the 2010 Decadal Survey. Compared to the Hubble Space Telescope, WFIRST's wider field of view with similar image quality will provide hundreds more astrometric targets per image as well as background galaxies and stars with precise positions in the Gaia catalog. In addition, WFIRST will operate in the infrared, a wavelength regime where the most precise astrometry has so far been achieved with adaptive optics images from large ground-based telescopes. WFIRST will provide at least a factor of three improvement in astrometry over the current state of the art in this wavelength range, while spanning a field of view thousands of times larger. WFIRST is thus poised to make major contributions to multiple science topics in which astrometry plays an important role, without major alterations to the planned mission or instrument. We summarize a few of the most compelling science cases where WFIRST astrometry could prove transformational.

  14. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging of Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P.; Kline, David I.; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys. PMID:25582836

  15. Development of the wide field imager for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Eder, Josef; Fürmetz, Maria; Nandra, Kirpal; Pietschner, Daniel; Plattner, Markus; Rau, Arne; Reiffers, Jonas; Strecker, Rafael; Barbera, Marco; Brand, Thorsten; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-08-01

    The WFI (Wide Field Imager) instrument is planned to be one of two complementary focal plane cameras on ESA's next X-ray observatory Athena. It combines unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arcmin x 40 arcmin together with excellent count-rate capability (>= 1 Crab). The energy resolution of the silicon sensor is state-of-the-art in the energy band of interest from 0.2 keV to 15 keV, e.g. the full width at half maximum of a line at 6 keV will be MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450 μm thick silicon bulk. Two different types of DEPFET sensors are planned for the WFI instrument: A set of four large-area sensors to cover the physical size of 14 cm x 14 cm in the focal plane and a single smaller gateable DEPFET sensor matrix optimized for high count-rate observations. Here we present the conceptual design of the instrument with focus on the critical subsystems and describe the instrument performance expectations. An outline of the model philosophy and the project organization completes the presentation.

  16. Wide-field single photon counting imaging with an ultrafast camera and an image intensifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanda, Gianmarco, E-mail: gianmarco.zanda@kcl.ac.uk [King' s College London, Department of Physics, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Sergent, Nicolas; Green, Mark; Levitt, James A. [King' s College London, Department of Physics, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Petrasek, Zdenek [Biotechnologisches Zentrum, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Tatzberg 47/49, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk [King' s College London, Department of Physics, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-11

    We are reporting a method for wide-field photon counting imaging using a CMOS camera with a 40 kHz frame rate coupled with a three-stage image intensifier mounted on a standard fluorescence microscope. This system combines high frame rates with single photon sensitivity. The output of the phosphor screen, consisting of single-photon events, is collected by a CMOS camera allowing to create a wide-field image with parallel positional and timing information of each photon. Using a pulsed excitation source and a luminescent sample, the arrival time of hundreds of photons can be determined simultaneously in many pixels with microsecond resolution.

  17. Wide-field single photon counting imaging with an ultrafast camera and an image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanda, Gianmarco; Sergent, Nicolas; Green, Mark; Levitt, James A.; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Suhling, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    We are reporting a method for wide-field photon counting imaging using a CMOS camera with a 40 kHz frame rate coupled with a three-stage image intensifier mounted on a standard fluorescence microscope. This system combines high frame rates with single photon sensitivity. The output of the phosphor screen, consisting of single-photon events, is collected by a CMOS camera allowing to create a wide-field image with parallel positional and timing information of each photon. Using a pulsed excitation source and a luminescent sample, the arrival time of hundreds of photons can be determined simultaneously in many pixels with microsecond resolution.

  18. Wide-field fundus imaging with trans-palpebral illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toslak, Devrim; Thapa, Damber; Chen, Yanjun; Erol, Muhammet Kazim; Chan, R. V. Paul; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-02-01

    In conventional fundus imaging devices, transpupillary illumination is used for illuminating the inside of the eye. In this method, the illumination light is directed into the posterior segment of the eye through the cornea and passes the pupillary area. As a result of sharing the pupillary area for the illumination beam and observation path, pupil dilation is typically necessary for wide-angle fundus examination, and the field of view is inherently limited. An alternative approach is to deliver light from the sclera. It is possible to image a wider retinal area with transcleral-illumination. However, the requirement of physical contact between the illumination probe and the sclera is a drawback of this method. We report here trans-palpebral illumination as a new method to deliver the light through the upper eyelid (palpebra). For this study, we used a 1.5 mm diameter fiber with a warm white LED light source. To illuminate the inside of the eye, the fiber illuminator was placed at the location corresponding to the pars plana region. A custom designed optical system was attached to a digital camera for retinal imaging. The optical system contained a 90 diopter ophthalmic lens and a 25 diopter relay lens. The ophthalmic lens collected light coming from the posterior of the eye and formed an aerial image between the ophthalmic and relay lenses. The aerial image was captured by the camera through the relay lens. An adequate illumination level was obtained to capture wide angle fundus images within ocular safety limits, defined by the ISO 15004-2: 2007 standard. This novel trans-palpebral illumination approach enables wide-angle fundus photography without eyeball contact and pupil dilation.

  19. Structured illumination for wide-field Raman imaging of cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Houkai; Wang, Siqi; Zhang, Yuquan; Yang, Yong; Fang, Hui; Zhu, Siwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2017-11-01

    Although the diffraction limit still restricts their lateral resolution, conventional wide-field Raman imaging techniques offer fast imaging speeds compared with scanning schemes. To extend the lateral resolution of wide-field Raman microscopy using filters, standing-wave illumination technique is used, and an improvement of lateral resolution by a factor of more than two is achieved. Specifically, functionalized surface enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles are employed to strengthen the desired scattering signals to label cell membranes. This wide-field Raman imaging technique affords various significant opportunities in the biological applications.

  20. Wide Field-of-View (FOV) Soft X-Ray Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wide Field-of-View (FOV) Soft X-Ray Imager proposes to be a state-of-art instrument with applications for numerous heliospheric and planetary...

  1. Astro-WISE Processing of Wide-field Images and Other Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buddelmeijer, H.; Williams, O.R.; McFarland, J. P.; Belikov, A.; Ballester, P.; Egret, D.; Lorente, N.P.F.

    Astro-WISE (Vriend et al. 2012) is the Astronomical Wide-field Imaging System for Europe (Valentijn et al. 2007). It is a scientific information system which consists of hardware and software federated over about a dozen institutes throughout Europe. It has been developed to exploit the ever

  2. Scalable wide-field optical coherence tomography-based angiography for in vivo imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingjiang; Wei, Wei; Song, Shaozhen; Qi, Xiaoli; Wang, Ruikang K

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based angiography have demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diseases with vascular involvement. While promising, its imaging field of view (FOV) is however still limited (typically less than 9 mm(2)), which somehow slows down its clinical acceptance. In this paper, we report a high-speed spectral-domain OCT operating at 1310 nm to enable wide FOV up to 750 mm(2). Using optical microangiography (OMAG) algorithm, we are able to map vascular networks within living biological tissues. Thanks to 2,048 pixel-array line scan InGaAs camera operating at 147 kHz scan rate, the system delivers a ranging depth of ~7.5 mm and provides wide-field OCT-based angiography at a single data acquisition. We implement two imaging modes (i.e., wide-field mode and high-resolution mode) in the OCT system, which gives highly scalable FOV with flexible lateral resolution. We demonstrate scalable wide-field vascular imaging for multiple finger nail beds in human and whole brain in mice with skull left intact at a single 3D scan, promising new opportunities for wide-field OCT-based angiography for many clinical applications.

  3. Wide-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging of adhesives using a bolometer camera

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Shigeru; Nakayama, Yoshihiko; Taniguchi, Hideya; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    By combining a bolometer detector with an imaging-type interferometer, an inexpensive, easy-to-handle wide-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging apparatus was produced. We measured the distributions of four types of thin adhesive layers on an aluminium plate and analysed the results using correlation coefficients to visualise the distribution of various adhesives that cannot be discerned by the naked eye or conventional methods such as visible/near-infrared spectroscopic/fluorescent photog...

  4. Wide-field Imaging of the Environments of LITTLE THINGS Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Melton, Casey; Leshin, Stephen; Wong, Alson; Clark, Maurice; Kamienski, Jerald; Moriya, Netzer; Packwood, Burley; Birket, Bob; Edwards, William; Millward, Mervyn; Wheelband, Ian

    2018-01-01

    We have obtained wide-field images of 36 of the 41 LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey) nearby (limiting magnitudes of the images range from 19.7 to 28.3 mag arcsec‑2, with a median value of 25.9 mag arcsec‑2. We did not find any unknown companions. Two of the LITTLE THINGS galaxies, NGC 4163 and NGC 4214, and the fainter dwarf, UGCA 276, lie potentially within 100 kpc of each other, but our imaging does not reveal any stellar bridge between the galaxies. This project was part of the Lowell Amateur Research Initiative.

  5. A Wide Field Auroral Imager (WFAI for low Earth orbit missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Bannister

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of the solar wind interaction with Earth's coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system requires an ability to observe the charged particle environment and auroral activity from the same platform, generating particle and photon image data which are matched in time and location. While unambiguous identification of the particles giving rise to the aurora requires a Low Earth Orbit satellite, obtaining adequate spatial coverage of aurorae with the relatively limited field of view of current space bourne auroral imaging systems requires much higher orbits. A goal for future satellite missions, therefore, is the development of compact, wide field-of-view optics permitting high spatial and temporal resolution ultraviolet imaging of the aurora from small spacecraft in low polar orbit. Microchannel plate optics offer a method of achieving the required performance. We describe a new, compact instrument design which can observe a wide field-of-view with the required spatial resolution. We report the focusing of 121.6 nm radiation using a spherically-slumped, square-pore microchannel plate with a focal length of 32 mm and an F number of 0.7. Measurements are compared with detailed ray-trace simulations of imaging performance. The angular resolution is 2.7±0.2° for the prototype, corresponding to a footprint ~33 km in diameter for an aurora altitude of 110 km and a spacecraft altitude of 800 km. In preliminary analysis, a more recent optic has demonstrated a full width at half maximum of 5.0±0.3 arcminutes, corresponding to a footprint of ~1 km from the same spacecraft altitude. We further report the imaging properties of a convex microchannel plate detector with planar resistive anode readout; this detector, whose active surface has a radius of curvature of only 100 mm, is shown to meet the spatial resolution and sensitivity requirements of the new wide field auroral imager (WFAI.

  6. Optically sectioned wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging endoscopy enabled by structured illumination (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Malik, Bilal H.; Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Jo, Javier A.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system with optical sectioning by structured illumination microscopy (SIM). FLIM measurements were made using a time gated ICCD camera in conjunction with a pulsed nitrogen dye laser operating at 450 nm. Intensity images were acquired at multiple time delays from a trigger initiated by a laser pulse to create a wide-field FLIM image, which was then combined with three phase SIM to provide optical sectioning. Such a mechanism has the potential to increase the reliability and accuracy of the FLIM measurements by rejecting background intensity. SIM also provides the opportunity to create volumetric FLIM images with the incorporation of scanning mechanisms for the sample plane. We present multiple embodiments of such a system: one as a free space endoscope and the other as a fiber microendoscope enabled by the introduction of a fiber bundle. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of such an imaging system by imaging dyes embedded in a tissue phantom.

  7. Wide-field TCSPC-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhling, Klaus; Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Becker, Wolfgang; Smietana, Stefan; Netz, Holger; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Le Marois, Alix; Jagutzki, Ottmar

    2016-05-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is a widely used, sensitive, precise, robust and mature technique to measure photon arrival times in applications such as fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, light detection and ranging (lidar) and optical tomography. Wide-field TCSPC detection techniques, where the position and the arrival time of the photons are recorded simultaneously, have seen several advances in the last few years, from the microsecond to the picosecond time scale. Here, we summarise some of our recent work in this field with emphasis on microsecond resolution phosphorescence lifetime imaging (PLIM) and nanosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscopy.

  8. Wide-field and high-resolution optical imaging for early detection of oral neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Mark C.; Schwarz, Richard A.; Rosbach, Kelsey; Roblyer, Darren; Muldoon, Tim; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-02-01

    Current procedures for oral cancer screening typically involve visual inspection of the entire tissue surface at risk under white light illumination. However, pre-cancerous lesions can be difficult to distinguish from many benign conditions when viewed under these conditions. We have developed wide-field (macroscopic) imaging system which additionally images in cross-polarized white light, narrowband reflectance, and fluorescence imaging modes to reduce specular glare, enhance vascular contrast, and detect disease-related alterations in tissue autofluorescence. We have also developed a portable system to enable high-resolution (microscopic) evaluation of cellular features within the oral mucosa in situ. This system is a wide-field epi-fluorescence microscope coupled to a 1 mm diameter, flexible fiber-optic imaging bundle. Proflavine solution was used to specifically label cell nuclei, enabling the characteristic differences in N/C ratio and nuclear distribution between normal, dysplastic, and cancerous oral mucosa to be quantified. This paper discusses the technical design and performance characteristics of these complementary imaging systems. We will also present data from ongoing clinical studies aimed at evaluating diagnostic performance of these systems for detection of oral neoplasia.

  9. Speckle correlation resolution enhancement of wide-field fluorescence imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hasan

    2016-03-01

    Structured illumination enables high-resolution fluorescence imaging of nanostructures [1]. We demonstrate a new high-resolution fluorescence imaging method that uses a scattering layer with a high-index substrate as a solid immersion lens [2]. Random scattering of coherent light enables a speckle pattern with a very fine structure that illuminates the fluorescent nanospheres on the back surface of the high-index substrate. The speckle pattern is raster-scanned over the fluorescent nanospheres using a speckle correlation effect known as the optical memory effect. A series of standard-resolution fluorescence images per each speckle pattern displacement are recorded by an electron-multiplying CCD camera using a commercial microscope objective. We have developed a new phase-retrieval algorithm to reconstruct a high-resolution, wide-field image from several standard-resolution wide-field images. We have introduced phase information of Fourier components of standard-resolution images as a new constraint in our algorithm which discards ambiguities therefore ensures convergence to a unique solution. We demonstrate two-dimensional fluorescence images of a collection of nanospheres with a deconvolved Abbe resolution of 116 nm and a field of view of 10 µm × 10 µm. Our method is robust against optical aberrations and stage drifts, therefore excellent for imaging nanostructures under ambient conditions. [1] M. G. L. Gustafsson, J. Microsc. 198, 82-87 (2000). [2] H. Yilmaz, E. G. van Putten, J. Bertolotti, A. Lagendijk, W. L. Vos, and A. P. Mosk, Optica 2, 424-429 (2015).

  10. Microlensing Surveys of M31 in the Wide Field Imaging ERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltz, E.

    2004-10-27

    The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) is the closest large galaxy to the Milky Way, thus it is an important laboratory for studying massive dark objects in galactic halos (MACHOs) by gravitational microlensing. Such studies strongly complement the studies of the Milky Way halo using the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We consider the possibilities for microlensing surveys of M31 using the next generation of wide field imaging telescopes with fields of view in the square degree range. We consider proposals for such imagers both on the ground and in space. For concreteness, we specialize to the SNAP proposal for a space telescope and the LSST proposal for a ground based telescope. We find that a modest space-based survey of 50 visits of one hour each is considerably better than current ground based surveys covering 5 years. Crucially, systematic effects can be considerably better controlled with a space telescope because of both the infrared sensitivity and the angular resolution. To be competitive, 8 meter class wide-field ground based imagers must take exposures of several hundred seconds with several day cadence.

  11. Wide-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging of adhesives using a bolometer camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Shigeru; Nakayama, Yoshihiko; Taniguchi, Hideya; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2017-09-29

    By combining a bolometer detector with an imaging-type interferometer, an inexpensive, easy-to-handle wide-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging apparatus was produced. We measured the distributions of four types of thin adhesive layers on an aluminium plate and analysed the results using correlation coefficients to visualise the distribution of various adhesives that cannot be discerned by the naked eye or conventional methods such as visible/near-infrared spectroscopic/fluorescent photography. The measurement wavelength range, obtained spectrum's wavenumber resolution, and measurement time was 8-14 μm, about 9 cm-1, and about 30 s, respectively. Using conventional methods, adhesives could not be distinguished from the others. By using this method, we found that adhesives could be precisely distinguished by setting an appropriate threshold value for the correlation coefficient. Thus, our approach can accurately measure the spatial distribution of different types of adhesive that cannot be discriminated by conventional methods.

  12. Cost-effective and compact wide-field fluorescent imaging on a cell-phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Su, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-21

    We demonstrate wide-field fluorescent and darkfield imaging on a cell-phone with compact, light-weight and cost-effective optical components that are mechanically attached to the existing camera unit of the cell-phone. For this purpose, we used battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to pump the sample of interest from the side using butt-coupling, where the pump light was guided within the sample cuvette to uniformly excite the specimen. The fluorescent emission from the sample was then imaged using an additional lens that was positioned right in front of the existing lens of the cell-phone camera. Because the excitation occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to our detection path, an inexpensive plastic colour filter was sufficient to create the dark-field background required for fluorescent imaging, without the need for a thin-film interference filter. We validate the performance of this platform by imaging various fluorescent micro-objects in 2 colours (i.e., red and green) over a large field-of-view (FOV) of ∼81 mm(2) with a raw spatial resolution of ∼20 μm. With additional digital processing of the captured cell-phone images, through the use of compressive sampling theory, we demonstrate ∼2 fold improvement in our resolving power, achieving ∼10 μm resolution without a trade-off in our FOV. Further, we also demonstrate darkfield imaging of non-fluorescent specimen using the same interface, where this time the scattered light from the objects is detected without the use of any filters. The capability of imaging a wide FOV would be exceedingly important to probe large sample volumes (e.g., >0.1 mL) of e.g., blood, urine, sputum or water, and for this end we also demonstrate fluorescent imaging of labeled white-blood cells from whole blood samples, as well as water-borne pathogenic protozoan parasites such as Giardia Lamblia cysts. Weighing only ∼28 g (∼1 ounce), this compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform

  13. Wide-Field Imaging Telescope-0 (WIT0) with automatic observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tae-Geun; Byeon, Seoyeon; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Lee, Sang-Yun; Hwang, Sungyong; Choi, Changsu; Gibson, Coyne Andrew; Kuehne, John W.; Prochaska, Travis; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2018-01-01

    We introduce Wide-Field Imaging Telescope-0 (WIT0), with an automatic observing system. It is developed for monitoring the variabilities of many sources at a time, e.g. young stellar objects and active galactic nuclei. It can also find the locations of transient sources such as a supernova or gamma-ray bursts. In 2017 February, we installed the wide-field 10-inch telescope (Takahashi CCA-250) as a piggyback system on the 30-inch telescope at the McDonald Observatory in Texas, US. The 10-inch telescope has a 2.35 × 2.35 deg field-of-view with a 4k × 4k CCD Camera (FLI ML16803). To improve the observational efficiency of the system, we developed a new automatic observing software, KAOS30 (KHU Automatic Observing Software for McDonald 30-inch telescope), which was developed by Visual C++ on the basis of a windows operating system. The software consists of four control packages: the Telescope Control Package (TCP), the Data Acquisition Package (DAP), the Auto Focus Package (AFP), and the Script Mode Package (SMP). Since it also supports the instruments that are using the ASCOM driver, the additional hardware installations become quite simplified. We commissioned KAOS30 in 2017 August and are in the process of testing. Based on the WIT0 experiences, we will extend KAOS30 to control multiple telescopes in future projects.

  14. Wide-field microscopic FRET imaging using simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mengyan; Zhang, Lili; Xie, Shusen; Chen, Tongsheng

    2016-07-11

    Simultaneous spectral unmixing of excitation and emission spectra (ExEm unmixing) has the inherent ability to resolve donor emission, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-sensitized acceptor emission and directly excited acceptor emission. We here develop an ExEm unmixing-based quantitative FRET measurement method (EES-FRET) independent of excitation intensity and detector parameter setting. The ratio factor (rK), predetermined using a donor-acceptor tandem construct, of total acceptor absorption to total donor absorption in excitation wavelengths used is introduced for determining the concentration ratio of acceptor to donor. We implemented EES-FRET method on a wide-field microscope to image living cells expressing tandem FRET constructs with different donor-acceptor stoichiometry.

  15. Automatic detection of diabetic retinopathy features in ultra-wide field retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenkova, Anastasia; Sowmya, Arcot; Kalloniatis, Michael; Ly, Angelica; Ho, Arthur

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major cause of irreversible vision loss. DR screening relies on retinal clinical signs (features). Opportunities for computer-aided DR feature detection have emerged with the development of Ultra-WideField (UWF) digital scanning laser technology. UWF imaging covers 82% greater retinal area (200°), against 45° in conventional cameras3 , allowing more clinically relevant retinopathy to be detected4 . UWF images also provide a high resolution of 3078 x 2702 pixels. Currently DR screening uses 7 overlapping conventional fundus images, and the UWF images provide similar results1,4. However, in 40% of cases, more retinopathy was found outside the 7-field ETDRS) fields by UWF and in 10% of cases, retinopathy was reclassified as more severe4 . This is because UWF imaging allows examination of both the central retina and more peripheral regions, with the latter implicated in DR6 . We have developed an algorithm for automatic recognition of DR features, including bright (cotton wool spots and exudates) and dark lesions (microaneurysms and blot, dot and flame haemorrhages) in UWF images. The algorithm extracts features from grayscale (green "red-free" laser light) and colour-composite UWF images, including intensity, Histogram-of-Gradient and Local binary patterns. Pixel-based classification is performed with three different classifiers. The main contribution is the automatic detection of DR features in the peripheral retina. The method is evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation on 25 UWF retinal images with 167 bright lesions, and 61 other images with 1089 dark lesions. The SVM classifier performs best with AUC of 94.4% / 95.31% for bright / dark lesions.

  16. Wide-field imaging through scattering media by scattered light fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yulan; Li, Xun

    2017-08-01

    To obtain images through scattering media, scattered light fluorescence (SLF) microscopy that utilizes the optical memory effect has been developed. However, the small field of view (FOV) of SLF microscopy limits its application. In this paper, we have introduced a re-modulation method to achieve wide-field imaging through scattering media by SLF microscopy. In the re-modulation method, to raster scan the focus across the object plane, the incident wavefront is re-modulated via a spatial light modulator (SLM) in the updated phase compensation calculated using the optimized iterative algorithm. Compared with the conventional optical memory effect method, the re-modulation method can greatly increase the FOV of a SLF microscope. With the phase compensation theoretically calculated, the process of updating the phase compensation of a high speed SLM is fast. The re-modulation method does not increase the imaging time. The re-modulation method is, therefore, expected to make SLF microscopy have much wider applications in biology, medicine and physiology.

  17. Automated segmentation of oral mucosa from wide-field OCT images (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, Ryan N.; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Cahill, Lucas; Liu, Kelly; MacAulay, Calum; Poh, Catherine F.; Lane, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can discriminate morphological tissue features important for oral cancer detection such as the presence or absence of basement membrane and epithelial thickness. We previously reported an OCT system employing a rotary-pullback catheter capable of in vivo, rapid, wide-field (up to 90 x 2.5mm2) imaging in the oral cavity. Due to the size and complexity of these OCT data sets, rapid automated image processing software that immediately displays important tissue features is required to facilitate prompt bed-side clinical decisions. We present an automated segmentation algorithm capable of detecting the epithelial surface and basement membrane in 3D OCT images of the oral cavity. The algorithm was trained using volumetric OCT data acquired in vivo from a variety of tissue types and histology-confirmed pathologies spanning normal through cancer (8 sites, 21 patients). The algorithm was validated using a second dataset of similar size and tissue diversity. We demonstrate application of the algorithm to an entire OCT volume to map epithelial thickness, and detection of the basement membrane, over the tissue surface. These maps may be clinically useful for delineating pre-surgical tumor margins, or for biopsy site guidance.

  18. Wide-field OCT imaging of oral lesions in vivo: quantification and classification (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizada, Rashika; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Liu, Kelly Y.; MacAulay, Calum E.; Ng, Samson; Poh, Catherine F.; Lane, Pierre M.

    2017-02-01

    Worldwide, there are over 450,000 new cases of oral cancer reported each year. Late-stage diagnosis remains a significant factor responsible for its high mortality rate (>50%). In-vivo non-invasive rapid imaging techniques, that can visualise clinically significant changes in the oral mucosa, may improve the management of oral cancer. We present an analysis of features extracted from oral images obtained using our hand- held wide-field Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) instrument. The images were analyzed for epithelial scattering, overall tissue scattering, and 3D basement membrane topology. The associations between these three features and disease state (benign, pre-cancer, or cancer), as measured by clinical assessment or pathology, were determined. While scattering coefficient has previously been shown to be sensitive to cancer and dysplasia, likely due to changes in nuclear and cellular density, the addition of basement membrane topology may increase diagnostic ability- as it is known that the presence of bulbous rete pegs in the basement membrane are characteristic of dysplasia. The resolution and field-of-view of our oral OCT system allowed analysis of these features over large areas of up to 2.5mm x 90mm, in a timely fashion, which allow for application in clinical settings.

  19. WIDE-FIELD WIDE-BAND INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING: THE WB A-PROJECTION AND HYBRID ALGORITHMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, S.; Rau, U.; Golap, K., E-mail: sbhatnag@nrao.edu, E-mail: rurvashi@nrao.edu, E-mail: kgolap@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    Variations of the antenna primary beam (PB) pattern as a function of time, frequency, and polarization form one of the dominant direction-dependent effects at most radio frequency bands. These gains may also vary from antenna to antenna. The A-Projection algorithm, published earlier, accounts for the effects of the narrow-band antenna PB in full polarization. In this paper, we present the wide-band A-Projection algorithm (WB A-Projection) to include the effects of wide bandwidth in the A-term itself and show that the resulting algorithm simultaneously corrects for the time, frequency, and polarization dependence of the PB. We discuss the combination of the WB A-Projection and the multi-term multi-frequency synthesis (MT-MFS) algorithm for simultaneous mapping of the sky brightness distribution and the spectral index distribution across a wide field of view. We also discuss the use of the narrow-band A-Projection algorithm in hybrid imaging schemes that account for the frequency dependence of the PB in the image domain.

  20. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  1. Automatic Processing of Chinese GF-1 Wide Field of View Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Wan, Y.; Wang, B.; Kang, Y.; Xiong, J.

    2015-04-01

    The wide field of view (WFV) imaging instrument carried on the Chinese GF-1 satellite includes four cameras. Each camera has 200km swath-width that can acquire earth image at the same time and the observation can be repeated within only 4 days. This enables the applications of remote sensing imagery to advance from non-scheduled land-observation to periodically land-monitoring in the areas that use the images in such resolutions. This paper introduces an automatic data analysing and processing technique for the wide-swath images acquired by GF-1 satellite. Firstly, the images are validated by a self-adaptive Gaussian mixture model based cloud detection method to confirm whether they are qualified and suitable to be involved into the automatic processing workflow. Then the ground control points (GCPs) are quickly and automatically matched from the public geo-information products such as the rectified panchromatic images of Landsat-8. Before the geometric correction, the cloud detection results are also used to eliminate the invalid GCPs distributed in the cloud covered areas, which obviously reduces the ratio of blunders of GCPs. The geometric correction module not only rectifies the rational function models (RFMs), but also provides the self-calibration model and parameters for the non-linear distortion, and it is iteratively processed to detect blunders. The maximum geometric distortion in WFV image decreases from about 10-15 pixels to 1-2 pixels when compensated by self-calibration model. The processing experiments involve hundreds of WFV images of GF-1 satellite acquired from June to September 2013, which covers the whole mainland of China. All the processing work can be finished by one operator within 2 days on a desktop computer made up by a second-generation Intel Core-i7 CPU and a 4-solid-State-Disk array. The digital ortho maps (DOM) are automatically generated with 3 arc second Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The geometric accuracies of the

  2. Wide field imaging spectrometer for ESA's future X-ray mission: XEUS

    CERN Document Server

    Strüder, L

    1999-01-01

    An active pixel sensor (APS) based on the DEpleted P-channel junction Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) concept will be described as a potential wide field imager for ESA's high resolution, high throughput mission: 'X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy' (XEUS). It comprises a parallel multichannel readout, low noise at high speed readout, backside illumination and a fill factor of 100% over the whole field of view. The depleted thickness will be 500 microns. These design parameters match the scientific requirements of the mission. The fabrication techniques of the DEPFET arrays are related to the high resistivity process of the X-ray pn-CCDs. Potential extensions of the already realized DEPFET structures are a non-destructive repetitive readout of the signal charges. This concept will be presented. As an alternative solution, frame store pn-CCDs are considered having the same format and pixel sizes as the proposed DEPFET arrays. Their development is a low risk, straightforward continuation of the XMM devices. ...

  3. Studies of prototype DEPFET sensors for the Wide Field Imager of Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Andritschke, Robert; Bähr, Alexander; Behrens, Annika; Hauser, Günter; Lechner, Peter; Meidinger, Norbert; Müller-Seidlitz, Johannes; Treis, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    The Wide Field Imager (WFI) of ESA's next X-ray observatory Athena will combine a high count rate capability with a large field of view, both with state-of-the-art spectroscopic performance. To meet these demands, specific DEPFET active pixel detectors have been developed and operated. Due to the intrinsic amplification of detected signals they are best suited to achieve a high speed and low noise performance. Different fabrication technologies and transistor geometries have been implemented on a dedicated prototype production in the course of the development of the DEPFET sensors. The main modifications between the sensors concern the shape of the transistor gate - regarding the layout - and the thickness of the gate oxide - regarding the technology. To facilitate the fabrication and testing of the resulting variety of sensors the presented studies were carried out with 64×64 pixel detectors. The detector comprises a control ASIC (Switcher-A), a readout ASIC (VERITAS- 2) and the sensor. In this paper we give an overview on the evaluation of different prototype sensors. The most important results, which have been decisive for the identification of the optimal fabrication technology and transistor layout for subsequent sensor productions are summarized. It will be shown that the developments result in an excellent performance of spectroscopic X-ray DEPFETs with typical noise values below 2.5 ENC at 2.5 μs/row.

  4. Evaluation of illumination system uniformity for wide-field biomedical hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Travis W.; Siri Luthman, A.; E Bohndiek, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems collect both spatial (morphological) and spectral (chemical) information from a sample. HSI can provide sensitive analysis for biological and medical applications, for example, simultaneously measuring reflectance and fluorescence properties of a tissue, which together with structural information could improve early cancer detection and tumour characterisation. Illumination uniformity is a critical pre-condition for quantitative data extraction from an HSI system. Non-uniformity can cause glare, specular reflection and unwanted shading, which negatively impact statistical analysis procedures used to extract abundance of different chemical species. Here, we model and evaluate several illumination systems frequently used in wide-field biomedical imaging to test their potential for HSI. We use the software LightTools and FRED. The analysed systems include: a fibre ring light; a light emitting diode (LED) ring; and a diffuse scattering dome. Each system is characterised for spectral, spatial, and angular uniformity, as well as transfer efficiency. Furthermore, an approach to measure uniformity using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (KLD) is introduced. The KLD is generalisable to arbitrary illumination shapes, making it an attractive approach for characterising illumination distributions. Although the systems are quite comparable in their spatial and spectral uniformity, the most uniform angular distribution is achieved using a diffuse scattering dome, yielding a contrast of 0.503 and average deviation of 0.303 over a ±60° field of view with a 3.9% model error in the angular domain. Our results suggest that conventional illumination sources can be applied in HSI, but in the case of low light levels, bespoke illumination sources may offer improved performance.

  5. Wide field imager instrument for the Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Porro, Matteo; Rau, Arne; Santangelo, Andrea; Tenzer, Chris; Wilms, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected for ESA's L2 mission, scheduled for launch in 2028. It will provide the necessary capabilities to achieve the ambitious goals of the science theme "The Hot and Energetic Universe." Athena's x-ray mirrors will be based on silicon pore optics technology with a 12-m focal length. Two complementary focal plane camera systems are foreseen, which can be moved interchangeably to the focus of the mirror system: the actively shielded micro-calorimeter spectrometer X-IFU and the wide field imager (WFI). The WFI camera will provide an unprecedented survey power through its large field of view of 40 arc min with a high count-rate capability (˜1 Crab). It permits a state-of-the-art energy resolution in the energy band of 0.1 to 15 keV during the entire mission lifetime (e.g., full width at half maximum ≤150 eV at 6 keV). This performance is accomplished by a set of depleted P-channel field effect transistor (DEPFET) active pixel sensor matrices with a pixel size well suited to the angular resolution of 5 arc sec (on-axis) of the mirror system. Each DEPFET pixel is a combined detector-amplifier structure with a MOSFET integrated onto a fully depleted 450-μm-thick silicon bulk. This manuscript will summarize the current instrument concept and design, the status of the technology development, and the envisaged baseline performance.

  6. Compressive imaging for difference image formation and wide-field-of-view target tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhar

    2010-11-01

    Use of imaging systems for performing various situational awareness tasks in military and commercial settings has a long history. There is increasing recognition, however, that a much better job can be done by developing non-traditional optical systems that exploit the task-specific system aspects within the imager itself. In some cases, a direct consequence of this approach can be real-time data compression along with increased measurement fidelity of the task-specific features. In others, compression can potentially allow us to perform high-level tasks such as direct tracking using the compressed measurements without reconstructing the scene of interest. In this dissertation we present novel advancements in feature-specific (FS) imagers for large field-of-view surveillence, and estimation of temporal object-scene changes utilizing the compressive imaging paradigm. We develop these two ideas in parallel. In the first case we show a feature-specific (FS) imager that optically multiplexes multiple, encoded sub-fields of view onto a common focal plane. Sub-field encoding enables target tracking by creating a unique connection between target characteristics in superposition space and the target's true position in real space. This is accomplished without reconstructing a conventional image of the large field of view. System performance is evaluated in terms of two criteria: average decoding time and probability of decoding error. We study these performance criteria as a function of resolution in the encoding scheme and signal-to-noise ratio. We also include simulation and experimental results demonstrating our novel tracking method. In the second case we present a FS imager for estimating temporal changes in the object scene over time by quantifying these changes through a sequence of difference images. The difference images are estimated by taking compressive measurements of the scene. Our goals are twofold. First, to design the optimal sensing matrix for taking

  7. Wide field imaging - I. Applications of neural networks to object detection and star/galaxy classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreon, S.; Gargiulo, G.; Longo, G.; Tagliaferri, R.; Capuano, N.

    2000-12-01

    Astronomical wide-field imaging performed with new large-format CCD detectors poses data reduction problems of unprecedented scale, which are difficult to deal with using traditional interactive tools. We present here NExt (Neural Extractor), a new neural network (NN) based package capable of detecting objects and performing both deblending and star/galaxy classification in an automatic way. Traditionally, in astronomical images, objects are first distinguished from the noisy background by searching for sets of connected pixels having brightnesses above a given threshold; they are then classified as stars or as galaxies through diagnostic diagrams having variables chosen according to the astronomer's taste and experience. In the extraction step, assuming that images are well sampled, NExt requires only the simplest a priori definition of `what an object is' (i.e. it keeps all structures composed of more than one pixel) and performs the detection via an unsupervised NN, approaching detection as a clustering problem that has been thoroughly studied in the artificial intelligence literature. The first part of the NExt procedure consists of an optimal compression of the redundant information contained in the pixels via a mapping from pixel intensities to a subspace individualized through principal component analysis. At magnitudes fainter than the completeness limit, stars are usually almost indistinguishable from galaxies, and therefore the parameters characterizing the two classes do not lie in disconnected subspaces, thus preventing the use of unsupervised methods. We therefore adopted a supervised NN (i.e. a NN that first finds the rules to classify objects from examples and then applies them to the whole data set). In practice, each object is classified depending on its membership of the regions mapping the input feature space in the training set. In order to obtain an objective and reliable classification, instead of using an arbitrarily defined set of features

  8. Wide-field time-resolved luminescence imaging and spectroscopy to decipher obliterated documents in forensic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mototsugu; Akiba, Norimitsu; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Akao, Yoshinori; Higashikawa, Yoshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    We applied a wide-field time-resolved luminescence (TRL) method with a pulsed laser and a gated intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) for deciphering obliterated documents for use in forensic science. The TRL method can nondestructively measure the dynamics of luminescence, including fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetimes, which prove to be useful parameters for image detection. First, we measured the TRL spectra of four brands of black porous-tip pen inks on paper to estimate their luminescence lifetimes. Next, we acquired the TRL images of 12 obliterated documents at various delay times and gate times of the ICCD. The obliterated contents were revealed in the TRL images because of the difference in the luminescence lifetimes of the inks. This method requires no pretreatment, is nondestructive, and has the advantage of wide-field imaging, which makes it is easy to control the gate timing. This demonstration proves that TRL imaging and spectroscopy are powerful tools for forensic document examination.

  9. SkICAT: A cataloging and analysis tool for wide field imaging surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, N.; Fayyad, U. M.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Roden, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe an integrated system, SkICAT (Sky Image Cataloging and Analysis Tool), for the automated reduction and analysis of the Palomar Observatory-ST ScI Digitized Sky Survey. The Survey will consist of the complete digitization of the photographic Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS-II) in three bands, comprising nearly three Terabytes of pixel data. SkICAT applies a combination of existing packages, including FOCAS for basic image detection and measurement and SAS for database management, as well as custom software, to the task of managing this wealth of data. One of the most novel aspects of the system is its method of object classification. Using state-of-theart machine learning classification techniques (GID3* and O-BTree), we have developed a powerful method for automatically distinguishing point sources from non-point sources and artifacts, achieving comparably accurate discrimination a full magnitude fainter than in previous Schmidt plate surveys. The learning algorithms produce decision trees for classification by examining instances of objects classified by eye on both plate and higher quality CCD data. The same techniques will be applied to perform higher-level object classification (e.g., of galaxy morphology) in the near future. Another key feature of the system is the facility to integrate the catalogs from multiple plates (and portions thereof) to construct a single catalog of uniform calibration and quality down to the faintest limits of the survey. SkICAT also provides a variety of data analysis and exploration tools for the scientific utilization of the resulting catalogs. We include initial results of applying this system to measure the counts and distribution of galaxies in two bands down to Bj is approximately 21 mag over an approximate 70 square degree multi-plate field from POSS-II. SkICAT is constructed in a modular and general fashion and should be readily adaptable to other large-scale imaging surveys.

  10. Lensfree Fluorescent On-Chip Imaging of Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans Over an Ultra-Wide Field-of-View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate lensfree on-chip fluorescent imaging of transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) over an ultra-wide field-of-view (FOV) of e.g., >2–8 cm2 with a spatial resolution of ∼10µm. This is the first time that a lensfree on-chip platform has successfully imaged fluorescent C. elegans samples. In our wide-field lensfree imaging platform, the transgenic samples are excited using a prism interface from the side, where the pump light is rejected through total internal reflection occurring at the bottom facet of the substrate. The emitted fluorescent signal from C. elegans samples is then recorded on a large area opto-electronic sensor-array over an FOV of e.g., >2–8 cm2, without the use of any lenses, thin-film interference filters or mechanical scanners. Because fluorescent emission rapidly diverges, such lensfree fluorescent images recorded on a chip look blurred due to broad point-spread-function of our platform. To combat this resolution challenge, we use a compressive sampling algorithm to uniquely decode the recorded lensfree fluorescent patterns into higher resolution images, demonstrating ∼10 µm resolution. We tested the efficacy of this compressive decoding approach with different types of opto-electronic sensors to achieve a similar resolution level, independent of the imaging chip. We further demonstrate that this wide FOV lensfree fluorescent imaging platform can also perform sequential bright-field imaging of the same samples using partially-coherent lensfree digital in-line holography that is coupled from the top facet of the same prism used in fluorescent excitation. This unique combination permits ultra-wide field dual-mode imaging of C. elegans on a chip which could especially provide a useful tool for high-throughput screening applications in biomedical research. PMID:21253611

  11. Rapid wide-field Mueller matrix polarimetry imaging based on four photoelastic modulators with no moving parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Sanaz; Gribble, Adam; Vitkin, I Alex

    2016-03-01

    A new polarimetry method is demonstrated to image the entire Mueller matrix of a turbid sample using four photoelastic modulators (PEMs) and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, with no moving parts. Accurate wide-field imaging is enabled with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) optical gating technique and an evolutionary algorithm (EA) that optimizes imaging times. This technique accurately and rapidly measured the Mueller matrices of air, polarization elements, and turbid phantoms. The system should prove advantageous for Mueller matrix analysis of turbid samples (e.g., biological tissues) over large fields of view, in less than a second.

  12. Multimodal wide-field two-photon excitation imaging: characterization of the technique for in vivo applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Nowatzyk, Andreas G; Koronyo, Yosef; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K; Gross, Zeev; Gray, Harry B; Farkas, Daniel L

    2011-01-13

    We report fast, non-scanning, wide-field two-photon fluorescence excitation with spectral and lifetime detection for in vivo biomedical applications. We determined the optical characteristics of the technique, developed a Gaussian flat-field correction method to reduce artifacts resulting from non-uniform excitation such that contrast is enhanced, and showed that it can be used for ex vivo and in vivo cellular-level imaging. Two applications were demonstrated: (i) ex vivo measurements of beta-amyloid plaques in retinas of transgenic mice, and (ii) in vivo imaging of sulfonated gallium(III) corroles injected into tumors. We demonstrate that wide-field two photon fluorescence excitation with flat-field correction provides more penetration depth as well as better contrast and axial resolution than the corresponding one-photon wide field excitation for the same dye. Importantly, when this technique is used together with spectral and fluorescence lifetime detection modules, it offers improved discrimination between fluorescence from molecules of interest and autofluorescence, with higher sensitivity and specificity for in vivo applications.

  13. Image Centroid Algorithms for Sun Sensors with Super Wide Field of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAN Yinhu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sun image centroid algorithm is one of the key technologies of celestial navigation using sun sensors, which directly determine the precision of the sensors. Due to the limitation of centroid algorithm for non-circular sun image of the sun sensor of large field of view, firstly, the ellipse fitting algorithm is proposed for solving elliptical or sub-elliptical sun images. Then the spherical circle fitting algorithm is put forward. Based on the projection model and distortion model of the camera, the spherical circle fitting algorithm is used to obtain the edge points of the sun in the object space, and then the centroid of the sun can be determined by fitting the edge points as a spherical circle. In order to estimate the precision of spherical circle fitting algorithm, the centroid of the sun should be projected back to the image space. Theoretically, the spherical circle fitting algorithm is no longer need to take into account the shape of the sun image, the algorithm is more precise. The results of practical sun images demonstrate that the ellipse fitting algorithm is more suitable for the sun image with 70°~80.3° half angle of view, and the mean precision is about 0.075 pixels; the spherical circle fitting algorithm is more suitable for the sun image with a half angle of view larger than 80.3°, and the mean precision is about 0.082 pixels.

  14. Compressive hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging and spatial multiplexing have offered information content and collection-efficiency boosts in microscopy, but efficient implementations for macroscopic applications are still lacking. An imaging platform based on time-resolved structured light and hyperspectral single-pixel detection has been developed to perform quantitative macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging (MFLI) over a large field of view (FOV) and multiple spectral bands simultaneously. The system makes use of three digital micromirror device (DMD)-based spatial light modulators (SLMs) to generate spatial optical bases and reconstruct N by N images over 16 spectral channels with a time-resolved capability (∼40 ps temporal resolution) using fewer than N2 optical measurements. We demonstrate the potential of this new imaging platform by quantitatively imaging near-infrared (NIR) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) both in vitro and in vivo. The technique is well suited for quantitative hyperspectral lifetime imaging with a high sensitivity and paves the way for many important biomedical applications.

  15. Wide-field flexible endoscope for simultaneous color and NIR fluorescence image acquisition during surveillance colonoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Allende, P. Beatriz; Nagengast, Wouter B.; Glatz, Jürgen; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common form of cancer and, despite recent declines in both incidence and mortality, it still remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the western world. Colonoscopy is the standard for detection and removal of premalignant lesions to prevent CRC. The major challenges that physicians face during surveillance colonoscopy are the high adenoma miss-rates and the lack of functional information to facilitate decision-making concerning which lesions to remove. Targeted imaging with NIR fluorescence would address these limitations. Tissue penetration is increased in the NIR range while the combination with targeted NIR fluorescent agents provides molecularly specific detection of cancer cells, i.e. a red-flag detection strategy that allows tumor imaging with optimal sensitivity and specificity. The development of a flexible endoscopic fluorescence imaging method that can be integrated with standard medical endoscopes and facilitates the clinical use of this potential is described in this work. A semi-disposable coherent fiber optic imaging bundle that is traditionally employed in the exploration of biliary and pancreatic ducts is proposed, since it is long and thin enough to be guided through the working channel of a traditional video colonoscope allowing visualization of proximal lesions in the colon. A custom developed zoom system magnifies the image of the proximal end of the imaging bundle to fill the dimensions of two cameras operating in parallel providing the simultaneous color and fluorescence video acquisition.

  16. Retinal changes detected by wide-field autofluorescence imaging of patients with primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christina Døfler; Grauslund, Jakob; Peto, Tunde

    2014-01-01

    and 2 months follow-up and 59 had gradable images with characteristics studied in this part of the study. Exclusions were: poor images (n=8), major surgery or changes on fellow-eye (n=11), no baseline or 2-month image (n=7), re-detachment at 2-month follow-up (n=1) and eyes traumas (n=2). Retinal.......2 million inhabitants. Methods: A clinical prospective study of 99 eyes in 99 patients undergoing surgery for primary RRD between 1st of January 2013 and 12th of July 2013. All patients underwent surgery with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and had either gas or silicone oil tamponade. Patients were examined...... eye history (including cataract surgery), present symptoms, IOP, time from RRD to surgery, preoperative proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) graded according to standardized protocol as follows: A (vitreous haze, pigment, vitreous cells and clumps) , B (wrinkling of inner retinal suface, vessel...

  17. GravityCam: ground-based wide-field high-resolution imaging and high-speed photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, Martin; Mackay, Craig; Steele, Iain; Snodgrass, Colin; Hirsch, Michael; Gråe Jørgensen, Uffe; Hundertmark, Markus; Rebolo, Rafael; Horne, Keith; Bridle, Sarah; Sicardy, Bruno; Bramich, Daniel; Alsubai, Khalid

    2015-12-01

    The image blurring by the Earth's atmosphere generally poses a substantial limitation to ground-based observations. While opportunities in space are scarce, lucky imaging can correct over a much larger patch of sky and with much fainter reference stars. We propose the first of a new kind of versatile instruments, "GravityCam", composed of ~100 EMCCDs, that will open up two entirely new windows to ground-based astronomy: (1) wide-field high-resolution imaging, and (2) wide-field high-speed photometry. Potential applications include (a) a gravitational microlensing survey going 4 magnitudes deeper than current efforts, and thereby gaining a factor 100 in mass at the same sensitivity, which means probing down to Lunar mass or even below, (b) extra-solar planet hunting via transits in galactic bulge fields, with high time resolution well-suited for transit timing variation studies, (c) variable stars in crowded fields, with sensitivity to very short periods, (d) asteroseismology with many bright stars in one pointing, (e) serendipitous occultations of stars by small solar system bodies, giving access to the small end of the Kuiper Belt size distribution and potentially leading to the first detection of true Oort cloud objects, while predicted occultations at high time resolution can reveal atmospheres, satellites, or rings, (f) general data mining of the high-speed variable sky (down to 40 ms cadence).

  18. Optically sectioned wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy enabled by structured illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsdale, Taylor; Olsovsky, Cory; Rico-Jimenez, Jose J.; Maitland, Kristen C.; Jo, Javier A.; Malik, Bilal H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of structured illumination microscopy to enhance the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging to resolve fluorescence lifetimes in relatively thick samples that possess distinct but spectrally overlapping fluorescent layers. Structured illumination fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (SI-FLIM) is shown to be able to accurately reconstruct lifetime values in homogenous fluorophore samples (POPOP, NADH, and FAD) as well as accurately measure fluorescent lifetime in two layer models that are layered with NADH/FAD over POPOP, where NADH/FAD and POPOP have spectral overlap. Finally, the ability of SI-FLIM was demonstrated in a hamster cheek pouch ex vivo to show that more accurate lifetimes could be measured for each layer of interest in the oral mucosa (epithelium and submucosa). PMID:28663841

  19. Light-pollution measurement with the Wide-field all-sky image analyzing monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítek, S.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to measure light pollution in the capital of Czech Republic, Prague. As a measuring instrument is used calibrated consumer level digital single reflex camera with IR cut filter, therefore, the paper reports results of measuring and monitoring of the light pollution in the wavelength range of 390 - 700 nm, which most affects visual range astronomy. Combining frames of different exposure times made with a digital camera coupled with fish-eye lens allow to create high dynamic range images, contain meaningful values, so such a system can provide absolute values of the sky brightness.

  20. Wide-field retinal optical coherence tomography with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for enhanced imaging of targeted regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polans, James; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; LaRocca, Francesco; Cole, Elijah; Whitson, Heather E; Lad, Eleonora M; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral retina of the human eye offers a unique opportunity for assessment and monitoring of ocular diseases. We have developed a novel wide-field (>70°) optical coherence tomography system (WF-OCT) equipped with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) for enhancing the visualization of smaller (23°) retina. We demonstrated the ability of our WF-OCT system to acquire non wavefront-corrected wide-field images rapidly, which could then be used to locate regions of interest, zoom into targeted features, and visualize the same region at different time points. A pilot clinical study was conducted on seven healthy volunteers and two subjects with prodromal Alzheimer's disease which illustrated the capability to image Drusen-like pathologies as far as 32.5° from the fovea in un-averaged volume scans. This work suggests that the proposed combination of WF-OCT and WSAO may find applications in the diagnosis and treatment of ocular, and potentially neurodegenerative, diseases of the peripheral retina, including diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Portable lensless wide-field microscopy imaging platform based on digital inline holography and multi-frame pixel super-resolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonio C Sobieranski; Fatih Inci; H Cumhur Tekin; Mehmet Yuksekkaya; Eros Comunello; Daniel Cobra; Aldo Von Wangenheim; Utkan Demirci

    2015-01-01

      In this paper, an irregular displacement-based lensless wide-field microscopy imaging platform is presented by combining digital in-line holography and computational pixel super-resolution using multi-frame processing...

  2. Wide-field spectral imaging of human ovary autofluorescence and oncologic diagnosis via previously collected probe data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkoski, Timothy E.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Utzinger, Urs

    2012-03-01

    With no sufficient screening test for ovarian cancer, a method to evaluate the ovarian disease state quickly and nondestructively is needed. The authors have applied a wide-field spectral imager to freshly resected ovaries of 30 human patients in a study believed to be the first of its magnitude. Endogenous fluorescence was excited with 365-nm light and imaged in eight emission bands collectively covering the 400- to 640-nm range. Linear discriminant analysis was used to classify all image pixels and generate diagnostic maps of the ovaries. Training the classifier with previously collected single-point autofluorescence measurements of a spectroscopic probe enabled this novel classification. The process by which probe-collected spectra were transformed for comparison with imager spectra is described. Sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 51% were obtained in classifying normal and cancerous ovaries using autofluorescence data alone. Specificity increased to 69% when autofluorescence data were divided by green reflectance data to correct for spatial variation in tissue absorption properties. Benign neoplasm ovaries were also found to classify as nonmalignant using the same algorithm. Although applied ex vivo, the method described here appears useful for quick assessment of cancer presence in the human ovary.

  3. Gradient Permittivity Meta-Structure model for Wide-field Super-resolution imaging with a sub-45 nm resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shun; Wang, Taisheng; Xu, Wenbin; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Hongxin; Hu, Bingliang; Yu, Weixing

    2016-03-21

    A gradient permittivity meta-structure (GPMS) model and its application in super-resolution imaging were proposed and discussed in this work. The proposed GPMS consists of alternate metallic and dielectric films with a gradient permittivity which can support surface plasmons (SPs) standing wave interference patterns with a super resolution. By employing the rigorous numerical FDTD simulation method, the GPMS was carefully simulated to find that the period of the SPs interference pattern is only 84 nm for a 532 nm incident light. Furthermore, the potential application of the GPMS for wide-field super-resolution imaging was also discussed and the simulation results show that an imaging resolution of sub-45 nm can be achieved based on the plasmonic structure illumination microscopic method, which means a 5.3-fold improvement on resolution has been achieved in comparison with conventional epifluorescence microscopy. Moreover, besides the super-resolution imaging application, the proposed GPMS model can also be applied for nanolithography and other areas where super resolution patterns are needed.

  4. Wide Field-of-View Fluorescence Imaging with Optical-Quality Curved Microfluidic Chamber for Absolute Cell Counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohiuddin Khan Shourav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Field curvature and other aberrations are encountered inevitably when designing a compact fluorescence imaging system with a simple lens. Although multiple lens elements can be used to correct most such aberrations, doing so increases system cost and complexity. Herein, we propose a wide field-of-view (FOV fluorescence imaging method with an unconventional optical-quality curved sample chamber that corrects the field curvature caused by a simple lens. Our optics simulations and proof-of-concept experiments demonstrate that a curved substrate with lens-dependent curvature can reduce greatly the distortion in an image taken with a conventional planar detector. Following the validation study, we designed a curved sample chamber that can contain a known amount of sample volume and fabricated it at reasonable cost using plastic injection molding. At a magnification factor of approximately 0.6, the curved chamber provides a clear view of approximately 119 mm2, which is approximately two times larger than the aberration-free area of a planar chamber. Remarkably, a fluorescence image of microbeads in the curved chamber exhibits almost uniform intensity over the entire field even with a simple lens imaging system, whereas the distorted boundary region has much lower brightness than the central area in the planar chamber. The absolute count of white blood cells stained with a fluorescence dye was in good agreement with that obtained by a commercially available conventional microscopy system. Hence, a wide FOV imaging system with the proposed curved sample chamber would enable us to acquire an undistorted image of a large sample volume without requiring a time-consuming scanning process in point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  5. Development of digital system for the wide-field x-ray imaging detector aboard Kanazawa-SAT3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yasuaki; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Sawano, Tatsuya; Mihara, Tatehiro; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Kazuki; Ina, Masao; Ota, Kaichi; Suzuki, Daichi; Miyao, Kouga; Watanabe, Syouta; Hatori, Satoshi; Kume, Kyo; Mizushima, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    We are planning to launch a micro satellite, Kanazawa-SAT3 , at the end of FY2018 to localize X-ray transients associated with gravitational wave sources. Now we are testing a prototype model of wide-field Xray imaging detector named T-LEX (Transient Localization EXperiment). T-LEX is an orthogonally distributed two sets of 1-dimensional silicon strip detectors with coded aperture masks, and covers more than 1 steradian field of view in the energy range of 1 - 20 keV. Each dimension has 512 readout electrodes (totally 1,024 channels), and they are read out with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) controlled by two onboard FPGAs. Moreover, each FPGA calculates the cross correlation between the X-ray intensity and mask patterns every 64 msec, makes a histogram of lightcurves and energy spectra, and also plays a role of telemetry/command interface to mission CPU. In this paper, we report an overview of digital electronics system. Especially, we focus on the high-speed imaging processor on FPGA and demonstrate its performance as an X-ray imaging system.

  6. Final design and progress of WEAVE: the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Abrams, Don Carlos; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Middleton, Kevin; Benn, Chris; Dee, Kevin; Sayède, Frédéric; Lewis, Ian; Pragt, Johannes; Pico, Sergio; Walton, Nic; Rey, Jeurg; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Peñate, José; Lhome, Emilie; Agócs, Tibor; Alonso, José; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Gilbert, James; Schallig, Ellen; Ridings, Andy; Guinouard, Isabelle; Verheijen, Marc; Tosh, Ian; Rogers, Kevin; Lee, Martin; Steele, Iain; Stuik, Remko; Tromp, Niels; Jaskó, Attila; Carrasco, Esperanza; Farcas, Szigfrid; Kragt, Jan; Lesman, Dirk; Kroes, Gabby; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Gribbin, Frank; Delgado, José Miguel; Herreros, José Miguel; Martin, Carlos; Cano, Diego; Navarro, Ramon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim; Gonzalez Solares, Eduardo; Murphy, David; Worley, Clare; Bassom, Richard; O'Mahoney, Neil; Bianco, Andrea; Zurita, Christina; ter Horst, Rik; Molinari, Emilio; Lodi, Marcello; Guerra, José; Martin, Adrian; Vallenari, Antonella; Salasnich, Bernardo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Jin, Shoko; Hill, Vanessa; Smith, Dan; Drew, Janet; Poggianti, Bianca; Pieri, Mat; Dominquez Palmero, Lillian; Farina, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    We present the Final Design of the WEAVE next-generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), together with a status update on the details of manufacturing, integration and the overall project schedule now that all the major fabrication contracts are in place. We also

  7. Final design and progress of WEAVE : the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Abrams, Don Carlos; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Middleton, Kevin; Benn, Chris; Dee, Kevin; Sayède, Frédéric; Lewis, Ian; Pragt, Johannes; Pico, Sergio; Walton, Nic; Rey, Jeurg; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Peñate, José; Lhome, Emilie; Agócs, Tibor; Alonso, José; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Gilbert, James; Schallig, Ellen; Ridings, Andy; Guinouard, Isabelle; Verheijen, Marc; Tosh, Ian; Rogers, Kevin; Lee, Martin; Steele, Iain; Stuik, Remko; Tromp, Niels; Jaskó, Attila; Carrasco, Esperanza; Farcas, Szigfrid; Kragt, Jan; Lesman, Dirk; Kroes, Gabby; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Gribbin, Frank; Delgado, José Miguel; Herreros, José Miguel; Martin, Carlos; Cano, Diego; Navarro, Ramon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim; Gonzalez Solares, Eduardo; Murphy, David; Worley, Clare; Bassom, Richard; O'Mahoney, Neil; Bianco, Andrea; Zurita, Christina; ter Horst, Rik; Molinari, Emilio; Lodi, Marcello; Guerra, José; Martin, Adrian; Vallenari, Antonella; Salasnich, Bernardo; Baruffolo, Andrea; Jin, Shoko; Hill, Vanessa; Smith, Dan; Drew, Janet; Poggianti, Bianca; Pieri, Mat; Dominquez Palmero, Lillian; Farina, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    We present the Final Design of the WEAVE next-generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), together with a status update on the details of manufacturing, integration and the overall project schedule now that all the major fabrication contracts are in place. We also

  8. Project overview and update on WEAVE: the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, Gavin; Trager, Scott; Abrams, Don Carlos; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; López Aguerri, J. Alfonso; Middleton, Kevin; Benn, Chris; Dee, Kevin; Sayède, Frédéric; Lewis, Ian; Pragt, Johan; Pico, Sergio; Walton, Nic; Rey, Juerg; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Peñate, José; Lhome, Emilie; Agócs, Tibor; Alonso, José; Terrett, David; Brock, Matthew; Gilbert, James; Ridings, Andy; Guinouard, Isabelle; Verheijen, Marc A.W.; Tosh, Ian; Rogers, Kevin; Steele, Iain; Stuik, Remko; Tromp, Neils; Jasko, Attila; Kragt, Jan; Lesman, Dirk; Mottram, Chris; Bates, Stuart; Gribbin, Frank; Rodriguez, Luis Fernando; Delgado, José M.; Martin, Carlos; Cano, Diego; Navarro, Ramón; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Jim; Gonzalez Solares, Eduardo; O'Mahony, Neil; Bianco, Andrea; Zurita, Christina; ter Horst, Rik; Molinari, Emilio; Lodi, Marcello; Guerra, José; Vallenari, Antonella; Baruffolo, Andrea

    We present an overview of and status report on the WEAVE next-generation spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT). WEAVE principally targets optical ground-based follow up of upcoming ground-based (LOFAR) and space-based (Gaia) surveys. WEAVE is a multi-object and multi-IFU

  9. Mapping the Tidal Destruction of the Hercules Dwarf: A Wide-field DECam Imaging Search for RR Lyrae Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garling, Christopher; Willman, Beth; Sand, David J.; Hargis, Jonathan; Crnojević, Denija; Bechtol, Keith; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Strader, Jay; Zou, Hu; Zhou, Xu; Nie, Jundan; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhou, Zhimin; Peng, Xiyan

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the hypothesized tidal disruption of the Hercules ultra-faint dwarf galaxy (UFD). Previous tidal disruption studies of the Hercules UFD have been hindered by the high degree of foreground contamination in the direction of the dwarf. We bypass this issue by using RR Lyrae stars, which are standard candles with a very low field-volume density at the distance of Hercules. We use wide-field imaging from the Dark Energy Camera on CTIO to identify candidate RR Lyrae stars, supplemented with observations taken in coordination with the Beijing–Arizona Sky Survey on the Bok Telescope. Combining color, magnitude, and light-curve information, we identify three new RR Lyrae stars associated with Hercules. All three of these new RR Lyrae stars lie outside its published tidal radius. When considered with the nine RR Lyrae stars already known within the tidal radius, these results suggest that a substantial fraction of Hercules’ stellar content has been stripped. With this degree of tidal disruption, Hercules is an interesting case between a visibly disrupted dwarf (such as the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy) and one in dynamic equilibrium. The degree of disruption also shows that we must be more careful with the ways we determine object membership when estimating dwarf masses in the future. One of the three discovered RR Lyrae stars sits along the minor axis of Hercules, but over two tidal radii away. This type of debris is consistent with recent models that suggest Hercules’ orbit is aligned with its minor axis.

  10. Argus+: The Future of Wide-Field, Spectral-Line Imaging at 3-mm with the Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Ronald; Frayer, David; Lockman, Felix; O'Neil, Karen; White, Steven; Argus+ Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Robert C Byrd Green Bank Telescope has met its design goal of providing high-quality observations at 115 GHz. Observers also have access to the new, 16-pixel, 3-mm Argus receiver, which is providing high-dynamic range images over wide fields for the multitude of spectral lines between 85 and 115 GHz, including CO, 13CO, C18O, SiO, HCN, HCO+, HNC, N2H+, and CS. The small number of pixels in Argus limits its ability to map many of the most interesting objects whose extent exceeds many arc-minutes. The successful performance of Argus, and its modular design, demonstrates that receivers with many more pixels could be built for the GBT. A 12 x 12 array of the Argus design would have mapping speeds about nine times faster than Argus without suffering any degradation in performance for the outer pixels in the array. We present our plans to build the next-generation Argus instrument (Argus+) with 144-pixels, a footprint 5’x5’, and 7" resolution at 110 GHz. The project will be a collaboration between the Green Bank Observatory and university groups, who will supply key components. The key science drivers for Argus+ are studies of molecular filaments in the Milky Way, studies of molecular clouds in nearby galaxies, and the observations of rapidly evolving solar system objects.

  11. Outcome of universal newborn eye screening with wide-field digital retinal image acquisition system: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, P; Padhi, T R; Das, T; Pradhan, L; Sutar, S; Butola, S; Behera, U C; Jain, L; Jalali, S

    2017-07-24

    PurposeTo evaluate the outcome of universal newborn eye screening with wide-field digital retinal imaging (WFDRI) system.MethodsIn this pilot study, we examined 1152 apparently healthy newborn infants in the obstetrics and gynecology ward of a civil hospital in Eastern India over 1.5 years. The examination included external eye examination, red reflex test and fundus imaging by WFDRI (RetCam II, Clarity medical system, Pleasanton, CA, USA) by a trained optometrist. The pathologies detected, net monetary gain and skilled manpower saved were documented. The results were compared with three similar studies thus far published in the literature.ResultsOcular abnormality of any kind was seen in 172 (14.93%) babies. Retinal hemorrhage in 153 babies (88.9% of all abnormal findings) was the most common abnormality; it was bilateral in 118 (77.12%) babies and 4 babies had foveal hemorrhage. Other abnormalities included vitreous hemorrhage (n=1), congenital glaucoma (n=2), uveal coloboma (n=2), retinopathy mimicking retinopathy of prematurity (n=2), and cystic fovea (n=3). The retinal hemorrhages resolved spontaneously in all eyes. One baby with congenital glaucoma received surgery and the other was treated medically. The benefits included savings in skilled manpower, a net monetary gain of INR 4.195 million (US$ 62,612) and skilled manpower saving by 319.4 h.ConclusionsThe universal neonatal eye screening using WFDRI detected pathologies that needed immediate care or regular follow up; saved skilled manpower with a net monetary gain. But compared to a red reflex test the benefits were marginal in terms of detecting treatment warranting ocular pathologies.Eye advance online publication, 24 July 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.129.

  12. ProtoEXIST2: Advanced Wide-field Imaging CZT Detector Development For The HET On The Proposed EXIST Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.; Gehrels, N.; Cook, W.; Kaye, S.; Harrison, F.

    2010-03-01

    We describe our development of ProtoEXIST2, the advanced CZT imaging detector and wide field telescope prototype for the High Energy Telescope (HET) on the proposed Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission. EXIST is a multi-wavelength Medium class mission which would explore the early Universe using high redshift Gamma-ray Bursts and survey black holes on all scales. ProtoEXIST2 will demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale imaging module (256 cm2) with a close-tiled array of fine pixel (0.6 mm) CZT with a balloon flight test in 2010 or 2011. This second generation close-tiled CZT imager follows ProtoEXIST1, which had a recent successful balloon flight (see Allen et al in this meeting) using the same area CZT detector module (256 cm2) but with larger pixel size (2.5mm). For signal readout and event processing, we use the Direct-Bond (DB) ASIC, developed for the NuSTAR mission to be used in a close-tiled 2 x 2 array of 2x2 cm2 CZT detectors, each with 32x32 pixels. The DB-ASIC is attractive for a large scale implementation of tiled imaging CZT detectors given its low noise and power consumption (70uW/pixel). We are developing readout for the DB-ASIC that incorporates our back-end FPGA readout architecture developed for ProtoEXIST1 in order to accomplish the 256 cm2 detector module area with totally vertical integration (i.e. no auxialliary boards to the sides of the module. This is required to tile large numbers of modules into the very large total area (4.5m^2) proposed for the HET on EXIST. We review the design of the EXIST/HET and its optimum shielding in light of our ProtoEXIST1 balloon flight and our plan for future development of ProtoEXIST3, a final EXIST/HET detector module that would incorporate a still lower power version of the DB ASIC.

  13. Comparison of multispectral wide-field optical imaging modalities to maximize image contrast for objective discrimination of oral neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblyer, Darren; Kurachi, Cristina; Stepanek, Vanda; Schwarz, Richard A.; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Lee, J. Jack; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-11-01

    Multispectral widefield optical imaging has the potential to improve early detection of oral cancer. The appropriate selection of illumination and collection conditions is required to maximize diagnostic ability. The goals of this study were to (i) evaluate image contrast between oral cancer/precancer and non-neoplastic mucosa for a variety of imaging modalities and illumination/collection conditions, and (ii) use classification algorithms to evaluate and compare the diagnostic utility of these modalities to discriminate cancers and precancers from normal tissue. Narrowband reflectance, autofluorescence, and polarized reflectance images were obtained from 61 patients and 11 normal volunteers. Image contrast was compared to identify modalities and conditions yielding greatest contrast. Image features were extracted and used to train and evaluate classification algorithms to discriminate tissue as non-neoplastic, dysplastic, or cancer; results were compared to histologic diagnosis. Autofluorescence imaging at 405-nm excitation provided the greatest image contrast, and the ratio of red-to-green fluorescence intensity computed from these images provided the best classification of dysplasia/cancer versus non-neoplastic tissue. A sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85% were achieved in the validation set. Multispectral widefield images can accurately distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue; however, the ability to separate precancerous lesions from cancers with this technique was limited.

  14. Miniature spectral imaging device for wide-field quantitative functional imaging of the morphological landscape of breast tumor margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brandon S.; Llopis, Antonio; Palmer, Gregory M.; McCachren, Samuel S., III; Senlik, Ozlem; Miller, David; Brooke, Martin A.; Jokerst, Nan M.; Geradts, Joseph; Greenup, Rachel; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a portable, breast margin assessment probe leveraging diffuse optical spectroscopy to quantify the morphological landscape of breast tumor margins during breast conserving surgery. The approach presented here leverages a custom-made 16-channel annular photodiode imaging array (arranged in a 4×4 grid), a raster-scanning imaging platform with precision pressure control, and compressive sensing with an optimized set of eight wavelengths in the visible spectral range. A scalable Monte-Carlo-based inverse model is used to generate optical property [μs‧(λ) and μa(λ)] measures for each of the 16 simultaneously captured diffuse reflectance spectra. Subpixel sampling (0.75 mm) is achieved through incremental x, y raster scanning of the imaging probe, providing detailed optical parameter maps of breast margins over a 2×2 cm2 area in ˜9 min. The morphological landscape of a tumor margin is characterized using optical surrogates for the fat to fibroglandular content ratio, which has demonstrated diagnostic utility in delineating tissue subtypes in the breast.

  15. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source

    OpenAIRE

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequenc...

  16. Flight performance of an advanced CZT imaging detector in a balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope—ProtoEXIST1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelemy, S.; Baker, R.; Garson, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Apple, J.; Cleveland, W. H.

    2011-10-01

    We successfully carried out the first high-altitude balloon flight of a wide-field hard X-ray coded-aperture telescope ProtoEXIST1, which was launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on October 9, 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first implementation of an advanced CdZnTe (CZT) imaging detector in our ongoing program to establish the technology required for next generation wide-field hard X-ray telescopes such as the High Energy Telescope (HET) in the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST). The CZT detector plane in ProtoEXIST1 consists of an 8×8 array of closely tiled 2 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm thick pixellated CZT crystals, each with 8×8 pixels, mounted on a set of readout electronics boards and covering a 256 cm2 active area with 2.5 mm pixels. A tungsten mask, mounted at 90 cm above the detector provides shadowgrams of X-ray sources in the 30-600 keV band for imaging, allowing a fully coded field of view of 9°×9° (and 19°×19° for 50% coding fraction) with an angular resolution of 20‧. In order to reduce the background radiation, the detector is surrounded by semi-graded (Pb/Sn/Cu) passive shields on the four sides all the way to the mask. On the back side, a 26 cm×26 cm×2 cm CsI(Na) active shield provides signals to tag charged particle induced events as well as ≳100keV background photons from below. The flight duration was only about 7.5 h due to strong winds (60 knots) at float altitude (38-39 km). Throughout the flight, the CZT detector performed excellently. The telescope observed Cyg X-1, a bright black hole binary system, for ˜1h at the end of the flight. Despite a few problems with the pointing and aspect systems that caused the telescope to track about 6.4° off the target, the analysis of the Cyg X-1 data revealed an X-ray source at 7.2σ in the 30-100 keV energy band at the expected location from the optical images taken by the onboard daytime star camera. The success of this first flight is very

  17. Deep wide-field imaging down to the oldest main sequence turn-offs in the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Tolstoy, E.; Saha, A.; Olsen, K.; Irwin, M. J.; Battaglia, G.; Hill, V.; Shetrone, M. D.; Fiorentino, G.; Cole, A.

    2011-04-01

    We present wide-field photometry of resolved stars in the nearby Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy using CTIO/MOSAIC, going down to the oldest main sequence turn-off. The accurately flux calibrated wide field colour-magnitude diagrams can be used to constrain the ages of different stellar populations, and also their spatial distribution. The Sculptor dSph contains a predominantly ancient stellar population (>10 Gyr old) which can be easily resolved into individual stars. A galaxy dominated by an old population provides a clear view of ancient processes of galaxy formation unimpeded by overlying younger populations. By using spectroscopic metallicities of RGB stars in combination with our deep main sequence turn-off photometry we can constrain the ages of different stellar populations with particular accuracy. We find that the known metallicity gradient in Sculptor is well matched to an age gradient. This is the first time that this link with age has been directly quantified. This gradient has been previously observed as a variation in horizontal branch properties and is now confirmed to exist for main sequence turn-offs as well. It is likely the Sculptor dSph first formed an extended metal-poor population at the oldest times, and subsequent more metal-rich, younger stars were formed more towards the centre until the gas was depleted or lost roughly 7 Gyr ago. The fact that these clear radial gradients have been preserved up to the present day is consistent with the apparent lack of signs of recent tidal interactions. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Wide-field color imaging of scatter-based tissue contrast using both high spatial frequency illumination and cross-polarization gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mackenzie L; McClatchy, David M; Gunn, Jason R; Elliott, Jonathan T; Paulsen, Keith D; Kanick, Stephen C; Pogue, Brian W

    2017-08-11

    This study characterizes the scatter-specific tissue contrast that can be obtained by high spatial frequency (HSF) domain imaging and cross-polarization (CP) imaging, using a standard color imaging system, and how combining them may be beneficial. Both HSF and CP approaches are known to modulate the sensitivity of epi-illumination reflectance images between diffuse multiply scattered and superficially backscattered photons, providing enhanced contrast from microstructure and composition than what is achieved by standard wide-field imaging. Measurements in tissue-simulating optical phantoms show that CP imaging returns localized assessments of both scattering and absorption effects, while HSF has uniquely specific sensitivity to scatter-only contrast, with a strong suppression of visible contrast from blood. The combination of CP and HSF imaging provided an expanded sensitivity to scatter compared with CP imaging, while rejecting specular reflections detected by HSF imaging. ex vivo imaging of an atlas of dissected rodent organs/tissues demonstrated the scatter-based contrast achieved with HSF, CP and HSF-CP imaging, with the white light spectral signal returned by each approach translated to a color image for intuitive encoding of scatter-based contrast within images of tissue. The results suggest that visible CP-HSF imaging could have the potential to aid diagnostic imaging of lesions in skin or mucosal tissues and organs, where just CP is currently the standard practice imaging modality. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Wide-field-of-view phase-contrast imaging of nanostructures with a comparatively large polychromatic soft x-ray plasma source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasilov, S V; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, T A; Fukuda, Y; Kando, M; Kawachi, T; Skobelev, I Yu; Daido, H; Kato, Y; Bulanov, S V

    2009-11-01

    Polychromatic soft x-ray plasma sources were not previously considered to be among the sources suitable for the propagation based phase contrast imaging because of their comparatively large emission-zone size. In the current work a scheme based on the combination of soft x-ray emission of multicharged ions, generated by the interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with an ultrasonic jet of gas clusters, and an LiF crystal detector was used to obtain phase-enhanced high-resolution images of micro- and nanoscale objects in a wide field of view.

  20. An automated wide-field time-gated optically sectioning fluorescence lifetime imaging multiwell plate reader for high-content analysis of protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibhai, Dominic; Kumar, Sunil; Kelly, Douglas; Warren, Sean; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Murray, Edward J.; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A. A.; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M. W.

    2011-03-01

    We describe an optically-sectioned FLIM multiwell plate reader that combines Nipkow microscopy with wide-field time-gated FLIM, and its application to high content analysis of FRET. The system acquires sectioned FLIM images in protein. It has been applied to study the formation of immature HIV virus like particles (VLPs) in live cells by monitoring Gag-Gag protein interactions using FLIM FRET of HIV-1 Gag transfected with CFP or YFP. VLP formation results in FRET between closely packed Gag proteins, as confirmed by our FLIM analysis that includes automatic image segmentation.

  1. Wide-field, full-field optical coherence microscopy for high-axial-resolution phase and amplitude imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Antoine; da Costa, Henrique S Gutierrez; Ogien, Jonas; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Dubois, Arnaud

    2015-09-20

    An original single-objective, full-field optical coherence microscopy system is reported that is capable of imaging both the phase and the amplitude of semi-transparent samples over a field of view of 17.5  mm×17.5  mm with an axial sectioning resolution of 1.5 μm. A special stack acquisition arrangement ensures optimal reachable imaging depth. Several phase-shifting interferometry algorithms for phase measurement with broadband light are compared theoretically and experimentally. Using the phase information, noninvasive depth-resolved topographic images of multilayer samples are produced to characterize each layer by measuring their defects and curvature with a nanometric scale precision. Using the amplitude information, tomographic images with a constant detection sensitivity of ∼80  dB through the entire field of view are obtained and applied to biological specimens.

  2. Development of Tiled Imaging CZT Detectors for Sensitive Wide-Field Hard X-Ray Surveys to EXIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the proposed EXIST mission, a "medium-class" space observatory to survey black holes and the Early Universe proposed to the 2010 NAS/NRC Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, we have developed the first "large" area 256 sq cm close-tiled (0.6 mm gaps) hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging detector employing pixelated (2.5 mm) CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, each 2 x 2 x 0.5 cubic cm. We summarize the design, development and operation of this detector array (8 x 8 CZTs) and its performance as the imager for a coded aperture telescope on a high altitude (40 km) balloon flight in October. 2009, as the ProtoEX1STl payload. We then outline our current development of a second-generation imager, ProtcEXIST2. with 0.6 mm pixels on a 32 x 32 array on each CZT, and how it will lead to the ultimate imaging system needed for EXIST. Other applications of this technology will also be mentioned.

  3. Development of tiled imaging CZT detectors for sensitive wide-field hard X-ray surveys to EXIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, J.; Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Barthelmy, S.; Baker, R.

    2011-10-01

    Motivated by the proposed EXIST mission, a "medium-class" space observatory to survey black holes and the Early Universe proposed to the 2010 NAS/NRC Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, we have developed the first "large" area 256 cm 2 close-tiled (0.6 mm gaps) hard X-ray (20-600 keV) imaging detector employing pixelated (2.5 mm) CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, each 2×2×0.5 cm 3. We summarize the design, development and operation of this detector array (8×8 CZTs) and its performance as the imager for a coded aperture telescope on a high altitude (40 km) balloon flight in October, 2009, as the ProtoEXIST1 payload. We then outline our current development of a second-generation imager, ProtoEXIST2, with 0.6 mm pixels on a 32×32 array on each CZT, and how it will lead to the ultimate imaging system needed for EXIST. Other applications of this technology will also be mentioned.

  4. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2015-07-01

    Single photon detecting capabilities of an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD), where a photon is converted into a photoelectron that is accelerated through a high voltage before hitting the CCD chip, were characterised. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. Based on these results, we propose that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an EBCCD or EBCMOS camera would allow photon arrival time determination from the photon event pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), or a 2-dimensional streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), may benefit from this approach. Moreover, the EBCCD was used on a fluorescence microscope to image fluorescently labelled cells in single photon counting mode.

  5. Real-time in vitro Fourier ptychographic microscopy for high resolution wide field of view phase imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Lei; Yeh, Li-Hao; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, microscopes have had to trade field of view (FOV) for resolution. Recently, a new computational imaging technique, termed Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM), circumvents this limit in order to capture gigapixel-scale images having both wide FOV and high resolution. FPM has enormous potential for revolutionizing biomedical microscopy; however, it has until now been limited to fixed samples, since acquisition time is on the order of minutes. Live biological samples are continuously evolving on multiple spatial and temporal scales, which can cause motion blur. Here, we present a Fast FPM method to achieve sub-second capture times for FPM results with 0.8 NA resolution across a 4x objective's FOV. We demonstrate the first FPM quantitative phase results for both growing and confluent in vitro cell cultures. Experiments capture real-time videos of HeLa and human mammary epithelial (MCF10A) cell division and migration and subcellular dynamical phenomena in adult rat neural stem cells.

  6. Preclinical evaluation of spatial frequency domain-enabled wide-field quantitative imaging for enhanced glioma resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibai, Mira; Fisher, Carl; Veilleux, Israel; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Leblond, Frederic; Roberts, David W.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2017-07-01

    5-Aminolevelunic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence-guided resection (FGR) enables maximum safe resection of glioma by providing real-time tumor contrast. However, the subjective visual assessment and the variable intrinsic optical attenuation of tissue limit this technique to reliably delineating only high-grade tumors that display strong fluorescence. We have previously shown, using a fiber-optic probe, that quantitative assessment using noninvasive point spectroscopic measurements of the absolute PpIX concentration in tissue further improves the accuracy of FGR, extending it to surgically curable low-grade glioma. More recently, we have shown that implementing spatial frequency domain imaging with a fluorescent-light transport model enables recovery of two-dimensional images of [PpIX], alleviating the need for time-consuming point sampling of the brain surface. We present first results of this technique modified for in vivo imaging on an RG2 rat brain tumor model. Despite the moderate errors in retrieving the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the subdiffusive regime of 14% and 19%, respectively, the recovered [PpIX] maps agree within 10% of the point [PpIX] values measured by the fiber-optic probe, validating its potential as an extension or an alternative to point sampling during glioma resection.

  7. The FLARE mission: deep and wide-field 1-5um imaging and spectroscopy for the early universe: a proposal for M5 cosmic vision call

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgarella, D.; Levacher, P.; Vives, S.; Dohlen, K.; Pascal, S.

    2016-07-01

    FLARE (First Light And Reionization Explorer) is a space mission that will be submitted to ESA (M5 call). Its primary goal (~80% of lifetime) is to identify and study the universe before the end of the reionization at z > 6. A secondary objective (~20% of lifetime) is to survey star formation in the Milky Way. FLARE's strategy optimizes the science return: imaging and spectroscopic integral-field observations will be carried out simultaneously on two parallel focal planes and over very wide instantaneous fields of view. FLARE will help addressing two of ESA's Cosmic Vision themes: a) universe originate and what is it made of? » and b) « What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life? >> and more specifically, >. FLARE will provide to the ESA community a leading position to statistically study the early universe after JWST's deep but pin-hole surveys. Moreover, the instrumental development of wide-field imaging and wide-field integral-field spectroscopy in space will be a major breakthrough after making them available on ground-based telescopes.

  8. Challenges and advantages in wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the human retinal and choroidal vasculature at 1.7-MHz A-scan rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Raju; Migacz, Justin V.; Schwartz, Daniel M.; Werner, John S.; Gorczynska, Iwona

    2017-10-01

    We present noninvasive, three-dimensional, depth-resolved imaging of human retinal and choroidal blood circulation with a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system at 1065-nm center wavelength. Motion contrast OCT imaging was performed with the phase-variance OCT angiography method. A Fourier-domain mode-locked light source was used to enable an imaging rate of 1.7 MHz. We experimentally demonstrate the challenges and advantages of wide-field OCT angiography (OCTA). In the discussion, we consider acquisition time, scanning area, scanning density, and their influence on visualization of selected features of the retinal and choroidal vascular networks. The OCTA imaging was performed with a field of view of 16 deg (5 mm×5 mm) and 30 deg (9 mm×9 mm). Data were presented in en face projections generated from single volumes and in en face projection mosaics generated from up to 4 datasets. OCTA imaging at 1.7 MHz A-scan rate was compared with results obtained from a commercial OCTA instrument and with conventional ophthalmic diagnostic methods: fundus photography, fluorescein, and indocyanine green angiography. Comparison of images obtained from all methods is demonstrated using the same eye of a healthy volunteer. For example, imaging of retinal pathology is presented in three cases of advanced age-related macular degeneration.

  9. 3D wide field-of-view Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy advancing real-time in-vivo imaging and metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cogliati, Andrea; Hayes, Adam; Tankam, Patrice; Santhanam, Anand; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2017-02-01

    Real-time volumetric high-definition wide-field-of-view in-vivo cellular imaging requires micron-scale resolution in 3D. Compactness of the handheld device and distortion-free images with cellular resolution are also critically required for onsite use in clinical applications. By integrating a custom liquid lens-based microscope and a dual-axis MEMS scanner in a compact handheld probe, Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) breaks the lateral resolution limit of optical coherence tomography through depth, overcoming the tradeoff between numerical aperture and depth of focus, enabling advances in biotechnology. Furthermore, distortion-free imaging with no post-processing is achieved with a compact, lightweight handheld MEMS scanner that obtained a 12-fold reduction in volume and 17-fold reduction in weight over a previous dual-mirror galvanometer-based scanner. Approaching the holy grail of medical imaging - noninvasive real-time imaging with histologic resolution - GD-OCM demonstrates invariant resolution of 2 μm throughout a volume of 1 x 1 x 0.6 mm3, acquired and visualized in less than 2 minutes with parallel processing on graphics processing units. Results on the metrology of manufactured materials and imaging of human tissue with GD-OCM are presented.

  10. AWARE Wide Field View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    RGB colors to the standard sRGB to allow spectrally consistent colors on monitors for viewing . Finally, the images from each sensor are corrected based ...on the exposure time used and the calibrated sensitivity of each image sensor, again based on the flat field calibration, to allow viewing of imagery...prediction is scaled based on available bandwidth and the computational resources of the cluster. In addition to the interface described in the

  11. Evaluation of Visunex Medical's PanoCam(TM) LT and PanoCam(TM) Pro wide-field imaging systems for the screening of ROP in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Edward H; Moshfeghi, Andrew A; Nudleman, Eric D; Moshfeghi, Darius M

    2016-08-01

    Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) is a leading cause of childhood blindness. The incidence of ROP is rising, placing greater demands on the healthcare providers that serve these patients and their families. Telemedicine remote digital fundus imaging (TM-RDFI) plays a pivotal role in ROP management, and has allowed for the expansion of ROP care into previously underserved areas. A broad literature review through the pubmed index was undertaken with the goal of summarizing the current state of ROP and guidelines for its screening . Furthermore, all currently used telemedicine remote digital fundus imaging devices were analyzed both via the literature and the companies' websites/brochures. Finally, the PanoCam LT™ and PanoCam™ Pro created by Visunex Medical were analyzed via the company website/brochures. Expert commentary: The PanoCam LT™ and PanoCam™ Pro have recently been approved for use within the USA and CE marked for international commercialization in European Union and other countries requiring CE mark. These wide-field imaging systems have the intended use of ophthalmic imaging of all newborn babies and meet the requirements for ROP screening, thereby serving as competition within the ROP screening market previously dominated by one camera imaging system.

  12. Reflection, phase and en- face sectional imaging of scattering objects using quasi-single-shot wide-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Tulsi; Kimura, Satoshi; Mehta, Dalip Singh; Sato, Manabu

    2015-10-01

    We report a quasi-single-shot wide-field optical coherence tomography system that enables to measure the reflection, phase and en- face OCT images from the same setup using the glass jig. The jig consisting of a wedge glass substrate and a glue dot is contacted to the tissue surfaces, and the data within glue dot is used to reduce the phase noise of the interference signal. The reconstructed image size of the object was 4.0 mm × 4.3 mm. The standard deviation (STD) of the phase variation was minimized by 54 % and obtained to be 0.027 rad for the poke tissue. The corresponding STD in optical path length change was measured to be 1.4 nm. The refractive index of the water and poke tissue at the surface is also evaluated as 1.36 and 1.39, respectively, using reflection intensity images. Further, the en- face sectional images of the tissue sample are also measured.

  13. Noncontact and Wide-Field Characterization of the Absorption and Scattering Properties of Apple Fruit Using Spatial-Frequency Domain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dong; Fu, Xiaping; He, Xueming; Ying, Yibin

    2016-12-01

    Spatial-frequency domain imaging (SFDI), as a noncontact, low-cost and wide-field optical imaging technique, offers great potential for agro-product safety and quality assessment through optical absorption (μa) and scattering (μ) property measurements. In this study, a laboratory-based SFDI system was constructed and developed for optical property measurement of fruits and vegetables. The system utilized a digital light projector to generate structured, periodic light patterns and illuminate test samples. The diffuse reflected light was captured by a charge coupled device (CCD) camera with the resolution of 1280 × 960 pixels. Three wavelengths (460, 527, and 630 nm) were selected for image acquisition using bandpass filters in the system. The μa and μ were calculated in a region of interest (ROI, 200 × 300 pixels) via nonlinear least-square fitting. Performance of the system was demonstrated through optical property measurement of ‘Redstar’ apples. Results showed that the system was able to acquire spatial-frequency domain images for demodulation and calculation of the μa and μ. The calculated μa of apple tissue experiencing internal browning (IB) were much higher than healthy apple tissue, indicating that the SFDI technique had potential for IB tissue characterization.

  14. Low-frequency wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging using a high-power near-infrared light-emitting diode light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Lomnes, Stephen J; Choi, Hak Soo; Frangioni, John V

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLi) could potentially improve exogenous near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging, because it offers the capability of discriminating a signal of interest from background, provides real-time monitoring of a chemical environment, and permits the use of several different fluorescent dyes having the same emission wavelength. We present a high-power, LED-based, NIR light source for the clinical translation of wide-field (larger than 5 cm in diameter) FLi at frequencies up to 35 MHz. Lifetime imaging of indocyanine green (ICG), IRDye 800-CW, and 3,3(')-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) was performed over a large field of view (10 cm by 7.5 cm) using the LED light source. For comparison, a laser diode light source was employed as a gold standard. Experiments were performed both on the bench by diluting the fluorescent dyes in various chemical environments in Eppendorf tubes, and in vivo by injecting the fluorescent dyes mixed in Matrigel subcutaneously into CD-1 mice. Last, measured fluorescence lifetimes obtained using the LED and the laser diode sources were compared with those obtained using a state-of-the-art time-domain imaging system and with those previously described in the literature. On average, lifetime values obtained using the LED and the laser diode light sources were consistent, exhibiting a mean difference of 3% from the expected values and a coefficient of variation of 12%. Taken together, our study offers an alternative to laser diodes for clinical translation of FLi and explores the use of relatively low frequency modulation for in vivo imaging.

  15. Reconsidering the advantages of the three-dimensional representation of the interferometric transform for imaging with non-coplanar baselines and wide fields of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. M. P.; Young, A.; Davidson, D. B.

    2017-07-01

    Radio telescopes with baselines that span thousands of kilometres and with fields of view that span tens of degrees have been recently deployed, such as the Low Frequency Array, and are currently being developed, such as the Square Kilometre Array. Additionally, there are proposals for space-based instruments with all-sky imaging capabilities, such as the Orbiting Low Frequency Array. Such telescopes produce observations with three-dimensional visibility distributions and curved image domains. In most work to date, the visibility distribution has been converted to a planar form to compute the brightness map using a two-dimensional Fourier transform. The celestial sphere is faceted in order to counter pixel distortion at wide angles, with each such facet requiring a unique planar form of the visibility distribution. Under the above conditions, the computational and storage complexities of this approach can become excessive. On the other hand, when using the direct Fourier transform approach, which maintains the three-dimensional shapes of the visibility distribution and celestial sphere, the non-coplanar visibility component requires no special attention. Furthermore, as the celestial samples are placed directly on the curved surface of the celestial sphere, pixel distortion at wide angles is avoided. In this paper, a number of examples illustrate that under these conditions (very long baselines and very wide fields of view) the costs of the direct Fourier transform may be comparable to (or even lower than) methods that utilise the two-dimensional fast Fourier transform.

  16. Microneedles rollers as a potential device to increase ALA diffusion and PpIX production: evaluations by wide-field fluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracielli Sousa, R. Phamilla; de Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Fujita, Alessandra K. L.; Requena, Michelle B.; Govone, Angelo Biassi; Escobar, André; de Nardi, Andrigo B.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2014-03-01

    One of the limitations of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the poor ability to penetrate biological barriers of skin and the recurrence rates in treatments. This study aimed to identify possible signs of increased diffusion of ALA-induced PpIX by fluorescence images and fluorescence spectroscopy. The research was done using in vivo porcine skin model. Before the cream application, microholes was performed with microneedles rollers in only one direction, afterward the ALA cream was applied at a 2.5cm2 area in triplicate and an occlusive dressing was placed. PpIX production was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy collected at skin surface after 70, 100, 140, and 180 minutes of ALA incubation. About 100 fluorescence spectra of each treatment were collected, distributed by about five points for each site. Wide-field fluorescence imaging was made after 70, 90, and 170 minutes after treatment. The results obtained by imaging analysis indicated increase of the PpIX diffusion in the skin surface using the microneedles rollers (MNs) before ALA application. Circular regions of red fluorescence around the microholes were observed. In addition, the fluorescence spectra showed a greater intensity (2 times as many) in groups microneedles rollers associated. In conclusion, our data shown greater homogeneity and PpIX production in the groups pre-treated with microneedles indicating that the technique can be used to greater uniformity of PpIX production throughout the area to be treated reducing the chances of recurrent tumor as well as has potential for decreasing the time of therapy. (FUNDING SUPPORT:CAPES, CNPq and FAPESP)

  17. A Wide-Field Fluorescence Microscope Extension for Ultrafast Screening of One-Bead One-Compound Libraries Using a Spectral Image Subtraction Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusermann, Wolf; Ludin, Beat; Pham, Nhan T; Auer, Manfred; Weidemann, Thomas; Hintersteiner, Martin

    2016-05-09

    The increasing involvement of academic institutions and biotech companies in drug discovery calls for cost-effective methods to identify new bioactive molecules. Affinity-based on-bead screening of combinatorial one-bead one-compound libraries combines a split-mix synthesis design with a simple protein binding assay operating directly at the bead matrix. However, one bottleneck for academic scale on-bead screening is the unavailability of a cheap, automated, and robust screening platform that still provides a quantitative signal related to the amount of target protein binding to individual beads for hit bead ranking. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy has long been considered unsuitable due to significant broad spectrum autofluorescence of the library beads in conjunction with low detection sensitivity. Herein, we demonstrate how such a standard microscope equipped with LED-based excitation and a modern CMOS camera can be successfully used for selecting hit beads. We show that the autofluorescence issue can be overcome by an optical image subtraction approach that yields excellent signal-to-noise ratios for the detection of bead-associated target proteins. A polymer capillary attached to a semiautomated bead-picking device allows the operator to efficiently isolate individual hit beads in less than 20 s. The system can be used for ultrafast screening of >200,000 bead-bound compounds in 1.5 h, thereby making high-throughput screening accessible to a wider group within the scientific community.

  18. Optimizing ultrafast wide field-of-view illumination for high-throughput multi-photon imaging and screening of mutant fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb; Mikhailov, Alexandr; Rebane, Aleksander

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence induced by 1wo-photon absorption (2PA) and three-photon absorption (3PA) is becoming an increasingly important tool for deep-tissue microscopy, especially in conjunction with genetically-encoded functional probes such as fluorescent proteins (FPs). Unfortunately, the efficacy of the multi-photon excitation of FPs is notoriously low, and because relations between a biological fluorophore's nonlinear-optical properties and its molecular structure are inherently complex, there are no practical avenues available that would allow boosting the performance of current FPs. Here we describe a novel method, where we apply directed evolution to optimize the 2PA properties of EGFP. Key to the success of this approach consists in high-throughput screening of mutants that would allow selection of variants with promising 2PA and 3PA properties in a broad near-IR excitation range of wavelength. For this purpose, we construct and test a wide field-of-view (FOV), femtosecond imaging system that we then use to quantify the multi-photon excited fluorescence in the 550- 1600 nm range of tens of thousands of E. coli colonies expressing randomly mutated FPs in a standard 10 cm diameter Petri dish configuration. We present a quantitative analysis of different factors that are currently limiting the maximum throughput of the femtosecond multi-photon screening techniques and also report on quantitative measurement of absolute 2PA and 3PA cross sections spectra.

  19. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF A z = 6.42 QUASAR HOST GALAXY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechtley, M.; Windhorst, R. A.; Cohen, S. H.; Jansen, R. A.; Scannapieco, E. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Ryan, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Schneider, G.; Fan, X. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hathi, N. P. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Keel, W. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Roettgering, H. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Schneider, D. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Strauss, M. A. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Yan, H. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Missouri, 701 South College Ave, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We report on deep near-infrared F125W (J) and F160W (H) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of the z = 6.42 quasar J1148+5251 to attempt to detect rest-frame near-ultraviolet emission from the host galaxy. These observations included contemporaneous observations of a nearby star of similar near-infrared colors to measure temporal variations in the telescope and instrument point-spread function (PSF). We subtract the quasar point source using both this direct PSF and a model PSF. Using direct subtraction, we measure an upper limit for the quasar host galaxy of m{sub J} > 22.8 and m{sub H} > 23.0 AB mag (2 {sigma}). After subtracting our best model PSF, we measure a limiting surface brightness from 0.''3 to 0.''5 radius of {mu}{sub J} > 23.5 and {mu}{sub H} > 23.7 AB mag arcsec{sup -2} (2 {sigma}). We test the ability of the model subtraction method to recover the host galaxy flux by simulating host galaxies with varying integrated magnitude, effective radius, and Sersic index, and conducting the same analysis. These models indicate that the surface brightness limit ({mu}{sub J} > 23.5 AB mag arcsec{sup -2}) corresponds to an integrated upper limit of m{sub J} > 22-23 AB mag, consistent with the direct subtraction method. Combined with existing far-infrared observations, this gives an infrared excess log (IRX) > 1.0 and corresponding ultraviolet spectral slope {beta} > -1.2 {+-} 0.2. These values match those of most local luminous infrared galaxies, but are redder than those of almost all local star-forming galaxies and z {approx_equal} 6 Lyman break galaxies.

  20. Wide-Field Plate Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, M. K.; Stavrev, K. Y.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Semkov, E. H.; Mutatov, A. S.

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) and the possibilities for its application as a research tool in observational astronomy are presented. Currently the WFPDB comprises the descriptive data for 400 000 archival wide field photographic plates obtained with 77 instruments, from a total of 1 850 000 photographs stored in 269 astronomical archives all over the world since the end of last century. The WFPDB is already accessible for the astronomical community, now only in batch mode through user requests sent by e-mail. We are working on on-line interactive access to the data via INTERNET from Sofia and parallel from the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg. (Initial information can be found on World Wide Web homepage URL http://www.wfpa.acad.bg.) The WFPDB may be useful in studies of a variety of astronomical objects and phenomena, andespecially for long-term investigations of variable objects and for multi-wavelength research. We have analysed the data in the WFPDB in order to derive the overall characteristics of the totality of wide-field observations, such as the sky coverage, the distributions by observation time and date, by spectral band, and by object type. We have also examined the totality of wide-field observations from point of view of their quality, availability and digitisation. The usefulness of the WFPDB is demonstrated by the results of identification and investigation of the photometrical behaviour of optical analogues of gamma-ray bursts.

  1. The Ooty Wide Field Array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 38; Issue 1. The Ooty Wide Field Array. C. R. Subrahmanya P. K. Manoharan Jayaram N. Chengalur. Review Article Volume 38 Issue 1 March 2017 Article ID ... Keywords. Cosmology: large scale structure of Universe; intergalactic medium; diffuse radiation.

  2. Simulations of the x-ray imaging capabilities of the silicon drift detectors (SDD) for the LOFT wide-field monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelista, Y.; Campana, R.; Del Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT), selected by ESA as one of the four Cosmic Vision M3 candidate missions to undergo an assessment phase, will revolutionize the study of compact objects in our galaxy and of the brightest supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. The Large Area...... Detector (LAD), carrying an unprecedented effective area of 10 m^2, is complemented by a coded-mask Wide Field Monitor, in charge of monitoring a large fraction of the sky potentially accessible to the LAD, to provide the history and context for the sources observed by LAD and to trigger its observations...

  3. The ESO-Spitzer Imaging extragalactic Survey (ESIS). II. VIMOS I, z wide field imaging of ELAIS-S1 and selection of distant massive galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, S.; Rubele, S.; Franceschini, A.; Held, E. V.; Rizzi, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Cimatti, A.; Dias, J. E.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Maiolino, R.; Matute, I.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Sacchi, N.; Zamorani, G.

    2008-09-01

    Context: The ESO-Spitzer Imaging extragalactic Survey (ESIS) is the optical follow up of the Spitzer Wide-area Infra-Red Extragalactic survey (SWIRE) in the ELAIS-S1 region of the sky. Aims: In the era of observational cosmology, the main efforts are focused on the study of galaxy evolution and its environmental dependence. Wide area, multiwavelength, extragalactic surveys are needed in order to probe sufficiently large volumes, minimize cosmic variance and find significant numbers of rare objects. Methods: We present VIMOS I and z band imaging belonging to the ESIS survey. A total of ~4 deg2 was targeted in I and ~1 deg2 in z. Accurate data processing includes removal of fringing, and mosaicking of the complex observing pattern. Completeness levels and photometric uncertainties are estimated through simulations. The multi-wavelength data available in the area are exploited to identify high-redshift galaxies, using the IR-peak technique. Results: More than 300 000 galaxies have been detected in the I band and ~50 000 in the z band. Object coordinates are defined within an uncertainty of ~0.2 arcsec rms, with respect to GSC 2.2. We reach a 90% average completeness at 23.1 and 22.5 mag (Vega) in the I and z bands, respectively. On the basis of IRAC colors, we identify galaxies having the 1.6 μm stellar peak shifted to z = 1-3. The new I, z band data provide reliable constraints to help avoid low-redshift interlopers and reinforce this selection. Roughly 1000 galaxies between z = 2-3 are identified over the ESIS ~4 deg^2, at the SWIRE 5.8 μm depth (25.8 μJy at 3σ). These are the best galaxy candidates to dominate the massive tail (M > 1011 M_⊙) of the z > 2 mass function. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, ESO No. 168.A-0322(A). ESIS web page:http://www.astro.unipd.it/esis Appendix A, Tables 4 and 5 are only available at http://www.aanda.org The full I and z band catalogs (see Table [see full textsee full textsee full

  4. The LOFT wide field monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Hernanz, M.; Alvarez, L.

    2012-01-01

    be able to address fundamental questions about strong gravity in the vicinity of black holes and the equation of state of nuclear matter in neutron stars. The prime goal of the WFM will be to detect transient sources to be observed by the LAD. However, with its wide field of view and good energy...... to the community of ~100 gamma ray burst positions per year with a ~1 arcmin location accuracy within 30 s of the burst. This paper provides an overview of the design, configuration, and capabilities of the LOFT WFM instrument....

  5. Gemini Frontier Fields: Wide-field Adaptive Optics Ks-band Imaging of the Galaxy Clusters MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, M.; Carrasco, E. R.; Pessev, P.; Garrel, V.; Winge, C.; Neichel, B.; Vidal, F.

    2015-04-01

    We have observed two of the six Frontier Fields galaxy clusters, MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744, using the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) and the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI). With 0.″ 08-0.″ 10 FWHM our data are nearly diffraction-limited over a 100\\prime\\prime × 100\\prime\\prime wide area. GeMS/GSAOI complements the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) redwards of 1.6 μm with twice the angular resolution. We reach a 5σ depth of {{K}s}˜ 25.6 mag (AB) for compact sources. In this paper, we describe the observations, data processing, and initial public data release. We provide fully calibrated, co-added images matching the native GSAOI pixel scale as well as the larger plate scales of the HST release, adding to the legacy value of the Frontier Fields. Our work demonstrates that even for fields at high galactic latitude where natural guide stars are rare, current multi-conjugated adaptive optics technology at 8 m telescopes has opened a new window on the distant universe. Observations of a third Frontier Field, Abell 370, are planned. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal Observatories, Chile.

  6. Michelson wide-field stellar interferometry : Principles and experimental verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montilla, I.; Pereira, S.F.; Braat, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new interferometric technique for Michelson wide-field interferometry is presented that consists of a Michelson pupil-plane combination scheme in which a wide field of view can be achieved in one shot. This technique uses a stair-shaped mirror in the intermediate image plane of each telescope in

  7. Invited Article: First flight in space of a wide-field-of-view soft x-ray imager using lobster-eye optics: Instrument description and initial flight results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R; Porter, F Scott; Sibeck, David G; Carter, Jenny A; Chiao, Meng P; Chornay, Dennis J; Cravens, Thomas E; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Keller, John W; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Kujawski, Joseph; Kuntz, Kip; Read, Andy M; Robertson, Ina P; Sembay, Steve; Snowden, Steven L; Thomas, Nicholas; Uprety, Youaraj; Walsh, Brian M

    2015-07-01

    We describe the development, launch into space, and initial results from a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The sheath transport observer for the redistribution of mass is the first instrument using this type of optics launched into space and provides proof-of-concept for future flight instruments capable of imaging structures such as the terrestrial cusp, the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere, comets, the Moon, and the solar wind interaction with planetary bodies like Venus and Mars [Kuntz et al., Astrophys. J. (in press)].

  8. Long-range and depth-selective imaging of macroscopic targets using low-coherence and wide-field interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sungsoo; Kang, Sungsam; Yoon, Changhyeong; Choi, Wonshik

    2016-03-01

    With the advancement of 3D display technology, 3D imaging of macroscopic objects has drawn much attention as they provide the contents to display. The most widely used imaging methods include a depth camera, which measures time of flight for the depth discrimination, and various structured illumination techniques. However, these existing methods have poor depth resolution, which makes imaging complicated structures a difficult task. In order to resolve this issue, we propose an imaging system based upon low-coherence interferometry and off-axis digital holographic imaging. By using light source with coherence length of 200 micro, we achieved the depth resolution of 100 micro. In order to map the macroscopic objects with this high axial resolution, we installed a pair of prisms in the reference beam path for the long-range scanning of the optical path length. Specifically, one prism was fixed in position, and the other prism was mounted on a translation stage and translated in parallel to the first prism. Due to the multiple internal reflections between the two prisms, the overall path length was elongated by a factor of 50. In this way, we could cover a depth range more than 1 meter. In addition, we employed multiple speckle illuminations and incoherent averaging of the acquired holographic images for reducing the specular reflections from the target surface. Using this newly developed system, we performed imaging targets with multiple different layers and demonstrated imaging targets hidden behind the scattering layers. The method was also applied to imaging targets located around the corner.

  9. Observations and Modeling of Solar Coronal Structures Using High-Resolution Eclipse Images and Space-based Telescopes with Wide Field of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Muzhou; Pasachoff, J. M.; Su, Y.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Seaton, D. B.; West, M.

    2013-07-01

    We present a comparison of the solar corona observed during the total solar eclipses on 2010 July 11 and on 2012 November 13. The white light images were taken at Easter Island in 2010 and at Northeast Queensland, Australia, in 2012; while the concurrent EUV images were take with SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP. The 2010 eclipse was observed at the beginning of Sunspot Cycle 24 [1], which peaked near our 2012 observation. We compare a plethora of corona features in the white light images and reveal some interesting differences in the enhanced EUV images taken by SDO/AIA and PROBA2/SWAP. We construct potential field models using our newly refined Coronal Modeling System (CMS2) software with line-of-sight photospheric magnetograms from SDO/HMI. The source surface heights derived from detailed comparison between our models and observations are compared to the standard source-surface model. We also compare the dynamics of the two eclipse observations. Similar to the 2010 eclipse, a CME was observed using temporally spaced eclipse images. We address unresolved problems in the models and observations with the hope of correcting them for future eclipse observations, such as the 2017 total solar eclipse across the continental U.S. References [1] Pasachoff, J. M., Rusin, V., Druckmüllerová, H., Saniga, M., Lu, M., Malamut, C., Seaton, D. B., Golub, L., Engell, A. J., Hill, S. W., Lucas, R., 2011, ApJ, 734, 114

  10. WFIRST: Simulating the Wide-Field Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Molly; WFIRST Wide Field Imager Simulations Working Group

    2018-01-01

    As astronomy’s first high-resolution wide-field multi-mode instrument, simulated data will play a vital role in the planning for and analysis of data from WFIRST’s WFI (Wide Field Imager) instrument. Part of the key to WFIRST’s scientific success lies in our ability to push the systematics limit, but in order to do so, the WFI pipeline will need to be able to measure and take out said systematics. The efficacy of this pipeline can only be verified with large suites of synthetic data; these data must include both the range of astrophysical sky scenes (from crowded starfields to high-latitude grism data observations) and the systematics from the detector and telescope optics the WFI pipeline aims to mitigate. We summarize here(1) the status of current and planned astrophysical simulations in support of the WFI,(2) the status of current WFI instrument simulators and requirements on future generations thereof, and(3) plans, methods, and requirements on interfacing astrophysical simulations and WFI instrument simulators.

  11. Comparison of glomerular activity patterns by fMRI and wide-field calcium imaging: implications for principles underlying odor mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Rebello, Michelle R.; Herman, Peter; Papademetris, Xenophon; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Verhagen, Justus V.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging signals arise from distinct metabolic and hemodynamic events at the neuropil, but how these processes are influenced by pre- and post-synaptic activities need to be understood for quantitative interpretation of stimulus-evoked mapping data. The olfactory bulb (OB) glomeruli, spherical neuropil regions with well-defined neuronal circuitry, can provide insights into this issue. Optical calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye imaging (OICa2+) reflects dynamics of pre-synaptic input to glomeruli, whereas high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using deoxyhemoglobin contrast reveals neuropil function within the glomerular layer where both pre- and post-synaptic activities contribute. We imaged odor-specific activity patterns of the dorsal OB in the same anesthetized rats with fMRI and OICa2+ and then co-registered the respective maps to compare patterns in the same space. Maps by each modality were very reproducible as trial-to-trial patterns for a given odor, overlapping by ~80%. Maps evoked by ethyl butyrate and methyl valerate for a given modality overlapped by ~80%, suggesting activation of similar dorsal glomerular networks by these odors. Comparison of maps generated by both methods for a given odor showed ~70% overlap, indicating similar odor-specific maps by each method. These results suggest that odor-specific glomerular patterns by high-resolution fMRI primarily tracks pre-synaptic input to the OB. Thus combining OICa2+ and fMRI lays the framework for studies of OB processing over a range of spatiotemporal scales, where OICa2+ can feature the fast dynamics of dorsal glomerular clusters and fMRI can map the entire glomerular sheet in the OB. PMID:26631819

  12. Michelson wide-field stellar interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montilla, I.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to develop a system to permit wide field operation of Michelson Interferometers. A wide field of view is very important in applications such as the observation of extended or multiple objects, the fringe acquisition and/ or tracking on a nearby unresolved object, and

  13. A wide field of view plasma spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Möbius, E.; Harper, R. W.; Kihara, K. H.; Bower, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a fundamentally new type of space plasma spectrometer, the wide field of view plasma spectrometer, whose field of view is > 1.25π ster using fewer resources than traditional methods. The enabling component is analogous to a pinhole camera with an electrostatic energy-angle filter at the image plane. Particle energy-per-charge is selected with a tunable bias voltage applied to the filter plate relative to the pinhole aperture plate. For a given bias voltage, charged particles from different directions are focused by different angles to different locations. Particles with appropriate locations and angles can transit the filter plate and are measured using a microchannel plate detector with a position-sensitive anode. Full energy and angle coverage are obtained using a single high-voltage power supply, resulting in considerable resource savings and allowing measurements at fast timescales. We present laboratory prototype measurements and simulations demonstrating the instrument concept and discuss optimizations of the instrument design for application to space measurements.

  14. The LOFT wide field monitor simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Campana, R.

    2012-01-01

    We present the simulator we developed for the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) aboard the Large Observatory For Xray Timing (LOFT) mission, one of the four ESA M3 candidate missions considered for launch in the 2022–2024 timeframe. The WFM is designed to cover a large FoV in the same bandpass as the Larg...

  15. Advanced MOKE magnetometry in wide-field Kerr-microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, I. V.; Schäfer, R.

    2017-10-01

    The measurement of MOKE (Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect) magnetization loops in a wide-field Kerr microscope offers the advantage that the relevant domain images along the loop can be readily recorded. As the microscope's objective lens is exposed to the magnetic field, the loops are usually strongly distorted by non-linear Faraday rotations of the polarized light that occur in the objective lens and that are superimposed to the MOKE signal. In this paper, an experimental method, based on a motorized analyzer, is introduced which allows to compensate the Faraday contributions, thus leading to pure MOKE loops. A wide field Kerr microscope, equipped with this technology, works well as a laser-based MOKE magnetometer, additionally offering domain images and thus providing the basis for loop interpretation.

  16. Calibration and testing of wide-field UV instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H. U.; Mende, S. B.; Loicq, J.; Habraken, S.

    2017-06-01

    As with all optical systems the calibration of wide-field ultraviolet (UV) systems includes three main areas: sensitivity, imaging quality, and imaging capability. The one thing that makes UV calibrations difficult is the need for working in vacuum substantially extending the required time and effort compared to visible systems. In theory a ray tracing and characterization of each individual component of the optical system (mirrors, windows, and grating) should provide the transmission efficiency of the combined system. However, potentially unknown effects (contamination, misalignment, and measurement errors) can make the final error too large and unacceptable for most applications. Therefore, it is desirable to test and measure the optical properties of the whole system in vacuum and compare the overall response to the response of a calibrated photon detector. A proper comparison then allows the quantification of individual sources of uncertainty and ensures that the whole instrument performance is within acceptable tolerances or pinpoints which parts fail to meet requirements. Based on the experience with the IMAGE Spectrographic Imager, the Wide-band Imaging Camera, and the ICON Far Ultraviolet instruments, we discuss the steps and procedures for the proper radiometric sensitivity and passband calibration, spot size, imaging distortions, flatfield, and field of view determination.Plain Language SummaryAs with all optical systems the calibration of wide-field ultraviolet (UV) systems includes three main areas: sensitivity, imaging quality, and imaging capability. The one thing that makes UV calibrations difficult is the need for working in vacuum substantially extending the required time and effort compared to visible systems. Based on the experience with the IMAGE Spectrographic Imager, the Wide-band Imaging Camera (WIC), and the ICON Far Ultraviolet instruments, we discuss the steps and procedures for the proper radiometric sensitivity and pass-band calibration

  17. Instrumentation of the ESRF medical imaging facility

    CERN Document Server

    Elleaume, H; Berkvens, P; Berruyer, G; Brochard, T; Dabin, Y; Domínguez, M C; Draperi, A; Fiedler, S; Goujon, G; Le Duc, G; Mattenet, M; Nemoz, C; Pérez, M; Renier, M; Schulze, C; Spanne, P; Suortti, P; Thomlinson, W; Estève, F; Bertrand, B; Le Bas, J F

    1999-01-01

    At the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) a beamport has been instrumented for medical research programs. Two facilities have been constructed for alternative operation. The first one is devoted to medical imaging and is focused on intravenous coronary angiography and computed tomography (CT). The second facility is dedicated to pre-clinical microbeam radiotherapy (MRT). This paper describes the instrumentation for the imaging facility. Two monochromators have been designed, both are based on bent silicon crystals in the Laue geometry. A versatile scanning device has been built for pre-alignment and scanning of the patient through the X-ray beam in radiography or CT modes. An intrinsic germanium detector is used together with large dynamic range electronics (16 bits) to acquire the data. The beamline is now at the end of its commissioning phase; intravenous coronary angiography is intended to start in 1999 with patients and the CT pre-clinical program is underway on small animals. The first in viv...

  18. New Subarray Readout Patterns for the ACS Wide Field Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golimowski, D.; Anderson, J.; Arslanian, S.; Chiaberge, M.; Grogin, N.; Lim, Pey Lian; Lupie, O.; McMaster, M.; Reinhart, M.; Schiffer, F.; Serrano, B.; Van Marshall, M.; Welty, A.

    2017-04-01

    At the start of Cycle 24, the original CCD-readout timing patterns used to generate ACS Wide Field Channel (WFC) subarray images were replaced with new patterns adapted from the four-quadrant readout pattern used to generate full-frame WFC images. The primary motivation for this replacement was a substantial reduction of observatory and staff resources needed to support WFC subarray bias calibration, which became a new and challenging obligation after the installation of the ACS CCD Electronics Box Replacement during Servicing Mission 4. The new readout patterns also improve the overall efficiency of observing with WFC subarrays and enable the processing of subarray images through stages of the ACS data calibration pipeline (calacs) that were previously restricted to full-frame WFC images. The new readout patterns replace the original 512×512, 1024×1024, and 2048×2046-pixel subarrays with subarrays having 2048 columns and 512, 1024, and 2048 rows, respectively. Whereas the original square subarrays were limited to certain WFC quadrants, the new rectangular subarrays are available in all four quadrants. The underlying bias structure of the new subarrays now conforms with those of the corresponding regions of the full-frame image, which allows raw frames in all image formats to be calibrated using one contemporaneous full-frame "superbias" reference image. The original subarrays remain available for scientific use, but calibration of these image formats is no longer supported by STScI.

  19. Wide-field subdiffraction RESOLFT microscopy using fluorescent protein photoswitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwentker, Miriam A; Bock, Hannes; Hofmann, Michael; Jakobs, Stefan; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W

    2007-03-01

    Subdiffraction fluorescence imaging is presented in a parallelized wide-field arrangement exploiting the principle of reversible saturable/switchable optical transitions (RESOLFT). The diffraction barrier is overcome by photoswitching ensembles of the label protein asFP595 between a nonfluorescent off- and a fluorescent on-state. Relying on ultralow continuous-wave intensities, reversible protein switching facilitates parallelized fast image acquisition. The RESOLFT principle is implemented by illuminating with intensity distributions featuring zero intensity lines that are further apart than the conventional Abbe resolution limit. The subdiffraction resolution is verified by recording live Escherichia coli bacteria labeled with asFP595. The obtained resolution of 50 nm ( approximately lambda/12) is limited only by the spectroscopic properties of the proteins and the imperfections of the optical implementation, but not on principle grounds. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Visibility retrieval in Michelson wide-field stellar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla, I.; Sellos, J.; Pereira, S. F.; Braat, J. J. M.

    2006-04-01

    Wide-field interferometry has become a subject of increasing interest in recent years. New methods have been suggested in order to avoid the drawbacks of the standard wide-field method (homothetic mapping), which is not applicable when the aperture is highly diluted; for this reason, imaging with non-homothetic arrays is being extensively studied (E. Pedretti, et al., Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. Ser. 147 285 (2000); S. Gillet, et al., Astron. Astrophys. 400 393 (2003)). The field of view of a pupil-plane interferometer or a densified array consists of only a few resolution elements; in order to improve these systems, we have developed a new method consisting of a Michelson pupil-plane combination scheme where a wide field of view can be achieved in one shot. This technique, called the ‘staircase mirror’ approach, has been described in a previous paper (I. Montilla, S.F. Pereira and J.J.M. Braat, Appl. Optics 44 328 (2005)) and uses a stair-shaped mirror in the intermediate image plane of each telescope in the array, allowing for simultaneous correction of the differential delay for both the on- and off-axis image positions. Experimental results have been obtained showing the simultaneous recovery of the fringes of off-axis stars with an appreciable angular separation, and with a contrast similar to that of the on-axis reference star. With this example we demonstrate an increase of the field of view by a factor of 5, with no need for extra observation time. In this article, we present a further analysis of the method. We investigate how to retrieve the visibility when a star is focused on the edge of a step of the stair-shaped mirror. Even though the optical pathlength difference correction is discontinuous, we show both numerically and analytically that the visibility can be completely recovered, so that no information is lost. Our experimental results demonstrate that the visibility can be retrieved to within a 1% error.

  1. Wide-Field Ultraviolet Spectrometer for Planetary Exospheres and Thermospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Wishnow, E. H.; Miller, T.; Edelstein, J.; Lillis, R. J.; Korpela, E.; England, S.; Shourt, W. V.; Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J.; Courtade, S.; Curtis, D. W.; Deighan, J.; Chaffin, M.; Harmoul, A.; Almatroushi, H. R.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the composition, structure, and variability of a planet's upper atmosphere - the exosphere and thermosphere - is essential for understanding how the upper atmosphere is coupled to the lower atmosphere, magnetosphere and near-space environment, and the Sun. Ultraviolet spectroscopy can directly observe emissions from constituents in the exosphere and thermosphere. From such observations, the structure, composition, and variability can be determined.We will present the preliminary design for a wide field ultraviolet imaging spectrometer for remote sensing of planetary atmospheres. The imaging spectrometer achieves an extremely large instantaneous 110 degree field of view with no moving scanning mirror. The imaging resolution is very appropriate for extended atmospheric emission studies, with a resolution of better than 0.3 degrees at the center to 0.4 degrees at the edges of the field. The spectral range covers 120 - 170 nm, encompassing emissions from H, O, C, N, CO, and N2, with an average spectral resolution of 1.5 nm. The instrument is composed of a 2-element wide-field telescope, a 3-element Offner spectrometer, and a sealed MCP detector system contained within a compact volume of about 40 x 25 x 20 cm. We will present the optical and mechanical design as well as the predicted optical performance.The wide instantaneous FOV simplifies instrument and spacecraft operations by removing the need for multiple scans (either from a scan mirror or spacecraft slews) to cover the regions of interest. This instrumentation can allow for two-dimensional spectral information to be built up with simple spacecraft operation or just using spacecraft motion. Applications to the terrestrial geocorona and thermosphere will be addressed as well as applications to the upper atmospheres of other planetary objects.

  2. DMD-based programmable wide field spectrograph for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Liotard, Arnaud; Viard, Thierry; Costes, Vincent; Hébert, Philippe-Jean

    2015-03-01

    In Earth Observation, Universe Observation and Planet Exploration, scientific return could be optimized in future missions using MOEMS devices. In Earth Observation, we propose an innovative reconfigurable instrument, a programmable wide-field spectrograph where both the FOV and the spectrum could be tailored thanks to a 2D micromirror array (MMA). For a linear 1D field of view (FOV), the principle is to use a MMA to select the wavelengths by acting on intensity. This component is placed in the focal plane of a first grating. On the MMA surface, the spatial dimension is along one side of the device and for each spatial point, its spectrum is displayed along the perpendicular direction: each spatial and spectral feature of the 1D FOV is then fully adjustable dynamically and/or programmable. A second stage with an identical grating recomposes the beam after wavelengths selection, leading to an output tailored 1D image. A mock-up has been designed, fabricated and tested. The micromirror array is the largest DMD in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. A synthetic linear FOV is generated and typical images have been recorded o at the output focal plane of the instrument. By tailoring the DMD, we could modify successfully each pixel of the input image: for example, it is possible to remove bright objects or, for each spatial pixel, modify the spectral signature. The very promising results obtained on the mock-up of the programmable wide-field spectrograph reveal the efficiency of this new instrument concept for Earth Observation.

  3. Thermal design of the Wide Field/Planetary Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R. D.; Jones, J. A.; Stultz, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera is an imaging system developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the NASA Hubble Space Telescope currently scheduled to be launched in December 1989 aboard the space shuttle. The temperature control design of the instrument utilizes multilayered insulation, electric resistance heaters, aluminum/ammonia heat pipes, thermoelectric coolers, temperature control coatings, and space radiators. A feedback control system maintains stable sensor temperatures. Thermal capacitance maintains stable optics and electronics temperatures during transient conditions. Schedule slips and launch delays have allowed extensive thermal testing of the instrument. Six instrument thermal vacuum tests and a spacecraft thermal vacuum test were performed. Several modifications have been made to the instrument to correct icing and contamination problems that have been discovered during thermal vacuum testing. This paper describes the thermal design, last instrument thermal vacuum test, results, and thermal model correlation.

  4. The spectral imaging facility: Setup characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, Simone, E-mail: simone.deangelis@iaps.inaf.it; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Manzari, Paola Olga [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Ammannito, Eleonora [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567 (United States); Di Iorio, Tatiana [ENEA, UTMEA-TER, Rome (Italy); Liberati, Fabrizio [Opto Service SrL, Campagnano di Roma (RM) (Italy); Tarchi, Fabio; Dami, Michele; Olivieri, Monica; Pompei, Carlo [Selex ES, Campi Bisenzio (Italy); Mugnuolo, Raffaele [Italian Space Agency, ASI, Spatial Geodesy Center, Matera (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The SPectral IMager (SPIM) facility is a laboratory visible infrared spectrometer developed to support space borne observations of rocky bodies of the solar system. Currently, this laboratory setup is used to support the DAWN mission, which is in its journey towards the asteroid 1-Ceres, and to support the 2018 Exo-Mars mission in the spectral investigation of the Martian subsurface. The main part of this setup is an imaging spectrometer that is a spare of the DAWN visible infrared spectrometer. The spectrometer has been assembled and calibrated at Selex ES and then installed in the facility developed at the INAF-IAPS laboratory in Rome. The goal of SPIM is to collect data to build spectral libraries for the interpretation of the space borne and in situ hyperspectral measurements of planetary materials. Given its very high spatial resolution combined with the imaging capability, this instrument can also help in the detailed study of minerals and rocks. In this paper, the instrument setup is first described, and then a series of test measurements, aimed to the characterization of the main subsystems, are reported. In particular, laboratory tests have been performed concerning (i) the radiation sources, (ii) the reference targets, and (iii) linearity of detector response; the instrumental imaging artifacts have also been investigated.

  5. Invited Article: First Flight in Space of a Wide-field-of-view Soft X-Ray Imager Using Lobster-Eye Optics: Instrument Description and Initial Flight Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael; Porter, F. Scott; Sibeck, David G.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chomay, Dennis J.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Galeazzi, Massiniliano; Keller, John; Koutroumpa, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development, launch into space, and initial results from a prototype wide eld-of-view (FOV) soft X-ray imager that employs Lobster-eye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) is the rst instrument using this type of optics launched into space and provides proof-of-concept for future ight instruments capable of imaging structures such as the terrestrial cusp, the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere, comets, the moon, and the solar wind interaction with planetary bodies like Venus and Mars.

  6. Pixel History for Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, D.; Grogin, N.; Bourque, M.; Ogaz, S.

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy present in a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can result in additional electrical current. This excess charge is trapped within the silicon lattice structure of the CCD electronics. It can persist through multiple exposures and have an adverse effect on science performance of the detectors unless properly flagged and corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed. These images, generally referred to as "dark" images, allow for the measurement of the thermal-electron contamination present in each pixel of the CCD lattice. This so-called "dark current" can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling the dark to the corresponding exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain threshold are traditionally marked as "hot" and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these because of the extra current. However, these pixels may not be unusable because of an unreliable dark subtraction; if we find these pixels to be stable over an anneal period, we can properly subtract the charge and the extra Poisson noise from this dark current will be propagated into the error arrays. Here we present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every individual pixel of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) CCDs over time and allows pixels that were previously flagged as unusable to be brought back into the science image as a reliable pixel.

  7. The KIDROP model of combining strategies for providing retinopathy of prematurity screening in underserved areas in India using wide-field imaging, tele-medicine, non-physician graders and smart phone reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Vinekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the Karnataka Internet Assisted Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity (KIDROP program for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP screening in underserved rural areas using an indigenously developed tele-ROP model. Materials and Methods: KIDROP currently provides ROP screening and treatment services in three zones and 81 neonatal units in Karnataka, India. Technicians were trained to use a portable Retcam Shuttle (Clarity, USA and validated against ROP experts performing indirect ophthalmoscopy. An indigenously developed 20-point score (STAT score graded their ability (Level I to III to image and decide follow-up based on a three-way algorithm. Images were also uploaded on a secure tele-ROP platform and accessed and reported by remote experts on their smart phones (iPhone, Apple. Results: 6339 imaging sessions of 1601 infants were analyzed. A level III technician agreed with 94.3% of all expert decisions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for treatment grade disease were 95.7, 93.2, 81.5 and 98.6 respectively. The kappa for technicians to decide discharge of babies was 0.94 (P < 0.001. Only 0.4% of infants needing treatment were missed.The kappa agreement of experts reporting on the iPhone vs Retcam for treatment requiring and mild ROP were 0.96 and 0.94 (P < 0.001 respectively. Conclusions: This is the first and largest real-world program to employ accredited non-physicians to grade and report ROP. The KIDROP tele-ROP model demonstrates that ROP services can be delivered to the outreach despite lack of specialists and may be useful in other middle-income countries with similar demographics.

  8. Construction of imaging system for wide-field-range ESR spectra using localized microwave field and its case study of crystal orientation in suspension of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4 . 5H2O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Atsushi; Ueno, Takehiro; Yamanaka, Chihiro; Katsura, Makoto; Ikeya, Motoji

    2005-02-01

    A scanning electron spin resonance (ESR) microscope using a localized microwave field was redesigned to measure ESR spectra from 0 to 400 mT using electromagnets. Divalent copper ion (Cu2+) in copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4 . 5H2O) was imaged, after the powdered samples were cemented in silicone rubber under a magnetic field. The ratio of the two signal intensities at g=2.27 and 2.08 clearly indicates the orientation of the particles. This method can be used for mapping the local magnetic field and its direction.

  9. Construction of imaging system for wide-field-range ESR spectra using localized microwave field and its case study of crystal orientation in suspension of copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Atsushi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)]. E-mail: atani@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ueno, Takehiro [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamanaka, Chihiro [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Katsura, Makoto [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ikeya, Motoji [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2005-02-01

    A scanning electron spin resonance (ESR) microscope using a localized microwave field was redesigned to measure ESR spectra from 0 to 400mT using electromagnets. Divalent copper ion (Cu{sup 2+}) in copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O) was imaged, after the powdered samples were cemented in silicone rubber under a magnetic field. The ratio of the two signal intensities at g=2.27 and 2.08 clearly indicates the orientation of the particles. This method can be used for mapping the local magnetic field and its direction.

  10. Wide-Field Slitless Spectroscopy with JWST/NIRISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, William V.

    2013-01-01

    The Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS) is one of four scientific instruments that will fly aboard the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) later in this decade. Among its capabilities, NIRISS offers wide-field slitless spectroscopy (WFSS) with a resolving power R = 150 over the wavelength range 1.0 to 2.25 microns using a pair of grisms that disperse light in orthogonal directions. Employing the software packages aXe and Source Extractor, we have developed the configuration files needed to model WFSS observations with NIRISS and to extract and calibrate the resulting spectra. These files, together with a cookbook detailing their use, are available on the JWST/NIRISS web site at STScI. Using these tools, we construct synthetic images of the near-IR sky, identify and extract the spectra of individual sources, and demonstrate that NIRISS can observe galaxies with redshifts up to z = 17. NIRISS is provided to the JWST project by the Canadian Space Agency under the leadership of René Doyon of the Université de Montréal. The prime contractor is COM DEV Canada.

  11. Selected aspects of wide-field stellar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcio, Luigi Arsenio

    1999-11-01

    In Michelson stellar interferometry, the high-resolution information about the source structure is detected by performing observations with widely separated telescopes, interconnected to form an interferometer. At optical wavelengths, this method provides a technically viable approach for achieving angular resolutions in the milliarcsecond range, comparable to those of a 100 m diameter telescope, whose realization is beyond the immediate engineering capabilities. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to the definition of dedicated interferometric instruments, which will allow to address ambitious astronomical tasks such as high-resolution imaging, astrometry at microarcsecond level, and the direct detection of exoplanets. Astrometry and related techniques employ the so-called wide field-of-view interferometric mode, where phase measurements are performed simultaneously at two (or more) sources; often, the actual observable is the instantaneous phase difference of the two object signals. The future success of wide-field interferometry critically depends on the development of techniques for the accurate control of field-dependent (anisoplanatic) phase errors. In this thesis, we address two aspects of this problem in detail. The first one is theoretical in nature. For ground-based measurements, atmospheric turbulence is the largest source of random phase fluctuations between the on- and the off-axis fringes. We developed a model of the temporal power spectrum of this disturbance, whose validity is not limited to low frequencies only, as it is the case with earlier models. This extension opens the possibility of the analysis of dynamic issues, such as the determination of the allowable coherent integration time T for the off-axis fringes. The spectrum turns out to be well approximated by a sequences of four power-law branches. In first instance, its overall form is determined by the values of the baseline length, telescope diameter, and average beam separation in

  12. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Integrated Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Chia; Blaurock, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Contents: introduction to WFIRST (Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope) and integrated modeling; WFIRST stability requirement summary; instability mitigation strategies; dynamic jitter results; STOP (structural-thermal-optical performance) (thermal distortion) results; STOP and jitter capability limitations; model validation philosophy.

  13. High Resolution Wide Field of View Stereographic Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overarching challenge of tele-presence is to provide an environment to the human operator that is sufficiently familiar that the interface itself does not become...

  14. Wide-field interferometric phase microscopy with molecular specificity using plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turko, Nir A; Peled, Anna; Shaked, Natan T

    2013-11-01

    We present a method for adding molecular specificity to wide-field interferometric phase microscopy (IPM) by recording the phase signatures of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) labeling targets of interest in biological cells. The AuNPs are excited by time-modulated light at a wavelength corresponding to their absorption spectral peak, evoking a photothermal (PT) effect due to their plasmonic resonance. This effect induces a local temperature rise, resulting in local refractive index and phase changes that can be detected optically. Using a wide-field interferometric phase microscope, we acquired an image sequence of the AuNP sample phase profile without requiring lateral scanning, and analyzed the time-dependent profile of the entire field of view using a Fourier analysis, creating a map of the locations of AuNPs in the sample. The system can image a wide-field PT phase signal from a cluster containing down to 16 isolated AuNPs. AuNPs are then conjugated to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies and inserted to an EGFR-overexpressing cancer cell culture, which is imaged using IPM and verified by confocal microscopy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time wide-field interferometric PT imaging is performed at the subcellular level without the need for total internal reflection effects or scanning.

  15. Firearm Projectile in the Maxillary Tuberosity Located by Adjunctive Examination of Wide-Field Optical Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Sérgio Araújo; Varotti, Fernando de Pilla; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Pratavieira, Sebastião

    2017-10-10

    Demonstrate the use of wide-field optical fluorescence as an adjunctive examination in a clinical routine to oral diagnosis. Use of wide-field optical fluorescence in the oral cavity has been restricted to topics related to the detection and diagnosis of oral cancer. In a regular medical appointment, a 58-year-old female patient, without any complaint or oral symptom, underwent the complementary examination by wide-field optical fluorescence. A device with high-power light-emitting diode emitting light centered at a wavelength of (400 ± 10) nm and maximum irradiance of (0.040 ± 0.008) W/cm(2) was used for fluorescence visualization. We report the location of a firearm projectile, intraosseous, in the maxillary tuberosity using wide-field optical fluorescence. It is evidenced that wide-field optical fluorescence, within a clinical routine, can provide relevant images and data, with an immediate result, without the use of ionizing radiation, enabling an efficient oral diagnosis.

  16. Wide-field surface-enhanced CARS microscopy of cells (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Alexander; Kenison, John T.; Potma, Eric O.

    2017-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated a total internal reflection, wide-field CARS microscope, where the signal is enhanced with the aid of a thin gold layer that supports surface plasmon polariton resonances. This surface-enhanced CARS microscope is capable of generating images of lipid structures in close proximity (visualizing lipids in aqueous media, including imaging of cells, with a unique surface-sensitive contrast that cannot be obtained with conventional CARS microscopy.

  17. DCC Case Study: Wide Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU)

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Case study on the Wide Field Astronomy Unit (WFAU), Edinburgh. Outlines data curation issues with which WFAU is involved, with an emphasis on interoperability. Particular regard is given to the transfer and reuse of data collected from disparate sources. The case study also covers other factors influencing data curation, including methodological development, standards and legal issues, evaluation, and human factors. A technical appendix outlines the technologies used i...

  18. Systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable storage media for wide-field interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G. (Inventor); Leisawitz, David T. (Inventor); Rinehart, Stephen A. (Inventor); Memarsadeghi, Nargess (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable storage media for wide field imaging interferometry. The method includes for each point in a two dimensional detector array over a field of view of an image: gathering a first interferogram from a first detector and a second interferogram from a second detector, modulating a path-length for a signal from an image associated with the first interferogram in the first detector, overlaying first data from the modulated first detector and second data from the second detector, and tracking the modulating at every point in a two dimensional detector array comprising the first detector and the second detector over a field of view for the image. The method then generates a wide-field data cube based on the overlaid first data and second data for each point. The method can generate an image from the wide-field data cube.

  19. Wide-Field Optic for Autonomous Acquisition of Laser Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Norman A.; Charles, Jeffrey R.; Biswas, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    An innovation reported in Two-Camera Acquisition and Tracking of a Flying Target, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 8 (August 2008), p. 20, used a commercial fish-eye lens and an electronic imaging camera for initially locating objects with subsequent handover to an actuated narrow-field camera. But this operated against a dark-sky background. An improved solution involves an optical design based on custom optical components for the wide-field optical system that directly addresses the key limitations in acquiring a laser signal from a moving source such as an aircraft or a spacecraft. The first challenge was to increase the light collection entrance aperture diameter, which was approximately 1 mm in the first prototype. The new design presented here increases this entrance aperture diameter to 4.2 mm, which is equivalent to a more than 16 times larger collection area. One of the trades made in realizing this improvement was to restrict the field-of-view to +80 deg. elevation and 360 azimuth. This trade stems from practical considerations where laser beam propagation over the excessively high air mass, which is in the line of sight (LOS) at low elevation angles, results in vulnerability to severe atmospheric turbulence and attenuation. An additional benefit of the new design is that the large entrance aperture is maintained even at large off-axis angles when the optic is pointed at zenith. The second critical limitation for implementing spectral filtering in the design was tackled by collimating the light prior to focusing it onto the focal plane. This allows the placement of the narrow spectral filter in the collimated portion of the beam. For the narrow band spectral filter to function properly, it is necessary to adequately control the range of incident angles at which received light intercepts the filter. When this angle is restricted via collimation, narrower spectral filtering can be implemented. The collimated beam (and the filter) must be relatively large to

  20. Laser light-field fusion for wide-field lensfree on-chip phase contrast nanoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast nanoscopy, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using an on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wav...

  1. National Ignition Facility Beamline Pupil Relay Plane Location and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korniski, R J; Lawson, J K

    2002-01-29

    Axial astigmatism can be introduced into the nominal design of an optical system by tilted and tilted-wedged plates. The pupil images in the National Ignition Facility experience many such components. Some ramifications will be explored.

  2. Brandaris ultra high-speed imaging facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lajoinie, Guillaume; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Tsuji, K.

    2017-01-01

    High-speed imaging is in popular demand for a broad range of scientific applications, including fluid physics, and bubble and droplet dynamics. It allows for a detailed visualization of the event under study by acquiring a series of images captured at high temporal and spatial resolution. The

  3. Blind deconvolution with principal components analysis for wide-field and small-aperture telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Peng; Sun, Rongyu; Wang, Weinan; Cai, Dongmei; Liu, Huigen

    2017-09-01

    Telescopes with a wide field of view (greater than 1°) and small apertures (less than 2 m) are workhorses for observations such as sky surveys and fast-moving object detection, and play an important role in time-domain astronomy. However, images captured by these telescopes are contaminated by optical system aberrations, atmospheric turbulence, tracking errors and wind shear. To increase the quality of images and maximize their scientific output, we propose a new blind deconvolution algorithm based on statistical properties of the point spread functions (PSFs) of these telescopes. In this new algorithm, we first construct the PSF feature space through principal component analysis, and then classify PSFs from a different position and time using a self-organizing map. According to the classification results, we divide images of the same PSF types and select these PSFs to construct a prior PSF. The prior PSF is then used to restore these images. To investigate the improvement that this algorithm provides for data reduction, we process images of space debris captured by our small-aperture wide-field telescopes. Comparing the reduced results of the original images and the images processed with the standard Richardson-Lucy method, our method shows a promising improvement in astrometry accuracy.

  4. Spatially Resolved Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy via Wide-Field Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Joshua S; Serrano, Arnaldo L; Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-07-20

    We report the first wide-field microscope for measuring two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopic images. We concurrently collect more than 16 000 2D IR spectra, made possible by a new focal plane array detector and mid-IR pulse shaping, to generate hyperspectral images with multiple frequency dimensions and diffraction-limited spatial resolution. Both frequency axes of the spectra are collected in the time domain by scanning two pairs of femtosecond pulses using a dual acousto-optic modulator pulse shaper. The technique is demonstrated by imaging a mixture of metal carbonyl absorbed polystyrene beads. The differences in image formation between FTIR and 2D IR microscopy are also explored by imaging a patterned USAF test target. We find that our 2D IR microscope has diffraction-limited spatial resolution and enhanced contrast compared to FTIR microscopy because of the nonlinear scaling of the 2D IR signal to the absorptivity coefficient for the vibrational modes. Images generated using off-diagonal peaks, created from vibrational anharmonicities, improve the molecular discrimination and eliminate noise. Two-dimensional wide-field IR microscopy provides information on vibrational lifetimes, molecular couplings, transition dipole orientations, and many other quantities that can be used for creating image contrast to help disentangle and interpret complex and heterogeneous samples. Such experiments made possible could include the study of amyloid proteins in tissues, protein folding in heterogeneous environments, and structural dynamics in devices employing mid-IR materials.

  5. Wide field focal plane arrays for UKIRT and VISTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, D.; Laidlaw, K.; Bezawada, N. N.

    This paper briefly describes the focal plane arrays of the UKIRT Wide Field Camera and the IR camera for the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). Laboratory test results on the HAWAII-2 engineering grade detector are summarised. The interference problems resulting from the on-axis wavefront/autoguider sensors and their controllers (autoguider, wavefront sensor, etc.) are anticipated and possible options to eliminate or attenuate these effects are presented. Laboratory tests on the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) issues are also reported.

  6. Vestibular rehabilitation using a wide field of view virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparto, P J; Furman, J M; Whitney, S L; Hodges, L F; Redfern, M S

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical justification for using a wide field of view (FOV) virtual reality display system for use in vestibular rehabilitation. A wide FOV environment offers some unique features that may be beneficial to vestibular rehabilitation. Primarily, optic flow information extracted from the periphery may be critical for recalibrating the sensory processes used by people with vestibular disorders. If this hypothesis is correct, then wide FOV systems will have an advantage over narrow field of view input devices such as head mounted or desktop displays. Devices that we have incorporated into our system that are critical for monitoring improvement in this clinical population will also be described.

  7. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Will [Australian Astron. Observ.; Gillingham, Peter [Australian Astron. Observ.; Smith, Greg [Australian Astron. Observ.; Kent, Steve [Fermilab; Doel, Peter [University Coll. London

    2014-07-18

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2-3 degree fields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a 'Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  8. The UKIRT wide-field camera (WFCAM): commissioning and performance on the telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Paul; Casali, Mark; Adamson, Andy; Ives, Derek; Kerr, Tom

    2006-06-01

    The UKIRT Wide-Field Camera (WFCAM) was commissioned in two phases between October and December 2004, and March and April 2005. It has been carrying out full-scale sky survey operations since May 2005. This paper describes the commissioning process and compares actual performance on the telescope with specifications in four key areas: optical image quality including delivered FWHM and ghosting etc., noise and sensitivity in the infrared and on the visible autoguider, array artifacts such as crosstalk and persistent images, and observing efficiency. A comprehensive program of science verification was carried out before commencing the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS).

  9. PERSPECTIVE: Toward a wide-field retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Hossein; Ratanapakorn, Tanapat; Ufer, Stefan; Eckhardt, Helmut; Humayun, Mark S.; Weiland, James D.

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a wide field electrode array that may increase the field of vision in patients implanted with a retinal prosthesis. Mobility is often impaired in patients with low vision, particularly in those with peripheral visual loss. Studies on low vision patients as well as simulation studies on normally sighted individuals have indicated a strong correlation between the visual field and mobility. In addition, it has been shown that an increased visual field is associated with a significant improvement in visual acuity and object discrimination. Current electrode arrays implanted in animals or human vary in size; however, the retinal area covered by the electrodes has a maximum projected visual field of about 10°. We have designed wide field electrode arrays that could potentially provide a visual field of 34°, which may significantly improve the mobility. Tests performed on a mechanical eye model showed that it was possible to fix 10 mm wide flexible polyimide dummy electrode arrays onto the retina using a single retinal tack. They also showed that the arrays could conform to the inner curvature of the eye. Surgeries on an enucleated porcine eye model demonstrated feasibility of implantation of 10 mm wide arrays through a 5 mm eye wall incision.

  10. Simple concept for a wide-field lensless digital holographic microscope using a laser diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adinda-Ougba A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wide-field, lensless digital holographic microscopy is a new microscopic imaging technique for telemedicine and for resource limited setting [1]. In this contribution we propose a very simple wide-field lensless digital holographic microscope using a laser diode. It is based on in-line digital holography which is capable to provide amplitude and phase images of a sample resulting from numerical reconstruction. The numerical reconstruction consists of the angular spectrum propagation method together with a phase retrieval algorithm. Amplitude and phase images of the sample with a resolution of ∽2 µm and with ∽24 mm2 field of view are obtained. We evaluate our setup by imaging first the 1951 USAF resolution test chart to verify the resolution. Second, we record holograms of blood smear and diatoms. The individual specimen can be easily identified after the numerical reconstruction. Our system is a very simple, compact and low-cost possibility of realizing a microscope capable of imaging biological samples. The availability of the phase provide topographic information of the sample extending the application of this system to be not only for biological sample but also for transparent microstructure. It is suitable for fault detection, shape and roughness measurements of these structures.

  11. Wide-Field Fundus Autofluorescence for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cone/Cone-Rod Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Akio; Oishi, Maho; Ogino, Ken; Morooka, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa and cone/cone-rod dystrophy are inherited retinal diseases characterized by the progressive loss of rod and/or cone photoreceptors. To evaluate the status of rod/cone photoreceptors and visual function, visual acuity and visual field tests, electroretinogram, and optical coherence tomography are typically used. In addition to these examinations, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) has recently garnered attention. FAF visualizes the intrinsic fluorescent material in the retina, which is mainly lipofuscin contained within the retinal pigment epithelium. While conventional devices offer limited viewing angles in FAF, the recently developed Optos machine enables recording of wide-field FAF. With wide-field analysis, an association between abnormal FAF areas and visual function was demonstrated in retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. In addition, the presence of "patchy" hypoautofluorescent areas was found to be correlated with symptom duration. Although physicians should be cautious when interpreting wide-field FAF results because the peripheral parts of the image are magnified significantly, this examination method provides previously unavailable information.

  12. The design of the wide field monitor for LOFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Hernanz, M.; Alvarez, L.

    2014-01-01

    is designed to carry on-board two instruments with sensitivity in the 2-50 keV range: a 10 m 2 class Large Area Detector (LAD) with a ... will be to detect transient sources to be observed by the LAD. However, thanks to its unique combination of a wide field of view (FoV) and energy resolution (better than 500 eV), the WFM will be also an excellent monitoring instrument to study the long term variability of many classes of X-ray sources. The WFM...... consists of 10 independent and identical coded mask cameras arranged in 5 pairs to provide the desired sky coverage. We provide here an overview of the instrument design, configuration, and capabilities of the LOFT WFM. The compact and modular design of the WFM could easily make the instrument concept...

  13. Extreme multiplex spectroscopy at wide-field 4-m telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Content, Robert; Shanks, Tom

    2008-07-01

    We describe the design and science case for a spectrograph for the prime focus of classical 4-m wide-field telescopes that can deliver at least 4000 MOS slits over a 1° field. This extreme multiplex capability means that 25000 galaxy redshifts can be measured in a single night, opening up the possibilities for large galaxy redshift surveys out to z~0.7 and beyond for the purpose of measuring the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and for many other science goals. The design features four cloned spectrographs and exploits the exclusive possibility of tiling the focal plane of wide-field 4-m telescopes with CCDs for multi-object spectroscopic purposes. In ~200 night projects, such spectrographs have the potential to make galaxy redshift surveys of ~6×106 galaxies over a wide redshift range and thus may provide a low-cost alternative to other survey routes such as WFMOS and SKA. Two of these extreme multiplex spectrographs are currently being designed for the AAT (NG1dF) and Calar Alto (XMS) 4-m class telescopes. NG2dF, a larger version for the AAT 2° field, would have 12 clones and at least 12000 slits. The clones use a transparent design including a grism in which all optics are smaller than the clone square subfield so that the clones can be tightly packed with little gaps between the contiguous fields. Only low cost glasses are used; the variations in chromatic aberrations between bands are compensated by changing one or two of the lenses adjacent to the grism. The total weight and length is smaller with a few clones than a unique spectrograph which makes it feasible to place the spectrograph at the prime focus.

  14. Clinical assessment of human breast cancer margins with wide-field optical coherence micro-elastography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Wijesinghe, Philip; Kirk, Rodney W.; Latham, Bruce; Sampson, David D.; Saunders, Christobel M.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer has the second highest mortality rate of all cancers in females. Surgical excision of malignant tissue forms a central component of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) procedures. Incomplete excision of malignant tissue is a major issue in BCS with typically 20 - 30% cases requiring a second surgical procedure due to postoperative detection of tumor in the margin. A major challenge for surgeons during BCS is the lack of effective tools to assess the surgical margin intraoperatively. Such tools would enable the surgeon to more effectively remove all tumor during the initial surgery, hence reducing re-excision rates. We report advances in the development of a new tool, optical coherence micro-elastography, which forms images, known as elastograms, based on mechanical contrast within the tissue. We demonstrate the potential of this technique to increase contrast between malignant tumor and healthy stroma in elastograms over OCT images. We demonstrate a key advance toward clinical translation by conducting wide-field imaging in intraoperative time frames with a wide-field scanning system, acquiring mosaicked elastograms with overall dimensions of 50 × 50 mm, large enough to image an entire face of most lumpectomy specimens. We describe this wide-field imaging system, and demonstrate its operation by presenting wide-field optical coherence tomography images and elastograms of a tissue mimicking silicone phantom and a number of representative freshly excised human breast specimens. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of scanning large areas of lumpectomies, which is an important step towards practical intraoperative margin assessment.

  15. The Sondrestrom Research Facility All-sky Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, E. A.; Grill, M.; Gudmundsson, E.; Stromme, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Sondrestrom Upper Atmospheric Research Facility is located near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, just north of the Arctic Circle and 100 km inland from the west coast of Greenland. The facility is operated by SRI International in Menlo Park, California, under the auspices of the U.S. National Science Foundation. Operating in Greenland since 1983, the Sondrestrom facility is host to more than 20 instruments, the majority of which provide unique and complementary information about the arctic upper atmosphere. Together these instruments advance our knowledge of upper atmospheric physics and determine how the tenuous neutral gas interacts with the charged space plasma environment. The suite of instrumentation supports many disciplines of research - from plate tectonics to auroral physics and space weather. The Sondrestrom facility has recently acquired two new all-sky imagers. In this paper, we present images from both new imagers, placing them in context with other instruments at the site and detailing to the community how to gain access to this new data set. The first new camera replaces the intensified auroral system which has been on site for nearly three decades. This new all-sky imager (ASI), designed and assembled by Keo Scientific Ltd., employs a medium format 180° fisheye lens coupled to a set of five 3-inch narrowband interference filters. The current filter suite allows operation at the following wavelengths: 750 nm, 557.7 nm, 777.4 nm, 630.0 nm, and 732/3 nm. Monochromatic images from the ASI are acquired at a specific filter and integration time as determined by a unique configuration file. Integrations as short as 0.5 sec can be commanded for exceptionally bright features. Preview images are posted to the internet in near real-time, with final images posted weeks later. While images are continuously collected in a "patrol mode," users can request special collection sequences for targeted experiments. The second new imager installed at the Sondrestrom

  16. Radiometric calibration of wide-field camera system with an application in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítek, Stanislav; Nasyrova, Maria; Stehlíková, Veronika

    2017-09-01

    Camera response function (CRF) is widely used for the description of the relationship between scene radiance and image brightness. Most common application of CRF is High Dynamic Range (HDR) reconstruction of the radiance maps of imaged scenes from a set of frames with different exposures. The main goal of this work is to provide an overview of CRF estimation algorithms and compare their outputs with results obtained under laboratory conditions. These algorithms, typically designed for multimedia content, are unfortunately quite useless with astronomical image data, mostly due to their nature (blur, noise, and long exposures). Therefore, we propose an optimization of selected methods to use in an astronomical imaging application. Results are experimentally verified on the wide-field camera system using Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera.

  17. Comparison of image quality indicators among mammography facilities in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, N L; Yaffe, M J

    2001-12-01

    To compare the technical aspects of image quality of mammography machines in facilities across Ontario. Eight mammographic physics consultants took measurements and calculated accreditation phantom scores, mean glandular dose, entrance exposure, average optical density, half value layer and the limiting resolution of the imaging chain for 100 mammography machines across Ontario. Of the 100 machines, 39 were affiliated with the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP), and the remaining 61 were applying to become OBSP affiliates. All of the OBSP facilities and 32 of the applicants were accredited with the Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) of the Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR). All OBSP facilities had passing phantom scores, and 84% of the applicants with CAR accreditation and 79% of those without had passing phantom scores. The mean glandular dose was 1.5 (range 1.0-1.9, standard deviation [SD] 0.22) mGy for OBSP facilities, 1.3 (0.8-1.8, SD 0.29) mGy for CAR accredited and 1.4 (0.9-1.9, SD 0.24) mGy for nonaccredited applicants. Mean entrance exposures were 798 (540-1280, SD 135) mR, 717 (430-980, SD 153) mR and 770 (520-930, SD 116) mR for the OBSP, accredited and nonaccredited facilities respectively. There were no appreciable differences in the mean optical densities (approx. 1.62 OD), mean half-value layers (approx. 0.34 mm Al) or mean resolutions measured with the large focal spot (nominal size of 0.3 mm) either parallel (approx. 16 line pairs/mm) or perpendicular (approx. 14 line pairs/mm) to the cathode-anode axis of the x-ray tube, among the 3 types of facilities. Image quality is increased and variability is decreased in facilities participating in a province-wide screening program.

  18. Wide-Field Multi-Parameter FLIM: Long-Term Minimal Invasive Observation of Proteins in Living Cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitali, M.; Picazo, F.; Prokazov, Y.; Duci, A.; Turbin, E.; Götze, C.; Llopis, J.; Hartig, R.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Zuschratter, W.

    2011-01-01

    Time-domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) is a remarkable tool to monitor the dynamics of fluorophore-tagged protein domains inside living cells. We propose a Wide-Field Multi-Parameter FLIM method (WFMP-FLIM) aimed to monitor continuously living cells under minimum light intensity

  19. The neutron imaging system fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fittinghoff D.N.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n′ reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system is presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system is presented. We also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  20. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittinghoff, D N; Atkinson, D P; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P B; Grim, G P; Aragonez, R J; Archuleta, T N; Batha, S H; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Danly, C R; Day, R D; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Hsu, A H; Jaramillo, S A; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Oertel, J A; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Buckles, R A; Cradick, J R; Kaufman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

    2011-10-24

    We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n') reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system will be presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system will be presented. We will also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  1. Picosecond wide-field time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence microscopy with a delay line anode detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Le Marois, Alix; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Becker, Wolfgang; Smietana, Stefan [Becker & Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, 12277 Berlin (Germany); Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas [Photek Ltd., 26 Castleham Rd, Saint Leonards-on-Sea TN38 9NS (United Kingdom); Jagutzki, Ottmar [Institut für Kernphysik, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    We perform wide-field time-correlated single photon counting-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a crossed delay line anode image intensifier, where the pulse propagation time yields the photon position. This microchannel plate-based detector was read out with conventional fast timing electronics and mounted on a fluorescence microscope with total internal reflection (TIR) illumination. The picosecond time resolution of this detection system combines low illumination intensity of microwatts with wide-field data collection. This is ideal for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell membranes using TIR. We show that fluorescence lifetime images of living HeLa cells stained with membrane dye di-4-ANEPPDHQ exhibit a reduced lifetime near the coverslip in TIR compared to epifluorescence FLIM.

  2. Wide-field Fourier ptychographic microscopy using laser illumination source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jaebum; Lu, Hangwen; Ou, Xiaoze; Zhou, Haojiang; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic (FP) microscopy is a coherent imaging method that can synthesize an image with a higher bandwidth using multiple low-bandwidth images captured at different spatial frequency regions. The method’s demand for multiple images drives the need for a brighter illumination scheme and a high-frame-rate camera for a faster acquisition. We report the use of a guided laser beam as an illumination source for an FP microscope. It uses a mirror array and a 2-dimensional scanning Galvo mirror system to provide a sample with plane-wave illuminations at diverse incidence angles. The use of a laser presents speckles in the image capturing process due to reflections between glass surfaces in the system. They appear as slowly varying background fluctuations in the final reconstructed image. We are able to mitigate these artifacts by including a phase image obtained by differential phase contrast (DPC) deconvolution in the FP algorithm. We use a 1-Watt laser configured to provide a collimated beam with 150 mW of power and beam diameter of 1 cm to allow for the total capturing time of 0.96 seconds for 96 raw FPM input images in our system, with the camera sensor’s frame rate being the bottleneck for speed. We demonstrate a factor of 4 resolution improvement using a 0.1 NA objective lens over the full camera field-of-view of 2.7 mm by 1.5 mm. PMID:27896016

  3. Programmable LED-based integrating sphere light source for wide-field fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Aziz Ul; Anwer, Ayad G; Goldys, Ewa M

    2017-12-01

    Wide-field fluorescence microscopy commonly uses a mercury lamp, which has limited spectral capabilities. We designed and built a programmable integrating sphere light (PISL) source which consists of nine LEDs, light-collecting optics, a commercially available integrating sphere and a baffle. The PISL source is tuneable in the range 365-490nm with a uniform spatial profile and a sufficient power at the objective to carry out spectral imaging. We retrofitted a standard fluorescence inverted microscope DM IRB (Leica) with a PISL source by mounting it together with a highly sensitive low- noise CMOS camera. The capabilities of the setup have been demonstrated by carrying out multispectral autofluorescence imaging of live BV2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Proton pinhole imaging on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Park, H.-S.; Ross, J. S.; Higginson, D. P.; Huntington, C.; Pollock, B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Ryutov, D.; Turnbull, D.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fiuza, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Séguin, F. H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Pinhole imaging of large (mm scale) carbon-deuterium (CD) plasmas by proton self-emission has been used for the first time to study the microphysics of shock formation, which is of astrophysical relevance. The 3 MeV deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton self-emission from these plasmas is imaged using a novel pinhole imaging system, with up to five different 1 mm diameter pinholes positioned 25 cm from target-chamber center. CR39 is used as the detector medium, positioned at 100 cm distance from the pinhole for a magnification of 4 ×. A Wiener deconvolution algorithm is numerically demonstrated and used to interpret the images. When the spatial morphology is known, this algorithm accurately reproduces the size of features larger than about half the pinhole diameter. For these astrophysical plasma experiments on the National Ignition Facility, this provides a strong constraint on simulation modeling of the experiment.

  5. The Singapore high resolution single cell imaging facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Frank; Chen, Xiao; Vera, Armin Baysic De; Udalagama, Chammika N. B.; Ren, M.; Kan, Jeroen A. van; Bettiol, Andrew A.

    2011-10-01

    The Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore has recently expanded from three state-of-the-art beam lines to five. Two new beam lines have been constructed: A second generation proton beam writing line, and a high resolution single cell imaging facility. Both systems feature high demagnification lens systems based on compact Oxford Microbeams OM52 lenses, coupled with reduced lens/image distances. The single cell imaging facility is designed around OM52 compact lenses capable of operating in a variety of high demagnification configurations including the spaced Oxford triplet and the double crossover Russian quadruplet. The new facility has design specifications aimed at spatial resolutions below 50 nm, with a variety of techniques including STIM, secondary electron and fluorescence imaging, and an in-built optical and fluorescence microscope for sample imaging, identification and positioning. Preliminary tests using the single space Oxford triplet configuration have indicated a beam spot size of 31 × 39 nm in the horizontal and vertical directions respectively, at beam currents of ∼10,000 protons per second. However, a weakness in the specifications of the electrostatic scanning system has been identified, and a more stable scanning system needs to be implemented before we can fully realize the optimum performance. A single whole fibroblast cell has been scanned using 1.5 MeV protons, and a median fit to the proton transmission energy loss data has shown that proton STIM gives excellent details of the cell structure despite the relatively poor contrast of proton STIM compared with alpha STIM.

  6. The Singapore high resolution single cell imaging facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, Frank, E-mail: phywattf@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Dept. of Physics, National University of Singapore, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Chen, Xiao; Vera, Armin Baysic De; Udalagama, Chammika N.B.; Ren, M.; Kan, Jeroen A van; Bettiol, Andrew A [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Dept. of Physics, National University of Singapore, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-10-15

    The Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore has recently expanded from three state-of-the-art beam lines to five. Two new beam lines have been constructed: A second generation proton beam writing line, and a high resolution single cell imaging facility. Both systems feature high demagnification lens systems based on compact Oxford Microbeams OM52 lenses, coupled with reduced lens/image distances. The single cell imaging facility is designed around OM52 compact lenses capable of operating in a variety of high demagnification configurations including the spaced Oxford triplet and the double crossover Russian quadruplet. The new facility has design specifications aimed at spatial resolutions below 50 nm, with a variety of techniques including STIM, secondary electron and fluorescence imaging, and an in-built optical and fluorescence microscope for sample imaging, identification and positioning. Preliminary tests using the single space Oxford triplet configuration have indicated a beam spot size of 31 x 39 nm in the horizontal and vertical directions respectively, at beam currents of {approx}10,000 protons per second. However, a weakness in the specifications of the electrostatic scanning system has been identified, and a more stable scanning system needs to be implemented before we can fully realize the optimum performance. A single whole fibroblast cell has been scanned using 1.5 MeV protons, and a median fit to the proton transmission energy loss data has shown that proton STIM gives excellent details of the cell structure despite the relatively poor contrast of proton STIM compared with alpha STIM.

  7. Water-Immersible MEMS scanning mirror designed for wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Martel, Catherine; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lidai; Yang, Joon-Mo; Gao, Liang; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    By offering images with high spatial resolution and unique optical absorption contrast, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has gained increasing attention in biomedical research. Recent developments in OR-PAM have improved its imaging speed, but have sacrificed either the detection sensitivity or field of view or both. We have developed a wide-field fast-scanning OR-PAM by using a water-immersible MEMS scanning mirror (MEMS-ORPAM). Made of silicon with a gold coating, the MEMS mirror plate can reflect both optical and acoustic beams. Because it uses an electromagnetic driving force, the whole MEMS scanning system can be submerged in water. In MEMS-ORPAM, the optical and acoustic beams are confocally configured and simultaneously steered, which ensures uniform detection sensitivity. A B-scan imaging speed as high as 400 Hz can be achieved over a 3 mm scanning range. A diffraction-limited lateral resolution of 2.4 μm in water and a maximum imaging depth of 1.1 mm in soft tissue have been experimentally determined. Using the system, we imaged the flow dynamics of both red blood cells and carbon particles in a mouse ear in vivo. By using Evans blue dye as the contrast agent, we also imaged the flow dynamics of lymphatic vessels in a mouse tail in vivo. The results show that MEMS-OR-PAM could be a powerful tool for studying highly dynamic and time-sensitive biological phenomena.

  8. High-Speed and Wide-Field Photometry with TORTORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Greco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the photometric analysis of the extended sky fields observed by the TORTORA optical monitoring system. The technology involved in the TORTORA camera is based on the use of a fast TV-CCD matrix with an image intensifier. This approach can both significantly reduce the readout noise and shorten the focal length following to monitor relatively large sky regions with high temporal resolution and adequate detection limit. The performance of the system has been tested using the relative magnitudes of standard stars by means of long image sequences collected at different airmasses and at various intensities of the moon illumination. As expected from the previous laboratory measurements, artifact sources are negligible and do not affect the photometric results. The following analysis is based on a large sample of images acquired by the TORTORA instrument since July 2006.

  9. The new neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouardi, A.; Alami, R.; Bensitel, A. [Centre National de l' Energie des Science et des Techniques Nucleaires, PB.1382 R.P 10001 Rabat (Morocco)

    2011-07-01

    A new neutron imaging facility is currently developed around 2 MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear research centre (CENM). Neutron imaging combined to X-ray or gamma radiography offers the opportunity to extend Non Destructive Testing (NDT) activities DT in Morocco to new fields of applications such as space and aircraft Moroccan industry, mining, wood industry and Archeology. The facility is planed to be completed in the end of 2011. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the reactor tangential channel is selected. For power of 2 MW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 1.10{sup 13}ncm{sup 2}/s. The facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with a flight tube of 8m and offers three circular diaphragms with diameters of 1cm, 2 cm and 4 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio varying between 200 and 600. The holes will be housed in the primary shutter. These diaphragms' sizes allow to perform neutron radiography with high resolution (L/D = 600) and high speed (L/D= 200). Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 are used to optimize the whole neutron beam line and to reach a shorten distance between the source and detector and reduce as possible the exposure time. (author)

  10. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-13

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm(2) without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  11. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  12. Wide-Field Astronomical Surveys in the Next Decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U.; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC, Davis; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Axelrod, T.S.; /LSST Corp.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bickerton, Steven J.; /Princeton U.; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U.; Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Condon, J.J.; /NRAO, Socorro; Connolly, A.J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cooray, Asantha R.; /UC, Irvine; Covey, Kevin R.; /Harvard U.; Csabai, Istvan; /Eotvos U.; Ferguson, Henry C.; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Kantor, Jeffrey; /LSST Corp.; Kent, Stephen M.; /Fermilab; Knapp, G.R.; /Princeton U.; Myers, Steven T.; /NRAO, Socorro; Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Caltech, IPAC /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Harvard U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /NOAO, Tucson /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2011-11-14

    Wide-angle surveys have been an engine for new discoveries throughout the modern history of astronomy, and have been among the most highly cited and scientifically productive observing facilities in recent years. This trend is likely to continue over the next decade, as many of the most important questions in astrophysics are best tackled with massive surveys, often in synergy with each other and in tandem with the more traditional observatories. We argue that these surveys are most productive and have the greatest impact when the data from the surveys are made public in a timely manner. The rise of the 'survey astronomer' is a substantial change in the demographics of our field; one of the most important challenges of the next decade is to find ways to recognize the intellectual contributions of those who work on the infrastructure of surveys (hardware, software, survey planning and operations, and databases/data distribution), and to make career paths to allow them to thrive.

  13. Wide-Field Astronomical Surveys in the Next Decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U.; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC, Davis; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Axelrod, T.S.; /LSST Corp.; Becker, Andrew C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bickerton, Steven J.; /Princeton U.; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U.; Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Condon, J.J.; /NRAO, Socorro; Connolly, A.J.

    2009-03-01

    Wide-angle surveys have been an engine for new discoveries throughout the modern history of astronomy, and have been among the most highly cited and scientifically productive observing facilities in recent years. This trend is likely to continue over the next decade, as many of the most important questions in astrophysics are best tackled with massive surveys, often in synergy with each other and in tandem with the more traditional observatories. We argue that these surveys are most productive and have the greatest impact when the data from the surveys are made public in a timely manner. The rise of the 'survey astronomer' is a substantial change in the demographics of our field; one of the most important challenges of the next decade is to find ways to recognize the intellectual contributions of those who work on the infrastructure of surveys (hardware, software, survey planning and operations, and databases/data distribution), and to make career paths to allow them to thrive.

  14. Mapping absolute tissue endogenous fluorophore concentrations with chemometric wide-field fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhang; Reilley, Michael; Li, Run; Xu, Min

    2017-06-01

    We report chemometric wide-field fluorescence microscopy for imaging the spatial distribution and concentration of endogenous fluorophores in thin tissue sections. Nonnegative factorization aided by spatial diversity is used to learn both the spectral signature and the spatial distribution of endogenous fluorophores from microscopic fluorescence color images obtained under broadband excitation and detection. The absolute concentration map of individual fluorophores is derived by comparing the fluorescence from "pure" fluorophores under the identical imaging condition following the identification of the fluorescence species by its spectral signature. This method is then demonstrated by characterizing the concentration map of endogenous fluorophores (including tryptophan, elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide) for lung tissue specimens. The absolute concentrations of these fluorophores are all found to decrease significantly from normal, perilesional, to cancerous (squamous cell carcinoma) tissue. Discriminating tissue types using the absolute fluorophore concentration is found to be significantly more accurate than that achievable with the relative fluorescence strength. Quantification of fluorophores in terms of the absolute concentration map is also advantageous in eliminating the uncertainties due to system responses or measurement details, yielding more biologically relevant data, and simplifying the assessment of competing imaging approaches.

  15. A small animal time-resolved optical tomography platform using wide-field excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Vivek

    Small animal imaging plays a critical role in present day biomedical research by filling an important gap in the translation of research from the bench to the bedside. Optical techniques constitute an emerging imaging modality which have tremendous potential in preclinical applications. Optical imaging methods are capable of non-invasive assessment of the functional and molecular characteristics of biological tissue. The three-dimensional optical imaging technique, referred to as diffuse optical tomography, provides an approach for the whole-body imaging of small animal models and can provide volumetric maps of tissue functional parameters (e.g. blood volume, oxygen saturation etc.) and/or provide 3D localization and quantification of fluorescence-based molecular markers in vivo. However, the complex mathematical reconstruction problem associated with optical tomography and the cumbersome instrumental designs limits its adoption as a high-throughput quantitative whole-body imaging modality in current biomedical research. The development of new optical imaging paradigms is thus necessary for a wide-acceptance of this new technology. In this thesis, the design, development, characterization and optimization of a small animal optical tomography system is discussed. Specifically, the platform combines a highly sensitive time-resolved imaging paradigm with multi-spectral excitation capability and CCD-based detection to provide a system capable of generating spatially, spectrally and temporally dense measurement datasets. The acquisition of such data sets however can take long and translate to often unrealistic acquisition times when using the classical point source based excitation scheme. The novel approach in the design of this platform is the adoption of a wide-field excitation scheme which employs extended excitation sources and in the process allows an estimated ten-fold reduction in the acquisition time. The work described herein details the design of the imaging

  16. Image-based force and moment measurement in hypersonic facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Stuart J.; Hornung, H.G. [California Institute of Technology, Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    This article addresses the problem of force and moment measurement in short-duration hypersonic facilities. An image-based technique is described in which the motion of a free-flying model is tracked over a sequence of high-speed digital images. Force components are derived from the calculated trajectory by assuming constant acceleration during the test time. A linear version of the technique, appropriate for simple model geometries, is first outlined and the technique's precision is estimated. A nonlinear version, suitable for more generalised body shapes, is then described in the context of a series of experiments to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the NASA Orion vehicle in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel. The accuracy of these measurements was adversely affected by both the choice of light source and test-gas luminosity, but these experiments nevertheless show image-based measurements to be, at the very least, a promising supplement to standard accelerometer-based techniques. (orig.)

  17. Development of a Data Reduction algorithm for Optical Wide Field Patrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-youp Park

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The detector subsystem of the Optical Wide-field Patrol (OWL network efficiently acquires the position and time information of moving objects such as artificial satellites through its chopper system, which consists of 4 blades in front of the CCD camera. Using this system, it is possible to get more position data with the same exposure time by changing the streaks of the moving objects into many pieces with the fast rotating blades during sidereal tracking. At the same time, the time data from the rotating chopper can be acquired by the time tagger connected to the photo diode. To analyze the orbits of the targets detected in the image data of such a system, a sequential procedure of determining the positions of separated streak lines was developed that involved calculating the World Coordinate System (WCS solution to transform the positions into equatorial coordinate systems, and finally combining the time log records from the time tagger with the transformed position data. We introduce this procedure and the preliminary results of the application of this procedure to the test observation images.

  18. Calibration of BVRI Photometry for the Wide Field Channel of the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijit; Shaw, Richard A.; Claver, Jennifer A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2011-04-01

    We present new observations of two Galactic globular clusters, PAL4 and PAL14, using the Wide Field Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and reanalyze archival data from a third, NGC2419. We matched our photometry of hundreds of stars in these fields from the ACS images to existing ground-based photometry of faint sequences that were calibrated on the standard BVRI system of Landolt. These stars are significantly fainter than those generally used for HST calibration purposes and therefore are much better matched to supporting precision photometry of ACS science targets. We were able to derive more accurate photometric transformation coefficients for the commonly used ACS broadband filters, compared with those published by Sirianni et al., due to the use of a factor of several more calibration stars that span a greater range of color. We find that the inferred transformations from each cluster individually do not vary significantly from the average, except for a small offset of the photometric zero point in the F850LP filter. Our results suggest that the published prescriptions for the time-dependent correction of CCD charge transfer efficiency appear to work very well over the ˜3.5 yr interval that spans our observations of PAL4 and PAL14 and the archived images of NGC2419.

  19. Imaging VISAR diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R M; Bower, J R; Bradley, D K; Capelle, G A; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W; Eckart, M J; Eggert, J H; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Hicks, D G; Kaufman, M I; MacGowan, B J; Montelongo, S; Ng, E W; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W; Zapata, P G

    2004-08-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. A VISAR (Velocity Interferometry System for Any Reflector) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two interferometers. A 60-kW VISAR probe laser operates at 659.5 nm with variable pulse width. Special coatings on the mirrors and cutoff filters are used to reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and to pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, passive shock breakout light, or thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing other experimenters to use that port. A unique resolution pattern has been designed to validate the VISAR diagnostic before each use. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. Seven CCD cameras monitor the diagnostic alignment.

  20. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rebull, L. M. [Spitzer Science Center (SSC), California Institute of Technology, M/S 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Assef, R. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 169-530, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  1. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  2. Advances on Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Grism Calibration and Slitless Spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Julia; Brammer, Gabriel; Ryan, Russell; Deustua, Susana; Pirzkal, Nor

    2018-01-01

    Grisms are spectral elements combining a grating and prism to conduct slitless spectroscopy; presently they make up approximately 13% of all Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). WFC3 contains three grisms, two for the infrared (IR) channel and one for the ultraviolet-visible (UVIS). Here we summarize recent results from an ongoing effort to improve the analysis tools, characterization, and calibration of WFC3 slitless spectroscopic observations. This includes (1) calibrating the IR wavelength solutions with respect to compact zeroth order images, (2) improved IR throughput curves from modelling grism flux by extending the pixel range of effective point spread functions, (3) IR linear-reconstruction solving methods that solve for optimal, non-parametric spectra, (4) calibrating the UVIS +1 and -1 order over the entire field of view of both chips (allowing for spectral extraction from the entire UVIS detector.) With these efforts we continue to improve and advance the science possible with WFC3 grism observations.

  3. The ARGO-YBJ legacy to next generation wide field-of-view experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Sciascio Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking for more than 5 years at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm2. With a duty-cycle greater than 86% the detector collected about 5×1011 events in a wide energy range, from few hundreds GeV up to about 10 PeV. High altitude location and detector features make ARGO-YBJ capable of investigating a wide range of important issues in Cosmic Ray and Astroparticle Physics by imaging the front of atmospheric showers with unprecedented resolution and detail. In this contribution some of the latest physics results obtained by ARGO-YBJ in gamma-ray astronomy and in cosmic ray physics are summarized. The prospects of TeV gamma-ray observations with new ground-based wide field-of-view detectors are presented.

  4. Optical Design of the WFIRST Phase-A Wide Field Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, Bert A.; Marx, Catherine T.; Gao, Guangjun; Armani, Nerses; Casey, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The WFIRST Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope TMA optical design provides 0.28-sq degrees FOV at 0.11” pixel scale to the Wide Field Instrument, operating between 0.48-2.0 micrometers, including a spectrograph mode (1.0-2.0 micrometers). An Integral Field Channel provides 2-D discrete spectroscopy at 0.15” & 0.3” sampling.

  5. ISS-Lobster: A Proposed Wide-Field X-Ray Telescope on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The Lobster wide-field imaging telescope combines simultaneous high FOV, high sensitivity and good position resolution. These characteristics can open the field of X-Ray time domain astronomy, which will study many interesting transient sources, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, and high redshift gamma-ray bursts. Also important will be its use for the X-ray follow-up of gravitational wave detections. I will describe our present effort to propose the Lobster concept for deployment on the International Space Station through a NASA Mission of Opportunity this fall.

  6. A wide-field TCSPC FLIM system based on an MCP PMT with a delay-line anode

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Wolfgang; Hirvonen, Liisa; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Netz, Holger; Smietana, Stefan; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We report on the implementation of a wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). It is based on a 40 mm diameter crossed delay line anode detector, where the readout is performed by three standard TCSPC boards. Excitation is performed by a picosecond diode laser with 50 MHz repetition rate. The photon arrival timing is obtained directly from the microchannel plates, with an instrumental response of ∼190 to 230 ps full width at hal...

  7. Retinal pigment epithelium findings in patients with albinism using wide-field polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Christopher; Ritter, Markus; Blum, Robert; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-11-01

    To investigate pigmentation characteristics of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in patients with albinism using wide-field polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography compared with intensity-based spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence imaging. Five patients (10 eyes) with previously genetically diagnosed albinism and 5 healthy control subjects (10 eyes) were imaged by a wide-field polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system (scan angle: 40 × 40° on the retina), sensitive to melanin contained in the RPE, based on the polarization state of backscattered light. Conventional intensity-based spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence examinations were performed. Retinal pigment epithelium-pigmentation was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively based on depolarization assessed by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography. This study revealed strong evidence of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to specifically image melanin in the RPE. Depolarization of light backscattered by the RPE in patients with albinism was reduced compared with normal subjects. Heterogeneous RPE-specific depolarization characteristics were observed in patients with albinism. Reduction of depolarization observed in the light backscattered by the RPE in patients with albinism corresponds to expected decrease of RPE pigmentation. The degree of depigmentation of the RPE is possibly associated with visual acuity. Findings suggest that different albinism genotypes result in heterogeneous levels of RPE pigmentation. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography showed a heterogeneous appearance of RPE pigmentation in patients with albinism depending on different genotypes.

  8. Prime Focus Spectrograph: A very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical & near-infrared spectrograph for Subaru Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Naoyuki

    This short article is about Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS), a very wide-field, massively-multiplexed, and optical & near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph as a next generation facility instrument on Subaru Telescope. More details and updates are available on the PFS official website (http://pfs.ipmu.jp), blog (http://pfs.ipmu.jp/blog/), and references therein. The project, instrument, & timeline PFS will position 2400 fibers to science targets or blank sky in the 1.3 degree field on the Subaru prime focus. These fibers will be quickly (~60sec) reconfigurable and feed the photons during exposures to the Spectrograph System (SpS). SpS consists of 4 modules each of which accommodate ~600 fibers and deliver spectral images ranging from 380nm to 1260nm simultaneously at one exposure via the 3 arms of blue, red, and NIR cameras. The instrument development has been undertaken by the international collaboration at the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at system integration and on-sky engineering observations in 2017-2018, and science operation in 2019. The survey design has also been under development envisioning a survey spanning ~300 nights over ~5 years in the framework of Subaru Strategic Program (SSP). The key science areas are: Cosmology, galaxy/AGN evolution, and Galactic Archaeology (GA) (Takada et al. 2014). The cosmology program will be to constrain the nature of dark energy via a survey of emission line galaxies over a comoving volume of 10 Gpc3 at z=0.8-2.4. In the galaxy/AGN program, the wide wavelength coverage of PFS as well as the large field of view will be exploited to characterize the galaxy populations and its clustering properties over a wide redshift range. A survey of color-selected galaxies/AGN at z = 1-2 will be conducted over 20 square degrees yielding a fair sample of galaxies with stellar masses down to ~1010 M ⊙. In the GA program, radial velocities and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky

  9. Wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) microscopy with time resolution below the frame exposure time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M. [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Petrášek, Zdeněk [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany); Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Fast frame rate CMOS cameras in combination with photon counting intensifiers can be used for fluorescence imaging with single photon sensitivity at kHz frame rates. We show here how the phosphor decay of the image intensifier can be exploited for accurate timing of photon arrival well below the camera exposure time. This is achieved by taking ratios of the intensity of the photon events in two subsequent frames, and effectively allows wide-field TCSPC. This technique was used for measuring decays of ruthenium compound Ru(dpp) with lifetimes as low as 1 μs with 18.5 μs frame exposure time, including in living HeLa cells, using around 0.1 μW excitation power. We speculate that by using an image intensifier with a faster phosphor decay to match a higher camera frame rate, photon arrival time measurements on the nanosecond time scale could well be possible.

  10. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Mission and Synergies with LISA and LIGO-Virgo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Spergel, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) is a NASA space mission in study for launch in 2024. It has a 2.4 m telescope, wide-field IR instrument operating in the 0.7 - 2.0 micron range and an exoplanet imaging coronagraph instrument operating in the 400 - 1000 nm range. The observatory will perform galaxy surveys over thousands of square degrees to J=27 AB for dark energy weak lensing and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements and will monitor a few square degrees for dark energy SN Ia studies. It will perform microlensing observations of the galactic bulge for an exoplanet census and direct imaging observations of nearby exoplanets with a pathfinder coronagraph. The mission will have a robust and wellfunded guest observer program for 25% of the observing time. WFIRST will be a powerful tool for time domain astronomy and for coordinated observations with gravitational wave experiments. Gravitational wave events produced by mergers of nearby binary neutron stars (LIGO-Virgo) or extragalactic supermassive black hole binaries (LISA) will produce electromagnetic radiation that WFIRST can observe.

  11. WIDE-FIELD PRECISION KINEMATICS OF THE M87 GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strader, Jay [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Beasley, Michael A.; Arnold, Jacob A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Spitler, Lee R. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Tamura, Naoyuki [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Sharples, Ray M. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham (United Kingdom); Arimoto, Nobuo, E-mail: jstrader@cfa.harvard.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    We present the most extensive combined photometric and spectroscopic study to date of the enormous globular cluster (GC) system around M87, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the nearby Virgo Cluster. Using observations from DEIMOS and the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer at Keck, and Hectospec on the Multiple Mirror Telescope, we derive new, precise radial velocities for 451 GCs around M87, with projected radii from {approx}5 to 185 kpc. We combine these measurements with literature data for a total sample of 737 objects, which we use for a re-examination of the kinematics of the GC system of M87. The velocities are analyzed in the context of archival wide-field photometry and a novel Hubble Space Telescope catalog of half-light radii, which includes sizes for 344 spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We use this unique catalog to identify 18 new candidate ultracompact dwarfs and to help clarify the relationship between these objects and true GCs. We find much lower values for the outer velocity dispersion and rotation of the GC system than in earlier papers and also differ from previous work in seeing no evidence for a transition in the inner halo to a potential dominated by the Virgo Cluster, nor for a truncation of the stellar halo. We find little kinematical evidence for an intergalactic GC population. Aided by the precision of the new velocity measurements, we see significant evidence for kinematical substructure over a wide range of radii, indicating that M87 is in active assembly. A simple, scale-free analysis finds less dark matter within {approx}85 kpc than in other recent work, reducing the tension between X-ray and optical results. In general, out to a projected radius of {approx}150 kpc, our data are consistent with the notion that M87 is not dynamically coupled to the Virgo Cluster; the core of Virgo may be in the earliest stages of assembly.

  12. Performance Improvement of Near Earth Space Survey (NESS Wide-Field Telescope (NESS-2 Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Yeol Yu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We modified the optical system of 500 mm wide-field telescope of which point spread function showed an irregularity. The telescope has been operated for Near Earth Space Survey (NESS located at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO in Australia, and the optical system was brought back to Korea in January 2008. After performing a numerical simulation with the tested value of surface figure error of the primary mirror using optical design program, we found that the surface figure error of the mirror should be fabricated less than root mean square (RMS λ/10 in order to obtain a stellar full width at half maximum (FWHM below 28 μm. However, we started to figure the mirror for the target value of RMS λ/20, because system surface figure error would be increased by the error induced by the optical axis adjustment, mirror cell installation, and others. The radius of curvature of the primary mirror was 1,946 mm after the correction. Its measured surface figure error was less than RMS λ/20 on the table of polishing machine, and RMS λ/15 after installation in the primary mirror cell. A test observation performed at Daeduk Observatory at Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute by utilizing the exiting mount, and resulted in 39.8 μm of stellar FWHM. It was larger than the value from numerical simulation, and showed wing-shaped stellar image. It turned out that the measured-curvature of the secondary mirror, 1,820 mm, was not the same as the designed one, 1,795.977 mm. We fabricated the secondary mirror to the designed value, and finally obtained a stellar FWHM of 27 μm after re-installation of the optical system into SSO NESS Observatory in Australia.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Wide-field spectrosc. survey of GCs in Virgo cluster (Ko+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Y.; Hwang, H. S.; Lee, M. G.; Park, H. S.; Lim, S.; Sohn, J.; Jang, I. S.; Hwang, N.; Park, B.-G.

    2017-08-01

    We selected globular cluster (GC) candidates using the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS; Ferrarese+ 2012ApJS..200....4F) archival images covering the central region of the Virgo cluster. The NGVS is a wide-field imaging survey of the Virgo cluster using MegaCam with a field of view of 1°x1° attached at the Canada-French-Hawaii Telescope. We carried out spectroscopic observation of GC candidates in the Virgo using the Hectospec mounted on the 6.5m Multiple-Mirror Telescope in queue mode under program ID 2014A-UAO-G18 (PI: Myung Gyoon Lee) between 2014 February and March (wavelength range: 3650Å to 9200Å). (3 data files).

  14. SixPak: a wide-field IFU for the William Herschel Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, Lars B.; Schoenmaker, Ton; Verheijen, Marc; Trager, Scott; Rutten, René; Bershady, Matthew; Larsen, Søren; Peletier, Reynier; Spaans, Marco

    2008-01-01

    We intend to construct SixPak, a wide-field fibre-based IFU for the 4.2-meter William Herschel Telescope on La Palma. The fibre bundle will consist of 238 fibres, each 3.0 arcsec in diameter, piping light from the Nasmyth focal plane of the WHT to the existing WYFFOS bench spectrograph. A total of

  15. Infrared Testing of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope Grism Using Computer Generated Holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Content, David A.; Gong, Qian; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John G.; Marx, Catherine T; Whipple, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    Infrared Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) were designed, manufactured and used to measure the performance of the grism (grating prism) prototype which includes testing Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The grism in the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will allow the surveying of a large section of the sky to find bright galaxies.

  16. Concerning the Development of the Wide-Field Optics for WFXT Including Methods of Optimizing X-Ray Optical Prescriptions for Wide-Field Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    We present a progress report on the various endeavors we are undertaking at MSFC in support of the Wide Field X-Ray Telescope development. In particular we discuss assembly and alignment techniques, in-situ polishing corrections, and the results of our efforts to optimize mirror prescriptions including polynomial coefficients, relative shell displacements, detector placements and tilts. This optimization does not require a blind search through the multi-dimensional parameter space. Under the assumption that the parameters are small enough so that second order expansions are valid, we show that the performance at the detector can be expressed as a quadratic function with numerical coefficients derived from a ray trace through the underlying Wolter I optic. The optimal values for the parameters are found by solving the linear system of equations creating by setting derivatives of this function with respect to each parameter to zero.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Wide field imagers ground-based astrometry. V. (Libralato+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libralato, M.; Bellini, A.; Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Platais, I.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Milone, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Astro-photometric catalogs of 7 different fields. For each field we provide equatorial and pixel coordinates, infrared wide-band photometry. For NGC 6656 and NGC 6121 we also provide proper motions and an estimate of the membership probability. (11 data files).

  18. The First Wide-field X-ray Imaging Telescope for Observations of Charge Exchange Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We will demonstrate a full, end-to-end, lobster-eye optic instrument at GSFC. The STORM prototype is fully self-contained, including integrated pre-amps, HV power...

  19. How do you define body image? Exploring conceptual gaps in understandings of body image at an exercise facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, K Alysse; Gammage, Kimberley L; van Ingen, Cathy

    2017-12-01

    The definition of body image has evolved within research; however, less is known about the layperson's understanding of the construct. This study explored how members and student trainees of an exercise facility (designed for older adults, people with physical disability, and those with cardiac complications) defined body image. Nineteen participants completed a one-on-one interview, and seven of those participants took part in six additional focus group meetings. The following main themes were found: stereotypical assumptions about body image (e.g., it is solely a person's weight or merely a woman's issue), body image continua for positive and negative body image, degree of complexity of body image dimensions, broad considerations of body image (e.g., it is self-esteem), and limited knowledge about body image. These findings suggest a need for knowledge translation between researchers and the general public which informs future body image program design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Two groups have recently used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) to acquire new high-resolution images of the planet Neptune. Members of the WFPC-2 Science Team, lead by John Trauger, acquired the first series of images on 27 through 29 June 1994. These were the highest resolution images of Neptune taken since the Voyager-2 flyby in August of 1989. A more comprehensive program is currently being conducted by Heidi Hammel and Wes Lockwood. These two sets of observations are providing a wealth of new information about the structure, composition, and meteorology of this distant planet's atmosphere.Neptune is currently the most distant planet from the sun, with an orbital radius of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles, or 30 Astronomical Units). Even though its diameter is about four times that of the Earth (49,420 vs. 12,742 km), ground-based telescopes reveal a tiny blue disk that subtends less than 1/1200 of a degree (2.3 arc-seconds). Neptune has therefore been a particularly challenging object to study from the ground because its disk is badly blurred by the Earth's atmosphere. In spite of this, ground-based astronomers had learned a great deal about this planet since its position was first predicted by John C. Adams and Urbain Leverrier in 1845. For example, they had determined that Neptune was composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gas, and that its blue color caused by the presence of trace amounts of the gas methane, which absorbs red light. They had also detected bright cloud features whose brightness changed with time, and tracked these clouds to infer a rotation period between 17 and 22 hours.When the Voyager-2 spacecraft flew past the Neptune in 1989, its instruments revealed a surprising array of meteorological phenomena, including strong winds, bright, high-altitude clouds, and two large dark spots attributed to long-lived giant storm systems. These bright clouds and dark spots were tracked as they moved

  1. Implementing full backtracking facilities for Prolog-based image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew C.; Batchelor, Bruce G.

    1995-10-01

    PIP (Prolog image processing) is a system currently under development at UWCC, designed to support interactive image processing using the PROLOG programming language. In this paper we discuss Prolog-based image processing paradigms and present a meta-interpreter developed by the first author, designed to support an approach to image processing in PIP which is more in the spirit of Prolog than was previously possible. This meta-interpreter allows backtracking over image processing operations in a manner transparent to the programmer. Currently, for space-efficiency, the programmer needs to indicate over which operations the system may backtrack in a program; however, a number of extensions to the present work, including a more intelligent approach intended to obviate this need, are mentioned at the end of this paper, which the present meta-interpreter will provide a basis for investigating in the future.

  2. Wide-Field Multi-Parameter FLIM: long-term minimal invasive observation of proteins in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Marco; Picazo, Fernando; Prokazov, Yury; Duci, Alessandro; Turbin, Evgeny; Götze, Christian; Llopis, Juan; Hartig, Roland; Visser, Antonie J W G; Zuschratter, Werner

    2011-02-02

    Time-domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) is a remarkable tool to monitor the dynamics of fluorophore-tagged protein domains inside living cells. We propose a Wide-Field Multi-Parameter FLIM method (WFMP-FLIM) aimed to monitor continuously living cells under minimum light intensity at a given illumination energy dose. A powerful data analysis technique applied to the WFMP-FLIM data sets allows to optimize the estimation accuracy of physical parameters at very low fluorescence signal levels approaching the lower bound theoretical limit. We demonstrate the efficiency of WFMP-FLIM by presenting two independent and relevant long-term experiments in cell biology: 1) FRET analysis of simultaneously recorded donor and acceptor fluorescence in living HeLa cells and 2) tracking of mitochondrial transport combined with fluorescence lifetime analysis in neuronal processes.

  3. A flexible wide-field FLIM endoscope utilising blue excitation light for label-free contrast of tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Hugh; Warren, Sean; Guedes, Joana; Yoshida, Nagisa; Charn, Tze Choong; Guerra, Nadia; Tatla, Taranjit; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has previously been shown to provide contrast between normal and diseased tissue. Here we present progress towards clinical and preclinical FLIM endoscopy of tissue autofluorescence, demonstrating a flexible wide-field endoscope that utilised a low average power blue picosecond laser diode excitation source and was able to acquire ∼mm-scale spatial maps of autofluorescence lifetimes from fresh ex vivo diseased human larynx biopsies in ∼8 seconds using an average excitation power of ∼0.5 mW at the specimen. To illustrate its potential for FLIM at higher acquisition rates, a higher power mode-locked frequency doubled Ti:Sapphire laser was used to demonstrate FLIM of ex vivo mouse bowel at up to 2.5 Hz using 10 mW of average excitation power at the specimen. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Combining wide-field super-resolution microscopy and electron tomography: rendering nanoscopic correlative arrays on subcellular architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braet, Filip; Cheng, Delfine; Huynh, Minh; Henriquez, Jeffrey; Shami, Gerry; Lampe, Marko

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors outline in full detail, an uncomplicated approach that enables the combination of wide-field fluorescence super-resolution microscopy with electron tomography, thereby providing an approach that affords the best possible confidence in the structures investigated. The methodical steps to obtain these high-throughput correlative nanoscopic arrays will be visually explored and outlined in detail. The authors will demonstrate the feasibility of the method on cultured Caco-2 colorectal cancer cells that are labeled for filamentous actin. The presented images, morphometric data, and generated models illustrate the strengths of our correlative approach for future advanced structural-biology-oriented questions. Correlative nanoscopy applications can be readily found in which there is a need to reveal biomolecular information at unprecedented resolution on subcellular behavior in various biological and pathobiological processes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wide field monitoring of the X-ray sky using Rotation Modulation Collimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren

    1995-01-01

    Wide field monitoring is of particular interest in X-ray astronomy due to the strong time-variability of most X-ray sources. Not only does the time-profiles of the persistent sources contain characteristic signatures of the underlying physical systems, but, additionally, some of the most intriguing...... sources have long periods of quiesense in which they are almost undetectable as X-ray sources, interspersed with relatively brief periods of intense outbursts, where we have unique opportunities of studying dynamical effects, in, for instance, the evolution of accretion discs. Another question for which...... wide field monitors may provide key information, is the origin and nature of the cosmic gamma ray bursts.Rotation Modulation Collimators (RMC's) were originally introduced in X-ray astronomy to provide accurate source localizations over extended fields. This role has since been taken over...

  6. The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in the rabbit retina selectively contacts blue cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Margaret A.; Gaul, Paulette A.

    2010-01-01

    The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in rabbit retina is a sparsely populated ON cone bipolar cell with a broad dendritic arbor that does not contact all cones in its dendritic field. The purpose of our study was to identify the cone types that this cell contacts. We identified the bipolar cells by selective uptake of biocytin, labeled the cones with peanut agglutinin and then used antibodies against blue cone opsin and red-green cone opsin to identify the individual cone types. The biocytin-labeled cells selectively contacted cones whose outer segments stained for blue cone opsin and avoided cones that did not. We conclude that the biocytin wide-field bipolar cell is an ON blue cone bipolar cell in the rabbit retina and is homologous to the blue cone bipolar cells that have been previously described in primate, mouse, and ground squirrel retinas. PMID:17990268

  7. Biocytin wide-field bipolar cells in rabbit retina selectively contact blue cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Margaret A; Gaul, Paulette A

    2008-01-01

    The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in rabbit retina has a broad axonal arbor in layer 5 of the inner plexiform layer and a wide dendritic arbor that does not contact all cones in its dendritic field. The purpose of our study was to identify the types of cones that this cell contacts. We identified the bipolar cells by selective uptake of biocytin, labeled the cones with peanut agglutinin, and then used antibodies against blue cone opsin and red-green cone opsin to identify the individual cone types. The biocytin-labeled cells selectively contacted cones whose outer segments stained for blue cone opsin and avoided cones that did not. We conclude that the biocytin wide-field bipolar cell is an ON blue cone bipolar cell in the rabbit retina and is homologous to the blue cone bipolar cells that have been previously described in primate, mouse, and ground squirrel retinas. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Ground-based complex for detection and investigation of fast optical transients in wide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Emilio; Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Plokhotnichenko, Vladimir; de-Bur, Vjacheslav; Greco, Guiseppe; Bartolini, Corrado; Guarnieri, Adriano; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2008-07-01

    To study short stochastic optical flares of different objects (GRBs, SNs, etc) of unknown localizations as well as NEOs it is necessary to monitor large regions of sky with high time resolution. We developed a system which consists of wide-field camera (FOW is 400-600 sq.deg.) using TV-CCD with time resolution of 0.13 s to record and classify optical transients, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their spectroscopic and photometric investigation just after detection. Such two telescope complex TORTOREM combining wide-field camera TORTORA and robotic telescope REM operated from May 2006 at La Silla ESO observatory. Some results of its operation, including first fast time resolution study of optical transient accompanying GRB and discovery of its fine time structure, are presented. Prospects for improving the complex efficiency are given.

  9. Wide-field monitoring strategy for the study of fast optical transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Greco, Giuseppe; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2010-10-01

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  10. Monitoring with high temporal resolution to search for optical transients in the wide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Ivanov, Evgeny; Karpov, Sergey; Katkova, Elena; Pozanenko, Alexei; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Greco, Giuseppe; Molinari, Emilio; Covino, Stefano

    2008-02-01

    In order to detect and investigate short stochastic optical flares from a number of variable astrophysical objects (GRBs, SNs, flare stars, CVs, X-Ray binaries) of unknown localizations as well as near-earth objects (NEOs), both natural and artificial, it is necessary to perform the systematic monitoring of large regions of the sky with high temporal resolution. Here we describe the design of a system able to perform such a task, which consists of a wide-field camera with high time resolution able to detect and classify the transient events on a subsecond time scale, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their detailed investigation. In a last few years we've created the prototype FAVOR wide-field camera, placed at North Caucasus near Russian 6-m telescope, and a complete two-telescope complex TORTOREM, combining TORTORA wide-field camera with REM robotic telescope and placed at La Silla ESO observatory. Its technical parameters and first results of operation are described.

  11. Imaging the risks - risking the image: Social impact assessment of the final disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avolahti, J.; Vira, J. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-12-01

    Preparations for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland started about twenty years ago. At present the work is carried out by Posiva Oy, which in 1996 took over the programme managed earlier by Teollisuuden Voima Oy, one of the country's nuclear power companies. From 1996 on the preparations have been made for all the spent fuel from Finnish nuclear power stations. The site for the final disposal facility will be selected among four alternatives by the end of 2000 and - assuming that the technical approach proposed by Posiva is accepted by the Government and the Parliament - the construction of the repository will start in the 2010s. The disposal operations are planned to be started in 2020. The alternative four sites have gone through a systematic site selection process based on geologic siting criteria and on environmental and cultural considerations. One of the objectives of the process was to avoid inhabited areas, agricultural fields, valuable groundwater or preservation areas as well as areas which might draw interest as regards the potential for ore deposits. The idea was that the field investigations and later the possible disposal facility should not cause any harm to local people. Two of the candidate sites are at present nuclear power plant sites situated at the coast, the two other candidates are inland sites with no nuclear activities. The geologic siting investigations were started in 1987. Interim assessments of the results so far have been made in 1992 and 1996 and a final report of all the investigations will be published before the end of 2000. The present view is that all four candidates are geologically suitable for siting the repository. Posiva's EIA for the final disposal of spent fuel in Finland is nearing completion. A considerable effort was made to involve local groups and individuals in the assessment process. Yet the participation remained limited and consisted mainly of active opponents of the project and of those

  12. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durisi, E.A., E-mail: elisabettaalessandra.durisi@unito.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Visca, L. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Corsi, J. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dughera, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Ferrarese, W. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N. [Fondazione Centro per la Conservazione ed il Restauro dei Beni Culturali “La Venaria Reale”, Piazza della Repubblica, 10078 Venaria Reale, Torino (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); and others

    2013-10-21

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/{sup 6}LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup.

  13. Wide-field human photoreceptor morphological analysis using phase-resolved sensorless adaptive optics swept-source OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Myeong Jin; Heisler, Morgan; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2017-02-01

    Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) systems capable of 3D high resolution imaging have been applied to posterior eye imaging in order to resolve the fine morphological features in the retina. Human cone photoreceptors have been extensively imaged and studied for the investigation of retinal degeneration resulting in photoreceptor cell death. However, there are still limitations of conventional approaches to AO in the clinic, such as relatively small field-of-view (FOV) and the complexities in system design and operation. In this research, a recently developed phase-resolved Sensorless AO Swept Source based OCT (SAO-SS-OCT) system which is compact in size and easy to operate is presented. Owing to its lens-based system design, wide-field imaging can be performed up to 6° on the retina. A phase stabilization unit was integrated with the OCT system. With the phase stabilized OCT signal, we constructed retinal micro-vasculature image using a phase variance technique. The retinal vasculature image was used to align and average multiple OCT volumes acquired sequentially. The contrast-enhanced photoreceptor projection image was then extracted from the averaged volume, and analyzed based on its morphological features through a novel photoreceptor structure evaluation algorithm. The retinas of twelve human research subjects (10 normal and 2 pathological cases) were measured in vivo. Quantitative parameters used for evaluating the cone photoreceptor mosaic such as cell density, cell area, and mosaic regularity are presented and discussed. The SAO-SS-OCT system and the proposed photoreceptor evaluation method has significant potential to reveal early stage retinal diseases associated with retinal degeneration.

  14. Multi-feature combined cloud and cloud shadow detection in GaoFen-1 wide field of view imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiwei; Shen, Huanfeng; Li, Huifang; Xia, Guisong; Gamba, Paolo; Zhang, Liangpei

    2017-03-01

    The wide field of view (WFV) imaging system onboard the Chinese GaoFen-1 (GF-1) optical satellite has a 16-m resolution and four-day revisit cycle for large-scale Earth observation. The advantages of the high temporal-spatial resolution and the wide field of view make the GF-1 WFV imagery very popular. However, cloud cover is an inevitable problem in GF-1 WFV imagery, which influences its precise application. Accurate cloud and cloud shadow detection in GF-1 WFV imagery is quite difficult due to the fact that there are only three visible bands and one near-infrared band. In this paper, an automatic multi-feature combined (MFC) method is proposed for cloud and cloud shadow detection in GF-1 WFV imagery. The MFC algorithm first implements threshold segmentation based on the spectral features and mask refinement based on guided filtering to generate a preliminary cloud mask. The geometric features are then used in combination with the texture features to improve the cloud detection results and produce the final cloud mask. Finally, the cloud shadow mask can be acquired by means of the cloud and shadow matching and follow-up correction process. The method was validated using 108 globally distributed scenes. The results indicate that MFC performs well under most conditions, and the average overall accuracy of MFC cloud detection is as high as 96.8%. In the contrastive analysis with the official provided cloud fractions, MFC shows a significant improvement in cloud fraction estimation, and achieves a high accuracy for the cloud and cloud shadow detection in the GF-1 WFV imagery with fewer spectral bands. The proposed method could be used as a preprocessing step in the future to monitor land-cover change, and it could also be easily extended to other optical satellite imagery which has a similar spectral setting.

  15. An Analysis of Medical Imaging Costs in Military Treatment Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    quality. • Responsibly Managing the Total Cost of Health Care: Creating value by focusing on quality, eliminating waste , and reducing un-warranted...using only Category I codes. Category I codes are subdivided into several broad categories: • evaluation and management: 99201-99499 • anesthesia ...data were then further sorted by code type to categorize data by imaging type (CT, MRI, NUC, PET, and Ultra). CMAC data extracted from the CHAMPUS

  16. Biological Imaging Capability in the ABRS Facility on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David R.; Murdoch, T.; Regan, M. F.; Meshlberger, R. J.; Mortenson, T. E.; Albino, S. A.; Paul, A. L.; Ferl, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) on the International Space Station (ISS) and its biological imaging capability. The ABRS is an environmental control chamber. It has two indpendently controlled Experiment Research Chambers (ERCs) with temperature, relative humidity and carbon dioxide controls. ABRS is a third generation plant growth system. Several experiments are reviewed, with particular interest in the use of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) a non-destructive plant stress reporting mechanism, naturally found in jellyfish.

  17. Wide Field Coverage for Juno (WFCJ): Jupiter's 2D Wind Field and Cloud Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Juno will take novel measurements in the jovian system during HST Cycles 23, 24, and 25. This proposal supports Juno's neutral atmospheric investigation, which includes measurements with an IR imager/spectrometer (JIRAM) and the Microwave Radiometer (MWR). Both will achieve high spatial resolution as the orbiter swoops past Jupiter, in between the radiation belts and the cloud tops. But instrument fields of view are small compared to the planet, so HST observations would provide valuable context and complementary information.We propose to measure Jupiter's 2D wind field, as well as UV/optical cloud colors (and their evolution). We will measure winds using sets of global maps that cover two of Juno's perijove passes, characterizing the time-varying dynamics of waves, jets, vortices, and storms. The remaining perijove passes will be covered by snapshot (1-orbit) visits, sufficient to characterize feature morphology along each Juno track at high resolution. These observations will give crucial context for MWR observations and enable more precise retrievals from MWR data. Earth-based support is particularly important for Juno, due to its highly eccentric orbit and specialized instrumentation. WFC3/UVIS imaging can play an important role in the effort, since no other facility can obtain precise 2D wind fields and UV/optical photometry at high spatial resolution. Without the HST component of this campaign, key dynamical constraints will be missing.

  18. Wide-Field Plates Observations of Stars from Earth Orientation Catalogs (EOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanov, Y.; Tsvetkova, K.; Tsvetkov, M.; Vondrak, J.; Ron, C.; Stefka, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Orientation Catalogues (EOCs) are primarily meant to provide stable celestial reference frame in optical wavelengths for deriving Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) from astrometric observations. The EOCs combine catalogues ARIHIP and TYCHO-2 with the rich observation material (variations of Latitude/Universal Time), obtained during the 20th century in programs of monitoring Earth orientation. Other possible source of information for improving the EOCs is the WFPDB (Wide-Field Plate Database). The number of plates, containing EOCs stars and their distribution in time are determined by means of the search engine of the WFPDB.

  19. Sherlock: An Automated Follow-Up Telescope for Wide-Field Transit Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotredes, Lewis; Charbonneau, David; Looper, Dagny L.; O'Donovan, Francis T.

    2004-06-01

    The most significant challenge currently facing photometric surveys for transiting gas-giant planets is that of confusion with eclipsing binary systems that mimic the photometric signature. A simple way to reject most forms of these false positives is high-precision, rapid-cadence monitoring of the suspected transit at higher angular resolution and in several filters. We are currently building a system that will perform higher-angular-resolution, multi-color follow-up observations of candidate systems identified by Sleuth (our wide-field transit survey instrument at Palomar), and its two twin system instruments in Tenerife and northern Arizona.

  20. Developments of wide field submillimeter optics and lens antenna-coupled MKID cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Y.; Nitta, T.; Karatsu, K.; Sekine, M.; Sekiguchi, S.; Okada, T.; Shu, S.; Noguchi, T.; Naruse, M.; Mitsui, K.; Okada, N.; Tsuzuki, T.; Dominjon, A.; Matsuo, H.

    2014-07-01

    Wide field cryogenic optics and millimeter-wave Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) cameras with Si lens array have been developed. MKID is a Cooper-pair breaking photon detector and consists of supercon- ducting resonators which enable microwave (~GHz) frequency multiplexing. Antenna-coupled Aluminum CPW resonators are put in a line on a Si substrate to be read by a pair of coaxial cables. A 220 GHz - 600 pixels MKID camera with anti-reflection (AR) coated Si lens has been demonstrated in an 0.1 K cryostat. A compact cryogenic system with high refractive index materials has been developed for the MKID camera.

  1. The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in the rabbit retina selectively contacts blue cones

    OpenAIRE

    MacNeil, Margaret A.; Gaul, Paulette A.

    2008-01-01

    The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in rabbit retina is a sparsely populated ON cone bipolar cell with a broad dendritic arbor that does not contact all cones in its dendritic field. The purpose of our study was to identify the cone types that this cell contacts. We identified the bipolar cells by selective uptake of biocytin, labeled the cones with peanut agglutinin and then used antibodies against blue cone opsin and red-green cone opsin to identify the individual cone types. The biocytin-...

  2. The High-Speed and Wide-Field TORTORA Camera: description & results .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, G.; Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Bondar, S.; Piccioni, A.; Molinari, E.

    We present the description and the most significant results of the wide-field and ultra-fast TORTORA camera devoted to the investigation of rapid changes in light intensity in a phenomenon occurring within an extremely short period of time and randomly distributed over the sky. In particular, the ground-based TORTORA observations synchronized with the gamma -ray BAT telescope on board of the Swift satellite has permitted to trace the optical burst time-structure of the Naked-Eye GRB 080319B with an unprecedented level of accuracy.

  3. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Larger Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J. L.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was returned from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by shuttle mission STS-125 in 2009. In space for 16 years, the surface accumulated hundreds of impact features on the zinc orthotitanate paint, some penetrating through into underlying metal. Larger impacts were seen in photographs taken from within the shuttle orbiter during service missions, with spallation of paint in areas reaching 1.6 cm across, exposing alloy beneath. Here we describe larger impact shapes, the analysis of impactor composition, and the micrometeoroid (MM) types responsible.

  4. X-ray grating interferometer for biomedical imaging applications at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yan; Kou, Binquan; Sun, Haohua; Qi, Juncheng; Sun, Jianqi; Mohr, Jürgen; Börner, Martin; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Lisa X; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yujie

    2012-09-01

    An X-ray grating interferometer was installed at the BL13W beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) for biomedical imaging applications. Compared with imaging results from conventional absorption-based micro-computed tomography, this set-up has shown much better soft tissue imaging capability. In particular, using the set-up, the carotid artery and the carotid vein in a formalin-fixed mouse can be visualized in situ without contrast agents, paving the way for future applications in cancer angiography studies. The overall results have demonstrated the broad prospects of the existing set-up for biomedical imaging applications at SSRF.

  5. CometCIEF: A Web-based Image Enhancement Facility to digitally enhance images of cometary comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinha, N.; Martin, P.; Larson, S.

    2014-07-01

    The detailed analysis of cometary comae provides an observational basis to investigate both the nucleus as well as the coma of comets. The structures in the coma are indicative of the anisotropic emission of gas and dust from the nucleus. Therefore, accurate identifications and measurements of spatial information related to coma structures are needed for realistic quantitative interpretation of coma observations. In many instances, the coma features are only a few percent above the ambient background coma and require enhancement of such features to unambiguously identify them, to make measurements on them, and to carry out subsequent detailed analyses. There is a number of image enhancement techniques used by cometary scientists. Despite this, the wider applicability of many advanced enhancement techniques is limited due to the non-availability of relevant software as open source. To alleviate this, we are making available a number of such techniques using a user-friendly web interface. In this image enhancement facility available at http://www.psi.edu/research/cometimen one can upload a fits format image of a cometary coma and digitally enhance it using an image enhancement technique of the user's choice. The user can then easily download the enhanced image as well as any associated images generated during the enhancement as fits files for detailed analysis later at the user's institution. The available image enhancement techniques at the facility are: (a) division by azimuthal average; (b) division by azimuthal median; (c) azimuthal renormalization; (d) division by 1/ρ profile, where ρ is the sky-plane projected distance from the nucleus; and (e) radially variable spatial filtering. The site provides documentation describing the above enhancement techniques as well as a tutorial showing the application of the enhancement techniques to actual cometary images and how the results may vary with different input parameters. In addition, the source codes as well as

  6. Design status of WFCAM: a wide field camera for the UK infrared telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, David M.; Casali, Mark M.; Montgomery, David; Burch, Keith; Laidlaw, Ken; Ives, Derek J.; Vick, Andrew J. A.; Bridger, Alan; Lunney, David; Adamson, Andrew J.; Rees, Nicholas P.; Chylek, Tomas; Chuter, Timothy C.

    2003-03-01

    An update on the design status of the UKIRT Wide Field Camera (WFCAM) is presented. WFCAM is a wide field infrared camera for the UK Infrared Telescope, designed to produce large scale infrared surveys. The complete system consists of a new IR camera with integral autoguider and a new tip/tilt secondary mirror unit. WFCAM is being designed and built by a team at the UK Astronomy Technology Centre in Edinburgh, supported by the Joint Astronomy Centre in Hawaii. The camera uses a novel quasi-Schmidt camera type design, with the camera mounted above the UKIRT primary mirror. The optical system operates over 0.7 - 2.4 μm and has a large corrected field of view of 0.9° diameter. The focal plane is sparsely populated with 4 2K x 2K Rockwell HAWAII-2 MCT array detectors, giving a pixel scale of 0.4 arcsec/pixel. A separate autoguider CCD is integrated into the focal plane unit. Parallel detector controllers are used, one for each of the four IR arrays and a fifth for the autoguider CCD.

  7. A wide-field suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis is stable and well tolerated following chronic implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Joel; Nayagam, David A X; Allen, Penelope J; McKelvie, Penelope; Luu, Chi D; Ayton, Lauren N; Freemantle, Alexia L; McPhedran, Michelle; Basa, Meri; McGowan, Ceara C; Shepherd, Robert K; Williams, Chris E

    2013-05-01

    The safety of chronic implantation of a retinal prosthesis in the suprachoroidal space has not been established. This study aimed to determine the safety of a wide-field suprachoroidal electrode array following chronic implantation using histopathologic techniques and electroretinography. A platinum electrode array in a wide silicone substrate was implanted unilaterally in the suprachoroidal space in adult cats (n = 7). The lead and connector were tunneled out of the orbit and positioned subcutaneously. Postsurgical recovery was assessed using fundus photography and electroretinography (ERG). Following 3 months of passive implantation, the animals were terminated and the eyes assessed for the pathologic response to implantation. The implant was mechanically stable in the suprachoroidal space during the course of the study. The implanted eye showed a transient increase in ERG response amplitude at 2 weeks, which returned to normal by 3 months. Pigmentary changes were observed at the distal end of the implant, near the optic disc. Histopathologic assessment revealed a largely intact retina and a thin fibrous capsule around the suprachoroidal implant cavity. The foreign body response was minimal, with sporadic presence of macrophages and no active inflammation. All implanted eyes were negative for bacterial or fungal infections. A midgrade granuloma and thick fibrous buildup surrounded the extraocular cable. Scleral closure was maintained in six of seven eyes. There were no staphylomas or choroidal incarceration. A wide-field retinal prosthesis was stable and well tolerated during long-term suprachoroidal implantation in a cat model. The surgical approach was reproducible and overall safe.

  8. Stray-field-induced Faraday contributions in wide-field Kerr microscopy and -magnetometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markó, D.; Soldatov, I. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Tekielak, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, Bialystok 15-424 Poland (Poland); Schäfer, R., E-mail: r.schaefer@ifw-dresden.de [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, PO 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic domain contrast in wide-field Kerr microscopy on bulk specimens can be substantially distorted by non-linear, field-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective lens that are caused by stray-field components emerging from the specimen. These Faraday contributions, which were detected by Kerr-magnetometry on grain-oriented iron–silicon steel samples, are thoroughly elaborated and characterized. They express themselves as a field-dependent gray-scale offset to the domain contrast and in highly distorted surface magnetization curves if optically measured in a wide field Kerr microscope. An experimental method to avoid such distortions is suggested. In the course of these studies, a low-permeability part in the surface magnetization loop of slightly misoriented (110)-surfaces in iron–silicon sheets was discovered that is attributed to demagnetization effects in direction perpendicular to the sheet surface. - Highlights: • Magnetizing a finite sample in a Kerr microscope leads to sample-generated stray-fields. • They cause non-linear, field- and position-dependent Faraday rotations in the objective. • This leads to a modulation of the Kerr contrast and to distorted MOKE loops. • A method to compensate these Faraday rotations is presented.

  9. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTROSCOPY OF BROWN DWARFS DISCOVERED WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Adam C.; Cushing, Michael C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft St., Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Eisenhardt, Peter R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Skrutskie, M. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Griffith, Roger L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Marsh, Kenneth A., E-mail: Adam.Schneider@Utoledo.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-10

    We present a sample of brown dwarfs identified with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for which we have obtained Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-infrared grism spectroscopy. The sample (22 in total) was observed with the G141 grism covering 1.10–1.70 μm, while 15 were also observed with the G102 grism, which covers 0.90–1.10 μm. The additional wavelength coverage provided by the G102 grism allows us to (1) search for spectroscopic features predicted to emerge at low effective temperatures (e.g.,ammonia bands) and (2) construct a smooth spectral sequence across the T/Y boundary. We find no evidence of absorption due to ammonia in the G102 spectra. Six of these brown dwarfs are new discoveries, three of which are found to have spectral types of T8 or T9. The remaining three, WISE J082507.35+280548.5 (Y0.5), WISE J120604.38+840110.6 (Y0), and WISE J235402.77+024015.0 (Y1), are the 19th, 20th, and 21st spectroscopically confirmed Y dwarfs to date. We also present HST grism spectroscopy and reevaluate the spectral types of five brown dwarfs for which spectral types have been determined previously using other instruments.

  10. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Slitless Spectrometer: Design, Prototype, and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian; Content, David; Dominguez, Margaret; Emmett, Thomas; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John; Kruk, Jeffrey; Marx, Catherine; Pasquale, Bert; Wallace, Thomas; hide

    2016-01-01

    The slitless spectrometer plays an important role in the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission for the survey of emission-line galaxies. This will be an unprecedented very wide field, HST quality 3D survey of emission line galaxies. The concept of the compound grism as a slitless spectrometer has been presented previously. The presentation briefly discusses the challenges and solutions of the optical design, and recent specification updates, as well as a brief comparison between the prototype and the latest design. However, the emphasis of this paper is the progress of the grism prototype: the fabrication and test of the complicated diffractive optical elements and powered prism, as well as grism assembly alignment and testing. Especially how to use different tools and methods, such as IR phase shift and wavelength shift interferometry, to complete the element and assembly tests. The paper also presents very encouraging results from recent element tests to assembly tests. Finally we briefly touch the path forward plan to test the spectral characteristic, such as spectral resolution and response.

  11. SHOK—The First Russian Wide-Field Optical Camera in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Kornilov, V. G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Amelushkin, A. M.; Petrov, V. L.; Yashin, I. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Vedenkin, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Onboard the spacecraft Lomonosov is established two fast, fixed, very wide-field cameras SHOK. The main goal of this experiment is the observation of GRB optical emission before, synchronously, and after the gamma-ray emission. The field of view of each of the cameras is placed in the gamma-ray burst detection area of other devices located onboard the "Lomonosov" spacecraft. SHOK provides measurements of optical emissions with a magnitude limit of ˜ 9-10m on a single frame with an exposure of 0.2 seconds. The device is designed for continuous sky monitoring at optical wavelengths in the very wide field of view (1000 square degrees each camera), detection and localization of fast time-varying (transient) optical sources on the celestial sphere, including provisional and synchronous time recording of optical emissions from the gamma-ray burst error boxes, detected by the BDRG device and implemented by a control signal (alert trigger) from the BDRG. The Lomonosov spacecraft has two identical devices, SHOK1 and SHOK2. The core of each SHOK device is a fast-speed 11-Megapixel CCD. Each of the SHOK devices represents a monoblock, consisting of a node observations of optical emission, the electronics node, elements of the mechanical construction, and the body.

  12. The HST/WFC3 Quicklook Project: A User Interface to Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Matthew; Bajaj, Varun; Bowers, Ariel; Dulude, Michael; Durbin, Meredith; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Gunning, Heather; Khandrika, Harish; Martlin, Catherine; Sunnquist, Ben; Viana, Alex

    2017-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument, comprised of two detectors, UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) and IR (Infrared), has been acquiring ~ 50-100 images daily since its installation in 2009. The WFC3 Quicklook project provides a means for instrument analysts to store, calibrate, monitor, and interact with these data through the various Quicklook systems: (1) a ~ 175 TB filesystem, which stores the entire WFC3 archive on disk, (2) a MySQL database, which stores image header data, (3) a Python-based automation platform, which currently executes 22 unique calibration/monitoring scripts, (4) a Python-based code library, which provides system functionality such as logging, downloading tools, database connection objects, and filesystem management, and (5) a Python/Flask-based web interface to the Quicklook system. The Quicklook project has enabled large-scale WFC3 analyses and calibrations, such as the monitoring of the health and stability of the WFC3 instrument, the measurement of ~ 20 million WFC3/UVIS Point Spread Functions (PSFs), the creation of WFC3/IR persistence calibration products, and many others.

  13. Wide field of view tabletop light field display based on piece-wise tracking and off-axis pickup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanhong; Sang, Xinzhu; Yu, Xunbo; Wang, Peng; Xing, Shujun; Chen, Duo; Yan, Binbin; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu

    2017-11-01

    A wide field of view (FOV) tabletop light field display (LFD) based on piece-wise tracking and off-axis pickup is presented to display the floating three-dimensional (3D) scene, which is 360°surrounding viewable. The demonstrated LFD is specially designed with an integral imaging display (IID) with 83 × 83 viewpoints and a full-parallax holographic functional screen (HFS). To improve the FOV, a piece-wise tracking based FOV enhancement method is proposed. The relationship between the viewing zone and the elemental images (EIs) is formulated. A ray-tracing based method using off-axis pickup instead of parallel pickup directly is adopted to render the 3D scene to EIs. Then the piece-wise tracking method of varying the viewing zone by placing the EIs according to the position of viewer is analyzed. The floating 3D scene with a FOV of 70° × 70°is experimentally demonstrated with a good 3D perception.

  14. A wide-field TCSPC FLIM system based on an MCP PMT with a delay-line anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Hirvonen, Liisa M; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Netz, Holger; Smietana, Stefan; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    We report on the implementation of a wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). It is based on a 40 mm diameter crossed delay line anode detector, where the readout is performed by three standard TCSPC boards. Excitation is performed by a picosecond diode laser with 50 MHz repetition rate. The photon arrival timing is obtained directly from the microchannel plates, with an instrumental response of ∼190 to 230 ps full width at half maximum depending on the position on the photocathode. The position of the photon event is obtained from the pulse propagation time along the two delay lines, one in x and one in y. One end of a delay line is fed into the "start" input of the corresponding TCSPC board, and the other end is delayed by 40 ns and fed into the "stop" input. The time between start and stop is directly converted into position, with a resolution of 200-250 μm. The data acquisition software builds up the distribution of the photons over their spatial coordinates, x and y, and their times after the excitation pulses, typically into 512 × 512 pixels and 1024 time channels per pixel. We apply the system to fluorescence lifetime imaging of cells labelled with Alexa 488 phalloidin in an epi-fluorescence microscope and discuss the application of our approach to other fluorescence microscopy methods.

  15. A wide-field TCSPC FLIM system based on an MCP PMT with a delay-line anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Netz, Holger; Smietana, Stefan; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    We report on the implementation of a wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). It is based on a 40 mm diameter crossed delay line anode detector, where the readout is performed by three standard TCSPC boards. Excitation is performed by a picosecond diode laser with 50 MHz repetition rate. The photon arrival timing is obtained directly from the microchannel plates, with an instrumental response of ˜190 to 230 ps full width at half maximum depending on the position on the photocathode. The position of the photon event is obtained from the pulse propagation time along the two delay lines, one in x and one in y. One end of a delay line is fed into the "start" input of the corresponding TCSPC board, and the other end is delayed by 40 ns and fed into the "stop" input. The time between start and stop is directly converted into position, with a resolution of 200-250 μm. The data acquisition software builds up the distribution of the photons over their spatial coordinates, x and y, and their times after the excitation pulses, typically into 512 × 512 pixels and 1024 time channels per pixel. We apply the system to fluorescence lifetime imaging of cells labelled with Alexa 488 phalloidin in an epi-fluorescence microscope and discuss the application of our approach to other fluorescence microscopy methods.

  16. Knowledge-based image data management - An expert front-end for the BROWSE facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoms, David M.; Star, Jeffrey L.; Estes, John E.

    1988-01-01

    An intelligent user interface being added to the NASA-sponsored BROWSE testbed facility is described. BROWSE is a prototype system designed to explore issues involved in locating image data in distributed archives and displaying low-resolution versions of that imagery at a local terminal. For prototyping, the initial application is the remote sensing of forest and range land.

  17. Calibration and Change Detection of [Alaska Satellite Facility] ASF/ERS-1 SAR Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatland, Rob; Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The results of a calibration analysis performed on ERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images produced by the Alaska SAR facility (ASF) are presented, together with some preliminary results on change detection on the Alaskan north slope derived from the same images. Image quality, geometric and radiometric fidelity, and repeat pass radiometric stability have all been determined to be satisfactory. A calibration workstation has been designed and implemented for use in operational data quality analysis of ASF data products. Higher-level data analysis programs have been developed for interferometry, texture analysis, and change detection.

  18. Performance of the Aspect Camera Assembly for the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility: Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The Aspect Camera Assembly (ACA) is a "state-of-the-art" star tracker that provides real-time attitude information to the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - Imaging (AXAF-I), and provides imaging data for "post-facto" ground processing. The ACA consists of a telescope with a CCD focal plane, associated focal plane read-out electronics, and an on-board processor that processes the focal plane data to produce star image location reports. On-board star image locations are resolved to 0.8 arcsec, and post-facto algorithms yield 0.2 arcsec star location accuracies (at end of life). The protoflight ACA has been built, along with a high accuracy vacuum test facility. Image position determination has been verified to accuracies. This paper is a follow-on paper to one presented by the author at the AeroSense '95 conference. This paper presents the "as built" configuration, the tested performance, and the test facility's design and demonstrated accuracy. The ACA has been delivered in anticipation of a August, 1998 shuttle launch.

  19. Plastic optical fiber for wide field-of-view optical wireless receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Hoorieh; Sterckx, Karel; Saengudomlert, Poompat; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates a working indoor optical wireless link for smart environment applications. The system utilizes a wide field-of-view (FOV) optical wireless receiver through cleaving the tip of large core plastic optical fibers (POFs) attached to the detector. The quality of the optical link is quantified through bit error rate (BER) measurements. The experimental results show a wide FOV with the uncoded BER in the order of 10-3 for transmission distances up to 35 cm when using two POFs for signal collection. The distance can be improved further by increasing the number of fibers. The transmitted signal format and how the BER measurement is achieved are discussed at length. In addition, details are provided for the design of the electronics to establish the optical wireless link.

  20. Deconvolution of wide field-of-view radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation. I - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. L.; Green, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of deconvolution of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation provides a technique by which the resolution of such measurements can be enhanced to provide radiant exitance at the top of the atmosphere with a finer resolution than the field of view. An analytical solution for the earth-emitted radiant exitance in terms of WFOV radiometer measurements is derived for the nonaxisymmetric (or regional) case, in which the measurements and radiant exitance are considered to be functions of both latitude and longitude. This solution makes it possible to deconvolve a set of WFOV radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation and obtain information with a finer resolution than the instantaneous field of view of the instrument. It is shown that there are tradeoffs involved in the selection between WFOV and scanning radiometers.

  1. Miniaturized high-resolution wide-field contact lens for panretinal photocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushan K

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Keyvan Koushan, KV Chalam Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA Background and objective: We describe a miniaturized lightweight high-refractive-index panretinal contact lens for diagnostic and therapeutic visualization of the peripheral retina. Instrument design: The miniaturized high-resolution wide-field contact lens includes three optical elements in a light (15 g and miniaturized (16 mm footplate, 24 mm external aperture, and 21 mm vertical height casing contributing to a total dioptric power of +171 diopters. This lens provides up to 165° visualization of the retina for diagnostic and therapeutic applications while allowing easier placement due to its miniaturization. Conclusion: This new lens (50% lighter and 89% smaller improves upon earlier contact lenses for visualization of the peripheral retina. Keywords: contact lens, panretinal photocoagulation, retinal examination, peripheral retina, high resolution view, wide-angle lens, lens

  2. Readout electronics for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, R.; Bai, L.; Zhang, J.; Huang, J.; Yang, C.; Cao, Z.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), supported by IHEP of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a multipurpose project with a complex detectors array for high energy gamma ray and cosmic ray detection. The Wide Field of view Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA), as one of the components of the LHAASO project, aim to tag each primary particle that causes an air shower. The WFCTA is a portable telescope array used to detect cosmic ray spectra. The design of the readout electronics of the WFCTA is described in this paper Sixteen photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), together with their readout electronics are integrated into a single sub-cluster. To maintain good resolution and linearity over a wide dynamic range, a dual-gain amplification configuration on an analog board is used The digital board contains two 16channel 14-bit, 50 Msps analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and its power consumption, noise level, and relative deviation are all tested.

  3. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Smaller Particle Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J.C.; Opiela, J.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grime, G.; Webb, R.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V.; Colaux, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The radiator shield on the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) was subject to optical inspection following return from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009. The survey revealed over 600 impact features of > 300 micrometers diameter, from exposure in space for 16 years. Subsequently, an international collaborative programme of analysis was organized to determine the origin of hypervelocity particles responsible for the damage. Here we describe examples of the numerous smaller micrometeoroid (MM) impact features (< 700 micrometers diameter) which excavated zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint from the radiator surface, but did not incorporate material from underlying Al alloy; larger impacts are described by [3]. We discuss recognition and interpretation of impactor remains, and MM compositions found on WFPC2.

  4. San Pedro meeting on Wide Field Variability Surveys: Some concluding comments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feast Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a written version of the closing talk at the 22nd Los Alamos Stellar pulsation conference on wide field variability surveys. It comments on some of the issues which arise from the meeting. These include the need for attention to photometric standardization (especially in the infrared and the somewhat controversial problem of statistical bias in the use of parallaxes (and other methods of distance determination. Some major advances in the use of pulsating variables to study Galactic structure are mentioned. The paper includes a clarification of apparently conflicting results from classical Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars in the inner Galaxy and bulge. The importance of understanding non-periodic phenomena in variable stars, particularly asymptotic giant branch variables and R Coronae Borealis stars, is stressed, especially for its relevance to mass-loss in which pulsation may only play a minor role.

  5. Meteor observations with Mini-Mega-TORTORA wide-field monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, S.; Orekhova, N.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    Here we report on the results of meteor observations with 9-channel Mini-Mega-TORTORA (MMT-9) optical monitoring system with the wide field and high temporal resolution. During the first 1.5 years of operation more than 90 thousands of meteors have been detected, at a rate of 300-350 per night, with durations from 0.1 to 2.5 seconds and angular velocities up to 38 degrees per second. The faintest detected meteors have peak brightnesses about 10 mag, while the majority have them ranging from 4 to 8 mag. Some of the meteors have been observed in BVR filters simultaneously. Color variations along the trail for them have been determined. The parameters of the detected meteors have been published online. The database also includes data from 10 thousands of meteors detected by our previous FAVOR camera during 2006-2009.

  6. Precision Pointing for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope(WFIRST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Eric T.; Hsu, Oscar C.; Welter, Gary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, scheduled for a mid-2020's launch, is currently in its definition phase. The mission is designed to investigate essential questions in the areas of dark energy, exoplanets, and infrared astrophysics. WFIRST will use a 2.4-meter primary telescope (same size as the Hubble Space Telescope's primary mirror) and two instruments: the Wide Field Instrument (WFI) and the Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). In order to address the critical science requirements, the WFIRST mission will conduct large-scale surveys of the infrared sky, requiring both agility and precision pointing (11.6 milli-arcsec stability, 14 milli-arcsec jitter). This paper describes some of the challenges this mission profile presents to the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) subsystem, and some of the design elements chosen to accommodate those challenges. The high-galactic-latitude survey is characterized by 3-minute observations separated by slews ranging from 0.025 deg to 0.8 deg. The need for observation efficiency drives the slew and settle process to be as rapid as possible. A description of the shaped slew profile chosen to minimize excitation of structural oscillation, and the handoff from star tracker-gyro control to fine guidance sensor control is detailed. Also presented is the fine guidance sensor (FGS), which is integral with the primary instrument (WFI). The FGS is capable of tracking up to 18 guide stars, enabling robust FGS acquisition and precision pointing. To avoid excitation of observatory structural jitter, reaction wheel speeds are operationally maintained within set limits. In addition, the wheel balance law is designed to maintain 1-Hz separation between the wheel speeds to avoid reinforcing jitter excitation at any particular frequency. The wheel balance law and operational implications are described. Finally, the candidate GNC hardware suite needed to meet the requirements of the mission is presented.

  7. Microvax-based data management and reduction system for the regional planetary image facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, R.; Guinness, E.; Slavney, S.; Weiss, B.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a progress report for the Regional Planetary Image Facilities (RPIF) prototype image data management and reduction system being jointly implemented by Washington University and the USGS, Flagstaff. The system will consist of a MicroVAX with a high capacity (approx 300 megabyte) disk drive, a compact disk player, an image display buffer, a videodisk player, USGS image processing software, and SYSTEM 1032 - a commercial relational database management package. The USGS, Flagstaff, will transfer their image processing software including radiometric and geometric calibration routines, to the MicroVAX environment. Washington University will have primary responsibility for developing the database management aspects of the system and for integrating the various aspects into a working system.

  8. Development of a Data Reduction Algorithm for Optical Wide Field Patrol (OWL II: Improving Measurement of Lengths of Detected Streaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Youp Park

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available As described in the previous paper (Park et al. 2013, the detector subsystem of optical wide-field patrol (OWL provides many observational data points of a single artificial satellite or space debris in the form of small streaks, using a chopper system and a time tagger. The position and the corresponding time data are matched assuming that the length of a streak on the CCD frame is proportional to the time duration of the exposure during which the chopper blades do not obscure the CCD window. In the previous study, however, the length was measured using the diagonal of the rectangle of the image area containing the streak; the results were quite ambiguous and inaccurate, allowing possible matching error of positions and time data. Furthermore, because only one (position, time data point is created from one streak, the efficiency of the observation decreases. To define the length of a streak correctly, it is important to locate the endpoints of a streak. In this paper, a method using a differential convolution mask pattern is tested. This method can be used to obtain the positions where the pixel values are changed sharply. These endpoints can be regarded as directly detected positional data, and the number of data points is doubled by this result.

  9. ON THE BINARY FREQUENCY OF THE LOWEST MASS MEMBERS OF THE PLEIADES WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, E. V. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff (United States); Dupuy, Trent J. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Astronomy, 2515 Speedway C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Allers, Katelyn N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Liu, Michael C. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Deacon, Niall R., E-mail: eugenio.v.garcia@gmail.com [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, AL1 5TL (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey of 11 of the lowest mass brown dwarfs in the Pleiades known (25–40 M{sub Jup}). These objects represent the predecessors to T dwarfs in the field. Using a semi-empirical binary point-spread function (PSF)-fitting technique, we are able to probe to 0.″ 03 (0.75 pixel), better than 2x the WFC3/UVIS diffraction limit. We did not find any companions to our targets. From extensive testing of our PSF-fitting method on simulated binaries, we compute detection limits which rule out companions to our targets with mass ratios of ≳0.7 and separations ≳4 AU. Thus, our survey is the first to attain the high angular resolution needed to resolve brown dwarf binaries in the Pleiades at separations that are most common in the field population. We constrain the binary frequency over this range of separation and mass ratio of 25–40 M{sub Jup} Pleiades brown dwarfs to be <11% for 1σ (<26% at 2σ). This binary frequency is consistent with both younger and older brown dwarfs in this mass range.

  10. THE SIZE EVOLUTION OF PASSIVE GALAXIES: OBSERVATIONS FROM THE WIDE-FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, R. E. Jr. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); McCarthy, P. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cohen, S. H.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Mechtley, M. R.; Windhorst, R. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Yan, H. [Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Hathi, N. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Bushouse, H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); O' Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Crockett, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Disney, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Dopita, M. A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frogel, J. A. [Galaxies Unlimited, Lutherville, MD 21093 (United States); Hall, D. N. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holtzman, J. A., E-mail: rryan@physics.ucdavis.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

    2012-04-10

    We present the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at z {approx} 2 identified in Wide-Field Camera 3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK galaxy selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation at z {approx}> 1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in {approx}40 arcmin{sup 2} to H < 25 mag. By fitting the 10-band Hubble Space Telescope photometry from 0.22 {mu}m {approx}< {lambda}{sub obs} {approx}< 1.6 {mu}m with stellar population synthesis models, we simultaneously determine photometric redshift, stellar mass, and a bevy of other population parameters. Based on the six galaxies with published spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate a typical redshift uncertainty of {approx}0.033(1 + z). We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical point-spread function. By supplementing our data with published samples, we propose a mass-dependent size evolution model for passively evolving galaxies, where the most massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) undergo the strongest evolution from z {approx} 2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1 + z){sup -{alpha}}, we find a tentative scaling of {alpha} Almost-Equal-To (- 0.6 {+-} 0.7) + (0.9 {+-} 0.4)log (M{sub *}/10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }), where the relatively large uncertainties reflect the poor sampling in stellar mass due to the low numbers of high-redshift systems. We discuss the implications of this result for the redshift evolution of the M{sub *}-R{sub e} relation for red galaxies.

  11. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, Gérard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey - and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces - the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  12. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Conder, A.; Cerjan, C.; Hagmann, C.; Hey, D.; Izumi, N.; Moody, J.; Teruya, A.; Celeste, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Khater, H.; Eckart, M. J.; Ayers, J.

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10171017 neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  13. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Conder, A.; Cerjan, C.; Hagmann, C.; Hey, D.; Izumi, N.; Moody, J.; Teruya, A.; Celeste, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Khater, H.; Eckart, M. J.; Ayers, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10{sup 17} neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  14. Setting up and running an advanced light microscopy and imaging facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Carlos; Muñoz, Ma Ángeles; Villalba, Maite; Labrador, Verónica; Díez-Guerra, F Javier

    2011-07-01

    During the last twenty years, interest in light microscopy and imaging techniques has grown in various fields, such as molecular and cellular biology, developmental biology, and neurobiology. In addition, the number of scientific articles and journals using these techniques is rapidly increasing. Nowadays, most research institutions require sophisticated microscopy systems to cover their investigation demands. In general, such instruments are too expensive and complex to be purchased and managed by a single laboratory or research group, so they have to be shared with other groups and supervised by specialized personnel. This is the reason why microscopy and imaging facilities are becoming so important at research institutions nowadays. In this unit, we have gathered and presented a number of issues and considerations from our own experience that we hope will be helpful when planning or setting up a new facility.

  15. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Kilkenny, J D; Conder, A; Cerjan, C; Hagmann, C; Hey, D; Izumi, N; Moody, J; Teruya, A; Celeste, J; Kimbrough, J; Khater, H; Eckart, M J; Ayers, J

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10(17) neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  16. Detection of facilities in satellite imagery using semi-supervized image classification and auxiliary contextual observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Neal R.; Ruggiero, C.; Pawley, N. H.; MacDonald, B.; Oyer, A.; Balick, L.; Brumby, S. P.

    2009-05-01

    Detecting complex targets, such as facilities, in commercially available satellite imagery is a difficult problem that human analysts try to solve by applying world knowledge. Often there are known observables that can be extracted by pixel-level feature detectors that can assist in the facility detection process. Individually, each of these observables is not sufficient for an accurate and reliable detection, but in combination, these auxiliary observables may provide sufficient context for detection by a machine learning algorithm. We describe an approach for automatic detection of facilities that uses an automated feature extraction algorithm to extract auxiliary observables, and a semi-supervised assisted target recognition algorithm to then identify facilities of interest. We illustrate the approach using an example of finding schools in Quickbird image data of Albuquerque, New Mexico. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory's Genie Pro automated feature extraction algorithm to find a set of auxiliary features that should be useful in the search for schools, such as parking lots, large buildings, sports fields and residential areas and then combine these features using Genie Pro's assisted target recognition algorithm to learn a classifier that finds schools in the image data.

  17. Detection of facilities in satellite imagery using semi-supervised image classification and auxiliary contextual observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Neal R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pawley, Norma H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brumby, Steven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balick, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oyer, Alden [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Detecting complex targets, such as facilities, in commercially available satellite imagery is a difficult problem that human analysts try to solve by applying world knowledge. Often there are known observables that can be extracted by pixel-level feature detectors that can assist in the facility detection process. Individually, each of these observables is not sufficient for an accurate and reliable detection, but in combination, these auxiliary observables may provide sufficient context for detection by a machine learning algorithm. We describe an approach for automatic detection of facilities that uses an automated feature extraction algorithm to extract auxiliary observables, and a semi-supervised assisted target recognition algorithm to then identify facilities of interest. We illustrate the approach using an example of finding schools in Quickbird image data of Albuquerque, New Mexico. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory's Genie Pro automated feature extraction algorithm to find a set of auxiliary features that should be useful in the search for schools, such as parking lots, large buildings, sports fields and residential areas and then combine these features using Genie Pro's assisted target recognition algorithm to learn a classifier that finds schools in the image data.

  18. Influence of the environment and phototoxicity of the live cell imaging system at IMP microbeam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjing; Du, Guanghua; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Wei, Junzhe; Chen, Hao; Li, Yaning; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xiaoyue

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA damage and repair after the ion irradiation, an online live cell imaging system has been established based on the microbeam facility at Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). The system could provide a sterile and physiological environment by making use of heating plate and live cell imaging solution. The phototoxicity was investigated through the evaluation of DNA repair protein XRCC1 foci formed in HT1080-RFP cells during the imaging exposure. The intensity of the foci induced by phototoxicity was much lower compared with that of the foci induced by heavy ion hits. The results showed that although spontaneous foci were formed due to RFP exposure during live cell imaging, they had little impact on the analysis of the recruitment kinetics of XRCC1 in the foci induced by the ion irradiation.

  19. Image-Based Reconstruction and Analysis of Dynamic Scenes in a Landslide Simulation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaioni, M.; Crippa, J.; Longoni, L.; Papini, M.; Zanzi, L.

    2017-12-01

    The application of image processing and photogrammetric techniques to dynamic reconstruction of landslide simulations in a scaled-down facility is described. Simulations are also used here for active-learning purpose: students are helped understand how physical processes happen and which kinds of observations may be obtained from a sensor network. In particular, the use of digital images to obtain multi-temporal information is presented. On one side, using a multi-view sensor set up based on four synchronized GoPro 4 Black® cameras, a 4D (3D spatial position and time) reconstruction of the dynamic scene is obtained through the composition of several 3D models obtained from dense image matching. The final textured 4D model allows one to revisit in dynamic and interactive mode a completed experiment at any time. On the other side, a digital image correlation (DIC) technique has been used to track surface point displacements from the image sequence obtained from the camera in front of the simulation facility. While the 4D model may provide a qualitative description and documentation of the experiment running, DIC analysis output quantitative information such as local point displacements and velocities, to be related to physical processes and to other observations. All the hardware and software equipment adopted for the photogrammetric reconstruction has been based on low-cost and open-source solutions.

  20. Application of a wide-field electromagnetic method to shale gas exploration in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Li; Li, Bo; Peng, Chuan-Sheng; Yang, Yang

    2017-09-01

    In an effort to reduce the shale gas exploration risks and costs, we applied the wide-field electromagnetic method (WFEM), because of its strong anti-interference capability, high resolution, ability to conduct exploration at large depths, and high efficiency, to the Bayan Syncline in the South Huayuan block, Hunan Province. We collected rock samples and analyzed their resistivity and induced polarization (IP) and built A series of two-dimensional models for geological conditions to investigate the applicability of WFEM to different geological structures. We also analyzed the correlation between TOC of shale and the resistivity and IP ratio to determine the threshold for identifying target formations. We used WFEM to identify the underground structures and determine the distribution, depth, and thickness of the target strata. Resistivity, IP, and total organic carbon were used to evaluate the shale gas prospects and select favorable areas (sweet spots) for exploration and development. Subsequently, drilling in these areas proved the applicability of WFEM in shale gas exploration.

  1. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ferguson, Annette M. N. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  2. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  3. Image quality of mammography in Croatian nationwide screening program: comparison between various types of facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnić, Zoran; Blašković, Darko; Klasić, Branimir; Ramač, Jelena Popić; Flegarić-Bradić, Mirjana; Stimac, Damir; Lubina, Ivan Zvonimir; Brnić, Vedran; Faj, Dario

    2012-04-01

    The study was aimed to provide objective evidence about the mammographic image quality in Croatia, to compare it between different types of MG facilities and to identify the most common deficiencies and possible reasons as well as the steps needed to improve image quality. A total of 420 mammographic examinations collected from 84 mammographic units participating in the Croatian nationwide breast cancer screening program were reviewed in terms of four image quality categories: identification of patient and examination, breast positioning and compression, exposure and contrast, and artifacts. Those were rated using image evaluating system based on American College of Radiology and European Commission proposals. The results were compared among different types of mammographic units, and common image quality deficiencies were identified. Total image quality scores of 12.8, 16.1, 13.0 and 13.7 were found for general hospitals, university hospitals, private clinics and public healthcare centres, respectively. Average score for all mammographic units was 13.5 (out of 25 points). University hospitals were significantly better than all other mammography units in overall image quality, which was mostly contributed by better breast positioning practices. Private clinics showed the worst results in identification, exposure, contrast and artifacts. Serious deficiencies in identification and breast positioning, which might compromise breast cancer screening outcome, were detected in our material. They occur mainly due to subjective reasons and could be corrected through additional staff training and improvement of working discipline. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. SAAO's new robotic telescope and WiNCam (Wide-field Nasmyth Camera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worters, Hannah L.; O'Connor, James E.; Carter, David B.; Loubser, Egan; Fourie, Pieter A.; Sickafoose, Amanda; Swanevelder, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    The South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) is designing and manufacturing a wide-field camera for use on two of its telescopes. The initial concept was of a Prime focus camera for the 74" telescope, an equatorial design made by Grubb Parsons, where it would employ a 61mmx61mm detector to cover a 23 arcmin diameter field of view. However, while in the design phase, SAAO embarked on the process of acquiring a bespoke 1-metre robotic alt-az telescope with a 43 arcmin field of view, which needs a homegrown instrument suite. The Prime focus camera design was thus adapted for use on either telescope, increasing the detector size to 92mmx92mm. Since the camera will be mounted on the Nasmyth port of the new telescope, it was dubbed WiNCam (Wide-field Nasmyth Camera). This paper describes both WiNCam and the new telescope. Producing an instrument that can be swapped between two very different telescopes poses some unique challenges. At the Nasmyth port of the alt-az telescope there is ample circumferential space, while on the 74 inch the available envelope is constrained by the optical footprint of the secondary, if further obscuration is to be avoided. This forces the design into a cylindrical volume of 600mm diameter x 250mm height. The back focal distance is tightly constrained on the new telescope, shoehorning the shutter, filter unit, guider mechanism, a 10mm thick window and a tip/tilt mechanism for the detector into 100mm depth. The iris shutter and filter wheel planned for prime focus could no longer be accommodated. Instead, a compact shutter with a thickness of less than 20mm has been designed in-house, using a sliding curtain mechanism to cover an aperture of 125mmx125mm, while the filter wheel has been replaced with 2 peripheral filter cartridges (6 filters each) and a gripper to move a filter into the beam. We intend using through-vacuum wall PCB technology across the cryostat vacuum interface, instead of traditional hermetic connector-based wiring. This

  5. Anisoplanatic error evaluation and wide-field adaptive optics performance at Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbillet, M.; Aristidi, É.; Giordano, C.; Vernin, J.

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: (i) to deduce the most representative C_N^2 profile(s) for Dome C (DC), Antarctica, from the latest measurements, and (ii) to evaluate the performance of a wide-field adaptive optics (AO) system equipping a 2-3 m telescope. Two models of the C_N^2 profile, corresponding to the bimodal distribution of seeing (a poor seeing mode and a good seeing mode), are composed from both Single Star Scidar data and balloon radio soundings. The anisoplanatic error is first evaluated for a standard AO system from Monte Carlo simulations. DC is shown to outperform Mauna Kea for both seeing modes. A simple ground-layer AO (GLAO) system is then considered. This provides an anisoplanatic error of less than 150 nm over a field of 30 arcmin for the good seeing mode, corresponding to a basic performance Strehl ratio (considering also the fitting and the servo-lag errors) of more than ˜80 per cent in K and ˜50 per cent in J. The poor seeing model shows performance comparable to the Mauna Kea model. We also studied the influence of telescope elevation, showing that a telescope at 40 m would perform, in the poor seeing mode, like a telescope observing 8 m above the ground in the good seeing mode. Finally, we show that while tip-tilt-only correction permits high levels of correction in the good seeing mode at 40 m, it is not as efficient as the GLAO system, even at an altitude of 8 m, and it is not sufficient for high levels of correction for poor seeing, even at a height of 40 m.

  6. A deep, wide-field study of Holmberg II with Suprime-Cam: evidence for ram pressure stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Barker, Michael K.; Irwin, Michael J.; Jablonka, Pascale; Arimoto, Nobuo

    2012-11-01

    We present a deep, wide-field optical study of the M81 group dwarf galaxy Holmberg II (HoII) based on Subaru/Suprime-Cam imaging. Individual stars are resolved down to I ˜ 25.2, that is, about 1.5 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (RGB). We use resolved star counts in the outskirts of the galaxy to measure the radial surface brightness profile down to μV ˜ 32 mag arcsec-2, from which we determine a projected exponential scalelength of 0.70 ± 0.01 arcmin (i.e. 0.69 ± 0.01 kpc). The composite profile, ranging from the cored centre out to R = 7 arcmin, is best fitted by an Elson-Fall-Freeman profile which gives a half-light radius of 1.41 ± 0.04 arcmin (i.e. 1.39 ± 0.04 kpc), and an absolute magnitude MV = -16.3. The low surface brightness stellar component of HoII is regular and symmetric and has an extent much smaller than the vast H I cloud in which it is embedded. We compare the spatial distribution of the young, intermediate-age and old stellar populations, and find that the old RGB stars are significantly more centrally concentrated than the young stellar populations, contrary to what is observed in most dwarf galaxies of the local Universe. We discuss these properties in the context of the comet-like distribution of H I gas around HoII, and argue for the presence of a hot intragroup medium in the vicinity of HoII to explain the contrasting morphologies of gas and stars. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  7. THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: SPECTRAL VARIATION ON KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Wesley C. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Brown, Michael E. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Glass, Florian, E-mail: wesley.fraser@nrc.ca [Observatoire de Genve, Universit de Genve, 51 chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    Here, we present additional photometry of targets observed as part of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. Twelve targets were re-observed with the WFC3 in the optical and NIR wavebands designed to complement those used during the first visit. Additionally, all of the observations originally presented by Fraser and Brown were reanalyzed through the same updated photometry pipeline. A re-analysis of the optical and NIR color distribution reveals a bifurcated optical color distribution and only two identifiable spectral classes, each of which occupies a broad range of colors and has correlated optical and NIR colors, in agreement with our previous findings. We report the detection of significant spectral variations on five targets which cannot be attributed to photometry errors, cosmic rays, point-spread function or sensitivity variations, or other image artifacts capable of explaining the magnitude of the variation. The spectrally variable objects are found to have a broad range of dynamical classes and absolute magnitudes, exhibit a broad range of apparent magnitude variations, and are found in both compositional classes. The spectrally variable objects with sufficiently accurate colors for spectral classification maintain their membership, belonging to the same class at both epochs. 2005 TV189 exhibits a sufficiently broad difference in color at the two epochs that span the full range of colors of the neutral class. This strongly argues that the neutral class is one single class with a broad range of colors, rather than the combination of multiple overlapping classes.

  8. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  9. Summary of the first neutron image data collected at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grim Gary P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A summary of data and results from the first neutron images produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA are presented. An overview of the neutron imaging technique is presented, as well as a synopsis of data and measurements made to date. Data from directly driven, DT filled microballoons, as well as indirectly driven, cryogenically layered ignition experiments are presented. The data show that the primary cores from directly driven implosions are approximately twice as large, 64 ± 3 μm, as indirectly driven cores, 25 ± 4 and 29 ± 4 μm and more asymmetric, P2/P0 = 47% vs. − 14% and 7%. Further, comparison with the size and shape of X-ray image data on the same implosions show good agreement, indicating X-ray emission is dominated by the hot regions of the implosion.

  10. Summary of the first neutron image data collected at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grim, G P; Archuleta, T N; Aragonez, R J; Atkinson, D P; Batha, S H; Barrios, M A; Bower, D E; Bradley, D K; Buckles, R A; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Cradick, J R; Danly, C; Drury, O B; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Glenn, S M; Hsu, A H; Izumi, N; Jaramillo, S A; Kyrala, G A; Pape, S L; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tommasini, T; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Fittinghoff, D N; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P B; Kauffman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

    2011-11-01

    A summary of data and results from the first neutron images produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA are presented. An overview of the neutron imaging technique is presented, as well as a synopsis of the data collected and measurements made to date. Data form directly driven, DT filled microballoons, as well as, indirectly driven, cryogenically layered ignition experiments are presented. The data presented show that the primary cores from directly driven implosions are approximately twice as large, 64 {+-} 3 {mu}m, as indirect cores 25 {+-} 4 and 29 {+-} 4 {mu}m and more asymmetric, P2/P0 = 47% vs. -14% and 7%. Further, comparison with the size and shape of X-ray image data on the same implosions show good agreement, indicating X-ray emission is dominated by the hot regions of the implosion.

  11. Wide-Field Gamma-Spectrometer BDRG: GRB Monitor On-Board the Lomonosov Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svertilov, S. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Amelushkin, A. M.; Barinova, V. O.; Galkin, V. I.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Petrov, V. L.; Rozhkov, G. V.; Yashin, I. V.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Lipunov, V. M.; Park, I. H.; Jeong, S.; Kim, M. B.

    2018-02-01

    The study of GRB prompt emissions (PE) is one of the main goals of the Lomonosov space mission. The payloads of the GRB monitor (BDRG) with the wide-field optical cameras (SHOK) and the ultra-fast flash observatory (UFFO) onboard the Lomonosov satellite are intended for the observation of GRBs, and in particular, their prompt emissions. The BDRG gamma-ray spectrometer is designed to obtain the temporal and spectral information of GRBs in the energy range of 10-3000 keV as well as to provide GRB triggers on several time scales (10 ms, 1 s and 20 s) for ground and space telescopes, including the UFFO and SHOK. The BDRG instrument consists of three identical detector boxes with axes shifted by 90° from each other. This configuration allows us to localize a GRB source in the sky with an accuracy of ˜ 2°. Each BDRG box contains a phoswich NaI(Tl)/CsI(Tl) scintillator detector. A thick CsI(Tl) crystal in size of \\varnothing 130 × 17 mm is placed underneath the NaI(Tl) as an active shield in the soft energy range and as the main detector in the hard energy range. The ratio of the CsI(Tl) to NaI(Tl) event rates at varying energies can be employed as an independent metric to distinguish legitimate GRB signals from false positives originating from electrons in near-Earth vicinities. The data from three detectors are collected in a BA BDRG information unit, which generates a GRB trigger and a set of data frames in output format. The scientific data output is ˜ 500 Mb per day, including ˜ 180 Mb of continuous data for events with durations in excess of 100 ms for 16 channels in each detector, detailed energy spectra, and sets of frames with ˜ 5 Mb of detailed information for each burst-like event. A number of pre-flight tests including those for the trigger algorithm and calibration were carried out to confirm the reliability of the BDRG for operation in space.

  12. BIM for existing facilities: feasibility of spectral image integration to 3D point cloud data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amano Kinjiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate geometrical and spatial information of the built environment can be accurately acquired and the resulting 3D point cloud data is required to be processed to construct the digital model, Building Information Modelling (BIM for existing facilities. Point cloud by laser scanning over the buildings and facilities has been commonly used, but the data requires external information so that any objects and materials can be correctly identified and classified. A number of advanced data processing methods have been developed, such as the use of colour information to attach semantic information. However, the accuracy of colour information depends largely on the scene environment where the image is acquired. The limited number of spectral channels on conventional RGB camera often fails to extract important information about surface material, despite spectral surface reflectance can represent a signature of the material. Hyperspectral imaging can, instead, provide precise representation of spatial and spectral information. By implementing such information to 3D point cloud, the efficiency of material detection and classification in BIM should be significantly improved. In this work, the feasibility of the image integration and discuss practical difficulties in the development.

  13. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Malone; John R. Celesteb; Peter M. Celliers; Brent C. Froggeta; Robert L. Guyton; Morris I. Kaufman; Tony L. Lee; Brian J. MacGowan; Edmund W. Ng; Imants P. Reinbachs; Ronald B. Robinson; Lynn G. Seppala; Tom W. Tunnell; Phillip W. Watts

    2005-01-01

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1–5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  14. Combined x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging facility: application to image-guided stereotactic and functional neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsche, Stefan; Sauner, Dieter; Maarouf, Mohammad; Lackner, Klaus; Sturm, Volker; Treuer, Harald

    2007-04-01

    To assess the feasibility of a hybrid imaging setup combining x-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the setting of both stereotactic and functional neurosurgery. A combined x-ray and MRI scanning facility with a trolley system for a fast patient transfer between both modalities was installed in a neurosurgical setting. A registration algorithm for fusion of MRI scans and x-ray images was derived for augmentation of fluoroscopic x-ray projection images with MRI scan data, such as anatomic structures and planned probe trajectories. Phantom measurements were obtained between both modalities for estimation of registration accuracy. Practical application of our system in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery was tested in brachytherapy, deep brain stimulation, and motor cortex stimulation. Phantom measurements yielded a mean spatial deviation of 0.7 +/- 0.3 mm with a maximum deviation of 1.1 mm for MRI scans versus x-rays. Augmentation of x-ray images with MRI scan data allowed intraoperative verification of the planned trajectory and target in three types of neurosurgical procedures: positioning iodine seeds in brachytherapy in one case with cerebellar metastasis, placement of electrodes for deep brain stimulation in two cases of advanced Parkinson's disease, and placement of an epidural grid for motor cortex stimulation in two cases of intractable pain. Combined x-ray and MRI-guided stereotactic and functional neurosurgery is feasible. Augmentation of x-ray projection images with MRI scan data, such as planned probe trajectories and MRI scan segmented anatomic structures may be beneficial for probe guidance in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery.

  15. Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Seppala, L; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P

    2005-07-07

    Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

  16. Stellar photometry in the inner bulge of M31 using the Hubble Space Telescope wide field camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, R. M.; Mighell, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    We present photometry of two fields in the M31 bulge imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camara (WFC). The nuclear field (r less than 40 arcsecs = 150 pc) giant branch extends to I = 19.5, M(sub I) = -5 (Cousins system), a full 0.9 mag brighter than the giant-branch tips of metal-poor Galactic globular clusters and M31 halo fields. This is also approximately = 1.5 mag brighter than the giant branches of metal-rich Galactic globular clusters, but is no brighter than Mould's (1986) M31 bulge field 1 kpc from the nucleus. The data also suggest that the brighter stars may be preferentially concentrated to the center. The 648 luminous stars detected in 2 x 10(exp 9) solar luminosity is approximately = 25% that expected from a hypothetical population of evolved asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with lifetimes approximately = 10(exp 5) yr, with the cautionary note that we are near the detection limit. The number of bright stars is also consistent with the progeny of blue stragglers, if one uses a lifetime for the thermal-pulsing AGB of 2 x 10(exp 6) yr. We strongly caution that incompleteness becomes severe below I = 19.9 mag and that future surveys are likely to find numbers of bright stars too large to accomodate the blue straggler progeny hypothesis. We have imaged an additional field 2 arcmin = 500 pc south of the nucleus. The brightest stars in this field are also I = 19.5, but bright stars appear less numerous than in the nuclear field. If the population resembles that of the Galactic bulge, then M(sub bol) = -4.5 is a lower limit to the giant-branch tip luminosity; infrared studies should reveal stars 0.5 mag or more brighter. Either high-metallicity or (more likely) age approximately = 10 Gyr may be responsible for the presence of these luminous AGB stars. These observations confirm that previous ground-based infrared studies (e.g., Rich & Mould 1991) very likely detect an extended giant branch and not spurious luminous stars caused by

  17. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source-Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W. [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)], E-mail: tomasz.wysokinski@lightsource.ca; Chapman, Dean [Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Adams, Gregg [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Renier, Michel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki (Finland); Thomlinson, William [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2007-11-11

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) Facility will provide synchrotron-specific imaging and therapy capabilities. This paper describes one of the BMIT beamlines: the bend magnet (BM) beamline 05B1-1. It plays a complementary role to the insertion device (ID) beamline 051D-2 and allows either monochromatic or filtered white beam to be used in the experimental hutch. The monochromatic spectral range will span 8-40 keV, and the beam is more than 200 mm wide in the experimental hutch for imaging studies of small and medium-size animals (up to sheep size). The experimental hutch will have a positioning system that will allow imaging (computed tomography and planar imaging) as well as radiation therapy applications with both filtered white and monochromatic X-ray beams and will handle subjects up to 120 kg. Several different focal plane detectors (cameras) will be available with resolutions ranging from 10 to 150 {mu}m.

  18. Active optics and the axisymmetric case: MINITRUST wide-field three-reflection telescopes with mirrors aspherized from tulip and vase forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulie, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires larger size telescopes. Compared to the catadioptric Schmidt, the optical properties of a three mirror telescope provides significant advantages. (1) The flat field design is anastigmatic at any wavelength, (2) the system is extremely compact -- four times shorter than a Schmidt -- and, (3) compared to a Schmidt with refractive corrector -- requiring the polishing of three optical surfaces --, the presently proposed Modified-Rumsey design uses all of eight available free parameters of a flat fielded anastigmatic three mirror telescope for mirrors generated by active optics methods. Compared to a Rumsey design, these parameters include the additional slope continuity condition at the primary-tertiary link for in-situ stressing and aspherization from a common sphere. Then, active optics allows the polishing of only two spherical surfaces: the combined primary-tertiary mirror and the secondary mirror. All mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. This compact system is of interest for space and ground-based astronomy and allows to built larger wide-field telescopes such as demonstrated by the design and construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° FOV, consisting of an in-situ stressed double vase form primary-tertiary and of a stress polished tulip form secondary. Optical tests of these telescopes, showing diffraction limited images, are presented.

  19. Initial evaluation of safety of wide-field irradiation in the treatment of hematopoietic neoplasia in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Brian D; McNiel, Elizabeth A; Modiano, Jaime F

    2010-01-01

    Localized radiation therapy is well tolerated in cats with confined tumors; however, the use of wide-field radiation therapy to treat disseminated neoplasia has not been evaluated systematically in this species. Wide-field external beam radiation therapy, which we define as irradiation of cranial or caudal halves of the body either individually or sequentially, was undertaken as an experimental option to treat cats with either chemotherapy-refractory or naive hematopoietic neoplasia considered to have a poor prognosis. Fifteen cats with hematopoietic malignancies received wide-field external beam radiation therapy between 2003 and 2006. Cats received 8 Gy delivered in 4 Gy fractions with 60Co photons. Treatment-related toxicity was scored according to criteria established by the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group. Animals without preexisting abnormalities on hemograms exhibited no or mild (Grade 1 or 2) hematopoietic toxicity. Although most cats (14 of 15) had preexisting gastrointestinal (GI) signs, these signs were stable (29%) or improved (42%) following irradiation. Worsening GI signs following irradiation occurred transiently in two cats and in association with progressive disease in two others. No pulmonary, renal, hepatic, or dermatologic toxicities were detected. In summary, wide-field external beam radiation therapy can be administered safely to, and may provide therapeutic benefit for, cats with disseminated hematopoietic neoplasia.

  20. Facile Synthesis of Biocompatible Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Cellular Imaging and Targeted Detection of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fu; Wang, Chun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Lidong

    2015-11-18

    In this work, we report the facile synthesis of functional core-shell structured nanoparticles with fluorescence enhancement, which show specific targeting of cancer cells. Biopolymer poly-l-lysine was used to coat the silver core with various shell thicknesses. Then, the nanoparticles were functionalized with folic acid as a targeting agent for folic acid receptor. The metal-enhanced fluorescence effect was observed when the fluorophore (5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein-succinimidyl ester) was conjugated to the modified nanoparticle surface. Cellular imaging assay of the nanoparticles in folic acid receptor-positive cancer cells showed their excellent biocompatibility and selectivity. The as-prepared functional nanoparticles demonstrate the efficiency of the metal-enhanced fluorescence effect and provide an alternative approach for the cellular imaging and targeting of cancer cells.

  1. Wide-field surface plasmon microscopy of nano- and microparticles: features, benchmarking, limitations, and bioanalytical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamov, Shavkat; Scherbahn, Vitali; Mirsky, Vladimir M.

    2017-05-01

    Detection of nano- and micro-particles is an important task for chemical analytics, food industry, biotechnology, environmental monitoring and many other fields of science and industry. For this purpose, a method based on the detection and analysis of minute signals in surface plasmon resonance images due to adsorption of single nanopartciles was developed. This new technology allows one a real-time detection of interaction of single nano- and micro-particles with sensor surface. Adsorption of each nanoparticle leads to characteristic diffraction image whose intensity depends on the size and chemical composition of the particle. The adsorption rate characterizes volume concentration of nano- and micro-particles. Large monitored surface area of sensor enables a high dynamic range of counting and to a correspondingly high dynamic range in concentration scale. Depending on the type of particles and experimental conditions, the detection limit for aqueous samples can be below 1000 particles per microliter. For application of method in complex media, nanoparticle images are discriminated from image perturbations due to matrix components. First, the characteristic SPRM images of nanoparticles (templates) are collected in aqueous suspensions or spiked real samples. Then, the detection of nanoparticles in complex media using template matching is performed. The detection of various NPs in consumer products like cosmetics, mineral water, juices, and wines was shown at sub-ppb level. The method can be applied for ultrasensitive detection and analysis of nano- and micro-particles of biological (bacteria, viruses, endosomes), biotechnological (liposomes, protein nanoparticles for drug delivery) or technical origin.

  2. Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Quantum Dots for Bio-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Yro Persia Ada N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon quantum dots (CQD with fascinating properties has gradually become a rising star as a new nanocarbon member due to its nonthreatening, abundant and inexpensive nature. This study reports on a facile preparation of fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQD from iota Carrageenan. CQD from iota Carrageenan was produced by hydrothermal method with a quantum yield (QY of 16 to 20%. Doping the CQD with nitrogen by the addition of tetraethylene pentamine (TEPE produced CQD with a QY of 77%. FTIR data confirmed the formation of hydroxyl, carboxylic and carbonyl functional groups as confirmed by the ToFSIMS data due to the presence of nitrogen bonds on the N-CQD produced with TEPE. The CQD and N-CQD produced are crystalline with graphitic structures because of the presence of sp2 graphitic d line spacing with the sizes ranging from 2 to 10nm. To examine the feasibility of using the CQD as nanoprobe in practical applications, labelling and detection of E.coli was performed. The E.coli fluoresced proving CQD as an effective probe in bio imaging application. This study has successfully demonstrated a facile approach of producing CQD with significant high quantum yields to fluorescent CQD for bio imaging applications.

  3. Crystal and source characterization for the Crystal Backlighter Imager capability at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauland, C. M.; Hall, G. N.; Buscho, J. G.; Hibbard, R.; McCarville, T. J.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ayers, S. L.; Kalantar, D.; Kohut, T.; Kemp, G. E.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Landen, O. L.; Brewster, T. N.; Piston, K.

    2017-10-01

    The Crystal Backlighter Imager (CBI) is a very narrow bandwidth ( 10 eV) x-ray radiography system that uses Bragg reflection from a spherically-curved crystal at near normal incidence. This diagnostic has the capability to image late in an ICF implosion because it only requires the brightness of the backlighter to be larger than the capsule self-emission in that narrow bandwidth. While the limited bandwidth is advantageous for this reason, it also requires that the effective energy of the backlighter atomic line is known to 1 eV accuracy for proper crystal alignment. Any Doppler shift in the line energy must be understood for the imaging system to work. The work presented details characterization experiments done at the Jupiter Laser Facility with a Si (8 6 2) crystal that will be used with a Selenium backlighter in the NIF CBI diagnostic. We used the spherically-bent crystals to image a small ( 200 µm) He α source generated by the Janus laser on a Se foil. Scanning Bragg angles over multiple shots allowed us to map out the spectral line intensity distribution for optimal alignment in NIF. A subsequent Doppler shift measurement using CBI on NIF will also be presented with complementary HYDRA modeling for both experiments. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by General Atomics under Contract DE-NA0001808.

  4. Wide-Field Survey around Local Group Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo II: Spatial Distribution of Stellar Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Yutaka; Doi, Mamoru; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hamabe, Masaru; Imi, Katsumi; Kimura, Masahiko; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Okamura, Sadanori; Ouchi, Masami; Sekiguchi, Maki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Masafumi; Yasuda, Naoki

    2007-08-01

    We carried out a wide-field V, I imaging survey of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo II using the Subaru Prime Focus Camera on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The survey covered an area of 26.67×26.67 arcmin2, far beyond the tidal radius of Leo II (8.63'), down to the limiting magnitude of V~=26, which is roughly 1 mag deeper than the turnoff point of the main-sequence stars of Leo II. Radial number density profiles of bright and faint red giant branch (RGB) stars were found to change their slopes at around the tidal radius, and extend beyond the tidal radius with shallower slopes. A smoothed surface brightness map of Leo II suggests the existence of a small substructure (4×2.5 arcmin2, 270×170 pc 2 in physical size) of globular cluster luminosity beyond the tidal radius. We investigated the properties of the stellar population by means of a color-magnitude diagram. The horizontal branch (HB) morphology index shows a radial gradient in which red HB stars are more concentrated than blue HB stars, which is common to many Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The color distribution of RGB stars around the mean RGB sequence shows a larger dispersion at the center than in the outskirts, indicating a mixture of stellar populations at the center and a more homogeneous population in the outskirts. Based on the age estimation using subgiant branch stars, we found that although the major star formation took place ~8 Gyr ago, a considerable stellar population younger than 8 Gyr is found at the center; such a younger population is insignificant in the outskirts. The following star formation history is suggested for Leo II. Star-forming activity occurred more than ~8 Gyr ago throughout the galaxy at a modest star formation rate. The star-forming region gradually shrank from the outside toward the center, and star-forming activity finally dropped to ~0 by ~4 Gyr ago, except for the center, where a small population younger than 4 Gyr is present. Based on data collected

  5. Scintillating Fiber Array Characterization and Alignment for Neutron Imaging using the High Energy X-ray (HEX) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckles, R. A., Ali, Z. A., Cradick, J. R., Traille, A. J., Warthan, W. A.

    2009-09-04

    The Neutron Imager diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will produce high-resolution, gated images of neutron-generating implosions. A similar pinhole imaging experiment (PINEX) diagnostic was recently deployed at the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Both the SNL and LLNL neutron imagers use similar fiber array scintillators (BCF-99-555). Despite diverse resolution and magnification requirements, both diagnostics put significant onus on the scintillator spatial quality and alignment precision to maintain optimal point spread. Characterization and alignment of the Z-PINEX scintillator and imaging system were done at NSTec/Livermore Operations in 2009, and is currently underway for the NIF Neutron Imager.

  6. The Galactic Plane Exoplanet Survey (GPX) - an Amateur Designed Transiting Exoplanet Wide-Field Search (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benni, P.

    2017-06-01

    (Abstract only) GPX is designed to search high density star fields where other surveys, such as WASP, HATNet, XO, and KELT would find challenging due to blending of transit like events. Using readily available amateur equipment, a survey telescope (Celestron RASA, 279 mm f/2.2, based in Acton, Massachusetts) was configured first with a SBIG ST-8300M camera then later upgraded to an FLI ML16200 camera and tested under different sampling scenarios with multiple image fields to obtain a 9- to 11-minute cadence per field. The resultant image resolution of GPX is about 2 arcsec/pixel compared to 13.7±23 arcsec/pixel of the aforementioned surveys and the future TESS space telescope exoplanet survey.

  7. Advanced wide-field surface plasmon microscopy of single adsorbing nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamov, Shavkat; Scherbahn, Vitali; Mirsky, Vladimir M.

    2017-05-01

    In-situ detection and characterization of nanoparticles in biological media as well as in food or other complex samples is still a big challenge for existing analytical methods. Here we describe a label-free and cost-effective analytical method for detection of nanoparticles in the concentration range 106 -1010 NPs/ml. The proposed method is based on the surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) with a large field of view ( 1.3mm2 ). It is able to detect and count adsorbing nanoparticles individually, totally up to the hundreds of thousands of NPs on the sensor surface. At constant diffusion conditions the detection rate is proportional to the number concentration of NPs, this provides an approach to determine the NPs concentration. The adsorption of nanoparticle can be manipulated by the surface functionalization, pH and electrolyte concentration of suspensions. Images of detected nanoparticles can be quantified in order to characterize them individually. The image intensity grows quasi-linearly with nanoparticle size for the given material. However, the size and material of nanoparticle cannot be resolved directly from the image. For determination of chemical composition, SPRM can be assisted by electrochemical analysis. In this case, the gold sensor surface is used both as a resonant media for plasmon microscopy and as a working electrode. Under potential sweep, the adsorbed NPs can be subjected to electrochemical dissolution, which is detected optically. The potential of this conversion characterizes the material of NPs.

  8. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source – part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W., E-mail: bmit@lightsource.ca [Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chapman, Dean [Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Adams, Gregg [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Renier, Michel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Suortti, Pekka [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Thomlinson, William [Department of Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-03-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1–4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6–9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20–100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to –7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT

  9. Beamlines of the biomedical imaging and therapy facility at the Canadian light source - part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Chapman, Dean; Adams, Gregg; Renier, Michel; Suortti, Pekka; Thomlinson, William

    2015-03-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility provides synchrotron-specific imaging and radiation therapy capabilities [1-4]. We describe here the Insertion Device (ID) beamline 05ID-2 with the beam terminated in the SOE-1 (Secondary Optical Enclosure) experimental hutch. This endstation is designed for imaging and therapy research primarily in animals ranging in size from mice to humans to horses, as well as tissue specimens including plants. Core research programs include human and animal reproduction, cancer imaging and therapy, spinal cord injury and repair, cardiovascular and lung imaging and disease, bone and cartilage growth and deterioration, mammography, developmental biology, gene expression research as well as the introduction of new imaging methods. The source for the ID beamline is a multi-pole superconducting 4.3 T wiggler [5]. The high field gives a critical energy over 20 keV. The high critical energy presents shielding challenges and great care must be taken to assess shielding requirements [6-9]. The optics in the POE-1 and POE-3 hutches [4,10] prepare a monochromatic beam that is 22 cm wide in the last experimental hutch SOE-1. The double crystal bent-Laue or Bragg monochromator, or the single-crystal K-edge subtraction (KES) monochromator provide an energy range appropriate for imaging studies in animals (20-100+ keV). SOE-1 (excluding the basement structure 4 m below the experimental floor) is 6 m wide, 5 m tall and 10 m long with a removable back wall to accommodate installation and removal of the Large Animal Positioning System (LAPS) capable of positioning and manipulating animals as large as a horse [11]. This end-station also includes a unique detector positioner with a vertical travel range of 4.9 m which is required for the KES imaging angle range of +12.3° to -7.3°. The detector positioner also includes moveable shielding integrated with the safety shutters. An update on the status of the other two end-stations at BMIT, described

  10. Facile synthesis and functionalization of manganese oxide nanoparticles for targeted T1-weighted tumor MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Yang, Jia; Li, Jingchao; Yu, Zhibo; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang; Shen, Mingwu

    2015-12-01

    We report the polyethyleneimine (PEI)-enabled synthesis and functionalization of manganese oxide (Mn3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted tumor magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in vivo. In this work, monodispersed PEI-coated Mn3O4 NPs were formed by decomposition of acetylacetone manganese via a solvothermal approach. The Mn3O4 NPs with PEI coating were sequentially conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate, folic acid (FA)-linked polyethylene glycol (PEG), and PEG monomethyl ether. Followed by final acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines, multifunctional Mn3O4 NPs were formed and well characterized. We show that the formed multifunctional Mn3O4 NPs with a mean diameter of 8.0 nm possess good water-dispersibility, colloidal stability, and cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility in the given concentration range. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopic observation reveal that the multifunctional Mn3O4 NPs are able to target FA receptor-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro. Importantly, the FA-targeted Mn3O4 NPs can be used as a nanoprobe for efficient T1-weighted MR imaging of cancer cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo via an active FA-mediated targeting pathway. With the facile PEI-enabled formation and functionalization, the developed PEI-coated Mn3O4 NPs may be modified with other biomolecules for different biomedical imaging applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fielding of an Imaging VISAR Diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R; Bower, J; Capelle, G; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Kauffman, M; Lare, G; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Montelongo, S; Thomas, T; Tunnell, T; Watts, P

    2004-06-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. As a core NIF early light diagnostic, this system measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. A 659.5 nm VISAR probe laser illuminates the target. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 33-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) interferometers. Both streak cameras and CCD cameras record the images. Total track is 75 feet. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing for other experimenters to use that port. The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. Along with special coatings on the mirrors, cutoff filters reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, for passive shock breakout light, or for thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). Finite Element Analysis was performed on all mounting structures. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts, so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. A two-color laser alignment scheme is discussed.

  12. A new streaked soft x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benstead, J., E-mail: james.benstead@awe.co.uk; Morton, J.; Guymer, T. M.; Garbett, W. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Skidmore, J. W. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Moore, A. S.; Ahmed, M. F.; Soufli, R.; Pardini, T.; Hibbard, R. L.; Bailey, C. G.; Bell, P. M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Reagan, S.; Agliata, T.; Jungquist, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Schmidt, D. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2016-05-15

    A new streaked soft x-ray imager has been designed for use on high energy-density (HED) physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility based at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This streaked imager uses a slit aperture, single shallow angle reflection from a nickel mirror, and soft x-ray filtering to, when coupled to one of the NIF’s x-ray streak cameras, record a 4× magnification, one-dimensional image of an x-ray source with a spatial resolution of less than 90 μm. The energy band pass produced depends upon the filter material used; for the first qualification shots, vanadium and silver-on-titanium filters were used to gate on photon energy ranges of approximately 300–510 eV and 200–400 eV, respectively. A two-channel version of the snout is available for x-ray sources up to 1 mm and a single-channel is available for larger sources up to 3 mm. Both the one and two-channel variants have been qualified on quartz wire and HED physics target shots.

  13. Design of refocusing system for a high-resolution space TDICCD camera with wide-field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Shiliang; Liu, Jinguo

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a refocusing system for a space TDICCD camera of 2.2-meter focal length, which, features a three mirror anastigmatic(TMA) optical system along with 8 TDICCDs assemble at the focal plane, is high resolution and wide field of view. TDICCDs assemble is a kind of major method of acquiring wide field of view for space camera. In this way, the swath width reach 60km. First, the design of TMA optical system and its advantage of this space TDICCD camera was introduced; Then, the refocusing system as well as the technique of mechanical interleaving assemble for TDICCDs focal plane of this space camera was discussed in detail, At last, the refocusing system was measured. Experimental results indicated that the precision of the refocusing system is +/- 3.12μm(3σ), which satisfy the refocusing control system requirements of higher precision and stabilization.

  14. Status and Perspectives of the Mini-MegaTORTORA Wide-field Monitoring System with High Temporal Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Karpov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we briefly summarize our long-term experience of constructing and operating wide-field monitoring cameras with sub-second temporal resolution to look for optical components of GRBs, fast-moving satellites and meteors. The general hardware requirements for these systems are discussed, along with algorithms for real-time detection and classification of various kinds of short optical transients. We also give a status report on the next generation, the MegaTORTORA multi-objective and transforming monitoring system, whose 6-channel (Mini-MegaTORTORA-Spain and 9-channel prototypes (Mini-MegaTORTORA-Kazan we have been building at SAO RAS. This system combines a wide field of view with subsecond temporal resolution in monitoring regime, and is able, within fractions of a second, to reconfigure itself to follow-up mode, which has better sensitivity and simultaneously provides multi-color and polarimetric information on detected transients.

  15. Searching for fast optical transients by means of a wide-field monitoring observations with high temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Perkov, A.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.

    We discuss the strategy of search for fast optical transients accompanying gamma-ray bursts by means of continuous monitoring of wide sky fields with high temporal resolution. We describe the design, performance and results of our cameras, FAVOR and TORTORA. Also we discuss the perspectives of this strategy and possible design of next-generation equipment for wide-field monitoring which will be able to detect optical transients and to study their color and polarization properties with high time resolution.

  16. Ulva prolifera monitoring by GF-1 wide field-of-view sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenxiu; Li, Junsheng; Zhou, Demin; Shen, Qian; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhang, Haobin

    2014-11-01

    Ulva prolifera, a kind of green macroalgae, is nontoxic itself, however, its bloom has bad effects on the marine environment, coastal scene, water sports and seashore tourism. Monitoring of the Ulva prolifera by remote sensing technology has the advantages of wide coverage, rapidness, low cost and dynamic monitoring over a long period of time. The GF-1 satellite was launched in April 2013, which provides a new suitable remote sensing data source for monitoring the Ulva prolifera. At present, segmenting image with a threshold is the most widely used method in Ulva prolifera extraction by remote sensing data, because it is simple and easy to operate. However, the threshold value is obtained through visual analysis or using a fixed statistical value, and could not be got automatically. Facing this problem, we proposed a new method, which can obtain the segmentation threshold automatically based on the local maximum gradient value. This method adopted the average NDVI value of local maximum gradient points as the threshold, and could get an appropriate segmentation threshold automatically for each image. The preliminary results showed that this method works well in monitoring Ulva prolifera by GF-1 WFV data.

  17. Obtaining Sub-uas Astrometry on a Wide-field, Coronagraph Equipped, Space Telescope Using a Diffractive Pupil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Belikov, R.; Guyon, O.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and mass measurement of earth-size exoplanets using the astrometric signal of the host star requires sub-uas measurement precision. One major challenge in achieving this precision using medium-size space telescopes is the calibration of dynamic distortions. To solve this problem, we propose a diffractive pupil approach in which an array of dots on the primary mirror generates polychromatic diffraction spikes in the focal plane used to calibrate the distortions in the optical system. According to our simulations, this technique enables 0.2microarcsecond or better single-visit precision astrometric measurements on a 2.4m wide-field (>0.1deg2) space telescope. We present the laboratory results of the diffractive pupil concept performed at the University of Arizona, showing that this approach can calibrate dynamic distortion errors even for wide field applications. Also, this technique can be used simultaneously with a high-performance coronagraph to determine/constrain the masses, composition, atmospheric properties, and planetary system architectures. Numerical simulations and experiments performed at the NASA Ames ACE test bed have shown that the diffractive pupil does not affect the coronagraph performance. Finally, we assess the compatibility of a diffractive pupil telescope with a general astrophysics mission, showing that the spikes are too faint to impact wide field observations.

  18. Effect of Brand Image, Education Cost, and Education Facilities on Student’s Decision in Choosing Accounting Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Suyono

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the illustration of brand image, education cost, and education facilities related to the student’s decision in choosing the Accounting Department, Faculty of Teacher Training of Universitas Islam Riau. This research was conducted in August 2016. The subject in this research is the students of FKIP Accounting Department of Universitas Islam Riau, semester 3, 5 and 7 with a population of 318 students. 177 students were analyzed as sample. The technique of research used random sampling and method used descriptive quantitative. The data of brand image, education costs, education facilities, and student’s decisions are obtained from questionnaires. Multiple linear regressions were used to analyse the data and the calculation of coefficient determinant (R was used to know the influence of brand image, education cost, and education facilities.

  19. Tetraphenylethene-based aggregation-induced emission fluorescent organic nanoparticles: facile preparation and cell imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiqi; Liu, Meiying; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2013-12-01

    Tetraphenylethene-based (TPE) aggregation-induced emission fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) were facilely prepared via Schiff base condensation with ɛ-polylysine (Ply) and subsequent reduction to form stable CN covalent bond. Thus obtained TPE-Ply FONs were characterized by a series of techniques including fluorescent spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Biocompatibility evaluation and cell uptake behavior of TPE-Ply FONs were further investigated to explore their potential biomedical application. We demonstrated that such FONs showed high water dispersibility, intense fluorescence, uniform morphology (100-200nm) and excellent biocompatibility, making them promising for cell imaging application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D-HST: A WIDE-FIELD GRISM SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brammer, Gabriel B. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Nelson, Erica; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Lundgren, Britt [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon; Labbe, Ivo [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Da Cunha, Elisabete [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kriek, Mariska [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Erb, Dawn K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Dan, E-mail: gbrammer@eso.org [Astronomy Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2012-06-01

    We present 3D-HST, a near-infrared spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope for studying the physical processes that shape galaxies in the distant universe. 3D-HST provides rest-frame optical spectra for a sample of {approx}7000 galaxies at 1 < z < 3.5, the epoch when {approx}60% of all star formation took place, the number density of quasars peaked, the first galaxies stopped forming stars, and the structural regularity that we see in galaxies today must have emerged. 3D-HST will cover three quarters (625 arcmin{sup 2}) of the CANDELS Treasury survey area with two orbits of primary WFC3/G141 grism coverage and two to four orbits with the ACS/G800L grism in parallel. In the IR, these exposure times yield a continuum signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}5 per resolution element at H{sub 140} {approx} 23.1 and a 5{sigma} emission-line sensitivity of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for typical objects, improving by a factor of {approx}2 for compact sources in images with low sky background levels. The WFC3/G141 spectra provide continuous wavelength coverage from 1.1 to 1.6 {mu}m at a spatial resolution of {approx}0.''13, which, combined with their depth, makes them a unique resource for studying galaxy evolution. We present an overview of the preliminary reduction and analysis of the grism observations, including emission-line and redshift measurements from combined fits to the extracted grism spectra and photometry from ancillary multi-wavelength catalogs. The present analysis yields redshift estimates with a precision of {sigma}(z) = 0.0034(1 + z), or {sigma}(v) Almost-Equal-To 1000 km s{sup -1}. We illustrate how the generalized nature of the survey yields near-infrared spectra of remarkable quality for many different types of objects, including a quasar at z = 4.7, quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2, and the most distant T-type brown dwarf star known. The combination of the CANDELS and 3D-HST surveys

  1. Wide field-of-view target detection and simultaneous narrow field of view target analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard W.; Miller, Geoffrey M.

    2009-05-01

    Protecting national borders, military and industrial complexes, national Infrastructure and high-value targets is critical to national security. Traditional solutions use a combination of ground surveillance radar, motion detection systems and video surveillance systems. Our development objective was to provide wide area 360-degree surveillance and ground-moving target detection using a passive optical system. In order to meet this objective, the development of an optical system capable of wide-area surveillance with intelligent cueing, high-resolution tracking and target identification is required. The predominant approach to optical surveillance has traditionally been gimbaled narrow field-of-view systems. These systems miss the majority of events occurring around them because of their inability to focus on anything other than a single event or object at any one time. Details of the system requirements definition, design trade studies and selected design configurations are discussed. The experimental results obtained during the current development phase have provided consistently high quality images and enhanced situational awareness. A summary of field validation methods and results is provided.

  2. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED POLARIMETRY OF THE ρ OPHIUCHI CLOUD CORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hough, James H. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Nakajima, Yasushi [Center of Information and Communication Technology, Hitotsubashi University, 2-1 Naka, Kunitachi, Tokyo 186-8601 (Japan); Nishiyama, Shogo [Miyagi University of Education, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Nagata, Tetsuya [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kandori, Ryo, E-mail: jungmi.kwon@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    We conducted wide and deep simultaneous JHK{sub s}-band imaging polarimetry of the ρ Ophiuchi cloud complex. Aperture polarimetry in the JHK{sub s} band was conducted for 2136 sources in all three bands, of which 322 sources have significant polarizations in all the JHK{sub s} bands and have been used for a discussion of the core magnetic fields. There is a positive correlation between degrees of polarization and H − K{sub s} color up to H − K{sub s} ≈ 3.5. The magnetic field structures in the core region are revealed up to at least A{sub V} ≈ 47 mag and are unambiguously defined in each sub-region (core) of Oph-A, Oph-B, Oph-C, Oph-E, Oph-F, and Oph-AC. Their directions, degrees of polarization, and polarization efficiencies differ but their changes are gradual; thus, the magnetic fields appear to be connected from core to core, rather than as a simple overlap of the different cloud core components. Comparing our results with the large-scale field structures obtained from previous optical polarimetric studies, we suggest that the magnetic field structures in the core were distorted by the cluster formation in this region, which may have been induced by shock compression due to wind/radiation from the Scorpius–Centaurus association.

  3. Hyper Suprime-Camera Survey of the Akari NEP Wide Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tomotsugu; Toba, Yoshiki; Utsumi, Yousuke; Oi, Nagisa; Takagi, Toshinobu; Malkan, Matt; Ohayma, Youichi; Murata, Kazumi; Price, Paul; Karouzos, Marios; Matsuhara, Hideo; Nakagawa, Takao; Wada, Takehiko; Serjeant, Steve; Burgarella, Denis; Buat, Veronique; Takada, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Oguri, Masamune; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Oyabu, Shinki; White, Glenn; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Inami, Hanae; Perason, Chris; Malek, Katarzyna; Marchetti, Lucia; Lee, Hyung Mok; Im, Myung; Kim, Seong Jin; Koptelova, Ekaterina; Chao, Dani; Wu, Yi-Han; AKARI NEP Survey Team; AKARI All Sky Survey Team

    2017-03-01

    The extragalactic background suggests half the energy generated by stars was reprocessed into the infrared (IR) by dust. At z ∼1.3, 90% of star formation is obscured by dust. To fully understand the cosmic star formation history, it is critical to investigate infrared emission. AKARI has made deep mid-IR observation using its continuous 9-band filters in the NEP field (5.4 deg^2), using ∼10% of the entire pointed observations available throughout its lifetime. However, there remain 11,000 AKARI infrared sources undetected with the previous CFHT/Megacam imaging (r ∼25.9ABmag). Redshift and IR luminosity of these sources are unknown. These sources may contribute significantly to the cosmic star-formation rate density (CSFRD). For example, if they all lie at 1 Camera (HSC), which has 1.5 deg field of view in diameter on Subaru 8m telescope. This will provide photometric redshift information, and thereby IR luminosity for the previously-undetected 11,000 faint AKARI IR sources. Combined with AKARI's mid-IR AGN/SF diagnosis, and accurate mid-IR luminosity measurement, this will allow a complete census of cosmic star-formation/AGN accretion history obscured by dust.

  4. Simulation of Collimator for Neutron Imaging Facility of TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, Muhammad Rawi Mohamed; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Khairiah; Hussain, Hishamuddin; Yazid, Hafizal; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Azman, Azraf; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Hamzah, Nai'im Syaugi; Abu, Mohamad Puad

    Neutron Radiography facility in TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI reactor is being upgraded to obtain better image resolution as well as reducing exposure time. Collimator and exposure room are the main components have been designed for fabrication. This article focuses on the simulation part that was carried out to obtain the profile of collimated neutron beam by utilizing the neutron transport protocol code in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) software. Particular interest is in the selection of materials for inlet section of the collimator. Results from the simulation indicates that a combination of Bismuth and Sapphire, each of which has 5.0 cm length that can significantly filter both the gamma radiation and the fast neutrons. An aperture made of Cadmium with 1.0 cm opening diameter provides thermal neutron flux about 1.8 x108 ncm-2s-1 at the inlet, but reduces to 2.7 x106 ncm-2s-1 at the sample plane. Still the flux obtained is expected to reduces exposure time as well as gaining better image resolution.

  5. Near Field Intensity Trends of Main Laser Alignment Images in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, R R; Beltsar, I; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Kamm, V M; Salmon, T; Wilhelmsen, K

    2015-01-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes 192 high-energy laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to potentially initiate a fusion reaction. NIF has been operational for six years; during that time, thousands of successful laser firings or shots have been executed. Critical instrument measurements and camera images are carefully recorded for each shot. The result is a massive and complex database or ‘big data’ archive that can be used to investigate the state of the laser system at any point in its history or to locate and track trends in the laser operation over time. In this study, the optical light throughput for more than 1600 NIF shots for each of the 192 main laser beams and 48 quads was measured over a three year period from January 2009 to October 2012. The purpose was to verify that the variation in the transmission of light through the optics over time performed within design expectations during this time period. Differences between average or integrated intensity from images recorded by the input sensor package (ISP) and by the output sensor package (OSP) in the NIF beam-line were examined. A metric is described for quantifying changes in the integrated intensity measurements and was used to view potential trends. Results are presented for the NIF input and output sensor package trends and changes over the three year time-frame.

  6. Deep wide-field near-infrared survey of the Carina Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Kuderna, B.; Ohlendorf, H.; King, R. R.; Hodgkin, S.; Irwin, M.; Lewis, J. R.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Zinnecker, H.

    2011-06-01

    Context. The Great Nebula in Carina is a giant H ii region and a superb location in which to study the physics of violent massive star formation, but the population of the young low-mass stars remained very poorly studied until recently. Aims: Our aim was to produce a near-infrared survey that is deep enough to detect the full low-mass stellar population (i.e. down to ≈0.1 M⊙ and for extinctions up to AV ≈ 15 mag) and wide enough to cover all important parts of the Carina Nebula complex (CNC), including the clusters Tr 14, 15, and 16 as well as the South Pillars region. Methods: We used HAWK-I at the ESO VLT to survey the central ≈0.36 deg2 area of the Carina Nebula. These data reveal more than 600 000 individual infrared sources down to magnitudes as faint as J ≈ 23, H ≈ 22, and Ks ≈ 21. The results of a recent deep X-ray survey (which is complete down to stellar masses of ~0.5-1 M⊙) are used to distinguish between young stars in Carina and background contaminants. We analyze color - magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to derive information about the ages and masses of the low-mass stars. Results: The ages of the low-mass stars agree with previous age estimates for the massive stars. The CMD suggests that ≈3200 of the X-ray selected stars have masses of M∗ ≥ 1 M⊙; this number is in good agreement with extrapolations of the field IMF based on the number of high-mass (M∗ ≥ 20 M⊙) stars and shows that there is no deficit of low-mass stars in the CNC. The HAWK-I images confirm that about 50% of all young stars in Carina are in a widely distributed, non-clustered spatial configuration. Narrow-band images reveal six molecular hydrogen emission objects (MHOs) that trace jets from embedded protostars. However, none of the optical HH objects shows molecular hydrogen emission, suggesting that the jet-driving protostars are located very close to the edges of the globules in which they are embedded. Conclusions: The near-infrared excess fractions for the

  7. A new low cost wide-field illumination method for photooxidation of intracellular fluorescent markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel da Silva Filho

    Full Text Available Analyzing cell morphology is crucial in the fields of cell biology and neuroscience. One of the main methods for evaluating cell morphology is by using intracellular fluorescent markers, including various commercially available dyes and genetically encoded fluorescent proteins. These markers can be used as free radical sources in photooxidation reactions, which in the presence of diaminobenzidine (DAB forms an opaque and electron-dense precipitate that remains localized within the cellular and organelle membranes. This method confers many methodological advantages for the investigator, including absence of photo-bleaching, high visual contrast and the possibility of correlating optical imaging with electron microscopy. However, current photooxidation techniques require the continuous use of fluorescent or confocal microscopes, which wastes valuable mercury lamp lifetime and limits the conversion process to a few cells at a time. We developed a low cost optical apparatus for performing photooxidation reactions and propose a new procedure that solves these methodological restrictions. Our "photooxidizer" consists of a high power light emitting diode (LED associated with a custom aluminum and acrylic case and a microchip-controlled current source. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method by converting intracellular DiI in samples of developing rat neocortex and post-mortem human retina. DiI crystals were inserted in the tissue and allowed to diffuse for 20 days. The samples were then processed with the new photooxidation technique and analyzed under optical microscopy. The results show that our protocols can unveil the fine morphology of neurons in detail. Cellular structures such as axons, dendrites and spine-like appendages were well defined. In addition to its low cost, simplicity and reliability, our method precludes the use of microscope lamps for photooxidation and allows the processing of many labeled cells simultaneously in relatively

  8. Green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent proteins: tracking cell and protein dynamics on standard wide-field mercury arc-based microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckheit Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green fluorescent protein (GFP and other FP fusions have been extensively utilized to track protein dynamics in living cells. Recently, development of photoactivatable, photoswitchable and photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (PAFPs has made it possible to investigate the fate of discrete subpopulations of tagged proteins. Initial limitations to their use (due to their tetrameric nature were overcome when monomeric variants, such as Dendra, mEos, and mKikGR were cloned/engineered. Results Here, we report that by closing the field diaphragm, selective, precise and irreversible green-to-red photoconversion (330-380 nm illumination of discrete subcellular protein pools was achieved on a wide-field fluorescence microscope equipped with standard DAPI, Fluorescein, and Rhodamine filter sets and mercury arc illumination within 5-10 seconds. Use of a DAPI-filter cube with long-pass emission filter (LP420 allowed the observation and control of the photoconversion process in real time. Following photoconversion, living cells were imaged for up to 5 hours often without detectable phototoxicity or photobleaching. Conclusions We demonstrate the practicability of this technique using Dendra2 and mEos2 as monomeric, photoconvertible PAFP representatives fused to proteins with low (histone H2B, medium (gap junction channel protein connexin 43, and high (α-tubulin; clathrin light chain dynamic cellular mobility as examples. Comparable efficient, irreversible green-to-red photoconversion of selected portions of cell nuclei, gap junctions, microtubules and clathrin-coated vesicles was achieved. Tracking over time allowed elucidation of the dynamic live-cycle of these subcellular structures. The advantage of this technique is that it can be performed on a standard, relatively inexpensive wide-field fluorescence microscope with mercury arc illumination. Together with previously described laser scanning confocal microscope-based photoconversion

  9. Lensfree optofluidic plasmonic sensor for real-time and label-free monitoring of molecular binding events over a wide field-of-view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Cetin, Arif E.; Galarreta, Betty C.; Alvarez, Daniel Adrianzen; Altug, Hatice; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-throughput biosensing device that utilizes microfluidics based plasmonic microarrays incorporated with dual-color on-chip imaging toward real-time and label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions over a wide field-of-view of >20 mm2. Weighing 40 grams with 8.8 cm in height, this biosensor utilizes an opto-electronic imager chip to record the diffraction patterns of plasmonic nanoapertures embedded within microfluidic channels, enabling real-time analyte exchange. This plasmonic chip is simultaneously illuminated by two different light-emitting-diodes that are spectrally located at the right and left sides of the plasmonic resonance mode, yielding two different diffraction patterns for each nanoaperture array. Refractive index changes of the medium surrounding the near-field of the nanostructures, e.g., due to molecular binding events, induce a frequency shift in the plasmonic modes of the nanoaperture array, causing a signal enhancement in one of the diffraction patterns while suppressing the other. Based on ratiometric analysis of these diffraction images acquired at the detector-array, we demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this biosensor by monitoring in real-time biomolecular interactions of protein A/G with immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. For high-throughput on-chip fabrication of these biosensors, we also introduce a deep ultra-violet lithography technique to simultaneously pattern thousands of plasmonic arrays in a cost-effective manner. PMID:25346102

  10. Wide-Field Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Globular Cluster System in NGC 1399*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzia, Thomas H.; Paolillo, Maurizio; Goudfrooij, Paul; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Angelini, Lorella

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive high spatial resolution imaging study of globular clusters (GCs) in NGC 1399, thecentral giant elliptical cD galaxy in the Fornax galaxy cluster, conducted with the Advanced Camera for Surveys(ACS) aboard theHubble Space Telescope(HST).Using a novel technique to construct drizzled point-spreadfunction libraries for HSTACS data, we accurately determine the fidelity of GC structural parameter measurementsfrom detailed artificial star cluster experiments and show the superior robustness of the GC half-light radius,rh,compared with other GC structural parameters, such as King core and tidal radius. The measurement ofrhfor themajor fraction of the NGC 1399 GC system reveals a trend of increasingrhversus galactocentric distance,Rgal,out to about 10 kpc and a flat relation beyond. This trend is very similar for blue and red GCs, which are found tohave a mean size ratio ofrh,redrh,blue0.820.11 at all galactocentric radii from the core regions of the galaxyout to40 kpc. This suggests that the size difference between blue and red GCs is due to internal mechanismsrelated to the evolution of their constituent stellar populations. Modeling the mass density profile of NGC 1399shows that additional external dynamical mechanisms are required to limit the GC size in the galaxy halo regionstorh2 pc. We suggest that this may be realized by an exotic GC orbit distribution function, an extended darkmatter halo, andor tidal stress induced by the increased stochasticity in the dwarf halo substructure at largergalactocentric distances. We compare our results with the GCrhdistribution functions in various galaxies and findthat the fraction of extended GCs withrh5 pc is systematically larger in late-type galaxies compared with GCsystems in early-type galaxies. This is likely due to the dynamically more violent evolution of early-type galaxies.We match our GCrhmeasurements with radial velocity data from the literature and split the resulting sample at

  11. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herges, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  12. Optical System and Desing Of The New 1.6 Meter Wide-Field Telescope With Active Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papushev, Pavel; Denisenko, Sergey; Kamus, Sergey; Pimenov, Yury; Tergoev, Vladim

    2006-08-01

    In this report we present and discuss the design, construction and capabilities of the two meters class wide field survey telescope. The designs based on modified R-C system with two or three lens correctors in visible and near infrared (2,2 mkm) spectral range. The optical systems of the 1.6 meters telescope with up to 3 degrees field of view and less than 15% obscuration area are considered in detail. Optical performance of system, its mount and separate element of the active optics system are examined.

  13. Preliminary Analysis of Ground-based Orbit Determination Accuracy for the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sease, Brad

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope is a 2.4-meter telescope planned for launch to the Sun-Earth L2 point in 2026. This paper details a preliminary study of the achievable accuracy for WFIRST from ground-based orbit determination routines. The analysis here is divided into two segments. First, a linear covariance analysis of early mission and routine operations provides an estimate of the tracking schedule required to meet mission requirements. Second, a simulated operations scenario gives insight into the expected behavior of a daily Extended Kalman Filter orbit estimate over the first mission year given a variety of potential momentum unloading schemes.

  14. All sky coordination initiative, simple service for wide-field monitoring systems to cooperate in searching for fast optical transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, S.; Sokołowski, M.; Gorbovskoy, E.

    Here we stress the necessity of cooperation between different wide-field monitoring projects (FAVOR/TORTORA, Pi of the Sky, MASTER, etc), aimed for independent detection of fast optical transients, in order to maximize the area of the sky covered at any moment and to coordinate the monitoring of gamma-ray telescopes' field of view. We review current solutions available for it and propose a simple protocol with dedicated service (ASCI) for such systems to share their current status and pointing schedules.

  15. Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Experimental Simulation of Micrometeoroid Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. C.; Kearsley, A. T.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Spratt, J.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Ross, D. K.; Opiela, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features have been recognized on painted surfaces returned from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Here we describe experiments that help us to understand their creation, and the preservation of micrometeoroid (MM) remnants. We simulated capture of silicate and sulfide minerals on the Zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) paint and Al alloy plate of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) radiator, which was returned from HST after 16 years in low Earth orbit (LEO). Our results also allow us to validate analytical methods for identification of MM (and orbital debris) impacts in LEO.

  16. Facile preparation of water-soluble fluorescent gold nanoclusters for cellular imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Li; Dörlich, René M.; Brandholt, Stefan; Schneider, Reinhard; Trouillet, Vanessa; Bruns, Michael; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    We report a facile strategy to synthesize water-soluble, fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) in one step by using a mild reductant, tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC). A zwitterionic functional ligand, d-penicillamine (DPA), as a capping agent endowed the AuNCs with excellent stability in aqueous solvent over the physiologically relevant pH range. The DPA-capped AuNCs displayed excitation and emission bands at 400 and 610 nm, respectively; the fluorescence quantum yield was 1.3%. The effect of borohydride reduction on the optical spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the AuNC luminescence is closely related to the presence of Au(i) on their surfaces. In a first optical imaging application, we studied internalization of the AuNCs by live HeLa cells using confocal microscopy with two-photon excitation. A cell viability assay revealed good biocompatibility of these AuNCs. Our studies demonstrate a great potential of DPA-stabilized AuNCs as fluorescent nanoprobes in bioimaging and related applications.We report a facile strategy to synthesize water-soluble, fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) in one step by using a mild reductant, tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC). A zwitterionic functional ligand, d-penicillamine (DPA), as a capping agent endowed the AuNCs with excellent stability in aqueous solvent over the physiologically relevant pH range. The DPA-capped AuNCs displayed excitation and emission bands at 400 and 610 nm, respectively; the fluorescence quantum yield was 1.3%. The effect of borohydride reduction on the optical spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the AuNC luminescence is closely related to the presence of Au(i) on their surfaces. In a first optical imaging application, we studied internalization of the AuNCs by live HeLa cells using confocal microscopy with two-photon excitation. A cell viability assay revealed good biocompatibility of these Au

  17. Surgical feasibility and biocompatibility of wide-field dual-array suprachoroidal-transretinal stimulation prosthesis in middle-sized animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Tibor Karl; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Takeshi; Endo, Takao; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Nishida, Kentaro; Kamei, Motohiro; Walter, Peter; Fujikado, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of a newly-developed wide-field dual-array suprachoroidal-transretinal stimulation (STS) prosthesis in middle-sized animals. The prosthesis consisted of two arrays with 50 to 74 electrodes. To test the feasibility of implanting the prosthesis and its efficacy, the prosthesis was implanted for 14 days into two rabbits. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and ophthalmoscopy were performed 7 and 14 days after the implantation. Then the rabbits were euthanized, eyes were enucleated, and the posterior segment of the eye was examined histologically. In a second experiment, the arrays were implanted into two cats, and their ability to elicit neural responses was determined by electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) at the chiasm and by optical imaging of the retina. All arrays were successfully implanted, and no major complications occurred during the surgery or during the 2-week postoperative period. Neither OCT nor ophthalmoscopy showed any major complications or instability of the arrays. Histological evaluations showed only mild cellular infiltration and overall good retinal preservation. Stimulation of the retina by the arrays evoked EEPs recorded from the chiasm. Retinal imaging showed that the electrical pulses from the arrays altered the retinal images indicating an activation of retinal neurons. The thresholds were as low as 100 μA for a chiasm response and 300 μA for the retinal imaging. Implantation of a newly-developed dual-array STS prosthesis for 2 weeks in rabbits was feasible surgically, and safe. The results of retinal imaging showed that the dual-array system was able to activate retinal neurons. We conclude that the dual-array design can be implanted without complication and is able to activate retinal neurons and optic nerve axons.

  18. Demonstration of the Capabilities of CometCIEF: A Web-based Image Enhancement Facility to Enhance Images of Cometary Comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael Patrick; Samarasinha, Nalin; Larson, Steve

    2014-11-01

    Accurate identifications and measurements of spatial information related to coma structures of comets are an essential component of realistic quantitative interpretation of coma observations. For this purpose, there is a number of image enhancement techniques used by cometary scientists. Despite this, the wider applicability of many advanced enhancement techniques is limited due to the non-availability of relevant software as open source. We are making available a number of such techniques using a user-friendly web interface.In this image enhancement facility available at http://www.psi.edu/research/cometimen one can upload a FITS format image of a cometary coma and digitally enhance it using an image enhancement technique of the user’s choice. The user can then download the enhanced image as well as any associated images generated during the enhancement as FITS files for detailed analysis later at the user’s institution. The available image enhancement techniques at the facility are:(a) division by azimuthal average,(b) division by azimuthal median,(c) azimuthal renormalization,(d) division by 1/ρ profile, where ρ is the skyplane projected distance from the nucleus, and(e) radially variable spatial filtering.The site provides documentation describing the above enhancement techniques as well as a tutorial showing the application of the enhancement techniques to actual cometary images and how the results may vary with different input parameters. In addition, the source codes as well as the executables are available for the user to download. To provide a secure facility, all the images uploaded by the users as well as the images created at the facility are deleted using a script that runs every hour.At the Division for Planetary Sciences 2014 meeting, we will present a description of CometCIEF and its capabilities, as well as a live demonstration of the facility that includes a question-answer session.Acknowledgements: We thank the NASA Planetary Atmospheres

  19. Facile Synthesis of Lipid-Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Coated with Silica Shell as an Ultrasound Imaging Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Chen, Huali; Bai, Yan; Cao, Yang; Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Liangke

    2017-12-21

    A novel organic/inorganic hybrid nanovesicle as an ultrasound imaging agent is synthesized via facile emulsion and silica deposition methods. This nanovesicle, hyaluronate (HA)-docetaxel (DTX)/perfluoro-n-pentane (PFP)@SNC, consists of an encapsulated liquid PFP core, loaded DTX, and an HA-decorated silica shell. The HA-DTX/PFP@SNC has a narrow size distribution of 274.5 ± 3.25 nm, a negative zeta potential of -11.6 ± 0.47 mV, and an entrapment efficiency of 86.70% ± 1.42%. HA-DTX/PFP@SNC possesses an ultrasound (US)-triggered drug release and a temperature-dependent size change behavior. Compared with DTX/PFP@soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC), which has no silica shell, the HA-DTX/PFP@SNC is more stable under various conditions. The MTT assay indicates that the blank HA-PFP@SNC vehicle has no cytotoxicity to A549 cells. Furthermore, due to the HA-mediated tumor-targeting ability, the HA-DTX/PFP@SNC shows obvious cytotoxicity to A549 cells. In vitro and in vivo US imaging results indicate that HA-DTX/PFP@SNC has a stronger and more durable echo signal than DTX/PFP@SPC. Moreover, the in vivo echo signal of HA-DTX/PFP@SNC is stronger than that of DTX/PFP@SNC due to the HA-mediated tumor targeting. Therefore, this novel organic/inorganic hybrid vesicle is a US contrast agent candidate. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Wide-Field Landers Temporary Keratoprosthesis in Severe Ocular Trauma: Functional and Anatomical Results after One Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowomiejska, Katarzyna; Haszcz, Dariusz; Forlini, Cesare; Forlini, Matteo; Moneta-Wielgos, Joanna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Juenemann, Anselm G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate longitudinal functional and anatomical results after combined pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) using a wide-field Landers intraoperative temporary keratoprosthesis (TKP) in patients with vitreoretinal pathology and corneal opacity due to severe ocular trauma. Material and Methods. Medical records of 12 patients who had undergone PPV/PKP/KP due to severe eye trauma were analyzed. Functional (best-corrected visual acuity) and anatomic outcomes (clarity of the corneal graft, retinal attachment, and intraocular pressure) were assessed during the follow-up (mean 16 months). Results. Final visual acuities varied from NLP to CF to 2 m. Visual acuity improved in 7 cases, was unchanged in 4 eyes, and worsened in 1 eye. The corneal graft was transparent during the follow-up in 3 cases and graft failure was observed in 9 eyes. Silicone oil was used as a tamponade in all cases and retina was reattached in 92% of cases. Conclusions. Combined PPV and PKP with the use of wide-field Landers TKP allowed for surgical intervention in patients with vitreoretinal pathology coexisting with corneal wound. Although retina was attached in most of the cases, corneal graft survived only in one-fourth of patients and final visual acuities were poor. PMID:26617994

  1. Wide-Field Landers Temporary Keratoprosthesis in Severe Ocular Trauma: Functional and Anatomical Results after One Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Nowomiejska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate longitudinal functional and anatomical results after combined pars plana vitrectomy (PPV and penetrating keratoplasty (PKP using a wide-field Landers intraoperative temporary keratoprosthesis (TKP in patients with vitreoretinal pathology and corneal opacity due to severe ocular trauma. Material and Methods. Medical records of 12 patients who had undergone PPV/PKP/KP due to severe eye trauma were analyzed. Functional (best-corrected visual acuity and anatomic outcomes (clarity of the corneal graft, retinal attachment, and intraocular pressure were assessed during the follow-up (mean 16 months. Results. Final visual acuities varied from NLP to CF to 2 m. Visual acuity improved in 7 cases, was unchanged in 4 eyes, and worsened in 1 eye. The corneal graft was transparent during the follow-up in 3 cases and graft failure was observed in 9 eyes. Silicone oil was used as a tamponade in all cases and retina was reattached in 92% of cases. Conclusions. Combined PPV and PKP with the use of wide-field Landers TKP allowed for surgical intervention in patients with vitreoretinal pathology coexisting with corneal wound. Although retina was attached in most of the cases, corneal graft survived only in one-fourth of patients and final visual acuities were poor.

  2. Design of the polar neutron-imaging aperture for use at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatherley, V. E.; Barker, D. A.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Hibbard, R. L.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-11-01

    The installation of a neutron imaging diagnostic with a polar view at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) required design of a new aperture, an extended pinhole array (PHA). This PHA is different from the pinhole array for the existing equatorial system due to significant changes in the alignment and recording systems. The complex set of component requirements, as well as significant space constraints in its intended location, makes the design of this aperture challenging. In addition, lessons learned from development of prior apertures mandate careful aperture metrology prior to first use. This paper discusses the PHA requirements, constraints, and the final design. The PHA design is complex due to size constraints, machining precision, assembly tolerances, and design requirements. When fully assembled, the aperture is a 15 mm × 15 mm × 200 mm tungsten and gold assembly. The PHA body is made from 2 layers of tungsten and 11 layers of gold. The gold layers include 4 layers containing penumbral openings, 4 layers containing pinholes and 3 spacer layers. In total, there are 64 individual, triangular pinholes with a field of view (FOV) of 200 μm and 6 penumbral apertures. Each pinhole is pointed to a slightly different location in the target plane, making the effective FOV of this PHA a 700 μm square in the target plane. The large FOV of the PHA reduces the alignment requirements both for the PHA and the target, allowing for alignment with a laser tracking system at NIF.

  3. Imaging Facilities' Adherence to PI-RADS v2 Minimum Technical Standards for the Performance of Prostate MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esses, Steven J; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to assess variability in imaging facilities' adherence to the minimum technical standards for prostate magnetic resonance imaging acquisition established by Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2 (v2). A total of 107 prostate magnetic resonance imaging examinations performed at 107 unique imaging facilities after the release of PI-RADS v2 and that were referred to a tertiary care center for secondary interpretation were included. Image sets, DICOM headers, and outside reports were reviewed to assess adherence to 21 selected PI-RADS v2 minimum technical standards. Hardware arrangements were 23.1%, 1.5T without endorectal coil; 7.7%, 1.5T with endorectal coil; 63.5%, 3T without endorectal coil; and 5.8%, 3T with endorectal coil. Adherence to minimum standards was lowest on T2 weighted imaging (T2WI) for frequency resolution ≤0.4 mm (16.8%) and phase resolution ≤0.7 mm (48.6%), lowest on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for field of view (FOV) 120-220 mm (30.0%), and lowest on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging for slice thickness 3 mm (33.3%) and temporal resolution value (≥1400 s/mm 2 ) images were included in 58.0% (calculated in 25.9%). Adherence to T2WI phase resolution and DWI inter-slice gap were greater (P  .05) for any parameter between examinations performed with and without an endorectal coil. Adherence was greater for examinations performed at teaching facilities for T2WI slice thickness and DCE temporal resolution (P  .05). Facilities' adherence to PI-RADS v2 minimum technical standards was variable, being particularly poor for T2WI frequency resolution and DCE temporal resolution. The standards warrant greater community education. Certain technical standards may be too stringent, and revisions should be considered. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A search for a distant companion to the sun with the wide-field infrared survey explorer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhman, K. L., E-mail: kluhman@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    I have used multi-epoch astrometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer to perform a search for a distant companion to the Sun via its parallactic motion. I have not found an object of this kind down to W2 = 14.5. This limit corresponds to analogs of Saturn and Jupiter at 28,000 and 82,000 AU, respectively, according to models of the Jovian planets by Fortney and coworkers. Models of brown dwarfs by Burrows and coworkers predict fainter fluxes at a given mass for the age of the solar system, producing a closer distance limit of 26,000 AU for a Jupiter-mass brown dwarf. These constraints exclude most combinations of mass and separation at which a solar companion has been suggested to exist by various studies over the years.

  5. KOALA: a wide-field 1000 element integral-field unit for the Anglo-Australian Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, S. C.; Ireland, M.; Lawrence, J. S.; Tims, J.; Staszak, N.; Brzeski, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sharp, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Case, S.; Colless, M.; Croom, S.; Couch, W.; De Marco, O.; Glazebrook, K.; Saunders, W.; Webster, R.; Zucker, D. B.

    2012-09-01

    KOALA, the Kilofibre Optimised Astronomical Lenslet Array, is a wide-field, high efficiency integral field unit being designed for use with the bench mounted AAOmega spectrograph on the AAT. KOALA will have 1000 fibres in a rectangular array with a selectable field of view of either 1390 or 430 sq. arcseconds with a spatial sampling of 1.25" or 0.7" respectively. To achieve this KOALA will use a telecentric double lenslet array with interchangeable fore-optics. The IFU will feed AAOmega via a 31m fibre run. The efficiency of KOALA is expected to be ≍ 52% at 3700A and ≍ 66% at 6563°Å with a throughput of > 52% over the entire wavelength range.

  6. Mini-Mega-TORTORA wide-field monitoring system with sub-second temporal resolution: first year of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, S.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    Here we present the summary of first years of operation and the first results of a novel 9-channel wide-field optical monitoring system with sub-second temporal resolution, Mini-Mega-TORTORA (MMT-9), which is in operation now at Special Astrophysical Observatory on Russian Caucasus. The system is able to observe the sky simultaneously in either wide (˜900 square degrees) or narrow (˜100 square degrees) fields of view, either in clear light or with any combination of color (Johnson-Cousins B, V or R) and polarimetric filters installed, with exposure times ranging from 0.1 s to hundreds of seconds. The real-time system data analysis pipeline performs automatic detection of rapid transient events, both near-Earth and extragalactic. The objects routinely detected by MMT include faint meteors and artificial satellites. The pipeline for a longer time scales variability analysis is still in development.

  7. Impacts on the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Microanalysis and Recognition of Micrometeoroid Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Colaux, J. L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Postflight surveys of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on the Hubble Space Telescope have located hundreds of features on the 2.2 by 0.8 m curved plate, evidence of hypervelocity impact by small particles during 16 years of exposure to space in low Earth orbit (LEO). The radiator has a 100 - 200 micron surface layer of white paint, overlying 4 mm thick Al alloy, which was not fully penetrated by any impact. Over 460 WFPC2 samples were extracted by coring at JSC. About half were sent to NHM in a collaborative program with NASA, ESA and IBC. The structural and compositional heterogeneity at micrometer scale required microanalysis by electron and ion beam microscopes to determine the nature of the impactors (artificial orbital debris, or natural micrometeoroids, MM). Examples of MM impacts are described elsewhere. Here we describe the development of novel electron beam analysis protocols, required to recognize the subtle traces of MM residues.

  8. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Sace Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Ion Beam Analysis of Subtle Impactor Traces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Colaux, J. L.; Kearsley, A. T.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of origin for particles responsible for impact damage on spacecraft such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) relies upon postflight analysis of returned materials. A unique opportunity arose in 2009 with collection of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) from HST by shuttle mission STS-125. A preliminary optical survey confirmed that there were hundreds of impact features on the radiator surface. Following extensive discussion between NASA, ESA, NHM and IBC, a collaborative research program was initiated, employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ion beam analysis (IBA) to determine the nature of the impacting grains. Even though some WFPC2 impact features are large, and easily seen without the use of a microscope, impactor remnants may be hard to find.

  9. Wide-field infrared survey explorer observations of young stellar objects in the Lynds 1509 dark cloud in Auriga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wilson M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Padgett, Deborah L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Terebey, Susan; Angione, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Rebull, Luisa M. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Leisawitz, David, E-mail: wliu@ipac.caltech.edu [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 605, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

  10. Development of a lightweight near-zero CTE optical bench for the Wide-Field Camera 3 instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Jill M.; Kunt, Cengiz; Lashley, Chris; McGuffey, Douglas B.

    2003-02-01

    The design and development of an optical bench (OB) for Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a next generation science instrument for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has proven a challenging task. WFC3 will replace Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WF/PC 2) during the next servicing mission of the HST in 2004. The WFC3 program is re-using much of the hardware from WF/PC 1, returned from the First Servicing Mission, which has added complexity to the program. This posed some significant packaging challenges, further complicated by WFC3 utilizing two, separate optical channels. The WF/PC 1 optical bench could not house the additional optical components, so a new bench was developed. The new bench had to be designed to accommodate the sometimes-conflicting requirements of the two channels, which operate over a wavelength range of 200nm to 1800nm, from Near Ultraviolet to Near Infrared. In addition, the bench had to interface to the reused WF/PC 1 hardware, which was not optimized for this mission. To aid in the design of the bench, the team used software tools to merge structural, thermal and optical models to obtain performance (STOP) of the optical systems in operation. Several iterations of this performance analysis were needed during the design process to verify the bench would meet requirements. The fabrication effort included a rigorous material characterization program and significant tooling. After assembly, the optical bench underwent an extensive qualification program to prove the design and manufacturing processes. This paper provides the details of the design and development process of this highly optimized optical bench.

  11. Comparison of results from quality control of physical parameters and results from clinical evaluation of mammographic images for the mammography screening facilities in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiszewska, E; Grabska, I; Jankowska, K; Wesolowska, E; Bulski, W

    2011-09-01

    The material for this study comprised control protocols from 248 mammography screening facilities, prepared by physicists employed at 16 Regional Coordinating Centres and the results from the clinical evaluation of mammographic images in 248 facilities in Poland. All mammograms were evaluated independently by three experts selected from a list approved by the national consultant of radiology and diagnostic imaging. The requirements for proper breast positioning, selection of appropriate parameters for exposure and absence of artefacts were fulfilled only in 38 % of inspected mammography facilities. The requirements of the clinical audit were met only in 15 % of the mammography facilities. The requirements for the physical parameters of mammographic equipment were met only in 28 % of them. The requirements of the quality control (QC) tests and clinical audit were not fulfilled only in 19 % of the mammography facilities. Results from the QC of physical parameters are comparable with results from clinical evaluation of mammographic images in 57 % of the mammography facilities in Poland.

  12. A hardened gated x-ray imaging diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S; Koch, J; Bradley, D K; Izumi, N; Bell, P; Holder, J; Stone, G; Prasad, R; MacKinnon, A; Springer, P; Landen, O L; Kyrala, G

    2010-10-01

    A gated x-ray detector is under development for use at the National Ignition Facility that is intended to provide plasma emission images in the presence of neutron yields up to 10(15) expected during inertial confinement fusion experiments with layered cryogenic targets. These images are expected to provide valuable time-resolved measurements of core and fuel symmetries. Additional capabilities of this instrument will include the ability to make spatially resolved electron temperature measurements. A description of this instrument and its operation is given with emphasis on features that differentiate it from previous designs.

  13. Retinal Astrocytes and GABAergic Wide-Field Amacrine Cells Express PDGFRα: Connection to Retinal Ganglion Cell Neuroprotection by PDGF-AA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Shokichi; Adetunji, Modupe O; Zhao, Tantai; Chen, Shan; Li, Wei; Tomarev, Stanislav I

    2017-09-01

    Our previous experiments demonstrated that intravitreal injection of platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA) provides retinal ganglion cell (RGC) neuroprotection in a rodent model of glaucoma. Here we used PDGFRα-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) mice to identify retinal cells that may be essential for RGC protection by PDGF-AA. PDGFRα-EGFP mice expressing nuclear-targeted EGFP under the control of the PDGFRα promoter were used. Localization of PDGFRα in the neural retina was investigated by confocal imaging of EGFP fluorescence and immunofluorescent labeling with a panel of antibodies recognizing different retinal cell types. Primary cultures of mouse RGCs were produced by immunopanning. Neurobiotin injection of amacrine cells in a flat-mounted retina was used for the identification of EGFP-positive amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer. In the mouse neural retina, PDGFRα was preferentially localized in the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers. Immunostaining of the retina demonstrated that astrocytes in the ganglion cell layer and a subpopulation of amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer express PDGFRα, whereas RGCs (in vivo or in vitro) did not. PDGFRα-positive amacrine cells are likely to be Type 45 gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) wide-field amacrine cells. These data indicate that the neuroprotective effect of PDGF-AA in a rodent model of glaucoma could be mediated by astrocytes and/or a subpopulation of amacrine cells. We suggest that after intravitreal injection of PDGF-AA, these cells secrete factors protecting RGCs.

  14. Globular Cluster Photometry with the Hubble Space Telescope. VII. Color Gradients and Blue Stragglers in the Central Region of M30 from Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Webster, Zodiac T.; Yanny, Brian; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, John N.

    1998-10-01

    We present F555W (V), F439W (B), and F336W (U) photometry of 9507 stars in the central 2' of the dense, post-core-collapse cluster M30 (NGC 7099) derived from Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images. These data are used to study the mix of stellar populations in the central region of the cluster. Forty-eight blue straggler stars are identified; they are found to be strongly concentrated toward the cluster center. The specific frequency of blue stragglers, F_BSS = N(BSS)/N(V responsible for about half of the observed color gradient; the rest of the gradient is caused by the relative underabundance of faint red main-sequence stars near the cluster center (presumably a result of mass segregation). The luminosity function of M30's evolved stars does not match the luminosity function shape derived from standard stellar evolutionary models: the ratio of the number of bright giants to the number of turnoff stars in the cluster is 30% higher than predicted by the model (3.8 sigma effect), roughly independent of red giant brightness over the range M_V = -2 to +2. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Lick Observatory Bulletin No. 1377.

  15. The Adaptive Optics Facility: Commissioning Progress and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, R.; Madec, P.-Y.; Vernet, E.; Hackenberg, W.; La Penna, P.; Paufique, J.; Kuntschner, H.; Pirard, J.-F.; Kolb, J.; Hubin, N.

    2017-06-01

    All the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) subsystems are now in Paranal and the project team is working on commissioning activities on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4) of the Very Large Telescope. Excellent progress has been made; the new secondary mirror unit, the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM), was installed in October 2016 and UT4 is now operating routinely with the DSM in non-adaptive optics mode. The other modules of the AOF, the Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive optiCs for Spectroscopic Imaging (GALACSI), the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) and the GRound-layer Adaptive optics Assisted by Lasers (GRAAL), have been installed and are being qualified. The coupling with the High Acuity Wide field K-band Imager (HAWK-I) and the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) has been tested and all elements are functional and ready to proceed with their full commissioning. The goal for the AOF is to complete GALACSI wide-field mode technical commissioning by the end of summer 2017 and the GRAAL ground-layer adaptive optics mode by the end of the year.

  16. GEANT4 used for neutron beam design of a neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouardi, A.; Machmach, A.; Alami, R.; Bensitel, A.; Hommada, A.

    2011-09-01

    Neutron imaging has a broad scope of applications and has played a pivotal role in visualizing and quantifying hydrogenous masses in metallic matrices. The field continues to expand into new applications with the installation of new neutron imaging facilities. In this scope, a neutron imaging facility for computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography is currently being developed around 2.0MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear Research Center in Morocco (Reuscher et al., 1990 [1]; de Menezes et al., 2003 [2]; Deinert et al., 2005 [3]). The neutron imaging facility consists of neutron collimator, real-time neutron imaging system and imaging process systems. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the tangential channel was selected. For power of 250 kW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux measured at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 3×10 11 ncm 2/s. This facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with two circular diaphragms with diameters of 4 and 2 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio of 165 and 325, respectively. These diaphragms' sizes allow reaching a compromise between good flux and efficient L/D-ratio. Convergent-divergent collimator geometry has been adopted. The beam line consists of a gamma filter, fast neutrons filter, neutron moderator, neutron and gamma shutters, biological shielding around the collimator and several stages of neutron collimator. Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 were used to design the neutron beam line ( http://www.info.cern.ch/asd/geant4/geant4.html[4]). To enhance the neutron thermal beam in terms of quality, several materials, mainly bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) were examined as gamma and neutron filters respectively. The GEANT4 simulations showed that the gamma and epithermal and fast neutron could be filtered using the bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) filters, respectively. To get a good cadmium ratio, GEANT 4 simulations were used to

  17. THE LOW-FREQUENCY CHARACTERISTICS OF PSR J0437–4715 OBSERVED WITH THE MURCHISON WIDE-FIELD ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; Tingay, S. J.; Oronsaye, S.; Emrich, D. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Deshpande, A. A. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Van Straten, W.; Briggs, F. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Bernardi, G. [Square Kilometre Array South Africa, 3rd Floor, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa); Bowman, J. D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E. [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Goeke, R.; Hewitt, J. N. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Greenhill, L. J.; Kasper, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hazelton, B. J. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Johnston-Hollitt, M. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Kaplan, D. L. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); and others

    2014-08-20

    We report on the detection of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437–4715 with the Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) at a frequency of 192 MHz. Our observations show rapid modulations of pulse intensity in time and frequency that arise from diffractive scintillation effects in the interstellar medium (ISM), as well as prominent drifts of intensity maxima in the time-frequency plane that arise from refractive effects. Our analysis suggests that the scattering screen is located at a distance of ∼80-120 pc from the Sun, in disagreement with a recent claim that the screen is closer (∼10 pc). Comparisons with higher frequency data from Parkes reveal a dramatic evolution of the pulse profile with frequency, with the outer conal emission becoming comparable in strength to that from the core and inner conal regions. As well as demonstrating the high time resolution science capabilities currently possible with the MWA, our observations underscore the potential to conduct low-frequency investigations of timing-array millisecond pulsars, which may lead to increased sensitivity in the detection of nanoHertz gravitational waves via the accurate characterization of ISM effects.

  18. An experiment in big data: storage, querying and visualisation of data taken from the Liverpool Telescope's wide field cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsley, R. M.; Steele, Iain A.; Smith, R. J.; Mawson, Neil R.

    2014-07-01

    The Small Telescopes Installed at the Liverpool Telescope (STILT) project has been in operation since March 2009, collecting data with three wide field unfiltered cameras: SkycamA, SkycamT and SkycamZ. To process the data, a pipeline was developed to automate source extraction, catalogue cross-matching, photometric calibration and database storage. In this paper, modifications and further developments to this pipeline will be discussed, including a complete refactor of the pipeline's codebase into Python, migration of the back-end database technology from MySQL to PostgreSQL, and changing the catalogue used for source cross-matching from USNO-B1 to APASS. In addition to this, details will be given relating to the development of a preliminary front-end to the source extracted database which will allow a user to perform common queries such as cone searches and light curve comparisons of catalogue and non-catalogue matched objects. Some next steps and future ideas for the project will also be presented.

  19. Cross-Comparative Analysis of GF-1 Wide Field View and Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X.-Q.; Gu, X.-F.; Meng, Q.-Y.; Yu, T.; Jia, K.; Zhan, Y.-L.; Wang, Ch.-M.

    2017-11-01

    The wide field view (WFV) sensor on-board GF-1 satellite can acquire multi-spectral data with moderate spatial resolution, which holds great potential for monitoring the Earth's surface. This study assesses WFV data through cross-comparison of spectral band reflectances and vegetation indices with Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) data. The four vegetation indices considered in this study are the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), the enhanced vegetation index (EVI), the ratio vegetation index (RVI), and the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI). The R2 between the WFV and ETM+ data were 0.82, 0.89, 0.92, and 0.80 for the blue, green, red, and near-infrared bands reflectance, and 0.90, 0.84, 0.83, and 0.91 for NDVI, EVI, RVI, and SAVI, respectively. The results displayed a high correlation between the spectral reflectances and vegetation indices of the two sensors' data, which indicated the reliability of the WFV data. Furthermore, the WFV data were better than the ETM+ data with regards to spatial and temporal resolutions.

  20. Measuring galaxy [O ii] emission line doublet with future ground-based wide-field spectroscopic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparat, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Bacon, Roland; Mostek, Nick J.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Schlegel, David J.; Yèche, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    The next generation of wide-field spectroscopic redshift surveys will map the large-scale galaxy distribution in the redshift range 0.7 ≤ z ≤ 2 to measure baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO). The primary optical signature used in this redshift range comes from the [Oii] emission line doublet, which provides a unique redshift identification that can minimize confusion with other single emission lines. To derive the required spectrograph resolution for these redshift surveys, we simulate observations of the [Oii] (λλ 3727, 3729) doublet for various instrument resolutions, and line velocities. We foresee two strategies for the choice of the resolution for future spectrographs for BAO surveys. For bright [Oii] emitter surveys ([Oii] flux ~30 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 like SDSS-IV/eBOSS), a resolution of R ~ 3300 allows the separation of 90 percent of the doublets. The impact of the sky lines on the completeness in redshift is less than 6 percent. For faint [Oii] emitter surveys ([Oii] flux ~10 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 like DESi), the detection improves continuously with resolution, so we recommend the highest possible resolution, the limit being given by the number of pixels (4k by 4k) on the detector and the number of spectroscopic channels (2 or 3).

  1. Facile synthesis of fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres and their application for potential drug delivery and live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ruimin; Liu, Shanhu

    2012-05-01

    Fabrication of intrinsically fluorescent porous nanocarriers that are simultaneously stable in aqueous solutions and photostable is critical for their application in drug delivery and optical imaging but remains a challenge. In this study, fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres were synthesized by a facile gum arabic-assisted hydrothermal procedure. The morphology, composition and properties of the nanospheres have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, fourier transform infrared spectrograph, optical measurement, dynamic light scattering, and cytotoxicity assay. They exhibit larger surface area, excellent colloidal stability, photostable fluorescent signals, and good biocompatibility, which makes them promising hosts for drug delivery and cellular imaging. The fluorescent dye safranine-T was employed as a drug model and loaded into the porous nanospheres, which were delivered to human cervical cancer HeLa cells in vitro for live cell imaging.Fabrication of intrinsically fluorescent porous nanocarriers that are simultaneously stable in aqueous solutions and photostable is critical for their application in drug delivery and optical imaging but remains a challenge. In this study, fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres were synthesized by a facile gum arabic-assisted hydrothermal procedure. The morphology, composition and properties of the nanospheres have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, fourier transform infrared spectrograph, optical measurement, dynamic light scattering, and cytotoxicity assay. They exhibit larger surface area, excellent colloidal stability, photostable fluorescent signals, and good biocompatibility, which makes them promising

  2. Facile synthesis of Gd-doped CdTe quantum dots with optimized properties for optical/MR multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zizhen; Dergham, Ali; McCulloch, Holly; Qin, Yubo; Yang, Xiuying; Zhang, Jingchang; Cao, Xudong

    2017-12-01

    Each imaging modality has its own merits and intrinsic limitations; therefore, combining two or more complementary imaging modalities has become an interesting area of research. Recently, magnetic ion-doped quantum dots have become an increasingly promising class of optical/magnetic resonance multimodal imaging probes due to their excellent physical and chemical properties. In this work, Gd-doped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were successfully synthesized via a facile one-step refluxing route,and their optimal synthesis conditions were investigated. The prepared CdTe:Gd QDs were shown to exhibit good optical properties with high quantum yields up to 69%, high longitudinal relaxivity (r 1 = 3.8 mM-1 s-1), and good crystalline structures. In addition, after further QD surface modification with dextran amine (DA), the resulting DA-modified QDs (i.e. DA-CdTe:Gd QDs) showed strong magnetic resonance imaging contrast (r 1 = 3.5 mM-1 s-1) and improved biocompatibility when tested with cell cultures in vitro. Taken together, this new material demonstrated promising performances for both optical and magnetic resonance imaging modalities, suggesting its promising potential applications in non-invasive imaging, particularly in neuronal tracing.

  3. Facile synthesis of CdTe@GdS fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted dual-modal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Kong, Xiu-Qi; Li, Qiong; Sun, Ting-Ting; Chai, Chao; Shen, Wen; Hong, Zhang-Yong; He, Xi-Wen; Li, Wen-You; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal imaging has made great contribution for diagnosis and therapy of disease since it can provide more effective and complementary information in comparison to any single imaging modality. The design and fabrication of fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles for multimodal imaging has rapidly developed over the years. Herein, we demonstrate the facile synthesis of GdS coated CdTe nanoparticles (CdTe@GdS NPs) as multimodal agents for fluorescence (FL) and T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These nanoparticles obtain both prominent fluorescent and paramagnetic properties by coating the GdS shell on the surface of CdTe core via a simple room-temperature route in aqueous solution directly. It is shown that the as-prepared CdTe@GdS NPs have high quantum yield (QY) value of 12% and outstanding longitudinal relaxation rate (r1) of 11.25 mM s(-1), which allow them to be employed as FL/MR dual-modal imaging contrast agents. They also exhibit small particle size of 5 nm, excellent colloidal stability and low cellular toxicity for concentrations up to 750 μg mL(-1). In addition, with the conjugation of folic acid, the nanoparticles were successfully used for tumor-targeted FL/MR dual-modal imaging in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Optical transmission of glass for the National Ignition Facility near backscatter imagers under x-ray exposurea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, R. A.; Froula, D. H.; Sorce, C. M.; Moody, J. D.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Jones, O. S.; Meezan, N. B.; Rosen, M. D.

    2008-10-01

    In experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the near backscatter imager materials need to maintain high optical transmission while exposed to hohlraum generated x rays. Glass plates are incorporated in the design to protect the optical scattering plates from x-ray damage. Radiation environments spanning those expected on NIF have been produced at the Omega Laser Facility by symmetric laser illumination of 1mm sized gold spheres. The time-dependent ultraviolet transmission of sample glass plates was measured. The data are interpreted with a free electron absorption model. Combined with the simulations of the hohlraum x-ray emission, this model is used to predict the transmission of the glass plates on the NIF. We predict that the plates should perform adequately up to the peak of the laser pulse.

  5. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Buecherl, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Zou, Y., E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Guo, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-09-21

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  6. Design, construction, and demonstration of a neutron beamline and a neutron imaging facility at a Mark-I TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Aaron E.

    The fleet of research and training reactors is aging, and no new research reactors are planned in the United States. Thus, there is a need to expand the capabilities of existing reactors to meet users' needs. While many research reactors have beam port facilities, the original design of the United States Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (GSTR) did not include beam ports. The MInes NEutron Radiography (MINER) facility developed by this thesis and installed at the GSTR provides new capabilities for both researchers and students at the Colorado School of Mines. The facility consists of a number of components, including a neutron beamline and beamstop, an optical table, an experimental enclosure and associated interlocks, a computer control system, a multi-channel plate imaging detector, and the associated electronics. The neutron beam source location, determined through Monte Carlo modeling, provides the best mixture of high neutron flux, high thermal neutron content, and low gamma radiation content. A Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the neutron beam provides researchers with a tool for designing experiments before placing objects in the neutron beam. Experimental multi-foil activation results, compared to calculated multi-foil activation results, verify the model. The MCNP model predicts a neutron beamline flux of 2.2*106 +/- 6.4*105 n/cm2-s based on a source particle rate determined from the foil activation experiments when the reactor is operating at a power of 950 kWt with the beam shutter fully open. The average cadmium ratio of the beamline is 7.4, and the L/D of the neutron beam is approximately 200+/-10. Radiographs of a sensitivity indicator taken using both the digital detector and the transfer foil method provide one demonstration of the radiographic capabilities of the new facility. Calibration fuel pins manufactured using copper and stainless steel surrogate fuel pellets provide additional specimens for demonstration of the new facility and offer a

  7. Quantitative analysis of wide field-of-view and broadband quarter-wave plate based on metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanjun; Guo, Zhe; Liu, Ke; Liu, Lihui; Li, Yanqiu

    2018-01-01

    As the numerical aperture (NA) of the projection objective increases continually and the exposure pattern feature size decreases gradually, the polarization illumination is introduced into the lithography system. Therefore, it is necessary to design a wide field-of-view (FOV) wave plate to eliminate the effect of oblique incident light on the phase delay of the traditional zero order wave plate effectively. The quarter-wave plate with 20° FOV based on birefringent optical crystals has been designed in our laboratory by Dong et al. In order to obtain a wider FOV, we explore a previously reported Ag patch ultrathin quarter-wave plate whose performances were not analyzed by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In this paper, we mainly investigate three performances of the Ag patch quarter-wave plate consisting of FOV, achromatic band and achromatic band transmission. The simulation results indicate that when phase difference error is controlled at +/-2° (1) the range of FOV of the quarter-wave plate is +/-29° at 632nm; (2) the achromatic band ranges from 618nm to 658nm at normal incidence; (3) the achromatic band transmission ranges from 11% to 30%. Compared with the traditional wave plate made of birefringent crystals, the achromatic band and transmission is slightly lower but the FOV of this quarter-wave plate is much wider. Thus, this Ag patch nanoscale wide FOV quarter-wave plate can be effectively used in high NA lithography projection exposure systems to reduce the polarization aberration caused by oblique incidence of light.

  8. Detector Control and Data Acquisition for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) with a Custom ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian S.; Loose, Markus; Alkire, Greg; Joshi, Atul; Kelly, Daniel; Siskind, Eric; Rossetti, Dino; Mah, Jonathan; Cheng, Edward; Miko, Laddawan; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will have the largest near-IR focal plane ever flown by NASA, a total of 18 4K x 4K devices. The project has adopted a system-level approach to detector control and data acquisition where 1) control and processing intelligence is pushed into components closer to the detector to maximize signal integrity, 2) functions are performed at the highest allowable temperatures, and 3) the electronics are designed to ensure that the intrinsic detector noise is the limiting factor for system performance. For WFIRST, the detector arrays operate at 90 to 100 K, the detector control and data acquisition functions are performed by a custom ASIC at 150 to 180 K, and the main data processing electronics are at the ambient temperature of the spacecraft, notionally approx.300 K. The new ASIC is the main interface between the cryogenic detectors and the warm instrument electronics. Its single-chip design provides basic clocking for most types of hybrid detectors with CMOS ROICs. It includes a flexible but simple-to-program sequencer, with the option of microprocessor control for more elaborate readout schemes that may be data-dependent. All analog biases, digital clocks, and analog-to-digital conversion functions are incorporated and are connected to the nearby detectors with a short cable that can provide thermal isolation. The interface to the warm electronics is simple and robust through multiple LVDS channels. It also includes features that support parallel operation of multiple ASICs to control detectors that may have more capability or requirements than can be supported by a single chip.

  9. Atmospheric characterization of five hot Jupiters with the wide field Camera 3 on the Hubble space telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Désert, Jean-Michel [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Mandell, Avi M., E-mail: sranjan@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    We probe the structure and composition of the atmospheres of five hot Jupiter exoplanets using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. We use the G141 grism (1.1-1.7 μm) to study TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b in transit; TrES-3b in secondary eclipse; and WASP-4b in both. This wavelength region includes a predicted absorption feature from water at 1.4 μm, which we expect to be nondegenerate with the other molecules that are likely to be abundant for hydrocarbon-poor (e.g., solar composition) hot Jupiter atmospheres. We divide our wavelength regions into 10 bins. For each bin we produce a spectrophotometric light curve spanning the time of transit or eclipse. We correct these light curves for instrumental systematics without reference to an instrument model. For our transmission spectra, our mean 1σ precision per bin corresponds to variations of 2.1, 2.8, and 3.0 atmospheric scale heights for TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b, respectively. We find featureless spectra for these three planets. We are unable to extract a robust transmission spectrum for WASP-4b. For our dayside emission spectra, our mean 1σ precision per bin corresponds to a planet-to-star flux ratio of 1.5 × 10{sup –4} and 2.1 × 10{sup –4} for WASP-4b and TrES-3b, respectively. We combine these estimates with previous broadband measurements and conclude that for both planets isothermal atmospheres are disfavored. We find no signs of features due to water. We confirm that WFC3 is suitable for studies of transiting exoplanets, but in staring mode multivisit campaigns are necessary to place strong constraints on water abundance.

  10. Atmospheric Characterization of Five Hot Jupiters with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Deming, Drake; Wilkins, Ashlee; Mandell, Avi M.

    2014-01-01

    We probe the structure and composition of the atmospheres of five hot Jupiter exoplanets using the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument. We use the G141 grism (1.1-1.7 micrometers) to study TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b in transit; TrES-3b in secondary eclipse; and WASP-4b in both. This wavelength region includes a predicted absorption feature from water at 1.4 micrometers, which we expect to be nondegenerate with the other molecules that are likely to be abundant for hydrocarbon-poor (e.g., solar composition) hot Jupiter atmospheres. We divide our wavelength regions into 10 bins. For each bin we produce a spectrophotometric light curve spanning the time of transit or eclipse. We correct these light curves for instrumental systematics without reference to an instrument model. For our transmission spectra, our mean 1s precision per bin corresponds to variations of 2.1, 2.8, and 3.0 atmospheric scale heights for TrES-2b, TrES-4b, and CoRoT-1b, respectively. We find featureless spectra for these three planets. We are unable to extract a robust transmission spectrum for WASP-4b. For our dayside emission spectra, our mean 1 sigma precision per bin corresponds to a planet-to-star flux ratio of 1.5 x 10(exp -4) and 2.1 x 10(exp -4) for WASP-4b and TrES-3b, respectively. We combine these estimates with previous broadband measurements and conclude that for both planets isothermal atmospheres are disfavored. We find no signs of features due to water. We confirm that WFC3 is suitable for studies of transiting exoplanets, but in staring mode multivisit campaigns are necessary to place strong constraints on water abundance.

  11. Transfer, Imaging, and Analysis Plate for Facile Handling of 384 Hanging Drop 3D Tissue Spheroids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Salomonsson, Emma; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    .... Using the TRIM plate, we demonstrated several downstream analyses, including bulk tissue collection for flow cytometry, high-resolution low working-distance immersion imaging, and timely reagent...

  12. The Crystal Backlighter Imager: a spherically-bent crystal imager for radiography on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Gareth; Krauland, Christine; Buscho, Justin; Hibbard, Robin; McCarville, Thomas; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Ayers, Shannon; Kalantar, Daniel; Kohut, Thomas; Kemp, G. Elijah; Bradley, David; Bell, Perry; Landen, Otto; Brewster, Nathaniel; Piston, Kenneth

    2017-10-01

    The Crystal Backlighter Imager (CBI) is a quasi-monochromatic, near-normal incidence, spherically-bent crystal imager being developed for the NIF, which will allow ICF capsule implosions to be radiographed close to stagnation for the first time. This has not been possible using the previous pinhole-based area-backlighter configuration, as the self-emission from the capsule hotspot overwhelms the backlighter in the final stages of the implosion. CBI mitigates the broadband self-emission from the capsule hot spot by using the extremely narrow bandwidth (a few eV) inherent to imagers based on near-normal-incidence Bragg x-ray optics. The development of a diagnostic with the capability to image the capsule during the final stages of the implosion (r less than 200um) is important, as it will allow the shape, integrity and density of the shell to be measured, and will allow the evolution of features, such as the fill tube and capsule support structure, to be imaged close to bang time. The concept and operation of the 11.6keV CBI diagnostic will be discussed, and the first results from experiments on the NIF will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Signal-to-noise characterization of time-gated intensifiers used for wide-field time-domain FLIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinty, J; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Talbot, C B; Dunsby, C; Neil, M A A; French, P M W [Photonics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Kellett, P A; Hares, J D, E-mail: james.mcginty@imperial.ac.u [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Isis Building, Howbery Park, Wallingford, OX10 8BA (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-07

    Time-gated imaging using gated optical intensifiers provides a means to realize high speed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for the study of fast events and for high throughput imaging. We present a signal-to-noise characterization of CCD-coupled micro-channel plate gated intensifiers used with this technique and determine the optimal acquisition parameters (intensifier gain voltage, CCD integration time and frame averaging) for measuring mono-exponential fluorescence lifetimes in the shortest image acquisition time for a given signal flux. We explore the use of unequal CCD integration times for different gate delays and show that this can improve the lifetime accuracy for a given total acquisition time.

  14. Report of the facility definition team spacelab UV-Optical Telescope Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Scientific requirements for the Spacelab Ultraviolet-Optical Telescope (SUOT) facility are presented. Specific programs involving high angular resolution imagery over wide fields, far ultraviolet spectroscopy, precisely calibrated spectrophotometry and spectropolarimetry over a wide wavelength range, and planetary studies, including high resolution synoptic imagery, are recommended. Specifications for the mounting configuration, instruments for the mounting configuration, instrument mounting system, optical parameters, and the pointing and stabilization system are presented. Concepts for the focal plane instruments are defined. The functional requirements of the direct imaging camera, far ultraviolet spectrograph, and the precisely calibrated spectrophotometer are detailed, and the planetary camera concept is outlined. Operational concepts described in detail are: the makeup and functions of shuttle payload crew, extravehicular activity requirements, telescope control and data management, payload operations control room, orbital constraints, and orbital interfaces (stabilization, maneuvering requirements and attitude control, contamination, utilities, and payload weight considerations).

  15. The PixFEL project: Progress towards a fine pitch X-ray imaging camera for next generation FEL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    The INFN PixFEL project is developing the fundamental building blocks for a large area X-ray imaging camera to be deployed at next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities with unprecedented intensity. Improvement in performance beyond the state of art in imaging instrumentation will be explored adopting advanced technologies like active edge sensors, a 65 nm node CMOS process and vertical integration. These are the key ingredients of the PixFEL project to realize a seamless large area focal plane instrument composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. In order to minimize the dead area and reduce ambiguities in image reconstruction, a fine pitch active edge thick sensor is being optimized to cope with very high intensity photon flux, up to 104 photons per pixel, in the range from 1 to 10 keV. A low noise analog front-end channel with this wide dynamic range and a novel dynamic compression feature, together with a low power 10 bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, has been realized in a 110 μm pitch with a 65 nm CMOS process. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be also explored in the future to build a four-side buttable readout chip with high density memories. In the long run the objective of the PixFEL project is to build a flexible X-ray imaging camera for operation both in burst mode, like at the European X-FEL, or in continuous mode with the high frame rates anticipated for future FEL facilities.

  16. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

    2012-05-01

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

  17. A Micromegas Detector for Neutron Beam Imaging at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviani, M; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Giomataris, Y; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Iguaz, F J; Kebbiri, M; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Tsinganis, A; Vlachoudis, V; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Corté-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Marítnez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A J M; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors are gas detectors consisting of a stack of one ionization and one proportional chamber. A micromesh separates the two communicating regions, where two different electric fields establish respectively a charge drift and a charge multiplication regime. The n\\_TOF facility at CERN provides a white neutron beam (from thermal up to GeV neutrons) for neutron induced cross section measurements. These measurements need a perfect knowlodge of the incident neutron beam, in particular regarding its spatial profile. A position sensitive micromegas detector equipped with a B-10 based neutron/charged particle converter has been extensively used at the n\\_TOF facility for characterizing the neutron beam profile and extracting the beam interception factor for samples of different size. The boron converter allowed to scan the energy region of interest for neutron induced capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy, determined by the time of flight. Experimental ...

  18. Facile Fabrication of Animal-Specific Positioning Molds For Multi-modality Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Oh, Ji Eun; Woo, Seung Tae [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-10-15

    Recently multi-modal imaging system has become widely adopted in molecular imaging. We tried to fabricate animal-specific positioning molds for PET/MR fusion imaging using easily available molding clay and rapid foam. The animal-specific positioning molds provide immobilization and reproducible positioning of small animal. Herein, we have compared fiber-based molding clay with rapid foam in fabricating the molds of experimental animal. The round bottomed-acrylic frame, which fitted into microPET gantry, was prepared at first. The experimental mice was anesthetized and placed on the mold for positioning. Rapid foam and fiber-based clay were used to fabricate the mold. In case of both rapid foam and the clay, the experimental animal needs to be pushed down smoothly into the mold for positioning. However, after the mouse was removed, the fabricated clay needed to be dried completely at 60 .deg. C in oven overnight for hardening. Four sealed pipe tips containing [{sup 18}F]FDG solution were used as fiduciary markers. After injection of [{sup 18}F]FDG via tail vein, microPET scanning was performed. Successively, MRI scanning was followed in the same animal. Animal-specific positioning molds were fabricated using rapid foam and fiber-based molding clay for multimodality imaging. Functional and anatomical images were obtained with microPET and MRI, respectively. The fused PET/MR images were obtained using freely available AMIDE program. Animal-specific molds were successfully prepared using easily available rapid foam, molding clay and disposable pipet tips. Thanks to animal-specific molds, fusion images of PET and MR were co-registered with negligible misalignment.

  19. A Micromegas Detector for Neutron Beam Imaging at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Giomataris, Y.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Iguaz, F. J.; Kebbiri, M.; Pancin, J.; Papaevangelou, T.; Tsinganis, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Cortés, G.; Corté-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Gurusamy, P.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Marítnez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T. J.; Žugec, P.

    2014-05-01

    Micromegas (Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors are gas detectors consisting of a stack of one ionization and one proportional chamber. A micromesh separates the two communicating regions, where two different electric fields establish respectively a charge drift and a charge multiplication regime. The n_TOF facility at CERN provides a white neutron beam (from thermal up to GeV neutrons) for neutron induced cross section measurements. These measurements need a perfect knowlodge of the incident neutron beam, in particular regarding its spatial profile. A position sensitive micromegas detector equipped with a 10B based neutron/charged particle converter has been extensively used at the n_TOF facility for characterizing the neutron beam profile and extracting the beam interception factor for samples of different size. The boron converter allowed to scan the energy region of interest for neutron induced capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy, determined by the time of flight. Experimental results will be presented and compared to simulations, performed by means of the FLUKA code.

  20. Image analysis algorithms for the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) grating tilt sensor at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Bliss, Erlan S.; Rushford, Michael C.; Halpin, John M.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Leach, Richard R.

    2014-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system designed to produce a sequence of short pulses used to backlight imploding fuel capsules. Laser pulses from a short-pulse oscillator are dispersed in wavelength into long, low-power pulses, injected in the NIF main laser for amplification, and then compressed into high-power pulses before being directed into the NIF target chamber. In the target chamber, the laser pulses hit targets which produce x-rays used to backlight imploding fuel capsules. Compression of the ARC laser pulses is accomplished with a set of precision-surveyed optical gratings mounted inside of vacuum vessels. The tilt of each grating is monitored by a measurement system consisting of a laser diode, camera and crosshair, all mounted in a pedestal outside of the vacuum vessel, and a mirror mounted on the back of a grating inside the vacuum vessel. The crosshair is mounted in front of the camera, and a diffraction pattern is formed when illuminated with the laser diode beam reflected from the mirror. This diffraction pattern contains information related to relative movements between the grating and the pedestal. Image analysis algorithms have been developed to determine the relative movements between the gratings and pedestal. In the paper we elaborate on features in the diffraction pattern, and describe the image analysis algorithms used to monitor grating tilt changes. Experimental results are provided which indicate the high degree of sensitivity provided by the tilt sensor and image analysis algorithms.

  1. Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

    2007-08-21

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS

  2. Unsupervised Semantic Labeling Framework for Identification of Complex Facilities in High-resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear proliferation is a major national security concern for many countries. Existing feature extraction and classification approaches are not suitable for monitoring proliferation activity using high-resolution multi-temporal remote sensing imagery. In this paper we present an unsupervised semantic labeling framework based on the Latent Dirichlet Allocation method. This framework is used to analyze over 70 images collected under different spatial and temporal settings over the globe representing two major semantic categories: nuclear and coal power plants. Initial experimental results show a reasonable discrimination of these two categories even though they share highly overlapping and common objects. This research also identified several research challenges associated with nuclear proliferation monitoring using high resolution remote sensing images.

  3. Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emission of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Robert; Celeste, John; Celliers, Peter; Frogget, Brent; Robert Guyton,,; Kaufman, Morris; Lee, Tony; MacGowan, Brian; Ng, Edmend; Reinbachs, Imants; Robinson, Ronald; Tunnell, Thomas; Watts, Phillip

    2007-08-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 m. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  4. Optical Alignment Techniques for Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometry and Line-Imaging Self-Emission of Targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, R M; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Frogget, B .; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M I; Lee, T L; MacGowan, B J; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W

    2007-07-31

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 meters. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  5. Exploring the NRO Opportunity for a Hubble-Sized Wide-Field Near-IR Space Telescope - New WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Alan; Spergel, David; Mountain, Matt; Postman, Mark; Elliott, Erin; Bendek, Eduardo; Bennett, David; Dalcanton, Julianne; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; hide

    2013-01-01

    We discuss scientific, technical, and programmatic issues related to the use of an NRO 2.4m telescope for the WFIRST initiative of the 2010 Decadal Survey. We show that this implementation of WFIRST, which we call "NEW WFIRST," would achieve the goals of the NWNH Decadal Survey for the WFIRST core programs of Dark Energy and Microlensing Planet Finding, with the crucial benefit of deeper and/or wider near-IR surveys for GO science and a potentially Hubble-like Guest Observer program. NEW WFIRST could also include a coronagraphic imager for direct detection of dust disks and planets around neighboring stars, a high-priority science and technology precursor for future ambitious programs to image Earth-like planets around neighboring stars.

  6. The ESO Spectroscopic facility

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquini, Luca; Delabre, B.; Ellis, R. S.; Marrero, J.; L. Cavaller; de Zeeuw, Tim

    2017-01-01

    We present the concept of a novel facility dedicated to massively-multiplexed spectroscopy. The telescope has a very wide field Cassegrain focus optimised for fibre feeding. With a Field of View (FoV) of 2.5 degrees diameter and a 11.4m pupil, it will be the largest etendue telescope. The large focal plane can easily host up to 16.000 fibres. In addition, a gravity invariant focus for the central 10 arc-minutes is available to host a giant integral field unit (IFU). The 3 lenses corrector inc...

  7. Ground to on-orbit alignment study of the WFIRST wide-field channel and resulting changes in the telescope architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Armani, Nerses; Bartusek, Lisa; Casey, Tom; Content, Dave; Conturie, Yves; Gao, Guangjun; Jurling, Alden; Marx, Cathy; Marzouk, Joe; Pasquale, Bert; Smith, J. Scott; Tang, Hong; Whipple, Arthur

    2017-08-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission[1] is the top-ranked large space mission in the New Worlds, New Horizon (NWNH) Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics. WFIRST will settle essential questions in both exoplanet and dark energy research and will advance topics ranging from galaxy evolution to the study of objects within the galaxy. The WFIRST mission uses a repurposed 2.4-m Forward Optical Telescope assembly (FOA), which, when completed with new aft optics will be an Integrated Optical Assembly (IOA). WFIRST is equipped with a Wide Field Instrument (WFI) and a Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). An Instrument Carrier (IC) meters these payload elements together and to the spacecraft bus (S/C). A distributed ground system receives the data, uploads commands and software updates, and processes the data. After transition from the study phase, Pre-Phase-A (a.k.a., "Cycle 6") design to NASA Phase A formulation, a significant change to the IOA was initiated; including moving the tertiary mirror from the instrument package to a unified three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) placement, that provides a wide 0.28-sq° instrumented field of view to the Wide Field Instrument (WFI). In addition, separate relays from the primary and secondary mirror feed the Wide Field Instrument (WFI) and Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). During commissioning the telescope is aligned using wavefront sensing with the WFI[2]. A parametric and Monte-Carlo analysis was performed, which determined that alignment compensation with the secondary mirror alone degraded performance in the other instruments. This led to the addition of a second compensator in the WFI optical train to alleviate this concern. This paper discusses the trades and analyses that were performed and resulting changes to the WFIRST telescope architecture.

  8. KOALA, a wide-field 1000 element integral-field unit for the Anglo-Australian Telescope: assembly and commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelem, Ross; Brzeski, Jurek; Case, Scott; Churilov, Vladimir; Ellis, Simon; Farrell, Tony; Green, Andrew; Heng, Anthony; Horton, Anthony; Ireland, Michael; Jones, Damien; Klauser, Urs; Lawrence, Jon; Miziarski, Stan; Orr, David; Pai, Naveen; Staszak, Nick; Tims, Julia; Vuong, Minh; Waller, Lew; Xavier, Pascal

    2014-07-01

    The KOALA optical fibre feed for the AAOmega spectrograph has been commissioned at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The instrument samples the reimaged telescope focal plane at two scales: 1.23 arcsec and 0.70 arcsec per image slicing hexagonal lenslet over a 49x27 and 28x15 arcsec field of view respectively. The integral field unit consists of 2D hexagonal and circular lenslet arrays coupling light into 1000 fibres with 100 micron core diameter. The fibre run is over 35m long connecting the telescope Cassegrain focus with the bench mounted spectrograph room where all fibres are reformatted into a one-dimensional slit. Design and assembly of the KOALA components, engineering challenges encountered, and commissioning results are discussed.

  9. Fast, wide-field and distortion-free telescope with curved detectors for surveys at ultralow surface brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimov, Eduard; Valls-Gabaud, David; Lemaître, Gérard; Hugot, Emmanuel; Jahn, Wilfred; Lombardo, Simona; Wang, Xin; Vola, Pascal; Ferrari, Marc

    2017-11-01

    We present the design of an all-reflective, bifolded Schmidt telescope aimed at surveys of extended astronomical objects with extremely low surface brightness. The design leads to a high image quality without any diffracting spider, a large aperture and field of view (FoV), and a small central obstruction that barely alters the point spread function (PSF). As an example, we design a high-quality, 36 cm diameter, fast (f/2.5) telescope working in the visible with a large FoV (1.6°×2.6°). The telescope can operate with a curved detector (or with a flat detector with a field flattener) and a set of filters. The entrance mirror is anamorphic and replaces the classical Schmidt entrance corrector plate. We show that this anamorphic primary mirror can be manufactured through stress polishing, avoiding high spatial frequency errors, and testing with a simple interferometer scheme. This prototype is intended to serve as a fast-track scientific and technological pathfinder for the future space-based MESSIER mission.

  10. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  11. A Wide-Field View of Leo II: A Structural Analysis Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Matthew G.; Jordi, Katrin; Rix, Hans-Walter; Grebel, Eva K.; Koch, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    Using SDSS I data, we have analyzed the stellar distribution of the Leo II dwarf spheroidal galaxy (distance of 233 kpc) to search for evidence of tidal deformation. The existing SDSS photometric catalog contains gaps in regions of high stellar crowding, hence we filled the area at the center of Leo II using the DAOPHOT algorithm applied to the SDSS images. The combined DAOPHOT-SDSS data set contains three-filter photometry over a 4 × 4 deg2 region centered on Leo II. By defining a mask in three-filter color-magnitude space, we removed the majority of foreground field stars. We have measured the following Leo II structural parameters: a core radius of rc = 2.64' ± 0.19' (178 ± 13 pc), a tidal radius of rt = 9.33' ± 0.47' (632 ± 32 pc), and a total V-band luminosity of LV = (7.4 ± 2.0) × 105 Lodot (MV = -9.9 ± 0.3). Our comprehensive analysis of the Leo II structure did not reveal any significant signs of tidal distortion. The internal structure of this object contains only mild isophotal twisting. A small overdensity was discovered approximately 4.5 tidal radii from the Leo II center; however, we conclude that it is unlikely to be material tidally stripped from Leo II based on its stellar population and is most likely a foreground overdensity of stars. Our results indicate that the influence of the Galactic gravitational field on the structure of Leo II has been relatively mild. We rederived the mass-to-light ratio of this system using existing kinematic data combined with our improved structural measurements, and we favor the scenario in which Leo II is strongly dominated by dark matter with (M/L)V ~ 100 in solar units.

  12. Facile synthesis of RGD peptide-modified iron oxide nanoparticles with ultrahigh relaxivity for targeted MR imaging of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Li, Jingchao; Yang, Jia; Wei, Ping; Luo, Yu; Ding, Ling; Sun, Wenjie; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang; Shen, Mingwu

    2015-05-01

    We report the facile synthesis of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-targeted iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) with ultrahigh relaxivity for in vivo tumor magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In this study, stable polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated Fe3O4 NPs were first prepared by a mild reduction route. The formed aminated Fe3O4 NPs with PEI coating were sequentially conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-RGD segment, followed by acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines. The thus-formed Fe3O4@PEI·NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD NPs were characterized via different techniques. We show that the multifunctional RGD-targeted Fe3O4 NPs with a mean size of 9.1 nm are water-dispersible, colloidally stable, and hemocompatible and cytocompatible in the given concentration range. With the displayed ultrahigh r2 relaxivity (550.04 mM(-1) s(-1)) and RGD-mediated targeting specificity to αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells as confirmed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the developed multifunctional Fe3O4@PEI·NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD NPs are able to be used as a highly efficient nanoprobe for targeted MR imaging of αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo. Given the versatile PEI amine-enabled conjugation chemistry, the developed PEI-coated Fe3O4 NPs may be functionalized with other biological ligands or drugs for various biomedical applications, in particular, the diagnosis and therapy of different types of cancer.

  13. Facile synthesis of 5 nm NaYF₄:Yb/Er nanoparticles for targeted upconversion imaging of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yueli; Wu, Boyue; Jin, Qing; Wang, Xueyuan; Li, Yan; Sun, Yuxiu; Huo, Jianzhong; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2016-05-15

    5nm intense green emission NaYF4:Yb/Er upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with pure β phase was synthesized with a simple "green" strategy for the first time. Traditional organic solvothermal method is often applied to prepare the high-quality and uniform UCNPs, but the preparation of lanthanide-oleate complexes is laborious as heating and multistep post-treatment for purification are often required. The water-alcohols solvothermal method is environmentally friendly, but the fabricated UCNPs have big size, poor biocompatibility and high cytotoxicity, which limited their application for cell imaging. Herein, NaYF4:Yb/Er UCNPs were prepared with rare-earth nitrates RE(NO3)3 (RE=Y0.80 Yb0.18 Er0.02) as precursors and diethylene glycol (DEG)/ethylene glycol (EG)/water as the solvent. A facile green solvothermal method with the temperature being controlled at 300°C was developed. The as-prepared NaYF4:Yb/Er UCNPs were characterized and were found to have enhanced UC emission and controllable particle size. The as-prepared UCNPs were further functionalized via folic acid coating for the targeted imaging and improved bio- compatibility. It was made the UCNPs potential for upconversion bioimaging of living cells by the strong upconversion luminescence, the excellent biocompatibility, and the super-small size. The good colloidal stability and low cell cytotoxicity of the as-prepared UCNPs and the developed synthesis protocol might advance both the fields of UCNPs and biomolecule-based nanotechnology for future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of body image psychological flexibility on the treatment of eating disorders in a residential facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluett, E J; Lee, E B; Simone, M; Lockhart, G; Twohig, M P; Lensegrav-Benson, Tera; Quakenbush-Roberts, Benita

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether pre-treatment levels of psychological flexibility would longitudinally predict quality of life and eating disorder risk in patients at a residential treatment facility for eating disorders. Data on body image psychological flexibility, quality of life, and eating disorder risk were collected from 63 adolescent and 50 adult, female, residential patients (N=113) diagnosed with an eating disorder. These same measures were again collected at post-treatment. Sequential multiple regression analyses were performed to test whether pre-treatment levels of psychological flexibility longitudinally predicted quality of life and eating disorder risk after controlling for age and baseline effects. Pre-treatment psychological flexibility significantly predicted post-treatment quality of life with approximately 19% of the variation being attributable to age and pre-treatment psychological flexibility. Pre-treatment psychological flexibility also significantly predicted post-treatment eating disorder risk with nearly 30% of the variation attributed to age and pre-treatment psychological flexibility. This study suggests that levels of psychological flexibility upon entering treatment for an eating disorder longitudinally predict eating disorder outcome and quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Three New Cool Brown Dwarfs Discovered with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and an Improved Spectrum of the Y0 Dwarf WISE J041022.71+150248.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Michael C.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R.; Mace, Gregory N.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Gould, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    As part of a larger search of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data for cool brown dwarfs with effective temperatures less than 1000 K, we present the discovery of three new cool brown dwarfs with spectral types later than T7. Using low-resolution, near-infrared spectra obtained with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Hubble Space Telescope, we derive spectral types of T9.5 for WISE J094305.98+360723.5, T8 for WISE J200050.19+362950.1, and Y0: for WISE J220905.73+271143.9. The identification of WISE J220905.73+271143.9 as a Y dwarf brings the total number of spectroscopically confirmed Y dwarfs to 17. In addition, we present an improved spectrum (i.e., higher signal-to-noise ratio) of the Y0 dwarf WISE J041022.71+150248.4 that confirms the Cushing et al. classification of Y0. Spectrophotometric distance estimates place all three new brown dwarfs at distances less than 12 pc, with WISE J200050.19+362950.1 lying at a distance of only 3.9-8.0 pc. Finally, we note that brown dwarfs like WISE J200050.19+362950.1 that lie in or near the Galactic plane offer an exciting opportunity to directly measure the mass of a brown dwarf via astrometric microlensing.

  16. Three new cool brown dwarfs discovered with the wide-field infrared survey explorer (WISE) and an improved spectrum of the Y0 dwarf wise J041022.71+150248.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, Michael C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mace, Gregory N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Skrutskie, Michael F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Gould, Andrew, E-mail: michael.cushing@utoledo.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    As part of a larger search of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data for cool brown dwarfs with effective temperatures less than 1000 K, we present the discovery of three new cool brown dwarfs with spectral types later than T7. Using low-resolution, near-infrared spectra obtained with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Hubble Space Telescope, we derive spectral types of T9.5 for WISE J094305.98+360723.5, T8 for WISE J200050.19+362950.1, and Y0: for WISE J220905.73+271143.9. The identification of WISE J220905.73+271143.9 as a Y dwarf brings the total number of spectroscopically confirmed Y dwarfs to 17. In addition, we present an improved spectrum (i.e., higher signal-to-noise ratio) of the Y0 dwarf WISE J041022.71+150248.4 that confirms the Cushing et al. classification of Y0. Spectrophotometric distance estimates place all three new brown dwarfs at distances less than 12 pc, with WISE J200050.19+362950.1 lying at a distance of only 3.9-8.0 pc. Finally, we note that brown dwarfs like WISE J200050.19+362950.1 that lie in or near the Galactic plane offer an exciting opportunity to directly measure the mass of a brown dwarf via astrometric microlensing.

  17. The Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) Program: A Completely Automated System for Telescope Control, Wide-Field Imaging, and Object Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Rabinowitz, D. L.; Helin, E. F.; Lawrence, K. J.; Bambery, R. J.; Clark, C. C.; Groom, S. L.; Levin, S.; Lorre, J.; Shaklan, S. B.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) system operates autonomously at the Maui Space Surveillance Site on the summit of the extinct Haleakala Volcano Crater, Hawaii. The program began in December 1995 and continues with an observing run every month.

  18. Counting radon tracks in Makrofol detectors with the 'image reduction and analysis facility' (IRAF) software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, F. [Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Radioactividad Ambiental, Departamento de Medicina Fisica y Farmacologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38320 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)]. E-mail: fimerall@ull.es; Gonzalez-Manrique, S. [Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Radioactividad Ambiental, Departamento de Medicina Fisica y Farmacologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38320 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Karlsson, L. [Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Radioactividad Ambiental, Departamento de Medicina Fisica y Farmacologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38320 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Hernandez-Armas, J. [Laboratorio de Fisica Medica y Radioactividad Ambiental, Departamento de Medicina Fisica y Farmacologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38320 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Aparicio, A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna. Avenida. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2007-03-15

    Makrofol detectors are commonly used for long-term radon ({sup 222}Rn) measurements in houses, schools and workplaces. The use of this type of passive detectors for the determination of radon concentrations requires the counting of the nuclear tracks produced by alpha particles on the detecting material. The 'image reduction and analysis facility' (IRAF) software package is a piece of software commonly used in astronomical applications. It allows detailed counting and mapping of sky sections where stars are grouped very closely, even forming clusters. In order to count the nuclear tracks in our Makrofol radon detectors, we have developed an inter-disciplinary application that takes advantage of the similitude that exist between counting stars in a dark sky and tracks in a track-etch detector. Thus, a low cost semi-automatic system has been set up in our laboratory which utilises a commercially available desktop scanner and the IRAF software package. A detailed description of the proposed semi-automatic method and its performance, in comparison to ocular counting, is described in detail here. In addition, the calibration factor for this procedure, 2.97+/-0.07kBqm{sup -3}htrack{sup -1}cm{sup 2}, has been calculated based on the results obtained from exposing 46 detectors to certified radon concentrations. Furthermore, the results of a preliminary radon survey carried out in 62 schools in Tenerife island (Spain), using Makrofol detectors, counted with the mentioned procedure, are briefly presented. The results reported here indicate that the developed procedure permits a fast, accurate and unbiased determination of the radon tracks in a large number of detectors. The measurements carried out in the schools showed that the radon concentrations in at least 12 schools were above 200Bqm{sup -3} and, in two of them, above 400Bqm{sup -3}. Further studies should be performed at those schools following the European Union recommendations about radon concentrations in

  19. Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emulsion of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert M. Malone, Brent C. Frogget, Morris I. Kaufman, Thomas W. Tunnell, Robert L. Guyton, Imants P. Reinbachs, Phillip W. Watts, et al.

    2007-08-31

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 69 feet. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. The orange alignment laser is introduced at the entrance to the two-level interferometer table and passes forward through the optical systems to the recording streak cameras. The red alignment laser is introduced in front of the recording streak cameras and passes in the reverse direction through all optical elements, out of the interferometer table, eventually reaching the target chamber center. Red laser wavelength is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of a special beamsplitter used to separate emission light from the Doppler-shifted interferometer light. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignments spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1- to 15-inch-diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-inch diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

  20. Design of 1-μm-pitch liquid crystal spatial light modulators having dielectric shield wall structure for holographic display with wide field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomae, Yoshitomo; Shibata, Yosei; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Fujikake, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    In the development of electronic holographic displays with a wide field of view, one issue is the realization of 1-μm-pitch spatial light modulators (SLMs) using liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) techniques. We clarified that it is necessary to suppress not only the leakage of fringe electric fields from adjacent pixels but also the effect of elastic forces in the liquid crystal to achieve full-phase modulation (2 π) in individual pixels. We proposed a novel LCOS-SLM with a dielectric shield wall structure, and achieved driving of individual 1-μm-pitch pixels. We also investigated the optimum values for width and dielectric constant of the wall structure when enlarging the area that can modulate light in the pixels. These results contribute to the design of 1-μm-pitch LCOS-SLM devices for wide-viewing-angle holographic displays.

  1. Optomechanical design concept for GMACS: a wide-field multi-object moderate resolution optical spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Stephen A.; Prochaska, Travis; Shectman, Stephen A.; Hammond, Randolph P.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; DePoy, D. L.; Marshall, J. L.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the conceptual optomechanical design for GMACS, a wide-field, multi-object, moderate-resolution optical spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). GMACS is a candidate first-light instrument for the GMT and will be one of several instruments housed in the Gregorian Instrument Rotator (GIR) located at the Gregorian focus. The instrument samples a 9 arcminute x 18 arcminute field of view providing two resolution modes (i.e, low resolution, R ~ 2000, and moderate resolution, R ~ 4000) over a 3700 Å to 10200 Å wavelength range. To minimize the size of the optics, four fold mirrors at the GMT focal plane redirect the full field into four individual "arms", that each comprises a double spectrograph with a red and blue channel. Hence, each arm samples a 4.5 arcminute x 9 arcminute field of view. The optical layout naturally leads to three separate optomechanical assemblies: a focal plane assembly, and two identical optics modules. The focal plane assembly contains the last element of the telescope's wide-field corrector, slit-mask, tent-mirror assembly, and slit-mask magazine. Each of the two optics modules supports two of the four instrument arms and houses the aft-optics (i.e. collimators, dichroics, gratings, and cameras). A grating exchange mechanism, and articulated gratings and cameras facilitate multiple resolution modes. In this paper we describe the details of the GMACS optomechanical design, including the requirements and considerations leading to the design, mechanism details, optics mounts, and predicted flexure performance.

  2. Analysis of the confluence of three patterns using the Centering and Pointing System (CAPS) images for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul; Bliss, Erlan; Roberts, Randy; Rushford, Michael; Wilhelmsen, Karl; Zobrist, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short pulses that generate X-rays which backlight highdensity internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Employing up to eight backlighters, ARC can produce an X-ray "motion picture" to diagnose the compression and ignition of a cryogenic deuterium-tritium target with tens-ofpicosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of an ICF shot. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. The function of the Centering and Pointing System (CAPS) in ARC is to provide superimposed near-field and far-field images on a common optical path. The Images are then analyzed to extract beam centering and pointing data for the control system. The images contain the confluence of pointing, centering, and reference patterns. The patterns may have uneven illumination, particularly when the laser is misaligned. In addition, the simultaneous appearance of three reference patterns may be co-incidental, possibly masking one or more of the patterns. Image analysis algorithms have been developed to determine the centering and pointing position of ARC from these images. In the paper we describe the image analysis algorithms used to detect and identify the centers of these patterns. Results are provided, illustrating how well the process meets system requirements.

  3. A high-speed two-frame, 1-2 ns gated X-ray CMOS imager used as a hohlraum diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Palmer, N.; Dayton, M.; Carpenter, A.; Schneider, M. B.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Claus, L. D.; Fang, L.; Hilsabeck, T.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kimmel, M. W.; Robertson, G.; Rochau, G.; Sanchez, M. O.; Stahoviak, J. W.; Trotter, D. C.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    A novel x-ray imager, which takes time-resolved gated images along a single line-of-sight, has been successfully implemented at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This Gated Laser Entrance Hole diagnostic, G-LEH, incorporates a high-speed multi-frame CMOS x-ray imager developed by Sandia National Laboratories to upgrade the existing Static X-ray Imager diagnostic at NIF. The new diagnostic is capable of capturing two laser-entrance-hole images per shot on its 1024 × 448 pixels photo-detector array, with integration times as short as 1.6 ns per frame. Since its implementation on NIF, the G-LEH diagnostic has successfully acquired images from various experimental campaigns, providing critical new information for understanding the hohlraum performance in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, such as the size of the laser entrance hole vs. time, the growth of the laser-heated gold plasma bubble, the change in brightness of inner beam spots due to time-varying cross beam energy transfer, and plasma instability growth near the hohlraum wall.

  4. Preparation and calibration of CsI photocathode and its x-ray imaging performance for high power laser interaction with Au foams at SGIII facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yukun; Fan, Long; Chen, Tao; Deng, Bo; Li, Jin; Deng, Keli; Hu, Xin

    2017-05-01

    We used a 300nm polycarbonate (PC) membrane as a supported structure and CsI photocathode was evaporated onto PC surface. The thickness of CsI can be controlled between 100 nm to 1 μm. The effects of deposition speed and deliquescence property on morphology and structure were analyzed. The photoelectric conversion properties of CsI films were analyzed with Manson X-ray source. The energy spectral response peak value of photocathode is above 3000μA/W calibrated at Beijing synchrotron radiation facility. The photocathode was applied to an X-ray streak camera on SG III facility and distinct x-ray images were captured.

  5. The impact of a final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel on a municipality`s image; Tutkimus loppusijoituslaitoksen vaikutuksista kuntien imagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankaanpaeae, H.; Haapavaara, L.; Lampinen, T

    1999-02-01

    The study comprised on one hand a nationwide telephone interview (totally 800 interviews) aimed at mapping out the current image of possible host municipalities to a final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel, and on the other hand some group interviews of people of another parish but of interest from the municipalities` point of view. The purpose of these group interviews was the same as that of the telephone interview, i.e. to find out what kind of an impact locating a final disposal facility of spent nuclear fuel in a certain municipality would have on the host municipality`s image. Because the groups interviewed were selected on different grounds the results of the interviews are not fully comparable. The most important result of the study is that the current attitude towards a final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel is calm and collected and that the matter is often considered from the standpoint of an outsider. The issue is easily ignored, classified as a matter `which does not concern me`, provided that the facility will not be placed too near one`s own home. Among those interviewed the subject seemed not to be of any `great interest and did not arouse spontaneous feelings for or against`. There are, however, deeply rooted beliefs concerning the facility and quite strong negative and positive attitudes towards it. The facility itself and the associated decision-making procedure arouse many questions, which at present to a large extent are still unexpressed because the subject is considered so remote. It is, however, necessary to give concrete answers to the questions because this makes it possible for people to relate the issue to daily life. It is further important that things arousing fear and doubts also can be discussed because a silence in this respect only emphasizes their importance. The attitude towards the facility is varying. On one hand there are economic and technical factors: the probable economic benefit from it, the obligation to

  6. Addressing Thermal Model Run Time Concerns of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Hume; Guerrero, Sergio; Hawk, John; Rodriguez, Juan; McDonald, Carson; Jackson, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) utilizes an existing 2.4 m diameter Hubble sized telescope donated from elsewhere in the federal government for near-infrared sky surveys and Exoplanet searches to answer crucial questions about the universe and dark energy. The WFIRST design continues to increase in maturity, detail, and complexity with each design cycle leading to a Mission Concept Review and entrance to the Mission Formulation Phase. Each cycle has required a Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) analysis to ensure the design can meet the stringent pointing and stability requirements. As such, the models have also grown in size and complexity leading to increased model run time. This paper addresses efforts to reduce the run time while still maintaining sufficient accuracy for STOP analyses. A technique was developed to identify slews between observing orientations that were sufficiently different to warrant recalculation of the environmental fluxes to reduce the total number of radiation calculation points. The inclusion of a cryocooler fluid loop in the model also forced smaller time-steps than desired, which greatly increases the overall run time. The analysis of this fluid model required mitigation to drive the run time down by solving portions of the model at different time scales. Lastly, investigations were made into the impact of the removal of small radiation couplings on run time and accuracy. Use of these techniques allowed the models to produce meaningful results within reasonable run times to meet project schedule deadlines.

  7. Self-Management of Patient Body Position, Pose, and Motion Using Wide-Field, Real-Time Optical Measurement Feedback: Results of a Volunteer Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, James M. [Developing Technologies, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Price, Gareth J., E-mail: gareth.price@christie.nhs.uk [Developing Technologies, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sharrock, Phil J. [Developing Technologies, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Jackson, Andrew S.N. [Clinical Oncology, Southampton University Hospitals Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Stratford, Julie [Department of Radiotherapy, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Moore, Christopher J. [Developing Technologies, Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We present the results of a clinical feasibility study, performed in 10 healthy volunteers undergoing a simulated treatment over 3 sessions, to investigate the use of a wide-field visual feedback technique intended to help patients control their pose while reducing motion during radiation therapy treatment. Methods and Materials: An optical surface sensor is used to capture wide-area measurements of a subject's body surface with visualizations of these data displayed back to them in real time. In this study we hypothesize that this active feedback mechanism will enable patients to control their motion and help them maintain their setup pose and position. A capability hierarchy of 3 different level-of-detail abstractions of the measured surface data is systematically compared. Results: Use of the device enabled volunteers to increase their conformance to a reference surface, as measured by decreased variability across their body surfaces. The use of visual feedback also enabled volunteers to reduce their respiratory motion amplitude to 1.7 ± 0.6 mm compared with 2.7 ± 1.4 mm without visual feedback. Conclusions: The use of live feedback of their optically measured body surfaces enabled a set of volunteers to better manage their pose and motion when compared with free breathing. The method is suitable to be taken forward to patient studies.

  8. The Fifteen-Year Attitude History of the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Radiator and Collection Efficiencies for Micrometeoroids and Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Cooke, William J.; Koehler, H.

    2010-01-01

    An examination of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) radiator assembly was conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) during the summer of 2009. Immediately apparent was a distinct biasing of the largest 45 impact features towards one side of the radiator, in contrast to an approximately uniform distribution of smaller impacts. Such a distribution may be a consequence of the HST s attitude history and pointing requirements for the cold radiator, or of environmental effects, such as an anisotropic distribution of the responsible population in that size regime. Understanding the size-dependent spatial distribution of impact features is essential to the general analysis of these features. We have obtained from GSFC a 15 minute temporal resolution record of the state vector (Earth Centered Inertial position and velocity) and HST attitude, consisting of the orientation of the velocity and HST-sun vectors in HST body coordinates. This paper reviews the actual state vector and attitude history of the radiator in the context of the randomly tumbling plate assumption and assesses the statistical likelihood (or collection efficiency) of the radiator for the micrometeoroid and orbital debris environments. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Meteoroid Environment Model is used to assess the micrometeoroid component. The NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) is used to model the orbital debris component. Modeling results are compared with observations of the impact feature spatial distribution, and the relative contribution of each environmental component are examined in detail.

  9. Simulator sickness when performing gaze shifts within a wide field of view optic flow environment: preliminary evidence for using virtual reality in vestibular rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney Susan L

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wide field of view virtual environments offer some unique features that may be beneficial for use in vestibular rehabilitation. For one, optic flow information extracted from the periphery may be critical for recalibrating the sensory processes used by people with vestibular disorders. However, wide FOV devices also have been found to result in greater simulator sickness. Before a wide FOV device can be used in a clinical setting, its safety must be demonstrated. Methods Symptoms of simulator sickness were recorded by 9 healthy adult subjects after they performed gaze shifting tasks to locate targets superimposed on an optic flow background. Subjects performed 8 trials of gaze shifting on each of the six separate visits. Results The incidence of symptoms of simulator sickness while subjects performed gaze shifts in an optic flow environment was lower than the average reported incidence for flight simulators. The incidence was greater during the first visit compared with subsequent visits. Furthermore, the incidence showed an increasing trend over the 8 trials. Conclusion The performance of head unrestrained gaze shifts in a wide FOV optic flow environment is tolerated well by healthy subjects. This finding provides rationale for testing these environments in people with vestibular disorders, and supports the concept of using wide FOV virtual reality for vestibular rehabilitation.

  10. Simulator sickness when performing gaze shifts within a wide field of view optic flow environment: preliminary evidence for using virtual reality in vestibular rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparto, Patrick J; Whitney, Susan L; Hodges, Larry F; Furman, Joseph M; Redfern, Mark S

    2004-12-23

    BACKGROUND: Wide field of view virtual environments offer some unique features that may be beneficial for use in vestibular rehabilitation. For one, optic flow information extracted from the periphery may be critical for recalibrating the sensory processes used by people with vestibular disorders. However, wide FOV devices also have been found to result in greater simulator sickness. Before a wide FOV device can be used in a clinical setting, its safety must be demonstrated. METHODS: Symptoms of simulator sickness were recorded by 9 healthy adult subjects after they performed gaze shifting tasks to locate targets superimposed on an optic flow background. Subjects performed 8 trials of gaze shifting on each of the six separate visits. RESULTS: The incidence of symptoms of simulator sickness while subjects performed gaze shifts in an optic flow environment was lower than the average reported incidence for flight simulators. The incidence was greater during the first visit compared with subsequent visits. Furthermore, the incidence showed an increasing trend over the 8 trials. CONCLUSION: The performance of head unrestrained gaze shifts in a wide FOV optic flow environment is tolerated well by healthy subjects. This finding provides rationale for testing these environments in people with vestibular disorders, and supports the concept of using wide FOV virtual reality for vestibular rehabilitation.

  11. A Panchromatic Catalog of Early-type Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift in the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Kaviraj, S.; O'Connell, R. W.; Hathi, N. P.; Windhorst, R. A.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Crockett, R. M.; Yan, H.; Kimble, R. A.; Silk, J.; McCarthy, P. J.; Koekemoer, A.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.; Trauger, J. T.; Walker, A. R.; Whitmore, B. C.; Young, E. T.

    2012-03-01

    In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 lsim z lsim 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broadband photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 1011 publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star formation episodes are activated, are discussed.

  12. THE FLAT TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF THE SUPER-EARTH GJ1214b FROM WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 ON THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berta, Zachory K.; Charbonneau, David; Desert, Jean-Michel; Irwin, Jonathan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Miller-Ricci Kempton, Eliza; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Nutzman, Philip [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); McCullough, Peter R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Burke, Christopher J. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Homeier, Derek, E-mail: zberta@cfa.harvard.edu [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, UMR 5574, CNRS, Universite de Lyon, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2012-03-01

    Capitalizing on the observational advantage offered by its tiny M dwarf host, we present Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) grism measurements of the transmission spectrum of the super-Earth exoplanet GJ1214b. These are the first published WFC3 observations of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere. After correcting for a ramp-like instrumental systematic, we achieve nearly photon-limited precision in these observations, finding the transmission spectrum of GJ1214b to be flat between 1.1 and 1.7 {mu}m. Inconsistent with a cloud-free solar composition atmosphere at 8.2{sigma}, the measured achromatic transit depth most likely implies a large mean molecular weight for GJ1214b's outer envelope. A dense atmosphere rules out bulk compositions for GJ1214b that explain its large radius by the presence of a very low density gas layer surrounding the planet. High-altitude clouds can alternatively explain the flat transmission spectrum, but they would need to be optically thick up to 10 mbar or consist of particles with a range of sizes approaching 1 {mu}m in diameter.

  13. Facile synthesis, pharmacokinetic and systemic clearance evaluation, and positron emission tomography cancer imaging of ⁶⁴Cu-Au alloy nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Sultan, Deborah; Detering, Lisa; Luehmann, Hannah; Liu, Yongjian

    2014-11-21

    Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of (64)Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters ((64)CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled (64)Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the (64)CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal biodistribution and significant renal and hepatobiliary excretion. PET imaging showed low non-specific tumor uptake, indicating its potential for active targeting of clinically relevant biomarkers in tumor and metastatic organs.

  14. Legal framework of Preclinical Molecular Imaging radioactive facilities; Marco legal de las instalaciones radiactivas de Imagen Molecular Preclínica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez, C.; Lorenz, P.

    2014-07-01

    Preclinical Molecular Imaging facilities are 2ª category radioactive facilities, so the regulation that applies to them is the same as the rest of the radioactive facilities, both the regime of authorizations and the establishment of the basic standards of radiation protection of workers and members of the public. There are also specific and mandatory technical regulations coming from Nuclear Safety Council safety instructions and ministerial orders, applicable for installations using unsealed radioactive material and equipment generating ionizing radiation for diagnosis, also taking account the possible existence of sealed radioactive sources of verification. [Spanish] Las instalaciones de Imagen Molecular Preclínica son instalaciones radiactivas de 2ª categoría, por lo que la reglamentación que les aplica es la misma que al resto de las instalaciones radiactivas, tanto en el régimen de autorizaciones, como en el establecimiento de las normas básicas de protección radiológica para los trabajadores y los miembros del público. Existe además normativa técnica específica y de obligado cumplimiento, procedente de instrucciones de seguridad del Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear y de Órdenes Ministeriales , aplicable para instalaciones donde se utilice material radiactivo no encapsulado y equipos generadores de radiaciones ionizantes para diagnóstico, teniendo en cuenta también la posible existencia de fuentes radiactivas encapsuladas de verificación.

  15. Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility contains specialized mobile spectral, radiometric, and imaging measurement systems to characterize ultraviolet,...

  16. An Optically Faint Quasar Survey at z ˜ 5 in the CFHTLS Wide Field: Estimates of the Black Hole Masses and Eddington Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H.; Nagao, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Kawakatu, N.; Kajisawa, M.; Akiyama, M.; Miyaji, T.; Morokuma, T.

    2017-09-01

    We present the result of our spectroscopic follow-up observation for faint quasar candidates at z ˜ 5 in part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey wide field. We select nine photometric candidates and identify three z ˜ 5 faint quasars, one z ˜ 4 faint quasar, and a late-type star. Since two faint quasar spectra show the C IV emission line without suffering from a heavy atmospheric absorption, we estimate their black hole masses ({M}{BH}) and Eddington ratios (L/{L}{Edd}). The inferred {log}{M}{BH} are 9.04 ± 0.14 and 8.53 ± 0.20, respectively. In addition, the inferred {log}(L/{L}{Edd}) are -1.00 ± 0.15 and -0.42 ± 0.22, respectively. If we adopt that L/{L}{Edd}={constant} {or}\\propto {(1+z)}2, the seed black hole masses ({M}{seed}) of our z ˜ 5 faint quasars are expected to be > {10}5 {M}⊙ in most cases. We also compare the observational results with a mass accretion model, where angular momentum is lost due to supernova explosions. Accordingly, {M}{BH} of the z ˜ 5 faint quasars in our sample can be explained even if {M}{seed} is ˜ {10}3 {M}⊙ . Since z ˜ 6 luminous qusars and our z ˜ 5 faint quasars are not on the same evolutionary track, z ˜ 6 luminous quasars and our z ˜ 5 quasars are not the same populations but different populations, due to the difference of a period of the mass supply from host galaxies. Furthermore, we confirm that one can explain {M}{BH} of z ˜ 6 luminous quasars and our z ˜ 5 faint quasars even if their seed black holes are formed at z ˜ 7.

  17. A Wide-field Study of the z 0.8 Cluster RX J0152.7-1357: The Role of Environment in Galaxy Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shannon; Kelson, D. D.; Holden, B. P.; Illingworth, G. D.; Franx, M.; van der Wel, A.; Ford, H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the influence of local environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies in the z 0.8 galaxy cluster RX J0152.7-1357 (RXJ0152-13) and its outskirts. Simulations show that massive clusters like RXJ0152-13 will grow in mass by a factor of 2-3 by z=0 through accretion of infalling galaxies and groups of galaxies. Our goal is to understand the transformation process that changes these infalling galaxies into red, early-type cluster members. We used a low-dispersion prism in the IMACS spectrograph at Magellan to obtain low-resolution spectroscopy for large numbers of galaxies over a wide field (D 30') in order to identify members in the vicinity of the cluster. With a mass limited sample (M>4x1010 MSun), we examined the rest-frame colors of galaxies as a function of local projected galaxy density. We found that the high-density regions in the core of the cluster and in the infalling groups support a high fraction of red galaxies compared to the lower density regions, as others have found at lower redshift. Intermediate density regions also revealed an elevated fraction of red galaxies. We also studied the star formation rates (SFRs) of members using Spitzer MIPS 24µm flux as a tracer. Our initial results show a lack of star-forming galaxies in the core of the cluster and in the high-density regions of the groups in the outskirts, which is consistent with their red colors discussed above. These results suggest that many future cluster members are transformed into passively evolving, red, early-types in infalling groups and in the surrounding filamentary structure of the cluster.

  18. A Physical Model-based Correction for Charge Traps in the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 Near-IR Detector and Its Applications to Transiting Exoplanets and Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifan; Apai, Dániel; Lew, Ben W. P.; Schneider, Glenn

    2017-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) near-IR channel is extensively used in time-resolved observations, especially for transiting exoplanet spectroscopy as well as brown dwarf and directly imaged exoplanet rotational phase mapping. The ramp effect is the dominant source of systematics in the WFC3 for time-resolved observations, which limits its photometric precision. Current mitigation strategies are based on empirical fits and require additional orbits to help the telescope reach a thermal equilibrium. We show that the ramp-effect profiles can be explained and corrected with high fidelity using charge trapping theories. We also present a model for this process that can be used to predict and to correct charge trap systematics. Our model is based on a very small number of parameters that are intrinsic to the detector. We find that these parameters are very stable between the different data sets, and we provide best-fit values. Our model is tested with more than 120 orbits (∼40 visits) of WFC3 observations and is proved to be able to provide near photon noise limited corrections for observations made with both staring and scanning modes of transiting exoplanets as well as for starting-mode observations of brown dwarfs. After our model correction, the light curve of the first orbit in each visit has the same photometric precision as subsequent orbits, so data from the first orbit no longer need to be discarded. Near-IR arrays with the same physical characteristics (e.g., JWST/NIRCam) may also benefit from the extension of this model if similar systematic profiles are observed.

  19. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  20. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Cu-In-S/ZnS Bimodal Quantum Dots with Optimized Properties for Tumor Targeted Fluorescence/MR In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weitao; Guo, Weisheng; Gong, Xiaoqun; Zhang, Bingbo; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Na; Yang, Wentao; Tu, Yu; Fang, Xiangming; Chang, Jin

    2015-08-26

    Dual-modal imaging techniques have gained intense attention for their potential role in the dawning era of tumor early accurate diagnosis. Chelate-free robust dual-modal imaging nanoprobes with high efficiency and low toxicity are of essential importance for tumor targeted dual-modal in vivo imaging. It is still a crucial issue to endow Cd-free dual-modal nanoprobes with bright fluorescence as well as high relaxivity. Herein, a facile synthetic strategy was developed to prepare Gd-doped CuInS/ZnS bimodal quantum dots (GCIS/ZnS, BQDs) with optimized properties. The fluorescent properties of the GCIS/ZnS BQDs can be thoroughly optimized by varying reaction temperature, aging time, and ZnS coating. The amount of Gd precursor can be well-controlled to realize the optimized balance between the MR relaxivity and optical properties. The obtained hydrophobic GCIS/ZnS BQDs were surface engineered into aqueous phase with PEGylated dextran-stearyl acid polymeric lipid vesicles (PEG-DS PLVs). Upon the phase transfer, the hydrophilic GCIS/ZnS@PLVs exhibited pronounced near-infrared fluorescence as well as high longitudinal relaxivity (r1 = 9.45 mM(-1) S(-1)) in water with good colloidal stability. In vivo tumor-bearing animal experiments further verified GCIS/ZnS@PLVs could achieve tumor-targeted MR/fluorescence dual-modal imaging. No toxicity was observed in the in vivo and ex vivo experiments. The GCIS/ZnS@PLVs present great potential as bimodal imaging contrast agents for tumor diagnosis.

  1. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  2. The ArTéMiS wide-field sub-millimeter camera: preliminary on-sky performance at 350 microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revéret, Vincent; André, Philippe; Le Pennec, Jean; Talvard, Michel; Agnèse, Patrick; Arnaud, Agnès.; Clerc, Laurent; de Breuck, Carlos; Cigna, Jean-Charles; Delisle, Cyrille; Doumayrou, Eric; Duband, Lionel; Dubreuil, Didier; Dumaye, Luc; Ercolani, Eric; Gallais, Pascal; Groult, Elodie; Jourdan, Thierry; Leriche, Bernadette; Maffei, Bruno; Lortholary, Michel; Martignac, Jérôme; Rabaud, Wilfried; Relland, Johan; Rodriguez, Louis; Vandeneynde, Aurélie; Visticot, François

    2014-07-01

    ArTeMiS is a wide-field submillimeter camera operating at three wavelengths simultaneously (200, 350 and 450 μm). A preliminary version of the instrument equipped with the 350 μm focal plane, has been successfully installed and tested on APEX telescope in Chile during the 2013 and 2014 austral winters. This instrument is developed by CEA (Saclay and Grenoble, France), IAS (France) and University of Manchester (UK) in collaboration with ESO. We introduce the mechanical and optical design, as well as the cryogenics and electronics of the ArTéMiS camera. ArTeMiS detectors consist in Si:P:B bolometers arranged in 16×18 sub-arrays operating at 300 mK. These detectors are similar to the ones developed for the Herschel PACS photometer but they are adapted to the high optical load encountered at APEX site. Ultimately, ArTeMiS will contain 4 sub-arrays at 200 μm and 2×8 sub-arrays at 350 and 450 μm. We show preliminary lab measurements like the responsivity of the instrument to hot and cold loads illumination and NEP calculation. Details on the on-sky commissioning runs made in 2013 and 2014 at APEX are shown. We used planets (Mars, Saturn, Uranus) to determine the flat-field and to get the flux calibration. A pointing model was established in the first days of the runs. The average relative pointing accuracy is 3 arcsec. The beam at 350 μm has been estimated to be 8.5 arcsec, which is in good agreement with the beam of the 12 m APEX dish. Several observing modes have been tested, like "On- The-Fly" for beam-maps or large maps, spirals or raster of spirals for compact sources. With this preliminary version of ArTeMiS, we concluded that the mapping speed is already more than 5 times better than the previous 350 μm instrument at APEX. The median NEFD at 350 μm is 600 mJy.s1/2, with best values at 300 mJy.s1/2. The complete instrument with 5760 pixels and optimized settings will be installed during the first half of 2015.

  3. A PANCHROMATIC CATALOG OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT IN THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, M. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Kaviraj, S.; Crockett, R. M.; Silk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); O' Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A.; Bond, H. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Yan, H. [Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kimble, R. A. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Disney, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Dopita, M. A. [Research School of Physics and Astronomy, The Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frogel, J. A. [Astronomy Department, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Hall, D. N. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2012-03-01

    In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broadband photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 10{sup 11} < M{sub *}[M{sub Sun }]<10{sup 12}. By transforming the observed photometry into the Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V) = 3.5 and (NUV-V) = 3.3, with 1{sigma} standard deviations {approx_equal}1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent ({approx}<50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star formation episodes are activated, are discussed.

  4. ANALYZING STAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS WITH STOCHASTIC MODELS: THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 SAMPLE OF CLUSTERS IN M83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouesneau, Morgan; Lancon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Chandar, Rupali [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Whitmore, Bradley C., E-mail: morgan.fouesneau@astro.u-strasbg.fr [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-05-01

    The majority of clusters in the universe have masses well below 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. Hence, their integrated fluxes and colors can be affected by the presence or absence of a few bright stars introduced by stochastic sampling of the stellar mass function. Specific methods are being developed to extend the analysis of cluster energy distributions into the low-mass regime. In this paper, we apply such a method to real observations of star clusters, in the nearby spiral galaxy M83. We reassess the ages and masses of a sample of 1242 clusters for which UBVIH{alpha} fluxes were obtained from observations with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Synthetic clusters with known properties are used to characterize the limitations of the method (valid range and resolution in age and mass, method artifacts). The ensemble of color predictions of the discrete cluster models are in good agreement with the distribution of observed colors. We emphasize the important role of the H{alpha} data in the assessment of the fraction of young objects, particularly in breaking the age-extinction degeneracy that hampers an analysis based on UBVI data only. We find the mass distribution of the cluster sample to follow a power law of index -2.1 {+-} 0.2, and the distribution of ages a power law of index -1.0 {+-} 0.2 for log (M/ M{sub Sun }) > 3.5, and ages between 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 9} yr. An extension of our main method, which makes full use of the probability distributions of age and mass obtained for the individual clusters of the sample, is explored. It produces similar power-law slopes and will deserve further investigation. Although the properties derived for individual clusters significantly differ from those obtained with traditional, non-stochastic models in about 30% of the objects, the first-order aspect of the age and mass distributions is similar to those obtained previously for this M83 sample in the range of overlap of the studies. We

  5. Wide field of view computed tomography and mid carpal instability: The value of the sagittal radius–lunate–capitate axis – Preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repse, Stephen E., E-mail: stephrep@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Health, VIC (Australia); Koulouris, George, E-mail: GeorgeK@melbourneradiology.com.au [Melbourne Radiology Clinic, Ground Floor, 3-6/100 Victoria Parade, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Centre for Orthopaedic Research, School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Troupis, John M., E-mail: john.troupis@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging & Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, Monash Health and Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, Monash University, VIC (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Unique insight into the assessment of mid carpal instability. • 4D CT using sagittal reconstructions along the radius–lunate–capitate axis. • 4D CT observations of vacuum phenomenon, trigger lunate and capitate subluxation. • Earlier recognition of mid carpal instability. - Abstract: Purpose: Dynamic four dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has recently emerged as a practical method for evaluating complex functional abnormality of joints. We retrospectively analysed 4D CT studies undertaken as part of the clinical management of hand and wrist symptoms. We present our initial experience of 4D CT in the assessment of functional abnormalities of the wrist in a group of patients with mid carpal instability (MCI), specifically carpal instability non-dissociative. We aim to highlight unique features in assessment of the radius–lunate–capitate (RLC) axis which allows insight and understanding of abnormalities in function, not just morphology, which may be contributing to symptoms. Materials and methods: Wide field of view multi-detector CT scanner (320 slices, 0.5 mm detector thickness) was used to acquire bilateral continuous motion assessment in hand flexion and extension. A maximum z-axis coverage of 16 cm was available for each acquisition, and a large field of view (FOV) was used. Due to the volume acquisition during motion, reconstructions at multiple time points were undertaken. Dynamic and anatomically targeted multi-planar-reconstructions (MPRs) were then used to establish the kinematic functionality of the joint. Results: Our initial cohort of 20 patients was reviewed. Three findings were identified which were present either in isolation or in combination. These are vacuum phenomenon, triggering of the lunate and capitate subluxation. We provide 4D CT representations of each and highlight features considered of clinical importance and their significance. We also briefly discuss how the current classifications of dynamic wrist

  6. NIPS–NORMA station—A combined facility for neutron-based nondestructive element analysis and imaging at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kis, Zoltán, E-mail: kis.zoltan@energia.mta.hu; Szentmiklósi, László; Belgya, Tamás

    2015-04-11

    Neutron attenuation, scattering or radiative capture are used in various non-destructive methods to gain morphological, structural, elemental or isotopic information about the sample under study. The combined use of position-sensitive prompt gamma-ray detection (i.e. prompt gamma-ray activation imaging, PGAI) and neutron radiography/tomography (NR/NT) makes it possible to determine the 3D distribution of major elements and to visualize internal structures of heterogeneous objects in a non-destructive way. Based on earlier experience, the first ever permanent facility for this purpose, NIPS–NORMA, was constructed at the Budapest Neutron Centre, Hungary in 2012. The installation consists of a well-shielded, Compton-suppressed HPGe detector; a CCD-camera based imaging equipment and a motorized positioning system with sample support. Conventional PGAA measurements and NR/NT imaging using guided cold neutrons are the basic methods that form the basis of the more sophisticated experimental method called NR/NT-driven PGAI. The current status of the experimental station and its characteristics are described in the present paper.

  7. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  8. X-ray beam splitting design for concurrent imaging at hard X-ray FELs and synchrotron facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberta, P., E-mail: peter.oberta@rigaku.com [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, Praha 8, CZ-18221 (Czech Republic); Rigaku, Novodvorská 994, Praha 4, CZ-14221 (Czech Republic); Mokso, R. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-11-21

    A new configuration of diffractive–refractive optics for beam splitting is investigated. The set-up can be applied to perform imaging with two beams simultaneously. It brings advantages toward dynamic studies using image guided diffraction or fluorescence spectroscopy. The optimal energy range of operation for the beam-splitter is between 7 keV and 24 keV, reaching best efficiency at an energy of 10 keV. Due to the long focusing distances (several tens of meters) created by the diffractive–refractive optics and the higher refraction efficiency in the softer energy range, the presented set-ups are ideal for hard X-ray FEL sources.

  9. Imaging and spectroscopy of copper dopant migration of indirectly driven Beryllium capsule implosion on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrala, George; Zylstra, A.; Yi, S. A.; Klline, J. L.; Shah, R. C.; Lopez, F. E.; Batha, S. A.; Doppner, T.; Thorn, D. B.; MacLaren, S.; Masters, N.; Callahan, D.; Hurricane, O.; Rice, N.; Huang, H.; Krauland, C. M.; MacDonald, M.

    2017-10-01

    Using beryllium, as an ablator material for indirectly driven inertial fusion, requires the use of a Copper dopant to block preheat from the hohlraum M-band radiation. However, due to the microstructure and imperfections of the capsule, some of the copper may be injected into the core of the implosion, affecting the yield and performance. Alternatively, the copper dopant may blow into the ablated plasma affecting the hohlraum performance as well. We will present some of data on time integrated imaging of the copper dopant into the core of the capsule using either the 2-dimensional multiple monochromatic imaging of the implosion, as well as the 1D spectrally resolved imaging of the copper dopant emission. In either case we found that the copper did migrate to the hot core, while fewer copper ions ablated into the hohlraum. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396, and by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. [The development and application of computer assisted photogrammetric-system of facial soft tissue running under multiple facilities for taking image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, B; Yu, S; Tan, J

    1997-08-01

    The photogrammetric-system was developed by using multimedia computer, colour television camera, SE100 video blaster, Newsketch 1212 HR digitizer and by using Visual Basic language. It ran under Windows 3.1 and Windows 95. The features of this system: 1. It had three kinds of functions: photogrammetric function for frontal and profile facial soft tissue, function for managing file and function for forming dynamic data base. 2. It ran under different facilities for taking image (television camera with video blaster, digitizer, scanner) speedily and specificly, and had very friendly interface, and was of multimedia. The application of this system: 1. assisting diagnosing, making plan for treatment and observing results of treatment in clinic of orthodontics, orthopedics and facial plastics, 2. assisting analysing the features of facial soft tissue about certain people, 3. assisting the multimedia teaching.

  11. Glycerol-regulated facile synthesis and targeted cell imaging of highly luminescent Ag2Te quantum dots with tunable near-infrared emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yanfeng

    2016-07-01

    In this work, highly luminescent and emission tunable Ag2Te quantum dots (QDs) were facilely prepared by using water-dispersed glycerol as viscous solvent and CH3COOAg/Na2TeO3 as Ag/Te precursors. Viscous glycerol was utilized to slow the nucleation and growth of QDs at 200°C, and enabled the isolation of QDs with different emission wavelengths. Experimental results revealed that the as-prepared Ag2Te QDs exhibited tunable near-infrared emission from 930 to 1084nm, high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (QYs, more than 20%), good photostability and low cytotoxicity. After surface coating of a thin silica shell (∼1.4nm), the resulting NH2 terminated Ag2Te@SiO2-NH2 displayed enhanced PL QYs, higher photostability and biocompatibility when compared with the original Ag2Te QDs. Through a facile carboxy-amine coupling, folic acid (FA) was grafted with Ag2Te@SiO2-NH2 to form Ag2Te@SiO2-FA nanocomposites, which were used for targeted PL imaging of folate receptor over-expressed tumor cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Calcium imaging with genetically encoded sensor Case12: Facile analysis of α7/α9 nAChR mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Shelukhina

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the structural basis of pharmacological differences for highly homologous α7 and α9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs may shed light on their involvement in different physiological functions and diseases. Combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electrophysiology is a powerful tool to pinpoint the key amino-acid residues in the receptor ligand-binding site, but for α7 and α9 nAChRs it is complicated by their poor expression and fast desensitization. Here, we probed the ligand-binding properties of α7/α9 nAChR mutants by a proposed simple and fast calcium imaging method. The method is based on transient co-expression of α7/α9 nAChR mutants in neuroblastoma cells together with Ric-3 or NACHO chaperones and Case12 fluorescent calcium ion sensor followed by analysis of their pharmacology using a fluorescence microscope or a fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR with a GFP filter set. The results obtained were confirmed by electrophysiology and by calcium imaging with the conventional calcium indicator Fluo-4. The affinities for acetylcholine and epibatidine were determined for human and rat α7 nAChRs, and for their mutants with homologous residues of α9 nAChR incorporated at positions 117-119, 184, 185, 187, and 189, which are anticipated to be involved in ligand binding. The strongest decrease in the affinity was observed for mutations at positions 187 and 119. The L119D mutation of α7 nAChR, showing a larger effect for epibatidine than for acetylcholine, may implicate this position in pharmacological differences between α7 and α9 nAChRs.

  13. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, N., E-mail: izumi2@llnl.gov; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 9212 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  14. Facile Synthesis of pH-sensitive Germanium Nanocrystals with High Quantum Yield for Intracellular Acidic Compartment Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Jing; Sun, Shuqing; Wang, Hai; Tang, Zhiyong; Nie, Guangjun

    2015-04-24

    A green-light emitting germanium nanocrystal-based biosensor to monitor lysosomal pH changes is developed. The Ge nanocrystals are synthesized in an aqueous solution with a significantly enhanced photoluminescence quantum yield of 26%. This synthesis involves a facile solution based route which avoided the use of toxic or environmentally unfriendly agents. Importantly, the photoluminescence intensity of the synthesized Ge nanocrystals is particularly sensitive to changes in pH between 5 and 6. When incubated with cultured cells, the nanocrystals are internalized and subsequently translocated via the lysosomal pathway, and the Ge nanocrystals' fluorescence are greatly enhanced, even when the lysosomal pH is only slightly increased. These results reveal that the Ge nanocrystals possess high pH sensitivity compared to a commercially available dye, LysoSensor Green DND-189. The fluorescent properties of the Ge nanocrystals are demonstrated to be dependent on both the crystal form and their surface chemistry. The superior fluorescence properties and bioapplicability of the Ge nanocrystals makes them a promising intracellular bioimaging probe for monitoring various pH-sensitive processes in cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A real-time error-free color-correction facility for digital consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    It has been well known since the earliest days of color photography that color-balance in general, and facial reproduction (flesh tones) in particular, are of dominant interest to the consumer, and significant research resources have been expended in satisfying this need. The general problem is a difficult one, spanning the factors that govern perception and personal preference, the physics and chemistry of color reproduction, as well as wide field of color measurement specification, and analysis. However, with the advent of digital photography and its widespread acceptance in the consumer market, and with the possibility of a much greater degree of individual control over color reproduction, the field is taking on a new consumer-driven impetus, and the provision of user facilities for preferred color choice now constitutes an intense field of research. In addition, due to the conveniences of digital technology, the collection of large data bases and statistics relating to individual color preferences have now become a relatively straightforward operation. Using a consumer preference approach of this type, we have developed a user-friendly facility whereby unskilled consumers may manipulate the color of their personal digital images according to their preferred choice. By virtue of its ease of operation and the real-time nature of the color-correction transforms, this facility can readily be inserted anywhere a consumer interacts with a digital image, from camera, printer, or scanner, to web or photo-kiosk. Here the underlying scientific principles are explored in detail, and these are related to the practical color-preference outcomes. Examples are given of the application to the correction of images with unsatisfactory color balance, and especially to flesh tones and faces, and the nature of the consumer controls and their corresponding image transformations are explored.

  16. Facile Synthesis of Cadmium-Free Zn-In-S:Ag/ZnS Nanocrystals for Bio-Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Tong-Tong; Liu, Jia-Qing; Yu, Cai-Yan; Xie, Rong-Jun; Li, Hui-Li

    2016-04-14

    High quality cadmium-free Zn-In-S:Ag doped-nanocrystals (d-NCs) were synthesized via a simple one-step noninjection route using silver nitrate, indium acetate, zinc acetate, oleylamine, S powder and 1-dodecanethiol as starting materials in an organic phase. The size and optical properties can be effectively tailored by controlling the reaction time, reaction temperature, Ag(+) dopant concentration, and the molar ratio of In to Zn. The photoluminescence wavelength of as-prepared Zn-In-S:Ag NCs covered a broad visible range from 458 nm to 603 nm. After being passivated by protective ZnS shell, the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of Zn-In-S:Ag(+) /ZnS was greatly improved to 43.5%. More importantly, the initial high PLQY of the obtained core/shell d-NCs in organic media can be preserved when being transferred into the aqueous media via ligand exchange. Finally, high quality Zn-In-S:Ag(+) /ZnS d-NCs in aqueous phase were applied as bio-imaging agents for identifying living KB cells.

  17. Facile Synthesis of Folic Acid-Modified Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Targeted MR Imaging in Pulmonary Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaixian; Hu, Yong; Yang, Jia; Xu, Yanhong; Zhang, Chengzhong; Wang, Zhongling; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Guixiang

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop folic acid (FA)-modified iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of H460 lung carcinoma cells. Water-dispersible Fe3O4 NPs synthesized via a mild reduction method were conjugated with FA to generate FA-targeted Fe3O4 NPs. The specificity of FA-targeted Fe3O4 NPs to bind FA receptor was investigated in vitro by cellular uptake and cell MRI and in vivo by MRI of H460 tumors. The formed NPs displayed good biocompatibility and ultrahigh r 2 relaxivity (440.01/mM/s). The targeting effect of the NPs to H460 cells was confirmed by in vitro cellular uptake and cell MRI. H460 tumors showed a significant reduction in T2 signal intensity at 0.85 h, which then recovered and returned to control at 2.35 h. The results indicate that the prepared FA-targeted Fe3O4 NPs have potential to be used as T2 negative contrast agents in targeted MRI.

  18. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  19. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  20. Glandular dose and image quality control in mammography facilities with computerized radiography systems; Dose glandular e controle de qualidade da imagem em servicos de mamografia com sistema de radiografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Marcelino Vicente de Almeida

    2010-07-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and early detection is critical to its diagnosis and treatment. To date, the most effective method for early detection of breast cancer has been x-ray mammography for which the screen/film (SF) technique has been the gold standard. However, even though SF combinations have been improved and optimized over the years for breast imaging, there are some critical limitations, including a narrow exposure range, image artifacts, film processing problems, and inflexibility in image processing and film management. In recent years, digital mammography has been introduced in cancer screening programmes with the screen/film techniques gradually being phased out. Computed radiography (CR), also commonly known as photostimulable phosphor (PSP) imaging or storage phosphor, employs reusable imaging plates and associated hardware and software to acquire and to display digital projection radiographs. In this work, a protocol model was tested for performing image quality control and average glandular dose (AGD) evaluation in 19 institutions with computed radiography systems for mammography. The protocol was validated through tests at the Laboratorio de Radioprotecao Aplicada a Mamografia (LARAM) from the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN). The image quality visual evaluation of CDMAM phantom showed that 53% of the facilities were able to produce images of excellent quality. Furthermore, the automated evaluation of image quality, using the analyze software cdcom.exe, showed that 57% of the images were considered to be of good quality. The detector linearity test showed that the CR response is very linear, where 95% of facilities evaluated were considered to be compliant. For the image noise was found that only 20% of facilities are in agreement with the parameters established for this test. The average glandular doses, which patients may be getting to perform an examination, were below the action levels

  1. A large sample of shear-selected clusters from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program S16A Wide field mass maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Satoshi; Oguri, Masamune; Hamana, Takashi; Shirasaki, Masato; Koike, Michitaro; Komiyama, Yutaka; Umetsu, Keiichi; Utsumi, Yousuke; Okabe, Nobuhiro; More, Surhud; Medezinski, Elinor; Lin, Yen-Ting; Miyatake, Hironao; Murayama, Hitoshi; Ota, Naomi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki

    2017-12-01

    We present the result of searching for clusters of galaxies based on weak gravitational lensing analysis of the ˜160 deg2 area surveyed by Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) as a Subaru Strategic Program. HSC is a new prime focus optical imager with a 1.5°-diameter field of view on the 8.2 m Subaru telescope. The superb median seeing on the HSC i-band images of 0{^''.}56 allows the reconstruction of high angular resolution mass maps via weak lensing, which is crucial for the weak lensing cluster search. We identify 65 mass map peaks with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio larger than 4.7, and carefully examine their properties by cross-matching the clusters with optical and X-ray cluster catalogs. We find that all the 39 peaks with S/N > 5.1 have counterparts in the optical cluster catalogs, and only 2 out of the 65 peaks are probably false positives. The upper limits of X-ray luminosities from the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) imply the existence of an X-ray underluminous cluster population. We show that the X-rays from the shear-selected clusters can be statistically detected by stacking the RASS images. The inferred average X-ray luminosity is about half that of the X-ray-selected clusters of the same mass. The radial profile of the dark matter distribution derived from the stacking analysis is well modeled by the Navarro-Frenk-White profile with a small concentration parameter value of c500 ˜ 2.5, which suggests that the selection bias on the orientation or the internal structure for our shear-selected cluster sample is not strong.

  2. Facile Fabrication of AIE-Active Fluorescent Polymeric Nanoparticles with Ultra-Low Critical Micelle Concentration Based on Ce(IV) Redox Polymerization for Biological Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qing; Xu, Dazhuang; Mao, Liucheng; He, Ziyang; Zeng, Guangjian; Shi, Yingge; Deng, Fengjie; Liu, Meiying; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-04-01

    Fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles (FPNs) with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property have received increasing attention and possess promising biomedical application potential in the recent years. Many efforts have been devoted to the fabrication methodologies of FPNs and significant advance has been achieved. In this contribution, a novel strategy for the fabrication of AIE-active amphiphilic copolymers is reported for the first time based on the Ce(IV) redox polymerization. As an example, ene group containing AIE-active dye (named as Phe-alc) is directly grafted onto a water soluble polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) in H2 O/THF system under low temperature. Thus-obtained amphiphilic fluorescent polymers will self-assemble into FPNs with ultra-low critical micelle concentration, ultra-brightness, and great water dispersibility. Biological evaluation results suggest that the PEG-poly(Phe-alc) possess excellent biocompatibility and can be used for tracing their behavior in cells using confocal laser scanning microscope. These features make PEG-poly(Phe-alc) FPNs promising candidates for many biomedical applications, such as cell imaging, drug delivery vehicles, and targeted tracing. More importantly, many other functional groups can also be incorporated into these AIE-active FPNs through the redox polymerization. Therefore, the redox polymerization should be a facile and effective strategy for fabrication of AIE-active FPNs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A facile strategy for fabrication of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) active fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles (FPNs) via post modification of synthetic polymers and their cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanzhu; Mao, Liucheng; Liu, Xinhua; Liu, Meiying; Xu, Dazhuang; Jiang, Ruming; Deng, Fengjie; Li, Yongxiu; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-10-01

    Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) active fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles (FPNs) have recently emerged as the promising nanoprobes for biological imaging for their intensive fluorescence, good photostability, desirable biocompatibility and well designability of structure and optical properties. Herein, we proposed a novel strategy for fabrication of AIE-active FPNs through the post modification of synthetic copolymers to form Schiff base. The size, morphology, optical properties and biocompatibility as well as cell uptake behavior were evaluated in detailed. To fabricate these AIE-active FPNs, poly(PEG-co-VA) copolymers were first obtained via addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) and 3-vinylaniline (VA) as the monomers. Then the AIE-active SA-poly(PEG-co-VA) FPNs were formed through the reaction between salicylaldehyde (SA) and VA. Results demonstrated that SA-poly(PEG-co-VA) FPNs possess bright fluorescence, superior photo-bleaching resistance, excellent biocompatibility and efficient cell uptake behavior. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report for fabrication AIE-active FPNs through post modification of synthetic copolymers. The facile fabrication procedure and the remarkable features suggested that these AIE-active FPNs promising candidates for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. "Clickable" Nanogels via Thermally Driven Self-Assembly of Polymers: Facile Access to Targeted Imaging Platforms using Thiol-Maleimide Conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktan, Bugra; Chambre, Laura; Sanyal, Rana; Sanyal, Amitav

    2017-02-13

    Multifunctionalizable nanogels are fabricated using thermally driven self-assembly and cross-linking of reactive thermoresponsive copolymers. Nanogels thus fabricated can be easily conjugated with various appropriately functionalized small molecules and/or ligands to tailor them for various applications in delivery and imaging. In this study, a poly(ethylene glycol)-methacrylate-based maleimide-bearing copolymer was cross-linked with a dithiol-based cross-linker to synthesize nanogels. Because of lower critical solution temperature (LCST) around 55 °C in aqueous media, these copolymers assemble into nanosized aggregates when heated to this temperature, and they are cross-linked using the thiol-maleimide conjugation. Nanogels thus fabricated contain both thiol and maleimide groups in the same cross-linked nanogels. Postgelation functionalization of the residual maleimide and thiol groups is demonstrated through conjugation of a thiol-bearing hydrophobic dye (BODIPY-SH) and N-(fluoresceinyl) maleimide, respectively. In addition, to demonstrate the utility of multifunctionality of these nanogels, a thiol-bearing cyclic-peptide-based targeting group, cRGDfC, and N-(fluoresceinyl)-maleimide-based fluorescent tag was conjugated to nanogels in aqueous media. Upon treatment with breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231, it was deduced from cellular internalization studies using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the peptide carrying constructs were preferentially internalized. Overall, a facile synthesis of multifunctionalizable nanogels that can be tailored using effective conjugation chemistry under mild conditions can serve as promising candidates for various applications.

  5. National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the National Cryo-EM Facility at NCI, created to provide researchers access to the latest cryo-EM technology for high resolution imaging. Includes timeline for installation and how to access the facility.

  6. Wide-Field Variability Survey of the Globular Cluster M 79 and a New Period-Luminosity Relation for SX Phe Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacki, G.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of a search for variable stars in a 26×39 arcmin2 field around globular cluster M 79 (NGC 1904). The search was made by means of an extended version of image subtraction, which allows us to analyze in a uniform manner CCD frames obtained with different telescopes and cameras of different sizes and resolutions. The search resulted in finding 20 new variable stars, among which 13 are cluster members. The members include one new RR Lyr star of subtype c, three SX Phe stars, and nine variable red giants. We also show that V7 is a W Vir star with a period of 13.985 d. Revised mean periods of RRab and RRc stars, ab=0.71 d and c=0.34 d, respectively, and relative percentage of RRc stars, Nc/(Nab+Nc)=45% confirm that M 79 belongs to the Oosterhoff II group of globular clusters. The mean V magnitude of the horizontal branch of M 79 based on ten RR Lyr stars has been estimated to be VHB=RR=16.11±0.03 mag. In one RRc star, V9, light changes with three close frequencies were detected, indicating excitation of nonradial modes. An SX Phe star, V18, is a double-mode pulsator with two radial modes excited, fundamental and first overtone. Moreover, we have discovered two SX Phe or δ Sct stars and one W UMa type system, all likely field objects. We also studied the period-luminosity relation for SX Phe stars. Using 62 fundamental and fundamentalized periods of radial double-mode and high-amplitude SX Phe stars known in Galactic globular clusters, we have derived the slope and zero point of this relation to be, -3.3±0.27 and 2.68±0.03 mag (at log(P/d)=-1.24), respectively.

  7. Reference-independent wide field fluorescence lifetime measurements using Frequency-Domain (FD) technique based on phase and amplitude crossing point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Gilad; Barnoy, Eran; Roth, Nir; Turgeman, Lior; Fixler, Dror

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is an essential tool in many scientific fields such as biology and medicine thanks to the known advantages of the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) over the classical fluorescence intensity (FI). However, the frequency domain (FD) FLIM technique suffers from its strong dependence on the reference and its compliance to the sample. In this paper, we suggest a new way to calculate the FLT by using the crossing point (CRPO) between the modulation and phase FLTs measured over several light emitting diode (LED) DC currents values instead of either method alone. This new technique was validated by measuring homogeneous substances with known FLT, where the CRPO appears to be the optimal measuring point. Furthermore, the CRPO method was applied in heterogeneous samples. It was found that the CRPO in known mixed solutions is the weighted average of the used solutions. While measuring B16 and lymphocyte cells, the CRPO of the DAPI compound in single FLT regions was measured at 3.5 ± 0.06 ns and at 2.83 ± 0.07 ns, respectively, both of which match previous reports and multi-frequency analyses. This paper suggests the CRPO as a new method to extract the FLT in problematic cases such as high MCP gains and heterogeneous environments. In traditional FD FLIM measurements, the variation in phase angle and modulation are measured. By measuring over varying DC currents, another variation is detected in the FLT determined through the phase and modulation methods, with the CRPO indicating the true FLT. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A Survey of Structural Design of Diagnostic X-ray Imaging Facilities and Compliance to Shielding Design Goals in a Limited Resource Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavious B. Nkubli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To survey structural designs of x-ray rooms and compliance to shielding design goals of three x-ray imaging facilities. Methods and Materials: The survey was conducted in three radiodiagnostic centers in South East Nigeria, labeled X, Y and Z for anonymity. A stretchable non-elastic meter rule was used to measure x-ray room dimensions. A Vernier caliper was used to measure lead thickness while a calibrated digital survey meter Radalert 100x was used for radiation survey of controlled and uncontrolled areas. Simple statistical tools such as mean and standard deviation were used for analysis with the aid of Microsoft Excel version 2007. Results: Center X had a room dimension of 2.4 m × 2.1 m, Center Y had an x-ray room dimension of 3.6 m × 3.3 m, and Center Z had two x-ray rooms with identical dimensions of 6.3 m × 3.6 m. Measured exit radiation doses for controlled areas in all the centers were: 0.00152 mSv/wk; 0.00496 mSv/wk; 0.00168 mSv/wk; 0.00224 mSv/wk respectively. Lead was the common shielding material used. Conclusion: Based on the parameters studied, Center Z had the ideal room size and layout. Relative distances from the x-ray tubes to the nearest walls were not optimized in all the centers except in Center Z. Measured exit doses were within recommended limits except in Center Y. The location of the control consoles and measured doses were appropriate and within recommended design goals.

  9. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  10. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  11. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  12. Double star images taken by HST WFPC and Las Campanas Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Comparison of the same area of sky (a double star) taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) wide field planetary camera (WFPC) and ground-based image taken from the Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institute of Washington.

  13. Hyper Suprime-Cam: System design and verification of image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Doi, Yoshiyuki; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hamana, Takashi; Hayashi, Yusuke; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Yukiko; Karoji, Hiroshi; Koike, Michitaro; Kurakami, Tomio; Miyama, Shoken; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nakata, Fumiaki; Namikawa, Kazuhito; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Nariai, Kyoji; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Oishi, Yukie; Okada, Norio; Okura, Yuki; Tait, Philip; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Yoko; Tanaka, Masayuki; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Daigo; Uraguchi, Fumihiro; Usuda, Tomonori; Utsumi, Yousuke; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Yamanoi, Hitomi; Aihara, Hiroaki; Fujimori, Hiroki; Mineo, Sogo; Miyatake, Hironao; Oguri, Masamune; Uchida, Tomohisa; Tanaka, Manobu M.; Yasuda, Naoki; Takada, Masahiro; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Chiba, Masashi; Futamase, Toshifumi; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Ho, Paul T. P.; Liaw, Eric J. Y.; Chiu, Chi-Fang; Ho, Cheng-Lin; Lai, Tsang-Chih; Lee, Yao-Cheng; Jeng, Dun-Zen; Iwamura, Satoru; Armstrong, Robert; Bickerton, Steve; Bosch, James; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Loomis, Craig; Price, Paul; Smith, Steward; Strauss, Michael A.; Turner, Edwin L.; Suzuki, Hisanori; Miyazaki, Yasuhito; Muramatsu, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Koei; Endo, Makoto; Ezaki, Yutaka; Ito, Noboru; Kawaguchi, Noboru; Sofuku, Satoshi; Taniike, Tomoaki; Akutsu, Kotaro; Dojo, Naoto; Kasumi, Kazuyuki; Matsuda, Toru; Imoto, Kohei; Miwa, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takeshi, Kunio; Yokota, Hideo

    2018-01-01

    The Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) is an 870 megapixel prime focus optical imaging camera for the 8.2 m Subaru telescope. The wide-field corrector delivers sharp images of 0{^''.}2 (FWHM) in the HSC-i band over the entire 1.5° diameter field of view. The collimation of the camera with respect to the optical axis of the primary mirror is done with hexapod actuators, the mechanical accuracy of which is a few microns. Analysis of the remaining wavefront error in off-focus stellar images reveals that the collimation of the optical components meets design specifications. While there is a flexure of mechanical components, it also is within the design specification. As a result, the camera achieves its seeing-limited imaging on Maunakea during most of the time; the median seeing over several years of observing is 0.67" (FWHM) in the i band. The sensors use p-channel, fully depleted CCDs of 200 μm thickness (2048 × 4176 15 μm square pixels) and we employ 116 of them to pave the 50 cm diameter focal plane. The minimum interval between exposures is 34 s, including the time to read out arrays, to transfer data to the control computer, and to save them to the hard drive. HSC on Subaru uniquely features a combination of a large aperture, a wide field of view, sharp images and a high sensitivity especially at longer wavelengths, which makes the HSC one of the most powerful observing facilities in the world.

  14. Review The Ooty Wide Field Array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    latitude, effectively making the telescope equatorially mounted. The sky can hence be tracked by rotation ..... spectral index (Bera et al. 2016). Clearly transient searches with the OWFA would be of high ... We are grateful to the staff at the Radio Astronomy. Centre (RAC) Ooty, whose help formed a critical com- ponent of this ...

  15. Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  16. Planning Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Richard B., Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Nine articles give information to help make professionals in health, physical education, recreation, dance, and athletics more knowledgeable about planning facilities. Design of natatoriums, physical fitness laboratories, fitness trails, gymnasium lighting, homemade play equipment, indoor soccer arenas, and dance floors is considered. A…

  17. Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Mela

    Full Text Available We have developed novel stereoscopic wearable multimodal intraoperative imaging and display systems entitled Integrated Imaging Goggles for guiding surgeries. The prototype systems offer real time stereoscopic fluorescence imaging and color reflectance imaging capacity, along with in vivo handheld microscopy and ultrasound imaging. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, both wide-field fluorescence imaging and in vivo microscopy are provided. The real time ultrasound images can also be presented in the goggle display. Furthermore, real time goggle-to-goggle stereoscopic video sharing is demonstrated, which can greatly facilitate telemedicine. In this paper, the prototype systems are described, characterized and tested in surgeries in biological tissues ex vivo. We have found that the system can detect fluorescent targets with as low as 60 nM indocyanine green and can resolve structures down to 0.25 mm with large FOV stereoscopic imaging. The system has successfully guided simulated cancer surgeries in chicken. The Integrated Imaging Goggle is novel in 4 aspects: it is (a the first wearable stereoscopic wide-field intraoperative fluorescence imaging and display system, (b the first wearable system offering both large FOV and microscopic imaging simultaneously,

  18. A large-volume press facility at the Advanced Photon Source: diffraction and imaging studies on materials relevant to the cores of planetary bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Uchida, T; Rivers, M L; Sutton, S R; Weidner, D J; Vaughan, M T; Chen, J; Li, B; Secco, R A; Rutter, M D; Liu, H

    2002-01-01

    A new large-volume, high-pressure facility is being utilized and developed as part of GeoSoilEnviroCARS at a third-generation synchrotron, the Advanced Photon Source. This user facility consists of two large-volume presses (LVP), a 2.5 MN (250 ton) LVP installed at the bending magnet beamline, and a 10 MN (1000 ton) LVP at the insertion device beamline. Here we report some techniques currently being developed with the 10 MN LVP and the latest scientific results obtained using the 2.5 MN LVP.

  19. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  20. Facile preparation of well-defined hydrophilic core-shell upconversion nanoparticles for selective cell membrane glycan labeling and cancer cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanjun; Peng, Bo; Tian, Fang; Qin, Weijie; Qian, Xiaohong

    2014-01-07

    Molecular imaging enables in situ visualization of biomolecules in living organisms and creates numerous opportunities for basic biological research and early disease diagnosis. As luminescent probes for molecular imaging, lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) exhibit superior performance compared to conventional fluorescent dyes in many ways, including high tissue penetration depth and minimized autofluorescence and photobleaching, making them particularly advantageous for imaging analysis. Although various synthesis methods have been reported, the preparation of high quality, water-soluble UCNPs remains challenging. For in situ imaging, glycans on the cell surface are particularly attractive due to their key roles in cellular activity and disease occurrence and development. However, glycan imaging is a challenging task due to their diverse structures and incompatibility with genetically encoded fluorescent tagging techniques. Herein, we report a new type of highly water-soluble, lectin-functionalized core-shell UCNP synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) for selective cell membrane glycan labeling and cancer cell imaging. SI-ATRP modification results in controlled growth of hydrophilic polymers on the UCNP surface and well-defined core-shell structure, producing UCNPs with improved biocompatibility and intact luminance property. Furthermore, the numerous functional groups on the polymer brush shell provide a large number of binding sites and 3D support for lectin immobilization. The increased loading density and diversified architecture of the immobilized lectins facilitates multivalent binding between the lectins and the glycans on the cell surface and leads to selective labeling of highly metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCCHM3) in vitro and successful in vivo imaging of HCCHM3 inoculated mice.

  1. Laser Doppler Imaging of Microflow

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, Michel; Leng, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    We report a pilot study with a wide-field laser Doppler detection scheme used to perform laser Doppler anemometry and imaging of particle seeded microflow. The optical field carrying the local scatterers (particles) dynamic state, as a consequence of momentum transfer at each scattering event, is analyzed in the temporal frequencies domain. The setup is based on heterodyne digital holography, which is used to map the scattered field in the object plane at a tunable frequency with a multipixel detector. We show that wide-field heterodyne laser Doppler imaging can be used for quantitative microflow diagnosis; in the presented study, maps of the first-order moment of the Doppler frequency shift are used as a quantitative and directional estimator of the Doppler signature of particles velocity.

  2. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  3. Locating, quantifying and characterising radiation hazards in contaminated nuclear facilities using a novel passive non-electrical polymer based radiation imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, S J; Lennox, K; Farfán, E B; Coleman, J R; Adamovics, J; Thomas, A; Oldham, M

    2012-06-01

    This paper provides a summary of recent trials which took place at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during December 2010. The overall objective for the trials was to demonstrate that a newly developed technology could be used to locate, quantify and characterise the radiological hazards within two separate ORNL hot cells (B and C). The technology used, known as RadBall(®), is a novel, passive, non-electrical polymer based radiation detection device which provides a 3D visualisation of radiation from areas where effective measurements have not been previously possible due to lack of access. This is particularly useful in the nuclear industry prior to the decommissioning of facilities where the quantity, location and type of contamination are often unknown. For hot cell B, the primary objective of demonstrating that the technology could be used to locate, quantify and characterise three radiological sources was met with 100% success. Despite more challenging conditions in hot cell C, two sources were detected and accurately located. To summarise, the technology performed extremely well with regards to detecting and locating radiation sources and, despite the challenging conditions, moderately well when assessing the relative energy and intensity of those sources. Due to the technology's unique deployability, non-electrical nature and its directional awareness the technology shows significant promise for the future characterisation of radiation hazards prior to and during the decommissioning of contaminated nuclear facilities.

  4. phiFLIM: a new method to avoid aliasing in frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    In conventional wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), excitation light is intensity-modulated at megahertz frequencies. Emitted fluorescence is recorded by a CCD camera through an image intensifier, which is modulated at the same frequency. From images recorded

  5. Providing and optimizing functional MR (Magnetic Resonance) of motor cortex of human brain by MRI ( Magnetic Resonance Imaging) facilities of Imam Khomeinie Hospital

    CERN Document Server

    Khosravie, H R

    2000-01-01

    During the stimulation, an observable increased signal (%2-%5)in respective sensory-motor cortex was obtained after correcting for partial volume effects, optimizing S/N,and incorporating small vowels. The 2 D F A S T functional image obtained by this method, showed an anatomical association of the increased signal with gray matter of sensory-motor cortex(in T 1 weighted image). The resultant data showed the feasibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging using optimized gradient echo sequences on a standard 1.5 T imager. Display of human brain cortical activity is accomplished using various techniques, by them different spatial and temporal resolution may be obtained. F MRI technique with proper spatial and temporal resolution due to its noninvasivity is one of the promising techniques for detection of brain activities. This can be used as an important tool by neurologists, since a great development has been achieved for display different brain function. This thesis report the results of simulation effe...

  6. Variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the north polar Atlantic based on ocean color observations with Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Stramski, Dariusz

    2005-01-01

    We use satellite data from Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) to investigate distributions of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration in surface waters of the north polar Atlantic Ocean during the spring summer season (April through August) over a 6-year period from 1998 through 2003. By use of field data collected at sea, we developed regional relationships for the purpose of estimating POC from remote-sensing observations of ocean color. Analysis of several approaches used in the POC algorithm development and match-up analysis of coincident in situ derived and satellite-derived estimates of POC resulted in selection of an algorithm that is based on the blue-to-green ratio of remote-sensing reflectance R(sub rs) (or normalized water-leaving radiance L(sub wn)). The application of the selected algorithm to a 6-year record of SeaWiFS monthly composite data of L(sub wn) revealed patterns of seasonal and interannual variability of POC in the study region. For example, the results show a clear increase of POC throughout the season. The lowest values, generally less than 200 mg per cubic meters, and at some locations often less than 50 mg per cubic meters, were observed in April. In May and June, POC can exceed 300 or even 400 mg per cubic meters in some parts of the study region. Patterns of interannual variability are intricate, as they depend on the geographic location within the study region and particular time of year (month) considered. By comparing the results averaged over the entire study region and the entire season (April through August) for each year separately, we found that the lowest POC occurred in 2001 and the highest POC occurred in 2002 and 1999.

  7. An Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer for NGST

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its simultaneous deep imaging and integral field spectroscopic capability, an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrograph (IFTS) is ideally suited to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) mission, and offers opportunities for tremendous scientific return in many fields of astrophysical inquiry. We describe the operation and quantify the advantages of an IFTS for space applications. The conceptual design of the Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (IFIRS) is a wide field (5'.3 x 5'.3) f...

  8. American College of Radiology Accredited Facility Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Presentations Resources Breast Imaging Resources CMS/MIPPA Resources Digital Mammography QC Manual Resources RaySafe Phantom Supertech Phantom Marketing Toolkit Accredited Facility Showcase Testimonials Validation Site Survey ...

  9. Breadboard Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    In the sixties, Chrysler was NASA's prime contractor for the Saturn I and IB test launch vehicles. The company installed and operated at Huntsville what was known as the Saturn I/IB Development Breadboard Facility. "Breadboard," means an array of electrical and electronic equipment for performing a variety of development and test functions. This work gave Chrysler a broad capability in computerized testing to assure quality control in development of solid-state electronic systems. Today that division is manufacturing many products not destined for NASA, most of them being associated with the company's automotive line. A major project is production and quality-control testing of the "lean-burn" engine, one that has a built-in Computer to control emission timing, and allow the engine to run on a leaner mixture of fuel and air. Other environment-related products include vehicle emission analyzers. The newest of the line is an accurate, portable solid state instrument for testing auto exhaust gases. The exhaust analyzers, now being produced for company dealers and for service

  10. Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (MBIL) is adjacent-a nd has access-to the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences clinical imaging facilities. MBIL...

  11. Facile synthesis of terminal-alkyne bioorthogonal molecules for live -cell surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging through Au-core and silver/dopamine-shell nanotags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Bo; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2018-02-03

    Alkyne is unique, specific and biocompatible in the Raman-silent region of the cell, but there still remains a challenge to achieve ultrasensitive detection in living systems due to its weak Raman scattering. Herein, a terminal alkyne ((E)-2-[4-(ethynylbenzylidene)amino]ethane-1-thiol (EBAE)) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering is synthesized. The EBAE molecule possesses S- and C-termini, which can be directly bonded to gold nanoparticles and dopamine/silver by forming the Au-S chemical bond and the carbon-metal bond, respectively. The distance between Raman reporter and AuNPs/AgNPs can be reduced, contributing to forming hot-spot-based SERS substrate. The alkyne functionalized nanoparticles are based on Au core and encapsulating polydopamine shell, defined as Au-core and dopamine/Ag-shell (ACDS). The bimetallic ACDS induce strong SERS signals for molecular imaging that arise from the strong electromagnetic field. Furthermore, the EBAE provides a distinct peak in the cellular Raman-silent region with nearly zero background interference. The EBAE Raman signals could be tremendously enhanced when the Raman reporter is located at the middle of the Au-core and dopamine/Ag-shell. Therefore, this work could have huge potential benefits for the highly sensitive detection of intercellular information delivery by connecting the recognition molecules in biomedical diagnostics. Graphical abstract Terminal-alkyne-functionalized Au-core and silver/dopamine-shell nanotags for live-cell surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging.

  12. Facile synthesis of magnetite/perfluorocarbon co-loaded organic/inorganic hybrid vesicles for dual-modality ultrasound/magnetic resonance imaging and imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dechao; Wang, Xia; Li, Yongsheng; Zheng, Yuanyi; Li, Faqi; Chen, Hangrong; Gu, Jinlou; Zhao, Wenru; Shi, Jianlin

    2013-05-21

    Multifunctional organic/inorganic hybrid nanovesicles, fabricated by a facile self-assembly/sol-gel approach, display a unique morphology (figure) and satisfactory stability under physiological conditions. By co-encapsulation of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles and a liquid perfluorocarbon, the nanovesicles can be used not only as a dual-modality ultrasound/magnetic resonance contrast agent for accurate cancer diagnosis and monitoring, but also as a therapeutic enhancement agent for effective high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  14. A Wide-Field Study of the z ~ 0.8 Cluster RX J0152.7-1357: The Role of Environment in the Formation of the Red Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shannon G.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Holden, Bradford P.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Franx, Marijn; van der Wel, Arjen; Ford, Holland

    2009-04-01

    We present the first results from the largest spectroscopic survey to date of an intermediate redshift galaxy cluster, the z = 0.834 cluster RX J0152.7-1357. We use the colors of galaxies, assembled from a D ~ 12 Mpc region centered on the cluster, to investigate the properties of the red sequence as a function of density and clustercentric radius. Our wide-field multislit survey with a low-dispersion prism in the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph at the 6.5 m Baade telescope allowed us to identify 475 new members of the cluster and its surrounding large-scale structure with a redshift accuracy of σ z /(1 + z) ≈ 1% and a contamination rate of ~2% for galaxies with i' 4 × 1010 M sun (log M/M sun>10.6). We find that the red galaxy fraction is 93 ± 3% in the two merging cores of the cluster and declines to a level of 64 ± 3% at projected clustercentric radii R gsim 3 Mpc. At these large projected distances, the correlation between clustercentric radius and local density is nonexistent. This allows an assessment of the influence of the local environment on galaxy evolution, as opposed to mechanisms that operate on cluster scales (e.g., harassment, ram-pressure stripping). Even beyond R>3 Mpc we find an increasing fraction of red galaxies with increasing local density. The red galaxy fraction at the highest local densities in two large groups at R>3 Mpc matches the red galaxy fraction found in the two cores. Strikingly, galaxies at intermediate densities at R>3 Mpc, that are not obvious members of groups, also show signs of an enhanced red galaxy fraction. Our results point to such intermediate-density regions and the groups in the outskirts of the cluster, as sites where the local environment influences the transition of galaxies onto the red sequence. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California

  15. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  16. Enhanced photoresponsive polyethyleneimine/citric acid co-carbonized dots for facile and selective sensing and intracellular imaging of cobalt ions at physiologic pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Wen-Sheng, E-mail: wszou@ahjzu.edu.cn; Zhao, Qing-Chun; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Shao-Hua; Wang, Ya-Qin, E-mail: yqwang@ahjzu.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    Whether as an important biological element or as a radioactive source/medicine, the monitoring of trace levels of cobalt ions (Co) has become a non-negligible factor for human health and green environment. Current technologies for the detection of Co are cost-expensive and time-consuming, and require cumbersome sample pretreatment process. Herein a novel sensing platform has been developed for Co detection based on the quenching of the enhanced fluorescence signal of polyamine functionalized C-dots. Amine groups at the surface of the C-dots can capture Zn{sup 2+}/Cd{sup 2+} to form coordination compound, which can inhibit the photoinduced electron transfer pathways of C-dots and then induce the fluorescence enhancement of the C-dots by ∼80% margin. Also, Co interacts with these amine groups to form an absorbent complex, which can strongly quench the enhanced fluorescence of C-dots via an inner filter effect. This C-dots-based probe showed a wide linear response to Co with a concentration ranging from 0.012 to 12 μM, and a detection limit of 8.0 nM and RSD of 5.7% (n = 5). Significantly, the C-Dots exhibit excellent properties, such as negligible cytotoxicity, excellent biocompatibility, low-cost and high photostability, etc., which make C-dots favorable for label-free monitoring of Co and then successfully applied to the confocal imaging of intracellular Co. - Highlights: • Polyethyleneimine/citric acid co-carbonized dots were prepared. • Zn{sup 2+} can enhance fluorescence of C-dots by inhibiting PET pathways. • Co{sup 2+} can quench the enhanced fluorescence by an inner filter effect. • Bioprobe has been established for intracellular imaging Co.

  17. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  18. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  19. Analysis of Fourier ptychographic microscopy with half reduced images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ao; Chen, Ni; Situ, Guohai

    2018-01-01

    Fourier ptychography microscopy (FPM) provides gigapixel imaging with both a high image resolution and a wide field-of-view (FOV). However, it is time consuming during the image capture process. In this paper, we perform an analysis on the FPM imaging process. With numerical and experimental comparison, we find that the reconstructed high resolution images with half number of the total captured images is less degenerated compare to that using all the captured images, especially in the case that the object is amplitude or phase-only.

  20. Ocular Imaging Combining Ultrahigh Resolution and High Speed OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoll, Tilman; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    The impact of ultrahigh-resolution and ultrahigh-speed OCT technique on corneal and retinal imaging is shown. The capabilities of advanced OCT system for imaging of the cornea and the thickness determination of the tear film, corneal epithelium, and Bowman's layer over a wide field of view are demonstrated. The high transverse and axial resolution of OCT system allowing one to image individual nerve fiber bundles, the parafoveal capillary network, and individual cone photoreceptors is described.

  1. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  2. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  3. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  4. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  5. Iridium-complex-functionalized Fe3O4/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles: a facile three-in-one system in magnetic resonance imaging, luminescence imaging, and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Wei; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Lai, Cheng-Hsuan; Yang, Meng-Ju; Chen, Chun-Yen; Chou, Pi-Tai; Chan, Chi-Shun; Chi, Yun; Chen, Yu-Chun; Hsiao, Jong-Kai

    2008-02-01

    Highly uniform Fe3O4/SiO2 core/shell nanoparticles functionalized by phosphorescent iridium complexes (Ir) have been strategically designed and synthesized. The Fe3O4/SiO2(Ir) nanocomposite demonstrates its versatility in various applications: the magnetic core provides the capability for magnetic resonance imaging and the great enhancement of the spin-orbit coupling in the iridium complex makes it well suited for phosphorescent labeling and simultaneous singlet oxygen generation to induce apoptosis.

  6. Facile Preparation of a Thiol-Reactive (18)F-Labeling Agent and Synthesis of (18)F-DEG-VS-NT for PET Imaging of a Neurotensin Receptor-Positive Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhanhong; Li, Lin; Liu, Shuanglong; Yakushijin, Fumiko; Yakushijin, Kenichi; Horne, David; Conti, Peter S; Li, Zibo; Kandeel, Fouad; Shively, John E

    2014-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that neurotensin receptors (NTRs) play key roles in cancer growth and survival. In this study, we developed a simple and efficient method to radiolabel neurotensin peptide with (18)F for NTR-targeted imaging. The thiol-reactive reagent (18)F-(2-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethylsulfonyl)ethane ((18)F-DEG-VS) was facilely prepared through 1-step radiofluorination. After high-pressure liquid chromatography purification, (18)F-DEG-VS was incubated with the c(RGDyC) and c(RGDyK) peptide mixture to evaluate its specificity toward the reactive thiol. Thiolated neurotensin peptide was then labeled with (18)F using this novel synthon, and the resulting imaging probe was subjected to receptor-binding assay and small-animal PET studies in a murine xenograft model. The imaging results and metabolic stability of (18)F-DEG-VS-NT were compared with the thiol-specific maleimide derivative N-[2-(4-(18)F-fluorobenzamido)ethyl]maleimide-neurotensin ((18)F-FBEM-NT). (18)F-DEG-VS was obtained in high labeling yield. The reaction of (19)F-DEG-VS was highly specific for thiols at neutral pH, whereas the lysine of c(RGDyK) reacted at a pH greater than 8.5. (18)F-DEG-VS-c(RGDyC) was the preferred product when both c(RGDyK) and c(RGDyC) were incubated together with (18)F-DEG-VS. Thiolated neurotensin peptide (Cys-NT) efficiently reacted with (18)F-DEG-VS, with a 95% labeling yield (decay-corrected). The radiochemical purity of the (18)F-DEG-VS-NT was greater than 98%, and the specific activity was about 19.2 ± 4.3 TBq/mmol. Noninvasive small-animal PET demonstrated that (18)F-DEG-VS-NT had an NTR-specific tumor uptake in subcutaneous HT-29 xenografts. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-liver, and tumor-to-kidney ratios reached 30.65 ± 22.31, 11.86 ± 1.98, and 1.91 ± 0.43 at 2 h after injection, respectively, based on the biodistribution study. Receptor specificity was demonstrated by blocking experiment. Compared with (18)F-FBEM-NT, (18)F-DEG-VS-NT was

  7. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  8. Facile synthesis [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine for hyperpolarized MRS imaging of cancer cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wenchao; Zha, Zhihao; Lieberman, Brian P; Mancuso, Anthony; Stetz, Mathew; Rizzi, Rahim; Ploessl, Karl; Wise, David; Thompson, Craig; Kung, Hank F

    2011-08-01

    Recent reports suggest that cancer cells may use glutamine, instead of glucose, as an alternative source of metabolic energy. This suggests that hyperpolarized (13)C glutamine may be useful as a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging agent for detecting changes in glutamine metabolism in cancerous cells or tissues. Synthesis of [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine was accomplished through a seven-step synthetic pathway with a 44% overall yield. The introduction of two stable isotopes was performed by a NaB(2)H(4)-mixed anhydride reduction and K(13)CN-nuclophilic substitution, respectively. The desired [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine was successfully obtained by a one-pot reaction of deprotection and controlled cyanide hydrolysis. Hyperpolarized [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine samples were tested in human glioma cells (myc upregulated glia cells, SF188-Bcl-x(L)). MRS signals were obtained with a 9.4 Tesla 89-mm bore nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and a direct-detection multi-nuclear probe. The initial degree of polarization for [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine was ~5% and the initial (13)C signal to noise ratio was ~100:1. Glutamate was detected within seconds after the injection of hyperpolarized glutamine into the cells. The ratio of glutamate to glutamine was very high, indicating rapid conversion to glutamate. Similar cell uptake studies using [(3)H]-L-glutamine also demonstrated cell uptakes higher than that of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose. We are reporting the first example of using specifically deuterated [5-(13)C-4-(2)H(2)]-L-glutamine in conjunction with hyperpolarized MRS for studying "glutaminolysis" in proliferating tumor cells. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of SPECTRAL at LRBA's HWIL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Frederic; Lesueur, Marc

    2002-07-01

    DGA/DCE/LRBA, the French MoD missiles and navigation evaluation center has developed several HWIL facilities in order to test the IR-autoguidance-loops of tactical missiles. LRBA has initiated the acquisition of SPECTRAL, a dedicated hardware and software configuration. SPECTRAL (Multipurpose System for Laboratory Evaluation of Image Processing Calculators) is a complete system including hardware and software designed for the evaluation of different missile functions or equipment (on-board image processing software, image processing calculators, imagers, terminal guidance and control performances). The main feature of this system is its capability to generate images representative of those elaborated by an infrared missile seeker, in real time. SPECTRAL is designed with an architecture for a multi-user environment including workstations carrying out several operations. Acceptance Test Procedures of SPECTRAL are being discussed and the first results are presented here. As a conclusion, we provide a comparison with existing image generating systems at LRBA's facilities.

  10. Sports Facility Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  11. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  12. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luohao Tang

    Full Text Available This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  13. Shapley Facility Location Games

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Porat, Omer; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    Facility location games have been a topic of major interest in economics, operations research and computer science, starting from the seminal work by Hotelling. Spatial facility location models have successfully predicted the outcome of competition in a variety of scenarios. In a typical facility location game, users/customers/voters are mapped to a metric space representing their preferences, and each player picks a point (facility) in that space. In most facility location games considered i...

  14. High throughput second harmonic imaging for label-free biological applications

    KAUST Repository

    Macias Romero, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) is inherently sensitive to the absence of spatial centrosymmetry, which can render it intrinsically sensitive to interfacial processes, chemical changes and electrochemical responses. Here, we seek to improve the imaging throughput of SHG microscopy by using a wide-field imaging scheme in combination with a medium-range repetition rate amplified near infrared femtosecond laser source and gated detection. The imaging throughput of this configuration is tested by measuring the optical image contrast for different image acquisition times of BaTiO3 nanoparticles in two different wide-field setups and one commercial point-scanning configuration. We find that the second harmonic imaging throughput is improved by 2-3 orders of magnitude compared to point-scan imaging. Capitalizing on this result, we perform low fluence imaging of (parts of) living mammalian neurons in culture.

  15. Mobile terawatt laser propagation facility (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Lawrence; Roumayah, Patrick; Bodnar, Nathan; Bradford, Joshua D.; Maukonen, Douglas; Richardson, Martin C.

    2017-03-01

    This presentation will describe the design and construction status of a new mobile high-energy femtosecond laser systems producing 500 mJ, 100 fs pulses at 10 Hz. This facility is built into a shipping container and includes a cleanroom housing the laser system, a separate section for the beam director optics with a retractable roof, and the environmental control equipment necessary to maintain stable operation. The laser system includes several innovations to improve the utility of the system for "in field" experiments. For example, this system utilizes a fiber laser oscillator and a monolithic chirped Bragg grating stretcher to improve system robustness/size and employs software to enable remote monitoring and system control. Uniquely, this facility incorporates a precision motion-controlled gimbal altitude-azimuth mount with a coudé path to enable aiming of the beam over a wide field of view. In addition to providing the ability to precisely aim at multiple targets, it is also possible to coordinate the beam with separate tracking/diagnostic sensing equipment as well as other laser systems. This mobile platform will be deployed at the Townes Institute Science and Technology Experimental Facility (TISTEF) located at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to utilize the 1-km secured laser propagation range and the wide array of meteorological instrumentation for atmospheric and turbulence characterization. This will provide significant new data on the propagation of high peak power ultrashort laser pulses and detailed information on the atmospheric conditions in a coastal semi-tropical environment.

  16. Image processing with ImageJ

    CERN Document Server

    Pascau, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The book will help readers discover the various facilities of ImageJ through a tutorial-based approach.This book is targeted at scientists, engineers, technicians, and managers, and anyone who wishes to master ImageJ for image viewing, processing, and analysis. If you are a developer, you will be able to code your own routines after you have finished reading this book. No prior knowledge of ImageJ is expected.

  17. Observatorio Astrofísico De Javalambre: A Dedicated Facility For Large Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Franch, A.

    2017-10-01

    The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is an astronomical facility located at the Pico del Buitre of the Sierra de Javalambre, in Teruel, Spain, at 1957m over the sea level. It has been conceived and defined to carry out large sky astronomical surveys from the Northern hemisphere with wide field telescopes and panoramic instrumentation. The OAJ is fundamentally organized around two large field-of-view (FoV) telescopes with their corresponding panoramic instrumentation for direct imaging that allows to carry out world-leading photometric surveys with an ample spectrum of key astrophysical applications. In this sense, the OAJ has already started to provide relevant data to essentially all the main research domains in Astrophysics and Cosmology.The two telescopes at the OAJ are the Javalambre Survey Telescope (hereafter, JST/T250), a 2.55m telescope with a FoV of 3 deg diameter, and the Javalambre Auxiliary Survey Telescope (hereafter, JAST/T80), a 0.83m telescope with a FoV of 2 deg diameter. Both of them are equipped with panoramic instrumentation designed to maximize the focal plane coverage while maintaining the image quality, namely JPAS-Pathfinder (interim) and JPCam for JST/T250, and T80Cam for JAST/T80. In particular, JPCam, with more than 1.2 Gpixels in a mosaic of 14 large-format CCDs (9.2k x 9.2k each) is amongst the largest astronomical cameras in the world. The large Etendue of the JST/T250 and JAST/T80 telescopes, their panoramic instrumentation, and the more than 70 unique optical filters available at the cameras of the two main telescopes makes the OAJ an unprecedented astronomical facility at this moment. Given that the telescopes will be mostly dedicated to predefined long-term projects, they will be the most efficient instruments to perform large scale, multi-filter astronomical surveys in reasonably short periods of time.The OAJ includes the UPAD Data Center with capacity to provide raw, reduced and calibrated data on a quasi real time

  18. Airborne Open Polar/Imaging Nephelometer for Ice Particles in Cirrus Clouds and Aerosols Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, JV [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Open Imaging Nephelometer (O-I-Neph) instrument is an adaptation of a proven laboratory instrument built and tested at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). The instrument design of both imaging nephelometers uses a narrow-beam laser source and a wide-field-of-view imaging camera to capture the entire scattering-phase function in one image, quasi-instantaneously.

  19. Handheld microwave bomb-detecting imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo

    2017-05-01

    Proposed novel imaging technique will provide all weather high-resolution imaging and recognition capability for RF/Microwave signals with good penetration through highly scattered media: fog, snow, dust, smoke, even foliage, camouflage, walls and ground. Image resolution in proposed imaging system is not limited by diffraction and will be determined by processor and sampling frequency. Proposed imaging system can simultaneously cover wide field of view, detect multiple targets and can be multi-frequency, multi-function. Directional antennas in imaging system can be close positioned and installed in cell phone size handheld device, on small aircraft or distributed around protected border or object. Non-scanning monopulse system allows dramatically decrease in transmitting power and at the same time provides increased imaging range by integrating 2-3 orders more signals than regular scanning imaging systems.

  20. The Pipeline, Portal and Archive (PPA) System for the WIYN Partial One Degree Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev

    2013-06-01

    The WIYN telescope has recently commissioned the partial One Degree Imager (pODI), which has already demonstrated very high image quality over a wide field. The PPA system was envisioned as the transport, archiving, reduction and discovery system for the complex and high-volume data from this instrument. The building blocks of the PPA are a high-speed transport conduit from the WIYN Observatory to Indiana where the archive resides, a pipeline data reduction system running on an NSF super computing facility (XSEDE) and a data access and discovery Portal. In many ways, the PPA is a forerunner of data systems for the extremely large data from the mega-surveys envisaged for the future. PPA has been designed and executed jointly by the WIYN partnership and Pervasive Technologies Institute (PTI) at IU. NOAO designed the pipeline algorithms and data transport, and PTI hosts the Archive, handles XSEDE computing and developed the Portal. The PPA was deployed for the first semester (2013A) of pODI shared-risk operation with essential services in place. When complete, the PPA will offer users, in addition to advanced data visualization tools, the option of generating pipeline re-runs and a virtual Desktop for limited custom analysis of reduced data. I will describe the development and report on the current status of the PPA system.

  1. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  2. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  3. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  4. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  5. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  6. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  7. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  8. Lesotho - Health Facility Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The main objective of the 2011 Health Facility Survey (HFS) was to establish a baseline for informing the Health Project performance indicators on health facilities,...

  9. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  10. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  11. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  12. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  13. Robustness in facility location

    OpenAIRE

    Van Lokven, Sander W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Facility location concerns the placement of facilities, for various objectives, by use of mathematical models and solution procedures. Almost all facility location models that can be found in literature are based on minimizing costs or maximizing cover, to cover as much demand as possible. These models are quite efficient for finding an optimal location for a new facility for a particular data set, which is considered to be constant and known in advance. In a real world situation, input da...

  14. CLEAR test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    A new user facility for accelerator R&D, the CERN Linear Electron Accelerator for Research (CLEAR), started operation in August 2017. CLEAR evolved from the former CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) used by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The new facility is able to host and test a broad range of ideas in the accelerator field.

  15. Facility Head | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facility HeadConfocal Microscopy Core FacilityLaboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics The Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics (LCBG), Center for Cancer Research (CCR), NCI, NIH, HHS is looking for a motivated and skilled microscopist to fill a Facility Head position to lead its Confocal Microscopy Core Facility. The CCR Microscopy Core provides microscopy equipment and support to approximately 150 active users representing over 20 NCI laboratories. The Core places an emphasis on training independent users, but the staff is available to assist in all phases of experiments. This includes experimental design, data acquisition, and data analysis. The Core provides state-of-the-art microscopic analyses to better understand critical biological structures and cellular processes involved in cancer. The Facility Head will also be expected to participate in the CCR Microscopy Core meetings and to interact extensively with the other microscopy facilities in CCR. Light microscopic techniques and analytic methods currently used in this facility include, but are not limited to: 1) co-localization of fluorescent fusion proteins with organelles; 2) demonstration of membrane ruffling, cytoskeletal organization, focal adhesions and other cell morphology; 3) live time-lapse translocation of fluorescent fusion proteins; 4) fluorescent indicators of oxidative stress in live cells; 5) 4D imaging of cell division; 6) Super-Resolution imaging; 7) tiling; 8) Fluorescent Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET); 9) Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS); 10) Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM); and, 11) Second Harmonic Generation imaging (SHG) of whole live tissue/organ. The Facility's equipment includes a Zeiss LSM 710 NLO for two-photon imaging, a Zeiss LSM 780 for higher sensitivity imaging, a Zeiss LSM 780/ELYRA for super-resolution imaging of fixed cells, and the Zeiss LSM 880/Airyscan for super-resolution imaging of live and

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of ... by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical ...

  17. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  18. The ideal imaging AR waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, David J.

    2017-06-01

    Imaging waveguides are a key development that are helping to create the Augmented Reality revolution. They have the ability to use a small projector as an input and produce a wide field of view, large eyebox, full colour, see-through image with good contrast and resolution. WaveOptics is at the forefront of this AR technology and has developed and demonstrated an approach which is readily scalable. This paper presents our view of the ideal near-to-eye imaging AR waveguide. This will be a single-layer waveguide which can be manufactured in high volume and low cost, and is suitable for small form factor applications and all-day wear. We discuss the requirements of the waveguide for an excellent user experience. When enhanced (AR) viewing is not required, the waveguide should have at least 90% transmission, no distracting artifacts and should accommodate the user's ophthalmic prescription. When enhanced viewing is required, additionally, the waveguide requires excellent imaging performance, this includes resolution to the limit of human acuity, wide field of view, full colour, high luminance uniformity and contrast. Imaging waveguides are afocal designs and hence cannot provide ophthalmic correction. If the user requires th