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Sample records for whole-skin electron therapy

  1. EPR persistence measurements of UV-induced melanin free radicals in whole skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, B.; Poehler, T.O. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Bryden, W.A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance is used to detect the formation of free radicals caused by exposure to ultraviolet radiation in chemically untreated rabbit skin. A fast jump in EPR signal level, occurring over a few seconds, is observed immediately after a skin sample is exposed to UV. This is followed by a slower increase toward an elevated steady-state signal over a period of hours as the skin is continuously exposed to a UV light source. Upon cessation of UV light exposure, EPR signal levels undergo an abrupt drop followed by a slower decay toward natural levels. Elevated free radical concentrations following UV exposure are found to persist for several hours in whole skin. These results are consistent with time resolved EPR measurements of photoinduced radicals in various natural melanins. (Author).

  2. Electron beams in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruinvis, I.A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical electron beams in interaction with beam flattening and collimating devices are studied, in order to obtain the means for adequate electron therapy. A treatment planning method for arbitrary field shapes is developed that takes the properties of the collimated electron beams into account. An electron multiple-scattering model is extended to incorporate a model for the loss of electrons with depth, in order to improve electron beam dose planning. A study of ionisation measurements in two different phantom materials yields correction factors for electron beam dosimetry. (Auth.)

  3. Review of electron beam therapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Almond, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    For over 50 years, electron beams have been an important modality for providing an accurate dose of radiation to superficial cancers and disease and for limiting the dose to underlying normal tissues and structures. This review looks at many of the important contributions of physics and dosimetry to the development and utilization of electron beam therapy, including electron treatment machines, dose specification and calibration, dose measurement, electron transport calculations, treatment and treatment-planning tools, and clinical utilization, including special procedures. Also, future changes in the practice of electron therapy resulting from challenges to its utilization and from potential future technology are discussed. (review)

  4. Review of electron beam therapy physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Almond, Peter R

    2006-07-07

    For over 50 years, electron beams have been an important modality for providing an accurate dose of radiation to superficial cancers and disease and for limiting the dose to underlying normal tissues and structures. This review looks at many of the important contributions of physics and dosimetry to the development and utilization of electron beam therapy, including electron treatment machines, dose specification and calibration, dose measurement, electron transport calculations, treatment and treatment-planning tools, and clinical utilization, including special procedures. Also, future changes in the practice of electron therapy resulting from challenges to its utilization and from potential future technology are discussed.

  5. Electron wedges for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene P.; Lo, Y.-C.; Humm, John L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Brain tumors can be advantageously treated with electron over photon radiation, by exploiting the rapid fall-off in dose with depth. This advantage could be further enhanced by utilizing multiple electron beams. However, in some beam configurations, wedged dose profiles would be necessary for the dose uniformity. Unlike photons, shaped pieces of material placed in electron beam severely degrade the energy, give additional scattering and, therefore, are suboptimal. The purpose of this study was to create wedged electron fields, using intensity modulation. The combination of electron wedges enables a more uniform coverage of brain tumors with a reduced dose to normal tissue. Methods and Materials: Intensity modulation was performed for 10 to 50 MeV electrons using a narrow scanning elementary beam of a racetrack Microtron accelerator, delivering radiation pulses with coordinates and intensities prescribed by a custom scan matrix. Dispensing more pulses (or longer pulses) within the field to increase the local dose, one can sharpen the penumbra at depth and generate wedged dose distributions of arbitrary angle as well as many other desired profiles. We modulated the electron beams, measured dose distributions using film in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compared the results with conventional techniques. Results: Intensity modulation of electron beams decreases the 50-90% penumbra at depth by 40% and increases the flatness by 80%. Wedged profiles at depth can be created for any angle up to about 70 deg. , depending on the beam energy. Multiple modulated electron beams give smaller 20-70% but larger 70-100% isodose regions than photon beams. Conclusions: Electron beams can improve dose distributions in brain compared to the same number of photon beams, reducing the 20-70% isodoses region in normal tissue by 30%. Intensity modulation significantly improves the dose distribution from combined electron beams providing a sharper penumbra, better conformity, and

  6. Clinical experience with electron pseudoarc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, M.R.; Freeman, C.R.; Pla, M.; Guerra, J.; Souhami, L.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1993-01-01

    Between November 1986 and June 1990, 24 patients were treated with electron pseudoarc therapy at McGill University. There were 21 females and three males aged 27 to 81 years (median 62 years). Electron pseudoarc therapy is a treatment option for selected breast carcinoma patients for palliation of extensive chest wall disease, although morbidity may be considerable. The technique may, however, play a more useful role in other situations where the superficial portion of large curved surfaces is to be treated with curative intent, such as chest wall lymphoma and sarcoma, scalp angiosarcoma, scalp lymphoma and posterior cervical soft tissue sarcoma. (Author)

  7. Epidermal electronic systems for sensing and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nanshu; Ameri, Shideh K.; Ha, Taewoo; Nicolini, Luke; Stier, Andrew; Wang, Pulin

    2017-04-01

    Epidermal electronic system is a class of hair thin, skin soft, stretchable sensors and electronics capable of continuous and long-term physiological sensing and clinical therapy when applied on human skin. The high cost of manpower, materials, and photolithographic facilities associated with its manufacture limit the availability of disposable epidermal electronics. We have invented a cost and time effective, completely dry, benchtop "cut-and-paste" method for the green, freeform and portable manufacture of epidermal electronics within minutes. We have applied the "cut-and-paste" method to manufacture epidermal electrodes, hydration and temperature sensors, conformable power-efficient heaters, as well as cuffless continuous blood pressure monitors out of metal thin films, two-dimensional (2D) materials, and piezoelectric polymer sheets. For demonstration purpose, we will discuss three examples of "cut-and-pasted" epidermal electronic systems in this paper. The first will be submicron thick, transparent epidermal graphene electrodes that can be directly transferred to human skin like a temporary transfer tattoo and can measure electrocardiogram (ECG) with signal-to-noise ratio and motion artifacts on par with conventional gel electrodes. The second will be a chest patch which houses both electrodes and pressure sensors for the synchronous measurements of ECG and seismocardiogram (SCG) such that beat-to-beat blood pressure can be inferred from the time interval between the R peak of the ECG and the AC peak of the SCG. The last example will be a highly conformable, low power consumption epidermal heater for thermal therapy.

  8. Collimation system for electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelli, R.J.; Carter, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An electron collimation system for electron arc therapy treatments consists of a slit collimation system which is movable with the electron beam applicator and is designed to allow for dose compensation in the sagittal direction and a hoop-and-clamp assembly for final field shaping. By correctly designing the shape of the slit in the former and properly adjusting the components of the latter, it is possible to accomplish quite uniform shielding without causing any weight of the shielding material to rest on the patient. The slit collimation system has a specially shaped aperture for confining the radiation beam. The hoop-and-clamp assembly has hoops and clamps which locate shielding over the patient's body. The shielding locating clamps are adjustably movable radially with respect to the hoops. (author)

  9. Auger Electron Therapy And Brachytherapy Tumor Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laster, B.H.; Shani, G.

    2002-01-01

    Auger Electron Therapy (AET) is a binary approach for improving cancer radiotherapy. It involves the selective targeting of an atom to tumor cells using physiological pathway. The atom is then irradiated by a specific radiation that produces secondary radiation called Auger electrons. One of the problems associated with the clinical application of AET, is that the energy of the photons required for stimulating photoelectric absorption in most of the available high Z target atoms, is too low to achieve penetration through normal surrounding tissues to the depth of the tumor, when an external source is used. The solution is therefore the use of a brachytherapy technique. There are two other problems associated with the use of radiation as a cancer treatment. The first is the limitation on radiation dose to the normal tissue within the treatment volume. The second problem is the limitation imposed by the miniscule size of the critical target of the cell, namely the DNA (0.25% of the cell mass). The solution to the first problem can be achieved by using the brachytherapy technique. The second problem can be resolved by placing the radiation source in close position to the DNA. AET, as we apply it, provides the two solutions to the two problems. When a photon is absorbed by an electron in the K or L shell of an high Z atom, the electron is ejected from the atom, creating a vacancy in the shell. This vacancy is immediately filled with an electron from an upper shell. The energy difference between the two shells is sometimes emitted as an x-ray, however, frequently the energy is transferred to an outer shell electron that is emitted as an Auger electron. These electrons are emitted at energies of up to ∼30 keV and therefore have a very short range in the cell. They will deposit all their energy within 20-30 nm from the point of emission. i.e. all the energy is deposited in the DNA. In our work indium is used as the high Z atom

  10. Radiotherapy for ocular lesions by electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaishi, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    Radiotherapy can be very significant as the treatment for ocular lesions, eyes need to be preserved as properly as possible on their functions and cosmetics. The appliance of conventional X ray therapy has been gradually abandaned as conventional X ray therapy ceased to be accepted as the general treatment for malignant tumors. Consequently the necessity of electron beam therapy has been rising even as the substituted method for conventional X ray therapy. The department of radiology of Gunma University was obliged to establish a new therapy for ocular lesions, and has been trying electron beam therapy since 1973; It is concluded that electron beam therapy is not at all inferior to conventional X ray therapy as reported above. Basic therapeutic methods for ocular lesions are the following: 1) For epidermoid carcinoma, 600 rads at a time, 3600 - 4200 rads in total is applied by 8 MeV electron twice a week method. 2) For malignant melanoma, 1000 rads at a time, 4000 - 5000 rads in total is applied by 8 MeV electron twice a week method. 3) For orbitar lymphoid neoplasm, Cobalt-60 γ ray or Linac X ray is applied together with electron beam. 4) For embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, adenoid cystic cancer etc., the therapy for whole body is necessary. 5) For benign tumors, a small dose at a time is applied for a long time. (author)

  11. Electron dose rate and photon contamination in electron arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.

    1989-01-01

    The electron dose rate at the depth of dose maximum dmax and the photon contamination are discussed as a function of several parameters of the rotational electron beam. A pseudoarc technique with an angular increment of 10 degrees and a constant number of monitor units per each stationary electron field was used in our experiments. The electron dose rate is defined as the electron dose at a given point in phantom divided by the number of monitor units given for any one stationary electron beam. For a given depth of isocenter di the electron dose rates at dmax are linearly dependent on the nominal field width w, while for a given w the dose rates are inversely proportional to di. The dose rates for rotational electron beams with different di are related through the inverse square law provided that the two beams have (di,w) combinations which give the same characteristic angle beta. The photon dose at the isocenter depends on the arc angle alpha, field width w, and isocenter depth di. For constant w and di the photon dose at isocenter is proportional to alpha, for constant alpha and w it is proportional to di, and for constant alpha and di it is inversely proportional to w. The w and di dependence implies that for the same alpha the photon dose at the isocenter is inversely proportional to the electron dose rate at dmax

  12. Development of total-skin electron therapy at two energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.S.; Heck, R.J.; Fessenden, P.; Karzmark, C.J.; Rust, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Total-Skin Electron Therapy (TSET) modalities have been developed at two energies on a Varian Clinac 1800. The physical criteria for the beams were determined mainly from the requirement of continuing the Stanford treatment technique, which was 12 Total-Skin Electron Therapy portals combined in six pairs. The penetration of the lower energy mode matches that previously obtained at Stanford on the Varian Clinac 10, (about 4 mm for the 80% isodose contour in the 12-field treatment). The penetration of the higher energy mode is about 8 mm at the 80% contour. The Total-Skin Electron Therapy modes necessarily use electrons produced by the two standard electron-beam modes of lowest energy, nominally 6 and 9 MeV. Measurements to verify the beam specifications were carried out with diodes, a variety of ionization chambers, and a specially constructed circular phantom for film dosimetry. Initially, the penetration of the Total-Skin Electron Therapy beams was too large to match our criteria, so two methods of reducing it were explored: (a) the energies of the electron beams produced by the machine were reduced (which also reduced the energies of the corresponding standard electron modes) and (b) a large polymethylmethacrylate degrader (2.4 m X 1.2 m) 1 cm thick was placed just in front of the patient plane. Acceptable Total-Skin Electron Therapy beams could be produced by either method and the latter was finally used. The use of the standard dose monitoring system for the Total-Skin Electron Therapy modes considerably simplifies the daily treatment delivery as well as the implementation. However, the need for reasonable dose rates at the treatment plane (3.5 meters beyond the isocenter) requires dose rates of 24 Gy/min at the isocenter. Nevertheless, it is possible to use the internal dose monitor provided the problems associated with high dose rates are addressed

  13. Results in electron therapy of tumors of various localizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardynskij, Yu.S.; Kudryavtseva, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    Immediate and late results of electron therapy are represented in 511 patients treated at a betatron B 5M-25 because of malignant tumors of skin, soft parts of the larynx, area of jaw and face, thyroid gland, mamma, as well as cutaneous melanoma. Total or considerable regression of the tumors was seen in 78% of the patients. The 3- and 5-years survival rate was 50.9 or 38.5% in electron therapy alone and 62 or 59% in combination with surgical methods. The radiation reactions were temporary and could be easily arrested by conventional therapy. The electron therapy with an energy of 5 to 20 MeV can be used in local tumors, lying superficially or in a maximum depth of 7 cm and is indicated especially for weakened patients. (author)

  14. Auger-electron spectra of radionuclides for therapy and diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanek, J.; Larsson, B.; Weinreich, R.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper documents the calculation of radiation spectra and of radial dose distribution around a point source for 24 selected radionuclides. The radionuclides were ordered into three groups: Nuclides potentially useful for therapy by emission of Auger electrons: 51 Cr, 64 Cu, 67 Ga, 73 Se, 75 Se, 77 Br, 80m Br, 94 Tc, 99m Tc, 114m In, 115m In, 123 I, 124 I, 125 I, 167 Tm, 193m Pt, and 195m Pt, nuclides potentially useful for therapy by α-particles with additional emission of Auger electrons; 212 Bi, 211 At and 255 Fm, and nuclides potentially useful for electron Auger-therapy with simultaneous PET diagnosis: 73 Se, 94 Tc and 124 I. The calculations imply strongly the development of labelled DNA-seeking compounds useful as carrier for the Auger- and Coster-Kronig electron-emitting radionuclides. (orig.)

  15. Energy and intensity modulated radiation therapy with electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    In recent years intensity modulated radiation therapy with photons (xIMRT) has gained attention due to its ability to reduce the dose in the tissues close to the tumour volume. However, this technique also results in a large low dose volume. Electron IMRT (eIMRT) has the potential to reduce the integral dose to the patient due to the dose fall off in the electron depth dose curves. This dose fall off makes it possible to modulate the dose distribution in the direction of the beam by selecting...

  16. Electronic cigarettes: health impact, nicotine replacement therapy, regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Zdrojewicz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available While the adverse effects of conventional cigarettes on human health have been thoroughly examined, in the last 15 years we have witnessed the birth of electronic cigarettes. There are many types of these devices available on the market. Studies are still underway to determine their negative impact on the human body. Electronic cigarettes comprise of power supply and a vaporising system. The user inhales the aerosol produced by heating up the liquid containing nicotine. In contrast with conventional cigarettes, the tobacco is not combusted, thus the compositions of the aerosol and cigarette smoke are considerably different. Out of 93 chemical substances present in the e-cigarette smoke, the aerosol contains only acetaldehyde, acetone, acrolein, formaldehyde and nicotine. More toxic substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals, are not present. The amount of evidence suggesting electronic cigarettes’ harmful effects on the human body is constantly increasing. Some reports imply that the electronic cigarettes negatively influence pregnancy, human psyche, respiratory and cardiovascular systems. They might also be involved in oncogenesis. With electronic cigarettes constantly gaining popularity, the question about the adverse effects of passive smoking becomes increasingly more relevant. Although various methods of helping people cease smoking or delivering nicotine to their bodies without burning toxic substances are being explored, electronic cigarettes are not recommended in nicotine substitution therapy. Legal regulations regarding electronic cigarettes are still being worked on. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects electronic cigarettes have on the human’s health.

  17. Dosimetric intercomparison between protons and electrons therapies applied to retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Flavia Vieira

    2008-01-01

    In this work we propose a construction of a simple human eye model in order to simulate the dosimetric response for a treatment with protons and electrons in a retinoblastoma cancer. The computational tool used in this simulation was the Geant4 code, in the version 4.9.1, all these package are free and permit simulate the interaction of radiation with matter. In our simulation we use a box with 4 cm side, with water, for represent the human eye. The simulation was performed considering mono energetics beams of protons and electrons with energy range between 50 and 70 MeV for protons and 2 and 10 MeV for electrons. The simulation was based on the advanced hadron therapy example of the Geant 4 code. In these example the phantom is divided in voxels with 0.2 mm side and it is generated the energy deposited in each voxel. The simulation results show the energy deliver in each voxel, with these energie we can calculate the dose deposited in that region. We can see the dose profile of, proton and electron, and we can see in both cases that for protons the position of delivered dose is well know, that happen in the position where the proton stop, for electrons the energies is delivered along the way and pass the desired position for high dose deposition. (author)

  18. Cutaneous complication after electron beam therapy in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jalilian

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the second cause of death among them. There are several treatment methods for breast cancer, one of which is radiation therapy. There are two important methods of radiation therapy: tangential field and single oppositional field. Main goal of this study is evaluation of factors that have a role in producing acute side effects such as skin burning in breast cancer patients treated by electron beam,in order to decrease these side effects. Methods: From 1/2003 through 7/2004, 200 consecutive patients were evaluated during 18 months in seid-al-shohad hospital, whose mean age was 49 years old. In this study a questionnaire was used including some questions about personal profile such as patient's name, address, registration number, age and some other factors. All patients who were candidated to enter in this investigation filled out the questionnaire at the end of radiation therapy. The patients were examined and their skin burning grades were evaluated by RTOG scale. Data were analyzed by chi-square test using SPSS 11 software. Results: None of patients showed grades O or 4 of burning. 31.5 % of Patients showed grade 1, 64.5 % showed grade 2, 4 % showed grade 3 of burning. There was statistically significant correlation between posterior axillary field and skin burning and there wasnot any meaning between the other factors. Conclusion: It is necessary to pay more attention to posterior axillary field planning including field size, location, photon energy, depth and dose of treatment. Keywords: breast cancer, electron beam radiation therapy, skin burning

  19. Electron beam therapy with coil-generated magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, Eran; Barnea, Gideon; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an initial study on the issues involved in the practical implementation of the use of transverse magnetic fields in electron beam therapy. By using such magnetic fields the dose delivered to the tumor region can increase significantly relative to that deposited to the healthy tissue. Initially we calculated the magnetic fields produced by the Helmholtz coil and modified Helmholtz coil configurations. These configurations, which can readily be used to generate high intensity magnetic fields, approximate the idealized magnetic fields studied in our previous publications. It was therefore of interest to perform a detailed study of the fields produced by these configurations. Electron beam dose distributions for 15 MeV electrons were calculated using the ACCEPTM code for a 3T transverse magnetic field produced by the modified Helmholtz configuration. The dose distribution was compared to those obtained with no magnetic field. The results were similar to those obtained in our previous work, where an idealized step function magnetic field was used and a 3T field was shown to be the optimal field strength. A simpler configuration was also studied in which a single external coil was used to generate the field. Electron dose distributions are also presented for a given geometry and given magnetic field strength using this configuration. The results indicate that this method is more difficult to apply to radiotherapy due to its lack of symmetry and its irregularity. For the various configurations dealt with here, a major problem is the need to shield the magnetic field in the beam propagation volume, a topic that must be studied in detail

  20. Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeely, L.K.; Jacobson, G.M.; Leavitt, D.D.; Stewart, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35 electively because of high risk of local failure, and 9 following local recurrence. One patient with advanced local regional disease was treated primarily. The target volume boundaries on the chest wall were defined by a foam lined cerrobend cast which rested on the patient during treatment, functioning as a tertiary collimator. A variable width secondary collimator was used to account for changes in the radius of the thorax from superior to inferior border. All patients had computerized tomography performed to determine Internal Mammary Chain depth and chest wall thickness. Electron energies were selected based on these thicknesses and often variable energies over different segments of the arc were used. The chest wall and regional node areas were irradiated to 45 Gy-50 Gy in 5-6 weeks by this technique. The supraclavicular and upper axillary nodes were treated by a direct anterior photon field abutted to the superior edge of the electron arc field. Follow-up is from 10-73 months with a median of 50 months. No major complications were observed. Acute and late effects and local control are comparable to standard chest wall irradiation. The disadvantages of this technique are that the preparation of the tertiary field defining cast and CT treatment planning are labor intensive and expensive. The advantage is that for specific clinical situations large areas of chest wall with marked topographical variation can be optimally, homogeneously irradiated while sparing normal uninvolved tissues

  1. On bolus for megavoltage photon and electron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, Vedang; Palmer, Lisa; Mudge, Ray; Jiang, Runqing; Fleck, Andre; Schaly, Bryan; Osei, Ernest; Charland, Paule

    2013-01-01

    Frequently, in radiation therapy one must treat superficial lesions on cancer patients; these are at or adjacent to the skin. Megavoltage photon radiotherapy penetrates through the skin to irradiate deep-seated tumors, with skin-sparing property. Hence, to treat superficial lesions, one must use a layer of scattering material to feign as the skin surface. Although megavoltage electron beams are used for superficial treatments, one occasionally needs to enhance the dose near the surface. Such is the function of a “bolus,” a natural or synthetically developed material that acts as a layer of tissue to provide a more effective treatment to the superficial lesions. Other uses of boluses are to correct for varying surface contours and to add scattering material around the patient's surface. Materials used as bolus vary from simple water to metal and include various mixtures and compounds. Even with the modernization of the technology for external-beam therapy and the emergence of various commercial boluses, the preparation and utilization of a bolus in clinical radiotherapy remains an art. Considering the varying experiences and practices, this paper briefly summarizes available boluses that have been proposed and are employed in clinical radiotherapy. Although this review is not exhaustive, it provides some initial guidance and answers questions that may arise in clinical practice

  2. Lying-on position of total skin electron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jiaming; Leung, Stephen Wan; Wang Chongjong; Chui Chenshou

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A technique for whole-body electron therapy with the patient in a lying position has been developed. This technique allows Total Skin Electron Therapy (TSET) for those patients who were previously unable to be treated in a conventional standing position. Methods and Materials: This study was carried out on a Varian 2100C linear accelerator with a 6 MeV high dose rate electron beam. The collimator was open to a width of 36 x 36 cm. There were two main procedures, with six dual-field techniques: 1) two static AP/PA vertical dual fields (VDF): the patient laid on the floor transversely under the collimator when the gantry was in a vertical position. A 0.6 cm acrylic board was placed 15 cm away from the patient, then the gantry was rotated 25 deg. clockwise and counterclockwise to treat the patient in the supine and prone positions, respectively. 2) Four oblique junction fields (OJF): the patient laid on the floor in a prone and supine position parallel to the wave guide at (227 - body thickness x tan 60 deg. ) cm away from the vertical axis of the gantry, then the gantry was rotated 60 deg. toward the patient. A 0.6 cm acrylic board was placed 15 cm away from the patient perpendicular to the beam. The patient was move along the field central axis. It allowed the patient's body to be within the 160 cm effective treatment profile. When the patient's body axis move 5 deg. toward the lateral side of the field central axis, we could obtain a better dose distribution in the vertex of the scalp and the soles of the feet. The angle of the VDF was measured by chamber detectors to obtain the effective treatment profile. Likewise, the optimal profile for the OJF was determined by the same procedures. The Rando phantom was used to measure the superficial dose of the body. Results: The dimension of effective treatment profile for the VDF was 188 x 72 cm at 87% dose level. For the OJF, we had to move the patient along the field central axis to obtain the effective

  3. Total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous lymphomas and leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisce, L.Z.; Chu, F.C.H.; Lee, H.S.; Filippa, D.; Kempin, S.; Coleman, M.

    1982-01-01

    Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEB) was used in the treatment of 33 patients with lymphoma and 13 patients with leukemia involving extensive segments of the skin surface. Twenty-two of 23 had lesions as a primary manifestation of lymphoma (primary cutaneous lymphoma-PCL) and 11 developed cutaneous lesions following disseminated nodal lymphoma (secondary cutaneous lymphoma-SCL). A once weekly fractionation scheme was employed to irradiate the entire skin surface with 3.5 to 4 MeV electron beam from a 6 MeV linear accelerator. During each weekly session, 400 rad were delivered to the entire skin and a complete course consisted of 4-6 consecutive weekly sessions. The majority of patients have been previously treated elsewhere for various periods and all patients have been at risk for a median of 12 months, range from 12-117 months following TSEB. Striking predominance of the diffuse pattern (76%) was demonstrated in both the PCL and SCL. There was extracutaneous involvement in 63% (13/22) of the PCL, nodal or visceral at onset of TSEB; median follow-up was 24 months, range 6-117 months; 20/22 (90%) of all patients obtained prompt relief of symptoms and complete regression of cutaneous lesions. Duration of cutaneous remission ranged from 6-96 months, median 18 months; in general, duration was adversly influenced by the presence of visceral involvement at onset of TSEB. Although cutaneous response among the patients with SCL and leukemia was equally good, many of these patients were treated for palliation because of rapid progression of their disease. Once weekly treatments were highly effective, well-tolerated and no untoward immediate or late effects have been noted in the bone marrow or normal skin irradiated

  4. Application of the electron pencil beam redefinition algorithm to electron arc therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Pai-Chun M; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Starkschall, George; Boyd, Robert A; Tucker, Susan L; Antolak, John A

    2006-07-01

    This project investigated the potential of summing fixed-beam dose distributions calculated using the pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) at small angular steps (1 degree) to model an electron arc therapy beam. The PRBA, previously modified to model skin collimation, was modified further by incorporating two correction factors. One correction factor that is energy, SSD (source-to-surface distance), and field-width dependent constrained the calculated dose output to be the same as the measured dose output for fixed-beam geometries within the range of field widths and SSDs encountered in arc therapy. Another correction factor (single field-width correction factor for each energy) compensated for large-angle scattering not being modeled, allowing a more accurate calculation of dose output at mid arc. The PBRA was commissioned to accurately calculate dose in a water phantom for fixed-beam geometries typical of electron arc therapy. Calculated central-axis depth doses agreed with measured doses to within 2% in the low-dose gradient regions and within 1-mm in the high-dose gradient regions. Off-axis doses agreed to within 2 mm in the high-dose gradient regions and within 3% in the low-dose gradient regions. Arced-beam calculations of dose output and depth dose at mid arc were evaluated by comparing to data measured using two cylindrical water phantoms with radii of 12 and 15 cm at 10 and 15 MeV. Dose output was measured for all combinations of phantom radii of curvature, collimator widths (4, 5, and 6 cm), and arc angles (0 degrees, 20 degrees, 40 degrees, 60 degrees, 80 degrees, and 90 degrees) for both beam energies. Results showed the calculated mid-arc dose output to agree within 2% of measurement for all combinations. For a 90 degree arc angle and 5 x 20 cm2 field size, the calculated mid-arc depth dose in the low-dose gradient region agreed to within 2% of measurement for all depths at 10 MeV and for depths greater than depth of dose maximum R100 at 15 Me

  5. Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavanaugh, James A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94

  6. Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanaugh, James A.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory; Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94

  7. Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, James A; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A; Fontenot, Jonas P; Henkelmann, Gregory

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94.62%, respectively, for the

  8. Treatment of cancer of the pancreas by intraoperative electron beam therapy: physical and biological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagne, F.R.; Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Milligan, A.J.; Bronn, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation therapy has had a significant and an expanded role in the management of cancer of the pancreas during the last decade. In particular, for locally advanced disease, radiation therapy has improved the median survival of patients to 1 year. Intraoperative electron beam therapy has been applied to unresectable and resectable pancreatic cancer in an attempt to enhance local control of disease and to improve patient survival. This paper presents a survey of the role of radiation therapy in treatment of cancer of the pancreas, provides information on the radiobiological aspects of this treatment modality and details the physical and dosimetric characteristics of intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons. Presented are the design specifics of an applicator system, central axis beam data, applicator parameters, dose distribution data, shielding, treatment planning and means of verification. Emphasis is placed on the collaboration and cooperation necessary for all members of the intraoperative radiation therapy team including surgeons, radiation therapists, medical physicists, anesthesiologists, technologists, and nurses.29 references

  9. MO-A-BRB-03: Integration Issues in Electronic Charting for External Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutlief, S.

    2015-01-01

    The process of converting to an electronic chart for radiation therapy can be daunting. It requires a dedicated committee to first research and choose appropriate software, to review the entire documentation policy and flow of the clinic, to convert this system to electronic form or if necessary, redesign the system to more easily conform to the electronic process. Those making the conversion and those who already use electronic charting would benefit from the shared experience of those who have been through the process in the past. Therefore TG262 was convened to provide guidance on electronic charting for external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. This course will present the results of an internal survey of task group members on EMR practices in External Beam Radiation Therapy as well as discuss important issues in EMR development and structure for both EBRT and brachytherapy. Learning Objectives: Be familiarized with common practices and pitfalls in development and maintenance of an electronic chart in Radiation Oncology Be familiarized with important issues related to electronic charting in External Beam Radiation Therapy Be familiarized with important issues related to electronic charting in Brachytherapy

  10. Awareness and Use of Electronic Health Records in Entry-Level Occupational Therapy and Occupational Therapy Assistant Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis F. Dmytryk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE requires programs to instruct entrylevel occupational therapy (OT and occupational therapy assistant (OTA students in technology that may include electronic documentation systems, distance communication, virtual environments, and telehealth (standard B1.8. At this time, there are no publications describing if and how electronic health record (EHR instruction is implemented in entry-level OT and OTA programs. The purpose of this study is to investigate awareness and use of EHRs in entry-level OT and OTA curricula. Respondents from 76 nationally accredited entry-level programs (two OT doctoral, 24 OT masters, two OT combined bachelors/masters, and 48 OTA completed a survey. The findings showed inconsistent and incomplete EHR instruction in entry-level OT and OTA education. This study provides a baseline for investigating best practices in EHR education for entrylevel OT and OTA students

  11. Small-size betatron for electron therapy of superficial tumors and its clinical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musabaeva, L.I.; Lisin, V.A.; Polishchuk, P.F.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the physicotechnical characteristics of a small-size betatron (with the energy of 7 MeV) designed in the Tomsk Polytechnical Institute for therapy of patients with superficial malignant tumors. An electron beam with the energy of 7 MeV was produced on the small-size betatron irradiation fields were formed, and absorbed dose distribution was studied. The efficacy of the use of the beam in 110 patients with superficial malignant tumors was analyzed. The use of electron beam radiation was found promising for therapy of patients with locally spread types of skin and lower lip cancers and breast cancer local recurrences. Complete tumor regression was noted in 75-90% of the patients. Intraoral cone electron therapy combined with 60 Co-therapy of surgery was employed for early cancer of the oral cavity

  12. Total skin electron beam therapy in mycosis fungoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Hiromi; Yamashita, Shigeru; Ishino, Yohichi; Suenaga, Yoshinori

    1988-01-01

    The studies using phantoms confirmed that the reduction of electron beam energy and minimization of X-ray contamination could be achieved when electron beam was interposed by an acrylic plate placed 20 cm anterior to a patient. Four patients of mycosis fungoides were treated with 8 MeV electron beam of a linear accelerator at UOEH Hospital from October 1981 to December 1986. Two of them were treated with this technique by placing 2 cm thick acrylic plate anterior to the patients and satisfactory results were obtained. Cutaneous lesions subsided remarkably with the dosage of 2000 cGy given in 2 months. Leucopenia due to bone marrow suppression was mild and the patients tolerated the treatment well. (author)

  13. Use of an electron reflector to improve dose uniformity at the vertex during total skin electron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, V.G.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The vertex of the scalp is always tangentially irradiated during total skin electron therapy (TSET). This study was conducted to determine the dose distribution at the vertex for a commonly used irradiation technique and to evaluate the use of an electron reflector, positioned above the head, as a means of improving the dose uniformity. Methods and Materials: Phantoms, simulating the head of a patient, were irradiated using our standard procedure for TSET. The technique is a six-field irradiation using dual angled electron beams at a treatment distance of 3.6 meters. Vertex dosimetry was performed using ionization methods and film. Measurements were made for an unmodified 6 MeV electron beam and for a 4 MeV beam obtained by placing an acrylic scattering plate in the beam line. Studies were performed to examine the effect of electron scattering on vertex dose when a lead reflector, 50 x 50 cm in area, was positioned above the phantom. Results: The surface dose at the vertex, in the absence of the reflector, was found to be less than 40% of the prescribed skin dose. Use of the lead reflector increased this value to 73% for the 6 MeV beam and 99% for the degraded 4 MeV beam. Significant improvements in depth dose were also observed. The dose enhancement is not strongly dependent on reflector distance or angulation since the reflector acts as a large source of broadly scattered electrons. Conclusion: The vertex may be significantly underdosed using standard techniques for total skin electron therapy. Use of an electron reflector improves the dose uniformity at the vertex and may reduce or eliminate the need for supplemental irradiation

  14. Secondary-electron-bremsstrahlung imaging for proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Nagao, Yuto [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Ando, Koki; Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, 1-1-1 Hirate-cho, Kita-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Kataoka, Jun [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kawachi, Naoki [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    A feasibility study on an imaging technique of a therapeutic proton-beam trajectory using a gamma camera by measuring secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB) was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and a beam-irradiation experiment. From the simulation and experimental results, it was found that a significant amount of SEB yield exists between the beam-injection surface and the range position along the beam axis and the beam trajectory is clearly imaged by the SEB yield. It is concluded that the SEB imaging is a promising technique for monitoring of therapeutic proton-beam trajectories.

  15. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  16. Dosimetric impact of a CT metal artefact suppression algorithm for proton, electron and photon therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jikun; Sandison, George A; Hsi, W-C; Ringor, Michael; Lu Xiaoyi

    2006-01-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to precision radiation treatment planning and this accuracy depends upon anatomic and tissue electron density information. Modern treatment planning inhomogeneity corrections use x-ray CT images and calibrated scales of tissue CT number to electron density to provide this information. The presence of metal in the volume scanned by an x-ray CT scanner causes metal induced image artefacts that influence CT numbers and thereby introduce errors in the radiation dose distribution calculated. This paper investigates the dosimetric improvement achieved by a previously proposed x-ray CT metal artefact suppression technique when the suppressed images of a patient with bilateral hip prostheses are used in commercial treatment planning systems for proton, electron or photon therapies. For all these beam types, this clinical image and treatment planning study reveals that the target may be severely underdosed if a metal artefact-contaminated image is used for dose calculations instead of the artefact suppressed one. Of the three beam types studied, the metal artefact suppression is most important for proton therapy dose calculations, intermediate for electron therapy and least important for x-ray therapy but still significant. The study of a water phantom having a metal rod simulating a hip prosthesis indicates that CT numbers generated after image processing for metal artefact suppression are accurate and thus dose calculations based on the metal artefact suppressed images will be of high fidelity

  17. Practical use of a plastic scintillator for quality assurance of electron beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, Katsunori; Tatsuno, Yuya; Tsuneda, Masato; Aono, Yuki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Fujisawa, Yoshiki; Matsushita, Akihiro; Ishigami, Minoru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2017-06-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of clinical electron beams is essential for performing accurate and safe radiation therapy. However, with advances in radiation therapy, QA has become increasingly labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator for quick and easy QA of clinical electron beams. The proposed tool comprises a plastic scintillator plate and a charge-coupled device camera that enable the scintillation light by electron beams to be recorded with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Further, the Cerenkov image is directly subtracted from the scintillation image to discriminate Cerenkov emissions and accurately measure the dose profiles of electron beams with high spatial resolution. Compared with conventional methods, discrepancies in the depth profile improved from 7% to 2% in the buildup region via subtractive corrections. Further, the output brightness showed good linearity with dose, good reproducibility (deviations below 1%), and dose rate independence (within 0.5%). The depth of 50% dose measured with the tool, an index of electron beam quality, was within  ±0.5 mm of that obtained with an ionization chamber. Lateral brightness profiles agreed with the lateral dose profiles to within 4% and no significant improvement was obtained using Cerenkov corrections. Field size agreed to within 0.5 mm with those obtained with ionization chamber. For clinical QA of electron boost treatment, a disk scintillator that mimics the shape of a patient’s breast is applied. The brightness distribution and dose, calculated using a treatment planning system, was generally acceptable for clinical use, except in limited zones. Overall, the proposed plastic scintillator plate tool efficiently performs QA for electron beam therapy and enables simultaneous verification of output constancy, beam quality, depth, and lateral dose profiles during monthly QAs at lower doses of irradiation (small monitor units, MUs).

  18. Practical use of a plastic scintillator for quality assurance of electron beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, Katsunori; Tatsuno, Yuya; Tsuneda, Masato; Aono, Yuki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Fujisawa, Yoshiki; Matsushita, Akihiro; Ishigami, Minoru; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2017-06-07

    Quality assurance (QA) of clinical electron beams is essential for performing accurate and safe radiation therapy. However, with advances in radiation therapy, QA has become increasingly labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we propose a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator for quick and easy QA of clinical electron beams. The proposed tool comprises a plastic scintillator plate and a charge-coupled device camera that enable the scintillation light by electron beams to be recorded with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Further, the Cerenkov image is directly subtracted from the scintillation image to discriminate Cerenkov emissions and accurately measure the dose profiles of electron beams with high spatial resolution. Compared with conventional methods, discrepancies in the depth profile improved from 7% to 2% in the buildup region via subtractive corrections. Further, the output brightness showed good linearity with dose, good reproducibility (deviations below 1%), and dose rate independence (within 0.5%). The depth of 50% dose measured with the tool, an index of electron beam quality, was within  ±0.5 mm of that obtained with an ionization chamber. Lateral brightness profiles agreed with the lateral dose profiles to within 4% and no significant improvement was obtained using Cerenkov corrections. Field size agreed to within 0.5 mm with those obtained with ionization chamber. For clinical QA of electron boost treatment, a disk scintillator that mimics the shape of a patient's breast is applied. The brightness distribution and dose, calculated using a treatment planning system, was generally acceptable for clinical use, except in limited zones. Overall, the proposed plastic scintillator plate tool efficiently performs QA for electron beam therapy and enables simultaneous verification of output constancy, beam quality, depth, and lateral dose profiles during monthly QAs at lower doses of irradiation (small monitor units, MUs).

  19. Results of mixed photon-electron therapy in early glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.; Rzepecki, W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of mixed photo-electron therapy in 85 patients with early glottic cancer are presented. 85% of the patients were in poor general condition. All patients received radiation to a single lateral laryngeal field of 6 X 6 to 8 X 8 cm 2 and the dose of 64 Gy to 70 Gy in 6 to 7 weeks. Half of the dose was delivered with a telecobalt unit and half with 15 MeV electrons. 78.8% patients (67/85) survived without evidence of malignancy for three years after the radiation therapy alone, and 5 patients survived after salvage surgery. The overall crude survival rate was 84.7% at three years. Three-year survival rates without evidence of malignancy were 91.5% in stage I and 69.2% in stage II

  20. Total skin electron beam therapy as palliative treatment for cutaneous manifestations of advanced, therapy-refractory cutaneous lymphoma and leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauswald, Henrik; Zwicker, Felix; Rochet, Nathalie; Uhl, Matthias; Hensley, Frank; Debus, Jürgen; Herfarth, Klaus; Bischof, Marc

    2012-01-01

    To retrospectively access the outcome and toxicity of a total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) in patients with cutaneous lymphoma (CL) or leukemia. Treatment results of 25 patients (median age 63 years; 5 female, 20 male) with cutaneous manifestations of advanced and therapy-refractory CL (n = 21; T-cell lymphomas n = 18, B-cell lymphomas n = 3) stage IIB-IV or leukemia (n = 4; AML n = 2, CLL n = 1, PDC n = 1) treated between 1993 and 2010 were reviewed. All patients were symptomatic. The median total dose was 29Gy, applied in 29 fractions of median 1 Gy each. The median follow-up was 10 months. Palliation was achieved in 23 patients (92%). A clinical complete response was documented in 13 (52%) and a partial response in 10 patients (40%). The median time to skin progression was 5 months (range 1–18 months) and the actuarial one-year progression-free survival 35%. The median overall survival (OS) after the initiation of TSEBT was 10 months (range 1–46 months) and the actuarial one-year OS 45%. TSEBT related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in all patients during the treatment period. An acute grade 3 epitheliolysis developed in eight patients (32%). Long-term adverse events as a hyperpigmentation of the skin (grade 1 or 2) were documented in 19 patients (76%), and a hypohidrosis in seven patients (28%). For palliation of symptomatic cutaneous manifestations of advanced cutaneous lymphoma or leukemia, total skin electron beam therapy is an efficient and well tolerated considerable treatment option

  1. Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sam Beddar, A.; Biggs, Peter J.; Chang Sha; Ezzell, Gary A.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hensley, Frank W.; Mills, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems

  2. Dosimetry of a prototype retractable eMLC for fixed-beam electron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Boyd, Robert A.; Antolak, John A.; Svatos, Michelle M.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Rosenman, Julian G.

    2004-01-01

    An electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) has been designed that is unique in that it retracts to 37 cm from the isocenter [63-cm source-to-collimator distance (SCD)] and can be deployed to distances of 20 and 10 cm from the isocenter (80 and 90 cm SCD, respectively). It is expected to be capable of arc therapy at 63 cm SCD; isocentric, fixed-beam therapy at 80 cm SCD; and source-to-surface distance (SSD), fixed-beam therapy at 90 cm SCD. In all positions, its leaves could be used for unmodulated or intensity-modulated therapy. Our goal in the present work is to describe the general characteristics of the eMLC and to demonstrate that its leakage characteristics and dosimetry are adequate for SSD, fixed-beam therapy as an alternative to Cerrobend cutouts with applicators once the prototype's leaves are motorized. Our eMLC data showed interleaf electron leakage at 15 MeV to be less than 0.1% based on a 0.0025 cm manufacturing tolerance, and lateral electron leakage at 5 and 15 MeV to be less than 2%. X-ray leakage through the leaves was 1.6% at 15 MeV. Our data showed that beam penumbra was independent of direction and leaf position. The dosimetric properties of square fields formed by the eMLC were very consistent with those formed by Cerrobend inserts in the 20x20 cm 2 applicator. Output factors exhibited similar field-size dependence. Airgap factors exhibited almost identical field-size dependence at two SSDs (105 and 110 cm), consistent with the common assumption that airgap factors are applicator independent. Percent depth-dose curves were similar, but showed variations up to 3% in the buildup region. The pencil-beam algorithm (PBA) fit measured data from the eMLC and applicator-cutout systems equally well, and the resulting two-dimensional (2-D) dose distributions, as predicted by the PBA, agreed well at common airgap distance. Simulating patient setups for breast and head and neck treatments showed that almost all fields could be treated using similar SSDs as

  3. The impact of an electronic monitoring and reminder device on patient compliance with antihypertensive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Arne; Christrup, Lona Louring; Fabricius, Paul Erik

    2010-01-01

    and were randomized to either electronic compliance monitoring with a reminder and monitoring device or standard therapy for 6 months. Both groups were crossed over after 6 months. Intervention effectiveness was assessed using self-reported compliance and BP. RESULTS: Data from 398 patients were analysed......BACKGROUND: High blood pressure (BP) significantly increases overall cardiovascular risk, the incidence of ischemic heart disease and stroke. One of the most important causes of insufficient BP control is low treatment compliance. Reminders and electronic compliance monitoring have been shown...... to be effective in improving patient compliance to some extent, but the combined effect has not been documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of an electronic reminder and monitoring device on patient compliance and BP control. METHODS: All patients received medical treatment with telmisartan once daily...

  4. Electron arc therapy: Influence of heterogeneities on dose to blood-forming organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavitt, D.D.; Gibbs, F.A.; Moeller, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Electron arc therapy has been used successfully to treat extended chest wall surfaces after mastectomy. Treatment is frequently given simultaneously with chemotherapy. Although the primary electron arc treatment volume consists only of the chest wall and mediastinum, dose is accumulated at the isocenter of rotation due to the photon contamination of the arcing electron beam. Additionally, higher energy electron fields which are occasionally used over segments of the arc may contribute to the dose at isocenter if the electron range has been extended due to passage through a low-density heterogeneity such as lung. In some patient setups, the isocenter may intersect blood-forming organs, such as the vertebral bodies. Thermoluminescent dosimetry has been used to measure the dose at isocenter for the following setups: polystyrene phantom, polystyrene phantom covered by 1-cm-thick lead cast, polystyrene phantom with cork insert to simulate lung, and phantom plus cork insert plus lead cast. For the 9-MeV treatment mode, dose at isocenter per 90 0 of arc (as a percentage of maximum tumor dose) is as follows: phantom, 6.5%; phantom plus lead, 5%; phantom plus cork, 8%; and phantom plus cork plus lead, 6%. These values must be scaled by the size of the arc to estimate dose at isocenter in actual treatments. Computer calculation showed good agreement with these measured values, indicating that the computerized treatment plans can be used as a predictor of electron arc dose to blood-forming organs

  5. Estimation of four-dimensional dose distribution using electronic portal imaging device in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Asumi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a method to evaluate four-dimensional radiation dose distribution in a patient body based upon the animated image of EPID (electronic portal imaging device) which is an image of beam-direction at the irradiation. In the first place, we have obtained the image of the dose which is emitted from patient body at therapy planning using therapy planning CT image and dose evaluation algorism. In the second place, we have estimated the emission dose image at the irradiation using EPID animated image which is obtained at the irradiation. In the third place, we have got an affine transformation matrix including respiratory movement in the body by performing linear registration on the emission dose image at therapy planning to get the one at the irradiation. In the fourth place, we have applied the affine transformation matrix on the therapy planning CT image and estimated the CT image 'at irradiation'. Finally we have evaluated four-dimensional dose distribution by calculating dose distribution in the CT image 'at irradiation' which has been estimated for each frame of the EPID animated-image. This scheme may be useful for evaluating therapy results and risk management. (author)

  6. Adherence to HAART therapy measured by electronic monitoring in newly diagnosed HIV patients in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriesendorp, Reinout; Cohen, Adam; Kristanto, Paulus; Vrijens, Bernard; Rakesh, Pande; Anand, Bene; Iwebor, Henry Uchechukwaka; Stiekema, Jacobus

    2007-12-01

    This pilot study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of electronic adherence monitoring of antiretroviral medications in HIV patients who recently started Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) in Francistown, Botswana and to compare this with self-reporting. Dosing histories were compiled electronically using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) monitors to evaluate adherence to prescribed therapies. Thirty patients enrolled in the antiretroviral treatment program were monitored over 6 weeks. These patients were all antiretroviral (ARV) naïve. After each visit (mean three times) to the pharmacy, the data compiled by the monitors were downloaded. Electronic monitoring of adherence was compared to patient self-reports of adherence. The mean individual medication adherence level measured with the electronic device was 85% (range 21-100%). The mean adherence level measured by means of self-reporting was 98% (range 70-100%). Medication prescribed on a once-a-day dose base was associated with a higher adherence level (97.9% for efavirenz) compared with a twice-a-day regimen (88.4% for Lamivudine/Zidovudine). It is feasible to assess treatment adherence of patients living in a low resource setting on HAART by using electronic monitors. Adherence, even in the early stages of treatment, appears to be insufficient in some patients and may be below the level required for continuous inhibition of viral replication. This approach may lead to improved targeting of counselling about their medication intake of such patients in order to prevent occurrence of resistant viral strains due to inadequate inhibition of viral replication. In this pilot study a significant difference between the data recorded through the electronic monitors and those provided by self-reporting was observed.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy applied to impression cytology for conjunctival damage from glaucoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Gilda; Forte, Raimondo; Del Prete, Salvatore; Cardone, Domenico

    2013-09-01

    To apply scanning electron microscopy to impression cytology (IC) to evaluate conjunctival damage in patients undergoing topical glaucoma therapy. All patients undergoing glaucoma therapy and without ocular surface disorders between September 2012 and January 2013 were enrolled. An age- and gender-matched group without glaucoma served as the control group. Conjunctival epithelium was evaluated with the ferning test (FT), impression cytology with light optic microscopy (ICOM), and impression cytology with scanning electron microscopy (ICSEM). Twenty patients (40 eyes; 11 men and 9 women, mean age 59.9 ± 11 years) constituted the treated group. The mean duration of glaucoma therapy was 25.5 ± 13.8 months (range, 6-48 months). The mean FT, ICOM, and ICSEM grades were 2.52 ± 0.5, 2.52 ± 0.6, and 2.55 ± 0.7, respectively. Treatment duration was not significantly correlated with FT/IC grade (P = 0.1), whereas it was significantly correlated with microvilli count at ICSEM (P = 0.01). The mean FT, ICOM, and ICSEM grades were significantly lower in the control group (40 eyes; 11 men and 9 women, mean age 61.1 ± 7.12 years) than in the treated group (1.22 ± 0.4, 1.25 ± 0.4 and 1.15 ± 0.3, respectively, P ICOM, and ICSEM grades were lower in eyes undergoing glaucoma therapy than in control eyes. Treatment duration was significantly associated with a reduced microvilli count at ICSEM, but not with FT or ICOM grades. Reduction of microvilli could be the first sign of cellular damage during chronic glaucoma therapy.

  8. Intraoperative electron beam therapy and external photon beam therapy with lumpectomy as primary treatment for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R.; Merrick, H.W.; Eltaki, A.; Bronn, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1988, seven women with breast cancer were treated with intraoperative electron beam therapy (IOEBT). All patients were Caucasian. Patient age ranged from 37 to 62 (median 53) years. Histopathology was infiltrating duct carcinoma (6/7) or medullary carcinoma (1/7). Four tumors were staged T1 N0 MO, one T1 N1 MO, one T2 N1 MO, and one lesion was recurrent. At the time of primary lumpectomy or axillary node dissection, a dose of 10 or 15 Gy IOEBT was administered to the tumor bed with 6 or 9 MeV electrons through the lumpectomy wound. All patients received 45 or 50 Gy over five to six weeks with 6 MV photons to the breast and, in four patients, to the regional nodes. Three patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and tamoxifen. No post-operative complications were observed. All patients are alive as of August, 1989, with no evidence of recurrent disease. Excellent cosmesis is the rule. Clinical and technical aspects of treatment are presented along with the rationale for the use of IOEBT in the primary definitive radiotherapeutic management of early breast cancer

  9. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosunen, A

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?){sup water} {sub air}, in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in {sup 60}Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?){sup water} {sub air} can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation

  10. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosunen, A.

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?) water air , in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in 60 Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?) water air can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation). To improve the accuracy

  11. Knowledge and Perceptions about Nicotine, Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Electronic Cigarettes among Healthcare Professionals in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Moysidou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and perceptions of Greek healthcare professionals about nicotine, nicotine replacement therapies and electronic cigarettes. Methods. An online survey was performed, in which physicians and nurses working in private and public healthcare sectors in Athens-Greece were asked to participate through email invitations. A knowledge score was calculated by scoring the correct answers to specific questions with 1 point. Results. A total of 262 healthcare professionals were included to the analysis. Most had daily contact with smokers in their working environment. About half of them considered that nicotine has an extremely or very important contribution to smoking-related disease. More than 30% considered nicotine replacement therapies equally or more addictive than smoking, 76.7% overestimated their smoking cessation efficacy and only 21.0% would recommend them as long-term smoking substitutes. For electronic cigarettes, 45.0% considered them equally or more addictive than smoking and 24.4% equally or more harmful than tobacco cigarettes. Additionally, 35.5% thought they involve combustion while the majority responded that nicotine in electronic cigarettes is synthetically produced. Only 14.5% knew about the pending European regulation, but 33.2% have recommended them to smokers in the past. Still, more than 40% would not recommend electronic cigarettes to smokers unwilling or unable to quit smoking with currently approved medications. Cardiologists and respiratory physicians, who are responsible for smoking cessation therapy in Greece, were even more reluctant to recommend electronic cigarettes to this subpopulation of smokers compared to all other participants. The knowledge score of the whole study sample was 7.7 (SD: 2.4 out of a maximum score of 16. Higher score was associated with specific physician specialties. Conclusions. Greek healthcare professionals appear to overestimate

  12. Brachytherapy or electron beam boost in conservation therapy of carcinoma of the breast: a nonrandomized comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Carlos A.; Taylor, Marie E.; Halverson, Karen; Garcia, Delia; Kuske, Robert R.; Lockett, Mary Ann

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The results of breast-conservation therapy using breast irradiation and a boost to the tumor excision site with either electron beam or interstitial 192 Ir implant are reviewed. Methods and Materials: A total of 701 patients with histologically confirmed Stage T1 and T2 carcinoma of the breast were treated with wide local tumor excision or quadrantectomy and breast irradiation. The breast was treated with tangential fields using 4 or 6 MV photons to deliver 48 to 50 Gy in 1.8 to 2 Gy daily dose, in five weekly fractions. In 80 patients the regional lymphatics were irradiated. In 342 patients with Stage T1 and 107 with Stage T2 tumors, boost to the primary tumor excision site was delivered with 9 MeV and, more frequently, with 12 MeV electrons. In 91 patients with Stage T1 and 38 patients with Stage T2 tumors an interstitial 192 Ir implant was performed. Tumor control, disease-free survival, cosmesis, and morbidity of therapy are reviewed. Minimum follow-up is 4 years (median, 5.6 years; maximum, 24 years). Results: The overall local tumor recurrence rates were 5% in the T1 and 11% in the T2 tumor groups. There was no significant difference in the breast relapse rate in patients treated with either electron beam or interstitial 192 Ir boost. Regional lymph node recurrences were 1% in patients with T1 and 5% with T2 tumors. Distant metastases were recorded in 5% of the T1 and 23% of the T2 groups. The 10-year actuarial disease-free survival rates were 87% for patients with T1 and 75% for patients with T2 tumors. Disease-free survival was exactly the same in patients receiving either electron beam or interstitial 192 Ir boost. Cosmesis was rated as excellent/good in 84% of patients with T1 tumors treated with electron beam and 81% of patients treated with interstitial implant, and 74 and 79%, respectively, in patients with T2 tumors. Conclusions: Breast-conservation therapy is an effective treatment for patients with T1 and T2 carcinoma of the breast. There

  13. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  14. Low-dose (10-Gy) total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Gniadecki, Robert; Iversen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments...... is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over ... or a very good partial response rate (skin involvement with patches or plaques) documented in 57% of the patients. Median duration of overall cutaneous response was 174 days (5.8 months; range: 60-675 days). TSEBT-related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in 60% of patients. CONCLUSIONS...

  15. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  16. Total skin high-dose-rate electron therapy dosimetry using TG-51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossman, Michael S.; Sharma, Subhash C.

    2004-01-01

    An approach to dosimetry for total skin electron therapy (TSET) is discussed using the currently accepted TG-51 high-energy calibration protocol. The methodology incorporates water phantom data for absolute calibration and plastic phantom data for efficient reference dosimetry. The scheme is simplified to include the high-dose-rate mode conversion and provides support for its use, as it becomes more available on newer linear accelerators. Using a 6-field, modified Stanford technique, one may follow the process for accurate determination of absorbed dose

  17. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M [Al Azhar University, Cairo Egypt (Egypt); Desouky, O [National center for radiation research and technology-Egyptian atomic energy, Cairo (Egypt); Eldib, A [Al Azhar University, Cairo Egypt (Egypt); Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  18. Total skin electron therapy treatment verification: Monte Carlo simulation and beam characteristics of large non-standard electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavon, Ester Carrasco; Sanchez-Doblado, Francisco; Leal, Antonio; Capote, Roberto; Lagares, Juan Ignacio; Perucha, Maria; Arrans, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Total skin electron therapy (TSET) is a complex technique which requires non-standard measurements and dosimetric procedures. This paper investigates an essential first step towards TSET Monte Carlo (MC) verification. The non-standard 6 MeV 40 x 40 cm 2 electron beam at a source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm as well as its horizontal projection behind a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) screen to SSD = 380 cm were evaluated. The EGS4 OMEGA-BEAM code package running on a Linux home made 47 PCs cluster was used for the MC simulations. Percentage depth-dose curves and profiles were calculated and measured experimentally for the 40 x 40 cm 2 field at both SSD = 100 cm and patient surface SSD = 380 cm. The output factor (OF) between the reference 40 x 40 cm 2 open field and its horizontal projection as TSET beam at SSD = 380 cm was also measured for comparison with MC results. The accuracy of the simulated beam was validated by the good agreement to within 2% between measured relative dose distributions, including the beam characteristic parameters (R 50 , R 80 , R 100 , R p , E 0 ) and the MC calculated results. The energy spectrum, fluence and angular distribution at different stages of the beam (at SSD = 100 cm, at SSD = 364.2 cm, behind the PMMA beam spoiler screen and at treatment surface SSD = 380 cm) were derived from MC simulations. Results showed a final decrease in mean energy of almost 56% from the exit window to the treatment surface. A broader angular distribution (FWHM of the angular distribution increased from 13deg at SSD 100 cm to more than 30deg at the treatment surface) was fully attributable to the PMMA beam spoiler screen. OF calculations and measurements agreed to less than 1%. The effect of changing the electron energy cut-off from 0.7 MeV to 0.521 MeV and air density fluctuations in the bunker which could affect the MC results were shown to have a negligible impact on the beam fluence distributions. Results proved the applicability of using MC

  19. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  20. Total skin electron therapy as treatment for epitheliotropic lymphoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Domenico; Kubicek, Lyndsay; Lu, Bo; Craft, William; Conway, Julia

    2017-04-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is an uncommon cutaneous neoplasm in dogs. Treatment options are limited. Total skin electron therapy (TSET) has been suggested as a possible therapy for canine MF. To describe the use of TSET as palliative treatment for MF in a dog. An adult dog, previously diagnosed with nonepidermolytic ichthyosis, was presented with generalized erythroderma, alopecia and erosions. Histopathology revealed a densely cellular, well-demarcated, unencapsulated infiltrate extending from the epidermis to the mid-dermis compatible with MF. The infiltrate exhibited epitheliotropism multifocally for the epidermis, infundibula and adnexa. Due to a lack of response to chemotherapy, TSET was elected. Six megavoltage electrons were delivered using a 21EX Varian linear accelerator. A dose of 6 Gy was delivered to the skin surface and a 100 cm skin to surface distance was used for dog setup. The treatment time for the cranial half treatment was 3 h. The treatment was divided in two sessions (cranial and caudal halves of the body) 15 days apart. Clinical and histopathological complete remission was achieved and the dog was kept in remission with no additional treatments for 19 months before relapse and development of Sézary syndrome. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case reporting the use of TSET for medically refractory canine MF with post treatment follow-up. This case suggests that the use of TSET may be an effective palliative treatment for canine MF. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  1. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance pO2 Image Tumor Oxygen-Guided Radiation Therapy Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Maggio, Matt; Pelizzari, Charles; Halpern, Howard J

    2017-01-01

    Modern standards for radiation treatment do not take into account tumor oxygenation for radiation treatment planning. Strong correlation between tumor oxygenation and radiation treatment success suggests that oxygen-guided radiation therapy (OGRT) may be a promising enhancement of cancer radiation treatment. We have developed an OGRT protocol for rodents. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging is used for recording oxygen maps with high spatial resolution and excellent accuracy better than 1 torr. Radiation is delivered with an animal intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) XRAD225Cx micro-CT/ therapy system. The radiation plan is delivered in two steps. First, a uniform 15% tumor control dose (TCD 15 ) is delivered to the whole tumor. In the second step, an additional booster dose amounting to the difference between TCD 98 and TCD 15 is delivered to radio-resistant, hypoxic tumor regions. Delivery of the booster dose is performed using a multiport conformal beam protocol. For radiation beam shaping we used individual radiation blocks 3D-printed from tungsten infused ABS polymer. Calculation of beam geometry and the production of blocks is performed next to the EPR imager, immediately after oxygen imaging. Preliminary results demonstrate the sub-millimeter precision of the radiation delivery and high dose accuracy. The efficacy of the radiation treatment is currently being tested on syngeneic FSa fibrosarcoma tumors grown in the legs of C3H mice.

  2. On mixed electron-photon radiation therapy optimization using the column generation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Marc-André; Serban, Monica; Seuntjens, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Despite considerable increase in the number of degrees of freedom handled by recent radiotherapy optimisation algorithms, treatments are still typically delivered using a single modality. Column generation is an iterative method for solving large optimisation problems. It is well suited for mixed-modality (e.g., photon-electron) optimisation as the aperture shaping and modality selection problem can be solved rapidly, and the performance of the algorithm scales favourably with increasing degrees of freedom. We demonstrate that the column generation method applied to mixed photon-electron planning can efficiently generate treatment plans and investigate its behaviour under different aperture addition schemes. Column generation was applied to the problem of mixed-modality treatment planning for a chest wall case and a leg sarcoma case. 6 MV beamlets (100 cm SAD) were generated for the photon components along with 5 energies for electron beamlets (6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV), simulated as shortened-SAD (80 cm) beams collimated with a photon MLC. For the chest wall case, IMRT-only, modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT)-only, and mixed electron-photon (MBRT) treatment plans were created using the same planning criteria. For the sarcoma case, MBRT and MERT plans were created to study the behaviour of the algorithm under two different sets of planning criteria designed to favour specific modalities. Finally, the efficiency and plan quality of four different aperture addition schemes was analysed by creating chest wall MBRT treatment plans which incorporate more than a single aperture per iteration of the column generation loop based on a heuristic aperture ranking scheme. MBRT plans produced superior target coverage and homogeneity relative to IMRT and MERT plans created using the same optimisation criteria, all the while preserving the normal tissue-sparing advantages of electron therapy. Adjusting the planning criteria to favour a specific modality in the sarcoma

  3. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-01-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10 −4 ), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10 −6 ) and 282

  4. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10-6) and 282 without density

  5. Evaluation of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100 for Intraoperative Electron Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Liuzzi

    Full Text Available Purpose of the present work was to investigate thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs response to intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT beams. In an IOERT treatment, a large single radiation dose is delivered with a high dose-per-pulse electron beam (2-12 cGy/pulse during surgery. To verify and to record the delivered dose, in vivo dosimetry is a mandatory procedure for quality assurance. The TLDs feature many advantages such as a small detector size and close tissue equivalence that make them attractive for IOERT as in vivo dosimeters.LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters (TLD-100 were irradiated with different IOERT electron beam energies (5, 7 and 9 MeV and with a 6 MV conventional photon beam. For each energy, the TLDs were irradiated in the dose range of 0-10 Gy in step of 2 Gy. Regression analysis was performed to establish the response variation of thermoluminescent signals with dose and energy.The TLD-100 dose-response curves were obtained. In the dose range of 0-10 Gy, the calibration curve was confirmed to be linear for the conventional photon beam. In the same dose region, the quadratic model performs better than the linear model when high dose-per-pulse electron beams were used (F test; p<0.05.This study demonstrates that the TLD dose response, for doses ≤10 Gy, has a parabolic behavior in high dose-per-pulse electron beams. TLD-100 can be useful detectors for IOERT patient dosimetry if a proper calibration is provided.

  6. A Study on clinical Considerations caused by inevitably Extended SSD for Electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Woo; Kim, Jeong Man

    1996-01-01

    We are often faced with the clinical situations that is inevitably extended SSD for electron beam therapy due to anatomical restriction or applicator structure. But there are some difficulties in accurately predicting output and properties. In electron beam treatment , unlike photon beam the decrease in output for extended SSD does not follow inverse-square law accurately because of a loss of side scatter equilibrium, which is particularly significant for small cone size and low energies. The purpose of our study is to analyze the output in changing with the energy, cone size, air gap beyond the standard SSD and to compare inverse-square law factor derived from calculated effective SSD, mominal SSD with measured output factor. In addition, we have analyzed the change of PDD for several cones with different SSDs which range from 100 cm to 120 cm with 5 cm step and with different energies(6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, 16 MeV, 20 MeV). In accordance with our study, an extended SSD produces a significant change in beam output, negligible change in depth dose which range from 100 cm to 120 cm SSDs. In order to deliver the more accurate dose to the neoplastic tissue, first of all we recommend inverse-square law using the table of effective SSDs with cone sizes and energies respectively or simply to create a table of extended SSD air gap correction factor. The second we need to have an insight into some change of dose distribution including PPD, penumbra caused by extended SSD for electron beam therapy.

  7. Multiple courses of high-dose total skin electron beam therapy in the management of mycosis fungoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Mark; Hoppe, Richard T.; Knox, Susan J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis was undertaken to determine the indications for, the efficacy of, and the long-term complications of two courses of total skin electron beam therapy for mycosis fungoides. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 15 patients with the pathologic diagnosis of mycosis fungoides treated in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Stanford University Medical Center between 1968 and 1990 was performed. All patients received two courses of high-dose electron beam therapy to the skin. The mean dose for the total skin treatment for the first course was 32.6 Gy and 23.4 Gy for the second course of treatment. Results: Following the first course of total skin electron beam therapy, 11 of 15 had a complete response, with a mean duration of 11.6 months. All patients received adjuvant therapies between the first and second courses of high-dose total skin electron beam therapy. The mean interval between the first and the second courses of therapy was 41.3 months. Patients were restaged prior to commencement of their second course of high-dose total skin electron beam therapy, resulting in upstaging in six. The second course of therapy resulted in six complete responses and nine partial responses. Twelve of these patients have since died, 1 is lost to follow-up, and 2 are living with disease. The long-term side effects in the two living patients include pigmentation changes, alopecia, and diffuse xerosis. Conclusion: Delivery of two courses of total skin electron beam therapy is technically feasible, tolerable, and efficacious. The dose to the total skin was reduced for the second course of therapy in all cases. The criteria used to screen patients included initial good response to total skin electron treatment, long disease-free interval, exhaustion of other therapeutic modalities, and generalized skin involvement at relapse. Long-term toxicities were mild in severity and generally consisted of generalized xerosis, scattered

  8. Development of a daily dosimetric control for radiation therapy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saboori, Mohammadsaeed

    2015-01-01

    Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) can be used to perform dose measurements during radiation therapy treatments if dedicated calibration and correction procedures are applied. The purpose of this study was to provide a new calibration and correction model for an amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPID for use in transit dose verification of step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A model was created in a commercial treatment planning system to calculate the nominal two-dimensional (2D) dose map of each radiation field at the EPID level. The EPID system was calibrated and correction factors were determined using a reference set-up, which consisted a patient phantom and an EPID phantom. The advantage of this method is that for the calibration, the actual beam spectrum is used to mimic a patient measurement. As proof-of-principle, the method was tested for the verification of two 7-field IMRT treatment plans with tumor sites in the head-and-neck and pelvic region. Predicted and measured EPID responses were successfully compared to the nominal data from treatment planning using dose difference maps and gamma analyses. Based on our result it can be concluded that this new method of 2D EPID dosimetry is a potential tool for simple patient treatment fraction dose verification.

  9. Combined modality therapy including intraoperative electron irradiation for locally recurrent colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Michael G; Miller, Robert C; Nelson, Heidi; Pemberton, John H; Dozois, Eric J; Alberts, Steven R; Gunderson, Leonard L

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate survival, relapse patterns, and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer relapse treated with curative-intent therapy, including intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT). From April 1981 through January 2008, 607 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer received IOERT as a component of treatment. IOERT was preceded or followed by external radiation (median dose, 45.5 Gy) in 583 patients (96%). Resection was classified as R0 in 227 (37%), R1 in 224 (37%), and R2 in 156 (26%). The median IOERT dose was 15 Gy (range, 7.5-30 Gy). Median overall survival was 36 months. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 30% and 16%, respectively. Survival estimates at 5 years were 46%, 27%, and 16% for R0, R1, and R2 resection, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that R0 resection, no prior chemotherapy, and more recent treatment (in the second half of the series) were associated with improved survival. The 3-year cumulative incidence of central, local, and distant relapse was 12%, 23%, and 49%, respectively. Central and local relapse were more common in previously irradiated patients and in those with subtotal resection. Toxicity Grade 3 or higher partially attributable to IOERT was observed in 66 patients (11%). Neuropathy was observed in 94 patients (15%) and was more common with IOERT doses exceeding 12.5 Gy. Long-term survival and disease control was achievable in patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer. Continued evaluation of curative-intent, combined-modality therapy that includes IOERT is warranted in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Automated electronic monitoring of circuit pressures during continuous renal replacement therapy: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Baldwin, Ian; Zhu, Guijun; Tanaka, Aiko; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2015-03-01

    Automated electronic monitoring and analysis of circuit pressures during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has the potential to predict failure and allow intervention to optimise function. Current CRRT machines can measure and store pressure readings for downloading into databases and for analysis. We developed a procedure to obtain such data at intervals of 1 minute and analyse them using the Prismaflex CRRT machine, and we present an example of such analysis. We obtained data on pressures obtained at intervals of 1 minute in a patient with acute kidney injury and sepsis treated with continuous haemofiltration at 2 L/hour of ultrafiltration and a blood flow of 200 mL/minute. Data analysis identified progressive increases in transmembrane pressure (TMP) and prefilter pressure (PFP) from time 0 until 33 hours or clotting. TMP increased from 104 mmHg to 313 mmHg and PFP increased from from 131 mmHg to 185 mmHg. Effluent pressure showed a progressive increase in the negative pressure applied to achieve ultrafiltration from 0 mmHg to -168 mmHg. The inflection point for such changes was also identified. Blood pathway pressures for access and return remained unchanged throughout. Automated electronic monitoring of circuit pressure during CRRT is possible and provides useful information on the evolution of circuit clotting.

  11. The dosimetric Properties of Electron Beam Using Lyon Intraoperative Device for Intraoperative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kye Jun; Park, Kyung Ran; Lee, Jong Young; Kim, Hie Yeon; Sung, Ki Joon; Chu, Sung Sil

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the dosimetric properties of electron beam using Lyon intraoperative device for intraoperative radiation therapy. The dosimetry data had compiled in such a way that a quick and correct decision regarding the cone shape, energy, and accurate calculations could be made. Using 3 dimensional water phantom, we have got the following data: cone output ratios, surface dose, dmax, dgo, flatness, symmetry, beam profiles, isodose curve, and SSD correction factors. The cone output ratios were measured with straight and bevelled cone, respectively. As the cone size and the energy were reduced, the cone output ratios decreased rapidly. With the flattening filter, the surface dose increased by electron beam to 85.3%, 89.2%, and 93.4%, for 6MeV, 9MeV, and 12MeV, respectively. It is important to increase the surface dose to 90% or more. Inspite of diminishing dose rate and beam penetration, this flattening filter increases the treatment volume significantly. With the combination of the three levels collimation and the flattening filter, we achieved good homogeneity of the beam and better flatness and the diameter of the 90% isodose curve was increased. It is important to increase the area that is included in the 90% isodose level. The value of measured and calculated SSD correction factors did not agree over the clinically important range from 100 cm to 110 cm

  12. The electronic view box: a software tool for radiation therapy treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, Walter R.; Low, Daniel A.; Gerber, Russell L.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Graham, Mary V.; Perez, Carlos A.; Harms, William B.; Purdy, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We have developed a software tool for interactively verifying treatment plan implementation. The Electronic View Box (EVB) tool copies the paradigm of current practice but does so electronically. A portal image (online portal image or digitized port film) is displayed side by side with a prescription image (digitized simulator film or digitally reconstructed radiograph). The user can measure distances between features in prescription and portal images and 'write' on the display, either to approve the image or to indicate required corrective actions. The EVB tool also provides several features not available in conventional verification practice using a light box. Methods and Materials: The EVB tool has been written in ANSI C using the X window system. The tool makes use of the Virtual Machine Platform and Foundation Library specifications of the NCI-sponsored Radiation Therapy Planning Tools Collaborative Working Group for portability into an arbitrary treatment planning system that conforms to these specifications. The present EVB tool is based on an earlier Verification Image Review tool, but with a substantial redesign of the user interface. A graphical user interface prototyping system was used in iteratively refining the tool layout to allow rapid modifications of the interface in response to user comments. Results: Features of the EVB tool include 1) hierarchical selection of digital portal images based on physician name, patient name, and field identifier; 2) side-by-side presentation of prescription and portal images at equal magnification and orientation, and with independent grayscale controls; 3) 'trace' facility for outlining anatomical structures; 4) 'ruler' facility for measuring distances; 5) zoomed display of corresponding regions in both images; 6) image contrast enhancement; and 7) communication of portal image evaluation results (approval, block modification, repeat image acquisition, etc.). Conclusion: The EVB tool facilitates the rapid

  13. Optimal electron and combined electron and photon therapy in the phase space of complication-free cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asell, M; Hyödynmaa, S; Söderström, S; Brahme, A

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of using intensity-modulated high-energy electrons beams alone or in combination with photon beams to treat tumours located at depths from 5 cm to 25 cm has been investigated. A radiobiologically based optimization algorithm using the probability of complication-free tumour control has been used to calculate the optimal dose distributions. Two different target volumes have been used; one advanced cervical cancer with locally involved lymph nodes and one astrocytoma in the upper brain hemisphere. Treatments with only electron beams and also combinations between electron and photon beams have been investigated. The dependence of the expected treatment outcome on the beam energy and directions was investigated, and to some extent on the number of beam portals. It is shown that the beam direction intervals resulting in a high expected treatment outcome increase with increasing electron energy and also with some electron-photon combinations. For an eccentrically placed, not too deeply situated tumour surrounded by sensitive normal tissue it is shown that the expected treatment outcome can be improved by using electron beams in combination with photon beams compared with using two photon beams, and using two electron beams results in almost as high an expected treatment outcome. The possibility of improving the dose conformity from electron beams by adding photon fields parallel or orthogonal to the electron beams is demonstrated.

  14. Evaluation of Cobalt-Labeled Octreotide Analogs for Molecular Imaging and Auger Electron-Based Radionuclide Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Dam, Johan Hygum

    2014-01-01

    The somatostatin receptor, which is overexpressed by many neuroendocrine tumors, is a well-known target for molecular imaging and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Recently, (57)Co-labeled DOTATOC, an octreotide analog, was shown to have the highest affinity yet found for somatostatin receptor...... subtype 2. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biologic effects of novel cobalt-labeled octreotide analogs targeting the somatostatin receptor to identify promising candidates for molecular imaging and Auger electron-based radionuclide therapy. METHODS: Cobalt-labeled DOTATATE, DOTATOC, and DOTANOC...... were prepared with (57)Co or (58m)Co for SPECT or Auger electron-based therapy, respectively. The cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of the radioligands were characterized with the pancreatic tumor cell line AR42J in vitro, including assessment of the therapeutic effects of (58m...

  15. Integration of a mobile-integrated therapy with electronic health records: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Malinda M; Iyer, Anand K; Cohen, Joshua L

    2013-05-01

    Responses to the chronic disease epidemic have predominantly been standardized in their approach to date. Barriers to better health outcomes remain, and effective management requires patient-specific data and disease state knowledge be presented in methods that foster clinical decision-making and patient self-management. Mobile technology provides a new platform for data collection and patient-provider communication. The mobile device represents a personalized platform that is available to the patient on a 24/7 basis. Mobile-integrated therapy (MIT) is the convergence of mobile technology, clinical and behavioral science, and scientifically validated clinical outcomes. In this article, we highlight the lessons learned from functional integration of a Food and Drug Administration-cleared type 2 diabetes MIT into the electronic health record (EHR) of a multiphysician practice within a large, urban, academic medical center. In-depth interviews were conducted with integration stakeholder groups: mobile and EHR software and information technology teams, clinical end users, project managers, and business analysts. Interviews were summarized and categorized into lessons learned using the Architecture for Integrated Mobility® framework. Findings from the diverse stakeholder group of a MIT-EHR integration project indicate that user workflow, software system persistence, environment configuration, device connectivity and security, organizational processes, and data exchange heuristics are key issues that must be addressed. Mobile-integrated therapy that integrates patient self-management data with medical record data provides the opportunity to understand the potential benefits of bidirectional data sharing and reporting that are most valuable in advancing better health and better care in a cost-effective way that is scalable for all chronic diseases. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thisgaard, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development

  17. Accelerator based production of auger-electron-emitting isotopes for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thisgaard, H.

    2008-08-01

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Auger-electron-emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Auger-emitter 119Sb has been identified as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been developed using a low-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reactions 119Sn(p,n)119Sb and 117Sn(p,n)117Sb including measurements of the excitation function for the former reaction. Moreover, a new high-yield radiochemical separation method has been developed to allow the subsequent separation of the produced 119Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron, two new 'High Power' cyclotron targets were developed in this study. The target development was primarily based on theoretical thermal modeling calculations using finite-element-analysis software. With these targets, I have shown that it will be possible to produce several tens of GBq of therapeutics isotopes (e.g. 119Sb or 64Cu) using the PETtrace cyclotron commonly found at the larger PET-centers in the hospitals. Finally, research in a new method to measure the radiotoxicity of Auger-emitters invitro using cellular microinjection has been carried out. The purpose of this method is to be able to experimentally evaluate and compare the potency of the new and unconventional Auger-emitters (e.g. 119Sb). However, due to experimental complications, the development of this

  18. Determination of absorbed dose calibration factors for therapy level electron beam ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, M R; Williams, A J; DuSautoy, A R

    2001-03-01

    Over several years the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has been developing an absorbed dose calibration service for electron beam radiotherapy. To test this service, a number of trial calibrations of therapy level electron beam ionization chambers have been carried out during the last 3 years. These trials involved 17 UK radiotherapy centres supplying a total of 46 chambers of the NACP, Markus, Roos and Farmer types. Calibration factors were derived from the primary standard calorimeter at seven energies in the range 4 to 19 MeV with an estimated uncertainty of +/-1.5% at the 95% confidence level. Investigations were also carried out into chamber perturbation, polarity effects, ion recombination and repeatability of the calibration process. The instruments were returned to the radiotherapy centres for measurements to be carried out comparing the NPL direct calibration with the 1996 IPEMB air kerma based Code of Practice. It was found that, in general, all chambers of a particular type showed the same energy response. However, it was found that polarity and recombination corrections were quite variable for Markus chambers-differences in the polarity correction of up to 1% were seen. Perturbation corrections were obtained and were found to agree well with the standard data used in the IPEMB Code. The results of the comparison between the NPL calibration and IPEMB Code show agreement between the two methods at the +/-1% level for the NACP and Farmer chambers, but there is a significant difference for the Markus chambers of around 2%. This difference between chamber types is most likely to be due to the design of the Markus chamber.

  19. Nonadherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy: clinically relevant patient categorization based on electronic event monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wijngaerden, Eric; De Saar, Veerle; De Graeve, Veerle; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Vaerenbergh, Kristien; Bobbaers, Herman; Deschamps, Ann; Ceunen, Helga; De Geest, Sabina

    2002-03-20

    Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is crucial, but which aspects of drug-taking behavior are important remain largely unknown. In a prospective observational study, 43 HIV-1-infected patients taking HAART underwent electronic event monitoring (EEM). Taking adherence was defined as the percentage of doses taken compared with the number prescribed, dosing adherence was defined as the percentage of days on which all doses were taken, and timing adherence was defined as the percentage of doses taken within 1 hr of the time prescribed. Drug holidays were defined as periods of no drug intake for >24 hr. Cluster analysis, including the four EEM parameters, was used and refined to construct an algorithm to discriminate patients. Patients were categorized as nonadherent if they had a taking adherence of 6 drug holidays per 100 days. All four EEM parameters differed significantly (p load (p = 0.011) and rise in CD4+ cell count (p = 0.035), showing that the algorithm-based categorization is clinically relevant.

  20. Nicotine replacement therapy, tobacco products, and electronic cigarettes in pharmacies in St. Louis, Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoya, Joaquin; Jin, Linda; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Schootman, Mario

    2015-01-01

    To compare availability of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), tobacco products, and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in pharmacies in St. Louis, MO. Cross-sectional study, on-site store audits of 322 pharmacies. St. Louis, MO. 242 eligible community pharmacies located in the study area. Pharmacies were visited by trained research assistants who conducted a 5- to 10-minute store audit using a paper-based data collection tool. Availability, accessibility, and pricing of NRT as a function of neighborhood poverty rate and proportion of black residents as well as availability of tobacco products and e-cigarettes. NRT availability decreased as neighborhood poverty rate increased (P = 0.02). Availability without pharmacy personnel assistance also decreased with increasing poverty rate (r = -0.19; 95% CI = -0.06, -0.31) and higher percentage of black residents (r = -0.18; 95% CI = -0.06, -0.31). Prices were lower in neighborhoods with higher poverty rates (P = 0.02) and a higher percentage of black residents (P = 0.03). E-cigarettes were available in 43% of pharmacies, and their availability and price did not differ by poverty rate or percentage of black residents. Low access to NRT might perpetuate smoking disparities in disadvantaged and racially diverse neighborhoods. Study data support policies to ensure equal NRT access to reduce disparities.

  1. Intraoperative electron-beam therapy for primary and recurrent retroperitoneal soft-tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krempien, Robert; Roeder, Falk; Oertel, Susanne; Weitz, Juergen; Hensley, Frank W.; Timke, Carmen; Funk, Angela; Lindel, Katja; Harms, Wolfgang; Buchler, Markus W.; Debus, Juergen; Treiber, Martina

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the long-term outcome of patients with retroperitoneal soft-tissue sarcomas treated by maximal resection in combination with intraoperative electron-beam therapy (IOERT) and postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2004, 67 patients were treated with curative intent for primary (n = 26) or recurrent (n = 41) retroperitoneal soft-tissue sarcoma. All patients underwent maximal resection in combination with IOERT (mean dose, 15 Gy), 45 patients underwent additional postoperative EBRT, and 20 patients were previously irradiated. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-free survival, local control (LC), and freedom from metastatic disease of all patients was 64%, 28%, 40%, and 50%, respectively. The 5-year LC inside the IOERT field was 72%. For patients who completed IOERT and EBRT after R0-resection 5-year and 10-year OS was 80%, and 5-year and 10-year LC was 100%. Only 1 of the 21 patients after R0-resection and only 8 of 34 patients after R1-resection compared with 9 of 12 patients after R2-resection experienced inside IOERT-field relapse. Grade II or higher late complications were seen in 21% of the patients, but only 2 patients required surgical intervention because of late complications. Conclusion: In selected patients, IOERT results in excellent local control and survival, with acceptable morbidity

  2. Phase space determination from measured dose data for intraoperative electron radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, E; Herraiz, J L; Ibáñez, P; Pérez-Liva, M; Puebla, R; Cal-González, J; Guerra, P; Rodríguez, R; Illana, C; Udías, J M

    2015-01-07

    A procedure to characterize beams of a medical linear accelerator for their use in Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) is presented. The procedure relies on dose measurements in homogeneous media as input, avoiding the need for detailed simulations of the accelerator head. An iterative algorithm (EM-ML) has been employed to extract the relevant details of the phase space (PHSP) of the particles coming from the accelerator, such as energy spectra, spatial distribution and angle of emission of particles. The algorithm can use pre-computed dose volumes in water and/or air, so that the machine-specific tuning with actual data can be performed in a few minutes. To test the procedure, MC simulations of a linear accelerator with typical IOERT applicators and energies, have been performed and taken as reference. A solution PHSP derived from the dose produced by the simulated accelerator has been compared to the reference PHSP. Further, dose delivered by the simulated accelerator for setups not included in the fit of the PHSP were compared to the ones derived from the solution PHSP. The results show that it is possible to derive from dose measurements PHSP accurate for IOERT MC dose estimations.

  3. Simulation of irradiation exposure of electronic devices due to heavy ion therapy with Monte Carlo Code MCNP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapins, Janis; Guilliard, Nicole; Bernnat, Wolfgang; Buck, Arnulf

    2017-09-01

    During heavy ion irradiation therapy the patient has to be located exactly at the right position to make sure that the Bragg peak occurs in the tumour. The patient has to be moved in the range of millimetres to scan the ill tissue. For that reason a special table was developed which allows exact positioning. The electronic control can be located outside the surgery. But that has some disadvantage for the construction. To keep the system compact it would be much more comfortable to put the electronic control inside the surgery. As a lot of high energetic secondary particles are produced during the therapy causing a high dose in the room it is important to find positions with low dose rates. Therefore, investigations are needed where the electronic devices should be located to obtain a minimum of radiation, help to prevent the failure of sensitive devices. The dose rate was calculated for carbon ions with different initial energy and protons over the entire therapy room with Monte Carlo particle tracking using MCNP6. The types of secondary particles were identified and the dose rate for a thin silicon layer and an electronic mixture material was determined. In addition, the shielding effect of several selected material layers was calculated using MCNP6.

  4. Total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: a nationwide cohort study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Lise M; Kamstrup, Maria Rørbæk; Petersen, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    Background. Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective palliative treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). In the present study we reviewed the clinical response to TSEBT in Danish patients with CTCL. Material and methods. This retrospective study included 35 patients with CTCL......, the present study confirms that high-dose TSEBT is an effective, but generally not a curative therapy in the management of CTCL. High-dose treatment yielded significantly better results than low-dose treatment with 4 Gy. TSEBT offers significant palliation in most patients when other skin-directed or systemic...

  5. A National Survey on the Use of Electronic Directly Observed Therapy for Treatment of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaraig, Michelle; Lobato, Mark N; McGinnis Pilote, Kara; Wegener, Donna

    2017-07-07

    An increasing number of tuberculosis (TB) programs are adopting electronic directly observed therapy (eDOT), the use of technology to supervise patient adherence remotely. Pilot studies show that treatment adherence and completion were similar with eDOT compared with the standard in-person DOT. In December 2015, the National Tuberculosis Controllers Association administered an online survey to determine the extent to which eDOT is used in the United States. Sixty-eight Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded health department TB programs across the United States and a convenient sample of local health department TB programs. Fifty-six (82%) of 68 CDC-funded health department TB programs and an additional 57 local TB programs responded to the survey. Forty-seven (42%) of 113 TB programs are currently using eDOT, 41 (36%) are planning to implement in the next year, and 25 (22%) have no plans to implement eDOT. Of the 47 TB programs using eDOT, 31 (66%) use synchronous video DOT, 4 (9%) asynchronous video DOT, 11 (23%) a combination of both, and 1 (2%) ingestible sensor to conduct electronic observations. Forty-one (87%) indicated that treatment adherence and 40 (85%) indicated that treatment completion were about the same or higher than in-person DOT. More than 80% indicated that eDOT resulted in program cost savings, and almost all (91%) reported benefits in patient and staff satisfaction. However, 25 (53%) of the 47 TB programs that use eDOT encountered technical challenges and 37 (79%) offer eDOT to less than a third of their patients. Results from this survey indicate that eDOT is a promising tool that can be utilized to efficiently and effectively manage TB treatment. Findings will inform other TB programs interested in implementing eDOT. However, further evaluation is needed to assess eDOT acceptability to understand barriers to eDOT implementation from the patient and provider perspectives.

  6. Evaluation of alanine as a reference dosimeter for therapy level dose comparisons in megavoltage electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, Malcolm; Sharpe, Peter; Voros, Sandor

    2015-01-01

    When comparing absorbed dose standards from different laboratories (e.g. National Measurement Institutes, NMIs, for Key or Supplementary comparisons) it is rarely possible to carry out a direct comparison of primary standard instruments, and therefore some form of transfer detector is required. Historically, air-filled, unsealed ionization chambers have been used because of the long history of using these instruments, very good stability over many years, and ease of transport. However, the use of ion chambers for therapy-level comparisons is not without its problems. Findings from recent investigations suggest that ion chambers are prone to non-random variations, they are not completely robust to standard courier practices, and failure at any step in a comparison can render all measurements potentially useless. An alternative approach is to identify a transfer system that is insensitive to some of these concerns - effectively a dosimeter that is inexpensive, simple to use, robust, but with sufficient precision and of a size relevant to the disseminated quantity in question. The alanine dosimetry system has been successfully used in a number of situations as an audit dosimeter and therefore the purpose of this investigation was to determine whether alanine could also be used as the transfer detector for dosimetric comparisons, which require a lower value for the measurement uncertainty. A measurement protocol was developed for comparing primary standards of absorbed dose to water in high-energy electron beams using alanine pellets irradiated in a water-equivalent plastic phantom. A trial comparison has been carried out between three NMIs and has indicated that alanine is a suitable alternative to ion chambers, with the system used achieving a precision of 0.1%. Although the focus of the evaluation was on the performance of the dosimeter, the comparison results are encouraging, showing agreement at the level of the combined uncertainties (∼0.6%). Based on this

  7. Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous lymphoma : Minimal risk of acute toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Kai; Elsayad, Khaled; Moustakis, Christos; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is attracting increased interest for the effective palliative treatment of primary cutaneous T‑cell lymphoma (pCTCL). In this study, we compared toxicity profiles following various radiation doses. We reviewed the records of 60 patients who underwent TSEBT for pCTCL between 2000 and 2016 at the University Hospital of Munster. The treatment characteristics of the radiotherapy (RT) regimens and adverse events (AEs) were then analyzed and compared. In total, 67 courses of TSEBT were administered to 60 patients. Of these patients, 34 (51%) received a standard dose with a median surface dose of 30 Gy and 33 patients (49%) received a low dose with the median surface dose of 12 Gy (7 salvage low-dose TSEBT courses were administered to 5 patients). After a median follow-up of 15 months, the overall AE rate was 100%, including 38 patients (57%) with grade 2 and 7 (10%) with grade 3 AEs. Patients treated with low-dose TSEBT had significantly fewer grade 2 AEs than those with conventional dose regimens (33 vs. 79%, P dose regimen compared to those with the conventional dose regimens (6 vs. 15%, P = 0.78). Multiple/salvage low-dose TSEBT courses were not associated with an increased risk of acute AEs. Low-dose TSEBT regimens are associated with significantly fewer grade 2 acute toxicities compared with conventional doses of TSEBT. Repeated/Salvage low-dose TSEBT, however, appears to be tolerable and can even be applied safely in patients with cutaneous relapses.

  8. Revisiting Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Cameron, E-mail: cameronh@stanford.edu [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Young, James; Navi, Daniel [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Riaz, Nadeem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Lingala, Bharathi; Kim, Youn [Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a highly effective treatment for mycosis fungoides (MF). The standard course consists of 30 to 36 Gy delivered over an 8- to 10-week period. This regimen is time intensive and associated with significant treatment-related toxicities including erythema, desquamation, anhydrosis, alopecia, and xerosis. The aim of this study was to identify a lower dose alternative while retaining a favorable efficacy profile. Methods and Materials: One hundred two MF patients were identified who had been treated with an initial course of low-dose TSEBT (5-<30 Gy) between 1958 and 1995. Patients had a T stage classification of T2 (generalized patch/plaque, n = 51), T3 (tumor, n = 29), and T4 (erythrodermic, n = 22). Those with extracutaneous disease were excluded. Results: Overall response (OR) rates (>50% improvement) were 90% among patients with T2 to T4 disease receiving 5 to <10 Gy (n = 19). In comparison, OR rates between the 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy subgroups were 98% and 97%, respectively. There was no significant difference in median progression free survival (PFS) in T2 and T3 patients when stratified by dose group, and PFS in each was comparable to that of the standard dose. Conclusions: OR rates associated with low-dose TSEBT in the ranges of 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy are comparable to that of the standard dose ({>=} 30 Gy). Efficacy measures including OS, PFS, and RFS are also favorable. Given that the efficacy profile is similar between 10 and <20 Gy and 20 and <30 Gy, the utility of TSEBT within the lower dose range of 10 to <20 Gy merits further investigation, especially in the context of combined modality treatment.

  9. Automatic atlas based electron density and structure contouring for MRI-based prostate radiation therapy on the cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, J A; Burdett, N; Chandra, S; Rivest-Hénault, D; Ghose, S; Salvado, O; Fripp, J; Greer, P B; Sun, J; Parker, J; Pichler, P; Stanwell, P

    2014-01-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  10. Automatic Atlas Based Electron Density and Structure Contouring for MRI-based Prostate Radiation Therapy on the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, J. A.; Burdett, N.; Greer, P. B.; Sun, J.; Parker, J.; Pichler, P.; Stanwell, P.; Chandra, S.; Rivest-Hénault, D.; Ghose, S.; Salvado, O.; Fripp, J.

    2014-03-01

    Our group have been developing methods for MRI-alone prostate cancer radiation therapy treatment planning. To assist with clinical validation of the workflow we are investigating a cloud platform solution for research purposes. Benefits of cloud computing can include increased scalability, performance and extensibility while reducing total cost of ownership. In this paper we demonstrate the generation of DICOM-RT directories containing an automatic average atlas based electron density image and fast pelvic organ contouring from whole pelvis MR scans.

  11. A prospective, open-label study of low-dose total skin electron beam therapy in mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Specht, Lena; Skovgaard, Gunhild L

    2008-01-01

    causes and did not complete treatment. Acute side effects included desquamation, xerosis, and erythema of the skin. No severe side effects were observed. CONCLUSION: Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy can induce complete and partial responses in Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides; however, the duration......PURPOSE: To determine the effect of low-dose (4 Gy) total skin electron beam therapy as a second-line treatment of Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides in a prospective, open-label study. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Ten patients (6 men, 4 women, average age 68.7 years [range, 55-82 years......]) with histopathologically confirmed mycosis fungoides T2-T4 N0-N1 M0 who did not achieve complete remission or relapsed within 4 months after treatment with psoralen plus ultraviolet-A were included. Treatment consisted of low-dose total skin electron beam therapy administered at a total skin dose of 4 Gy given in 4...

  12. Evaluation of the Eclipse eMC algorithm for bolus electron conformal therapy using a standard verification dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Robert L; Sprunger, Conrad P; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Popple, Richard A; Antolak, John A

    2016-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and calculation speed of electron dose distributions calculated by the Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). The recent com-mercial availability of bolus ECT technology requires further validation of the eMC dose calculation algorithm. eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to previously measured TLD-dose points throughout patient-based cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV (planning treatment volume) CT anatomy. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system, and electron dose distributions calculated using 1% and pencil beam algorithm (PBA). The eMC has comparable accuracy to the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) used for bolus ECT planning and has acceptably low dose calculation times. The eMC accuracy decreased when smoothing was used in high-gradient dose regions. The eMC accuracy was consistent with that previously reported for accuracy of the eMC electron dose algorithm and shows that the algorithm is suitable for clinical implementation of bolus ECT.

  13. Intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOEBRT) for carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Konski, A.A.; Merrick, H.W. III; Bronn, D.G.; Schifeling, D.; Kamen, C.

    1991-01-01

    The abdominal cavities of 50 patients were explored in a specially constructed intraoperative radiotherapy operating amphitheater at the Medical College of Ohio. Twenty-six patients were treated with intraoperative and postoperative precision high dose external beam therapy, 12 with intraoperative irradiation but no external beam therapy, and 12 with palliative surgery alone. All but two patients completed the postoperative external beam radiation therapy as initially prescribed. The median survival time for patients treated with palliative surgery alone was 4 months, and that for patients treated with intraoperative radiotherapy without external beam therapy was 3.5 months. Patients undergoing intraoperative irradiation and external beam radiation therapy had a median survival time of 10.5 months. Four patients died within 30 days of surgery and two patients died of gastrointestinal hemorrhage 5 months posttreatment

  14. Does electron and proton therapy reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer after spinal irradiation for childhood medulloblastoma? A comparative treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiangkui Mu; Zackrisson, Bjoern; Bjoerk-Eriksson, Thomas; Johansson, Lennart; Karlsson, Mikael; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Gagliardi, Giovanna

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this treatment planning comparison study was to explore different spinal irradiation techniques with respect to the risk of late side-effects, particularly radiation-induced cancer. The radiotherapy techniques compared were conventional photon therapy, intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT), conventional electron therapy, intensity/energy modulated electron therapy (IMET) and proton therapy (IMPT). CT images for radiotherapy use from five children, median age 8 and diagnosed with medulloblastoma, were selected for this study. Target volumes and organs at risk were defined in 3-D. Treatment plans using conventional photon therapy, IMXT, conventional electron therapy, IMET and IMPT were set up. The probability of normal tissue complication (NTCP) and the risk of cancer induction were calculated using models with parameters-sets taken from published data for the general population; dose data were taken from dose volume histograms (DVH). Similar dose distributions in the targets were achieved with all techniques but the absorbed doses in the organs-at-risk varied significantly between the different techniques. The NTCP models based on available data predicted very low probabilities for side-effects in all cases. However, the effective mean doses outside the target volumes, and thus the predicted risk of cancer induction, varied significantly between the techniques. The highest lifetime risk of secondary cancers was estimated for IMXT (30%). The lowest risk was found with IMPT (4%). The risks associated with conventional photon therapy, electron therapy and IMET were 20%, 21% and 15%, respectively. This model study shows that spinal irradiation of young children with photon and electron techniques results in a substantial risk of radiation-induced secondary cancers. Multiple beam IMXT seems to be associated with a particularly high risk of secondary cancer induction. To minimise this risk, IMPT should be the treatment of choice. If proton therapy is not

  15. SU-E-T-356: Accuracy of Eclipse Electron Macro Monte Carlo Dose Algorithm for Use in Bolus Electron Conformal Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, R [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Popple, R; Benhabib, S [UniversityAlabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United Kingdom); Antolak, J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Sprunger, C [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Hogstrom, K [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of electron dose distribution calculated by the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with recent commercially available bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to those previously measured for cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV CT anatomy for each site. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The bolus ECT treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and calculated using the maximum allowable histories (2×10{sup 9}), resulting in a statistical error of <0.2%. Smoothing was not used for these calculations. Differences between eMC-calculated and measured dose distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose difference as well as distance to agreement (DTA). Results: Results from the eMC for the retromolar trigone phantom showed 89% (41/46) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of −0.12% with a standard deviation of 2.56%. Results for the nose phantom showed 95% (54/57) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of 1.12% with a standard deviation of 3.03%. Dose calculation times for the retromolar trigone and nose treatment plans were 15 min and 22 min, respectively, using 16 processors (Intel Xeon E5-2690, 2.9 GHz) on a Varian Eclipse framework agent server (FAS). Results of this study were consistent with those previously reported for accuracy of the eMC electron dose algorithm and for the .decimal, Inc. pencil beam redefinition algorithm used to plan the bolus. Conclusion: These results show that the accuracy of the Eclipse eMC algorithm is suitable for clinical implementation of bolus ECT.

  16. SU-E-T-356: Accuracy of Eclipse Electron Macro Monte Carlo Dose Algorithm for Use in Bolus Electron Conformal Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, R; Popple, R; Benhabib, S; Antolak, J; Sprunger, C; Hogstrom, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of electron dose distribution calculated by the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm for use with recent commercially available bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT). Methods: eMC-calculated electron dose distributions for bolus ECT have been compared to those previously measured for cylindrical phantoms (retromolar trigone and nose), whose axial cross sections were based on the mid-PTV CT anatomy for each site. The phantoms consisted of SR4 muscle substitute, SR4 bone substitute, and air. The bolus ECT treatment plans were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and calculated using the maximum allowable histories (2×10 9 ), resulting in a statistical error of <0.2%. Smoothing was not used for these calculations. Differences between eMC-calculated and measured dose distributions were evaluated in terms of absolute dose difference as well as distance to agreement (DTA). Results: Results from the eMC for the retromolar trigone phantom showed 89% (41/46) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of −0.12% with a standard deviation of 2.56%. Results for the nose phantom showed 95% (54/57) of dose points within 3% dose difference or 3 mm DTA. There was an average dose difference of 1.12% with a standard deviation of 3.03%. Dose calculation times for the retromolar trigone and nose treatment plans were 15 min and 22 min, respectively, using 16 processors (Intel Xeon E5-2690, 2.9 GHz) on a Varian Eclipse framework agent server (FAS). Results of this study were consistent with those previously reported for accuracy of the eMC electron dose algorithm and for the .decimal, Inc. pencil beam redefinition algorithm used to plan the bolus. Conclusion: These results show that the accuracy of the Eclipse eMC algorithm is suitable for clinical implementation of bolus ECT

  17. Relationship between CT number and electron density, scatter angle and nuclear reaction for hadron-therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsufuji, N.; Tomura, H.; Futami, Y.; Yamashita, H.; Kanai, T.; Higashi, A.; Minohara, S.; Endo, M.

    1998-01-01

    The precise conversion of CT numbers to their electron densities is essential in treatment planning for hadron therapy. Although some conversion methods have already been proposed, it is hard to check the conversion accuracy during practical therapy. We have estimated the CT numbers of real tissues by a calculational method established by Mustafa and Jackson. The relationship between the CT numbers and the electron densities was investigated for various body tissues as well as some tissue-equivalent materials used for a conversion to check the accuracy of the current conversion methods. The result indicates a slight disagreement at the high-CT-number region. A precise estimation of the multiple scattering, nuclear reaction and range straggling of incident particles has been considered as being important to realize higher-level conformal therapy in the future. The relationship between these parameters and the CT numbers was also investigated for tissues and water. The result shows that it is sufficiently practical to replace these parameters for real tissues with those for water by adjusting the density. (author)

  18. Evaluation of various boluses in dose distribution for electron therapy of the chest wall with an inward defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Hoda; Jabbari, Keyvan; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Delivering radiotherapy to the postmastectomy chest wall can be achieved using matched electron fields. Surgical defects of the chest wall change the dose distribution of electrons. In this study, the improvement of dose homogeneity using simple, nonconformal techniques of thermoplastic bolus application on a defect is evaluated. The proposed phantom design improves the capability of film dosimetry for obtaining dose profiles of a patient's anatomical condition. A modeled electron field of a patient with a postmastectomy inward surgical defect was planned. High energy electrons were delivered to the phantom in various settings, including no bolus, a bolus that filled the inward defect (PB0), a uniform thickness bolus of 5 mm (PB1), and two 5 mm boluses (PB2). A reduction of mean doses at the base of the defect was observed by any bolus application. PB0 increased the dose at central parts of the defect, reduced hot areas at the base of steep edges, and reduced dose to the lung and heart. Thermoplastic boluses that compensate a defect (PB0) increased the homogeneity of dose in a fixed depth from the surface; adversely, PB2 increased the dose heterogeneity. This study shows that it is practical to investigate dose homogeneity profiles inside a target volume for various techniques of electron therapy. PMID:27051169

  19. Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous lymphoma. Minimal risk of acute toxicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, Kai; Elsayad, Khaled; Moustakis, Christos; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is attracting increased interest for the effective palliative treatment of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (pCTCL). In this study, we compared toxicity profiles following various radiation doses. We reviewed the records of 60 patients who underwent TSEBT for pCTCL between 2000 and 2016 at the University Hospital of Munster. The treatment characteristics of the radiotherapy (RT) regimens and adverse events (AEs) were then analyzed and compared. In total, 67 courses of TSEBT were administered to 60 patients. Of these patients, 34 (51%) received a standard dose with a median surface dose of 30 Gy and 33 patients (49%) received a low dose with the median surface dose of 12 Gy (7 salvage low-dose TSEBT courses were administered to 5 patients). After a median follow-up of 15 months, the overall AE rate was 100%, including 38 patients (57%) with grade 2 and 7 (10%) with grade 3 AEs. Patients treated with low-dose TSEBT had significantly fewer grade 2 AEs than those with conventional dose regimens (33 vs. 79%, P < 0.001). A lower grade 3 AE rate was also observed in patients who had received the low-dose regimen compared to those with the conventional dose regimens (6 vs. 15%, P = 0.78). Multiple/salvage low-dose TSEBT courses were not associated with an increased risk of acute AEs. Low-dose TSEBT regimens are associated with significantly fewer grade 2 acute toxicities compared with conventional doses of TSEBT. Repeated/Salvage low-dose TSEBT, however, appears to be tolerable and can even be applied safely in patients with cutaneous relapses. (orig.) [German] Eine niedrigdosierte Ganzhautelektronenbestrahlung (TSEBT) wird vermehrt zur effektiven palliativen Behandlung von Patienten mit primaer kutanen T-Zell-Lymphomen (pCTCL) eingesetzt. In dieser Studie vergleichen wir die Toxizitaetsprofile verschiedener Dosiskonzepte. Untersucht wurden 60 zwischen 2000 und 2016 am Universitaetsklinikum Muenster mittels TSEBT

  20. Treatment of cancer of the pancreas by precision high dose (PHD) external photon beam and intraoperative electron beam therapy (IOEBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Howard, J.M.; Bagne, F.R.; Eltaki, A.; Merrick, H.W. III

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with a diagnosis of unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were explored in the Clement O. Miniger (COMROC) IOEBT operating amphitheater at the Medical College of Ohio. Seventeen were treated with IOEBT (20-30 Gy, 15 or 18 meV electrons) PHD external beam radiation therapy (40-60 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction) plus appropriate operative biliary and gastrointestinal bypass procedures. No intraoperative complications were observed. Two patients died of causes that may have been treatment-related. Two patients developed abdominocutaneous fistulae. Pain was ameliorated in eleven of twelve patients. Jaundice was relieved in all patients. Four of ten patients with weight loss showed a reversal of that trend. Patient survival was not significantly different from that of patients treated with high-dose precision therapy alone

  1. Use of EGS4 codes system for the evaluation of electron contamination in telecobalt therapy unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, B.; Alfonso, R.

    1995-01-01

    The cobalt 60 beams employed radiotherapy usually have some electron contamination, mainly depending on the selected field size, the diaphragm-skin distance and the collation system features. The electron component of a thyratron 780C cobalt unit was evaluated, using in any material and geometry, by using Monte Carlo techniques. The radiation transport in the unit head was simulated, as well as the absorbed dose in a water phantom, so the surface dose fraction due to electron was computed. Measurements from 0 to 5 mm depth were carried out in order to confirm our calculations, finding good agreement with them. Several PMMA filters with different thickness were analyzed to study their role in the electron contamination reduction; an optimal thickness around 5 mm was found

  2. Accelerator based Production of Auger-Electron-emitting Isotopes for Radionuclide Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge

    In this research project the focus has been on the identification and production of new, unconventional Augerelectron- emitting isotopes for targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer. Based on 1st principles dosimetry calculations on the subcellular level, the Augeremitter 119Sb has been identified......Sb from the enriched 119Sn target material with high radionuclidic- and chemical purity. A method that also allows efficient recovery of the 119Sn for recycling. To demonstrate the ability of producing therapeutic quantities of 119Sb and other radioisotopes for therapy with a low-energy cyclotron...... as a potent candidate for therapy. The corresponding imaging analogue 117Sb has been shown from planar scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to be suitable for SPECT-based dosimetry of a future Sb-labeled radiopharmaceutical. The production method of these radioisotopes has been...

  3. Whole body electron therapy using the Philips SL75/10 linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelzweig, Y.; Yudelev, M.; Tatcher, M.

    1980-01-01

    Electrons produced by accelerators are always accompanied by Bremsstrahlung radiation generated by electron interactions with the accelerator exit window, monitor ionization chamber, collimator, etc. The ratio of the Bremsstrahlung x-rays to electrons depends on the design of the accelerator, beam energy and adjustment, and the treatment set-up. For the electron mode of the Philips SL75/10 linac, x-rays normally constitute 1-2% of the beam at a distance of 1 meter. While this is acceptable for conventional treatments when electrons are used for whole-body irradiation, the x-ray contamination can become excessive because of the degrading effects of the large treatment distances or scattering foils required to produce large fields. A whole body electron treatment method for the SL75/10 linac, with emphasis on the means employed to minimize the x-ray dose to the patient, is described. Measurements of the properties of the electro; beams and their x-ray components were made with the aid of a thin parallel plate ionization chamber, thermoluminescent dosimeters and films in various phantoms. From analysis of the results of the measurements a practical method for treating patients was developed. The method is based on multiple adjacent beams of 4 Mev electrons applied while the patient lies on the treatment couch at a distance of 150cm from the source. The method satisfies the clinical requirements with regard to the depth and uniformity of electron dose and the level of x-ray contamination. It is not necessary to modify the linac or to use any special devices when giving the treatment. (author)

  4. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John P; Antolak, John A; Followill, David S; Huq, M Saiful; Klein, Eric E; Lam, Kwok L; Palta, Jatinder R; Roback, Donald M; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M

    2014-03-01

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D'0, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D'0 = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D'0 ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of dm, with D'0 = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  5. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, John P., E-mail: john.gibbons@marybird.com [Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Antolak, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Roback, Donald M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Reid, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States); Khan, Faiz M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ′}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ′} ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  6. Breast-conserving radiation therapy using combined electron and intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.G.; Williams, S.S.; Goffinet, D.R.; Boer, A.L.; Xing, L.

    2000-01-01

    An electron beam with appropriate energy was combined with four intensity modulated photon beams. The direction of the electron beam was chosen to be tilted 10-20 laterally from the anteroposterior direction. Two of the intensity-modulated photon beams had the same gantry angles as the conventional tangential fields, whereas the other two beams were rotated 15-25' toward the anteroposterior directions from the first two photon beams. An iterative algorithm was developed which optimizes the weight of the electron beam as well as the fluence profiles of the photon beams for a given patient. Two breast cancer patients with early-stage breast tumors were planned with the new technique and the results were compared with those from 3D planning using tangential fields as well as 9-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques. The combined electron and IMRT plans showed better dose conformity to the target with significantly reduced dose to the ipsilateral lung and, in the case of the left-breast patient, reduced dose to the heart, than the tangential field plans. In both the right-sided and left-sided breast plans, the dose to other normal structures was similar to that from conventional plans and was much smaller than that from the 9-field IMRT plans. The optimized electron beam provided between 70 to 80% of the prescribed dose at the depth of maximum dose of the electron beam. The combined electron and IMRT technique showed improvement over the conventional treatment technique using tangential fields with reduced dose to the ipsilateral lung and the heart. The customized beam directions of the four IMRT fields also kept the dose to other critical structures to a minimum. (author)

  7. Improving proton therapy accessibility through seamless electronic integration of remote treatment planning sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belard, Arnaud; Dolney, Derek; Zelig, Tochner; McDonough, James; O'Connell, John

    2011-06-01

    Proton radiotherapy is a relatively scarce treatment modality in radiation oncology, with only nine centers currently operating in the United States. Funded by Public Law 107-248, the University of Pennsylvania and the Walter Reed Army Medical Center have developed a remote proton radiation therapy solution with the goals of improving access to proton radiation therapy for Department of Defense (DoD) beneficiaries while minimizing treatment delays and time spent away from home/work (time savings of up to 3 weeks per patient). To meet both Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act guidelines and the more stringent security restrictions imposed by the DoD, our program developed a hybrid remote proton radiation therapy solution merging a CITRIX server with a JITIC-certified (Joint Interoperability Test Command) desktop videoconferencing unit. This conduit, thoroughly tested over a period of 6 months, integrates both institutions' radiation oncology treatment planning infrastructures into a single entity for DoD patients' treatment planning and delivery. This telemedicine solution enables DoD radiation oncologists and medical physicists the ability to (1) remotely access a proton therapy treatment planning platform, (2) transfer patient plans securely to the University of Pennsylvania patient database, and (3) initiate ad-hoc point-to-point and multipoint videoconferences to dynamically optimize and validate treatment plans. Our robust and secure remote treatment planning solution grants DoD patients not only access to a state-of-the-art treatment modality, but also participation in the treatment planning process by Walter Reed Army Medical Center radiation oncologists and medical physicists. This telemedicine system has the potential to lead to a greater integration of military treatment facilities and/or satellite clinics into regional proton therapy centers.

  8. A novel radiation therapy technique for malignant pleural mesothelioma combining electrons with intensity-modulated photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Maria F.; Chui, Chen S.; Song Yulin; Burman, Chandra; Yorke, Ellen; Della-Biancia, Cesar; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Schupak, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential benefits of combining electron and photon intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Patients and methods: The planning CT images of 11 MPM patients, six after extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and five after pleurectomy/decortication (P/D), were used for this study. These cases were planned with photon IMRT alone and photon IMRT combined with electrons (IMRT+e). The latter approach incorporated the electron dose into the inverse planning optimization. The resulting doses to the planning target volume (PTV) and relevant critical structures were compared. Results: For all patients, the PTV was well covered and doses to critical structures were clinically acceptable for all patients with both techniques. However, IMRT+e exhibited a distinct advantage in reducing the doses to the liver, ipsilateral kidney, contralateral kidney, and heart (P=0.002, 0.003, 0.025, and 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: This study showed that IMRT or IMRT+e is a viable treatment modality for MPM patients. Both plans can provide excellent target coverage and normal tissue sparing, but with the addition of electron beams, the critical structures can be further spared. Additional refining of the electron contribution is expected to further reduce radiation-induced morbidity

  9. Preliminary results of the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) as real-time beam monitor in hadron therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aza, E., E-mail: eleni.aza@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); AUTH, Department of Physics, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Ciocca, M. [Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Murtas, F. [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); LNF-INFN, Via Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Puddu, S. [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); AEC-LHEP, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Pullia, M. [Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Silari, M. [CERN, Geneva 23, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-01-01

    The use of proton and carbon ion beams in cancer therapy (also known as hadron therapy) is progressively growing worldwide due to their improved dose distributions, sparing of healthy tissues and (for carbon ions) increased radiobiological effectiveness especially for radio-resistant tumours. Strict Quality Assurance (QA) protocols need to be followed for guaranteeing the clinical beam specifications. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a gaseous detector based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology for measuring the beam spot dimensions and the homogeneity of the scanned irradiation field, which are daily QA tasks commonly performed using radiochromic films. Measurements performed at the National Centre for Oncological Hadron Therapy (CNAO) in Pavia (Italy) showed that the detector is able to monitor the 2D beam image on-line with a pad granularity of 2 mm and a response proportional to the number of delivered particles. The dose homogeneity was measured with low deviation from the results obtained with radiochromic films.

  10. Experience with high-energy electron beam therapy at the University of Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.; Kuchnir, F.T.; Lanzl, L.H.; Skaggs, L.S.; Sutton, H.G.; Tokars, R.

    1979-01-01

    Current utilization of the linear accelerator as well as 5-year cumulative experience in radiotherapy is presented. Cutaneous lymphomas and mammary gland carcinomas were the prime experience region; however, cancers at other locations were treated with mixed-beam therapy; employing fast neutrons and photon beams. The technique appears promising for abdominal tumors and deep-seated malignancies. Carcinoma of the pancreas responds favorably to this technique

  11. Pencil-beam redefinition algorithm dose calculations for electron therapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert Arthur

    2001-08-01

    The electron pencil-beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) of Shiu and Hogstrom has been developed for use in radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP). Earlier studies of Boyd and Hogstrom showed that the PBRA lacked an adequate incident beam model, that PBRA might require improved electron physics, and that no data existed which allowed adequate assessment of the PBRA-calculated dose accuracy in a heterogeneous medium such as one presented by patient anatomy. The hypothesis of this research was that by addressing the above issues the PBRA-calculated dose would be accurate to within 4% or 2 mm in regions of high dose gradients. A secondary electron source was added to the PBRA to account for collimation-scattered electrons in the incident beam. Parameters of the dual-source model were determined from a minimal data set to allow ease of beam commissioning. Comparisons with measured data showed 3% or better dose accuracy in water within the field for cases where 4% accuracy was not previously achievable. A measured data set was developed that allowed an evaluation of PBRA in regions distal to localized heterogeneities. Geometries in the data set included irregular surfaces and high- and low-density internal heterogeneities. The data was estimated to have 1% precision and 2% agreement with accurate, benchmarked Monte Carlo (MC) code. PBRA electron transport was enhanced by modeling local pencil beam divergence. This required fundamental changes to the mathematics of electron transport (divPBRA). Evaluation of divPBRA with the measured data set showed marginal improvement in dose accuracy when compared to PBRA; however, 4% or 2mm accuracy was not achieved by either PBRA version for all data points. Finally, PBRA was evaluated clinically by comparing PBRA- and MC-calculated dose distributions using site-specific patient RTP data. Results show PBRA did not agree with MC to within 4% or 2mm in a small fraction (beam commissioning, documentation of accuracy, and calculational

  12. Indications for total cutaneous electron beam radiation therapy of mycosis fungoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Haddad, E.; Marinello, G.; Marin, L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Ganem, G.

    1987-01-01

    From 1977 to 1984, we treated 34 patients with mycosis fungoides and 9 patients with B cutaneous lymphomas. Eighteen patients with mycosis fungoides were treated with total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) and had a minimum follow-up of 15 months (range 15 months to 7 years). The lowest electron energy of the linear accelerator was 8 MeV therefore we placed a plexiglas screen between the patient and the machine; the resulting electron energy was 4 MeV. The total dose was 30 Gy delivered in 12 fractions over 40 days. There were 8 males and 10 females. The median age was 48 years (ranging from 13 to 78 years). All patients were staged as follows: Stage A = superficial lesions covering less than 50% of the body surface; Stage B = superficial lesions covering more than 50% of the body surface; Stage C = tumors involving the skin, lymph nodes and/or visceral organs. Five patients with Stage A (5/5) and 5 patients with Stage B (5/5) had a complete remission, 1 stage A patient relapsed 6 months after completion of treatment. All the Stage B patients recurred between 3 and 15 months. The recurrences were localized to the skin and were well controlled with topical nitrogen mustard or puvatherapy. Among the Stage C patients, 3 did not respond to treatment and died of their disease; the remaining 5 patients achieved complete remission but they all relapsed from 2 to 9 months following completion of treatment. The median follow-up was 32 months and the average time for relapse was 6.5 months. All relapses except one (15 months) occurred within the first year. We feel that total skin electron irradiation is indicated in Stage A and B patients. However, we feel Stage C patients should receive TSEI for palliative purposes only

  13. SU-E-T-424: Dosimetric Verification of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Delivered Using An Electron Specific Multileaf Collimator for Treatment of Scalp Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldib, A [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Al-Azhar University Cairo (Egypt); Jin, L; Martin, J; Li, J; Chibani, O; Galloway, T; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has the potential to achieve better treatment outcome for shallow tumors such as those of breast and scalp. In a separate study with scalp lesions, MERT was compared to volumetric modulated arc therapy. Our results showed a reduction in the dose reaching the brain with MERT. However dose calculation accuracy and delivery efficiency challenges remain. Thus in the current study we proceed to add more cases to demonstrate MERT beneficial outcome and its delivery accuracy using an electron specific multileaf collimator (eMLC). Methods: We have used the MCBEAM code for treatment head simulation and for generating phase space files to be used as radiation source input for our Monte Carlo based treatment planning system (MC TPS). MCPLAN code is used for calculation of patient specific dose deposition coefficient and for final MERT plan dose calculation. An in-house developed optimization code is used for the optimization process. MERT plans were generated for real patients and head and neck phantom. Film was used for dosimetric verification. The film was cut following the contour of the curved phantom surface and then sealed with black masking tape. In the measurement, the sealed film packet was sandwiched between two adjacent slabs of the head and neck phantom. The measured 2D dose distribution was then compared with calculations. Results: The eMLC allows effective treatment of scalps with multi-lesions spreading around the patient head, which was usually difficult to plan or very time consuming with conventional applicators. MERT continues to show better reduction in the brain dose. The dosimetric measurements showed slight discrepancy, which was attributed to the film setup. Conclusion: MERT can improve treatment plan quality for patients with scalp cancers. Our in-house MC TPS is capable of performing treatment planning and accurate dose calculation for MERT using the eMLC.

  14. External-beam radiation therapy after surgical resection and intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy for oligorecurrent gynecological cancer. Long-term outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, C.V. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Radiomedicina, Service of Radiation Oncology, Santiago (Chile); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, F.A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Lozano, M.A.; Gonzalez-Sansegundo, C. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Bayon, L. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of General Surgery, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Alvarez, A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Lizarraga, S. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Gynecology, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Institute of Research Investigation, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sabrido, J.L. [Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of General Surgery, Madrid (Spain); Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Gynecology, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-15

    The goal of the present study was to analyze prognostic factors in patients treated with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT), surgical resection and intraoperative electron-beam radiotherapy (IOERT) for oligorecurrent gynecological cancer (ORGC). From January 1995 to December 2012, 61 patients with ORGC [uterine cervix (52 %), endometrial (30 %), ovarian (15 %), vagina (3 %)] underwent IOERT (12.5 Gy, range 10-15 Gy), and surgical resection to the pelvic (57 %) and paraaortic (43 %) recurrence tumor bed. In addition, 29 patients (48 %) also received EBRT (range 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Median follow-up time for the entire cohort of patients was 42 months (range 2-169 months). The 10-year rates for overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LRC) were 17 and 65 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, no tumor fragmentation (HR 0.22; p = 0.03), time interval from primary tumor diagnosis to locoregional recurrence (LRR) < 24 months (HR 4.02; p = 0.02) and no EBRT at the time of pelvic recurrence (HR 3.95; p = 0.02) retained significance with regard to LRR. Time interval from primary tumor to LRR < 24 months (HR 2.32; p = 0.02) and no EBRT at the time of pelvic recurrence (HR 3.77; p = 0.04) showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. External-beam radiation therapy at the time of pelvic recurrence, time interval for relapse ≥24 months and not multi-involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with ORGC. As suggested from the present analysis a significant group of ORGC patients could potentially benefit from multimodality rescue treatment. (orig.)

  15. External-beam radiation therapy after surgical resection and intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy for oligorecurrent gynecological cancer. Long-term outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, C.V.; Calvo, F.A.; Lozano, M.A.; Gonzalez-Sansegundo, C.; Gonzalez-Bayon, L.; Alvarez, A.; Lizarraga, S.; Garcia-Sabrido, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to analyze prognostic factors in patients treated with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT), surgical resection and intraoperative electron-beam radiotherapy (IOERT) for oligorecurrent gynecological cancer (ORGC). From January 1995 to December 2012, 61 patients with ORGC [uterine cervix (52 %), endometrial (30 %), ovarian (15 %), vagina (3 %)] underwent IOERT (12.5 Gy, range 10-15 Gy), and surgical resection to the pelvic (57 %) and paraaortic (43 %) recurrence tumor bed. In addition, 29 patients (48 %) also received EBRT (range 30.6-50.4 Gy). Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Median follow-up time for the entire cohort of patients was 42 months (range 2-169 months). The 10-year rates for overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LRC) were 17 and 65 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, no tumor fragmentation (HR 0.22; p = 0.03), time interval from primary tumor diagnosis to locoregional recurrence (LRR) < 24 months (HR 4.02; p = 0.02) and no EBRT at the time of pelvic recurrence (HR 3.95; p = 0.02) retained significance with regard to LRR. Time interval from primary tumor to LRR < 24 months (HR 2.32; p = 0.02) and no EBRT at the time of pelvic recurrence (HR 3.77; p = 0.04) showed a significant association with OS after adjustment for other covariates. External-beam radiation therapy at the time of pelvic recurrence, time interval for relapse ≥24 months and not multi-involved fragmented resection specimens are associated with improved LRC in patients with ORGC. As suggested from the present analysis a significant group of ORGC patients could potentially benefit from multimodality rescue treatment. (orig.)

  16. TU-CD-304-07: Intensity Modulated Electron Beam Therapy Employing Small Fields in Virtual Scanning Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q; Liang, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic electron radiation therapies such as dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR) utilize small fields to provide target conformity and fluence modulation. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of virtual scanning mode using small fields. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) were performed using validated Varian TrueBeam phase space files for electron beam energies of 6, 9, 12, and 16 MeV and square/circular fields (1×1/1, 2×2/2, 3×3/3, 4×4/4, 5×5/5 cm 2 /cm diameter). Resulting dose distributions (kernels) were used for subsequent calculations. The following analyses were performed: (1) Comparison of composite square fields and reference 10×10 cm 2 dose distributions and (2) Scanning beam deliveries for square and circular fields realized as the convolution of kernels and scanning pattern. Preliminary beam weight and pattern optimization were also performed. Two linear scans of 10 cm with/without overlap were modeled. Comparison metrics included depth and orthogonal profiles at dmax. Results: (1) Composite fields regained reference depth dose profiles for most energies and fields within 5%. Smaller kernels and higher energies increased dose in the build-up and Bremsstrahlung region (30%, 16MeV and 1×1 cm 2 ), while reference dmax was maintained for all energies and composite fields. Smaller kernels (<2×2 cm 2 ) maintained penumbra and field size within 0.2 cm, and flatness within 2%. Deterioration of penumbra for larger kernels (5×5 cm 2 ) were observed. Balancing desirable dosimetry and efficiencies suggests that smaller kernels are used at edges and larger kernels in the center of the target. (2) Beam weight optimization improved cross-plane penumbra (0.2 cm) and increased the field size (0.4 cm) on average. In-plane penumbra and field size remained unchanged. Overlap depended on kernel size and optimal overlap resulted in flatness ±2%. Conclusion: Dynamic electron beam therapy in virtual

  17. Use of electronic music as an occupational therapy modality in spinal cord injury rehabilitation: an occupational performance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B; Nantais, T

    1996-05-01

    This article describes an electronic music program that allows clients with spinal cord injury (SCI) to form musical bands and play songs while performing therapeutic exercise in an occupational therapy program. Clients create the music by activating upper extremity exercise devices that are connected to a synthesizer through a computer. The bands choose the songs they would like to play and meet twice a week for 1 hr to practice. The 8-week program often concludes with a public performance. The music program is intended to motivate client participation in physical rehabilitation while promoting self-esteem, emotional expression, and peer support. It is based on the model of occupational performance and the theory of purposeful activity. To date, 33 persons have taken part. Client, therapist, and public response has been positive because this program highlights the abilities of persons with SCI, thereby encouraging their reintegration into the community.

  18. Successful treatment of skin infiltration in childhood hematological malignancies with total skin electron beam therapy. A report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkawa, Masahito; Shikano, Takaaki; Ueno, Norihiro; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tono-oka, Tatsuhito; Matsumoto, Takahide.

    1988-07-01

    Two children with cutaneous lymphoma and leukemia who were treated with total skin electron beam therapy (TSEB) are described here. Patient 1. A 7-year-old boy was admitted because of a mass over the bilateral parotis and anemia. The white blood cell count on admission was 5,000/ul. Bone marrow examination revealed 70 per cent monoblasts (M5a type by FAB classification). Complete remission was obtained following the regimen of daunomycin, cytosine arabinoside, 6-mercaptopurine and prednisolone. He was again admitted because of a skin nodule on the left thigh 19 months after initial diagnosis. A biopsy of the skin nodule demonstrated monoblastic infiltration. He received 20 Grays (Gy) to the left thigh and this led to resolution of the skin nodule. At that time, other skin nodules appeared on the right upper and lower extremities. He was treated with TSEB. Daily doses of 1 Gy were given twice a week with a 4 MeV electron beam and a total dose of 10 Gy was administered over a period of 4 weeks. Although he again had a isolated skin relapse on the right shoulder, he remained in remission for 6 years after completing TSEB. Patient 2. A 6-year-old boy was admitted because of multiple skin lesions. Physical examination revealed 22 discrete, indurated skin nodules. a biopsy of a skin nodule demonstrated lymphoblast infiltration, confirming the diagnosis of B cell cutaneous lymphoma (stage IV). He was treated with CHOP (consisting of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine and prednisolone). After two courses of CHOP therapy, he was treated with TSEB using the same technique described above. To date, the patient remains in remission 5 years after initial diagnosis.

  19. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm 2 were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the accelerator

  20. Electron beam therapy in squamous and basal cell carcinoma of the face

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Glinski, B.; Weiss, M.; Strzeszynski, J.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a retrospective study of 86 patients with squamous cell (51) and basal cell (35) carcinoma of the face. The median age was 67 years. The staging is as following: 31 cases T 1 and T 2 , 55 patients T 3 and T 4 . All patients were considered NO. Electron beam was used in all cases and energy ranged from 5 to 15 MeV depending on the thickness of the tumor. The total tumor dose was 60-70 Gy delivered in 6 weeks. In 7 cases of very old patients the authors have used concentrated irradiation: 3 patients received 21 Gy in one fraction and 4 patients 48 Gy in 8 fractions. 96.8% patients T 1 i T 2 are NED contrary to 56.4% T 3 i T 4 . Cosmetic results were considered as good in 52, fairly good in 7 and bad in 2 patients [fr

  1. SU-F-T-83: Infant Total Skin Electron Therapy Using Five Fields Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H; Howlin, T; Massey, V [University of Kansas Hospital, Overland Park, KS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We were presented with a 9 month old boy with Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) involving the skin. The plan was to treat the entire skin using 6 MeV electrons with the infant under complete anesthesia. The purpose of this work is to commission the 6 MeV electron beam and to develop a technique that can be used to deliver total skin dose to infants with minimal patient immobilization. Methods: A baby mannequin phantom that mimics the child’s length was used to determine the best technique to treat the infant. The 76 cm long phantom was placed on the floor. The phantom was placed in four unique immobilization devices to simulate four different treatment positions (anterior, posterior, left lateral and right lateral). Radiochromic films were used to determine beam profile in both axial and radial directions, and percent depth dose (PDD). Absolute calibration of the machine output at 214 cm distance was measured using an Exradin A11 parallel-plate ion chamber. A 1.0 cm plexiglass scatter plate was inserted in the collimator. Mosfet dosimeters were used for dose verification for phantom and and patient. Results: At 214 cm source to surface distance (SSD) using gantry angle of + 20o from vertical beam flatness is + 10% in the radial direction over a region of 70 cm and + 4% in the axial direction over 60 cm. A five field arrangement was determined to optimally deliver the desired dose with > 90% uniformity. The fifth field was used to boost the head vertex. Conclusion: It is possible to treat sedated infants with total skin dose using five positions. Four positions were enough to cover the body and the fifth position boosts the vertex of the head. All fractions can be reproduced accurately daily because of the patient’s stable immobilization.

  2. SU-F-T-83: Infant Total Skin Electron Therapy Using Five Fields Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H; Howlin, T; Massey, V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We were presented with a 9 month old boy with Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) involving the skin. The plan was to treat the entire skin using 6 MeV electrons with the infant under complete anesthesia. The purpose of this work is to commission the 6 MeV electron beam and to develop a technique that can be used to deliver total skin dose to infants with minimal patient immobilization. Methods: A baby mannequin phantom that mimics the child’s length was used to determine the best technique to treat the infant. The 76 cm long phantom was placed on the floor. The phantom was placed in four unique immobilization devices to simulate four different treatment positions (anterior, posterior, left lateral and right lateral). Radiochromic films were used to determine beam profile in both axial and radial directions, and percent depth dose (PDD). Absolute calibration of the machine output at 214 cm distance was measured using an Exradin A11 parallel-plate ion chamber. A 1.0 cm plexiglass scatter plate was inserted in the collimator. Mosfet dosimeters were used for dose verification for phantom and and patient. Results: At 214 cm source to surface distance (SSD) using gantry angle of + 20o from vertical beam flatness is + 10% in the radial direction over a region of 70 cm and + 4% in the axial direction over 60 cm. A five field arrangement was determined to optimally deliver the desired dose with > 90% uniformity. The fifth field was used to boost the head vertex. Conclusion: It is possible to treat sedated infants with total skin dose using five positions. Four positions were enough to cover the body and the fifth position boosts the vertex of the head. All fractions can be reproduced accurately daily because of the patient’s stable immobilization.

  3. Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with FLUKA Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Valente, M; Battistoni, G; Botta, F; Pedroli, G; Ferrari, A; Cremonesi, M; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Fasso, A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, FLUKA has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one. Methods: FLUKA DPKS have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10-3 MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy ((89)Sr, (90)Y, (131)I, (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (186)Re, and (188)Re). Point isotropic...

  4. Evaluation of cobalt-labeled octreotide analogs for molecular imaging and auger electron-based radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisgaard, Helge; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Dam, Johan Hygum; Bollen, Peter; Mollenhauer, Jan; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-08-01

    The somatostatin receptor, which is overexpressed by many neuroendocrine tumors, is a well-known target for molecular imaging and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Recently, (57)Co-labeled DOTATOC, an octreotide analog, was shown to have the highest affinity yet found for somatostatin receptor subtype 2. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biologic effects of novel cobalt-labeled octreotide analogs targeting the somatostatin receptor to identify promising candidates for molecular imaging and Auger electron-based radionuclide therapy. Cobalt-labeled DOTATATE, DOTATOC, and DOTANOC were prepared with (57)Co or (58m)Co for SPECT or Auger electron-based therapy, respectively. The cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of the radioligands were characterized with the pancreatic tumor cell line AR42J in vitro, including assessment of the therapeutic effects of (58m)Co-DOTATATE via DNA double-strand break and proliferation assays. Comparisons with the therapeutic effects of (111)In- and (177)Lu-DOTATATE were also performed. Tumor uptake and normal tissue uptake were characterized in a subcutaneous pancreatic tumor mouse model. All 3 cobalt-conjugated peptides resulted in time-dependent and receptor-specific uptake, with a high level (≥88%) of cellular internalization in vitro of the total cell-associated radioactivity. The DNA double-strand break yield showed a dose-dependent increase with activity, whereas cell survival showed a dose-dependent decrease. (58m)Co-DOTATATE was significantly more efficient in cell killing per cumulated decay than (111)In- and (177)Lu-DOTATATE. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies showed a high level of receptor-specific tumor uptake. All cobalt-labeled radioligands showed a high level of receptor-specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, (58m)Co-DOTATATE showed considerable therapeutic effects in vitro and, thus, could be an effective agent for eradicating disseminated tumor cells and

  5. A reviewed technique for total body electron therapy using a Varian Clinac 2100C/D high dose rate treatment beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, L.D.; Xuereb, E.M.A.; Last, V.; Hunt, P.B.; Wilfert, A.

    1996-01-01

    Our (Royal North Shore Hospital) most recent linear accelerator acquisition is a Varian Clinac 2100C/D which has a high dose rate (approximately 25Gy per minute at 1 metre) total body electron option. We investigated the physical characteristics of the electron beam to develop a suitable method of treatment for total body electron therapy. The useful electron beam width is defined as 80cm above and below the reference height. Measurements of the electron dose received from the two angled electron beams showed a critical dependence on the gantry angles. The treatment protocol uses ten different patient angles, fractionated into directly opposing fields and treated seuqentially each day. A full cycle of treatment is completed in five days. (author)

  6. Characterization of a microDiamond detector in high-dose-per-pulse electron beams for intra operative radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Venanzio, C; Marinelli, Marco; Tonnetti, A; Verona-Rinati, G; Falco, M D; Pimpinella, M; Ciccotelli, A; De Stefano, S; Felici, G; Marangoni, F

    2015-12-01

    To characterize a synthetic diamond dosimeter (PTW Freiburg microDiamond 60019) in high dose-per-pulse electron beams produced by an Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) dedicated accelerator. The dosimetric properties of the microDiamond were assessed under 6, 8 and 9 MeV electron beams by a NOVAC11 mobile accelerator (Sordina IORT Technologies S.p.A.). The characterization was carried out with dose-per-pulse ranging from 26 to 105 mGy per pulse. The microDiamond performance was compared with an Advanced Markus ionization chamber and a PTW silicon diode E in terms of dose linearity, percentage depth dose (PDD) curves, beam profiles and output factors. A good linearity of the microDiamond response was verified in the dose range from 0.2 Gy to 28 Gy. A sensitivity of 1.29 nC/Gy was measured under IORT electron beams, resulting within 1% with respect to the one obtained in reference condition under (60)Co gamma irradiation. PDD measurements were found in agreement with the ones by the reference dosimeters, with differences in R50 values below 0.3 mm. Profile measurements evidenced a high spatial resolution of the microDiamond, slightly worse than the one of the silicon diode. The penumbra widths measured by the microDiamond resulted approximately 0.5 mm larger than the ones by the Silicon diode. Output factors measured by the microDiamond were found within 2% with those obtained by the Advanced Markus down to 3 cm diameter field sizes. The microDiamond dosimeter was demonstrated to be suitable for precise dosimetry in IORT applications under high dose-per-pulse conditions. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy modulated electron therapy: Design, implementation, and evaluation of a novel method of treatment planning and delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yahya, Khalid

    Energy modulated electron therapy (EMET) is a promising treatment modality that has the fundamental capabilities to enhance the treatment planning and delivery of superficially located targets. Although it offers advantages over x-ray intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), EMET has not been widely implemented to the same level of accuracy, automation, and clinical routine as its x-ray counterpart. This lack of implementation is attributed to the absence of a remotely automated beam shaping system as well as the deficiency in dosimetric accuracy of clinical electron pencil beam algorithms in the presence of beam modifiers and tissue heterogeneities. In this study, we present a novel technique for treatment planning and delivery of EMET. The delivery is achieved using a prototype of an automated "few leaf electron collimator" (FLEC). It consists of four copper leaves driven by stepper motors which are synchronized with the x-ray jaws in order to form a series of collimated rectangular openings or "fieldlets". Based on Monte Carlo studies, the FLEC has been designed to serve as an accessory tool to the current accelerator equipment. The FLEC was constructed and its operation was fully automated and integrated with the accelerator through an in-house assembled control unit. The control unit is a portable computer system accompanied with customized software that delivers EMET plans after acquiring them from the optimization station. EMET plans are produced based on dose volume constraints that employ Monte Carlo pre-generated and patient-specific kernels which are utilized by an in-house developed optimization algorithm. The structure of the optimization software is demonstrated. Using Monte Carlo techniques to calculate dose allows for accurate modeling of the collimation system as well as the patient heterogeneous geometry and take into account their impact on optimization. The Monte Carlo calculations were validated by comparing them against output

  8. Photo-excitation of electrons in cytochrome c oxidase as a theory of the mechanism of the increase of ATP production in mitochondria by laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Andrzej

    2014-02-01

    The hypothesis explains the molecular basis for restoring mitochondrial function by laser therapy. It also explains how laser therapy reverses both excessive oxidation (lack of NADH/FADH2) and excessive reduction (lack of O2) states of cytochrome c oxidase complex. It is proposed that photons interact with heme molecules of cytochrome c oxidase. A molecule of heme contains a porphyrin ring and an atom of iron in the center. The iron atom (Fe) can switch oxidation states back and forth between ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) by accepting or releasing an electron. The porphyrin ring is a complex aromatic molecule that has 26 pi electrons which are "delocalized", spinning in the carbon rings creating a resonating electromagnetic cloud. Photons with similar wavelengths are absorbed by the cloud increasing its energy. The energy is then passed on to the centrally located atom of iron existing in a reduced state (Fe2+). The electrons on the orbits of the iron atom accept this electromagnetic energy, and change orbitals to a higher energetic level. If the energy is sufficient, electrons leave the atom entirely. If this occurs, Fe2+ become oxidized to Fe3+ releasing electrons, thus restoring electron flow and the production of ATP. At the same time, electrons freed from complex IV may have sufficient energy to be picked by NAD+/FADH and re-enter the chain at the complex I or II amplifying the flow of electrons.

  9. Calculation of electron and isotopes dose point kernels with FLUKA Monte Carlo code for dosimetry in nuclear medicine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Battistoni, G; Cremonesi, M; Di Dia, A; Fassò, A; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, M; Paganelli, G; Pedroli, G; Valente, M

    2011-07-01

    The calculation of patient-specific dose distribution can be achieved by Monte Carlo simulations or by analytical methods. In this study, FLUKA Monte Carlo code has been considered for use in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Up to now, FLUKA has mainly been dedicated to other fields, namely high energy physics, radiation protection, and hadrontherapy. When first employing a Monte Carlo code for nuclear medicine dosimetry, its results concerning electron transport at energies typical of nuclear medicine applications need to be verified. This is commonly achieved by means of calculation of a representative parameter and comparison with reference data. Dose point kernel (DPK), quantifying the energy deposition all around a point isotropic source, is often the one. FLUKA DPKS have been calculated in both water and compact bone for monoenergetic electrons (10-3 MeV) and for beta emitting isotopes commonly used for therapy (89Sr, 90Y, 131I 153Sm, 177Lu, 186Re, and 188Re). Point isotropic sources have been simulated at the center of a water (bone) sphere, and deposed energy has been tallied in concentric shells. FLUKA outcomes have been compared to PENELOPE v.2008 results, calculated in this study as well. Moreover, in case of monoenergetic electrons in water, comparison with the data from the literature (ETRAN, GEANT4, MCNPX) has been done. Maximum percentage differences within 0.8.RCSDA and 0.9.RCSDA for monoenergetic electrons (RCSDA being the continuous slowing down approximation range) and within 0.8.X90 and 0.9.X90 for isotopes (X90 being the radius of the sphere in which 90% of the emitted energy is absorbed) have been computed, together with the average percentage difference within 0.9.RCSDA and 0.9.X90 for electrons and isotopes, respectively. Concerning monoenergetic electrons, within 0.8.RCSDA (where 90%-97% of the particle energy is deposed), FLUKA and PENELOPE agree mostly within 7%, except for 10 and 20 keV electrons (12% in water, 8.3% in bone). The

  10. An all permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source for heavy ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yun; Li, Jia Qing; Sun, Liang Ting; Zhang, Xue Zhen; Feng, Yu Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ma, Bao Hua; Li, Xi Xia

    2014-02-01

    A high charge state all permanent Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source, Lanzhou All Permanent ECR ion source no. 3-LAPECR3, has been successfully built at IMP in 2012, which will serve as the ion injector of the Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) project. As a commercial device, LAPECR3 features a compact structure, small size, and low cost. According to HIMM scenario more than 100 eμA of C(5+) ion beam should be extracted from the ion source, and the beam emittance better than 75 π*mm*mrad. In recent commissioning, about 120 eμA of C(5+) ion beam was got when work gas was CH4 while about 262 eμA of C(5+) ion beam was obtained when work gas was C2H2 gas. The design and construction of the ion source and its low-energy transportation beam line, and the preliminary commissioning results will be presented in detail in this paper.

  11. Verification of setup errors in external beam radiation therapy using electronic portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Murthy, K.; Al-Rahbi, Zakiya; Sivakumar, S.S.; Davis, C.A.; Ravichandran, R.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an audit on QA aspects of treatment delivery by the verification of the treatment fields position on different days to document the efficiency of immobilization methods and reproducibility of treatment. A retrospective study was carried out on 60 patients, each 20 treated for head and neck, breast, and pelvic sites; and a total of 506 images obtained by electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were analyzed. The portal images acquired using the EPID systems attached to the Varian linear accelerators were superimposed on the reference images. The anatomy matching software (Varian portal Vision. 6.0) was used, and the displacements in two dimensions and rotation were noted for each treated field to study the patient setup errors. The percentages of mean deviations more than 3 mm in lateral (X) and longitudinal (Y) directions were 17.5%, 11.25%, and 7.5% for breast, pelvis, and head and neck cases respectively. In all cases, the percentage of mean deviation with more than 5 mm error was 0.83%. The maximum average mean deviation in all the cases was 1.87. The average mean SD along X and Y directions in all the cases was less than 2.65. The results revealed that the ranges of setup errors are site specific and immobilization methods improve reproducibility. The observed variations were well within the limits. The study confirmed the accuracy and quality of treatments delivered to the patients. (author)

  12. Postoperative electron beam irradiation therapy for keloid. Report of 95 patients followed for over eighteen months

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Rei; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Wang, Chunmei; Iwakiri, Itaru; Chigira, Miho; Miyashita, Tsuguhiro; Tateno, Atsushi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Kiyoshi [Marine Clinic, Urayasu, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Between 1988 band 2000, ninety-five patients with 105 keloid sites were treated by surgical removal and postoperative 15-Gy-electron-beam irradiation from followed for over eighteen months. Statistical analysis was performed and the therapeutic outcome was evaluated. Recurrence occurred in two sites on 12 earlobes (16.7%), two sites on 12 necks (16.7%), 17 sites on 45 anterior chest walls (37.8%), 10 sites on 27 scapular regions (37.0%), and three sites on 9 suprapubic regions (33.3%). The overall recurrence rate was 33.0%. As the results of analyzing therapeutic outcomes, the recurrence rate in sites with highly stretched tension such as the chest wall and scapular regions were significantly higher than those without such high tension such as the neck and earlobes (37.5% vs. 16.7%, p=0.0471). Results suggested that keloid sites with the high-risk of recurrence should be treated with the escalation of radiation dose. (author)

  13. Accuracy of pencil-beam redefinition algorithm dose calculations in patient-like cylindrical phantoms for bolus electron conformal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, Robert L.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Chu, Connel; Fields, Robert S. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Sprunger, Conrad P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the improved accuracy of the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) compared to the pencil beam algorithm (PBA) for bolus electron conformal therapy using cylindrical patient phantoms based on patient computed tomography (CT) scans of retromolar trigone and nose cancer.Methods: PBRA and PBA electron dose calculations were compared with measured dose in retromolar trigone and nose phantoms both with and without bolus. For the bolus treatment plans, a radiation oncologist outlined a planning target volume (PTV) on the central axis slice of the CT scan for each phantom. A bolus was designed using the planning.decimal{sup Registered-Sign} (p.d) software (.decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL) to conform the 90% dose line to the distal surface of the PTV. Dose measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed into predrilled holes. The Pinnacle{sup 3} (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MD) treatment planning system was used to calculate PBA dose distributions. The PBRA dose distributions were calculated with an in-house C++ program. In order to accurately account for the phantom materials a table correlating CT number to relative electron stopping and scattering powers was compiled and used for both PBA and PBRA dose calculations. Accuracy was determined by comparing differences in measured and calculated dose, as well as distance to agreement for each measurement point.Results: The measured doses had an average precision of 0.9%. For the retromolar trigone phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average {+-}1{sigma} dose difference (calculated - measured) of -0.65%{+-} 1.62% without the bolus and -0.20%{+-} 1.54% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculation had an average dose difference of 0.19%{+-} 3.27% without the bolus and -0.05%{+-} 3.14% with the bolus. For the nose phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.50%{+-} 3.06% without bolus and -0.18%{+-} 1.22% with the bolus. The PBA

  14. Accuracy of pencil-beam redefinition algorithm dose calculations in patient-like cylindrical phantoms for bolus electron conformal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Robert L; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Chu, Connel; Fields, Robert S; Sprunger, Conrad P

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the improved accuracy of the pencil beam redefinition algorithm (PBRA) compared to the pencil beam algorithm (PBA) for bolus electron conformal therapy using cylindrical patient phantoms based on patient computed tomography (CT) scans of retromolar trigone and nose cancer. PBRA and PBA electron dose calculations were compared with measured dose in retromolar trigone and nose phantoms both with and without bolus. For the bolus treatment plans, a radiation oncologist outlined a planning target volume (PTV) on the central axis slice of the CT scan for each phantom. A bolus was designed using the planning.decimal(®) (p.d) software (.decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL) to conform the 90% dose line to the distal surface of the PTV. Dose measurements were taken with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed into predrilled holes. The Pinnacle(3) (Philips Healthcare, Andover, MD) treatment planning system was used to calculate PBA dose distributions. The PBRA dose distributions were calculated with an in-house C++ program. In order to accurately account for the phantom materials a table correlating CT number to relative electron stopping and scattering powers was compiled and used for both PBA and PBRA dose calculations. Accuracy was determined by comparing differences in measured and calculated dose, as well as distance to agreement for each measurement point. The measured doses had an average precision of 0.9%. For the retromolar trigone phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average ± 1σ dose difference (calculated - measured) of -0.65% ± 1.62% without the bolus and -0.20% ± 1.54% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculation had an average dose difference of 0.19% ± 3.27% without the bolus and -0.05% ± 3.14% with the bolus. For the nose phantom, the PBRA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.50% ± 3.06% without bolus and -0.18% ± 1.22% with the bolus. The PBA dose calculations had an average dose difference of 0.65%

  15. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blasi Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Materials and methods Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Results Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4 to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Conclusions Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4 to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study.

  16. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasi, Olivier; Fontenot, Jonas D; Fields, Robert S; Gibbons, John P; Hogstrom, Kenneth R

    2011-01-01

    To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study

  17. Electronic medical record systems are associated with appropriate placement of HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in rural health facilities in Kenya: a retrospective pre-post study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oluoch, Tom; Katana, Abraham; Ssempijja, Victor; Kwaro, Daniel; Langat, Patrick; Kimanga, Davies; Okeyo, Nicky; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; de Keizer, Nicolette

    2014-01-01

    There is little evidence that electronic medical record (EMR) use is associated with better compliance with clinical guidelines on initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among ART-eligible HIV patients. We assessed the effect of transitioning from paper-based to an EMR-based system on

  18. Better adherence to pre-antiretroviral therapy guidelines after implementing an electronic medical record system in rural Kenyan HIV clinics: a multicenter pre-post study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oluoch, Tom; Kwaro, Daniel; Ssempijja, Victor; Katana, Abraham; Langat, Patrick; Okeyo, Nicky; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; de Keizer, Nicolette

    2015-01-01

    The monitoring of pre-antiretroviral therapy (pre-ART) is a key indicator of HIV quality of care. This study investigated the association of an electronic medical record system (EMR) with adherence to pre-ART guidelines in rural HIV clinics in Kenya. A retrospective study was carried out to assess

  19. Correction to: Impact of an electronic monitoring device and behavioural feedback on adherence to multiple sclerosis therapies in youth: results of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, E Ann; Grover, Stephanie A; Powell, Victoria E; Alper, Gulay; Banwell, Brenda L; Edwards, Kim; Gorman, Mark; Graves, Jennifer; Lotze, Timothy E; Mah, Jean K; Mednick, Lauren; Ness, Jayne; Obadia, Maya; Slater, Ruth; Waldman, Amy; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Schwartz, Carolyn E

    2017-12-23

    The clinicaltrials.gov identifying number for the article titled "Impact of an electronic monitoring device and behavioral feedback on adherence to multiple sclerosis therapies in youth: results of a randomized trial" is NCT02234713 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02234713).

  20. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling to improve adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our

  1. Long-Term Results of a Highly Performing Conformal Electron Therapy Technique for Chest Wall Irradiation After Mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grellier Adedjouma, Noemie, E-mail: grellier.noemie@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Chevrier, Marion [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fourquet, Alain; Costa, Emilie; Xu, Haoping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Berger, Frederique [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Campana, Francois [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Laki, Fatima [Department of Surgical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Beuzeboc, Philippe [Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Lefeuvre, Delphine [Department of Biostatistics, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate locoregional control and survival after mastectomy, as well as toxicity, in patients irradiated by a previously described postmastectomy highly conformal electron beam radiation therapy technique (PMERT). Methods and Materials: We included all women irradiated by postmastectomy electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 in our department. Acute and late toxicities were retrospectively assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 criteria. Results: Among the 796 women included, 10.1% were triple-negative, 18.8% HER2-positive, and 24.6% received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CT). Multifocal lesions were observed in 51.3% of women, and 64.6% had at least 1 involved lymph node (LN). Internal mammary chain, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and axillary LNs were treated in 85.6%, 88.3%, 77.9%, and 14.9% of cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 6-102 months), 5-year locoregional recurrence–free survival and overall survival were 90% (95% confidence interval 88.1%-92.4%) and 90.9% (95% confidence interval 88.9%-93%), respectively. Early skin toxicity was scored as grade 1 in 58.5% of patients, grade 2 in 35.9%, and grade 3 in 4.5%. Concomitant CT was associated with increased grade 3 toxicity (P<.001). At long-term follow-up, 29.8% of patients presented temporary or permanent hyperpigmentation or telangiectasia or fibrosis (grade 1: 23.6%; grade 2: 5.2%; grade 3: 1%), with higher rates among smokers (P=.06); 274 patients (34.4%) underwent breast reconstruction. Only 24 patients (3%) had early esophagitis of grade 1. Only 3 patients developed ischemic heart disease: all had been treated by anthracycline-based CT with or without trastuzumab, all had been irradiated to the left chest wall and LN, and all presented numerous cardiovascular risk factors (2-4 factors). Conclusions: This study demonstrated the good efficacy of this technique in terms of

  2. Therapy of human carcinoma xenografts with antibodies to EGFr and HER-2 conjugated to radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, M.J.; Goldenberg, David M. [Garden State Cancer Center at the Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Belleville, NJ (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Low-energy electrons (10-50 keV) can be effective and specific cytotoxic agents when delivered to the cell surface by antibodies, because their path length in tissue is comparable to a cell diameter. In this study, we have begun to evaluate the therapeutic potential of antibodies (Abs) conjugated to {sup 111}In against carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Abs to EGFr or HER-2 were labeled with {sup 111}In to a high specific activity of approximately 1.48 GBq/mg (40 mCi/mg). They were injected into nude mice 5-6 days after inoculation of human carcinoma cells, either A431 or SK-OV-3, and tumor growth was monitored. In preliminary in vitro experiments, we calculated the cumulative decays per cell, estimated the centigray dose delivered to the nucleus, and related this to the fraction surviving. Abs to both antigens provided significant protection in nude mouse xenograft models (p values ranging from <0.05 to <0.001). Some mice appeared to be cured, but most had delayed tumor growth. The specificity of the effect was demonstrated by testing non-reactive Abs labeled in the same way. The radioactivity was required, because unconjugated Abs had no therapeutic effect. The maximum tolerated dose was required in order for therapy to be effective, but most of the treated mice had no significant weight loss or other overt signs of toxicity. Abs labeled with nuclides emitting low-energy electrons, such as {sup 111}In, can be effective therapeutic agents against microscopic s.c. tumors. This strategy should be considered for clinical applications. (orig.)

  3. SU-E-T-344: Dynamic Electron Beam Therapy Using Multiple Apertures in a Single Cut-Out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Few leaf electron collimators (FLEC) or electron MLCs (eMLC) are highly desirable for dynamic electron beam therapies as they produce multiple apertures within a single delivery to achieve conformal dose distributions. However, their clinical implementation has been challenging. Alternatively, multiple small apertures in a single cut-out with variable jaw sizes could be utilized in a single dynamic delivery. In this study, we investigate dosimetric characteristics of such arrangement. Methods: Monte Carlo (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc/DOSXYnrc) simulations utilized validated Varian TrueBeam phase spaces. Investigated quantities included: Energy (6 MeV), jaw size (1×1 to 22×22 cm 2 ; centered to aperture), applicator/cut-out (15×15 cm 2 ), aperture (1×1, 2×2, 3×3, 4×4 cm 2 ), and aperture placement (on/off central axis). Three configurations were assessed: (1) single aperture on-axis, (2) single aperture off-axis, and (3) multiple apertures. Reference was configuration (1) with standard jaw size. Aperture placement and jaw size were optimized to maintain reference dosimetry and minimize leakage through unused apertures to <5%. Comparison metrics included depth dose and orthogonal profiles. Results: Configuration (1) and (2): Jaw openings were reduced to 10×10 cm 2 without affecting dosimetry (gamma 2%/1mm) regardless of on- or off-axis placement. For smaller jaw sizes, reduced surface (<2%, 5% for 1×1 cm 2 aperture) and increased Bremsstrahlung (<2%, 10% for 1×1 cm 2 aperture) dose was observed. Configuration (3): Optimal aperture placement was in the corners (order: 1×1, 4×4, 2×2, 3×3 cm 2 ) and jaw sizes were 4×4, 4×4, 7×7, and 5×5 cm 2 (apertures: 1×1, 2×2, 3×3, 4×4 cm 2 ). Asymmetric leakage was found from upper and lower jaws. Leakage was generally within 5% with a maximum of 10% observed for the 1×1 cm 2 aperture irradiation. Conclusion: Multiple apertures in a single cut-out with variable jaw size can be used in a single dynamic delivery

  4. Feasibility of integrating a multi-camera optical tracking system in intra-operative electron radiation therapy scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Vázquez, V; Marinetto, E; Santos-Miranda, J A; Calvo, F A; Desco, M; Pascau, J

    2013-01-01

    Intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) combines surgery and ionizing radiation applied directly to an exposed unresected tumour mass or to a post-resection tumour bed. The radiation is collimated and conducted by a specific applicator docked to the linear accelerator. The dose distribution in tissues to be irradiated and in organs at risk can be planned through a pre-operative computed tomography (CT) study. However, surgical retraction of structures and resection of a tumour affecting normal tissues significantly modify the patient's geometry. Therefore, the treatment parameters (applicator dimension, pose (position and orientation), bevel angle, and beam energy) may require the original IOERT treatment plan to be modified depending on the actual surgical scenario. We propose the use of a multi-camera optical tracking system to reliably record the actual pose of the IOERT applicator in relation to the patient's anatomy in an environment prone to occlusion problems. This information can be integrated in the radio-surgical treatment planning system in order to generate a real-time accurate description of the IOERT scenario. We assessed the accuracy of the applicator pose by performing a phantom-based study that resembled three real clinical IOERT scenarios. The error obtained (2 mm) was below the acceptance threshold for external radiotherapy practice, thus encouraging future implementation of this approach in real clinical IOERT scenarios. (paper)

  5. Effect of Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy Program on the Symptoms of Burnout Syndrome Among Undergraduate Electronics Work Students in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, Theresa C; Eseadi, Chiedu; Orji, Chibueze T; Omeje, Joachim C; Anyanwu, Joy I; Ugwoke, Samuel C; Edeh, Nkechinyere C

    2018-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effect that rational-emotive behavior therapy had on the symptoms of burnout among undergraduate electronics work students in Southeast Nigeria. This study utilized a pretest-posttest design involving a no-intervention group versus an intervention group. Participants were 124 undergraduate electronics work students who met the inclusion criteria of the study. The intervention consisted of 12 weeks of rational-emotive behavior therapy treatment and 2 weeks of follow-up meetings conducted at 6 months. Self-report questionnaire was used for data collection. Repeated measures analysis of variance and t test were used for data analysis. The results show that rational-emotive behavior therapy had a significant effect on the symptoms of burnout syndrome among the electronics work students in the treatment group compared to their counterparts in the no-intervention group. Finally, the positive gains were significantly maintained by the treatment group at the follow-up. The current study suggests that rational-emotive behavior therapy program can be effective for dealing with burnout syndrome among the population of undergraduates in Nigeria. Further clinical evaluation is needed.

  6. Outcome of patients with local recurrent gynecologic malignancies after resection combined with intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arians, Nathalie; Foerster, Robert; Rom, Joachim; Uhl, Matthias; Roeder, Falk; Debus, Jürgen; Lindel, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of recurrent gynecologic cancer is a challenging issue. Aim of the study was to investigate clinical features and outcomes of patients with recurrent gynecologic malignancies who underwent resection including IOERT (intraoperative electron radiation therapy) with regard to clinical outcome and potential predictive factors or subgroups that benefit most from this radical treatment regime. A total of 36 patients with recurrent gynecologic malignancies (cervical (n = 18), endometrial (n = 12) or vulvar cancer (n = 6)) were retrospectively identified through hospital databases in accordance with institutional ethical policies. Patient characteristics and outcomes were assessed. Survival data was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier-method and log-rank-test, categorical variables were analyzed with chi-square-method. For the entire cohort 1-/2-/5-year Overall Survival (OS) was 65.3 %/36.2 %/21.7 %. Patients with endometrial, cervical, and vulvar carcinoma had a 1-/2-/5-year OS of 83.3 %/62.5 %/50 %, 44.5 %/25.4 %/6.4 %, and 83.3 %/16.7 %/16.7 %, respectively. Patients with endometrial carcinoma showed a significantly better OS (p = 0.038). 1-/2-/5-year Local Progression-free Survival (LPFS) for the entire cohort was 44.1 %/28 %/21 % with 76.2 %/61 %/40.6 % for endometrial, 17.2 %/0 %/0 % for cervical, and 40 %/20 %/20 % for vulvar cancer, respectively. Patients with endometrial cancer showed a significantly (p = 0.017) and older patients a trend (p = 0.059) for a better LPFS. 1-/2-/5-year Distant Progression-free Survival (DPFS) for the entire cohort was 53.1 %/46.5 %/38.7 % with 74.1 %/74.1 %/74.1 % for endometrial, 36.7 %/36.7 %/0 % for cervical, and 60 %/30 %/30 % for vulvar cancer, respectively. There was a significantly better DPFS for older patients (p = 0.015) and a trend for a better DPFS for patients with endometrial carcinoma (p = 0.075). The radical procedure of resection combined with IOERT seems to be a valid curative treatment option for patients with

  7. InsuOnline, an Electronic Game for Medical Education on Insulin Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Leandro Arthur; Souza, Rodrigo Martins; Gordan, Pedro Alejandro; Esteves, Roberto Zonato; Coelho, Izabel Cristina Meister

    2017-03-09

    Most patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are followed by primary care physicians, who often lack knowledge or confidence to prescribe insulin properly. This contributes to clinical inertia and poor glycemic control. Effectiveness of traditional continuing medical education (CME) to solve that is limited, so new approaches are required. Electronic games are a good option, as they can be very effective and easily disseminated. The objective of our study was to assess applicability, user acceptance, and educational effectiveness of InsuOnline, an electronic serious game for medical education on insulin therapy for DM, compared with a traditional CME activity. Primary care physicians (PCPs) from South of Brazil were invited by phone or email to participate in an unblinded randomized controlled trial and randomly allocated to play the game InsuOnline, installed as an app in their own computers, at the time of their choice, with minimal or no external guidance, or to participate in a traditional CME session, composed by onsite lectures and cases discussion. Both interventions had the same content and duration (~4 h). Applicability was assessed by the number of subjects who completed the assigned intervention in each group. Insulin-prescribing competence (factual knowledge, problem-solving skills, and attitudes) was self-assessed through a questionnaire applied before, immediately after, and 3 months after the interventions. Acceptance of the intervention (satisfaction and perceived importance for clinical practice) was also assessed immediately after and 3 months after the interventions, respectively. Subjects' characteristics were similar between groups (mean age 38, 51.4% [69/134] male). In the game group, 69 of 88 (78%) completed the intervention, compared with 65 of 73 (89%) in the control group, with no difference in applicability. Percentage of right answers in the competence subscale, which was 52% at the baseline in both groups, significantly improved

  8. Feasibility assessment of the interactive use of a Monte Carlo algorithm in treatment planning for intraoperative electron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, Pedro; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Santos, Andrés; Udías, José M; Herranz, Elena; Herraiz, Joaquín L; Santos-Miranda, Juan Antonio; Calvo, Felipe A; Valdivieso, Manlio F; Rodríguez, Raúl; Illana, Carlos; Calama, Juan A; Pascau, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This work analysed the feasibility of using a fast, customized Monte Carlo (MC) method to perform accurate computation of dose distributions during pre- and intraplanning of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) procedures. The MC method that was implemented, which has been integrated into a specific innovative simulation and planning tool, is able to simulate the fate of thousands of particles per second, and it was the aim of this work to determine the level of interactivity that could be achieved. The planning workflow enabled calibration of the imaging and treatment equipment, as well as manipulation of the surgical frame and insertion of the protection shields around the organs at risk and other beam modifiers. In this way, the multidisciplinary team involved in IOERT has all the tools necessary to perform complex MC dosage simulations adapted to their equipment in an efficient and transparent way. To assess the accuracy and reliability of this MC technique, dose distributions for a monoenergetic source were compared with those obtained using a general-purpose software package used widely in medical physics applications. Once accuracy of the underlying simulator was confirmed, a clinical accelerator was modelled and experimental measurements in water were conducted. A comparison was made with the output from the simulator to identify the conditions under which accurate dose estimations could be obtained in less than 3 min, which is the threshold imposed to allow for interactive use of the tool in treatment planning. Finally, a clinically relevant scenario, namely early-stage breast cancer treatment, was simulated with pre- and intraoperative volumes to verify that it was feasible to use the MC tool intraoperatively and to adjust dose delivery based on the simulation output, without compromising accuracy. The workflow provided a satisfactory model of the treatment head and the imaging system, enabling proper configuration of the treatment planning

  9. Utilization of a 3D printer to fabricate boluses used for electron therapy of skin lesions of the eye canthi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukowiak, Magdalena; Jezierska, Karolina; Boehlke, Marek; Więcko, Marzena; Łukowiak, Adam; Podraza, Wojciech; Lewocki, Mirosław; Masojć, Bartłomiej; Falco, Michał

    2017-01-01

    This work describes the use of 3D printing technology to create individualized boluses for patients treated with electron beam therapy for skin lesions of the eye canthi. It aimed to demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D-printed over manually fabricated paraffin boluses. The study involved 11 patients for whom the construction of individual boluses were required. CT scans of the fabricated 3D-printed boluses and paraffin boluses were acquired and superimposed onto patient CT scans to compare their fitting, bolus homogeneity, and underlying dose distribution. To quantify the level of matching, multiple metrics were utilized. Matching Level Index (ML) values ranged from 0 to 100%, where 100% indicated a perfect fit between the reference bolus (planned in treatment planning system) and 3D-printed and paraffin bolus. The average ML (± 1 SD) of the 3D-printed boluses was 95.1 ± 2.1%, compared to 46.0 ± 10.1% for the manually fabricated paraffin bolus. Correspondingly, mean doses were closer to the prescribed doses, and dose spreads were less for the dose distributions from the 3D-printed boluses, as compared to those for the manually fabricated paraffin boluses. It was concluded that 3D-printing technology is a viable method for fabricating boluses for small eye lesions and provides boluses superior to our boluses manually fabricated from paraffin sheets. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Total Skin Electron Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Using a Modern Dual-Field Rotational Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heumann, Thatcher R. [Emory University School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute (WCI), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Parker, Sareeta [Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Biostatistics Shared Core Resource at WCI, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Dhabbaan, Anees [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute (WCI), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Goodman, Michael [Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Flowers, Christopher R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K., E-mail: drkhurram2000@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute (WCI), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with rotational total skin electron irradiation (RTSEI) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), and to examine response by disease stage and race. Methods and Materials: We reviewed our outcomes for 68 CTCL patients who received RTSEI (≥30 Gy) from 2000 to 2013. Primary outcomes were complete clinical response (CCR), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Using log–rank tests and Cox proportional hazards, OS and RFS were compared across tumor stages at time of RTSEI with further racial subgroup analysis. Results: Median age at diagnosis and at time of radiation was 52 and 56 years, respectively. Median follow-up was 5.1 years, 49% were African American, and 49% were female. At time of treatment, 18, 37, and 13 patients were T stage 2, 3, and 4, respectively. At 6 weeks after RTSEI, overall CCR was 82% (88%, 83%, and 69% for T2, T3, and T4, respectively). Median RFS was 11 months for all patients and 14, 10, and 12 months for stage T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Tumor stage was not associated with RFS or CCR. Maintenance therapy after RTSEI was associated with improved RFS in both crude and multivariable analysis, controlling for T stage. Median OS was 76 months (91 and 59 months for T3 and T4, respectively). With the exception of improved OS in African Americans compared with whites at stage T2, race was not associated with CCR, RFS, or OS. Conclusions: These results represent the largest RTSEI clinical outcomes study in the modern era using a dual-field rotational technique. Our observed response rates match or improve upon the standard set by previous outcome studies using conventional TSEI techniques, despite a large percentage of advanced CTCL lesions in our cohort. We found that clinical response after RTSEI did not seem to be affected by T stage or race.

  11. Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in the Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides: A Review of Conventional and Low-Dose Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Chhabra, Arpit M; Kharod, Shivam; Marwaha, Gaurav

    2016-12-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most prevalent subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, which is characterized by the proliferation of CD4 + T cells. While often an indolent disease, most patients eventually develop progression from isolated patches to tumors and finally nodal or visceral involvement. Treatment choice is largely based on disease burden, though prognostic factors such as disease stage, patient age, and extracutaneous involvement must be taken into consideration. Radiotherapy represents one of the most effective therapeutic modalities in the treatment of MF. Lymphocytes are exquisitely radiosensitive, and excellent responses are observed even with low doses of radiation. Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a special technique that allows for the homogenous irradiation of the entire skin. There are well-documented radiation dose-response relationships for achieving a complete response. As such, TSEBT doses ≥ 30 Gy comprise the current standard of care. Although highly effective, most patients experience recurrent disease even after conventional-dose (≥ 30 Gy) TSEBT. In addition, toxicity is cumulatively dose dependent, and there is reluctance to administer multiple courses of conventional-dose TSEBT. Consequently, there has been renewed interest in determining the utility of TSEBT at lower total (≤ 30 Gy) doses. Advantages of low-total-dose (with standard dose per fraction) TSEBT include a shortened treatment course, the potential to minimize the risk of adverse events, and the opportunity to allow for retreatment in cases of disease recurrence. This comprehensive review compares the impact of different TSEBT dosing schemes on clinical outcomes of MF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High energy electron beams characterization using CaSO4:Dy+PTFE Phosphors for clinical therapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, T.; Espinoza, A.; Von, S.M.; Alvarez, R.; Jiménez, Y.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work high energy electron beam dosimetry from linear accelerator (LINACs) for clinical applications using dysprosium doped calcium sulfate embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (CaSO 4 :Dy+PTFE) was studied. The irradiations were carried out using high electron beams (6 to 18 MeV) from a linear accelerator (LINAC) Varian, CLINAC 2300C/D, for clinical practice purpose. The electron irradiations were obtained using the water solid in order to guarantee electronic equilibrium conditions (EEC). Field shaping for electron beams was obtained with electron cones. Glow curve and other thermoluminescent characteristics of CaSO 4 :Dy+PTFE were conducted under high electrons beams irradiations. The TL response of the pellets showed an intensity peak centered at around 215 °C. TL response of CaSO 4 :Dy+PTFE as a function of high electron absorbed dose showed a linearity in a wide range. To obtain reproducibility characteristic, a set of pellets were exposed repeatedly for the same electron absorbed dose. The results obtained in this study can suggest the applicability of CaSO 4 :Dy+PTFE pellets for high electron beam dosimetry, provided fading is correctly accounted for. - Highlights: ► Developing of CaSO 4 :Dy to electron beams dosimetry. ► Characterization of caSO 4 :Dy to radiation safety in LINACs. ► TL characteristics of CaSO 4 :Dy for electron beams quality control.

  14. MO-AB-BRA-08: Rapid Treatment Field Uniformity Optimization for Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy Using Cherenkov Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreozzi, J; Zhang, R; Glaser, A; Pogue, B; Jarvis, L; Williams, B; Gladstone, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment field heterogeneity resulting from gantry angle choice in total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) following a modified Stanford dual-field technique, and determine a relationship between source to surface distance (SSD) and optimized gantry angle spread. Methods: Cherenkov imaging was used to image 62 treatment fields on a sheet of 1.2m x 2.2m x 1.2cm polyethylene following standard TSEBT setup at our institution (6 MeV, 888 MU/min, no spoiler, SSD=441cm), where gantry angles spanned from 239.5° to 300.5° at 1° increments. Average Cherenkov intensity and coefficient of variation in the region of interest were compared for the set of composite Cherenkov images created by summing all unique combinations of angle pairs to simulate dual-field treatment. The angle pair which produced the lowest coefficient of variation was further studied using an ionization chamber. The experiment was repeated at SSD=300cm, and SSD=370.5cm. Cherenkov imaging was also implemented during TSEBT of three patients. Results: The most uniform treatment region from a symmetric angle spread was achieved using gantry angles +/−17.5° about the horizontal axis at SSD=441cm, +/−18.5° at SSD=370.5cm, and +/−19.5° at SSD=300cm. Ionization chamber measurements comparing the original treatment spread (+/−14.5°) and the optimized angle pair (+/−17.5°) at SSD=441cm showed no significant deviation (r=0.999) in percent depth dose curves, and chamber measurements from nine locations within the field showed an improvement in dose uniformity from 24.41% to 9.75%. Ionization chamber measurements correlated strongly (r=0.981) with Cherenkov intensity measured concurrently on the flat Plastic Water phantom. Patient images and TLD results also showed modest uniformity improvements. Conclusion: A decreasing linear relationship between optimal angle spread and SSD was observed. Cherenkov imaging offers a new method of rapidly analyzing and optimizing TSEBT setup

  15. SU-E-T-66: Characterization of Radiation Dose Associated with Dark Currents During Beam Hold for Respiratory-Gated Electron Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessler, J; Gupta, N; Rong, Y; Weldon, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this study was to estimate the radiation dose contributed by dark currents associated with the respiratory-gated electron therapy during beam hold. The secondary aim was to determine clinical benefits of using respiratory-gated electron therapy for left-sided breast cancer patients with positive internal mammary nodes (IMN). Methods: Measurements of the dark current-induced dose in all electron modes were performed on multiple Siemens and Varian linear accelerators by manually simulating beam-hold during respiratory gating. Dose was quantified at the machine isocenter by comparing the collected charge to the known output for all energies ranging from 6 to 18 MeV for a 10cm × 10cm field at 100 SSD with appropriate solid-water buildup. Using the Eclipse treatment planning system, we compared the additional dose associated with dark current using gated electron fields to the dose uncertainties associated with matching gated photon fields and ungated electron fields. Dose uncertainties were seen as hot and cold spots along the match line of the fields. Results: The magnitude of the dose associated with dark current is highly correlated to the energy of the beam and the amount of time the beam is on hold. For lower energies (6–12 MeV), there was minimal dark current dose (0.1–1.3 cGy/min). Higher energies (15–18 MeV) showed measurable amount of doses. The dark current associated with the electron beam-hold varied between linear accelerator vendors and depended on dark current suppression and the age of the linear accelerator. Conclusion: For energies up to 12 MeV, the dose associated with the dark current for respiratorygated electron therapy was shown to be negligible, and therefore should be considered an option for treating IMN positive left-sided breast cancer patients. However, at higher energies the benefit of respiratory gating may be outweighed by dose due to the dark current

  16. High energy electron beams characterization using CaSO{sub 4}:Dy+PTFE Phosphors for clinical therapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, T., E-mail: trivera@ipn.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Legaria, IPN. Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion. 11500 Mexico DF (Mexico); Espinoza, A.; Von, S.M. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de los Servicios de Salud de Nayarit, Enfermeria S/n, Fracc, Fray Junipero Serra, 63169 Tepic Nay (Mexico); Alvarez, R.; Jimenez, Y. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Legaria, IPN. Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion. 11500 Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2012-07-15

    In the present work high energy electron beam dosimetry from linear accelerator (LINACs) for clinical applications using dysprosium doped calcium sulfate embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy+PTFE) was studied. The irradiations were carried out using high electron beams (6 to 18 MeV) from a linear accelerator (LINAC) Varian, CLINAC 2300C/D, for clinical practice purpose. The electron irradiations were obtained using the water solid in order to guarantee electronic equilibrium conditions (EEC). Field shaping for electron beams was obtained with electron cones. Glow curve and other thermoluminescent characteristics of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy+PTFE were conducted under high electrons beams irradiations. The TL response of the pellets showed an intensity peak centered at around 215 Degree-Sign C. TL response of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy+PTFE as a function of high electron absorbed dose showed a linearity in a wide range. To obtain reproducibility characteristic, a set of pellets were exposed repeatedly for the same electron absorbed dose. The results obtained in this study can suggest the applicability of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy+PTFE pellets for high electron beam dosimetry, provided fading is correctly accounted for. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy to electron beams dosimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of caSO{sub 4}:Dy to radiation safety in LINACs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL characteristics of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy for electron beams quality control.

  17. Dosimetric intercomparison between protons and electrons therapies applied to retinoblastoma; Intercomparacao dosimetrica entre terapias de protons e eletrons aplicada ao retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Flavia Vieira

    2008-07-01

    In this work we propose a construction of a simple human eye model in order to simulate the dosimetric response for a treatment with protons and electrons in a retinoblastoma cancer. The computational tool used in this simulation was the Geant4 code, in the version 4.9.1, all these package are free and permit simulate the interaction of radiation with matter. In our simulation we use a box with 4 cm side, with water, for represent the human eye. The simulation was performed considering mono energetics beams of protons and electrons with energy range between 50 and 70 MeV for protons and 2 and 10 MeV for electrons. The simulation was based on the advanced hadron therapy example of the Geant 4 code. In these example the phantom is divided in voxels with 0.2 mm side and it is generated the energy deposited in each voxel. The simulation results show the energy deliver in each voxel, with these energie we can calculate the dose deposited in that region. We can see the dose profile of, proton and electron, and we can see in both cases that for protons the position of delivered dose is well know, that happen in the position where the proton stop, for electrons the energies is delivered along the way and pass the desired position for high dose deposition. (author)

  18. Effects of rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices among electronics technology employees in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, Theresa Chinyere; Eseadi, Chiedu; Orji, Chibueze Tobias; Ede, Moses Onyemaechi; Ohanu, Ifeanyi Benedict; Bakare, Jimoh

    2017-05-01

    Improving employees' perception of organizational climate, and coaching them to remain steadfast when managing occupational risks associated with their job, might have an important effect on their psychosocial wellbeing and occupational health. This study examined the effects of a rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices. The participants were 77 electronics technology employees in the south-east of Nigeria. The study used a pretest-posttest control group design. The rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program significantly improved perceptions of the organizational climate for the people in the treatment group compared to those in the waitlist control group at post-intervention and follow-up assessments. Occupational risk management practices of the employees in the treatment group were also significantly better than those in the waitlist control group at the same 2 assessments. Corporate application of a rational emotive behavior therapy as an occupational health therapy intervention program is essential for improving the perceptions of organizational climate and promoting the adoption of feasible occupational risk management strategies in the workplace.

  19. Treatment of rat Walker-256 carcinosarcoma with photodynamic therapy and endotoxin irradiated with high-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Vasile F.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Laky, Dezideriu; Ionescu, Mircea D.; Dima, Stefan V.

    1994-03-01

    Experiments were performed on five batches of Wistar inbred rats with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma receiving sole treatment photodynamic therapy (PDT), irradiated endotoxin (R-LPS), native-endotoxin (N-LPS), or associated therapy (PDT + R-LPS) and the control batch (saline) consisted of animals with untreated Walker-256 tumors. The results were as follows: the sole treatment (PDT, R-LPS, N-LPS) gave survival rates between 56.3 and 60.7% and cure rates ranging from 32.1 to 37.5%. The `combined' therapy in multiple doses increased significantly (88.6%) the survival rate of tumor bearing rats as well as the highest incidence of complete tumor regression (71.4%). This work demonstrates that `combined' photodynamic and immunotherapy with irradiated endotoxin stimulates cell-mediated antitumoral activity and induces changes in the tumoral incidence in Walker-256 carcinosarcoma in the rat model.

  20. Effect of the electron transport through thin slabs on the simulation of linear electron accelerators of use in therapy: A comparative study of various Monte Carlo codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilches, M. [Servicio de Fisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Virgen de las Nieves' , Avda. de las Fuerzas Armadas, 2, E-18014 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: mvilches@ugr.es; Garcia-Pareja, S. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Carlos Haya' , Avda. Carlos Haya, s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain); Guerrero, R. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario ' San Cecilio' , Avda. Dr. Oloriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Anguiano, M.; Lallena, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2007-09-21

    When a therapeutic electron linear accelerator is simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code, the tuning of the initial spectra and the renormalization of dose (e.g., to maximum axial dose) constitute a common practice. As a result, very similar depth dose curves are obtained for different MC codes. However, if renormalization is turned off, the results obtained with the various codes disagree noticeably. The aim of this work is to investigate in detail the reasons of this disagreement. We have found that the observed differences are due to non-negligible differences in the angular scattering of the electron beam in very thin slabs of dense material (primary foil) and thick slabs of very low density material (air). To gain insight, the effects of the angular scattering models considered in various MC codes on the dose distribution in a water phantom are discussed using very simple geometrical configurations for the LINAC. The MC codes PENELOPE 2003, PENELOPE 2005, GEANT4, GEANT3, EGSnrc and MCNPX have been used.

  1. WE-A-207-00: In Memoriam of Jacques Ovadia - Reinvigorating Scientific Excellence: Electron Beam Therapy - Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Physics community lost one of its early pioneers in radiation oncology physics, Jacques Ovadia, who passed away in April of 2014 at the age of 90. Jacques received his Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana in 1951. Subsequently, under the guidance of John Laughlin, he was introduced to the field of Medical Physics. When John moved to Memorial Sloan Kettering, Jacques followed him. There he gained clinical experience and expertise in the then cutting-edge field of high energy electron beam therapy. In 1956, Jacques joined Dr. Erich Uhlmann at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago where one of the country’s first high energy medical linear accelerators had just been installed. During his 35 year tenure, Dr. Ovadia built a strong Medical Physics department that merged in 1984 with that of the University of Chicago. Jacques pioneered the use of high energy electron beams to treat deep seated tumors, multiple-field chest wall irradiation with variable electron energies, and even anticipated the current interest in high energy electron beam grid-therapy. At an early stage, he introduced a simulator, computerized treatment planning and in-house developed record and verify software. He retired in 1990 as Professor emeritus in Radiation and Cellular Biology at the University of Chicago. Dr. Ovadia was an early and strong supporter of AAPM. He was present at the Chicago ROMPS meeting where the decision was made to form an independent professional society for medical physics. He served as AAPM president in 1976. Jacques Ovadia is survived by his wife of 58 years, Florence, their daughter Corinne Graefe and son Marc Ovadia, MD, as well as four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Jacques’ dynamic and ever enthusiastic personality inspired all who collaborated with him. He will be greatly missed

  2. WE-A-207-00: In Memoriam of Jacques Ovadia - Reinvigorating Scientific Excellence: Electron Beam Therapy - Past, Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The Medical Physics community lost one of its early pioneers in radiation oncology physics, Jacques Ovadia, who passed away in April of 2014 at the age of 90. Jacques received his Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana in 1951. Subsequently, under the guidance of John Laughlin, he was introduced to the field of Medical Physics. When John moved to Memorial Sloan Kettering, Jacques followed him. There he gained clinical experience and expertise in the then cutting-edge field of high energy electron beam therapy. In 1956, Jacques joined Dr. Erich Uhlmann at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago where one of the country’s first high energy medical linear accelerators had just been installed. During his 35 year tenure, Dr. Ovadia built a strong Medical Physics department that merged in 1984 with that of the University of Chicago. Jacques pioneered the use of high energy electron beams to treat deep seated tumors, multiple-field chest wall irradiation with variable electron energies, and even anticipated the current interest in high energy electron beam grid-therapy. At an early stage, he introduced a simulator, computerized treatment planning and in-house developed record and verify software. He retired in 1990 as Professor emeritus in Radiation and Cellular Biology at the University of Chicago. Dr. Ovadia was an early and strong supporter of AAPM. He was present at the Chicago ROMPS meeting where the decision was made to form an independent professional society for medical physics. He served as AAPM president in 1976. Jacques Ovadia is survived by his wife of 58 years, Florence, their daughter Corinne Graefe and son Marc Ovadia, MD, as well as four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Jacques’ dynamic and ever enthusiastic personality inspired all who collaborated with him. He will be greatly missed.

  3. Development and application of compact and on-chip electron linear accelerators for dynamic tracking cancer therapy and DNA damage/repair analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesaka, M.; Demachi, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Fujisawa, H.; Chhatkuli, R. B.; Tsuda, A.; Tanaka, S.; Matsumura, Y.; Otsuki, S.; Kusano, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Nakamura, N.; Tanabe, E.; Koyama, K.; Yoshida, M.; Fujimori, R.; Yasui, A.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing compact electron linear accelerators (hereafter linac) with high RF (Radio Frequency) frequency (9.3 GHz, wavelength 32.3 mm) of X-band and applying to medicine and non-destructive testing. Especially, potable 950 keV and 3.95 MeV linac X-ray sources have been developed for on-site transmission testing at several industrial plants and civil infrastructures including bridges. 6 MeV linac have been made for pinpoint X-ray dynamic tracking cancer therapy. The length of the accelerating tube is ∼600 mm. The electron beam size at the X-ray target is less than 1 mm and X-ray spot size at the cancer is less than 3 mm. Several hardware and software are under construction for dynamic tracking therapy for moving lung cancer. Moreover, as an ultimate compact linac, we are designing and manufacturing a laser dielectric linac of ∼1 MeV with Yr fiber laser (283 THz, wavelength 1.06 pm). Since the wavelength is 1.06 μm, the length of one accelerating strcture is tens pm and the electron beam size is in sub-micro meter. Since the sizes of cell and nuclear are about 10 and 1 μm, respectively, we plan to use this “On-chip” linac for radiation-induced DNA damage/repair analysis. We are thinking a system where DNA in a nucleus of cell is hit by ∼1 μm electron or X-ray beam and observe its repair by proteins and enzymes in live cells in-situ.

  4. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy; Fluencia de neutrones en un Acelerador de Electrones de 18 MeV para terapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Direccion de Innovacion Tecnologica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the

  5. Radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp: treatment outcomes of total scalp irradiation with X-rays and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masaharu; Wada, Hidefumi; Ogino, Ichiro; Omura, Motoko; Koike, Izumi; Tayama, Yoshibumi; Odagiri, Kazumasa; Kasuya, Takeo; Inoue, Tomio

    2014-10-01

    Wide surgical excision is the standard treatment for angiosarcoma of the scalp, but many patients are inoperable. Therefore, we investigated the outcome of radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp. Seventeen patients with angiosarcoma of the scalp underwent radiation therapy with total scalp irradiation. Four patients had cervical lymph node metastases, but none had distant metastases. A median initial dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the entire scalp. Subsequently, local radiation boost to the tumor sites achieved a median total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Fourteen of the 17 patients developed recurrences during the median follow-up period of 14 months after radiation therapy; 7 had recurrences in the scalp, including primary tumor progression in 2 patients and new disease in 5, and 12 patients developed distant metastases. The primary progression-free, scalp relapse-free, and distant metastasis-free rates were 86, 67, and 38 % at 1 year and 86, 38, and 16 % at 3 years, respectively. Thirteen patients died; the overall and cause-specific survival rates were both 73 % at 1 year and 23 and 44 % at 3 years, respectively. The median survival time was 16 months. There were no therapy-related toxicities ≥ grade 3. Total scalp irradiation is safe and effective for local tumor control, but a dose of ≤ 50 Gy in conventional fractions may be insufficient to eradicate microscopic tumors. For gross tumors, a total dose of 70 Gy, and > 70 Gy for tumors with deep invasion, is recommended.

  6. Quantification and reduction of peripheral dose from leakage radiation on Siemens Primus accelerators in electron therapy mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Collins; Karotki, Alex; Hunt, Dylan; Holly, Rick

    2010-06-15

    In this work, leakage radiation from EA200 series electron applicators on Siemens Primus accelerators is quantified, and its penetration ability in water and/or the shielding material Xenolite-NL established. Initially, measurement of leakage from 10 x 10 - 25 x 25 cm2 applicators was performed as a function of height along applicator and of lateral distance from applicator body. Relative to central-axis ionization maximum in solid water, the maximum leakage in air observed with a cylindrical ion chamber with 1 cm solid water buildup cap at a lateral distance of 2 cm from the front and right sidewalls of applicators were 17% and 14%, respectively; these maxima were recorded for 18 MeV electron beams and applicator sizes of >or=20 x 20 cm2. In the patient plane, the applicator leakage gave rise to a broad peripheral dose off-axis distance peak that shifted closer to the field edge as the electron energy increases. The maximum peripheral dose from normally incident primary electron beams at a depth of 1 cm in a water phantom was observed to be equal to 5% of the central-axis dose maximum and as high as 9% for obliquely incident beams with angles of obliquity dose curves showed that the "practical range" of the leakage electrons in water varies from approximately 1.4 to 5.7 cm as the primary electron beam energy is raised from 6 to 18 MeV. Next, transmission measurements of leakage radiation through the shielding material Xenolite-NL showed a 4 mm thick sheet of this material is required to attenuate the leakage from 9 MeV beams by two-thirds, and that for every additional 3 MeV increase in the primary electron beam energy, an additional Xenolite-NL thickness of roughly 2 mm is needed to achieve the aforementioned attenuation level. Finally, attachment of a 1 mm thick sheet of lead to the outer surface of applicator sidewalls resulted in a reduction of the peripheral dose by up to 80% and 74% for 9 and 18MeV beams, respectively. This sidewall modification had an

  7. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, Jason A.; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean ± standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 ± 0.12, 0.70 ± 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 ± 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 ± 0.16 for the rectum. Conclusions: The

  8. Using 3D dosimetry to quantify the Electron Return Effect (ERE) for MR-image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hannah J.; Choi, Gye Won; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Kadbi, Mo; Ibbott, Geoffrey

    2017-05-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) using computed tomography (CT), cone-beam CT, MV on-board imager (OBI), and kV OBI systems have allowed for more accurate patient positioning prior to each treatment fraction. While these imaging modalities provide excellent bony anatomy image quality, MRI surpasses them in soft tissue image contrast for better visualization and tracking of soft tissue tumors with no additional radiation dose to the patient. A pre-clinical integrated 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging and 7 MV linear accelerator system (MR-linac) allows for real-time tracking of soft tissues and adaptive treatment planning prior to each treatment fraction. However, due to the presence of a strong magnetic field from the MR component, there is a three dimensional (3D) change in dose deposited by the secondary electrons. Especially at nonhomogeneous anatomical sites with tissues of very different densities, dose enhancements and reductions can occur due to the Lorentz force influencing the trajectories of secondary electrons. These dose changes at tissue interfaces are called the electron return effect or ERE. This study investigated the ERE using 3D dosimeters.

  9. Urethral dose sparing in squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal using proton therapy matching electrons with prior brachytherapy for prostate cancer: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apinorasethkul, Ontida; Lenards, Nishele; Hunzeker, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to communicate a technique on treating the re-irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of anal canal with proton fields matched with electron fields to spare prostatic urethra. A 76-year old male presented with a secondary radiation-induced malignancy as a result of prostate brachytherapy seeds irradiation 10 years prior. A rectal examination revealed a bulky tumor at the top of the anal canal involving the left superior-most aspect of the anal canal extending superiorly into the rectum. The inferior extent was palpable approximately 3cm from the anal verge and the superior extent of the mass measured greater than 5cm in the superior-inferior dimension. Chemoradiation was suggested since the patient was opposed to abdominoperineal resection (APR) and colostomy. The use of proton therapy matching with electron fields in the re-irradiation setting could help reduce the complications. A 2 lateral proton beams were designed to treat the bulky tumor volume with 2 electron beams treating the nodal volumes. This complication of treatment fields helped spare the prostatic urethra and reduced the risk of urinary obstruction in the future. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A fully electronic intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) process implemented in a network comprised of independent treatment planning, record and verify, and delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Daniel W; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to implement an electronic method to perform and analyze intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) using an aSi megavoltage electronic portal imaging device in a network comprised of independent treatment planning, record and verify (R&V), and delivery systems. A verification plan was generated in the treatment planning system using the actual treatment plan of a patient. After exporting the treatment fields to the R&V system, the fields were delivered in QA mode with the aSi imager deployed. The resulting dosimetric images are automatically stored in a DICOM-RT format in the delivery system treatment console computer. The relative dose density images are subsequently pushed to the R&V system. The absolute dose images are then transferred electronically from the treatment console computer to the treatment planning system and imported into the verification plan in the dosimetry work space for further analysis. Screen shots of the gamma evaluation and isodose comparison are imported into the R&V system as an electronic file (e.g. PDF) to be reviewed prior to initiation of patient treatment. A relative dose image predicted by the treatment planning system can also be sent to the R&V system to be compared with the relative dose density image measured with the aSi imager. Our department does not have integrated planning, R&V, and delivery systems. In spite of this, we are able to fully implement a paperless and filmless IMRT QA process, allowing subsequent analysis and approval to be more efficient, while the QA document is directly attached to its specific patient chart in the R&V system in electronic form. The calculated and measured relative dose images can be compared electronically within the R&V system to analyze the density differences and ensure proper dose delivery to patients. In the absence of an integrated planning, verifying, and delivery system, we have shown that it is nevertheless possible to develop a

  11. Impact of IUdR on Rat 9L glioma cell survival for 25-35 keV photon-activated auger electron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Diane; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Brown, Thomas A D; Ii, Kenneth L Matthews; Dugas, Joseph P; Ham, Kyungmin; Varnes, Marie E

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the current study was to measure the energy dependence of survival of rat 9L glioma cells labeled with iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) that underwent photon-activated Auger electron therapy using 25-35 keV monochromatic X rays, i.e., above and below the K-edge energy of iodine. Rat 9L glioma cells were selected because of their radioresistance, ability to be implanted for future in vivo studies and analogy to radioresistant human gliomas. Survival curves were measured for a 4 MV X-ray beam and synchrotron produced monochromatic 35, 30 and 25 keV X-ray beams. IUdR was incorporated into the DNA at levels of 0, 9 and 18% thymidine replacement for 4 MV and 35 keV and 0 and 18% thymidine replacement for 30 and 25 keV. For 10 combinations of beam energy and thymidine replacement, 62 data sets (3-13 per combination) provided 776 data points (47-148 per combination). Survival versus dose data taken for the same combination, but on different days, were merged by including the zero-dose points in the nonlinear, chi-squared data fitting using the linear-quadratic model and letting the best estimate to the zero-dose plating efficiency for each of the different days be a fitting parameter. When comparing two survival curves, the ratio of doses resulting in 10% survival gave sensitization enhancement ratios (SER10) from which contributions due to linear energy transfer (LET) (SER10,LET), IUdR radiosensitization (SER10,RS), the Auger effect (SER10,AE) and the total of all effects (SER10,T) were determined. At 4 MV and 35, 30 and 25 keV, SER10,LET values were 1.00, 1.08 ± 0.03, 1.22 ± 0.02 and 1.37 ± 0.02, respectively. At 4 MV SER10,RS values for 9 and 18% IUdR were 1.28 ± 0.02 and 1.40 ± 0.02, respectively. Assuming LET effects were independent of percentage IUdR and radiosensitization effects were independent of energy, SER10,AE values for 18% IUdR at 35, 30 and 25 keV were 1.35 ± 0.05, 1.06 ± 0.03 and 0.98 ± 0.03, respectively. The value for 9% IUdR at 35 keV was 1

  12. SU-D-19A-03: Monte Carlo Investigation of the Mobetron to Perform Modulated Electron Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emam, I; Eldib, A; Hosini, M; AlSaeed, E; Ma, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has been proposed as a mean of delivering conformal dose to shallow tumors while sparing distal structures and surrounding tissues. In intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) utilizing Mobetron, an applicator is placed as closely as possible to the suspected cancerous tissues to be treated. In this study we investigate the characteristics of Mobetron electron beams collimated by an in-house prospective electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) and its feasibility for MERT. Methods: IntraOp Mobetron™ dedicated to perform radiotherapy during surgery was used in the study. It provides several energies (6, 9 and 12 MeV). Dosimetry measurements were performed to obtain percentage depth dose curves (PDD) and profiles for a 10-cm diameter applicator using the PTW MP3/XS 3D-scanning system and the semiflex ion chamber. MCBEAM/MCSIM Monte Carlo codes were used for the treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. The design of an electron beam collimation by an eMLC attached to the Mobetron head was also investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. Isodose distributions resulting from eMLC collimated beams were compared to that collimated using cutouts. The design for our Mobetron eMLC is based on our previous experiences with eMLCs designed for clinical linear accelerators. For Mobetron the eMLC is attached to the end of a spacer-mounted rectangular applicator at 50 cm SSD. Steel will be used as the leaf material because other materials would be toxic and will not be suitable for intraoperative applications. Results: Good agreement (within 2%) was achieved between measured and calculated PDD curves and profiles for all available energies. Dose distributiosn provided by the eMLC showed reasonable agreement (∼3%/1mm) with those obtained by conventional cutouts. Conclusion: Monte Carlo simulations are capable of modeling Mobetron electron beams with a reliable accuracy. An eMLC attached to the Mobteron treatment head will

  13. Sci—Thur PM: Planning and Delivery — 03: Automated delivery and quality assurance of a modulated electron radiation therapy plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, T; Papaconstadopoulos, P; Alexander, A; Serban, M; Devic, S; Seuntjens, J

    2014-01-01

    Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) offers the potential to improve healthy tissue sparing through increased dose conformity. Challenges remain, however, in accurate beamlet dose calculation, plan optimization, collimation method and delivery accuracy. In this work, we investigate the accuracy and efficiency of an end-to-end MERT plan and automated-delivery workflow for the electron boost portion of a previously treated whole breast irradiation case. Dose calculations were performed using Monte Carlo methods and beam weights were determined using a research-based treatment planning system capable of inverse optimization. The plan was delivered to radiochromic film placed in a water equivalent phantom for verification, using an automated motorized tertiary collimator. The automated delivery, which covered 4 electron energies, 196 subfields and 6183 total MU was completed in 25.8 minutes, including 6.2 minutes of beam-on time with the remainder of the delivery time spent on collimator leaf motion and the automated interfacing with the accelerator in service mode. The delivery time could be reduced by 5.3 minutes with minor electron collimator modifications and the beam-on time could be reduced by and estimated factor of 2–3 through redesign of the scattering foils. Comparison of the planned and delivered film dose gave 3%/3 mm gamma pass rates of 62.1, 99.8, 97.8, 98.3, and 98.7 percent for the 9, 12, 16, 20 MeV, and combined energy deliveries respectively. Good results were also seen in the delivery verification performed with a MapCHECK 2 device. The results showed that accurate and efficient MERT delivery is possible with current technologies

  14. Radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp. Treatment outcomes of total scalp irradiation with X-rays and electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Masaharu; Koike, Izumi; Kasuya, Takeo; Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Wada, Hidefumi [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Dermatology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Ogino, Ichiro [Yokohama City University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Omura, Motoko [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Shonankamakura General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kamakura, Kanagawa (Japan); Tayama, Yoshibumi [Yokohama Minami Kyousai Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Odagiri, Kazumasa [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Yokohama Municipal Citizen' s Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Wide surgical excision is the standard treatment for angiosarcoma of the scalp, but many patients are inoperable. Therefore, we investigated the outcome of radiation therapy for angiosarcoma of the scalp. Seventeen patients with angiosarcoma of the scalp underwent radiation therapy with total scalp irradiation. Four patients had cervical lymph node metastases, but none had distant metastases. A median initial dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the entire scalp. Subsequently, local radiation boost to the tumor sites achieved a median total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Fourteen of the 17 patients developed recurrences during the median follow-up period of 14 months after radiation therapy; 7 had recurrences in the scalp, including primary tumor progression in 2 patients and new disease in 5, and 12 patients developed distant metastases. The primary progression-free, scalp relapse-free, and distant metastasis-free rates were 86, 67, and 38 % at 1 year and 86, 38, and 16 % at 3 years, respectively. Thirteen patients died; the overall and cause-specific survival rates were both 73 % at 1 year and 23 and 44 % at 3 years, respectively. The median survival time was 16 months. There were no therapy-related toxicities ≥ grade 3. Total scalp irradiation is safe and effective for local tumor control, but a dose of ≤ 50 Gy in conventional fractions may be insufficient to eradicate microscopic tumors. For gross tumors, a total dose of 70 Gy, and > 70 Gy for tumors with deep invasion, is recommended. (orig.) [German] Umfangreiche chirurgische Exzision ist die Standardbehandlung fuer Angiosarkome der Kopfhaut, aber viele Patienten sind nicht operierbar. Daher haben wir die Ergebnisse einer Strahlenbehandlung fuer Angiosarkome der Kopfhaut untersucht. Insgesamt 17 Patienten mit Angiosarkom der Kopfhaut erhielten eine Strahlenbehandlung der gesamten Kopfhaut. Vier Patienten hatten zervikale Lymphknotenmetastasen, aber keine Fernmetastasen. Die gesamte Kopfhaut

  15. Evaluation of LED therapy at 945nm on bone repair by micro x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantino, Alexandre G.; Nicolau, Renata A.; de Oliveira, Marco A.; Santo, Ana Maria E.

    2011-07-01

    Phototherapy is able to modulate cellular metabolism of bone tissue and consequently accelerate the repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of this therapy in repair of bone monocortical defects in femurs of thirty male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into six groups (five animals for group), including three controls and three irradiated groups with different experimental times (14, 21, and 28 days after surgery). LED was used for the irradiation, emitting non-coherent light in the spectral range of 945+/-20 nm and output power of 48 mW, on one point of irradiation for four minutes. Seven treatment sessions were performed with 48 hours between sessions. For analysis on the bone repair, qualitative and quantitative assessments of Ca and P contents were done by micro x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (μXRF) and the morphological structure was carried out using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results showed the efficiency of infrared LED therapy, because the amount of mineral components analyzed by μXRF and the morphological features of cortical and trabecular bones, demonstrated by the SEM images, showed enhanced bone repair in the irradiated groups when compared to their corresponding control groups at all stages.

  16. Low-dose (10-Gy) total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: an open clinical study and pooled data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstrup, Maria R; Gniadecki, Robert; Iversen, Lars; Skov, Lone; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Loft, Annika; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Five years' experience with a customized electronic checklist for radiation therapy planning quality assurance in a multicampus institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sean L; Tierney, Kevin P; Elguindi, Sharif; Mechalakos, James G

    2017-12-24

    An electronic checklist has been designed with the intention of reducing errors while minimizing user effort in completing the checklist. We analyze the clinical use and evolution of the checklist over the past 5 years and review data in an incident learning system (ILS) to investigate whether it has contributed to an improvement in patient safety. The checklist is written as a standalone HTML application using VBScript. User selection of pertinent demographic details limits the display of checklist items only to those necessary for the particular clinical scenario. Ten common clinical scenarios were used to illustrate the difference between the maximum possible number of checklist items available in the code versus the number displayed to the user at any one time. An ILS database of errors and near misses was reviewed to evaluate whether the checklist influenced the occurrence of reported events. Over 5 years, the number of checklist items available in the code nearly doubled, whereas the number displayed to the user at any one time stayed constant. Events reported in our ILS related to the beam energy used with pacemakers, projection of anatomy on digitally reconstructed radiographs, orthogonality of setup fields, and field extension beyond match lines, did not recur after the items were added to the checklist. Other events related to bolus documentation and breakpoints continued to be reported. Our checklist is adaptable to the introduction of new technologies, transitions between planning systems, and to errors and near misses recorded in the ILS. The electronic format allows us to restrict user display to a small, relevant, subset of possible checklist items, limiting the planner effort needed to review and complete the checklist. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Design and construction of a novel compact doubly achromatic asymmetric 2700 magnet system for 25 MeV therapy electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheon, R.M.; Hodge, S.B.

    1980-09-01

    A modern cancer therapy electron accelerator unit must satisfy many design constraints, one of which is the isocentric height above floor level. Usually 130 cm is considered the maximum height at which a nurse can work with a patient. The advent of higher energy machines has increasingly made this more difficult to achieve, as higher magnetic fields are required in the magnet that directs the beam onto the patient. A new 270 degree doubly-achromatic magnet configuration has been developed which minimizes the isocentre height for a given maximum energy and maximum magnetic field. The system is an asymmetric two-magnet configuration, with zero field index, equal fields and a bend of greater than 180 degrees in the first magnet. It is compact, easy to manufacture and relatively insensitive to assembly tolerances. Energy defining slits are easily incorporated in the design and can readily be radiation shielded. Input and output beam matching and steering is easily accomplished with a compact input quadrupole doublet and small steering windings. This report details the design and bench testing of a head magnet for a 25 MeV electron accelerator with +- 10 percent energy acceptance. The output beam requirement is < 3 mm diameter with < +- 17 mrad angular divergence. (auth)

  19. A Monte Carlo study of energy deposition at the sub-cellular level for application to targeted radionuclide therapy with low-energy electron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Bousis, C.; Hindorf, C.; Fotopoulos, A.; Pathak, A.; Kostarelos, K.

    2007-01-01

    Optimizing targeted radionuclide therapy for patients with circulating malignant cells (e.g. blood-related cancers) or a micrometastatic spread requires quantification of various dosimetric parameters at the single-cell level. We present results on the energy deposition of monoenergetic electrons of initial energy from 100 eV to 20 keV - relevant to Auger emitting radionuclides - distributed either uniformly or at the surface of spherical volumes of radii from 10 nm to 1 μm which correspond to critical sub-cellular targets. Calculations have been carried out by our detailed-history Monte Carlo (MC) code which simulates event-by-event the complete slowing down (to 1 Ry) of both the primary and all subsequent generations of electrons, as well as, by the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA) using analytic range-energy relationships. The latter method has been adopted by the MIRD committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine for dosimetry at the cellular level (>1 μm). Differences between the MC and CSDA results are up to ∼50% and are expected to be even larger at higher energies and/or smaller volumes. They are attributed to the deficiencies of the CSDA method associated with the neglect of straggling and δ-ray transport. The results are particularly relevant to targeted radiotherapy at the genome level by Auger emitters

  20. Auger electron emitter against multiple myeloma - targeted endo-radio-therapy with 125I-labeled thymidine analogue 5-iodo-4'-thio-2'-deoxyuridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenroth, Agnieszka; Dinger, Cornelia; Zlatopolskiy, Boris D.; Al-Momani, Ehab; Glatting, Gerhard; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Reske, Sven N.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by accumulation of malignant, terminally differentiated B cells in the bone marrow. Despite advances in therapy, MM remains an incurable disease. Novel therapeutic approaches are, therefore, urgently needed. Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals are attractive for targeted nano-irradiation therapy, given that DNA of malignant cells is selectively addressed. Here we evaluated the antimyeloma potential of the Auger electron-emitting thymidine analogue 125 I-labeled 5-iodo-4'-thio-2'-deoxyuridine ([ 125 I]ITdU). Methods: Cellular uptake and DNA incorporation of [ 125 I]ITdU were determined in fluorodeoxyuridine-pretreated KMS12BM, U266, dexamethasone-sensitive MM1.S and -resistant MM1.R cell lines. The effect of stimulation with interleukin 6 (IL6) or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) on the intracellular incorporation of [ 125 I]ITdU was investigated in cytokine-sensitive MM1.S and MM1.R cell lines. Apoptotic cells were identified using Annexin V. Cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP was visualized by Western blot. DNA fragmentation was investigated using laddering assay. Therapeutic efficiency of [ 125 I]ITdU was proven by clonogenic assay. Results: [ 125 I]ITdU was shown to be efficiently incorporated into DNA of malignant cells, providing a promising mechanism for delivering highly toxic Auger radiation emitters into tumor DNA. [ 125 I]ITdU had a potent antimyeloma effect in cell lines representing distinct disease stages and, importantly, in cell lines sensitive or resistant to the conventional therapeutic agent, but was not toxic for normal plasma and bone marrow stromal cells. Furthermore, [ 125 I]ITdU abrogated the protective actions of IL6 and IGF1 on MM cells. [ 125 I]ITdU induced massive damage in the DNA of malignant plasma cells, which resulted in efficient inhibition of clonogenic growth. Conclusion: These studies may provide a novel treatment strategy for overcoming

  1. Bowel sparing in pediatric cranio-spinal radiotherapy: a comparison of combined electron and photon and helical TomoTherapy techniques to a standard photon method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harron, Elizabeth; Lewis, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dose to organs at risk (OARs) from different craniospinal radiotherapy treatment approaches available at the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC), with a particular emphasis on sparing the bowel. Method: Treatment plans were produced for a pediatric medulloblastoma patient with inflammatory bowel disease using 3D conformal 6-MV photons (3DCP), combined 3D 6-MV photons and 18-MeV electrons (3DPE), and helical photon TomoTherapy (HT). The 3DPE plan was a modification of the standard 3DCP technique, using electrons to treat the spine inferior to the level of the diaphragm. The plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume data to OARs and the nontumor integral dose. Results: The 3DPE plan was found to give the lowest dose to the bowel and the lowest nontumor integral dose of the 3 techniques. However, the coverage of the spine planning target volume (PTV) was least homogeneous using this technique, with only 74.6% of the PTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose. HT was able to achieve the best coverage of the PTVs (99.0% of the whole-brain PTV and 93.1% of the spine PTV received 95% of the prescribed dose), but delivered a significantly higher integral dose. HT was able to spare the heart, thyroid, and eyes better than the linac-based techniques, but other OARs received a higher dose. Conclusions: Use of electrons was the best method for reducing the dose to the bowel and the integral dose, at the expense of compromised spine PTV coverage. For some patients, HT may be a viable method of improving dose homogeneity and reducing selected OAR doses.

  2. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J; Wang, An

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (−1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  3. Treatment planning comparison of electron arc therapy and photon intensity modulated radiotherapy for Askin's tumor of chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamema, Swamidas V.; Sharma, Pramod K.; Laskar, Siddhartha; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: A dosimetric study to quantitatively compare radiotherapy treatment plans for Askin's tumor using Electron Arc (EA) vs. photon Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). Materials and methods: Five patients treated with EA were included in this study. Treatment plans were generated for each patient using EA and IMRT. Plans were compared using dose volume histograms (DVH) of the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and Organs at Risk (OAR). Results: IMRT resulted in superior PTV coverage, and homogeneous dose distribution compared to EA. For EA, 92% of the PTV was covered to 85% of the dose compared to IMRT in which 96% was covered to 95% of the dose. V 107 that represents the hot spot within the PTV was more in IMRT compared to EA: 7.4(±2)% vs. 3(±0.5)%, respectively. With PTVs located close to the spinal cord (SC), the dose to SC was more with EA, whereas for PTVs located away from the SC, the dose to SC was more with IMRT. The cardiac dose profile was similar to that of SC. Ipsilateral lung received lower doses with IMRT while contralateral lung received higher dose with IMRT compared to EA. For non-OAR normal tissues, IMRT resulted in large volumes of low dose regions. Conclusions: IMRT resulted in superior PTV coverage and sparing of OAR compared to EA plans. Although IMRT seems to be superior to EA, one needs to keep in mind the volume of low dose regions associated with IMRT, especially while treating young children

  4. Design and evaluation of a multimedia electronic patient record "oncoflow" with clinical workflow assistance for head and neck tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jens; Boehm, Andreas; Kielhorn, Anne; Dietz, Andreas; Bohn, Stefan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    The management of patient-specific information is a challenging task for surgeons and physicians because existing clinical information systems are insufficiently integrated into daily clinical routine and contained information entities are distributed across different proprietary databases. Thus, existing information is hardly usable for further electronic processing, workflow support or clinical studies. A Web-based clinical information system has been developed that automatically imports patient-specific information from different information systems. The system is tailored to the existing workflow for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. In this paper, the clinical assistance functions and a quantitative as well as a qualitative system evaluation are presented. The information system has been deployed at a clinical site and is in use in daily clinical routine. Two evaluation studies show that the information integration, the structured information presentation in the Web browser and the assistance functions improve the physician's workflow. The studies also show that the usage of the new information system does not impair the time physicians need for a process step compared with the usage of the existing information system. Information integration is crucial for efficient workflow support in the clinic. The central access to information within a modern and structured user interface saves valuable time for the physician. The comprehensive database allows an instant usage of the existing information clinical workflow support or the conduction of trial studies.

  5. The low-energy β(-) and electron emitter (161)Tb as an alternative to (177)Lu for targeted radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehenberger, Silvia; Barkhausen, Christoph; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Grünberg, Jürgen; Hohn, Alexander; Köster, Ulli; Schibli, Roger; Türler, Andreas; Zhernosekov, Konstantin

    2011-08-01

    The low-energy β(-) emitter (161)Tb is very similar to (177)Lu with respect to half-life, beta energy and chemical properties. However, (161)Tb also emits a significant amount of conversion and Auger electrons. Greater therapeutic effect can therefore be expected in comparison to (177)Lu. It also emits low-energy photons that are useful for gamma camera imaging. The (160)Gd(n,γ)(161)Gd→(161)Tb production route was used to produce (161)Tb by neutron irradiation of massive (160)Gd targets (up to 40 mg) in nuclear reactors. A semiautomated procedure based on cation exchange chromatography was developed and applied to isolate no carrier added (n.c.a.) (161)Tb from the bulk of the (160)Gd target and from its stable decay product (161)Dy. (161)Tb was used for radiolabeling DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate; the radiolabeling profile was compared to the commercially available n.c.a. (177)Lu. A (161)Tb Derenzo phantom was imaged using a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography camera. Up to 15 GBq of (161)Tb was produced by long-term irradiation of Gd targets. Using a cation exchange resin, we obtained 80%-90% of the available (161)Tb with high specific activity, radionuclide and chemical purity and in quantities sufficient for therapeutic applications. The (161)Tb obtained was of the quality required to prepare (161)Tb-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate. We were able to produce (161)Tb in n.c.a. form by irradiating highly enriched (160)Gd targets; it can be obtained in the quantity and quality required for the preparation of (161)Tb-labeled therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. SU-F-I-24: Feasibility of Magnetic Susceptibility to Relative Electron Density Conversion Method for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K; Kadoya, N; Chiba, M; Matsushita, H; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Sato, K; Nagasaka, T; Yamanaka, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Dobashi, S; Takeda, K [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop radiation treatment planning using magnetic susceptibility obtained from quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) via MR imaging. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method for generating a substitute for a CT image from an MRI. Methods: The head of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a CT scanner and a 3.0 T MRI scanner. The CT imaging was performed with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm at 80 and 120 kV (dual-energy scan). These CT images were converted to relative electron density (rED) using the CT-rED conversion table generated by a previous dual-energy CT scan. The CT-rED conversion table was generated using the conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to rED via a single linear relationship. One T2 star-weighted 3D gradient echo-based sequence with four different echo times images was acquired using the MRI scanner. These T2 star-weighted images were used to estimate the phase data. To estimate the local field map, a Laplacian unwrapping of the phase and background field removal algorithm were implemented to process phase data. To generate a magnetic susceptibility map from the local field map, we used morphology enabled dipole inversion method. The rED map was resampled to the same resolution as magnetic susceptibility, and the magnetic susceptibility-rED conversion table was obtained via voxel-by-voxel mapping between the magnetic susceptibility and rED maps. Results: A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed through our method. Conclusion: Our results show that the correlation between magnetic susceptibility and rED is not observed. As the next step, we assume that the voxel of the magnetic susceptibility map comprises two materials, such as water (0 ppm) and bone (-2.2 ppm) or water and marrow (0.81ppm). The elements of each voxel were estimated from the ratio of the two materials.

  7. SU-G-TeP3-03: Dose Enhancement of Gold Nanoparticle in Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study Based On the Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y; Beaulieu, L [Centre Hospitalier University de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Laprise-Pelletier, M; Lagueux, J; Cote, M; Fordin, M [Dept of Mining, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University Laval, Quebec, QC, CA (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticle (GNP) is a promising radiosensitizer that selectively boosts tumor dose in radiotherapy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging observations recently revealed for the first time that GNP exists in vivo in the form of highly localized vesicles, instead of hypothetical uniform distribution. This work investigates the corresponding difference of energy deposition in proton therapy. Methods: First, single vesicles of various radii were constructed by packing GNPs (as Φ50 nm gold spheres) in spheres and were simulated, as well as a single GNP. The radial energy depositions (REDs) were scored using 100 concentric spherical shells from 0.1µm to 10µm, 0.1µm thickness each, for both vesicles and GNP, and compared. TEM images, 8 days after injection in a PC3 prostate cancer murine model, were used to extract position/dimension of vesicles, as well as contours of cytoplasmic and nucleus membranes. Vesicles were then constructed based on the TEM images. A 100 MeV proton beam was studied by using the Geant4-DNA code, which simulates all energy deposition events. Results: The vesicle REDs, normalized to the same proton energy loss as in a single GNP, are larger (smaller) than that of a single GNP when radius >2µm (<2µm). The peak increase (at about 3µm radius) is about 10% and 18% for Φ1µm and Φ1.6µm vesicles respectively, relative to a single GNP. The TEM-based simulation resulted in a larger energy deposition (by about one order of magnitude) that follows completely different pattern from that of hypothetical GNP distributions (regular dotted pattern in extracellular and/or extranucleus regions). Conclusion: The in vivo energy deposition, both in pattern and magnitude, of proton therapy is greatly affected by the true distribution of the GNP, as illustrated by the presence of GNP vesicles compared to hypothetical scenarios. Work supported by NSERC Discovery Grant #435510, Canada.

  8. Low-Dose (10-Gy) Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An Open Clinical Study and Pooled Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamstrup, Maria R., E-mail: mkam0004@bbh.regionh.dk [Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gniadecki, Robert [Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Iversen, Lars [Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Skov, Lone [Department of Dermatology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Petersen, Peter Meidahl [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. Methods and Materials: In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over <2.5 weeks, receiving a total dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. Results: The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (<1% skin involvement with patches or plaques) documented in 57% of the patients. Median duration of overall cutaneous response was 174 days (5.8 months; range: 60-675 days). TSEBT-related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in 60% of patients. Conclusions: Low-dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT.

  9. TH-AB-BRA-11: Using 3D Dosimeters for the Investigation of the Electron Return Effect (ERE) in MR-Guided Radiation Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, G; Lee, H; Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the capability of 3D radiochromic PRESAGE and Fricke-type dosimeters to measure the influence of magnetic fields on dose distribution, including the electron return effect (ERE), for MR-guided radiation therapy applications. Methods: Short cylindrical 3D dosimeters with PRESAGE and Fricke-type formulations were created in-house prior to irradiations in a 1.5T/7MV MR-linac. Each dosimeter was prepared with a concentric cylindrical air cavity with diameters of 1.5 cm and 2.5 cm, and the diameters of the dosimeters were 7.2 cm and 8.8 cm for PRESAGE and Fricke-type respectively. The dosimeters were irradiated within the bore of the MR-linac with the flat face of the dosimeters perpendicular to the magnetic field. Dosimeters were irradiated to approximately 9 Gy and 29 Gy to the center of dosimeters with a 15×15 cm 2 field. The PRESAGE dosimeter was scanned using an optical-CT 2 hours post-irradiation; the Fricke-type dosimeter was immediately imaged with the MR component of the MR-linac post-irradiation. Results: Axial slices of the dose distributions show a clear demonstration of the dose enhancement due to the ERE above the cavity and the region of reduced dose below the cavity. The regions of increased and reduced dose are rotated with respect to the radiation beam axis due to the average directional change of the electrons. Measurements from line profiles show the dose enhanced up to ∼0.5 cm around the cavity by up to a factor of 1.3 and 1.4 for PRESAGE and Fricke-type dosimeters respectively. Conclusion: PRESAGE and Fricke-type dosimeters are able to qualitatively measure the ERE with good agreement with previously published simulation and 2D dosimetry demonstrations of the ERE. Further investigation of these 3D dosimeters as promising candidates for quality assurance of MR-guided radiation therapy systems is encouraged to assess changes in response and measurement accuracy due to the magnetic field.

  10. Evaluation of bolus electron conformal therapy compared with conventional techniques for the treatment of left chest wall postmastectomy in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opp, Dan, E-mail: Daniel.Opp@moffitt.org; Forster, Kenneth; Li, Weiqi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2013-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) lowers local-regional recurrence risk and improves survival in selected patients with breast cancer. The chest wall and lower axilla are technically challenging areas to treat with homogenous doses and normal tissue sparing. This study compares several techniques for PMRT to provide data to guide selection of optimal treatment techniques. Twenty-five consecutive left-sided patients treated postmastectomy were contoured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas guidelines then planned using 4 different PMRT techniques: opposed tangents with wedges (3-dimensional [3D] wedges), opposed tangents with field-in-field (FiF) modulation, 8-field intensity modulation radiotherapy (IMRT), and custom bolus electron conformal therapy (BolusECT, .decimal, Inc., Sanford, FL). Required planning target volume (PTV) coverage was held constant, and then dose homogeneity and normal tissue dose parameters were compared among the 4 techniques. BolusECT achieved clincally acceptable PTV coverage for 22 out of 25 cases. Compared with either tangential technique, IMRT and BolusECT provided the lowest heart V{sub 25} doses (3.3% ± 0.9% and 6.6% ± 3.2%, respectively with p < 0.0001). FiF had the lowest mean total lung dose (7.3 ± 1.1 Gy, with p = 0.0013), IMRT had the lowest total lung V{sub 20} (10.3% ± 1.6%, p < 0.0001), and BolusECT had the lowest mean heart dose (7.3 ± 2.0 Gy, p = 0.0002). IMRT provided the optimal dose homogeneity and normal tissue sparing compared with all other techniques for the cases in which BolusECT could not achieve acceptable PTV coverage. IMRT generally exposes contralateral breast and lung to slightly higher doses. Optimal PMRT technique depends upon patient anatomy. Patients whose maximal target volume depth is about 5.7 cm or less can be treated with BolusECT-assisted 12 or 15 MeV electron beams. At these energies, BolusECT has comparable dose-volume statistics as IMRT and lower heart V{sub 25} than opposed

  11. Use of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy(IOERT) in the management of retroperitoneal and pelvic soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Ivy A.; Haddock, Michael G.; Donohue, John H.; Nagorney, David M.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Grill, Joseph P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results and tolerance of IOERT in the treatment of intraabdominal soft tissue sarcomas. Materials and Methods: Between (3(81)) and (9(95)) 87 patients with primary(42) and recurrent(45) retroperitoneal and pelvic sarcomas were evaluated and received intraoperative irradiation with electrons(IOERT) as a component of treatment at Mayo Clinic. Primary tumors were high grade in 33(79%) patients and low grade in 9(21%). Recurrent tumors were high grade in 21(47%) patients and low grade in 24(53%). Prior surgery was performed in 10% of the primary and 98% of the recurrent tumors. Prior irradiation had been given in 7% of the primary and 29% of the recurrent lesions. Chemotherapy had only been used in 11% of all patients. Median tumor size for these sarcomas was 10 cm with a range of 2 to 36 cm. All patients underwent maximum surgical resection with IOERT. In 72 patients there was microscopic or no residual tumor after surgical resection. The median IOERT dose was 12.5 Gy for the primary treatment group and 15 Gy for the recurrent group with a overall range of 8.75-30 Gy. External beam irradiation was also given either prior to or following surgery in all but eleven patients. Median external beam dose was 47.28 Gy with a range of 10-65 Gy. All patients were followed prospectively for outcome and toxicity evaluation. Results: With a median follow-up of over 3 years there are 53(61%) patients alive with an overall estimated 5 year survival of 50%. The 5 year survival was not significantly different for the primary vs. recurrent patients with 53% and 48% respectively(p=0.86). Grade did not significantly affect 5 year survival either with 60% of low grade and 45% of high grade sarcoma patients alive (p=0.15). A total of 47 reported failures(including 19 local failures). The analysis assumed 50 failures (and 22 local failures) because of 3 patients with no reported failures who dies either with disease or of unknown causes. Three failures were within

  12. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counselling to improve adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke eLangebeek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counselling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our objective was to review available evidence about the effectiveness of monitoring-informed counselling and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of the effect of such intervention on medication adherence and virologic treatment outcomes.Methods: We searched PubMed for papers reporting on randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing intervention groups receiving monitoring-informed counselling as one of the intervention components versus control groups not receiving such counselling for their effect on medication adherence and viral load concentrations. The standardized mean difference (SMD in adherence and the odds ratio (OR of undetectable HIV RNA in intervention versus control groups were the common effect sizes. Random-effect models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence limits. Results: A total of 13 studies were included. Adherence was significantly higher in intervention groups than in control groups (SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71. Patients in intervention groups were significantly more likely to have undetectable HIV RNA concentrations than patients in control groups (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.63. However, in studies in which monitoring-informed counselling was the only intervention component, the difference in adherence and virologic response between intervention and control groups was not statistically significant.Conclusion: Electronic monitoring-informed counselling improved adherence and virologic response compared with control groups not receiving such counselling in studies in which it was one out of multiple intervention components, but not

  13. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling to improve adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our objective was to review available evidence about the effectiveness of monitoring-informed counseling and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of the effect of such intervention on medication adherence and virologic treatment outcomes. We searched PubMed for papers reporting on randomized controlled trials comparing intervention groups receiving monitoring-informed counseling as one of the intervention components versus control groups not receiving such counseling for their effect on medication adherence and viral load concentrations. The standardized mean difference (SMD) in adherence and the odds ratio (OR) of undetectable HIV RNA in intervention versus control groups were the common effect sizes. Random-effect models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence limits (CI). A total of 13 studies were included. Adherence was significantly higher in intervention groups than in control groups (SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.31-0.71). Patients in intervention groups were significantly more likely to have undetectable HIV RNA concentrations than patients in control groups (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12-1.63). However, in studies in which monitoring-informed counseling was the only intervention component, the difference in adherence and virologic response between intervention and control groups was not statistically significant. Electronic monitoring-informed counseling improved adherence and virologic response compared with control groups not receiving such counseling in studies in which it was one out of multiple intervention components, but not in studies where it was the only intervention component.

  14. Comparative In Vitro Toxicity Profile of Electronic and Tobacco Cigarettes, Smokeless Tobacco and Nicotine Replacement Therapy Products: E-Liquids, Extracts and Collected Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Misra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs continues to increase worldwide in parallel with accumulating information on their potential toxicity and safety. In this study, an in vitro battery of established assays was used to examine the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, genotoxicity and inflammatory responses of certain commercial e-cigs and compared to tobacco burning cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (SLT products and a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT product. The toxicity evaluation was performed on e-liquids and pad-collected aerosols of e-cigs, pad-collected smoke condensates of tobacco cigarettes and extracts of SLT and NRT products. In all assays, exposures with e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, at the doses tested, showed no significant activity when compared to tobacco burning cigarettes. Results for the e-cigs, with and without nicotine in two evaluated flavor variants, were very similar in all assays, indicating that the presence of nicotine and flavors, at the levels tested, did not induce any cytotoxic, genotoxic or inflammatory effects. The present findings indicate that neither the e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, nor the extracts of the SLT and NRT products produce any meaningful toxic effects in four widely-applied in vitro test systems, in which the conventional cigarette smoke preparations, at comparable exposures, are markedly cytotoxic and genotoxic.

  15. Effects of Photodynamic Therapy on Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacterial Biofilms by Bioluminescence Imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Silvia C.; Azambuja, Nilton; Fregnani, Eduardo R.; Rodriguez, Helena M.H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Suzuki, Hideo; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to test photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an alternative approach to biofilm disruption on dental hard tissue, We evaluated the effect of methylene blue and a 660 nm diode laser on the viability and architecture of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial biofilms. Materials and methods: Ten human teeth were inoculated with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterococcus faecalis to form 3 day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify and evaluate the bacterial viability, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) imaging was used to assess architecture and morphology of bacterial biofilm before and after PDT employing methylene blue and 40 mW, 660 nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 300 μm fiber for 240 sec, resulting in a total energy of 9.6 J. The data were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. Results: The bacterial reduction showed a dose dependence; as the light energy increased, the bioluminescence decreased in both planktonic suspension and in biofilms. The SEM analysis showed a significant reduction of biofilm on the surface. PDT promoted disruption of the biofilm and the number of adherent bacteria was reduced. Conclusions: The photodynamic effect seems to disrupt the biofilm by acting both on bacterial cells and on the extracellular matrix. PMID:23822168

  16. Imaging of monochromatic beams by measuring secondary electron bremsstrahlung for carbon-ion therapy using a pinhole x-ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Nagao, Yuto; Ando, Koki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Sakai, Makoto; Parajuli, Raj Kumar; Arakawa, Kazuo; Kawachi, Naoki

    2018-02-01

    A feasibility study on the imaging of monochromatic carbon-ion beams for carbon-ion therapy was performed. The evaluation was based on Monte Carlo simulations and beam-irradiation experiments, using a pinhole x-ray camera, which measured secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB). The simulation results indicated that the trajectories of the carbon-ion beams with injection energies of 278, 249 and 218 MeV/u in a water phantom, were clearly imaged by measuring the SEB with energies from 30 to 60 keV, using a pinhole camera. The Bragg-peak positions for these three injection energies were located at the positions where the ratios of the counts of SEB acquisitions to the maximum counts were approximately 0.23, 0.26 and 0.29, respectively. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrated that it was possible to identify the Bragg-peak positons, at the positions where the ratios coincided with the simulation results. However, the estimated Bragg-peak positions for the injection energies of 278 and 249 MeV/u were slightly deeper than the expected positions. In conclusion, for both the simulations and experiments, we found that the 25 mm shifts in the Bragg-peak positions can be observed by this method.

  17. Comparative in vitro toxicity profile of electronic and tobacco cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and nicotine replacement therapy products: e-liquids, extracts and collected aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Manoj; Leverette, Robert D; Cooper, Bethany T; Bennett, Melanee B; Brown, Steven E

    2014-10-30

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) continues to increase worldwide in parallel with accumulating information on their potential toxicity and safety. In this study, an in vitro battery of established assays was used to examine the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, genotoxicity and inflammatory responses of certain commercial e-cigs and compared to tobacco burning cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (SLT) products and a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) product. The toxicity evaluation was performed on e-liquids and pad-collected aerosols of e-cigs, pad-collected smoke condensates of tobacco cigarettes and extracts of SLT and NRT products. In all assays, exposures with e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, at the doses tested, showed no significant activity when compared to tobacco burning cigarettes. Results for the e-cigs, with and without nicotine in two evaluated flavor variants, were very similar in all assays, indicating that the presence of nicotine and flavors, at the levels tested, did not induce any cytotoxic, genotoxic or inflammatory effects. The present findings indicate that neither the e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, nor the extracts of the SLT and NRT products produce any meaningful toxic effects in four widely-applied in vitro test systems, in which the conventional cigarette smoke preparations, at comparable exposures, are markedly cytotoxic and genotoxic.

  18. Patient-specific dosimetry of conventional and intensity modulated radiation therapy using a novel full Monte Carlo phase space reconstruction method from electronic portal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarry, Genevieve; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Electronic portal imagers have promising dosimetric applications in external beam radiation therapy. In this study a patient dose computation algorithm based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and on portal images is developed and validated. The patient exit fluence from primary photons is obtained from the portal image after correction for scattered radiation. The scattered radiation at the portal imager and the spectral energy distribution of the primary photons are estimated from MC simulations at the treatment planning stage. The patient exit fluence and the spectral energy distribution of the primary photons are then used to ray-trace the photons from the portal image towards the source through the CT geometry of the patient. Photon weights which reflect the probability of a photon being transmitted are computed during this step. A dedicated MC code is used to transport back these photons from the source through the patient CT geometry to obtain patient dose. Only Compton interactions are considered. This code also produces a reconstructed portal image which is used as a verification tool to ensure that the dose reconstruction is reliable. The dose reconstruction algorithm is compared against MC dose calculation (MCDC) predictions and against measurements in phantom. The reconstructed absolute absorbed doses and the MCDC predictions in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms agree within 3% for simple open fields. Comparison with film-measured relative dose distributions for IMRT fields yields agreement within 3 mm, 5%. This novel dose reconstruction algorithm allows for daily patient-specific dosimetry and verification of patient movement

  19. Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy as a Debulking Agent for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An open-label prospective phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M R; Lindahl, Lise Maria; Gniadecki, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a powerful treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). Based on the occurrence of relapses with low radiation doses, doses of 30-36 Gy are commonly used but most patients still eventually relapse and repeat treatment courses are limited...... due to the cumulative toxicity. Complete response rates are about 60-90% for T2-4 stages with a 5-year relapse-free survival of 10-25% for stages IB-III. Objectives: To evaluate prospectively the efficacy of low-dose TSEBT (10 Gy) in terms of complete cutaneous response rate, overall response rate...... and response duration in CTCL. Methods: Ten patients with stage IB-IV mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated in an open-label manner with 4 fractions of 1 Gy/week TSEB to a total skin dose of 10 Gy. Treatment responses were assessed at 1 and 3 months after treatment and subsequently at least every 6 months...

  20. SU-E-T-274: Radiation Therapy with Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) Beams in the Presence of Metal Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C; Palma, B; Qu, B; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Bazalova, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Hardemark, B; Hynning, E [RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of metal implants on treatment plans for radiation therapy with very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams. Methods: The DOSXYZnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes were used to simulate 50–150MeV VHEE beam dose deposition and its effects on steel and titanium (Ti) heterogeneities in a water phantom. Heterogeneities of thicknesses ranging from 0.5cm to 2cm were placed at 10cm depth. MC was also used to calculate electron and photon spectra generated by the VHEE beams' interaction with metal heterogeneities. The original VMAT patient dose calculation was planned in Eclipse. Patient dose calculations with MC-generated beamlets were planned using a Matlab GUI and research version of RayStation. VHEE MC treatment planning was performed on water-only geometry and water with segmented prostheses (steel and Ti) geometries with 100MeV and 150MeV beams. Results: 100MeV PDD 5cm behind steel/Ti heterogeneity was 51% less than in the water-only phantom. For some cases, dose enhancement lateral to the borders of the phantom increased the dose by up to 22% in steel and 18% in Ti heterogeneities. The dose immediately behind steel heterogeneity decreased by an average of 6%, although for 150MeV, the steel heterogeneity created a 23% increase in dose directly behind it. The average dose immediately behind Ti heterogeneities increased 10%. The prostate VHEE plans resulted in mean dose decrease to the bowel (20%), bladder (7%), and the urethra (5%) compared to the 15MV VMAT plan. The average dose to the body with prosthetic implants was 5% higher than to the body without implants. Conclusion: Based on MC simulations, metallic implants introduce dose perturbations to VHEE beams from lateral scatter and backscatter. However, when performing clinical planning on a prostate case, the use of multiple beams and inverse planning still produces VHEE plans that are dosimetrically superior to photon VMAT plans. BW Loo and P Maxim received research support from

  1. SU-E-T-274: Radiation Therapy with Very High-Energy Electron (VHEE) Beams in the Presence of Metal Implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C; Palma, B; Qu, B; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Bazalova, M; Hardemark, B; Hynning, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of metal implants on treatment plans for radiation therapy with very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams. Methods: The DOSXYZnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) codes were used to simulate 50–150MeV VHEE beam dose deposition and its effects on steel and titanium (Ti) heterogeneities in a water phantom. Heterogeneities of thicknesses ranging from 0.5cm to 2cm were placed at 10cm depth. MC was also used to calculate electron and photon spectra generated by the VHEE beams' interaction with metal heterogeneities. The original VMAT patient dose calculation was planned in Eclipse. Patient dose calculations with MC-generated beamlets were planned using a Matlab GUI and research version of RayStation. VHEE MC treatment planning was performed on water-only geometry and water with segmented prostheses (steel and Ti) geometries with 100MeV and 150MeV beams. Results: 100MeV PDD 5cm behind steel/Ti heterogeneity was 51% less than in the water-only phantom. For some cases, dose enhancement lateral to the borders of the phantom increased the dose by up to 22% in steel and 18% in Ti heterogeneities. The dose immediately behind steel heterogeneity decreased by an average of 6%, although for 150MeV, the steel heterogeneity created a 23% increase in dose directly behind it. The average dose immediately behind Ti heterogeneities increased 10%. The prostate VHEE plans resulted in mean dose decrease to the bowel (20%), bladder (7%), and the urethra (5%) compared to the 15MV VMAT plan. The average dose to the body with prosthetic implants was 5% higher than to the body without implants. Conclusion: Based on MC simulations, metallic implants introduce dose perturbations to VHEE beams from lateral scatter and backscatter. However, when performing clinical planning on a prostate case, the use of multiple beams and inverse planning still produces VHEE plans that are dosimetrically superior to photon VMAT plans. BW Loo and P Maxim received research support from

  2. Impact of an electronic monitoring device and behavioral feedback on adherence to multiple sclerosis therapies in youth: results of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, E Ann; Grover, Stephanie A; Powell, Victoria E; Alper, Gulay; Banwell, Brenda L; Edwards, Kim; Gorman, Mark; Graves, Jennifer; Lotze, Timothy E; Mah, Jean K; Mednick, Lauren; Ness, Jayne; Obadia, Maya; Slater, Ruth; Waldman, Amy; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Schwartz, Carolyn E

    2017-09-01

    To report the results of a randomized controlled trial using an electronic monitoring device (EM) plus a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention to enhance adherence to disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in pediatric MS. Fifty-two youth with MS (16.03 ± 2.2 years) were randomized to receive either MI (n = 25) (target intervention) or a MS medication video (n = 27) (attention control). Primary endpoint was change in adherence. Secondary outcomes included changes in quality of life, well-being and self-efficacy. Random effects modeling and Cohen's effect size computation evaluated intervention impact. Longitudinal random effect models revealed that the MI group decreased their EM adherence (GroupxTime interaction = -0.19), while increasing frequency of parental DMT reminder (26.01)/administration (11.69). We found decreased EM use in the MI group at 6 months (Cohen's d = -0.61), but increased pharmacy refill adherence (d = 0.23). Parental reminders about medication increased in MI subjects vs controls (d = 0.59 at 3 months; d = 0.70 at 6 months). We found increases in self-reported adherence (d = 0.21) at 3 but not 6 months, fewer barriers to adherence at three (d = -0.58) and six months (d = -0.31), better physical (d = 0.23 at 3 months; d = 0.45 at 6 months), emotional (d = 0.25 at 3 months) and self-efficacy function (d = 0.55 at 3 months; 0.48 at 6 months), but worse well-being, including self-acceptance (d = -0.53 at 6 months) and environmental mastery (d = -0.42 at 3 and 6 months) in intervention as compared to control patients. Participants receiving MI + EM experienced worsening on objective measures of adherence and increased parental involvement, but improved on some self- and parent-reported measures. MI participants reported improvements in quality of life and self-efficacy, but worsened well-being.

  3. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  4. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  5. Anticipated Intraoperative Electron Beam Boost, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Limb-Sparing Surgical Resection for Patients with Pediatric Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity: A Multicentric Pooled Analysis of Long-Term Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Claudio V., E-mail: cvsole@uc.cl [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Service of Radiation Oncology, Instituto de Radiomedicina, Santiago (Chile); Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); School of Medicine, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Polo, Alfredo [Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Cambeiro, Mauricio [Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Alvarez, Ana; Gonzalez, Carmen [Service of Radiation Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Jose [Service of Pediatric Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); San Julian, Mikel [Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Martinez-Monge, Rafael [Service of Radiation Oncology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To perform a joint analysis of data from 3 contributing centers within the intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT)-Spanish program, to determine the potential of IOERT as an anticipated boost before external beam radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of pediatric extremity soft-tissue sarcomas. Methods and Materials: From June 1993 to May 2013, 62 patients (aged <21 years) with a histologic diagnosis of primary extremity soft-tissue sarcoma with absence of distant metastases, undergoing limb-sparing grossly resected surgery, external beam radiation therapy (median dose 40 Gy) and IOERT (median dose 10 Gy) were considered eligible for this analysis. Results: After a median follow-up of 66 months (range, 4-235 months), 10-year local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival was 85%, 76%, and 81%, respectively. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for other covariates, tumor size >5 cm (P=.04) and R1 margin status (P=.04) remained significantly associated with local relapse. In regard to overall survival only margin status (P=.04) retained association on multivariate analysis. Ten patients (16%) reported severe chronic toxicity events (all grade 3). Conclusions: An anticipated IOERT boost allowed for external beam radiation therapy dose reduction, with high local control and acceptably low toxicity rates. The combined radiosurgical approach needs to be tested in a prospective trial to confirm these results.

  6. Comparison of geometric uncertainties using electronic portal imaging device in focal three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy using different head supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budrukkar Ashwini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the geometric uncertainties in the treatment and evaluate the adequacy of the margins employed for planning target volume (PTV generation in the treatment of focal conformal radiotherapy (CRT for patients with brain tumors treated with different head support systems. Materials and Methods: The study population included 11 patients with brain tumors who were to be treated with CRT. Contrast-enhanced planning CT scan (5-mm spacing and reconstructed to 2 mm of brain were performed. Five patients were immobilized using neck support only (NR-only and six patients had neck support with flexion (NRF, the form of immobilization being decided by the likely beam arrangements to be employed for that particular patient. The data was transferred to the planning system (CadPlan where three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was planned. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs were created for the orthogonal portals with the fixed field sizes of 10 x 10 taken at the isocenter. Treatment verification was done using an amorphous silicon detector portal imaging device for using orthogonal portals and the DRR was used as a reference image. An image matching software was used to match the anatomical landmarks in the DRR and the portal imaging and the displacement of the portals in x, y axis and rotation were noted in the anteroposterior (AP and lateral images. Electronic portal imaging was repeated twice weekly and an average of 8-14 images per patient was recorded. The mean deviation in all the directions was calculated for the each patient. Comparison of setup errors between the two head support systems was done. Results: A total 224 images were studied in anterior and lateral portals. The patient group with NR-only had 100 images, while the NRF group had 124 images. The mean total error in all patients, NR-only group, and NRF group was 0.33 mm, 0.24 mm, and 0.79 mm in the mediolateral (ML direction; 1.16 mm, 0.14 mm, and 2

  7. Utility of γH2AX as a molecular marker of DNA double-strand breaks in nuclear medicine: applications to radionuclide therapy employing auger electron-emitting isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Li-Jeen; Orlowski, Christian; Ververis, Katherine; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2011-01-01

    There is an intense interest in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for cancer therapy. In particular, radiopharmaceuticals which involve targeting radionuclides specifically to cancer cells with the use of monoclonal antibodies (radioimmunotherapy) or peptides (targeted radiotherapy) are being widely investigated. For example, the ultra-short range Auger electron-emitting isotopes, which are discussed in this review, are being considered in the context of DNAtargeted radiotherapy. The efficient quantitative evaluation of the levels of damage caused by such potential radiopharmaceuticals is required for assessment of therapeutic efficacy and determination of relevant doses for successful treatment. The DNA double-strand break surrogate marker, γH2AX, has emerged as a useful biomonitor of damage and thus effectiveness of treatment, offering a highly specific and sensitive means of assessment. This review will cover the potential applications of γH2AX in nuclear medicine, in particular radionuclide therapy.

  8. Film dosimetric investigations on the exposure of the eyes in radiation therapy of the head and the cervical region with fast electrons up to 17 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecher, M.; Eichler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Dose distributions in irradiating tumors of the head and the cervical region with 17 MeV electrons were determined in a phantom with films. From the isodoses obtained it can be derived how radiation reaches the eyes and how the dose to the eyes is influenced. Guidance is provided for the reduction of the dose to the eye. (author)

  9. Total skin electron beam therapy followed by adjuvant psoralen/ultraviolet-a light in the management of patients with T1 and T2 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiros, Peter A.; Jones, Glenn W.; Kacinski, Barry M.; Braverman, Irwin M.; Heald, Peter W.; Edelson, Richard L.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with mycosis fungoides [cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL)] may benefit from adjuvant therapy after completing total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT). We report the results for (T1(T2)) CTCL patients treated with adjuvant oral psoralen plus ultraviolet light (PUVA) with respect to overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), salvage of recurrence, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 1993, TSEBT was administered to a total of 213 patients with CTCL. Records were reviewed retrospectively, and a total of 114 patients were identified as having T1 or T2 disease. Radiotherapy was provided via a 6-MeV linac to a total of 36 Gy, 1 Gy/day, 4 days/week, for 9 weeks. Beginning in 1988, patients were offered adjuvant PUVA within 2 months of completing TSEBT. This was started at 0.5-2 J/m 2 , 1-2 treatments/week, with a taper over 3-6 months. Therapy then continued once per month. There were 39 T1 and 75 T2 patients. Six T1 (15%) and eight T2 (11%) patients were treated with adjuvant PUVA. A further 49% of the 114 patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, 3% received spot external beam, 4% received adjuvant ECP, 2% received topical nitrogen mustard, 22% received a combination of therapies exclusive of PUVA, and 9% received no adjuvant therapy. Patients were balanced in all subgroups based on pre-TSEBT therapy. The median age of the cohort was 58 (range 20-88), with a median follow-up time of 62 months (range 3-179). Results: Within 1 month after completing of TSEBT, 97% of T1, and 87% of T2 patients had achieved a complete remission. Stratified by adjuvant therapy, none of six T1 and one of eight T2 patients who received adjuvant PUVA failed within the first 3 years after completion of TSEBT. A total of 43% of the T1 and T2 patients receiving other or no adjuvant treatment failed within the same time course. The 5-year OS for the entire cohort was 85%. Those who received PUVA had a 5-year OS of 100% versus a 5-year OS for the non

  10. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy

  11. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy. (author)

  12. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  13. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Sandra; Costa, Filipa; Pereira, Alexandre; Lencart, Joana; Dias, Anabela; Cunha, Luís; Sousa, Olga; Silva, José Pedro; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-01-09

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy.

  14. ARCHERRT – A GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: Software development and application to helical tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHERRT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head & neck. Methods: To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHERRT. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHERRT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. Results: For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHERRT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHERRT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head & neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU, modified

  15. ARCHERRT - a GPU-based and photon-electron coupled Monte Carlo dose computing engine for radiation therapy: software development and application to helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Lin; Yang, Youming; Bednarz, Bryan; Sterpin, Edmond; Du, Xining; Liu, Tianyu; Ji, Wei; Xu, X George

    2014-07-01

    Using the graphical processing units (GPU) hardware technology, an extremely fast Monte Carlo (MC) code ARCHERRT is developed for radiation dose calculations in radiation therapy. This paper describes the detailed software development and testing for three clinical TomoTherapy® cases: the prostate, lung, and head & neck. To obtain clinically relevant dose distributions, phase space files (PSFs) created from optimized radiation therapy treatment plan fluence maps were used as the input to ARCHERRT. Patient-specific phantoms were constructed from patient CT images. Batch simulations were employed to facilitate the time-consuming task of loading large PSFs, and to improve the estimation of statistical uncertainty. Furthermore, two different Woodcock tracking algorithms were implemented and their relative performance was compared. The dose curves of an Elekta accelerator PSF incident on a homogeneous water phantom were benchmarked against DOSXYZnrc. For each of the treatment cases, dose volume histograms and isodose maps were produced from ARCHERRT and the general-purpose code, GEANT4. The gamma index analysis was performed to evaluate the similarity of voxel doses obtained from these two codes. The hardware accelerators used in this study are one NVIDIA K20 GPU, one NVIDIA K40 GPU, and six NVIDIA M2090 GPUs. In addition, to make a fairer comparison of the CPU and GPU performance, a multithreaded CPU code was developed using OpenMP and tested on an Intel E5-2620 CPU. For the water phantom, the depth dose curve and dose profiles from ARCHERRT agree well with DOSXYZnrc. For clinical cases, results from ARCHERRT are compared with those from GEANT4 and good agreement is observed. Gamma index test is performed for voxels whose dose is greater than 10% of maximum dose. For 2%/2mm criteria, the passing rates for the prostate, lung case, and head & neck cases are 99.7%, 98.5%, and 97.2%, respectively. Due to specific architecture of GPU, modified Woodcock tracking algorithm

  16. Electronic Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New FDA Regulations Text Size: A A A Electronic Cigarettes Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are battery operated products designed to ... more about: The latest news and events about electronic cigarettes on this FDA page Electronic cigarette basics on ...

  17. Electronic technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su

    2010-07-01

    This book is composed of five chapters, which introduces electronic technology about understanding of electronic, electronic component, radio, electronic application, communication technology, semiconductor on its basic, free electron and hole, intrinsic semiconductor and semiconductor element, Diode such as PN junction diode, characteristic of junction diode, rectifier circuit and smoothing circuit, transistor on structure of transistor, characteristic of transistor and common emitter circuit, electronic application about electronic equipment, communication technology and education, robot technology and high electronic technology.

  18. The Electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, George

    1972-01-01

    Electrons are elementary particles of atoms that revolve around and outside the nucleus and have a negative charge. This booklet discusses how electrons relate to electricity, some applications of electrons, electrons as waves, electrons in atoms and solids, the electron microscope, among other things.

  19. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Hard material technologies were surveyed to establish the hard electronic technology which offers superior characteristics under hard operational or environmental conditions as compared with conventional Si devices. The following technologies were separately surveyed: (1) The device and integration technologies of wide gap hard semiconductors such as SiC, diamond and nitride, (2) The technology of hard semiconductor devices for vacuum micro- electronics technology, and (3) The technology of hard new material devices for oxides. The formation technology of oxide thin films made remarkable progress after discovery of oxide superconductor materials, resulting in development of an atomic layer growth method and mist deposition method. This leading research is expected to solve such issues difficult to be easily realized by current Si technology as high-power, high-frequency and low-loss devices in power electronics, high temperature-proof and radiation-proof devices in ultimate electronics, and high-speed and dense- integrated devices in information electronics. 432 refs., 136 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Out-of-field doses from pediatric craniospinal irradiations using 3D-CRT, IMRT, helical tomotherapy and electron-based therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Verellen, Dirk; Poels, Kenneth; Crijns, Wouter; Magliona, Federica; Depuydt, Tom; Vanhavere, Filip; Struelens, Lara

    2017-07-01

    Medulloblastoma treatment involves irradiation of the entire central nervous system, i.e. craniospinal irradiation (CSI). This is associated with the significant exposure of large volumes of healthy tissue and there is growing concern regarding treatment-associated side effects. The current study compares out-of-field organ doses in children receiving CSI through 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), helical tomotherapy (HT) and an electron-based technique, and includes radiation doses resulting from imaging performed during treatment. An extensive phantom study is performed, using an anthropomorphic phantom corresponding to a five year old child, in which organ absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent detectors. Additionally, the study evaluates and explores tools for calculating out-of-field patient doses using the treatment planning system (TPS) and analytical models. In our study, 3D-CRT resulted in very high doses to a limited number of organs, while it was able to spare organs such as the lungs and breast when compared to IMRT and HT. Both IMRT and HT spread the dose over more organs and were able to spare the heart, thyroid, bladder, uterus and testes when compared to 3D-CRT. The electron-based technique considerably decreased the out-of-field doses in deep-seated organs but could not avoid nearby out-of-field organs such as the lungs, ribs, adrenals, kidneys and uterus. The daily imaging dose is small compared to the treatment dose burden. The TPS error for out-of-field doses was most pronounced for organs further away from the target; nevertheless, no systematic underestimation was observed for any of the studied TPS systems. Finally, analytical modeling was most optimal for 3D-CRT although the number of organs that could be modeled was limited. To conclude, none of the techniques studied was capable of sparing all organs from out-of-field doses. Nevertheless, the electron-based technique showed the most

  1. Early breast cancer: influence of type of boost (electrons vs iridium-192 implant) on local control and cosmesis after conservative surgery and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touboul, Emmanuel; Belkacemi, Yazid; Lefranc, Jean-Pierre; Uzan, Serge; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Korbas, Djawad; Buffat, Laurent; Balosso, Jacques; Pene, Francoise; Blondon, Jean; Schlienger, Michel; Laugier, Alain

    1995-01-01

    Between December 1981 and December 1988, 329 consecutive patients with stage I and II breast cancers who underwent wide excision (n = 261) or quadrantectomy (n = 68) with (n = 303) or without (n = 26) axillary dissection were referred to radiotherapy. Final margins of resection were microscopically free from tumor involvement in all cases. Radiotherapy consisted in 40-45 Gy over 4-4.5 weeks to the breast, with (n = 168) or without (n = 161) regional nodal irradiation of 45-50 Gy over 4.5-5 weeks. A mean booster dose of 15 Gy was delivered to the primary site by iridium-192 implant in 169 patients (group 1) or by electrons in 160 patients (group 2). Twenty-seven percent (n = 88) of patients received tamoxifen for ≥ 2 years. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered in 22% (n = 71) of patients. Groups 1 and 2 were not strictly comparable. Group 1 patients were significantly younger, had smaller tumors, were treated with cobalt at 5 x 2 Gy per week and axillary dissection was more frequently performed. Group 2 patients were more frequently bifocal and more frequently treated by quadrantectomy and tamoxifen, and irradiation used accelerator photons at 4 x 2.50 Gy per week. No difference in terms of follow-up and survival rates was observed between the two groups. For all patients the 5- and 10-year local breast relapse rates were 6.7% and 11%, respectively. No difference was observed regarding local control either by the electron or the iridium-192 implant boosts. Axillary dissection and age had an impact on the breast cosmetic outcome. Furthermore, the cosmetic results seemed to be poorer in group 1 than in group 2. This may be related to other factors; group 1 patients were treated with telecobalt and axillary dissection was more frequently performed; on the other hand, group 2 patients were treated with accelarator photons

  2. Auger electron emitter against multiple myeloma - targeted endo-radio-therapy with {sup 125}I-labeled thymidine analogue 5-iodo-4'-thio-2'-deoxyuridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenroth, Agnieszka, E-mail: amorgenroth@ukaachen.de [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Aachen, RWTH, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Dinger, Cornelia; Zlatopolskiy, Boris D.; Al-Momani, Ehab; Glatting, Gerhard [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Aachen, RWTH, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Reske, Sven N. [Nuclear Medicine Clinic, University Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by accumulation of malignant, terminally differentiated B cells in the bone marrow. Despite advances in therapy, MM remains an incurable disease. Novel therapeutic approaches are, therefore, urgently needed. Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals are attractive for targeted nano-irradiation therapy, given that DNA of malignant cells is selectively addressed. Here we evaluated the antimyeloma potential of the Auger electron-emitting thymidine analogue {sup 125}I-labeled 5-iodo-4'-thio-2'-deoxyuridine ([{sup 125}I]ITdU). Methods: Cellular uptake and DNA incorporation of [{sup 125}I]ITdU were determined in fluorodeoxyuridine-pretreated KMS12BM, U266, dexamethasone-sensitive MM1.S and -resistant MM1.R cell lines. The effect of stimulation with interleukin 6 (IL6) or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) on the intracellular incorporation of [{sup 125}I]ITdU was investigated in cytokine-sensitive MM1.S and MM1.R cell lines. Apoptotic cells were identified using Annexin V. Cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP was visualized by Western blot. DNA fragmentation was investigated using laddering assay. Therapeutic efficiency of [{sup 125}I]ITdU was proven by clonogenic assay. Results: [{sup 125}I]ITdU was shown to be efficiently incorporated into DNA of malignant cells, providing a promising mechanism for delivering highly toxic Auger radiation emitters into tumor DNA. [{sup 125}I]ITdU had a potent antimyeloma effect in cell lines representing distinct disease stages and, importantly, in cell lines sensitive or resistant to the conventional therapeutic agent, but was not toxic for normal plasma and bone marrow stromal cells. Furthermore, [{sup 125}I]ITdU abrogated the protective actions of IL6 and IGF1 on MM cells. [{sup 125}I]ITdU induced massive damage in the DNA of malignant plasma cells, which resulted in efficient inhibition of clonogenic growth. Conclusion: These studies may provide a

  3. Protocol for a randomised crossover trial to evaluate patient and nurse satisfaction with electronic and elastomeric portable infusion pumps for the continuous administration of antibiotic therapy in the home: the Comparing Home Infusion Devices (CHID) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jodie G; Ryan, Melissa K; Ritchie, Brett; Sluggett, Janet K; Sluggett, Andrew J; Ralton, Lucy; Reynolds, Karen J

    2017-07-31

    Previous studies comparing satisfaction with electronic and elastomeric infusion pumps are limited, and improvements in size and usability of electronic pumps have since occurred. The Comparing Home Infusion Devices (CHID) study plans to assess patient and nurse satisfaction with an elastomeric and electronic pump for delivering intravenous antibiotic treatment in the home. Secondary objectives are to determine pump-related complications and actual antibiotic dose administered, evaluate temperature variation and compare pump operating costs. The CHID study will be a randomised, crossover trial. A trained research nurse will recruit patients with infectious disease aged ≥18 years and prescribed ≥8 days of continuous intravenous antibiotic therapy from the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) (Adelaide, Australia). Patients will be randomised to receive treatment at home via an elastomeric (Baxter Infusor) or an electronic (ambIT Continuous) infusion pump for 4-7 days, followed by the other for a further 4-7 days. Patient satisfaction will be assessed by a 10-item survey to be completed at the end of each arm. Nurse satisfaction will be assessed by a single 24-item survey. Patient logbooks and case notes from clinic visits will be screened to identify complications. Pumps/infusion bags will be weighed to estimate the volume of solution delivered. Temperature sensors will record skin and ambient temperatures during storage and use of the pumps throughout the infusion period. Costs relating to pumps, consumables, antibiotics and servicing will be determined. Descriptive statistics will summarise study data. This study has been approved by the RAH Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC/16/RAH/133 R20160420, version 6.0, 5 September 2016). Study results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The CHID study will provide key insights into patient and provider satisfaction with elastomeric and electronic infusion pumps and inform

  4. Electron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  5. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. TU-H-BRA-03: Performance of a Clinical Gridded Electron Gun in Magnetic Fields: Implications for MRI-Linac Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, B; Keall, P; Bazalova-Carter, M; Oborn, B; Constantin, D; Holloway, L; Fahrig, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recent advances towards MRI Linac radiotherapy have motivated a wide range of studies characterizing electromagnetic interactions between the two devices. One of the most sensitive components is the linac electron gun. To data, only non gridded (diode) guns have been investigated however, most linac vendors utilize gridded (triode) guns, which enable efficient and robust beam gating. The purpose of this study was to develop a realistic model of a gridded gun used clinically, and to characterize its performance in magnetic fields. Methods: The gridded electron gun used on Varian high energy machines was measured using 3D laser scanning quoted as accurate to 0.1mm. Based on the scane, a detailed CAD mode was developed. From this, key geometry was extracted and a FEM model was developed (Opera/SCALA). Next, the high voltage (HV), grid voltage, and emission current were read from six dose matched TrueBeam linacs for the 6X, 10X and 15X photon modes (0 B-field). The mean values were used to represent each mode, which was simulated I constant magnetic fields from 0–200G in-line, and 0–35G perpendicular. Results: Experimentally measured HV, grid voltage, and emission current from 6X, 10X and 15X modes were respectively: 15±.03kV, 10±.08kV, 11±.03kV; 93±7V, 41±3V, and 70±6V; 327±27mA, 129±10mA, and 214±19mA. The error in simulated emission current of each mode was 3%,6%, and 3%. For in-line fields, 50% beam loss occurred at 114, 96, and 97G; for perpendicular; at 12, 13 and 14G. Sensitivity for a given geometry is primarily determined by HV setting. Conclusion: Future MRI-Linac systems will almost certainly use gridded guns. We present the first model of a clinical gridded gun, and match the experimental emission current to within 6% across three different operating modes. This clinical gun shows increased sensitivity to magnetic fields than previous work,and different modes show different sensitivity.

  7. Failure mode and effect analysis oriented to risk-reduction interventions in intraoperative electron radiation therapy: The specific impact of patient transportation, automation, and treatment planning availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Tarjuelo, Juan; Bouché-Babiloni, Ana; Santos-Serra, Agustín; Morillo-Macías, Virginia; Calvo, Felipe A.; Kubyshin, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Industrial companies use failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) to improve quality. Our objective was to describe an FMEA and subsequent interventions for an automated intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) procedure with computed tomography simulation, pre-planning, and a fixed conventional linear accelerator. Material and methods: A process map, an FMEA, and a fault tree analysis are reported. The equipment considered was the radiance treatment planning system (TPS), the Elekta Precise linac, and TN-502RDM-H metal–oxide-semiconductor-field-effect transistor in vivo dosimeters. Computerized order-entry and treatment-automation were also analyzed. Results: Fifty-seven potential modes and effects were identified and classified into ‘treatment cancellation’ and ‘delivering an unintended dose’. They were graded from ‘inconvenience’ or ‘suboptimal treatment’ to ‘total cancellation’ or ‘potentially wrong’ or ‘very wrong administered dose’, although these latter effects were never experienced. Risk priority numbers (RPNs) ranged from 3 to 324 and totaled 4804. After interventions such as double checking, interlocking, automation, and structural changes the final total RPN was reduced to 1320. Conclusions: FMEA is crucial for prioritizing risk-reduction interventions. In a semi-surgical procedure like IOERT double checking has the potential to reduce risk and improve quality. Interlocks and automation should also be implemented to increase the safety of the procedure

  8. Failure mode and effect analysis oriented to risk-reduction interventions in intraoperative electron radiation therapy: the specific impact of patient transportation, automation, and treatment planning availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Tarjuelo, Juan; Bouché-Babiloni, Ana; Santos-Serra, Agustín; Morillo-Macías, Virginia; Calvo, Felipe A; Kubyshin, Yuri; Ferrer-Albiach, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Industrial companies use failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) to improve quality. Our objective was to describe an FMEA and subsequent interventions for an automated intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) procedure with computed tomography simulation, pre-planning, and a fixed conventional linear accelerator. A process map, an FMEA, and a fault tree analysis are reported. The equipment considered was the radiance treatment planning system (TPS), the Elekta Precise linac, and TN-502RDM-H metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect transistor in vivo dosimeters. Computerized order-entry and treatment-automation were also analyzed. Fifty-seven potential modes and effects were identified and classified into 'treatment cancellation' and 'delivering an unintended dose'. They were graded from 'inconvenience' or 'suboptimal treatment' to 'total cancellation' or 'potentially wrong' or 'very wrong administered dose', although these latter effects were never experienced. Risk priority numbers (RPNs) ranged from 3 to 324 and totaled 4804. After interventions such as double checking, interlocking, automation, and structural changes the final total RPN was reduced to 1320. FMEA is crucial for prioritizing risk-reduction interventions. In a semi-surgical procedure like IOERT double checking has the potential to reduce risk and improve quality. Interlocks and automation should also be implemented to increase the safety of the procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Examining assumptions regarding valid electronic monitoring of medication therapy: development of a validation framework and its application on a European sample of kidney transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiger Jürg

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic monitoring (EM is used increasingly to measure medication non-adherence. Unbiased EM assessment requires fulfillment of assumptions. The purpose of this study was to determine assumptions needed for internal and external validity of EM measurement. To test internal validity, we examined if (1 EM equipment functioned correctly, (2 if all EM bottle openings corresponded to actual drug intake, and (3 if EM did not influence a patient's normal adherence behavior. To assess external validity, we examined if there were indications that using EM affected the sample representativeness. Methods We used data from the Supporting Medication Adherence in Renal Transplantation (SMART study, which included 250 adult renal transplant patients whose adherence to immunosuppressive drugs was measured during 3 months with the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS. Internal validity was determined by assessing the prevalence of nonfunctioning EM systems, the prevalence of patient-reported discrepancies between cap openings and actual intakes (using contemporaneous notes and interview at the end of the study, and by exploring whether adherence was initially uncharacteristically high and decreased over time (an indication of a possible EM intervention effect. Sample representativeness was examined by screening for differences between participants and non-participants or drop outs on non-adherence. Results Our analysis revealed that some assumptions were not fulfilled: 1 one cap malfunctioned (0.4%, 2 self-reported mismatches between bottle openings and actual drug intake occurred in 62% of the patients (n = 155, and 3 adherence decreased over the first 5 weeks of the monitoring, indicating that EM had a waning intervention effect. Conclusion The validity assumptions presented in this article should be checked in future studies using EM as a measure of medication non-adherence.

  10. Bromine-80m-labeled estrogens: Auger-electron emitting, estrogen receptor-directed ligands with potential for therapy of estrogen receptor positive cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSombre, E.R.; Mease, R.C.; Hughes, A.; Harper, P.V.; DeJesus, O.T.; Friedman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    A triphenylbromoethylene, 1,1-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-bromo-2-phenylethylene, Br-BHPE, and a bromosteroidal estrogen, 17α- bromovinylestradiol, BrVE 2 , were labeled with the Auger electron emitting nuclide bromine-80m, prepared by the [p,n] reaction with 80 Se. To assess their potential as estrogen receptor (ER) directed therapeutic substrates the bromine-80m labeled estrogens were injected into immature female rats and the tissue distribution studied at 0.5 and 2 hours. Both radiobromoestrogens showed substantial diethylstilbesterol (DES)-inhibitable localization in the ER rich tissues, uterus, pituitary, ovary and vagina at both time points. While the percent dose per gram tissue was higher for the Br-BHPE, the BrVE 2 showed higher tissue to blood ratios, especially at 2 hr, reflecting the lower blood concentrations of radiobromine following administration of the steroidal bromoestrogen. Comparing intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration for the radiobromine labeled Br-BHPE, the intraperitoneal route was particularly advantageous to provide maximum, DES-inhibitable concentrations in the peritoneal, ER-rich target organs, the uterus, ovary and vagina. While uterine concentrations after BrBHPE were from 10--48% dose/g and after BrVE 2 were 15--25% dose/g, similar treatment with /sup 80m/Br as sodium bromide showed uniform low concentrations in all tissues at about the levels seen in blood. The effective specific activity of [/sup 80m/Br]BrBHPE, assayed by specific binding to ER in rat uterine cytosol, was 8700 Ci/mmole. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  12. MO-G-BRF-07: Optical Characterization of Novel Terbium-Doped Nanophosphors Excited by Clinical Electron and Photon Beams for Potential Use in Molecular Imaging Or Photodynamic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darafsheh, A; Paik, T; Tenuto, M; Najmr, S; Friedberg, J; Murray, C; Finlay, J [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Optical properties of terbium (Tb3+)-doped gadolinium trifluoride (GdF3) nanoplates irradiated by electron and photon beams were investigated for their potential as optical probes. The contribution of induced Cerenkov radiation in exciting the nanophosphors was investigated as well. Methods: The emission spectra of Terbium-doped GdF3 dispersed in hexane, embedded in tissue mimicking phantoms were collected by an optical fiber connected to a CCD-coupled spectrograph, while the samples were irradiated by a medical linear accelerator with electron beams of energies 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV or X-ray beams of energies of 6, and 15 MV. The contribution of induced Cerenkov radiation in exciting the nanophosphores was investigated in a dedicated experimental apparatus through optical isolation of the samples and also by using 125 kVp X-ray beams whose energy is below the threshold for generating Cerenkov radiation in that medium. Results: Terbium-doped GdF3 nanoplates show characteristic cathodoluminescence emission peaks at 488, 543, 586, and 619 nm, which are responsible for the characteristic f-f transition of terbium ion. In a series of experiments, the contribution of Cerenkov radiation in the luminescence of such nanophosphors was ruled out. Conclusion: We have characterized the optical properties of Terbium-doped GdF3 nanoplates. Such nanocrystals with emission tunability and high surface area that facilitates attachment with targeting reagents are promising in situ light source candidates for molecular imaging or exciting a photosensitizer for ultralow fluence photodynamic therapy. This work is supported by the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania, the American Cancer Society through IRG-78-002-28, and the University of Pennsylvania's Nano/Bio Interface Center through NSEC DMR08-32802.

  13. Electron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, H.; Mogami, A.

    1975-01-01

    A device for measuring electron densities at a given energy level in an electron beam or the like having strong background noise, for example, in the detection of Auger electric energy spectrums is described. An electron analyzer passes electrons at the given energy level and at the same time electrons of at least one adjacent energy level. Detecting means associated therewith produce signals indicative of the densities of the electrons at each energy level and combine these signals to produce a signal indicative of the density of the electrons of the given energy level absent background noise

  14. In honour of N. Yngve Öhrn: surveying proton cancer therapy reactions with Öhrn's electron nuclear dynamics method. Aqueous clusters radiolysis and DNA-base damage by proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaurin, Patrick M.; Privett, Austin J.; Stopera, Christopher; Grimes, Thomas V.; Perera, Ajith; Morales, Jorge A.

    2015-02-01

    Proton cancer therapy (PCT) utilises high-energy H+ projectiles to cure cancer. PCT healing arises from its DNA damage in cancerous cells, which is mostly inflicted by the products from PCT water radiolysis reactions. While clinically established, a complete microscopic understanding of PCT remains elusive. To help in the microscopic elucidation of PCT, Professor Öhrn's simplest-level electron nuclear dynamics (SLEND) method is herein applied to H+ + (H2O)3-4 and H+ + DNA-bases at ELab = 1.0 keV. These are two types of computationally feasible prototypes to study water radiolysis reactions and H+-induced DNA damage, respectively. SLEND is a time-dependent, variational, non-adiabatic and direct-dynamics method that adopts a nuclear classical-mechanics description and an electronic single-determinantal wavefunction. Additionally, our SLEND + effective-core-potential method is herein employed to simulate some computationally demanding PCT reactions. Due to these attributes, SLEND proves appropriate for the simulation of various types of PCT reactions accurately and feasibly. H+ + (H2O)3-4 simulations reveal two main processes: H+ projectile scattering and the simultaneous formation of H and OH fragments; the latter process is quantified through total integrals cross sections. H+ + DNA-base simulations reveal atoms and groups displacements, ring openings and base-to-proton electron transfers as predominant damage processes. The authors warmly dedicate this SLEND investigation in honour of Professor N. Yngve Öhrn on the occasion of his 80th birthday celebration during the 54th Sanibel Symposium in St. Simons' Island, Georgia, on February 16-21, 2014. Associate Professor Jorge A. Morales was a former chemistry PhD student under the mentorship of Professor Öhrn and Dr Ajith Perera took various quantum chemistry courses taught by Professor Öhrn during his chemistry PhD studies. Both Jorge and Ajith look back to those great times of their scientific formation under

  15. Limb-sparing management with surgical resection, external-beam and intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy boost for patients with primary soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity. A multicentric pooled analysis of long-term outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Polo, Alfredo; Montero, Angel; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Alvarez, Ana; Cuervo, Miguel; Julian, Mikel San

    2014-01-01

    A joint analysis of data from three contributing centres within the intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) Spanish program was performed to investigate the main contributions of IORT to the multidisciplinary treatment of high-risk extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Patients with an histologic diagnosis of primary extremity STS, with absence of distant metastases, undergoing limb-sparing surgery with radical intent, external beam radiotherapy (median dose 45 Gy) and IOERT (median dose 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. From 1986-2012, a total of 159 patients were analysed in the study from three Spanish institutions. With a median follow-up time of 53 months (range 4-316 years), 5-year local control (LC) was 82 %. The 5-year IOERT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 86, 62 and 72 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only microscopically involved margin (R1) resection status retained significance in relation to LC (HR 5.20, p [de

  16. Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akine, Yasuyuki; Tokita, Nobuhiko; Tokuuye, Koichi; Satoh, Michinao; Churei, Hisahiko

    1993-01-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy makes use of photons and electrons produced by nuclear reactions between gadolinium and lower-energy neutrons which occur within the tumor. The results of our studies have shown that its radiation effect is mostly of low LET and that the electrons are the significant component in the over-all dose. The dose from gadolinium neutron capture reactions does not seem to increase in proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and the Gd-157 concentration of about 100 μg/ml appears most optimal for therapy. Close contact between gadolinium and the cell is not necessarily required for cell inactivation, however, the effect of electrons released from intracellular gadolinium may be significant. Experimental studies on tumor-bearing mice and rabbits have shown that this is a very promising modality though further improvements in gadolinium delivery to tumors are needed. (author)

  17. Electron/electron acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The electron acoustic wave becomes a normal mode of an unmagnetized collisionless plasma in the presence of two electron components with similar densities, but strongly disparate temperatures. The characteristic frequency of this mode is the plasma frequency of the cooler electron component. If these two electron components have a relative drift speed several times the thermal speed of the cooler component, the electron/electron acoustic instability may arise. This paper describes the parametric dependences of the threshold drift speed and maximum growth rate of this instability, and compares these with the same properties of the electron/ion acoustic instability. Under the condition of zero current, the electron/ion acoustic instability typically has the lower threshold drift speed, so that observation of the electron/electron acoustic instability is a strong indication of the presence of an electrical current in the plasma

  18. Clinical Implementation of a Model-Based In Vivo Dose Verification System for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy–Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Treatments Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, Peter M., E-mail: pmccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Asuni, Ganiyu [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Van Uytven, Eric [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); VanBeek, Timothy [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); McCurdy, Boyd M.C. [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Loewen, Shaun K. [Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ahmed, Naseer; Bashir, Bashir; Butler, James B.; Chowdhury, Amitava; Dubey, Arbind; Leylek, Ahmet; Nashed, Maged [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To report findings from an in vivo dosimetry program implemented for all stereotactic body radiation therapy patients over a 31-month period and discuss the value and challenges of utilizing in vivo electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry clinically. Methods and Materials: From December 2013 to July 2016, 117 stereotactic body radiation therapy–volumetric modulated arc therapy patients (100 lung, 15 spine, and 2 liver) underwent 602 EPID-based in vivo dose verification events. A developed model-based dose reconstruction algorithm calculates the 3-dimensional dose distribution to the patient by back-projecting the primary fluence measured by the EPID during treatment. The EPID frame-averaging was optimized in June 2015. For each treatment, a 3%/3-mm γ comparison between our EPID-derived dose and the Eclipse AcurosXB–predicted dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and the ≥20% isodose volume were performed. Alert levels were defined as γ pass rates <85% (lung and liver) and <80% (spine). Investigations were carried out for all fractions exceeding the alert level and were classified as follows: EPID-related, algorithmic, patient setup, anatomic change, or unknown/unidentified errors. Results: The percentages of fractions exceeding the alert levels were 22.6% for lung before frame-average optimization and 8.0% for lung, 20.0% for spine, and 10.0% for liver after frame-average optimization. Overall, mean (± standard deviation) planning target volume γ pass rates were 90.7% ± 9.2%, 87.0% ± 9.3%, and 91.2% ± 3.4% for the lung, spine, and liver patients, respectively. Conclusions: Results from the clinical implementation of our model-based in vivo dose verification method using on-treatment EPID images is reported. The method is demonstrated to be valuable for routine clinical use for verifying delivered dose as well as for detecting errors.

  19. Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Reviews technical aspects of structure determination in biological electron microscopy (EM). Discusses low dose EM, low temperature microscopy, electron energy loss spectra, determination of mass or molecular weight, and EM of labeled systems. Cites 34 references. (CS)

  20. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  1. Understand electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Understand Electronics provides a readable introduction to the exciting world of electronics for the student or enthusiast with little previous knowledge. The subject is treated with the minimum of mathematics and the book is extensively illustrated.This is an essential guide for the newcomer to electronics, and replaces the author's best-selling Beginner's Guide to Electronics.The step-by-step approach makes this book ideal for introductory courses such as the Intermediate GNVQ.

  2. Vacuum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Eichmeier, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen experts from the electronics industry, research institutes and universities have joined forces to prepare this book. ""Vacuum Electronics"" covers the electrophysical fundamentals, the present state of the art and applications, as well as the future prospects of microwave tubes and systems, optoelectronics vacuum devices, electron and ion beam devices, light and X-ray emitters, particle accelerators and vacuum interrupters. These topics are supplemented by useful information about the materials and technologies of vacuum electronics and vacuum technology.

  3. Electronic Commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Slavko Đerić

    2016-01-01

    Electronic commerce can be defined in different ways. Any definition helps to understand and explain that concept as better as possible.. Electronic commerce is a set of procedures and technologies that automate the tasks of financial transactions using electronic means. Also, according to some authors, electronic commerce is defined as a new concept, which is being developed and which includes process of buying and selling or exchanging products, services or information via computer networks...

  4. Electronic Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, F. W.

    1989-01-01

    Describes various stages involved in the applications of electronic media to the publishing industry. Highlights include computer typesetting, or photocomposition; machine-readable databases; the distribution of publications in electronic form; computer conferencing and electronic mail; collaborative authorship; hypertext; hypermedia publications;…

  5. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    (a) facilitate ecommerce;2. (b) remove and prevent barriers to electronic communications in South Africa;3. (c) ensure that electronic transactions in the Republic conform to the highest international standards;4. (d) promote the development of electronic transactions services which are responsive to the needs of users and ...

  6. Identification of the delivery of cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis (CBTp) using a cross-sectional sample from electronic health records and open-text information in a large UK-based mental health case register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Craig; Evans, Lauren; Broadbent, Matthew; Chandran, David; Craig, Thomas J; Kolliakou, Anna; Stewart, Robert; Garety, Philippa A

    2017-07-17

    Our primary objective was to identify cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivery for people with psychosis (CBTp) using an automated method in a large electronic health record database. We also examined what proportion of service users with a diagnosis of psychosis were recorded as having received CBTp within their episode of care during defined time periods provided by early intervention or promoting recovery community services for people with psychosis, compared with published audits and whether demographic characteristics differentially predicted the receipt of CBTp. Both free text using natural language processing (NLP) techniques and structured methods of identifying CBTp were combined and evaluated for positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity. Using inclusion criteria from two published audits, we identified anonymised cross-sectional samples of 2579 and 2308 service users respectively with a case note diagnosis of schizophrenia or psychosis for further analysis. The method achieved PPV of 95% and sensitivity of 96%. Using the National Audit of Schizophrenia 2 criteria, 34.6% service users were identified as ever having received at least one session and 26.4% at least two sessions of CBTp; these are higher percentages than previously reported by manual audit of a sample from the same trust that returned 20.0%. In the fully adjusted analysis, CBTp receipt was significantly (p<0.05) more likely in younger patients, in white and other when compared with black ethnic groups and patients with a diagnosis of other schizophrenia spectrum and schizoaffective disorder when compared with schizophrenia. The methods presented here provided a potential method for evaluating delivery of CBTp on a large scale, providing more scope for routine monitoring, cross-site comparisons and the promotion of equitable access. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted

  7. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Harold D

    1971-01-01

    Basic Electronics is an elementary text designed for basic instruction in electricity and electronics. It gives emphasis on electronic emission and the vacuum tube and shows transistor circuits in parallel with electron tube circuits. This book also demonstrates how the transistor merely replaces the tube, with proper change of circuit constants as required. Many problems are presented at the end of each chapter. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of electron theory, followed by a discussion on resistance, inductance, and capacitance, along with their effects on t

  8. Sticker electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-09-08

    Electronic stickers may be manufactured on flexible substrates (110, 120, 130) as layers and packaged together. The package may then have an adhesive applied to one side to provide capability for sticking the electronic devices to surfaces. The stickers can be wrappable, placed on surfaces, glued on walls or mirrors or wood or stone, and have electronics (112, 122, 132) which may or may not be ultrathin. Packaging for the electronic sticker can use polymer on cellulose manufacturing and/or three dimensional (3-D) printing. The electronic stickers may provide lighting capability, sensing capability, and/or recharging capabilities.

  9. Electron Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Rønde, Heidi S

    2013-01-01

    The photo shows a close-up of a Lichtenberg figure – popularly called an “electron tree” – produced in a cylinder of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Electron trees are created by irradiating a suitable insulating material, in this case PMMA, with an intense high energy electron beam. Upon discharge......, during dielectric breakdown in the material, the electrons generate branching chains of fractures on leaving the PMMA, producing the tree pattern seen. To be able to create electron trees with a clinical linear accelerator, one needs to access the primary electron beam used for photon treatments. We...... appropriated a linac that was being decommissioned in our department and dismantled the head to circumvent the target and ion chambers. This is one of 24 electron trees produced before we had to stop the fun and allow the rest of the accelerator to be disassembled....

  10. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  11. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION Hand Therapy is a type of rehabilitation performed by an occupational or physical therapist with patients that suffer from conditions affecting the hands and upper extremities. Therapy enables patients to hasten ...

  12. Electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007474.htm Electroconvulsive therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression ...

  13. The electron and the electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Balmaseda, M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a brief report of those historical events that originated and contributed to the scientific area of Electronics. The main discovering and investigations in both Vacuum Electronics and Semiconductor Electronics are reviewed. (Author) 12 refs

  14. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  15. Therapy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Independent School District, TX.

    Reviewed are the goals and activities of the therapy services in the Austin Early Childhood Special Education Program. Specific sections detail activities for speech therapy (such as diagnostic assessment, habilitation, consultation, and reporting procedures), occupational therapy (including identification and assessment, and services to children,…

  16. Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Đerić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electronic commerce can be defined in different ways. Any definition helps to understand and explain that concept as better as possible.. Electronic commerce is a set of procedures and technologies that automate the tasks of financial transactions using electronic means. Also, according to some authors, electronic commerce is defined as a new concept, which is being developed and which includes process of buying and selling or exchanging products, services or information via computer networks, including the Internet. Electronic commerce is not limited just to buying and selling, but it also includes all pre-sales and after-sales ongoing activities along the supply chain. Introducing electronic commerce, using the Internet and Web services in business, realizes the way to a completely new type of economy - internet economy.

  17. Electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    An introduction to the various techniques in electron spectroscopy is presented. These techniques include: (1) UV Photoelectron spectroscopy, (2) X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy, (3) Auger electron spectroscopy, (4) Electron energy loss spectroscopy, (5) Penning ionization spectroscopy and (6) Ion neutralization spectroscopy. The radiations used in each technique, the basis of the technique and the special information obtained in structure determination in atoms and molecules by each technique are summarised. (A.K.)

  18. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  19. Polymer electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Hsin-Fei, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Polymer semiconductor is the only semiconductor that can be processed in solution. Electronics made by these flexible materials have many advantages such as large-area solution process, low cost, and high performance. Researchers and companies are increasingly dedicating time and money in polymer electronics. This book focuses on the fundamental materials and device physics of polymer electronics. It describes polymer light-emitting diodes, polymer field-effect transistors, organic vertical transistors, polymer solar cells, and many applications based on polymer electronics. The book also disc

  20. Electron Bifurcation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, John W.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Jones, Anne K.; King, Paul W.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2016-04-01

    Electron bifurcation is the recently recognized third mechanism of biological energy conservation. It simultaneously couples exergonic and endergonic oxidation-reduction reactions to circumvent thermodynamic barriers and minimize free energy loss. Little is known about the details of how electron bifurcating enzymes function, but specifics are beginning to emerge for several bifurcating enzymes. To date, those characterized contain a collection of redox cofactors including flavins and iron-sulfur clusters. Here we discuss the current understanding of bifurcating enzymes and the mechanistic features required to reversibly partition multiple electrons from a single redox site into exergonic and endergonic electron transfer paths.

  1. Microfluidic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  2. Electronics Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bell, Robert; Carroll-Garrison, Martina; Donovan, Daniel; Fisher, John; Guemmer, Paul; Harms, Robert; Kelly, Timothy; Love, Mattie; McReynolds, James; Ward, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    .... Government action to preserve strategic access to semiconductor producers is clearly needed to ensure DoD electronic systems can be built without compromising sensitive technology, though every...

  3. Isolated electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekstrom, Ph.; Winwland, D.

    1981-08-01

    The problem of electron g-factor measurement by means of an isolated electron is considered. The technique of the experiment performed at the Washington university is described. A single electron is enclosed in a homogeneous magnetic field which is superimposed by an electric field. The electric field configuration represents a Penning trap. The trap together with the enclosed electron forms an ''atom'' of macroscopic dimensions. The electron trajectory in the trap consists of three components. The electron quickly rotates over small loops (cyclotron motion), the centre of these loops slowly moves over a large circle (magistron motion). Meanwhile the electron oscillates back and forth along the trap axis. The electron motion in the atom field is quantized and the transitions between various types of motions correspond to definite radiation frequencies. At the anomal frequency the transition with spin flip is registered and the electron g-factor is measured. The value g=2.0023193044 is obtained with a probable error less than a unit of the last decimal digit.

  4. The electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hestenes, David; Weingartshofer, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    The stupendous successes of the Dirac equation and quantum electro-dynamics have established the electron as the best understood of the fundamental constituents of matter. Nevertheless, physicists agree that the electron still has secrets to reveal. Moreover, powerful new theoretical and experimental tools for probing those secrets have been sharpened during the last decade. This workshop was organized to bring theorists and experimentalists together to discuss their common goal of knowing the electron. Present state and future prospects for progress toward that goal are here described. The theoretical papers encompass a wide range of views on the electron. Several argue that the 'Zitter-bewegung' is more than a mathematical peculiarity of the Dirac equation, that it may well be a real physical phenomenon and worthy of serious study, theoretically and experimentally. Besides generating the electron spin and magnetic moment, the 'Zitterbewegung' may be a vital clue to electron structure and self-interaction. Some of the papers employ a radical new formulation of the Dirac theory which reveals a hidden geo-metric structure in the theory that supports a 'Zitterbewegung' inter-pretation. For the last half century the properties of electrons have been probed primarily by scattering experiments at ever higher energies. Recently, however, two powerful new experimental techniques have emerged capable of giving alternative experimental views of the electron. First, techniques for confining single electrons for long term study have led to the most accurate measurements of the electron magnetic moment. Second, the interaction of high intensity laser fields with atoms and electrons have revealed striking new phenomena such as multiphoton ionization. refs.; figs.; tabs

  5. Limb-sparing management with surgical resection, external-beam and intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy boost for patients with primary soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity. A multicentric pooled analysis of long-term outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Felipe A. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Sole, Claudio V. [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Department of Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Complutense University, School of Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Radiomedicina, Service of Radiation Oncology, Santiago (Chile); Polo, Alfredo; Montero, Angel [Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Cambeiro, Mauricio; Martinez-Monge, Rafael [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Service of Radiation Oncology, Pamplona (Spain); Alvarez, Ana [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Radiation Oncology, Madrid (Spain); Cuervo, Miguel [Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Madrid (Spain); Julian, Mikel San [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Service of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Pamplona (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    A joint analysis of data from three contributing centres within the intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) Spanish program was performed to investigate the main contributions of IORT to the multidisciplinary treatment of high-risk extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Patients with an histologic diagnosis of primary extremity STS, with absence of distant metastases, undergoing limb-sparing surgery with radical intent, external beam radiotherapy (median dose 45 Gy) and IOERT (median dose 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. From 1986-2012, a total of 159 patients were analysed in the study from three Spanish institutions. With a median follow-up time of 53 months (range 4-316 years), 5-year local control (LC) was 82 %. The 5-year IOERT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 86, 62 and 72 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, only microscopically involved margin (R1) resection status retained significance in relation to LC (HR 5.20, p < 0.001). With regard to IOERT in-field control, incomplete resection (HR 4.88, p = 0.001) and higher IOERT dose (≥ 12.5 Gy; HR 0.32, p = 0.02) retained a significant association in multivariate analysis. From this joint analysis emerges the fact that an IOERT dose ≥ 12.5 Gy increases the rate of IOERT in-field control, but DFS remains modest, given the high risk of distant metastases. Intensified local treatment needs to be tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neo- and adjuvant systemic therapy. (orig.) [German] Um den therapeutischen Beitrag einer intraoperativen Bestrahlung mit Elektronen (IOERT) als Teil eines multidisziplinaeren Behandlungskonzepts von Weichteilsarkomen (STS) im Extremitaetenbereich mit hohem Risikoprofil evaluieren zu koennen, wurde anhand des spanischen IOERT-Programms eine gepoolte Datenanalyse von drei teilnehmenden Zentren vorgenommen. Eingeschlossen in diese Studie wurden Patienten mit histologisch

  6. Treatment of therapy-refractive ulcera cruris of various origins with autologous keratinocytes in fibrin sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, S; Ermuth, T; Tanczos, E; Bannasch, H; Horch, R E; Zschocke, I; Peschen, M; Schöpf, E; Vanscheidt, W; Augustin, M

    2005-02-01

    Evaluation of the effects of cultivated, subconfluent, autologous keratinocytes in fibrin sealant (BioSeed-S) on the healing of therapy-refractive chronic wounds. Open observational study in 60 patients with chronic leg ulcers and impaired wound healing of various origins. After whole-skin excision and cultivation of the autologous keratinocytes, the suspended cells were applied to the preconditioned wound in fibrin sealant. Wound epithelization and wound size were recorded at defined times. Fifty-two of the 60 participating patients could be evaluated. After 6 weeks, 29 ulcers (55.8%) were healed. The mean epithelization increased between the 8th and 42nd postoperative day from 23% to 62.5%. In 50.0% of the patients, global assessment of the wound showed a high degree of epithelization or healing after 42 days. In 32.6% of treated patients, improvement was observed, while no healing tendency was to be found in 17.4%. The present observational study indicates that the transplantation of autologous keratinocytes suspended in fibrin sealant could be of advantage in the treatment of refractive leg ulcers.

  7. Electronic marketplaces

    OpenAIRE

    TALAFOUSOVÁ, Jana

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the principles of electronic and Internet marketplaces. For analyzing the status of the use of electronic marketplaces and online polling was done with the actual marketplace and society, which is a member of the marketplace. Proposal that trade through the market is prepared for a particular company, which previously traded through the marketplace.

  8. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  9. Power electronics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kishore Chatterjee

    reference material for power electronics engineers, students and academicians. We thank the editors of Sadhana for inviting us to guest-edit this special issue on power electronics. July 2017. KISHORE CHATTERJEE. Department of Electrical Engineering,. Indian Institute of Technology,. Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, ...

  10. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  11. International Occupational Therapy Research Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Lynette; Coppola, Susan; Alvarez, Liliana; Cibule, Lolita; Maltsev, Sergey; Loh, Siew Yim; Mlambo, Tecla; Ikiugu, Moses N; Pihlar, Zdenka; Sriphetcharawut, Sarinya; Baptiste, Sue; Ledgerd, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Occupational therapy is a global profession represented by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT). International research priorities are needed for strategic guidance on global occupational therapy practice. The objective of this study was to develop international research priorities to reflect global occupational therapy practice. A Delphi study using three rounds of electronic surveys, distributed to WFOT member organizations and WFOT accredited universities, was conducted. Data were analyzed after each round, and priorities were presented for rating and ranking in order of importance. Forty-six (53%) out of 87 WFOT member countries participated in the Delphi process. Eight research priorities were confirmed by the final electronic survey round. Differences were observed in rankings given by member organizations and university respondents. Despite attrition at Round 3, the final research priorities will help to focus research efforts in occupational therapy globally. Follow-up research is needed to determine how the research priorities are being adopted internationally.

  12. Laser CO2treatment for vulvar lymphedema secondary to gynecological cancer therapy: A report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopracordevole, Francesco; Mancioli, Francesca; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Buttignol, Monica; Giorda, Giorgio; Ciavattini, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Vulvar lymphedema is an uncommon and disabling side-effect of pelvic lymphadenectomy and pelvic radiotherapeutic treatment for invasive genital cancer. Lymphorrhea, a complication of lymphedema, may be extremely distressing for patients due to the requirement to wear sanitary towels and as the pain and loss of elasticity of the vulvar skin and mucosa can cause discomfort during coitus. Surgical treatments of lymphorrhea and vulvar lymphedema secondary to gynecological cancer treatments remain controversial and are not currently considered to be the standard therapy. The present study reports two cases of vulvar lymphedema complicated by vulvar lymphorrhea in females who had undergone treatment for cervical and endometrial cancer, respectively; a review of the literature is also included. In the two present cases, vulvar lymphedemas were refractory to standard treatments, including decongestive therapy, manual lymph drainage, elastic bandaging, low-stretch bandaging, exercises and skin care. Laser CO 2 excision and vaporization of the whole skin and mucosal tissue of the vulva was successfully performed to treat the lymphorrhea and improve quality of life. Thus, the present two cases indicated that laser CO 2 surgery may present an additional therapy for the treatment of genital lymphedema that is refractory to other treatments.

  13. Electronic Commerce and Electronic Business

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    This special issue is motivated by the recent upsurge of research activity in the areas of electronic commerce and electronic business both in India and all over the world. The current research activity is quite intensive in the use of mathematical tools such as cryptography, game theory, mechanism design, optimization, ...

  14. Electronic identity

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Norberto Nuno Gomes; Argles, David

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing availability of electronic services, security and a reliable means by which identity is verified is essential.Written by Norberto Andrade the first chapter of this book provides an overview of the main legal and regulatory aspects regarding electronic identity in Europe and assesses the importance of electronic identity for administration (public), business (private) and, above all, citizens. It also highlights the role of eID as a key enabler of the economy.In the second chapter Lisha Chen-Wilson, David Argles, Michele Schiano di Zenise and Gary Wills discuss the user-cent

  15. Electronic diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Diagrams is a ready reference and general guide to systems and circuit planning and in the preparation of diagrams for both newcomers and the more experienced. This book presents guidelines and logical procedures that the reader can follow and then be equipped to tackle large complex diagrams by recognition of characteristic 'building blocks' or 'black boxes'. The goal is to break down many of the barriers that often seem to deter students and laymen in learning the art of electronics, especially when they take up electronics as a spare time occupation. This text is comprised of nin

  16. Digital electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, John

    2013-01-01

    An essential companion to John C Morris's 'Analogue Electronics', this clear and accessible text is designed for electronics students, teachers and enthusiasts who already have a basic understanding of electronics, and who wish to develop their knowledge of digital techniques and applications. Employing a discovery-based approach, the author covers fundamental theory before going on to develop an appreciation of logic networks, integrated circuit applications and analogue-digital conversion. A section on digital fault finding and useful ic data sheets completes th

  17. Starting electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Starting Electronics is unrivalled as a highly practical introduction for hobbyists, students and technicians. Keith Brindley introduces readers to the functions of the main component types, their uses, and the basic principles of building and designing electronic circuits. Breadboard layouts make this very much a ready-to-run book for the experimenter; and the use of multimeter, but not oscilloscopes, puts this practical exploration of electronics within reach of every home enthusiast's pocket. The third edition has kept the simplicity and clarity of the original. New material

  18. Polymer electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Polymer electronics is the science behind many important new developments in technology, such as the flexible electronic display (e-ink) and many new developments in transistor technology. Solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and transistors are all areas where plastic electronics is likely to, or is already having, a serious impact on our daily lives. With polymer transistors and light-emitting diodes now being commercialised, there is a clear need for a pedagogic text thatdiscusses the subject in a clear and concise fashion suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate students. The content

  19. Stretchable electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Someya, Takao

    2012-01-01

    With its comprehensive coverage this handbook and ready reference brings together some of the most outstanding scientists in the field to lay down the undisputed knowledge on how to make electronics stretchable.As such, it focuses on gathering and evaluating the materials, designs, models and technologies that enable the fabrication of fully elastic electronic devices which can sustain high strain. Furthermore, it provides a review of those specific applications that directly benefit from highly compliant electronics, including transistors, photonic devices and sensors. In addition to stre

  20. Electronic Elections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Electronic voting technology is a two edged sword. It comes with many risks but brings also many benefits. Instead of flat out rejecting the technology as uncontrollably dangerous, we advocate in this paper a different technological angle that renders electronic elections trustworthy beyond...... the usual levels of doubt. We exploit the trust that voters currently have into the democratic process and model our techniques around that observation accordingly. In particular, we propose a technique of trace emitting computations to record the individual steps of an electronic voting machine...... for a posteriori validation on an acceptably small trusted computing base. Our technology enables us to prove that an electronic elections preserves the voter’s intent, assuming that the voting machine and the trace verifier are independent....

  1. Electron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaodong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Shaw, J.J.; Bahri, C.

    1990-01-01

    Electron scattering is one of the best probes available to us to probe the nucleus. It has revealed to us, with unprecedented accuracy, the charge and current distributions of nuclei. It has provided us with positive evidence for meson exchange currents. It was used to 'discover' the quark and it revealed to us that nucleons may be modified in the nuclear environment (EMC Effect). In short, electron scattering has revolutionized the study of nuclear physics. Several recent developments will insure that electron beams which will soon become availabe at CEBAF, Bates and elsewhere will make high-precision coincidence experiments possible. As the technology is becoming available, we are just beginning to exploit polarization degrees of freedom in our experiments. In this paper, we will introduce the formalism of electron scattering, review what we have learned in the past and look ahead toward the future

  2. Power Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2008-01-01

    is to change the electrical power production sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. The other is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss the most...... emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy, which by means of power electronics are changing from being a minor energy source to be acting as an important power source in the energy system. Power electronics is the enabling technology and the presentation will cover the development in wind turbine...... technology from kW to MW, discuss which power electronic solutions are most feasible and used today....

  3. Paper electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobjörk, Daniel; Österbacka, Ronald

    2011-05-03

    Paper is ubiquitous in everyday life and a truly low-cost substrate. The use of paper substrates could be extended even further, if electronic applications would be applied next to or below the printed graphics. However, applying electronics on paper is challenging. The paper surface is not only very rough compared to plastics, but is also porous. While this is detrimental for most electronic devices manufactured directly onto paper substrates, there are also approaches that are compatible with the rough and absorptive paper surface. In this review, recent advances and possibilities of these approaches are evaluated and the limitations of paper electronics are discussed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Electronic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinidou, Eleni; Gabrielsson, Roger; Gomez, Eliot; Crispin, Xavier; Nilsson, Ove; Simon, Daniel T.; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directly merged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization. PMID:26702448

  5. Electron Emitters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tzeng, Yonhua

    2002-01-01

    When two carbon-nanotube coated electrodes are placed at a small distance from each other, electron emission from carbon nanotubes allows a DC or AC electrical current to flow between these two electrodes...

  6. Electron Microprobe

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The JEOL JXA-8600 is a conventional hairpin filament thermal emission electron microprobe that is more than 20 years old. It is capable of performing qualitative and...

  7. Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the widespread and erroneous belief that they are natural and do no harm, and because their use offers the opportunity for more control over treatment options and procedures. Alternative therapies can reduce stress, pain, and/or fatigue. Some therapies are covered ...

  8. Electronic spectroscopies

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared region is a versatile spectroscopic technique, as both d-d and charge transfer transitions of supported TMI can be probed. One of the advantages of electronic spectroscopy is that the obtained information is directly chemical since the outer shell electrons of the TMI are probed and provide information about the oxidation state and coordination environment of TMI on surfaces. Furthermore, the DRS technique ca...

  9. Electronic commerce

    OpenAIRE

    Zvolánková, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    The thesis deals with a description of electronic commerce from its beginning up to present situation in this area. It explains basic terms connected with electronic commerce and it summarizes the relevant legislation. Moreover it describes e-contracts and rights and duties of both contractual parties. The main view is the view of Internet retailer, which is reflected in the practical part focused on concrete problems of retailers.

  10. Spin Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    applications, a ferromagnetic metal may be used as a source of spin-polarized electronics to be injected into a semiconductor, a superconductor or a...physical phenomena in II-VI and III-V semiconductors. In II-VI systems, the Mn2+ ions act to boost the electron spin precession up to terahertz ...conductors, proximity effect between ferromagnets and superconductors , and the effects of spin injection on the physical properties of the

  11. Bullous pemphigoid after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duschet, P.; Schwarz, T.; Gschnait, F.

    1988-02-01

    Electron beam therapy applied to a lymph node metastasis from a squamous cell carcinoma was followed by the development of histologically and immunologically typical bullous pemphigoid, the lesions being initially strictly confined to the irradiation area. This observation suggests that the bullous pemphigoid antigen may be altered or unmasked by electron beam radiotherapy, leading subsequently to the production of autoantibodies. The disease in this case effectively responded to the administration of tetracycline and niacinamide, a therapeutic regimen described recently.

  12. Spin electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Buhrman, Robert; Daughton, James; Molnár, Stephan; Roukes, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This report is a comparative review of spin electronics ("spintronics") research and development activities in the United States, Japan, and Western Europe conducted by a panel of leading U.S. experts in the field. It covers materials, fabrication and characterization of magnetic nanostructures, magnetism and spin control in magnetic nanostructures, magneto-optical properties of semiconductors, and magnetoelectronics and devices. The panel's conclusions are based on a literature review and a series of site visits to leading spin electronics research centers in Japan and Western Europe. The panel found that Japan is clearly the world leader in new material synthesis and characterization; it is also a leader in magneto-optical properties of semiconductor devices. Europe is strong in theory pertaining to spin electronics, including injection device structures such as tunneling devices, and band structure predictions of materials properties, and in development of magnetic semiconductors and semiconductor heterost...

  13. Electronic Commerce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, N. [NRG Information Services Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1995-11-01

    The concept of electronic commerce in the gas industry was discussed. It was defined as the integration of communication technology, advanced information processing capability and business standards, to improve effectiveness of the business process. Examples of electronic data interchange from the automotive, airline, and banking industry were given. The objective of using this technology in the gas industry was described as the provision of one electronic facility to make seamless contractual and operational arrangements for moving natural gas across participating pipelines. The benefit of seamless integration - one readily available standard system used by several companies - was highlighted. A list of value-added services such as the free movement of bulletins, directories, nominations,and other documents was provided.

  14. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapists have graduate degrees and can demonstrate their competence in sex therapy by becoming credentialed by the ... ways to resolve your concerns and improve your communication and intimacy. Talking about sex and intimacy may ...

  15. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, from radioactive substances that a doctor places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  16. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best for you. Oxygen is usually delivered through nasal prongs (an oxygen cannula) or a face mask. Oxygen equipment can attach to other medical equipment such as CPAP machines and ventilators. Oxygen therapy can help you ...

  17. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  18. Behavior Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with children with ADHD. Behavior therapy recognizes the limits that having ADHD puts on a child. It ... be tiring and trying. It can test the limits of even the best parents. Parent training and ...

  19. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relating to each other Set individual and family goals and work on ways to achieve them Results Family therapy doesn't automatically solve family conflicts or make an unpleasant situation go away. But ...

  20. Electronic spectroscopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared region is a versatile spectroscopic technique, as both d-d and charge transfer transitions of supported TMI can be probed. One of the advantages of electronic spectroscopy is that the obtained information is

  1. Greening Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Søes Kokborg, Morten; Thomsen, Marianne

    Based on a literature review with focus on hazardous substances in waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) and numbers from a Danish treatment facility a flow analysis for specific substances has been conducted. Further, the accessible knowledge on human and environmental effects due to po...

  2. Electronic Government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmer, Maria A.; Traunmüller, Roland; Grönlund, Åke

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Electronic Government, EGOV 2005, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in August 2005. The 30 revised papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions, and assess the state-of-the-art in e...

  3. Electronic Commerce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2000-11-30

    Nov 30, 2000 ... applications of internet are exchange of electronic mail, ex- change of files (text as well as multimedia), storing information in a form which allows other computers connected to the internet to access it and remote logging into a computer and using it to run programs. For two computers in different locations to.

  4. Electronic Commerce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electronic commerce usually uses a public switched telephone network (PSTN) and is often between entities which are not known to one another. Ensuring security of communication between the entities participating in e-commerce is hence an important requirement. Apart from ensuring the security of messages on the ...

  5. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, T.

    1981-09-01

    A short survey is given on nuclear radiation detectors and nuclear electronics. It is written for newcomers and those, who are not very familiar with this technique. Some additional information is given on typical failures in nuclear measurement systems. (orig.) [de

  6. Power electronics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kishore Chatterjee

    Power electronics plays an important role in the processing, conditioning and utilization of electric power. From ubiquitous ... An induction motor drive based on a modular multilevel converter (MMC) is presented ... dynamic voltage restorer and the control of an induction motor drive having an active front end converter.

  7. Electronic Money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Tim

    Thirty years ago a cashless society was predicted for the near future; paper currency and checks would be an antiquated symbol of the past. Consumers would embrace a new alternative for making payments: electronic money. But currency is still used for 87% of payments, mainly for "nickel and dime" purchases. And checks are the payment…

  8. Electronics department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities in 1978 of some of the groups within the Electronics Department. The work covered includes plant protection and operator studies, reliability techniques, application of nuclear techniques to mineral exploration, applied laser physics, computing and, lastly, research instrumentation. (author)

  9. Electronic Commerce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nance, Vol.6, No.2, 6-13, 2001. SERIES I ARTICLE. Electronic Commerce. 5. Cash Transactions. V Rajaraman. In this article we will discuss payment by cash for e-com- merce transactions and micro payments for services re- ceived via the internet. Introduction. In the previous part, we discussed payment by credit cards and.

  10. Cryogenic electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourches, N.; Abbon, P.; Delagnes, E.; Le Meur, L.P.

    1995-04-01

    This study presents the cryogenic electronics, which is used in high energy physics with appropriate device. It discuss their ability to hardening against ionization radiation and neutrons. Some partial results on the operation of microelectronics devices at cryogenic temperature are given. (TEC). 33 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Electronic Commerce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2000-11-30

    Nov 30, 2000 ... Electronic Commerce. 2. E-Commerce System Architecture. V Rajaraman is with the. J awaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific. Research and the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. Several generations of scientists and engineers in India have learnt computer science using his lucidly.

  12. Electronic Commerce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the first part of this series we stated that in business to business e-commerce, electronic documents are exchanged be- tween business partners by using either a private network or a public switched network. We also stated that in order to inter- pret them correctly we need a standard notation which is agreed to by both ...

  13. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review...... uses a narrative synthesis format to determine evidence for effectiveness and provide insight into a model of action. Method The narrative synthesis framework consists of four elements: (i) theory development; (ii) preliminary synthesis of findings; (iii) exploration of relationships between studies......; and (iv) assessment of the robustness of the synthesis. Results Electronic and hand searches identified 263 potentially relevant studies. Eighteen studies met the full inclusion criteria. Three distinctive strands of investigations emerged: eight studies explored behavioural and psychological aspects...

  14. Electronic detectors for electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, A R; McMullan, G

    2011-08-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is an important tool for high-resolution structure determination in applications ranging from condensed matter to biology. Electronic detectors are now used in most applications in EM as they offer convenience and immediate feedback that is not possible with film or image plates. The earliest forms of electronic detector used routinely in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were charge coupled devices (CCDs) and for many applications these remain perfectly adequate. There are however applications, such as the study of radiation-sensitive biological samples, where film is still used and improved detectors would be of great value. The emphasis in this review is therefore on detectors for use in such applications. Two of the most promising candidates for improved detection are: monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) and hybrid pixel detectors (of which Medipix2 was chosen for this study). From the studies described in this review, a back-thinned MAPS detector appears well suited to replace film in for the study of radiation-sensitive samples at 300 keV, while Medipix2 is suited to use at lower energies and especially in situations with very low count rates. The performance of a detector depends on the energy of electrons to be recorded, which in turn is dependent on the application it is being used for; results are described for a wide range of electron energies ranging from 40 to 300 keV. The basic properties of detectors are discussed in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of spatial frequency.

  15. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Beate; Ulle, Tanja; Kahl, Kai G; Wasem, Jürgen; Aidelsburger, Pamela

    2008-05-29

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two), six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the interventions of media alone as well as through the intervention of

  16. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron...... transistors (Part 2). The synthetic protocols rely on stepwise Sonogashira coupling reactions. Conductivity studies on various OPE-based molecular wires reveal that mere OPE compounds have a higher electrical resistance compared to the cruciform based wires (up to 9 times higher). The most spectacular result...

  17. Automotive electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basshuysen, R. van [ed.; Baun, R. [comp.

    2000-10-01

    Electronic equipment is indispensable in modern motor cars for active and passive safety, exhaust and consumption monitoring or comfort. Electric and electronic systems today account for nearly 20 percent of the production cost of a normal passenger car, with an upward trend. Infotainment equipment is a growing market, which gets center stage in this issue. Further subjects discussed are current electronic and mechatronic applications as well as new developments in data transmission, development tools and constructional elements. [German] Ohne Elektronik sind moderne Automobile nicht mehr vorstellbar. Ob aktive oder passive Sicherheit, Abgas, Verbrauch oder Komfort - der Fortschritt im Autombil ist eng verknuepft mit der Einfuehrung neuer elektronischer Systeme und Komponenten. Obwohl meist nicht sehr auffaellig in einer Black-box verpackt, liegen die anteiligen Herstellungskosten fuer die Elektrik und Elektronik bei einem Mittelklassefahrzeug schon bei knapp 20 Prozent. Tendenz: Weiter steigend. Waehrend die Segnungen von ABS, ESP oder Motormanagement fuer den Kunden unsichtbar bleiben, tritt die Elektronik mit den Infotainment-Systemen ins Rampenlicht. Hochwertige Audio-Anlagen im Doppel-DIN-Format und grosse Farbbildschirme sitzen an prominenter Stelle im Armaturenbrett. Elektronische Systeme werden damit fuer den Kunden sichtbar, greifbar und erlebbar. Doch je mehr Funktionen integriert werden, desto wichtiger wird eine einfache Bedienung, die den Fahrer moeglichst wenig vom Verkehrsgeschehen ablenkt. Das ist leider keine Selbstverstaendlichkeit: Eine klare, einfache Bedienung wurde in der Vergangenheit schon bei so manchem simplen Cassetten-Radio schmerzlich vermisst. Infotainment im Automobil ist ein Wachstumsmarkt - und das Schwerpunkt-Thema der vorliegenden zweiten Ausgabe von 'Automotive Electronics'. Darueber hinaus beschaeftigt sich auch diese Ausgabe mit aktuellen Elektronik- und Mechatronik-Anwendungen und berichtet ueber neue Entwicklungen

  18. Electronic Aggression

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-20

    Aggression is no longer limited to the school yard. New forms of electronic media, such as blogs, instant messaging, chat rooms, email, text messaging, and the internet are providing new arenas for youth violence to occur.  Created: 11/20/2007 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention.   Date Released: 11/28/2007.

  19. Beam Dynamics With Electron Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Uesugi, T; Noda, K; Shibuya, S; Syresin, E M

    2004-01-01

    Electron cooling experiments have been carried out at HIMAC in order to develop new technologies in heavy-ion therapy and related researches. The cool-stacking method, in particular, has been studied to increase the intensity of heavy-ions. The maximum stack intensity was 2 mA, above which a fast ion losses occurred simulatneously with the vertical coherent oscillations. The instability depends on the working point, the stacked ion-density and the electron-beam density. The instability was suppressed by reducing the peak ion-density with RF-knockout heating.

  20. ELECTRON GUN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofilos, N.C.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1960-04-01

    A pulsed electron gun capable of delivering pulses at voltages of the order of 1 mv and currents of the order of 100 amperes is described. The principal novelty resides in a transformer construction which is disposed in the same vacuum housing as the electron source and accelerating electrode structure of the gun to supply the accelerating potential thereto. The transformer is provided by a plurality of magnetic cores disposed in circumferentially spaced relation and having a plurality of primary windings each inductively coupled to a different one of the cores, and a helical secondary winding which is disposed coaxially of the cores and passes therethrough in circumferential succession. Additional novelty resides in the disposition of the electron source cathode filament input leads interiorly of the transformer secondary winding which is hollow, as well as in the employment of a half-wave filament supply which is synchronously operated with the transformer supply such that the transformer is pulsed during the zero current portions of the half-wave cycle.

  1. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  2. Radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Hoefnagel, C A

    1999-09-11

    Nuclear medicine therapy uses unsealed radioactive sources for the selective delivery of radiation to tumours or target organs. For benign disorders such as thyrotoxicosis and arthritis radionuclide therapy provides an alternative to surgery or medical treatment. In cancer treatment, it often combines the advantage of target selectivity (like brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy) with that of being systemic, as with chemotherapy, and it may be used as part of a therapeutic strategy with curative intent or for disease control and palliation. Toxicity is generally limited to the haematopoietic tissue and few side-effects are observed. When cure is feasible, the long-term consequences of radionuclide therapy (eg, fertility disorders and leukaemia or other secondary cancers) do compare favourably with the risks associated with and accepted for chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  3. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols...... model of Art Therapy with this population. This article focuses on the psychological aspect of creativity related to mild depression with an emphasis on the interaction between the conscious and the unconscious part of the psyche....

  4. Animal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, D A

    1997-01-01

    This article explores the concept of animal therapy. The discussion includes a brief history of animal therapy, its importance, its relationship to rehabilitation, and its usefulness as a tool to influence adaptation, change, power, communication, advocacy, teaching, accountability, responsibility, and locus of control. This theoretical concept is important because of the joy and unconditional love animals can provide their owners. Relationships with animals can promote feelings of self-worth, help offset loneliness, reduce anxiety, provide contact, comfort, security, and the feeling of being needed.

  5. Emerging Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Amaliris; Musallam, Khaled M; Taher, Ali T; Rivella, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    At present, the only definitive cure for β-thalassemia is a bone marrow transplant (BMT); however, HLA-blood-matched donors are scarcely available. Current therapies undergoing clinical investigation with most potential for therapeutic benefit are the β-globin gene transfer of patient-specific hematopoietic stem cells followed by autologous BMT. Other emerging therapies deliver exogenous regulators of several key modulators of erythropoiesis or iron homeostasis. This review focuses on current approaches for the treatment of hemoglobinopathies caused by disruptions of β-globin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasem, Jürgen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. Objectives: What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? Methods: A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. Results: In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two, six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the

  7. Shock therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Erin

    2016-02-03

    Therapies administered by mental health nurses, aimed at "curing" gay people of their sexual preference were still in common use in the UK in the 1960s and early 1970s. Some nurses tried to avoid participating in these practices, but many believed that they were helping their patients, as a new book reveals.

  8. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  9. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  10. Electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kwok, H L

    2010-01-01

    The electronic properties of solids have become of increasing importance in the age of information technology. The study of solids and materials, while having originated from the disciplines of physics and chemistry, has evolved independently over the past few decades. The classical treatment of solid-state physics, which emphasized classifications, theories and fundamental physical principles, is no longer able to bridge the gap between materials advances and applications. In particular, the more recent developments in device physics and technology have not necessarily been driven by new conc

  11. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero B, E.

    1989-01-01

    The rapid technical development of Colombia over the past years, resulted among others, a considerable increase in the number of measuring instrumentation and testing laboratories, scientific research and metrology centers, in industry, agriculture, public health, education on the nuclear field, etc. IAN is a well organized institution with qualified management, trained staff and reasonably equipped laboratories to carry out tasks as: Metrology, standardization, quality control and maintenance and repair of nuclear instruments. The government of Colombia has adopted a policy to establish and operate through the country maintenance and repair facilities for nuclear instrumentation. This policy is reflected in the organization of electronic laboratories in Bogota-IAN

  12. Basic electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayal, DC

    2010-01-01

    The second edition of this book incorporates the comments and suggestions of my friends and students who have critically studied the first edition. In this edition the changes and additions have been made and subject matter has been rearranged at some places. The purpose of this text is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date study of the principles of operation of solid state devices, their basic circuits and application of these circuits to various electronic systems, so that it can serve as a standard text not only for universities and colleges but also for technical institutes. This book

  13. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  14. Fast Food Art, Talk Show Therapy: The Impact of Mass Media on Adolescent Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic media provides rapid delivery and unlimited access to pictures, sounds, and information. The ubiquitous presence of techno-digital culture in the lives of today's adolescents may influence or contaminate the art therapy process. This article presents two case studies that illustrate how cyberspace entered into art therapy sessions and…

  15. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  16. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  17. Practical electronics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Ian R

    2013-01-01

    Practical Electronics Handbook, Third Edition provides the frequently used and highly applicable principles of electronics and electronic circuits.The book contains relevant information in electronics. The topics discussed in the text include passive and active discrete components; linear and digital I.C.s; microprocessors and microprocessor systems; digital-analogue conversions; computer aids in electronics design; and electronic hardware components.Electronic circuit constructors, service engineers, electronic design engineers, and anyone with an interest in electronics will find the book ve

  18. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  19. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...... music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive...

  20. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  1. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  2. Power Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2008-01-01

    The global electrical energy consumption is still rising and there is an urgent demand to increase the power capacity. It is expected that the power capacity has to be doubled within 20 years. The production, distribution and use of energy should be as efficient as possible and incentives to save...... energy at the end-user should also be set up. Deregulation of energy has in the past lowered the investment in larger power plants, which means the need for new electrical power sources will be high in the near future. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve the future problems. One...... is to change the electrical power production sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. The other is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss the most...

  3. Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Storr, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    Music Therapy is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address to physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of individuals. After assessing the strength and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in therapeutic context, clients, abilities are strengthened and transfer to other areas of their liv...

  4. Psychological therapies for thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anie, Kofi A; Massaglia, Pia

    2014-03-06

    Thalassaemia is a group of genetic blood disorders characterised by the absence or reduction in the production of haemoglobin. Severity is variable from less severe anaemia, through thalassaemia intermedia, to profound severe anaemia (thalassaemia major). In thalassaemia major other complications include growth retardation, bone deformation, and enlarged spleen. Blood transfusion is required to treat severe forms of thalassaemia, but this results in excessive accumulation of iron in the body (iron overload), removed mostly by a drug called desferrioxamine through 'chelation therapy'. Non-routine treatments are bone marrow transplantation (which is age restricted), and possibly hydroxyurea, designed to raise foetal haemoglobin level, thus reducing anaemia. In addition, psychological therapies seem appropriate to improving outcome and adherence to medical treatment. To examine the evidence that in people with thalassaemia, psychological treatments improve the ability to cope with the condition, and improve both medical and psychosocial outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register which comprises of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Searches on the Internet were also performed.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 11 November 2013. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the use of psychological intervention to no (psychological) intervention in people with thalassaemia. No trials of psychological therapies have been found in the literature for inclusion in this review. There are currently no results to be reported. As a chronic disease with a considerable role for self-management, psychological support seems appropriate for managing thalassaemia. However, from the information currently available, no conclusions

  5. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material placed in the body near cancer cells ( internal radiation therapy , also called brachytherapy ). Systemic radiation therapy uses radioactive ... material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy, more commonly called brachytherapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses ...

  6. Diamond bio electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  7. Data needs for Auger electron cascade simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibedi, T.; Lee, B.Q.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Kondev, F.G.; Robinson, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    A brief description was given of the current progress in developing a new computational model to evaluate the complete energy spectra of Auger electron emission in nuclear decay. It is widely accepted that, due to their short range, low energy Auger electrons have the potential to be used for radiotherapy. Accurate knowledge of Auger yields is needed both to evaluate the dose to healthy cells when radioisotopes are administered for diagnostics, and to design radioisotope use in the targeted cancer therapy

  8. Sustainable Management of Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide information on EPAs strategy for electronics stewardship, certified electronics recyclers and the Challenge; as well as where to donate unwanted electronics, how to calculate benefits, and what's going on with electronics mgmt in their states.

  9. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the

  10. Nutritional Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Julie

    2016-03-01

    This article provides the reader with steps needed to accurately assess patient nutrition behaviors that contribute to weight gain, inability to lose weight, or inability to sustain weight loss. Evidence-based approaches in nutrition therapy that can create the daily energy deficit needed to produce 1/2 to 2 pounds of weight loss per week, and the strategies to create the energy deficit, are presented. To optimize health, long-term weight loss maintenance is needed. The benefits of using a multidisciplinary team approach in treating obesity are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  12. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  13. Scientists at Brookhaven contribute to the development of a better electron accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Scientists working at Brookhaven have developed a compact linear accelerator called STELLA (Staged Electron Laser Acceleration). Highly efficient, it may help electron accelerators become practical tools for applications in industry and medicine, such as radiation therapy (1 page)

  14. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  15. Interferential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganne, J M

    1976-09-01

    Interferential Therapy is a "new-comer" to the field of physical medicine, but it is gradually acquiring a particular identity. As the name implies, a current is generated within the tissues as a result of the interaction of two separate circuits. It can therefore be appreciated that four electrodes are required, two for each circuit. The two currents generated by the unit are medium frequency currents in the 4000 cycle per second range. One of these can be varied so that it is slightly out of phase with the other in such a way that a low frequency beat is generated where the two currents cross within the tissues, and this is equal to the difference between the two medium frequencies. The interferential current produced is an evenly alternating sinusoidal one, without polar effects (Diagram 1). Its frequency can be varied from 0 to 100 or 150, depending on the unit. It is evident that such a current can be made to scan the tissues more deeply, more accurately and more widely than the old sinusoidal current, depending on the way electrodes are placed, to determine where the low frequency current will be produced. Further, it has less superficial sensory effect, provided it is applied correctly. It is undoubtedly an effective therapy for controlling pain. Copyright © 1976 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  17. Accelerators for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlit, W.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decades circular and linear electron accelerators have been developed for clinical use in radiation therapy of tumors with the aim of achieving a high radiation dose in the tumor and as low as possible dose in the adjacent normal tissues. Today about one thousand accelerators are in medical use throughout the world and many hundred thousand patients are treated every day with accelerator-produced radiation. There exists, however, a large number of patients who cannot be treated satisfactorily in this way. New types of radiations such as neutrons, negative pions, protons and heavy ions were therefore tested recently. The clinical experience with these radiations and with new types of treatment procedures indicate that in future the use of a scanning beam of high energy protons might be optimal for the treatment of tumors. (orig.)

  18. A comparison of field-only electronic portal imaging hard copies with double exposure port films in radiation therapy treatment setup confirmation to determine its clinical application in a radiotherapy center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatherly, K; Smylie, J; Rodger, A

    1999-10-01

    To determine in which treatment sites field-only hard copy electronic portal images (EPI) captured during a treatment exposure could replace traditional double exposed port films in a busy radiation oncology department. The three linear accelerators in the William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre (WBRC) at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne are each equipped with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). These devices can be used daily on all patients where the treatment fields are within the size constraint of the cassette, for example, less than 25 x 25 cm. Port films using radiographic film in hard cassettes were previously considered the standard method of field placement verification. After the radiation therapists were trained in all program aspects of capturing, enhancing, and producing hard copies of EPIs, a study was developed to evaluate the possibility of replacing port films with EPI hard copies within the established departmental procedures. Comparison of EPI hard copy with the simulator film and the port film of the same field was carried out by the radiation oncologist specialists. Seventy-eight comparison sets were generated and grouped into seven anatomical regions for evaluation by the radiation oncologist specialist responsible for each particular region. The outcome decision was the preferred imaging option. Where no preference was stated, EPI became the modality of choice, as it increased the efficiency of work practice. The results indicate that field-only EPI can be considered to be at least as clinically useful for treatment verification in the following sites: breast, chest, hip, spine, and large pelvic fields. Port films using a standard, double exposure technique were considered necessary for partial brain fields, small pelvis fields, extremities, and radical head and neck fields. The quality of field-only images captured using an EPID has been favorably assessed to be equivalent to, or an improvement on, the traditional double exposed port

  19. Electron Beam Generation in Tevatron Electron Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  20. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-01-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices

  1. Proceedings, 1972 Carahan Conference on Electronic Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John S., Ed.; DeVore, R. William, Ed.

    Presented are 28 papers given at a 1972 conference on electronic prosthetics for the handicapped. Among the papers are the following titles: "Therapy for Cerebral Palsy Employing Artifician Sense Organs for Alternatives to Proprioceptive Feedback"; "Excessive Neuromuscular Time Delay as a Possible Cause of Poor Hand-Eye Coordination and…

  2. Robotic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, H. I.; Hogan, N.

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a remarkable shift in the neuro-rehabilitation paradigm. Neuroscientists and clinicians moved away from the perception that the brain is static and hardwired, to a new dynamic understanding that plasticity is a fundamental property of the adult human brain and might be harnessed to remap or create new neural pathways. Capitalizing on this innovative understanding, we introduced a paradigm shift in the clinical practice in 1989 when we initiated the development of the MIT-Manus robot for neuro-rehabilitation and deployed it in the clinic in 1994 10. Since then, we and others have developed and tested a multitude of robotic devices for stroke, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Here we discuss whether robotic therapy has achieved a level of maturity to justify its broad adoption in the clinical realm as a tool for motor recovery. PMID:23080044

  3. nano-particles in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billotey, Claire; Bourhis, Jean; Levy, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    After a recall of the history of radiation therapy this article outlines that the presence of a high electronic density material within a tumour can artificially and locally increase the radiation absorption. It outlines the benefit of the elaboration of nano-particles from such a material for the case of external radiation therapy (increase of material density and bioavailability of nano-particles) where nano-particles can even be introduced by intravenous injection. It describes the various possibility of using nano-particles in the case of internal radiation therapy or Curie therapy. It allows a much less invasive process, the possibility of direct injection into a tumour or a cavity, and the possibility of an increase of the dose received by cells. Other topics are briefly evoked: subcellular targeting by high atomic number nano-particles, and the radiation therapy approach by Nanobiotix

  4. Mobile electrons in electron-attaching liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyikos, L.

    1981-01-01

    Based on recent observations of mobile electrons in electron-attaching liquids some ideas are presented concerning the nature of the fas carrier. To explain the observed phenomena quantum chemical calculations and modified percolation theory are applied. (author)

  5. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance.

  6. Electronics for LHC Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of most presentations made at this workshop on electronics for the large hadron collider (LHC) experiments. The presentations were arranged into 6 sessions: 1) electronics for tracker, 2) trigger electronics, 3) detector control systems, 4) data acquisition, 5) electronics for calorimeters and electronics for muons, and 6) links, power systems, grounding and shielding, testing and quality assurance

  7. Electronic Design Automation Using Object Oriented Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Walid M. Aly; Mohamed S. Abuelnasr

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Electronic design automation is the usage of computer technology and software tools for designing integrated electronic system and creating electrical schematics. Approach: An approach is presented for modeling of various electronic and electric devices using object oriented design, aiming on building a library of devices (classes) which can be used for electronic design automation. Results: The presented library was implemented using Java programming language to form an El...

  8. Radiation therapy -- skin care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000735.htm Radiation therapy - skin care To use the sharing features on ... should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. Causes External radiation therapy uses high-powered x- ...

  9. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  10. [Physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2008-01-01

    Recently, pulmonary rehabilitation program is widely considered one of the most effective and evidence-based treatment for not only chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but many clinical situations including neuro-muscular disease, post-operative status and weaning period from the ventilator, etc. The essential components of a pulmonary rehabilitation program are team assessment, patient training, psycho-social intervention, exercise, and follow-up. In 2003, Japanese medical societies (J. Thoracic Society, J. Pul. Rehabilitation Society and J. Physiotherapist Society) made a new guideline for pulmonary rehabilitation, especially how to aproach the execise training. As for the duration after surgical operation, airway cleaning is the important technique to prevent post-operative complications including pneumonia. Postural dranage technique is well known for such condition, at the same time, several instruments (flutter vulve, positive expiratory mask, high frequecy oscillation, etc) were also used for the patient to expectrate airway mucus easier. Lung transplantation is a new method of treatment for the critically-ill patients with chronic respiratoy failure. Several techniques of physical therapy are must be needed before and after lung transplantation to prevent both pulmonary infection and osteoporosis.

  11. American Art Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... WELCOME BOARD OF DIRECTORS NATIONAL STAFF STRATEGIC PLAN VALUES STATEMENT FINANCIAL INFORMATION COLLABORATORS ABOUT ART THERAPY FEATURED MEMBERS ETHICS VIDEOS: ART THERAPY IN ACTION STORY LIBRARY SHARE ...

  12. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  13. [Music therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, P A; Dallaire, C

    1993-02-01

    Music stands for the mystical expression of life cycles celebrations: birth, death, renewal of seasons, hunting, rituals of passage... It serves in other familiar conjunctures, such as the dentist chair, waiting rooms and on the telephone, helping us to relax or increase our patience. However, music is not for everyone at all times. With each individual, its significance varies according to the moment and the situation. If a nurse can make use of it with some persons, it is because they have convinced her that music can be of comfort to them and can reduce their pain and anxiety. The role of the caregiver is to attend to the sick by different means. Music is one of them. By being alert and prudent, nurses can provide a care traditionally perpetuated as comforting. Music therapy is the controlled use of music and its elements to help the physiological, psychological and emotional integration of the individual in the course of a treatment for illness or incapacity. Its active mode implies that clients participate by playing an instrument or by singing to express oneself. It opens or maintains the field of communication. In the passive mode, therapists use tapes, disks or interpret pieces of music themselves. Its meaning, its power, take on other dimensions. When introducing music on a palliative care unit, for example, an initial assessment of each client is required to discover and monitor the degree of their acceptance. Thereafter, a continuous evaluation ensures that appropriate adjustments are made in the choice of music offered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Dance movement therapy for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkou, Vicky; Meekums, Bonnie

    2017-02-03

    therapist in training or (iii) was otherwise recognised as a dance movement therapist in the country in which the study was conducted. The two review authors independently reviewed studies on an abstract/title level and again after reading the full paper, and we independently evaluated methodological quality. Of the 102 studies identified through electronic searches and personal communication, after de-duplication we screened 80 at title/abstract level. We then reviewed 19 full papers, none of which met the inclusion criteria. Although three studies mentioned dance movement therapy as their intervention, they were excluded because they were not delivered by a qualified dance movement therapy practitioner. As a result, no studies were included in this review. Trials of high methodological quality, large sample sizes and clarity in the way the intervention is put together and delivered are needed to assess whether dance movement therapy is an effective intervention for dementia.

  15. Oxygen therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, Heather E; Mallory, George

    2013-07-25

    The most serious complications of cystic fibrosis (CF) relate to respiratory insufficiency. Oxygen supplementation therapy has long been a standard of care for individuals with chronic lung diseases associated with hypoxemia. Physicians commonly prescribe oxygen therapy for people with CF when hypoxemia occurs. However, it is unclear if empiric evidence is available to provide indications for this therapy with its financial costs and often profound impact on lifestyle. To assess whether oxygen therapy improves the longevity or quality of life of individuals with CF. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Latest search of Group's Trials Register: 15 May 2013. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing oxygen, administered at any concentration, by any route, in people with documented CF for any time period. Authors independently assessed the risk of bias for included studies and extracted data. This review includes 11 published studies (172 participants); only one examined long-term oxygen therapy (28 participants). There was no statistically significant improvement in survival, lung, or cardiac health. There was an improvement in regular attendance at school or work in those receiving oxygen therapy at 6 and 12 months. Four studies examined the effect of oxygen supplementation during sleep by polysomnography. Although oxygenation improved, mild hypercapnia was noted. Participants fell asleep quicker and spent a reduced percentage of total sleep time in rapid eye movement sleep, but there were no demonstrable improvements in qualitative sleep parameters. Six studies evaluated oxygen supplementation during exercise. Again, oxygenation improved, but mild hypercapnia resulted. Participants receiving oxygen therapy were able to exercise for a

  16. Effectiveness of manual therapy for cervical radiculopathy, a review

    OpenAIRE

    Thoomes, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Manual therapy is often used for patients with neck pain with or without radicular symptoms. There is sparse evidence on the effectiveness in cervical radiculopathy. The aim of this study was to assess current levels of evidence on the effectiveness of manual therapy interventions for patients with cervical radiculopathy. Electronic data bases were systematically searched for clinical guidelines, reviews and randomised clinical trials (RCTs) reporting on the effectiveness of manual therapy fo...

  17. Introduction to Electronics course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    Electronics in HEP experiments: specificities and evolution The Art of Electronics: is there something beyond Ohm's law? Basic building blocks of Analog electronics: quickly understanding a schematic Charge preamps, current preamps and future preamps, shaping and the rest Electronics noise: fundamental and practical Evolution of technology: ASICs, FPGAs...

  18. Introduction to electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    Electronics in HEP experiments: specificities and evolution The Art of Electronics: is there something beyond Ohm's law? Basic building blocks of Analog electronics: quickly understanding a schematic Charge preamps, current preamps and future preamps, shaping and the rest Electronics noise: fundamental and practical Evolution of technology: ASICs, FPGAs...

  19. Seeing with Electrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seeing with Electrons. A K Raychaudhuri. In this article we briefly review the application of electrons in the field of microscopy. Two types of microscopes are discussed, the electron microscope and the tunneling microscope. It is emphasized that in both the applications the electron behaves as a quantum mechanical object.

  20. Introduction to Electronic Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilbeck, Lettie

    These materials for a five-unit course were developed to introduce secondary and postsecondary students to the use of electronic equipment in marketing. The units cover the following topics: electronic marketing as a valid marketing approach; telemarketing; radio electronic media marketing; television electronic media marketing; and cable TV…

  1. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy for Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Arita, Masashi; Hamada, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Shibayama, Tamaki

    2015-01-01

    Electronic devices are strongly influenced by their microstructures. In situ transmission electron microscopy (in situ TEM) with capability to measure electrical properties is an effective method to dynamically correlate electric properties with microstructures. We have developed tools and in situ TEM experimental procedures for measuring electronic devices, including TEM sample holders and sample preparation methods. The method was used to study metallic nanowire by electromigration, magn...

  2. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: • Acupressure and acupuncture • Aromatherapy • Art therapy and music therapy • Chiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and ... should I avoid? • Is this complementary therapy (name therapy) safe? Is there research showing it is safe? • Are there side effects ...

  3. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  4. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  5. Electronics engineer's reference book

    CERN Document Server

    Mazda, F F

    1989-01-01

    Electronics Engineer's Reference Book, Sixth Edition is a five-part book that begins with a synopsis of mathematical and electrical techniques used in the analysis of electronic systems. Part II covers physical phenomena, such as electricity, light, and radiation, often met with in electronic systems. Part III contains chapters on basic electronic components and materials, the building blocks of any electronic design. Part IV highlights electronic circuit design and instrumentation. The last part shows the application areas of electronics such as radar and computers.

  6. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  7. Practical microwave electron devices

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Practical Microwave Electron Devices provides an understanding of microwave electron devices and their applications. All areas of microwave electron devices are covered. These include microwave solid-state devices, including popular microwave transistors and both passive and active diodes; quantum electron devices; thermionic devices (including relativistic thermionic devices); and ferrimagnetic electron devices. The design of each of these devices is discussed as well as their applications, including oscillation, amplification, switching, modulation, demodulation, and parametric interactions.

  8. Electronics engineer's reference book

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, L W

    1976-01-01

    Electronics Engineer's Reference Book, 4th Edition is a reference book for electronic engineers that reviews the knowledge and techniques in electronics engineering and covers topics ranging from basics to materials and components, devices, circuits, measurements, and applications. This edition is comprised of 27 chapters; the first of which presents general information on electronics engineering, including terminology, mathematical equations, mathematical signs and symbols, and Greek alphabet and symbols. Attention then turns to the history of electronics; electromagnetic and nuclear radiatio

  9. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  10. Occupational therapy students' perceptions of occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Merrill June; Rodger, Sylvia; Hall, Anna R

    2012-10-01

    An understanding of students' perceptions of occupational therapy on entry is required to recognise how professional socialisation occurs through curriculum. Findings pertain to a qualitative study investigating students' perceptions of occupational therapy upon entry to two occupational therapy programmes in Australia. Students commencing Bachelor of Occupational Therapy and Masters of Occupational Therapy Studies programmes participated in the study (n = 462). A purpose-designed questionnaire was distributed to students in the first lecture of each programme. Preliminary analysis comprised identification of keywords/phrases and coding categories were generated from patterns of keywords. Frequency counts and percentages of keywords/phrases within categories were completed. Students' responses were categorised as 'what' occupational therapists do; 'how' they do it; 'why' they do it; and 'who' they work with. In 'what' occupational therapists do students frequently described 'helping' people. Both undergraduate and graduate entry masters students used the term 'rehabilitation' to describe how occupational therapy is done, with graduate entry students occasionally responding with 'through occupation' and 'modifying the environment'. Students perceived the 'why' of occupational therapy as getting back to 'everyday activities', with some students emphasising returning to 'normal' activities or life. Regarding the 'who' category, students also thought occupational therapists worked with people with an 'injury' or 'disability'. Students entered their occupational therapy programmes with perceptions consistent with the general public's views of occupational therapy. However, graduate entry students exposed to a pre-reading package prior to entry had more advanced occupational therapy concepts than undergraduate students. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  11. Electron-electron interactions in disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Efros, AL

    1985-01-01

    ``Electron-Electron Interactions in Disordered Systems'' deals with the interplay of disorder and the Coulomb interaction. Prominent experts give state-of-the-art reviews of the theoretical and experimental work in this field and make it clear that the interplay of the two effects is essential, especially in low-dimensional systems.

  12. Energy electron analyzers raster electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dremova, N.N.; Raj, Eh.I.; Robinson, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrometers of back-scattered and secondary electrons used in a raster electron microscope designed to study multilayer structures and potential relief at the solid-state body surface, are described. Their possible applications are demonstrated using microelectronics devices as an example

  13. Single electron-ics with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, G.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally investigate Quantum Dots, formed in Carbon Nanotubes. The first part of this thesis deals with charge sensing on such quantum dots. The charge sensor is a metallic Single-electron-transistor, sensitive to the charge of a single electron on the quantum dot. We use this technique for

  14. VIRTUAL ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS OF THE ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lazarevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is present new idea of the creation, developments and improvements of the electronic equipment of complex systems by means of the virtual electronic components. The idea of the virtual electronic components is a presentation and perception of the creation and developments of the equipment on two forming: real – in the manner of standard marketed block of the intellectual property and image – in the manner of virtual component. The real component in most cases slows the development of the electronic equipment. The imaginary component is the «locomotive» of development of the electronic equipment. The Imaginary component contains the scientific has brushed against developer. The scientific has brushed against developer reveals of itself in the manner of virtual component on the modern level of the design rates of microelectronics.

  15. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other health disability; and persons with autism, dementia, depression, and other disorders. Art therapy helps people resolve conflicts, improve interpersonal skills, manage problematic behaviors, reduce negative stress, and ...

  16. Electronics for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Shamieh

    2015-01-01

    Explore the basic concepts of electronics, build your electronics workbench, and begin creating fun electronics projects right away! Electronics For Dummies, 3rd Edition is your guide to the world of electronics. Spanning circuitry, wiring, robotics, transmitters, amplifiers, and more, this book demystifies electricity basics and beyond. The third edition offers new content revised to reflect the latest advancements in the electronics field, and it offers full color project examples to spark your creativity and inspire you to put your new skills to use! Packed with projects that can be comple

  17. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Altinbas, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Bruno, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Binello, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Costanzo, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Drees, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Gassner, D. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hock, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Hock, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Harvey, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mi, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Michnoff, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Miller, T. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Pikin, A. I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Samms, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Shrey, T. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tan, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Thieberger, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; White, S. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  18. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses.

  19. Radionuclide antisense therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Xiaohong

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide antisense therapy achieves the joint goals of antisense therapy and internal radiation therapy. There have been a small number of investigations on the radionuclide antisense therapy in tissue culture and in animal studies. Considerable research is required before this novel technique can become a working practice. The authors reviewed some question and development on the radionuclide antisense therapy, such as selection of the target gene sequence, labelling the antisense oligonucleotide, improvement of the uptake and target of radionuclide antisense oligonucleotides and evaluation of the toxicity of the radionuclide antisense therapy

  20. Radiation therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomottogoo, G.

    1995-01-01

    The radiation therapy experienced at the hospital are classified into two sections:palliative and radically. A radically therapy can be done before or after surgery. Therapy after surgery is done when the results of the surgery have certain limits. The radiation therapy is accomplished within 2-3 weeks and 6 weeks at latest. A conclusion:1.To improving and increasing of radically radiation therapy method is necessary in the present time. 2.Monitoring, management and supervision capacity of the cancer radiation therapy for the nearest and future results should be strengthened

  1. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  2. Electron scattering from pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenares, Rafael; Fuss, Martina C; García, Gustavo; Oller, Juan C; Muñoz, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; Almeida, Diogo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Electron scattering from pyrimidine (C 4 H 4 N 2 ) was investigated over a wide range of energies. Following different experimental and theoretical approaches, total, elastic and ionization cross sections as well as electron energy loss distributions were obtained.

  3. ELSA electron stretcher devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The use of an electron stretcher ring at the Bonn electron synchrotron is discussed. The construction of the proposed ring is described, and the costs are estimated. Possible experiments using this ring are discussed. (HSI)

  4. Chapter 9: Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-01-01

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques

  5. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    ARTICLE. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Biological Applications. B G Hegde. Recently, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectros- copy has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules such as proteins, protein aggregates ... research interests are.

  6. Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Electronic Health Records KidsHealth / For Teens / Electronic Health Records ...

  7. Electron microscopy for Engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, I P

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of (mainly) Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) in an engineering context. The first two sections are TEM and chemical in nature; the final three sections are more general and include aspects of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  8. Certified Electronics Recyclers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how EPA encourages all electronics recyclers become certified by demonstrating to an accredited, independent third-party auditor and that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics.

  9. Laboratory Handbook Electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    Laboratory manual 1966 format A3 with the list of equipment cables, electronic tubes, chassis, diodes transistors etc. One of CERN's first material catalogue for construction components for mechanical and electronic chassis.

  10. Electronic Science Seminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geidarov P.Sh.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of electronic scientific seminar, which provides a high level of quality of the objectivity in the evaluation of scientific papers, including dissertations, is described. Conditions for the implementation of electronic scientific seminar are also considered.

  11. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  12. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  13. Joint Services Electronics Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-30

    Compound Semiconductors." 4 ......... I-*. Univesity of California. Berkeley Electronics Research Laboratory Joint Services Electronics Program August 15...reduction techniques [SCH-66,MCG- 73,HAM-75], for essentially i educing the proportionality constant. A significant portion of the probabilistic literature

  14. Handbook on electronic commerce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology; Blanning, R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Owen Graduate School of Management; Strader, T. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Management Information Systems; Whinston, A. [eds.] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Management Science and Information Systems

    2000-07-01

    The world is undergoing a revolution to a digital economy, with pronounced implications for corporate strategy, marketing, operations, information systems, customer services, global supply-chain management, and product distribution. This handbook examines the aspects of electronic commerce, including electronic storefront, on-line business, consumer interface, business-to-business networking, digital payment, legal issues, information product development, and electronic business models. Indispensable for academics, students and professionals who are interested in Electronic Commerce and Internet Business. (orig.)

  15. Electronics and computer acronyms

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Phil

    1988-01-01

    Electronics and Computer Acronyms presents a list of almost 2,500 acronyms related to electronics and computers. The material for this book is drawn from a number of subject areas, including electrical, electronics, computers, telecommunications, fiber optics, microcomputers/microprocessors, audio, video, and information technology. The acronyms also encompass avionics, military, data processing, instrumentation, units, measurement, standards, services, organizations, associations, and companies. This dictionary offers a comprehensive and broad view of electronics and all that is associated wi

  16. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  17. Electron-attachment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Christodoulides, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Topics covered include: (1) modes of production of negative ions, (2) techniques for the study of electron attachment processes, (3) dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules, (4) dissociative electron attachment to hot molecules (effects of temperature on dissociative electron attachment), (5) molecular parent negative ions, and (6) negative ions formed by ion-pair processes and by collisions of molecules with ground state and Rydberg atoms

  18. Electron Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, Christine; Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-01-01

    We report a previously unknown resonance for electron cloud dynamics. The 2D simulation code 'POSINST' was used to study the electron cloud buildup at different z positions in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up to a factor of 3 was found at magnetic field values for which the bunch frequency is an integral multiple of the electron cyclotron frequency. At low magnetic fields the effects of the resonance are prominent, but when B exceeds ∼(2 pi mec/(elb)), with lb = bunch length, effects of the resonance disappear. Thus short bunches and low B fields are required for observing the effect. The reason for the B field dependence, an explanation of the dynamics, and the results of the 2D simulations and of a single-particle tracking code used to elucidate details of the dynamics are discussed

  19. Arduino electronics blueprints

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcher, Don

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for those who want to learn about electronics and coding by building amazing devices and gadgets with Arduino. If you are an experienced developer who understands the basics of electronics, then you can quickly learn how to build smart devices using Arduino. The only experience needed is a desire to learn about electronics, circuit breadboarding, and coding.

  20. Electron Induction Linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    Electron induction linacs have been used for over four decades for a variety of applications. As discussed in Chap. 8, these include basic studies in magnetically confined fusion, transport of intense electron beams in various gases, the generation of electromagnetic radiation from free electron lasers, radiation processing of materials and food, and flash X-ray radiography sources.

  1. Electronic recordkeeping: An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deken, J.M.

    2000-01-19

    This paper begins with a brief overview of records and archival management before the advent of the electronic era; then describe the ways in which the definitions and constructs of archives and records management have been altered in the electronic environment; and outlines the various approaches to the challenges of electronic recordkeeping that are currently being investigated and applied.

  2. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  3. Syringe injectable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Seamless and minimally-invasive three-dimensional (3D) interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating syringe injection and subsequent unfolding of submicrometer-thick, centimeter-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 micrometers. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with > 90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with 3D structures, including (i) monitoring of internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (ii) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (iii) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, delivery of large volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics. PMID:26053995

  4. EFFECTIVE ELECTRONIC TUTORIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Fedoseev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes effective electronic tutorials creation and application based on the theory of pedagogy. Herewith the issues of necessary electronic tutorial functional, ways of the educational process organization with the use of information and communication technologies and the logistics of electronic educational resources are touched upon. 

  5. ELECTRONS IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    2002-10-22

    Excess electrons can be introduced into liquids by absorption of high energy radiation, by photoionization, or by photoinjection from metal surfaces. The electron's chemical and physical properties can then be measured, but this requires that the electrons remain free. That is, the liquid must be sufficiently free of electron attaching impurities for these studies. The drift mobility as well as other transport properties of the electron are discussed here as well as electron reactions, free-ion yields and energy levels, Ionization processes typically produce electrons with excess kinetic energy. In liquids during thermalization, where this excess energy is lost to bath molecules, the electrons travel some distance from their geminate positive ions. In general the electrons at this point are still within the coulombic field of their geminate ions and a large fraction of the electrons recombine. However, some electrons escape recombination and the yield that escapes to become free electrons and ions is termed G{sub fi}. Reported values of G{sub fi} for molecular liquids range from 0.05 to 1.1 per 100 eV of energy absorbed. The reasons for this 20-fold range of yields are discussed here.

  6. Adlerian Marriage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jon; Dinkmeyer, Don, Sr.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the assumptions, processes, and techniques used in Alderian marriage therapy. Describes purpose of therapy as assessing current beliefs and behaviors while educating the couple in new procedures that can help the couple establish new goals. (Author/ABL)

  7. Kidney Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Kidney Replacement Therapy Diabetes sometimes damages kidneys so badly that ... Dialysis Dialysis, the more common form of kidney-replacement therapy, is a way of cleaning the blood ...

  8. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  9. Proton Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public interest in this form of radiation therapy is growing, but members of the medical and research communities are concerned that enthusiasm for this promising therapy may be getting ahead of the research.

  10. Investigation of the clinical potential of scattering foil free electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin, Lihui; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C-M Charlie

    2014-02-21

    Electron beam therapy has been an important radiation therapy modality for many decades. Studies have been conducted recently for more efficient and advanced delivery of electron beam radiation therapy. X-ray contamination is a common problem that exists with all of the advanced electron beam therapy techniques such as Bolus Electron conformal therapy, segmented electron conformal therapy, and modulated electron arc therapy. X-ray contamination could add some limitations to the advancement and clinical utility of those electron modalities. It was previously shown in the literature that the scattering foil is one of the major accelerator parts contributing to the generation of bremsstrahlung photons. Thus, in this work we investigate the dosimetric characteristics of scattering foil free (SFF) electron beams and the feasibility of using those beams for breast cancer boosts. The SFF electron beams were modeled and simulated using the Monte Carlo method. CT scans of six previously treated breast patients were used for the treatment plan generation utilizing our in-house Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system. Electron boost plans with conventional beams and the SFF beams were generated, respectively, for all patients. A significant reduction of the photon component was observed with the removal of the primary scattering foil for beam energies higher than 12 MeV. Flatness was greatly affected but the difference in flatness between conventional and SFF beams was much reduced for small cone sizes, which were often used clinically for breast boosts. It was found that the SFF electron beams could deliver high-quality dose distributions as conventional electron beams for boost treatments of the breast with an added advantage of a further reduced dose to the lung and the heart.

  11. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  12. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Occupational Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Occupational Therapy What's in this ... care for some kids. Kids Who Might Need Occupational Therapy According to the AOTA, kids with these medical ...

  13. Predicting Marital Therapy Dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Scot M.; Crane, D. Russell

    1991-01-01

    Attempted to predict therapy dropouts using data gathered at marital therapy intake with 474 couples seeking marital therapy who attended at least 1 session. Significant predictors of dropping out included having less than two children, having a male intake clinician, and presenting problem relating only to one spouse. (Author/ABL)

  14. Aquatic Therapy for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Greta; Moore, Kelsey; Rodia, Rachel; Moser, Christy Szczech

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic therapy has long been highlighted in the literature as a potentially powerful therapeutic intervention. This review will highlight basic definitions of aquatic therapy, review salient research, and identify specific diagnoses that may benefit from aquatic therapy. Online resources, blogs, and books that occupational therapists may find…

  15. Sacral neuromodulation: Therapy evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannah H Thompson

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions : Our understanding of SNM, as well as technological advances in therapy delivery, expands the pool of patients for which this form of therapy may prove beneficial. Less invasive instrumentation may even make this form of therapy appealing to patients without refractory symptoms.

  16. Biological Therapies for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page What is biological therapy? What is the immune system and what role does it have in biological therapy for cancer? ... trials (research studies involving people). What is the immune system and what role does it have in biological therapy for cancer? ...

  17. Gene therapy for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowoyeye, Abiola; Okwundu, Charles I

    2016-11-14

    Sickle cell disease encompasses a group of genetic disorders characterized by the presence of at least one hemoglobin S (Hb S) allele, and a second abnormal allele that could allow abnormal hemoglobin polymerisation leading to a symptomatic disorder.Autosomal recessive disorders (such as sickle cell disease) are good candidates for gene therapy because a normal phenotype can be restored in diseased cells with only a single normal copy of the mutant gene. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. The objectives of this review are:to determine whether gene therapy can improve survival and prevent symptoms and complications associated with sickle cell disease;to examine the risks of gene therapy against the potential long-term gain for people with sickle cell disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which comprises of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and searching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 15 August 2016. All randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials (including any relevant phase 1, 2 or 3 trials) of gene therapy for all individuals with sickle cell disease, regardless of age or setting. No trials of gene therapy for sickle cell disease were found. No trials of gene therapy for sickle cell disease were reported. No randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials of gene therapy for sickle cell disease were reported. Thus, no objective conclusions or recommendations in practice can be made on gene therapy for sickle cell disease. This systematic review has identified the need for well-designed, randomised controlled trials to assess the benefits and risks of gene therapy for sickle cell disease.

  18. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  19. High brightness electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, R.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Young, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of accelerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electrons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electrons as the electrons enter the first cavity. 5 figs

  20. Electron reconstruction in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Baffioni, Stephanie; Ferri, Federico; Futyan, David; Meridiani, Paolo; Puljak, Ivica; Rovelli, Chiara; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves

    2006-01-01

    The reconstruction of the energy and momentum of isolated electrons in CMS combining tracking and electromagnetic calorimetry information is described. The emphasis is put on primary electrons with transverse momentum below 50 GeV/c. The energy deposited in the electromagnetic calorimeter is measured in superclusters which collect bremsstrahlung photons emitted along the electron trajectory in the tracker volume. The electron tracks are built from seeds in the pixel detector found via a cluster-driven pixel hit matching algorithm, followed by a reconstruction of trajectories in the silicon strip tracker with a Gaussian Sum Filter. Electrons are classified using observables sensitive to the pattern of bremsstrahlung emission and electromagnetic showering in the tracker material. Energy scale corrections depending on the electron class are applied to the supercluster and estimates of associated errors are obtained. The electron energy is deduced from a weighted combination of the corrected supercluster energy a...

  1. Electron crystallography and aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Andreas D; Hite, Richard K; Engel, Andreas; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Walz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Electron crystallography of two-dimensional (2D) crystals can provide information on the structure of membrane proteins at near-atomic resolution. Originally developed and used to determine the structure of bacteriorhodopsin (bR), electron crystallography has recently been applied to elucidate the structure of aquaporins (AQPs), a family of membrane proteins that form pores mostly for water but also other solutes. While electron crystallography has made major contributions to our understanding of the structure and function of AQPs, structural studies on AQPs, in turn, have fostered a number of technical developments in electron crystallography. In this contribution, we summarize the insights electron crystallography has provided into the biology of AQPs, and describe technical advancements in electron crystallography that were driven by structural studies on AQP 2D crystals. In addition, we discuss some of the lessons that were learned from electron crystallographic work on AQPs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Seeing with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellist, P.

    2006-01-01

    Commercially available lens correctors are extending the reach of electron microscopes to unprecedented atomic scales, as Peter Nellist describes. The electron microscope was invented in 1933 and is based on the principle that electrons have a wavelength that is inversely proportional to their momentum. There are two basic types: transmission electron microscopes and scanning electron microscopes, plus a hybrid of the two. The lenses in an electron microscope are provided by electromagnetic fields, but they suffer from spherical aberration. The addition of octupole and quadrupole corrector fields has improved the resolution of the electron microscope to better than 0.1 nm in the last decade. The next step is to correct for chromatic aberration, after which the resolution of the microscope will probably be limited by the size of the atom itself. (U.K.)

  3. Electronic equipment packaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Gerald L

    1992-01-01

    The last twenty years have seen major advances in the electronics industry. Perhaps the most significant aspect of these advances has been the significant role that electronic equipment plays in almost all product markets. Even though electronic equipment is used in a broad base of applications, many future applications have yet to be conceived. This versatility of electron­ ics has been brought about primarily by the significant advances that have been made in integrated circuit technology. The electronic product user is rarely aware of the integrated circuits within the equipment. However, the user is often very aware of the size, weight, mod­ ularity, maintainability, aesthetics, and human interface features of the product. In fact, these are aspects of the products that often are instrumental in deter­ mining its success or failure in the marketplace. Optimizing these and other product features is the primary role of Electronic Equipment Packaging Technology. As the electronics industry continues to pr...

  4. Advanced adhesives in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, C

    2011-01-01

    Adhesives are widely used in the manufacture of electronic devices to act as passive and active components. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of conductive adhesives. This book reviews key types of conductive adhesives, processing methods, properties and the way they can be modelled as well as potential applications.$bAdhesives for electronic applications serve important functional and structural purposes in electronic components and packaging, and have developed significantly over the last few decades. Advanced adhesives in electronics reviews recent developments in adhesive joining technology, processing and properties. The book opens with an introduction to adhesive joining technology for electronics. Part one goes on to cover different types of adhesive used in electronic systems, including thermally conductive adhesives, isotropic and anisotropic conductive adhesives and underfill adhesives for flip-chip applications. Part two focuses on the properties and processing of electronic ...

  5. Automotive electronics design fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Zaman, Najamuz

    2015-01-01

    This book explains the topology behind automotive electronics architectures and examines how they can be profoundly augmented with embedded controllers. These controllers serve as the core building blocks of today’s vehicle electronics. Rather than simply teaching electrical basics, this unique resource focuses on the fundamental concepts of vehicle electronics architecture, and details the wide variety of Electronic Control Modules (ECMs) that enable the increasingly sophisticated "bells & whistles" of modern designs.  A must-have for automotive design engineers, technicians working in automotive electronics repair centers and students taking automotive electronics courses, this guide bridges the gap between academic instruction and industry practice with clear, concise advice on how to design and optimize automotive electronics with embedded controllers.

  6. ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; BARTON, D.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV.

  7. Music Therapy for Seniors

    OpenAIRE

    SLUNEČKOVÁ, Petra

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the use of music therapy in the lives of seniors. The target of this thesis is to map the possibilities of using music therapy ways with seniors and to recommend a suitable music therapy resources on the basis of the research and evaluation of obtained dates. The theoretical part describes the term "the music therapy", e.g. concept, definition, types and forms, the development of music therapy, the history, methods and techniques. This age group is defined in t...

  8. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Early radiation effects in electron and gamma teletherapy of patients with carcinoma of the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motorina, L.I.

    1979-01-01

    The early radiation effects in 141 patients treated with gamma radiation and in 64 patients treated with fast electrons for carcinoma of the larynx were subjected to a comparative analysis. Thus is could be stated that the early radiation effects did not differ essentially between the two groups. An island-like epithelitis of the laryngeal mucosa occured more frequently after gamma therapy, skin reactions, however, after electron therapy. Because of the considerably lower radiation doses of the surrounding tissue, electron therapy is to be preferred

  10. [Music therapy and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a predominantly non-verbal psychotherapy based on music improvisation, embedded in a therapeutic relationship. This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression. We reviewed the literature on recent research into music therapy and depression, reporting on the methods used and the results achieved, and we assessed the current position of music therapy for depression in the context of evidence-based scientific research. A wide variety of research methods was used to investigate the effects of using music therapy as a psychotherapy. Most studies focused usually on the added value that music therapy brings to the standard form of psychiatric treatment, when administered with or without psychopharmacological support. Music therapy produced particularly significant and favourable results when used to treat patients with depression. Current research into music therapy and depression points to a significant and persistent reduction in patients' symptoms and to improvements in their quality of life. However, further research is needed with regard to the best methods of illustrating the effects of music therapy.

  11. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  12. Scanning ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; Mohammed, Omar F; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-08-24

    Progress has been made in the development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy, which enables space-time imaging of structural dynamics in the condensed phase. In ultrafast electron microscopy, the electrons are accelerated, typically to 200 keV, and the microscope operates in the transmission mode. Here, we report the development of scanning ultrafast electron microscopy using a field-emission-source configuration. Scanning of pulses is made in the single-electron mode, for which the pulse contains at most one or a few electrons, thus achieving imaging without the space-charge effect between electrons, and still in ten(s) of seconds. For imaging, the secondary electrons from surface structures are detected, as demonstrated here for material surfaces and biological specimens. By recording backscattered electrons, diffraction patterns from single crystals were also obtained. Scanning pulsed-electron microscopy with the acquired spatiotemporal resolutions, and its efficient heat-dissipation feature, is now poised to provide in situ 4D imaging and with environmental capability.

  13. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  15. Electronic Publishing or Electronic Information Handling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.

    The current dramatic evolution in information technology is bringing major modifications in the way scientists communicate. The concept of 'electronic publishing' is too restrictive and has often different, sometimes conflicting, interpretations. It is thus giving way to the broader notion of 'electronic information handling' encompassing the diverse types of information, the different media, as well as the various communication methodologies and technologies. New problems and challenges result also from this new information culture, especially on legal, ethical, and educational grounds. The procedures for validating 'published material' and for evaluating scientific activities will have to be adjusted too. 'Fluid' information is becoming a common concept. Electronic publishing cannot be conceived without link to knowledge bases nor without intelligent information retrieval tools.

  16. Therapy of the burnout syndrome [Therapie des Burnout-Syndroms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczak, Dieter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] The prevalence, diagnostics and therapy of the burnout syndrome are increasingly discussed in the public. The unclear definition and diagnics of the burnout syndrome are scientifically criticized. There are several therapies with unclear evidence for the treatment of burnout in existence.The health technology assessment (HTA report deals with the question of usage and efficacy of different burnout therapies.For the years 2006 to 2011, a systematic literature research was done in 31 electronic databases (e.g. EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO. Important inclusion criteria are burnout, therapeutic intervention and treatment outcome.17 studies meet the inclusion criteria and are regarded for the HTA report. The studies are very heterogeneous (sample size, type of intervention, measuring method, level of evidence. Due to their study design (e.g. four reviews, eight randomized controlled trials the studies have a comparable high evidence: three times 1A, five times 1B, one time 2A, two times 2B and six times 4. 13 of the 17 studies are dealing with the efficacy of psychotherapy and psychosocial interventions for the reduction of burnout (partly in combination with other techniques. Cognitive behaviour therapy leads to the improvement of emotional exhaustion in the majority of the studies. The evidence is inconsistent for the efficacy of stress management and music therapy. Two studies regarding the efficacy of Qigong therapy do not deliver a distinct result. One study proves the efficacy of roots of Rhodiola rosea (evidence level 1B. Physical therapy is only in one study separately examined and does not show a better result than standard therapy.Despite the number of studies with high evidence the results for the efficacy of burnout therapies are preliminary and do have only limited reach. The authors of the studies complain about the low number of skilled studies for the therapy of burnout. Furthermore, they point to the insufficient evaluation of

  17. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 1. The Electron

    CERN Multimedia

    Simon Singh

    2008-01-01

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 1. The Electron Just over a century ago, British physicist J.J. Thompson experimenting with electric currents and charged particles inside empty glass tubes, showed that atoms are divisible into indivisible elementary particles. But how could atoms be built up of these so called "corpuscles"? An exciting 30 year race ensued, to grasp the planetary model of the atom with its orbiting electrons, and the view inside the atom was born. Whilst the number of electrons around the nucleus of an atom determines their the chemistry of all elements, the power of electrons themselves have been harnessed for everyday use: electron beams for welding,cathode ray tubes and radiation therapy.

  18. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  19. Field emission electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  20. Interoperability for electronic ID

    OpenAIRE

    Zygadlo, Zuzanna

    2009-01-01

    Electronic Business, including eBanking, eCommerce and eGovernmental services, is today based on a large variety of security solutions, comprising electronic IDs provided by a broad community of Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) vendors. Significant differences in implementations of those solutions introduce a problem of lack of interoperability in electronic business, which have not yet been resolved by standardization and interoperability initiatives based on existing PKI trust models. It i...

  1. Introduction to electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Korneff, Theodore

    1966-01-01

    Introduction to Electronics focuses on the study of electronics and electronic devices. Composed of 14 chapters, the book starts with discussions on dc circuits, including resistance, voltmeter, ammeter, galvanometer, internal resistance, and positive and negative currents. This topic is followed by discussions on ac circuits, particularly addressing voltage and current, average power, resistive load, complex plane, and parallel circuits. Discussions also focus on filters and tuned circuits, diodes, and power supplies. Particularly given attention are the processes, diagrams, and analyses

  2. Modern electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, John B

    2013-01-01

    Modern Electronic Materials focuses on the development of electronic components. The book first discusses the history of electronic components, including early developments up to 1900, developments up to World War II, post-war developments, and a comparison of present microelectric techniques. The text takes a look at resistive materials. Topics include resistor requirements, basic properties, evaporated film resistors, thick film resistors, and special resistors. The text examines dielectric materials. Considerations include basic properties, evaporated dielectric materials, ceramic dielectri

  3. Electronic collection management

    CERN Document Server

    Mcginnis, Suzan D

    2013-01-01

    Build and manage your collection of digital resources with these successful strategies! This comprehensive volume is a practical guide to the art and science of acquiring and organizing electronic resources. The collections discussed here range in size from small college libraries to large research libraries, but all are facing similar problems: shrinking budgets, increasing demands, and rapidly shifting formats. Electronic Collection Management offers new ideas for coping with these issues. Bringing together diverse aspects of collection development, Electronic Collection

  4. Electron microscopy of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam techniques used to study clean surfaces and surface processes on a microscopic scale are reviewed. Recent experimental examples and possible future developments are discussed. Special emphasis is given to (i) transmission diffraction and microscopy techniques, including atomic imaging; (ii) Auger microscopy on bulk and thin film samples; (iii) secondary electron microscopy, especially low energy secondaries for work-function imaging and photoelectron imaging; and (iv) reflection electron microscopy and diffraction. (orig.)

  5. Introduction to printed electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail modern technologies for printed electronics, explaining how nanotechnology and modern printing technology are merging to revolutionize electronics fabrication of thin, lightweight, large, and inexpensive products. Readers will benefit from the explanations of materials, devices and circuits used to design and implement the latest applications of printed electronics, such as thin flexible OLED displays, organic solar cells, OLED lighting, smart wallpaper, sensors, logic, memory and more.

  6. Electron microscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.; Olsen, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report is a description of research activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Department, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  7. New electronics stuff chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byeon, Su Il

    2003-04-01

    The first part of this book is about equilibrium electrochemistry on electric thermo dynamic equilibrium state of electrochemistry, crystal defect of solid, thermodynamics on defect electron and election in semiconductor, Gawani potential, volta potential and equilibrium potential and thermodynamics application in Gawani battery. The second part deals with dynamic electrochemistry electrode reaction kinetics and corrosion potential in normal state, diffusion and transport of ion and electron and current impedance spectroscopy. It also mentions industrial electrochemistry and laboratory works in electronics chemistry course.

  8. Treatment of basal cell epithelioma with high energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y. (Hyogo-ken Cancer Center, Kobe (Japan)); Kumano, M.; Kumano, K.

    1981-11-01

    Thirty patients with basal cell epithelioma received high energy electron beam therapy. They were irradiated with a dose ranging from 4,800 rad (24 fractions, 35 days) to 12,000 rad (40 fractions, 57 days). Tumors disappeared in all cases. These were no disease-related deaths; in one patient there was recurrence after 2 years. We conclude that radiotherapy with high energy electron beam is very effective in the treatment of basal cell epithelioma.

  9. Physical foundations of electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, H.

    1997-01-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Physical foundations, dynamic theory of diffraction contrasts, dynamic theory of electron diffraction, electron diffraction on crystals with defects, high-resolution electron microscopy, analytical electron microscopy

  10. Role of radiation therapy in mycosis fungoides refractory to systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Persechino, Severino; Fanelli, Alessandro; Valeriani, Maurizio; Bracci, Stefano; D'Arienzo, Marco; Monarca, Bruno; Caperchi, Cristiano; Raffa, Salvatore; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2011-01-01

    The long natural history of early stage mycosis fungoides (MF) makes its management a difficult problem. Skin lesions are sensitive to different therapies and a variety of treatment modalities have been used, such as topical nitrogen mustard, puvatherapy, UV-B, retinoids, radiation therapy, extracorporal photopheresis and systemic chemotherapy. For patients with refractory early stage MF, treatment selection is made by clinical parameters such as the age, sex and performance status of the patients, as well as the institutional expertise and the toxicity profiles of the different therapeutic approaches. We report radiation therapy in a relapsed/resistant stage IB patient with mycosis fungoides treated with local radiation therapy for symptomatic progression unresponsive to bexarotene therapy. Total skin electron beam therapy has been employed in early stage and for limited skin failure MF, while the role of local radiation therapy in MF is less defined. In our experience local radiotherapy has proved to be a very efficient, tolerable and cost effective approach in patients with MF unresponsive to systemic approaches.

  11. Stationary Electron Atomic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, David E.

    1998-04-01

    I will present a novel theory concerning the position and nature of the electron inside the atom. This new concept is consistant with present experimental evidence and adheres strictly to the valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) model presently used in chemistry for predicting the shapes of molecules and ions. In addition, I will discuss the atomic model concept as being a true harmonic oscillator, periodic motion at resonant frequency which produces radiation at discrete frequencies or line spectra is possible because the electron is under the action of two restoring forces, electrostatic attraction and superconducting respulsion of the electron's magnetic field by the nucleus.

  12. Electronic signal conditioning

    CERN Document Server

    NEWBY, BRUCE

    1994-01-01

    At technician level, brief references to signal conditioning crop up in a fragmented way in various textbooks, but there has been no single textbook, until now!More advanced texts do exist but they are more mathematical and presuppose a higher level of understanding of electronics and statistics. Electronic Signal Conditioning is designed for HNC/D students and City & Guilds Electronics Servicing 2240 Parts 2 & 3. It will also be useful for BTEC National, Advanced GNVQ, A-level electronics and introductory courses at degree level.

  13. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  14. The auroral electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.A.; Hall, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    A model of the auroral electron acceleration process is presented in which the electrons are accelerated resonantly by lower-hybrid waves. The essentially stochastic acceleration process is approximated for the purposes of computation by a deterministic model involving an empirically derived energy transfer function. The empirical function, which is consistent with all that is known of electron energization by lower-hybrid waves, allows many, possibly all, observed features of the electron distribution to be reproduced. It is suggested that the process occurs widely in both space and laboratory plasmas. (author)

  15. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2011-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Ea

  16. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2007-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Each chapter ends with a set

  17. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase, use and disposal of electronics.The EEBC estimates the environmental and economic benefits of: Purchasing Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT)-registered products; Enabling power management features on computers and monitors above default percentages; Extending the life of equipment beyond baseline values; Reusing computers, monitors and cell phones; and Recycling computers, monitors, cell phones and loads of mixed electronic products.The EEBC may be downloaded as a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.See https://www.federalelectronicschallenge.net/resources/bencalc.htm for more details.

  18. Analytical Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Titan 80-300 is a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with spectroscopic detectors to allow chemical, elemental, and other analytical measurements to...

  19. Electron caustic lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Kennedy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A maskless method of electron beam lithography is described which uses the reflection of an electron beam from an electrostatic mirror to produce caustics in the demagnified image projected onto a resist–coated wafer. By varying the electron optics, e.g. via objective lens defocus, both the morphology and dimensions of the caustic features may be controlled, producing a range of bright and tightly focused projected features. The method is illustrated for line and fold caustics and is complementary to other methods of reflective electron beam lithography.

  20. High-power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitsa, Petr Leonidovich

    1966-01-01

    High-Power Electronics, Volume 2 presents the electronic processes in devices of the magnetron type and electromagnetic oscillations in different systems. This book explores the problems of electronic energetics.Organized into 11 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the motion of electrons in a flat model of the magnetron, taking into account the in-phase wave and the reverse wave. This text then examines the processes of transmission of electromagnetic waves of various polarization and the wave reflection from grids made of periodically distributed infinite metal conductors. Other

  1. Flying Electronic Warfare Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides NP-3D aircraft host platforms for Effectiveness of Navy Electronic Warfare Systems (ENEWS) Program antiship missile (ASM) seeker simulators used...

  2. Electronics pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, E A

    1981-01-01

    Electronics Pocket Book, Fourth Edition is a nonmathematical presentation of the many varied topics covered by electronics. The book tackles electron physics, electronic components (i.e. resistors, capacitors, and conductors), integrated circuits, and the principles of a.c. and d.c. amplifiers. The text also discusses oscillators, digital circuits, digital computers, and optoelectronics (i.e., sensors, emitters, and devices that utilize light). Communications (such as line and radio communications, transmitters, receivers, and digital techniques); the principles and examples of servosystems; a

  3. Fundamentals of electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Schubert, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    This book, Electronic Devices and Circuit Application, is the first of four books of a larger work, Fundamentals of Electronics. It is comprised of four chapters describing the basic operation of each of the four fundamental building blocks of modern electronics: operational amplifiers, semiconductor diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect transistors. Attention is focused on the reader obtaining a clear understanding of each of the devices when it is operated in equilibrium. Ideas fundamental to the study of electronic circuits are also developed in the book at a basic level to

  4. Electronic circuits fundamentals & applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Electronics explained in one volume, using both theoretical and practical applications.New chapter on Raspberry PiCompanion website contains free electronic tools to aid learning for students and a question bank for lecturersPractical investigations and questions within each chapter help reinforce learning Mike Tooley provides all the information required to get to grips with the fundamentals of electronics, detailing the underpinning knowledge necessary to appreciate the operation of a wide range of electronic circuits, including amplifiers, logic circuits, power supplies and oscillators. The

  5. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  6. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 0720-AB36 TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech... referrals of beneficiaries to the Military Health System for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... practitioners will be allowed to issue referrals to patients for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and...

  7. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. IV: Electronic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; McShan, Daniel L.; Matrone, Gwynne M.; Weaver, Tamar A.; Lewis, James D.; Kessler, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a system for electronically tracking relevant plan, prescription, and treatment data for computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy is described. Methods and Materials: The electronic charting system is implemented on a computer cluster coupled by high-speed networks to computer-controlled therapy machines. A methodical approach to the specification and design of an integrated solution has been used in developing the system. The electronic chart system is designed to allow identification and access of patient-specific data including treatment-planning data, treatment prescription information, and charting of doses. An in-house developed database system is used to provide an integrated approach to the database requirements of the design. A hierarchy of databases is used for both centralization and distribution of the treatment data for specific treatment machines. Results: The basic electronic database system has been implemented and has been in use since July 1993. The system has been used to download and manage treatment data on all patients treated on our first fully computer-controlled treatment machine. To date, electronic dose charting functions have not been fully implemented clinically, requiring the continued use of paper charting for dose tracking. Conclusions: The routine clinical application of complex computer-controlled conformal treatment procedures requires the management of large quantities of information for describing and tracking treatments. An integrated and comprehensive approach to this problem has led to a full electronic chart for conformal radiation therapy treatments

  8. Electron Beam Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriott, Lloyd R.

    1997-04-01

    Electron beams have played a significant role in semiconductor technology for more than twenty years. Early electron beam machines used a raster scanned beam spot to write patterns in electron-sensitive polymer resist materials. The main application of electron beam lithography has been in mask making. Despite the inherently high spatial resolution and wide process margins of electron beam lithography, the writing rate for semiconductor wafers has been too slow to be economically viable on a large scale. In the late 1970's, variable shape electron beam writing was developed, projecting a rectangular beam whose size can be varied for each "shot" exposure of a particular pattern, allowing some integrated circuits to be made economically where a variety of "customized" patterns are desired. In the cell or block projection electron beam exposure technique, a unit cell of a repetitive pattern is projected repeatedly to increase the level of parallelism. This can work well for highly repetitive patterns such as memory chips but is not well suited to complex varying patterns such as microprocessors. The rapid progress in the performance of integrated circuits has been largely driven by progress in optical lithography, through improvements in lens design and fabrication as well as the use of shorter wavelengths for the exposure radiation. Due to limitations from the opacity of lens and mask materials, it is unlikely that conventional optical printing methods can be used at wavelengths below 193 nm or feature sizes much below 180 nm. One candidate technology for a post-optical era is the Scattering with Angular Limitation Projection Electron-beam Lithography (SCALPEL) approach, which combines the high resolution and wide process latitude inherent in electron beam lithography with the throughput of a parallel projection system. A mask consisting of a low atomic number membrane and a high atomic number pattern layer is uniformly illuminated with high energy (100 ke

  9. Fertility and cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life

  10. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within t...... the same partner constellation. Through this training they learn as a therapeutic method to contain and incorporate experiences from being in the client role into managing the therapist role.......This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within...

  11. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pain in photodynamic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mircea Tampa; Maria Isabela Sârbu; Mădălina-Irina Mitran; Cristina-Iulia Mitran; Adrian Dumitru; Vasile Benea; Simona-Roxana Georgescu

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a modern treatment with applications in several medical specialties, which has been intensely studied in the last years. The main indications in dermatology are actinic keratosis, superficial basal cell carcinoma and Bowen's disease- common skin disorders in which photodynamic therapy proved its efficacy. At present, the use of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of other skin disorders is profoundly researched. Pain is the most common and redoubtable adverse effect...

  13. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, S D; Smith, C; Smith, E M; Miller, J M

    1991-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains an extremely valuable tool in the treatment of certain psychiatric disorders. Despite the sensationalism of the past decade, ECT is the treatment of choice in severe depression that is unresponsive to other therapies or in patients who are overtly suicidal. In addition, ECT is particularly valuable in the elderly population, who are at risk for serious complications from the side effects associated with drug therapy. This report describes a case of recurrent depression in which ECT was successfully used.

  15. E-Cigarette Use in Patients Receiving Home Oxygen Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lacasse, Yves; Légaré, Martin; Maltais, François

    2015-01-01

    Current smokers who are prescribed home oxygen may not benefit from the therapy. In addition to being an obvious fire hazard, there is some evidence that the physiological mechanisms by which home oxygen is believed to operate are inhibited by smoking. Although their effectiveness is yet to be demonstrated, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often regarded as an aid to smoking cessation. However, several burn accidents in e-cigarette smokers receiving home oxygen therapy have also been ...

  16. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolezzi M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Monica Zolezzi Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. Keywords: ECT, medications, drug interactions

  17. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  18. Marital and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Hargun; Anand, Tanya; Suman, L N

    2018-02-01

    Substance abuse is a family disease that adversely impacts both the user and the user's family. The family can act as a risk factor for the development of substance abuse among children and adults. The family can also be involved in therapy to either help the recovery process or prevent substance abuse. Marital and family therapy have been found to be effective in reducing the severity of substance use, lowering marital and family conflict, improving family communication and cohesion as well as effective parenting practices. Behavioural Couples Therapy has been found to have good empirical support for bringing about the desired changes in both substance abuse and marital relationship. While targeting entire families, the most common evidenced based family interventions are Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Multidimensional Family Therapy, Family Behaviour Therapy, Functional Family Therapy and Community Reinforcement Programme. Marital and family therapy have to be sensitive to gender and culture. Effective use of marital and family therapy requires adequate training to equip practitioners in adequately treating not only substance use disorders and family pathology, but also in treating co-morbid mental health conditions.

  19. Is Bicarbonate Therapy Useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate

    2017-03-01

    Despite concerns about the negative effects of metabolic acidosis, there is minimal evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration is an effective treatment. In addition, sodium bicarbonate therapy is associated with many adverse effects, including paradoxic intracellular acidosis, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypernatremia, and hyperosmolality. Definitive recommendations regarding bicarbonate therapy are challenging as there is little high-quality evidence available. In most clinical scenarios of metabolic acidosis, treatment efforts should focus on resolution of the underlying cause, and sodium bicarbonate therapy should be used with caution, if at all. An exception to this is kidney disease, wherein sodium bicarbonate therapy may have a valuable role. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Ninan, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to radically change the way cancer is diagnosed, imaged, and treated. The holistic approach to cancer involves noninvasive procedures that emphasize restoring the health of human energy fields. Presenting a wealth of information and research about the most potent cancer healing therapies, this forward-thinking book explores how nanomedicine, holistic medicine, and other cancer therapies play important roles in treatment of this disease. Topics include nanobiotechnology for antibacterial therapy and diagnosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer, antioxidants and combinatorial therapies, and optical and mechanical investigations of nanostructures for biomolecular detection.