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Sample records for whole-core leu silicide

  1. The whole-core LEU silicide fuel demonstration in the JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aso, Tomokazu; Akashi, Kazutomo; Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The JMTR was fully converted to LEU silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel with cadmium wires as burnable absorber in January, 1994. The reduced enrichment program for the JMTR was initiated in 1979, and the conversion to MEU (enrichment ; 45%) aluminide fuel was carried out in 1986 as the first step of the program. The final goal of the program was terminated by the present LEU conversion. This paper describes the results of core physics measurement through the conversion phase from MEU fuel core to LEU fuel core. Measured excess reactivities of the LEU fuel cores are mostly in good agreement with predicted values. Reactivity effect and burnup of cadmium wires, therefore, were proved to be well predicted. Control rod worth in the LEU fuel core is mostly less than that in the MEU fuel core. Shutdown margin was verified to be within the safety limit. There is no significant difference in temperature coefficient of reactivity between the MEU and LEU fuel cores. These results verified that the JMTR was successfully and safely converted to LEU fuel. Extension of the operating cycle period was achieved and reduction of spend fuel elements is expected by using the fuel with high uranium density.

  2. The whole-core LEU fuel demonstration in the ORR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cornella, R.J.; Hobbs, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    A whole-core demonstration of LEU fuel in the ORR is expected to begin during November 1985. Fuel elements will contain U 3 Si 2 at 4.8 Mg U/m 3 and shim rod fuel followers will contain U 3 Si 2 at 3.5 Mg U/m 3 . Fuel fabrication is underway at B and W, CERCA, and NUKEM, with shipments scheduled to commence in October. The primary objectives of the demonstration are to provide data for validation of LEU and mixed-core fuel cycle calculations and to provide a large-scale demonstration of the acceptable performance of production-line U 3 Si 2 fuel elements. It is planned to approach the full LEU core through a series of mixed cores. Measurements to be made include flux distribution, reactivity swing, control rod worth, cycle length, fuel discharge burn-up, gamma heating rate, β eff /l, and isothermal temperature coefficient. Measurements will also be made on fresh LEU and fresh HEU critical configurations. Preliminary safety approval has been received and the final safety assessment is being reviewed. Key issues being addressed in the safety assessment are fuel performance, radiological consequences, margin to burnout and transient behavior. The LEU core is comparable in all safety aspects to the HEU core and the transition core is only marginally worse owing to higher power seeking factors. (author)

  3. Whole-core LEU fuel demonstration in the ORR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Bretscher, M.M.; Cornella, R.J.; Hobbs, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    A whole-core demonstration of LEU fuel in the ORR is expected to begin during November 1985. Fuel elements will contain U 3 Si 2 at 4.8 Mg U/m 3 and shim rod fuel followers will contain U 3 Si 2 at 3.5 Mg U/m 3 . Fuel fabrication is underway at B and W, CERCA, and NUKEM, with shipments scheduled to commence in October. The primary objectives of the demonstration are to provide data for validation of LEU and mixed-core fuel cycle calculations and to provide a large-scale demonstration of the acceptable performance of production-line U 3 Si 2 fuel elements. It is planned to approach the full LEU core through a series of mixed cores. Measurements to be made include flux distribution, reactivity swing, control rod worths, cycle length, fuel discharge burnup, gamma heating rates, β/sub eff/l, and isothermal temperature coefficient. Measurements will also be made on fresh LEU and fresh HEU critical configurations. Preliminary safety approval has been received and the final safety assessment is being reviewed

  4. The ORR Whole-Core LEU Fuel Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The ORR Whole-Core LEU Fuel Demonstration, conducted as part of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program, has been successfully completed. Using commercially-fabricated U 3 Si 2 -Al 20%-enriched fuel elements (4.8 g U/cc) and fuel followers (3.5 g U/cc), the 30-MW Oak Ridge Research Reactor was safely converted from an all-HEU core, through a series of HEU/LEU mixed transition cores, to an all-LEU core. There were no fuel element failures and average discharge burnups were measured to be as high as 50% for the standard elements and 75% for the fuel followers. Experimental results for burnup-dependent critical configurations, cycle-averaged fuel element powers, and fuel-element-averaged 235 U burnups validated predictions based on three-dimensional depletion calculations. Calculated values for plutonium production and isotopic mass ratios as functions of 235 U burnup support the corresponding measured quantities. In general, calculations for reaction rate distributions, control rod worths, prompt neutron decay constants, and isothermal temperature coefficients were found to agree with corresponding measured values. Experimentally determined critical configurations for fresh HEU and LEU cores radially reflected with water and with beryllium are well-predicted by both Monte Carlo and diffusion calculations. 17 refs

  5. Reprocessing of LEU silicide fuel at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.

    1996-01-01

    UKAEA have recently reprocessed two LEU silicide fuel elements in their MTR fuel reprocessing plant at Dounreay. The reprocessing was undertaken to demonstrate UKAEA's commitment to the world-wide research reactor communities future needs. Reprocessing of LEU silicide fuel is seen as a waste treatment process, resulting in the production of a liquid feed suitable for conditioning in a stable form of disposal. The uranium product from the reprocessing can be used as a blending feed with the HEU to produce LEU for use in the MTR cycle. (author)

  6. Making of fission 99Mo from LEU silicide(s): A radiochemists' view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, Z.I.; Wolterbeek, H.Th.

    2005-01-01

    The present-day industrial scale production of 99 Mo is fission based and involves thermal-neutron irradiation in research reactors of highly enriched uranium (HEU, > 20 % 235 U) containing targets, followed by radiochemical processing of the irradiated targets resulting in the final product: a 99 Mo containing chemical compound of molybdenum. In 1978 a program (RERTR) was started to develop a substitute for HEU reactor fuel i.e. a low enriched uranium (LEU, 235 U) one. In the wake of that program studies were undertaken to convert HEU into LEU based 99 Mo production. Both new targets and radiochemical treatments leading to 99 Mo compounds were proposed. One of these targets is based on LEU silicide, U 3 Si 2 . Present paper aims at comparing LEU U 3 Si 2 and LEU U 3 Si with another LEU target i.e. target material and arriving at some preferences pertaining to 99 Mo production. (author)

  7. Operating experience, measurements, and analysis of the LEU whole core demonstration at the FNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weha, D.K.; Drumm, C.R.; King, J.S.; Martin, W.R.; Lee, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 2-MW Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan is serving as the demonstration reactor for the MTR-type low enrichment (LEU) fuel for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor program. Operational experience gained through six months of LEU core operation and seven months of mixed HEU-LEU core operation is presented. Subcadmium flux measurements performed with rhodium self-powered neutron detectors and iron wire activations are compared with calculations. Measured reactivity parameters are compared for HEU and LEU cores. Finally, the benchmark calculations for several HEU, LEU, and mixed HEU-LEU FNR cores and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) benchmark problem are presented. (author)

  8. Neutronic calculations of PARR-1 cores using LEU silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshad, M.; Bakhtyar, S.; Hayat, T.; Salahuddin, A.

    1991-08-01

    Detailed neutronic calculations have been carried out for different PARR-1 cores utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU) silicide fuel and operating at an upgraded power of 9 MW. The calculations include the search for critical loadings in open and stall ends of the pool, neutronic analysis of the first full equilibrium core and calculations cores. The burnup study of inventory have also been carried out. Further, the reactivity coefficients of the first full power operation core are evaluated for use in the accident analysis. 14 figs. (author)

  9. Reclamation and reuse of LEU silicide fuel from manufacturing scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, G.R.; Pace, B.W.; Evans, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide an understanding of the organization which is the sole supplier of United States plate type research and test reactor fuel and LEU core conversions, a brief description of the structure and history is presented. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is a part of McDermott International, Inc. which is a large diversified corporation employing over 20,000 people primarily in engineering and construction for the off-shore oil and power generation industries throughout the world. B and W provides many energy related products requiring precision machining and high quality systems. This is accomplished by using state-of-the-art equipment, technology and highly skilled people. The RTRFE group within B and W has the ability to produce various complexly shaped fuel elements with a wide variety of fuels and enrichments. B and W RTRFE has fabricated over 200,000 plates since 1981 and gained the diversified experience necessary to satisfy many customer requirements. This accomplishment was possible with the support of McDermott International and all of its resources. B and W has always had a commitment to high quality and integrity. This is apparent by the success and longevity (125 years) of the company. A lower cost to convert cores to LEU provides direct support to RERTR and demonstrates Babcock and Wilcox's commitment to the program. As a supporter of RERTR reactor conversion from HEU to LEU, B and W has contributed a significant amount of R and D money to improve the silicide fuel process which ultimately lowers the LEU core costs. In the most recent R and D project, B and W is constructing a LEU silicide reclamation facility to re-use the unirradiated fuel scrap generated from the production process. Remanufacturing use of this fuel completes the fuel cycle and provides a contribution to LEU cores by reducing scrap inventory and handling costs, lowering initial purchase of fuel due to increasing the process yields, and lowering the replacement costs. This

  10. Neutronic study on conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, G.; Pond, R.; Hanan, N.; Matos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper marks the initial study into the technical and economic feasibility of converting the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa to LEU silicide fuel. Several MTR assembly geometries and LEU uranium densities have been studied and compared with MEU and HEU fuels. Two factors of primary importance for conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU fuel are the economy of the fuel cycle and the performance of the incore and excore irradiation positions

  11. Further data of silicide fuel for the LEU conversion of JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.; Futamura, Y.; Nakata, H.; Ando, H.; Sakurai, F.; Ooka, N.; Sakakura, A.; Ugajin, M.; Shirai, E.

    1990-01-01

    Silicide fuel data for the safety assessment of the JMTR LEU fuel conversion are being measured. The data include fission product release, thermal properties, behaviour under accident conditions, and metallurgical characteristics. The methods used in the experiments are discussed. Results of fission products release at high temperature are described. The release of iodine from the silicide fuel is considerably lower than for U-Al alloy fuel

  12. Pilot plant production at Riso of LEU silicide fuel for the Danish reactor DR3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toft, P.; Borring, J.; Adolph, E.

    1988-01-01

    A pilot plant for fabricating LEU silicide fuel elements has been established at Riso National Laboratory. Three test elements for the Danish reactor DR3 have been fabricated, based on 19.88% enriched U 3 Si 2 powder that has been purchased elsewhere. The pilot plant has been set up and 3 test elements fabricated without any major difficulties

  13. Techno-economic study on conversion of SAFARI-1 to LEU silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, G.; Malherbe, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper marks the conclusion of the techno-economic study into the conversion of SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa to LEU silicide fuel. Several different fuel types were studied and their characteristics compared to the current HEU fuel. The technical feasibility of operating SAFARI-1 with the different fuels as well as the overall economic impact of the fuels is discussed and conclusions drawn.(author)

  14. Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Teruo; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Shirai, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x10{sup 13}(n/cm{sup 2}/s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities.

  15. Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Teruo; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Shirai, Eiji

    1997-01-01

    Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x10 13 (n/cm 2 /s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities

  16. Fuel element burnup measurements for the equilibrium LEU silicide RSG GAS (MPR-30) core under a new fuel management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinem, Surian; Liem, Peng Hong; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Surbakti, Tukiran

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Burnup measurement of fuel elements comprising the new equilibrium LEU silicide core of RSG GAS. • The burnup measurement method is based on a linear relationship between reactivity and burnup. • Burnup verification was conducted using an in-house, in-core fuel management code BATAN-FUEL. • A good agreement between the measured and calculated burnup was confirmed. • The new fuel management strategy was confirmed and validated. - Abstract: After the equilibrium LEU silicide core of RSG GAS was achieved, there was a strong need to validate the new fuel management strategy by measuring burnup of fuel elements comprising the core. Since the regulatory body had a great concern on the safety limit of the silicide fuel element burnup, amongst the 35 burnt fuel elements we selected 22 fuel elements with high burnup classes i.e. from 20 to 53% loss of U-235 (declared values) for the present measurements. The burnup measurement method was based on a linear relationship between reactivity and burnup where the measurements were conducted under subcritical conditions using two fission counters of the reactor startup channel. The measurement results were compared with the declared burnup evaluated by an in-house in-core fuel management code, BATAN-FUEL. A good agreement between the measured burnup values and the calculated ones was found within 8% uncertainties. Possible major sources of differences were identified, i.e. large statistical errors (i.e. low fission counters’ count rates), variation of initial U-235 loading per fuel element and accuracy of control rod indicators. The measured burnup of the 22 fuel elements provided the confirmation of the core burnup distribution planned for the equilibrium LEU silicide core under the new fuel management strategy.

  17. Study on Al-alloy or silicide LEU for DR3 in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haack, Karsten [Riso National Laboratory, DK 4000 Roskilde (Germany)

    1985-07-01

    The 10 MW D{sub 2}0-moderated and -cooled research reactor DR3 has at present HEU fuel available for continued operation till early 19. This report presents the status of a feasibility study prepared for selection of the best suited candidate LEU fuel type for DR3 at a potential conversion in 1988. At the moment two alternatives are evaluated: UAl-alloy with modified geometry and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} with unchanged geometry. A decision on the type selected for further investigation is expected late 1984. The investigation should comprise development, in- and out-of-pile--testing and licensing activities on the potential LEU option. (author)

  18. Development of new ORIGEN2 data library sets for research reactors with light water cooled oxide and silicide LEU (20 w/o) fuels based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, Peng Hong; Sembiring, Tagor Malem

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed new ORIGEN2 data library sets for research reactors based on JENDL-3.3. • The sets cover oxide and silicide LEU fuels with meat density up to 4.74 g U/cm 3 . • Two kinds of data library sets are available: fuel region and non-fuel regions. • We verified the new data library sets with other codes. • We validated the new data library against a non-destructive test. -- Abstract: New sets of ORIGEN2 data library dedicated to research/testing reactors with light water cooled oxide and silicide LEU fuel plates based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data were developed, verified and validated. The new sets are considered to be an extension of the most recent release of ORIGEN2.2UPJ code, i.e. the ORLIBJ33 library sets. The newly generated ORIGEN2 data library sets cover both oxide and silicide LEU fuels with fuel meat density range from 2.96 to 4.74 g U/cm 3 used in the present and future operation of the Indonesian 30 MWth RSG GAS research reactor. The new sets are expected applicable also for other research/testing reactors which utilize similar fuels or have similar neutron spectral indices. In addition to the traditional ORIGEN2 library sets for fuel depletion analyses in fuel regions, in the new data library sets, new ORIGEN2 library sets for irradiation/activation analyses were also prepared which cover all representative non-fuel regions of RSG GAS such as reflector elements, irradiation facilities, etc. whose neutron spectra are significantly softer than fuel regions. Verification with other codes as well as validation with a non-destructive test result showed promising results where a good agreement was confirmed

  19. Program description for the qualification of CNEA - Argentina as a supplier of LEU silicide fuel and post-irradiation examinations plan for the first prototype irradiated in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugirello, Gabriel; Adelfang, Pablo; Denis, Alicia; Zawerucha, Andres; Marco, Agustin di; Guillaume, Eduardo; Sbaffoni, Monica; Lacoste, Pablo

    1998-01-01

    In this report we present a description of the ongoing and future stages of the program for the qualification of CNEA, Argentina, as a supplier of low enriched uranium silicide fuel elements for research reactor. Particularly we will focus on the characteristics of the future irradiation experiment on a new detachable prototype, the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) plan for the already irradiated prototype PO4 and an overview of the recently implemented PIE facilities and equipment. The program is divided in several steps, some of which have been already completed. It concludes: development of the uranium silicide fissile material, irradiation and PIE of several full-scale prototypes. Important investments have been already carried out in the facilities for the FE production and PIE. (author)

  20. LEU fuel powder technology at Babcock and Wilcox (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogacik, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper traces BandW involvement in HEU fuel manufacturing to the current work directed at LEU reactor technology. Past work at BandW in areas such as alloying, fuel handling and core manufacturing has been of significant benefit to the current LEU fuel processing requirements. Recent investigations and process developments for production of LEU aluminide and silicide fuels are discussed. Techniques for alloying by vacuum are melting, followed by comminution methods after alloying, are presented for both the LEU aluminide and silicide fuel powders. Powder processing discussions include compacting techniques used by BandW for these alloys. This overview of BandW's LEU i nvolvement provides details of specific modifications and process developments in powdered fuels. Product attributes such as powder chemistry, size, and other physical properties of each LEU fuel are presented. (author)

  1. Production of Mo-99 using low-enriched uranium silicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutter, J.C.; Srinivasan, B.; Vicek, M.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last several years, uranium silicide fuels have been under development as low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for Mo-99. The use of LEU silicide is aimed at replacing the UAl x alloy in the highly-enriched uranium dissolution process. A process to recover Mo-99 from low-enriched uranium silicide is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The uranium silicide is dissolved in alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments performed to determine the optimum dissolution procedure are discussed, and the results of dissolving a portion of a high-burnup (>40%) U 3 Si 2 miniplate are presented. Future work related to Mo-99 separation and waste disposal are also discussed

  2. An alternative LEU design for the FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Mo, S.C.; Smith, R.S.; Matos, J.E.

    1997-02-01

    The Alternative LEU Design for the FRM-II proposed by the RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a compact core consisting of a single fuel element that uses LEU silicide fuel with a uranium density of 4.5 g/cm[sup 3] and has a power level of 32 MW. Both the HEU design by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the alternative LEU design by ANL have the same fuel lifetime (50 days) and the same neutron flux performance (8 x 10[sup 14] n/cm[sup 2]/s in the reflector). LEU silicide fuel with 4.5 g/cm[sup 3] has been thoroughly tested and is fully-qualified, licensable, and available now for use in a high flux reactor such as the FRM-II. Computer models for the HEU and LEU designs have been exchanged between TUM and ANL and discrepancies have been resolved. The following issues are addressed: qualification of HEU and LEU silicide fuels, stability of the fuel plates, gamma heating in the heavy water reflector, a hypothetical accident involving the configuration of the reflector, a loss of primary coolant flow transient due to an interrupted power supply, the radiological consequences of larger fission product and plutonium inventories in the LEU core, and cost and schedule. Calculations were also done to address the possibility that new high density LEU fuels could be developed that would allow conversion of the TUM HEU design to LEU fuel. Based on the excellent results for the Alternative LEU Design that were obtained in these analyses, the RERTR Program concludes that all of the major technical issues regarding use of LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel in the FRM-II have been successfully resolved and that it is definitely feasible to use LEU fuel in the FRM-II without compromising the safety or performance of the facility

  3. Neutronic analysis of the JMTR with LEU fuel and burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Oyamada, Rokuro; Matos, J.E.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of neutronics calculations are presented for the JMTR equilibrium core with LEU silicide fuel, boron and cadmium burnable poisons in the sideplates, and a cycle length of 24 days instead of 11 days with the current HEU fuel. The data indicate that several options are feasible provided that silicide fuels with high uranium densities are successfully demonstrated and licensed (author)

  4. Neutronic analysis of the JMTR with LEU fuel and burnable poison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Oyamada, Rokuro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Oarai-machi Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Matos, J E; Woodruff, W L [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1985-07-01

    The results of neutronics calculations are presented for the JMTR equilibrium core with LEU silicide fuel, boron and cadmium burnable poisons in the sideplates, and a cycle length of 24 days instead of 11 days with the current HEU fuel. The data indicate that several options are feasible provided that silicide fuels with high uranium densities are successfully demonstrated and licensed (author)

  5. Uranium silicide activities at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, W.W.; Freim, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Babcock and Wilcox, Naval Nuclear Fuel Division (NNFD) in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is actively involved in the Reduced Enrichment Research Test Reactor (RERTR) Program to produce low enriched fuel elements for research reactors. B and W and ANL have undertaken a joint effort in which NNFD will fabricate two low enriched uranium (LEU), Oak Ridge Reactor (ORR) elements with uranium silicide fuel furnished by ANL. These elements are being fabricated for irradiation testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Concurrently with this program, NNFD is developing and implementing the uranium silicide and uranium aluminide fuel fabrication technology. NNFD is fabricating the uranium silicide ORR elements in a two-phase program, Development and Production. To summarize: 1. Full size fuel plates can be made with U 3 SiAl but the fabricator must prevent oxidation of the compact prior to hot roll bonding; 2. Providing the ANL U 3 Si x irradiation results are successful, NNFD plans to provide two ORR elements during February 1983; 3. NNFD is developing and implementing U 3 Si x and UAI x fuel fabrication technology to be operational in 1983; 4. NNFD can supply U 3 O 8 high enriched uranium (HEU) or low enriched uranium (LEU) research reactor elements; 5. NNFD is capable of providing high quality, cost competitive LEU or HEU research reactor elements to meet the needs of the customer

  6. Fuel cycle cost study with HEU and LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Fuel cycle costs are compared for a range of 235 U loadings with HEU and LEU fuels using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. If LEU silicide fuels are successfully demonstrated and licensed, the results indicate that total fuel cycle costs can be about the same or lower than those with the HEU fuels that are currently used in most research reactors

  7. A fuel cycle cost study with HEU and LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Fuel cycle costs are compared for a range of 235 U loadings with HEU and LEU fuels using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. If LEU silicide fuels are successfully demonstrated and licensed, the results indicate that total fuel cycle costs can be about the same or lower than those with the HEU fuels that are currently used in most research reactors. (author)

  8. A fuel cycle cost study with HEU and LEU fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, J E; Freese, K E [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Fuel cycle costs are compared for a range of {sup 235}U loadings with HEU and LEU fuels using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. If LEU silicide fuels are successfully demonstrated and licensed, the results indicate that total fuel cycle costs can be about the same or lower than those with the HEU fuels that are currently used in most research reactors. (author)

  9. An alternative LEU design for the FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Mo, S.C.; Smith, R.S.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Alternative LEU Design for the FRM-II proposed by the RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a compact core consisting of a single fuel element that uses LEU silicide fuel with a uranium density of 4.5 g/cm 3 and has a power level of 32 MW. Both the HEU design by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the alternative LEU design by ANL have the same fuel lifetime (50 days) and the same neutron flux performance. LEU silicide fuel with 4.5 g/cm 3 has been thoroughly tested and is fully-qualified, licensable, and available now for use in a high flux reactor such as the FRM-II. The following issues raised by TUM were addressed in Ref. 1: qualification of HEU and LEU silicide fuels, gamma heating in the heavy water reflector, radiological consequences of larger fission product and plutonium inventories in the LEU core, and cost and schedule. The conclusions of these analyses are summarized below. This paper addresses three additional safety issues that were raised by TUM in Ref. 2: stability of the involute fuel plates, a hypothetical accident involving the configuration of the reflector, and a loss of primary coolant flow transient due to an interrupted power supply. Based on the excellent results for the Alternative LEU Design that were obtained in these analyses, the RERTR Program concludes that all of the major technical issues regarding use of LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel in the FRM-II have been successfully resolved and that it is definitely feasible to use LEU fuel in the FRM-II without compromising the safety or performance of the facility

  10. Progress in safety evaluation for the JMTR core conversion to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, F.; Komori, Y.; Saito, J.; Komukai, B.; Ando, H.; Nakata, H.; Sakakura, A.; Niiho, S.; Saito, M.; Futamura, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The JMTR (50 MWt) has been in steady operation with MEU fuel since July 1986. The effort is still continued to convert the core from MEU to LEU fuel. The LEU silicide fuel element at 4.8 gU/cm 3 with Cd wires as burnable absorbers has been selected in order to achieve upgraded fuel cycle performance of extended cycle length and reduced control rod movement operation. The neutronic calculation methods (diffusion theory model) developed for the LEU core with Cd wires was benchmarked with a detailed Monte Carlo model and verified experimentally using the critical facility, JMTRC. Hydraulic tests of the LEU silicide fuel element with Cd wires were completed with satisfactory results, and measurements of release/born (R/B) ratios of FPs of silicide fuel at high temperature are in progress. (orig.)

  11. Neutronic analysis of the JMTR with LEU fuel and burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Yoshiharu; Oyamada, Rokuro; Matos, J.E.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of neutronics calculations are presented for the JMTR equilibrium core with LEU silicide fuel, boron and cadmium burnable poisons in the sideplates, and a cycle length of 24 days instead of 11 days with the current HEU fuel. The data indicate that several options are feasible provided that silicide fuels with high uranium densities are successfully demonstrated and licensed. 2 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Toward whole-core neutron transport without spatial homogenization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, E. E.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A long-term goal of computational reactor physics is the deterministic analysis of power reactor core neutronics without incurring significant discretization errors in the energy, spatial or angular variables. In principle, given large enough parallel configurations with unlimited CPU time and memory, this goal could be achieved using existing three-dimensional neutron transport codes. In practice, however, solving the Boltzmann equation for neutrons over the six-dimensional phase space is made intractable by the nature of neutron cross-sections and the complexity and size of power reactor cores. Tens of thousands of energy groups would be required for faithful cross section representation. Likewise, the numerous material interfaces present in power reactor lattices require exceedingly fine spatial mesh structures; these ubiquitous interfaces preclude effective implementation of adaptive grid, mesh-less methods and related techniques that have been applied so successfully in other areas of engineering science. These challenges notwithstanding, substantial progress continues in the pursuit for more robust deterministic methods for whole-core neutronics analysis. This paper examines the progress over roughly the last decade, emphasizing the space-angle variables and the quest to eliminate errors attributable to spatial homogenization. As prolog we briefly assess 1990's methods used in light water reactor analysis and review the lessons learned from the C5G7 benchmark exercises which were originated in 1999 to appraise the ability of transport codes to perform core calculations without homogenization. We proceed by examining progress over the last decade much of which falls into three areas. These may be broadly characterized as reduced homogenization, dynamic homogenization and planar-axial synthesis. In the first, homogenization in three-dimensional calculations is reduced from the fuel assembly to the pin-cell level. In the second

  13. The role of fission products in whole core accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A R [FRSD, UKAEA, RNPDE, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); Teague, H J [SRD, UKAEA, Culcheth, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1977-07-01

    The review of the role of fission products in whole-core accidents falls into two parts. Firstly, there is a discussion of the hypothetical accidents usually considered in the UK and how they are dealt with. Secondly, there is a discussion of individual topics where fission products are known to be important or might be so. There is a brief discussion of the UK work on the establishment of an equation of state for unirradiated fuel and how this might be extended to incorporate fission product effects. The main issue is the contribution of fission products to the effective vapour pressure and the experimental programme on the pulsed reactor VIPER investigates this. Fission products may influence the probability of occurrence and the severity of MFCIs. Finally, the fission product effects in the pre-disassembly, disassembly and recriticality stages of an accident are discussed. (author)

  14. Whole core calculations of power reactors by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Mori, Takamasa

    1993-01-01

    Whole core calculations have been performed for a commercial size PWR and a prototype LMFBR by using vectorized Monte Carlo codes. Geometries of cores were precisely represented in a pin by pin model. The calculated parameters were k eff , control rod worth, power distribution and so on. Both multigroup and continuous energy models were used and the accuracy of multigroup approximation was evaluated through the comparison of both results. One million neutron histories were tracked to considerably reduce variances. It was demonstrated that the high speed vectorized codes could calculate k eff , assembly power and some reactivity worths within practical computation time. For pin power and small reactivity worth calculations, the order of 10 million histories would be necessary. Required number of histories to achieve target design accuracy were estimated for those neutronic parameters. (orig.)

  15. Fuel-cycle cost comparisons with oxide and silicide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper addresses fuel cycle cost comparisons for a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU aluminide fuel and with LEU oxide and silicide fuels in several fuel element geometries. The intention of this study is to provide a consistent assessment of various design options from a cost point of view. Fuel cycle cost benefits could result if a number of reactors were to utilize fuel elements with the same number or different numbers of the same standard fuel plate. Data are presented to quantify these potential cost benefits. This analysis shows that there are a number of fuel element designs using LEU oxide or silicide fuels that have either the same or lower total fuel cycle costs than the HEU design. Use of these fuels with the uranium densities considered requires that they are successfully demonstrated and licensed

  16. Axial SPN and radial MOC coupled whole core transport calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jin-Young; Kim, Kang-Seog; Lee, Chung-Chan; Zee, Sung-Quun; Joo, Han-Gyu

    2007-01-01

    The Simplified P N (SP N ) method is applied to the axial solution of the two-dimensional (2-D) method of characteristics (MOC) solution based whole core transport calculation. A sub-plane scheme and the nodal expansion method (NEM) are employed for the solution of the one-dimensional (1-D) SP N equations involving a radial transverse leakage. The SP N solver replaces the axial diffusion solver of the DeCART direct whole core transport code to provide more accurate, transport theory based axial solutions. In the sub-plane scheme, the radial equivalent homogenization parameters generated by the local MOC for a thick plane are assigned to the multiple finer planes in the subsequent global three-dimensional (3-D) coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) calculation in which the NEM is employed for the axial solution. The sub-plane scheme induces a much less nodal error while having little impact on the axial leakage representation of the radial MOC calculation. The performance of the sub-plane scheme and SP N nodal transport solver is examined by solving a set of demonstrative problems and the C5G7MOX 3-D extension benchmark problems. It is shown in the demonstrative problems that the nodal error reaching upto 1,400 pcm in a rodded case is reduced to 10 pcm by introducing 10 sub-planes per MOC plane and the transport error is reduced from about 150 pcm to 10 pcm by using SP 3 . Also it is observed, in the C5G7MOX rodded configuration B problem, that the eigenvalues and pin power errors of 180 pcm and 2.2% of the 10 sub-planes diffusion case are reduced to 40 pcm and 1.4%, respectively, for SP 3 with only about a 15% increase in the computing time. It is shown that the SP 5 case gives very similar results to the SP 3 case. (author)

  17. Whole-core analysis by 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinegar, H.J.; Tutunjian, P.N.; Edelstein, W.A.; Roemer, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a whole-core nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that was used to obtain natural abundance 13 C spectra. The system enables rapid, nondestructive measurements of bulk volume of movable oil, aliphatic/aromatic ratio, oil viscosity, and organic vs. carbonate carbon. 13 C NMR can be used in cores where the 1 H NMR spectrum is too broad to resolve oil and water resonances separately. A 5 1/4-in. 13 C/ 1 H NMR coil was installed on a General Electric (GE) CSI-2T NMR imager/spectrometer. With a 4-in.-OD whole core, good 13 C signal/noise ratio (SNR) is obtained within minutes, while 1 H spectra are obtained in seconds. NMR measurements have been made of the 13 C and 1 H density of crude oils with a wide range of API gravities. For light- and medium-gravity oils, the 13 C and 1 H signal per unit volume is constant within about 3.5%. For heavy crudes, the 13 C and 1 H density measured by NMR is reduced by the shortening of spin-spin relaxation time. 13 C and 1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times were measured on a suite of Cannon viscosity standards, crude oils (4 to 60 degrees API), and alkanes (C 5 through C 16 ) with viscosities at 77 degrees F ranging from 0.5 cp to 2.5 x 10 7 cp. The 13 C and 1 H relaxation times show a similar correlation with viscosity from which oil viscosity can be estimated accurately for viscosities up to 100 cp. The 13 C surface relaxation rate for oils on water-wet rocks is very low. Nonproton decoupled 13 C NMR is shown to be insensitive to kerogen; thus, 13 C NMR measures only the movable hydrocarbon content of the cores. In carbonates, the 13 C spectrum also contains a carbonate powder pattern useful in quantifying inorganic carbon and distinguishing organic from carbonate carbon

  18. Prospects in deterministic three dimensional whole-core transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The point we made in this paper is that, although detailed and precise three-dimensional (3D) whole-core transport calculations may be obtained in the future with massively parallel computers, they would have an application to only some of the problems of the nuclear industry, more precisely those regarding multiphysics or for methodology validation or nuclear safety calculations. On the other hand, typical design reactor cycle calculations comprising many one-point core calculations can have very strict constraints in computing time and will not directly benefit from the advances in computations in large scale computers. Consequently, in this paper we review some of the deterministic 3D transport methods which in the very near future may have potential for industrial applications and, even with low-order approximations such as a low resolution in energy, might represent an advantage as compared with present industrial methodology, for which one of the main approximations is due to power reconstruction. These methods comprise the response-matrix method and methods based on the two-dimensional (2D) method of characteristics, such as the fusion method.

  19. Comparison of the FRM-II HEU design with an alternative LEU design. Attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Mo, S.C.; Smith, R.S.; Matos, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    After presentation of the foregoing paper by Dr. Nelson Hanan of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) proposing an alternative LEU core with one fuel ring and a power level of 33 MW, a presentation was made by Dr. Klaus Boning of the Technical University of Munich comparing the FRM-II HEU design with an LEU design by Tlm that had two fuel rings and a power level of 40 MW. Dr. Boning raised the following issues concerning the use of LEU fuel in FRM-H reactor designs: (1) qualification of HEU and LEU silicide fuels, (2) gamma heating in the heavy water reflector, (3) the radiological consequences of hypothetical accidents, and (4) cost and schedule. These issues are addressed in this Attachment. In his presentation, Dr. Hanan mentioned that ANL was also investigating other LEU designs. This work led to a second alternative LEU design that has the same neutron flux performance (8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /s peak neutron flux in the reflector) and the same fuel lifetime (50 full power days) as the HEU design, but uses LEU silicide fuel with a uranium density of only 4.5 g/cm 3 . This design was achieved by using a fuel plate that has a fuel meat thickness of 0.76 mm, a cladding thickness of 0.38 mm, and a water channel gap of 2.2 mm. A comparison is shown of the main characteristics of this second alternative LEU design with those of the FRM-II HEU design. The ANL core again has one fuel ring with the same dimensions. With this LEU design, a two stage process is no longer necessary because LEU silicide fuel with a uranium density of 4.5 g/cm 3 is fully qualified, licensable, and available now for use in a high flux reactor such as the FRM-II

  20. OSIRIS, a MTR adapted and well fitted to LEU utilization qualification and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnier, M.; Beylot, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The MTR OSIRIS has been successfully operated for 4 years using the ''Caramel'' low enriched uranium dioxyde fuel for the whole core loading. In the first part we examine the performance and operating experience obtained up to the present time with ''Caramel''. In a second part the paper discusses the results of the calculations for a complete OSIRIS core loaded with 20 % silicide fuel and makes a comparison with UAl 93 % and ''Caramel'' 7 % fuels. (author)

  1. Stylized whole-core benchmark of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hon, Ryan; Kooreman, Gabriel; Rahnema, Farzad; Petrovic, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A stylized benchmark specification of the I2S-LWR core. • A library of cross sections were generated in both 8 and 47 groups. • Monte Carlo solutions generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. • Cross sections and pin fission densities provided in journal’s repository. - Abstract: The Integral, Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I 2 S-LWR) is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept under development by a multi-institutional team led by Georgia Tech. The core is similar in size to small 2-loop PWRs while having the power level of current large reactors (∼1000 MWe) but using uranium silicide fuel and advanced stainless steel cladding. A stylized benchmark specification of the I 2 S-LWR core has been developed in order to test whole-core neutronics codes and methods. For simplification the core was split into 57 distinct material regions for cross section generation. Cross sections were generated using the lattice physics code HELIOS version 1.10 in both 8 and 47 groups. Monte Carlo solutions, including eigenvalue and pin fission densities, were generated for the 8 group library using MCNP5. Due to space limitations in this paper, the full cross section library and normalized pin fission density results are provided in the journal’s electronic repository.

  2. Role of fission product in whole core accidents: research in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.F.; Deitrich, L.W.

    1977-01-01

    The techniques being developed in the United States for analyzing postulated whole-core accidents in LMFBRs are briefly reviewed. The key mechanistic analysis methods are discussed in detail. Important research projects in the area of fission product effects are examined. Some typical results on the role of fission products in whole-core accidents are presented

  3. Measurements of the HEU and LEU in-core spectra at the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehe, D K [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); King, J S; Lee, J C; Martin, W R [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1985-07-01

    The Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) at the University of Michigan has been serving as the test site for a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel whole-core demonstration. As part of the experimental program, the differential neutron spectrum has been measured in a high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and an LEU core. The HEU and LEU spectra were determined by unfolding the measured activities of foils that were irradiated in the reactor. When the HEU and LEU spectra are compared from meV to 10 MeV, significant differences between the two spectra are apparent below 10 eV. These are probably caused by the additional {sup 238}U resonance absorption in the LEU fuel. No measurable difference occurs in the shape of the spectra above MeV. (author)

  4. Whole core transport calculation for the VHTR hexagonal core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Lee, C. C.; Joo, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the DeCART code which performs the whole core calculation by coupling the radial MOC transport kernel with the axial nodal kernel has equipped a kernel to deal with the hexagonal geometry and applied to the VHTR hexagonal core to examine the accuracy and the computational efficiency of the implemented kernel. The implementation includes a modular ray tracing module based on the hexagonal assembly and a multi-group CMFD module to perform an efficient transport calculation. The requirements for the modular ray are: (1) the assembly based path linking and (2) the complete reflection capabilities. The first requirement is met by adjusting the azimuthal angle and the ray spacing for the modular ray to construct a core ray by the path linking. The second requirement is met by expanding the constructed azimuthal angle in the range of [0,30 degree] to the remained range to reflect completely at the core boundaries. The considered reflecting surface angles for the complete reflection are 30n's (n=1,2,1,12). The CMFD module performs the equivalent diffusion calculation to the radial MOC transport calculation based on the homogenized structure units. The structure units include the hexagonal pin cells and gap cells appearing at the assembly boundary. Therefore, the CMFD module is programmed to deal with the unstructured cells such as the gap cells. The CMFD equation consists of the two parts of (1) the conventional FDM and (2) the current corrective parts. Since the second part of the CMFD equation guarantees the reproducibility of the radial MOC transport solutions for the cell averaged reaction rate and the net current at the cell surfaces, how to build the first part of the CMFD equation is not important. Therefore, the first part of the CMFD equation is roughly built by using the normal distance from the gravity center to the surface. The VHTR core uses helium as a coolant which is realized as a void hole in a neutronics calculation. This void hole which

  5. Refractory silicides for integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murarka, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Transition metal silicides have, in the past, attracted attention because of their usefulness as high temperature materials and in integrated circuits as Schottky barrier and ohmic contacts. More recently, with the increasing silicon integrated circuits (SIC) packing density, the line widths get narrower and the sheet resistance contribution to the RC delay increases. The possibility of using low resistivity silicides, which can be formed directly on the polysilicon, makes these silicides highly attractive. The usefulness of a silicide metallization scheme for integrated circuits depends, not only on the desired low resistivity, but also on the ease with which the silicide can be formed and patterned and on the stability of the silicides throughout device processing and during actual device usage. In this paper, various properties and the formation techniques of the silicides have been reviewed. Correlations between the various properties and the metal or silicide electronic or crystallographic structure have been made to predict the more useful silicides for SIC applications. Special reference to the silicide resistivity, stress, and oxidizability during the formation and subsequent processing has been given. Various formation and etching techniques are discussed

  6. Fuel cycle cost comparisons with oxide and silicide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, J E; Freese, K E [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory (United States)

    1983-09-01

    This paper addresses fuel cycle cost comparisons for a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU aluminide fuel and with LEU oxide and silicide fuels in several fuel element geometries. The intention of this study is to provide a consistent assessment of various design options from a cost point of view. The status of the development and demonstration of the oxide and silicide fuels are presented in several papers in these proceedings. Routine utilization of these fuels with the uranium densities considered here requires that they are successfully demonstrated and licensed. Thermal-hydraulic safety margins, shutdown margins, mixed cores, and transient analyses are not addressed here, but analyses of these safety issues are in progress for a limited number of the most promising design options. Fuel cycle cost benefits could result if a number of reactors were to utilize fuel elements with the same number or different numbers of the same standard fuel plate. Data is presented to quantify these potential cost benefits. This analysis shows that there are a number of fuel element designs using LEU oxide or silicide fuels that have either the same or lower total fuel cycle costs than the HEU design. Use of these fuels with the uranium densities considered requires that they are successfully demonstrated and licensed. All safety criteria for the reactor with these fuel element designs need to be satisfied as well. With LEU oxide fuel, 31 g U/cm{sup 3} 1 and 0.76 mm--thick fuel meat, elements with 18-22 plates 320-391 g {sup 235}U) result in the same or lower total costs than with the HEU element 23 plates, 280 g {sup 235}U). Higher LEU loadings (more plates per element) are needed for larger excess reactivity requirements. However, there is little cost advantage to using more than 20 of these plates per element. Increasing the fuel meat thickness from 0.76 mm to 1.0 mm with 3.1 g U/cm{sup 3} in the design with 20 plates per element could result in significant cost reductions if the

  7. Surface morphology of erbium silicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, S.S.; Pai, C.S.; Wu, C.S.; Kuech, T.F.; Liu, B.X.

    1982-01-01

    The surface of rare-earth silicides (Er, Tb, etc.), formed by the reaction of thin-film metal layers with a silicon substrate, is typically dominated by deep penetrating, regularly shaped pits. These pits may have a detrimental effect on the electronic performance of low Schottky barrier height diodes utilizing such silicides on n-type Si. This study suggests that contamination at the metal-Si or silicide-Si interface is the primary cause of surface pitting. Surface pits may be reduced in density or eliminated entirely through either the use of Si substrate surfaces prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions prior to metal deposition and silicide formation or by means of ion irradiation techniques. Silicide layers formed by these techniques possess an almost planar morphology

  8. Nuclear criticality assessment of LEU and HEU fuel element storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Criticality aspects of storing LEU (20%) and HEU (93%) fuel elements have been evaluated as a function of 235 U loading, element geometry, and fuel type. Silicide, oxide, and aluminide fuel types have been evaluated ranging in 235 U loading from 180 to 620 g per element and from 16 to 23 plates per element. Storage geometry considerations have been evaluated for fuel element separations ranging from closely packed formations to spacings of several centimeters between elements. Data are presented in a form in which interpolations may be made to estimate the eigenvalue of any fuel element storage configuration that is within the range of the data. (author)

  9. Progress on LEU very high density fuel and target development in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balart, S.; Cabot, P.; Calzetta, O.; Duran, A.; Garces, J.; Hermida, J.D.; Manzini, A.; Pasqualini, E.; Taboada, H.

    2006-01-01

    Since last RRFM meeting, CNEA has continued on new LEU fuel and target development activities. Main goals are the plan to convert our RA-6 reactor from HEU to a new LEU core, to get a comprehensive understanding of U-Mo/Al compounds phase formation in dispersed and monolithic fuels, to develop possible solutions to VHD dispersed and monolithic fuels technical problems, to optimize techniques to recover U from silicide scrap samples as cold test for radiowaste separation for final conditioning of silicide spent fuels. and to improve the diffusion of LEU target and radiochemical technology for radioisotope production. Future plans include: - Completion of the RA-6 reactor conversion to LEU; - Improvement on fuel development and production facilities to implement new technologies, including NDT techniques to assess bonding quality; - Irradiation of miniplates and full scale fuel assembly at RA-3 and plans to perform irradiation on higher power and temperature regime reactors; - Optimization of LEU target and radiochemical techniques for radioisotope production. (author)

  10. Continuing investigations for technology assessment of 99Mo production from LEU [low enriched uranium] targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Currently much of the world's supply of 99m Tc for medical purposes is produced from 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product 99 Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or zircaloy. Included is a cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminium alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent 99 Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to 1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and 2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved. (Author)

  11. The conversion of NRU from HEU to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Atfield, M.D.; Kennedy, I.C.

    1990-01-01

    The program at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) to develop and test low-enriched uranium fuel (LEU, 3 Si, USiAl, USi Al and U 3 Si 2 (U-3.96 wt% Si; U-3.5 wt% Si-1.5 wt% AL; U-3.2 wt%; Si-3 wt% Al; U-7.3 wt% Si, respectively). Fuel elements were fabricated with uranium loadings suitable for NRU, 3.15 gU/cm 3 , and for NRX, 4.5 gU/cm 3 , and were irradiated under normal fuel-operating conditions. Eight experimental irradiations involving 100 mini-elements and 84 full-length elements (7X12-element rods) were completed to qualify the LEU fuel and the fabrication technology. Post irradiation examinations confirmed that the performance of the LEU fuel, and that of a medium enrichment uranium (MEU, 45% U-235) alloy fuel tested as a back-up, was comparable to the HEU fuel. The uranium silicide dispersion fuel swelling was approximately linear up to burnups exceeding NRU's design terminal burnup (80 at%). NRU was partially converted to LEU fuel when the first 31 prototype fuel rods manufactured with industrial scale production equipment were installed in the reactor. The rods were loaded in NRU at a fuelling rate of about two rods per week over the period 1988 September to December. This partial LEU core (one third of a full NRU core) has allowed the reactor engineers and physicists to evaluate the bulk effects of the LEU conversion on NRU operations. As expected, the irradiation is proceeding without incident

  12. High temperature structural silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi 2 -based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi 2 single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi 2 possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi 2 -Si 3 N 4 composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi 2 -based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing

  13. Assessment of assembly homogenized two-steps core dynamic calculations using direct whole core transport solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hursin, Mathieu; Downar, Thomas J.; Yoon, Joo Il; Joo, Han Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reactivity initiated accident analysis with direct whole core transient transport code. • Comparison with usual “two steps” procedure. • Effect of effective delayed neutron fraction definition on energy deposition in the fuel. • Effect of homogenized few-group cross sections generation at the assembly level on energy deposition in the fuel. • Effect of effective fuel temperature definition on energy deposition in the fuel. - Abstract: The impact of the approximations in the “two-steps” procedure used in the current generation of nodal simulators for core transient calculations is assessed by using a higher order solution obtained from a direct, whole core, transient transport calculation. A control rod ejection accident in an idealized minicore is analyzed with PARCS, which uses the two-steps procedure and DeCART which provides the higher order solution. DeCART is used as lattice code to provide the homogenized cross sections and kinetics parameters to PARCS. The approximations made by using (1) the homogenized few-group cross sections and kinetic parameters generated at the assembly level, (2) an effective delayed neutrons fraction, (3) an effective fuel temperature and (4) the few-group formulation are investigated in terms of global and local core power behavior. The results presented in the paper show that the current two-steps procedure produces sufficiently accurate transient results with respect to the direct whole core calculation solution, provided that its parameters are carefully generated using the prescriptions described in the present article.

  14. Development of LEU targets for 99Mo production and their chemical processing status 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Hoh, J.C.; Streets, E.W.; Vogler, S.; Thresh, H.R.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Matos, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of Tc-99m for medical purposes is currently produced from Mo-99 derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low enriched uranium (LEU) silicide fuel for the HEU alloy and aluminide fuels used in current target designs will allow equivalent Mo-99 yields with no change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal will also allow the substitution of LEU for HEU. Efforts performed in 1989 focused on (1) fabrication of a uranium metal target by Hot Isostatic Pressing uranium metal foil to zirconium, (2) experimental investigation of the dissolution step for U 3 Si 2 targets, allowing us to present a conceptual design for the dissolution process and equipment, and (3) investigation of the procedures used to reclaim irradiated uranium from Mo-production targets, allowing us to further analyze the waste and by-product problems associated with the substitution of LEU for HEU. (orig.)

  15. Fluxes at experiment facilities in HEU and LEU designs for the FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-01-01

    An Alternative LEU Design for the FRM-II proposed by the RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a compact core consisting of a single fuel element that uses LEU silicide fuel with a uranium density of 4.5 g/cm 3 and has a power level of 32 MW. Both the HEU design by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the alternative LEU design by ANL have the same fuel lifetime(50 days) and the same neutron flux performance (8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 -s in the reflector). LEU silicide fuel with 4.5 g/cm 3 has been thoroughly tested and is fully-qualified, licensable, and available now for use in a high flux reactor such as the FRM-II. Several issues that were raised by TUM have been addressed in Refs. 1-3. The conclusions of these analyses are summarized below. This paper addresses four additional issues that have been raised in several forums, including Ref 4: heat generation in the cold neutron source (CNS), the gamma and fast neutron fluxes which are components of the reactor noise in neutron scattering experiments in the experiment hall of the reactor, a fuel cycle length difference, and the reactivity worth of the beam tubes and other experiment facilities. The results show that: (a) for the same thermal neutron flux, the neutron and gamma heating in the CNS is smaller in the LEU design than in the HEU design, and cold neutron fluxes as good or better than those of the HEU design can be obtained with the LEU design; (b) the gamma and fast neutron components of the reactor noise in the experiment hall are about the same in both designs; (c) the fuel cycle length is 50 days for both designs; and (d) the absolute value of the reactivity worth of the beam tubes and other experiment facilities is smaller in the LEU design, allowing its fuel cycle length to be increased to 53 or 54 days. Based on the excellent results for the Alternative LEU Design that were obtained in all analyses, the RERTR Program reiterates its conclusion that there are no major technical

  16. Considerations on the influence of fission products in whole core accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer Heine, A.; Pattoret, A.; Schmitz, F.

    1977-01-01

    If the hypothetical Whole Core Accidents which are taken into account in reactor safety analysis can change from one country to another, there is nevertheless a general agreement over their description and main phases. Furthermore the important parameters have also been identified by every laboratory. During the development of such core accidents the role of the fission products in essential. It is not the purpose of this paper to give an exhaustive description of the phases which can be influenced by the fission products, we will try however to focus this study on the most important ones. In a second step we will discuss the equation of state of irradiated fuels; here again one principal preoccupation being to quantify the influence of fission products on reactor accidents. It is not our purpose to enter on the fundamental aspects of the equation of state. The studies and the experimental program launched at the CEA will then be described. Special attention will be directed towards the eventual role of fission products in molten fuel-coolant interactions (MFCls) or the events leading to the initiation of whole core accidents. This paper will be limited to oxide fuels. Whether the whole core accident is initiated by a reactivity defect or a coolant coast-down, one has to deal with four great categories of phenomena. Loss of flow: the power is around the nominal value, while the coolant flow has been reduced by a factor of 5 to 10. This induces boiling and clad weakening. Will the plenum pressure lead to a clad rupture? In case of a rupture, what will be the effect on the voiding of the channel? Transient over power: influence of gases from gaseous and volatile fission products on the fuel movements? MFCIs: Influence of the fission products in the mode of contact between fuel and coolant? Influence on the fuel characteristics. Sodium vapour bubble expansion: influence of the fission products on the heat transfer and eventual condensation of the bubble?

  17. Analysis of hypothetical LMFBR whole-core accidents in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, D.R.; Deitrich, L.W.; Brown, N.W.; Waltar, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    The issue of hypothetical whole-core accidents continues to play a significant role in assessment of the potential risk to the public associated with LMFBR operation in the USA. The paper briefly characterizes the changing nature of this role, with emphasis on the current risk-oriented perspective. It then describes the models and codes used for accident analysis in the USA which have been developed under DOE sponsorship and summarizes some specific applications of the codes to the current generation of fast reactors. An assessment of future trends in this area concludes the paper

  18. Whole core neutronics modeling of a TRIGA reactor using integral transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.; Toffer, H.

    1990-01-01

    An innovative analysis approach for performing whole core reactor physics calculations for TRIGA reactors has been employed recently at the Westinghouse Hanford Company. A deterministic transport theory model with sufficient geometric complexity to evaluate asymmetric loading patterns was used. Calculations of this complexity have been performed in the past using Monte Carlo simulation, such as the MCNP code. However, the Monte Carlo calculations are more difficult to prepare and require more computer time. On the Hanford Site CRAY XMP-18 computer, the new methods required less than one-third of the central processing unit time per calculation as compared to an MCNP calculation using 100,000 neutron histories

  19. Specialists' meeting on role of fission products in whole core accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-07-01

    Safety of nuclear reactors has been a central concern of the nuclear energy industry from the very beginning. This concern, and the resultant excellence of design, fabrication, and operation, aided by extensive engineered safety features, has given nuclear energy its superior record of protection of the environment and of the public health and safety. With respect to the fast reactor, it was recognized early in the program that there exists a theoretical possibility of a core compaction leading to significant energy release. The considerations of fission product effects are primarily on of the main concerns in evaluation of safety issues. Since fission products have the potential for dispersing fuel from the core region and thereby producing reactor shutdown, knowledge of their effects can contribute to demonstrating that there is a low probability producing whole-core involvement. Similarly, knowledge of fission product effects can contribute to demonstrating that there is a low probability of a whole-core disruptive accident leading to sufficient energy release to challenge the containment capability.

  20. Specialists' meeting on role of fission products in whole core accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Safety of nuclear reactors has been a central concern of the nuclear energy industry from the very beginning. This concern, and the resultant excellence of design, fabrication, and operation, aided by extensive engineered safety features, has given nuclear energy its superior record of protection of the environment and of the public health and safety. With respect to the fast reactor, it was recognized early in the program that there exists a theoretical possibility of a core compaction leading to significant energy release. The considerations of fission product effects are primarily on of the main concerns in evaluation of safety issues. Since fission products have the potential for dispersing fuel from the core region and thereby producing reactor shutdown, knowledge of their effects can contribute to demonstrating that there is a low probability producing whole-core involvement. Similarly, knowledge of fission product effects can contribute to demonstrating that there is a low probability of a whole-core disruptive accident leading to sufficient energy release to challenge the containment capability

  1. Continuing investigations for technology assessment of 99Mo production from LEU [low enriched Uranium] targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Currently much of the world's supply of /sup 99m/Tc for medical purposes is produced from 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). The need for /sup 99m/Tc is continuing to grow, especially in developing countries, where needs and national priorities call for internal production of 99 Mo. This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched Uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product 99 Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal are reported. These improvements continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or hastaloy. A cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets is reported. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in other current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent 99 Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to (1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and (2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that both concerns can be handled and that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved

  2. The series production in a standardized fabrication line for silicide fuels and commercial aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehner, E.L.; Hassel, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    NUKEM has been responsible for the development and fabrication of LEU fuel elements for MTR reactors under the frame of the German AF program since 1979. The AF program is part of the international RERTR efforts, which were initiated by the INFCE Group in 1978. This paper describes the actual status of development and the transition from the prototype to the series production in a standardized manufacturing line for silicide fuels at NUKEM. Technical provisions and a customer oriented standardized product range aim at an economized manufacturing. (Author)

  3. Incorporation of Resonance Upscattering and Intra-Pellet Power Profile in Direct Whole Core Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Hyun; Jung Yeon Sang; Joo Han Gyu

    2012-01-01

    It was generally known that the Doppler feedback effect computed by most industrial reactor analysis codes is underestimated than the actual values. Part of the underestimation was attributed to the neglect of the resonance upscattering during the slowing down calculation. On the contrary, the edge peaked power profile noted in burned fuel pins due to more plutonium buildup at the periphery of fuel pellets might lead to smaller power defects than the predicted values obtained with a flat profile. This work is to mitigate these problems with a direct whole core calculation code nTRACER which is capable of handling ringwise depletion as well as incorporating nonuniform power profiles inside a fuel pellet

  4. Whole-core damage analysis of EBR-II driver fuel elements following SHRT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Koenig, J.F.; Porter, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    In the Shutdown Heat Removal Testing (SHRT) program in EBR-II, fuel element cladding temperatures of some driver subassemblies were predicted to exceed temperatures at which cladding breach may occur. A whole-core thermal analysis of driver subassemblies was performed to determine the cladding temperatures of fuel elemnts, and these temperatures were used for fuel element damage calculation. The accumulated cladding damage of fuel element was found to be very small and fuel element failure resulting from SHRT transients is unlikely. No element breach was noted during the SHRT transients. The reactor was immediately restarted after the most severe SHRT transient had been completed and no driver fuel breach has been noted to date. (orig.)

  5. Depletion methodology in the 3-D whole core transport code DeCART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog; Cho, Jin Young; Zee, Sung Quun

    2005-02-01

    Three dimensional whole-core transport code DeCART has been developed to include a characteristics of the numerical reactor to replace partly the experiment. This code adopts the deterministic method in simulating the neutron behavior with the least assumption and approximation. This neutronic code is also coupled with the thermal hydraulic code CFD and the thermo mechanical code to simulate the combined effects. Depletion module has been implemented in DeCART code to predict the depleted composition in the fuel. The exponential matrix method of ORIGEN-2 has been used for the depletion calculation. The library of including decay constants, yield matrix and others has been used and greatly simplified for the calculation efficiency. This report summarizes the theoretical backgrounds and includes the verification of the depletion module in DeCART by performing the benchmark calculations.

  6. Parallelization characteristics of a three-dimensional whole-core code DeCART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. Y.; Joo, H.K.; Kim, H. Y.; Lee, J. C.; Jang, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron transport calculation for three-dimensional amount of computing time but also huge memory. Therefore, whole-core codes such as DeCART need both also parallel computation and distributed memory capabilities. This paper is to implement such parallel capabilities based on MPI grouping and memory distribution on the DeCART code, and then to evaluate the performance by solving the C5G7 three-dimensional benchmark and a simplified three-dimensional SMART core problem. In C5G7 problem with 24 CPUs, a speedup of maximum 22 is obtained on IBM regatta machine and 21 on a LINUX cluster for the MOC kernel, which indicates good parallel performance of the DeCART code. The simplified SMART problem which need about 11 GBytes memory with one processors requires about 940 MBytes, which means that the DeCART code can now solve large core problems on affordable LINUX clusters

  7. Status of LEU fuel development and conversion of NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Herbert, L.N.; Vaillancourt, K.D.

    1989-11-01

    The status of the low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel development and NRU conversion program at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is reviewed. Construction of a new fuel fabrication facility is essentially completed and installation of LEW fuel manufacturing equipment has begun. The irradiation of 31 prototype Al-61 wt% U 3 Si dispersion fuel rods, approximately one third of a full NRU core, is continuing without incident. Recent post-irradiation examination of spent fuel rods revealed that the prototype LEU fuel achieved the design burnup (80 at%) in excellent condition, confirming that the Al-U 3 Si 2 dispersion fuel to complement out Al-U 3 Si capability. Three full-size NRU rods containing Al-U 3 Si 2 dispersion fuel have been fabricated for a qualification irradiation in NRU. Post-irradiation examinations of mini-elements containing Al-U 3 Si 2 fuel revealed that the U 3 Si 2 behaved similarly to U 3 Si 2 fuel revealed that the U 3 Si 2 particles and the aluminum matrix, and fission gas bubbles up to 10 μm in diameter, could be seen in the particles after 60 at% and 80 at% burnup. The mini-elements contained a variety of silicide particle sizes; however, no significant swelling dependence on particle size distribution was observed

  8. HEU to LEU conversion experience at the UMass-Lowell research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, John R.; Bobek, Leo M.

    2005-01-01

    The UMass-Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) operated safely with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for over 25 years. Having reached the end of core lifetime and due to proliferation concerns, the reactor was recently converted to low-enriched uranium silicide (LEU) fuel. The actual process for converting the UMLRR from HEU to LEU fuel covered a period of over 15 years. The conversion effort - from the initial conceptual design studies in the late 1980s to the final offsite shipment of the spent HEU fuel in August 2004 - was a unique experience for the faculty and staff of a small university research reactor. This paper gives a historical view of the process and it highlights several key milestones along the road to successful completion of this project. (author)

  9. Parallelization of a three-dimensional whole core transport code DeCART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Young, Cho; Han Gyu, Joo; Ha Yong, Kim; Moon-Hee, Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Parallelization of the DeCART (deterministic core analysis based on ray tracing) code is presented that reduces the computational burden of the tremendous computing time and memory required in three-dimensional whole core transport calculations. The parallelization employs the concept of MPI grouping and the MPI/OpenMP mixed scheme as well. Since most of the computing time and memory are used in MOC (method of characteristics) and the multi-group CMFD (coarse mesh finite difference) calculation in DeCART, variables and subroutines related to these two modules are the primary targets for parallelization. Specifically, the ray tracing module was parallelized using a planar domain decomposition scheme and an angular domain decomposition scheme. The parallel performance of the DeCART code is evaluated by solving a rodded variation of the C5G7MOX three dimensional benchmark problem and a simplified three-dimensional SMART PWR core problem. In C5G7MOX problem with 24 CPUs, a speedup of maximum 21 is obtained on an IBM Regatta machine and 22 on a LINUX Cluster in the MOC kernel, which indicates good parallel performance of the DeCART code. In the simplified SMART problem, the memory requirement of about 11 GBytes in the single processor cases reduces to 940 Mbytes with 24 processors, which means that the DeCART code can now solve large core problems with affordable LINUX clusters. (authors)

  10. Calculations of the possible consequences of molten fuel sodium interactions in subassembly and whole core geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coddington, P.; Fishlock, T.P.; Jakeman, D.

    1976-01-01

    The possible consequences of molten fuel sodium interactions are calculated using various modelling assumptions and key parameters. And the significance of the choice of assumptions and parameters are discussed. As for subassembly geometry, the results of one-dimensional code EXPEL are compared with the solutions of the one-dimensional Lagrangian equations of a compressible fluid (TOPAL was used). The adequacy of acoustic approximation used in EXPEL is discussed here. The effects of heat transfer time constant on the behaviour of peak pressure are also analyzed by parametric surveys. Other items investigated are the length and position of the interacting zone, the existence of a non-condensable gas volume, and the vapour condensation on cold clad. As for whole core geometry, a simple dynamical model of arc expanding spherical interacting zone immersed in a semi-infinite sea of cold liquid was used (SHORE code). Within the interacting zone a simple heat transfer model (including a heat transfer time and a fragmentation time) was adopted. Vapour blanketing was considered in a number of ways. Representative results of the calculations are given in a table. Containment studies were also performed for ''ducted'' design and ''open pool'' design. The development of new codes in the U.K. for these analysis are also briefly described. (Aoki, K.)

  11. A polygonal nodal SP3 method for whole core Pin-by-Pin neutronics calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yunzhao; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi, E-mail: xjtulyz@gmail.com, E-mail: hongchun@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: caolz@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi (China)

    2011-07-01

    In this polygonal nodal-SP3 method, neutron transport equation is transformed by employing an isotropic SP3 method into two coupled equations that are both in the same mathematic form with the diffusion equation, and then a polygonal nodal method is proposed to solve the two coupled equations. In the polygonal nodal method, adjacent nodes are coupled through partial currents, and a nodal response matrix between incoming and outgoing currents is obtained by expanding detailed nodal flux distribution into a sum of exponential functions. This method avoids the transverse integral technique, which is widely used in regular nodal method and can not be used in triangular geometry because of the mathematical singularity. It is demonstrated by the numerical results of the test problems that the k{sub eff} and power distribution agree well with other codes, the triangular nodal-SP3 method appears faster, and that whole core pin-by-pin transport calculation with fine meshes is feasible after parallelization and acceleration. (author)

  12. Automatic whole core depletion and criticality calculations by MCNPX 2.7.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Different approaches to perform automatic whole core criticality and depletion calculations in a research reactor using MCNPX 2.7.0 are presented. An approximate method is to use the existing symmetries of the burned fuel material distribution in the core, i.e., the axial, radial and azimuth symmetries around the core center, in order to significantly reduce the computation time. In this case it is not necessary to give a unique material number to each burn up cell. Cells having similar burn up and power, achieved during similar irradiation history at same initial fuel composition, will experience similar composition evolution and can therefore be given the same material number. To study the impact of the number of unique burn up materials on the computation time and utilized RAM memory, several MCNPX models have been developed. The paper discusses the accuracy of the model on comparison with measurements of BR2 operation cycles in function of the number of unique burn up materials and the impact of the used Q-value (MeV/fission) of the recoverable fission energy. (authors)

  13. 2010 national progress report on R and D on LEU fuel and target technology in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balart, S.; Blaumann, H.; Cristini, P.; Gonzalez, A.G.; Gonzalez, R.; Hermida, J.D.; Lopez, M.; Mirandou, M.; Taboada, H.

    2010-01-01

    Since last RRFM meeting, CNEA has deployed several related tasks. The RA-6 MTR type reactor, converted its core from HEU to a new LEU silicide one is scaling up the power, according to a protocol requested by the national regulatory body, ARN. CNEA is deploying an intense R and D activity to fabricate both dispersed U-Mo (Al-Si matrix and Al cladding) and monolithic (Zry-4 cladding) miniplates to develop possible solutions to VHD dispersed and monolithic fuels technical problems. Some monolithic 58% enrichment U8%Mo and U10%Mo are being delivered to INL-DoE to be irradiated in ATR reactor core. A conscientious study on compound interphase formation in both cases is being carried out. CNEA, a worldwide leader on LEU technology for fission radioisotope production is providing Brazil with these radiopharmaceutical products and Egypt and Australia with the technology through INVAP SE. CNEA is also committed to improve the diffusion of LEU target and radiochemical technology for radioisotope production and target and process optimization. Future plans include: 1) Fabrication of a LEU dispersed U-Mo fuel prototype following the recommendations of the IAEA's Good Practices document, to be irradiated in a high flux reactor in the frame of the ARG/4/092 IAEA's Technical Cooperation project. 2) Development of LEU very high density monolithic and dispersed U-Mo fuel plates with Zry-4 or Al cladding as a part of the RERTR program. 3) Optimization of LEU target and radiochemical techniques for radioisotope production. (author)

  14. The role of fission product in whole core accidents - research in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, L W [Argonne National Laboratory, Division of Reactor Analysis and Safety, Argonne, IL (United States); Jackson, J F [Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Q Division - Energy, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1977-07-01

    Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Project, is balanced, consisting of a reliability programme to prevent malfunctions or accidents, backup systems to accommodate malfunctions or accidents, and systems to cope with the consequences of CDAs. In connection with the CRBR, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established that {sup t}he probability of core melt and disruptive accidents can and must be reduced to a sufficiently low level to justify their exclusion from the design basis accident spectrum (a goal probability of 10{sup -6} per reactor-year for dose exceeding current guidelines has been established). Thus, CDA accommodation is approached on the basis of reasonable conservatism in evaluation and mitigation. The ERDA fast reactor safety research programme is presently directed towards establishment of four 'lines of assurance' (LOA). The four lines of assurance are: prevent core disruptive accidents; limit core damage; control CDA progression; attenuate radiological consequences. The considerations of fission product effects germane to the present paper are primarily of concern in evaluation of the second and third lines. Since fission products have the potential for dispersing fuel from the core region and thereby producing reactor shutdown, knowledge of their effects can contribute to demonstrating that there is a low probability (10{sup -2} ) of a CDA initiator producing whole-core involvement. Similarly, knowledge of fission product effects can contribute to demonstrating that there Is a low probability of a whole-core disruptive accident leading to sufficient energy release to challenge the containment capability.

  15. 3-D Whole-Core Transport Calculation with 3D/2D Rotational Plane Slicing Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Han Jong; Cho, Nam Zin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Use of the method of characteristics (MOC) is very popular due to its capability of heterogeneous geometry treatment and widely used for 2-D core calculation, but direct extension of MOC to 3-D core is not so attractive due to huge calculational cost. 2-D/1-D fusion method was very successful for 3-D calculation of current generation reactor types (highly heterogeneous in radial direction but piece-wise homogeneous in axial direction). In this paper, 2-D MOC concept is extended to 3-D core calculation with little modification of an existing 2-D MOC code. The key idea is to suppose 3-D geometry as a set of many 2-D planes like a phone-directory book. Dividing 3-D structure into a large number of 2-D planes and solving each plane with a simple 2-D SN transport method would give the solution of a 3-D structure. This method was developed independently at KAIST but it is found that this concept is similar with that of 'plane tracing' in the MCCG-3D code. The method developed was tested on the 3-D C5G7 OECD/NEA benchmark problem and compared with the 2-D/1-D fusion method. Results show that the proposed method is worth investigating further. A new approach to 3-D whole-core transport calculation is described and tested. By slicing 3-D structure along characteristic planes and solving each 2-D plane problem, we can get 3-D solution. The numerical test results indicate that the new method is comparable with the 2D/1D fusion method and outperforms other existing methods. But more fair comparison should be done in similar discretization level.

  16. Development of 2-D/1-D fusion method for three-dimensional whole-core heterogeneous neutron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gil Soo

    2006-02-01

    To describe power distribution and multiplication factor of a reactor core accurately, it is necessary to perform calculations based on neutron transport equation considering heterogeneous geometry and scattering angles. These calculations require very heavy calculations and were nearly impossible with computers of old days. From the limitation of computing power, traditional approach of reactor core design consists of heterogeneous transport calculation in fuel assembly level and whole core diffusion nodal calculation with assembly homogenized properties, resulting from fuel assembly transport calculation. This approach may be effective in computation time, but it gives less accurate results for highly heterogeneous problems. As potential for whole core heterogeneous transport calculation became more feasible owing to rapid development of computing power during last several years, the interests in two and three dimensional whole core heterogeneous transport calculations by deterministic method are increased. For two dimensional calculation, there were several successful approaches using even parity transport equation with triangular meshes, S N method with refined rectangular meshes, the method of characteristics (MOC) with unstructured meshes, and so on. The work in this thesis originally started from the two dimensional whole core heterogeneous transport calculation by using MOC. After successful achievement in two dimensional calculation, there were efforts in three-dimensional whole-core heterogeneous transport calculation using MOC. Since direct extension to three dimensional calculation of MOC requires too much computing power, indirect approach to three dimensional calculation was considered.Thus, 2D/1D fusion method for three dimensional heterogeneous transport calculation was developed and successfully implemented in a computer code. The 2D/1D fusion method is synergistic combination of the MOC for radial 2-D calculation and S N -like methods for axial 1

  17. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis and flow channel blockage accident analysis of JRR-3 silicide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1997-03-01

    JRR-3 is a light water moderated and cooled, beryllium and heavy water reflected pool type research reactor using low enriched uranium (LEU) plate-type fuels. Its thermal power is 20 MW. The core conversion program from uranium-aluminum (UAl x -Al) dispersion type fuel (aluminide fuel) to uranium-silicon-aluminum (U 3 Si 2 -Al) dispersion type fuel (silicide fuel) is currently conducted at the JRR-3. This report describes about the steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis results and the flow channel blockage accident analysis result. In JRR-3, there are two operation mode. One is high power operation mode up to 20 MW, under forced convection cooling using the primary and the secondary cooling systems. The other is low power operation mode up to 200 kW, under natural circulation cooling between the reactor core and the reactor pool without the primary and the secondary cooling systems. For the analysis of the flow channel blockage accident, COOLOD code was used. On the other hand, steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis for both of the high power operation mode under forced convection cooling and low power operation under natural convection cooling, COOLOD-N2 code was used. From steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis results of both forced and natural convection cooling, fuel temperature, minimum DNBR etc. meet the design criteria and JRR-3 LEU silicide core has enough safety margin under normal operation conditions. Furthermore, flow channel blockage accident analysis results show that one channel flow blockage accident meet the safety criteria for accident conditions which have been established for JRR-3 LEU silicide core. (author)

  18. Calculations of the Possible Consequences of Molten Fuel Sodium Interactions in Subassembly and Whole Core Geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coddington, P.; Fishlock, T.P.; Jakeman, D.

    1976-01-01

    of any postulated SFI to be determined. Both subassembly and whole core geometries are considered. Modelling of an SFI has been kept as simple as possible since it does not appear that any more insight into the consequences of SFIs can be obtained by a more complex treatment. The preliminary results indicate that in assessing the importance of various characterisations of SFIs in determining damage following a nuclear excursion it is necessary to have a good representation of the geometry. It is intended in future studies to improve the calculation of heat loss from the expanding bubble and modifications are being made to the containment codes to include this. The effects of SFI on the fuel motion and the reactivity ramp rates associated with them are to be considered

  19. High-performance whole core Pin-by-Pin calculation based on EFEN-SP_3 method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wen; Zheng Youqi; Wu Hongchun; Cao Liangzhi; Li Yunzhao

    2014-01-01

    The EFEN code for high-performance PWR whole core pin-by-pin calculation based on the EFEN-SP_3 method can be achieved by employing spatial parallelization based on MPI. To take advantage of the advanced computing and storage power, the entire problem spatial domain can be appropriately decomposed into sub-domains and the assigned to parallel CPUs to balance the computing load and minimize communication cost. Meanwhile, Red-Black Gauss-Seidel nodal sweeping scheme is employed to avoid the within-group iteration deterioration due to spatial parallelization. Numerical results based on whole core pin-by-pin problems designed according to commercial PWRs demonstrate the following conclusions: The EFEN code can provide results with acceptable accuracy; Communication period impacts neither the accuracy nor the parallel efficiency; Domain decomposition methods with smaller surface to volume ratio leads to greater parallel efficiency; A PWR whole core pin-by-pin calculation with a spatial mesh 289 × 289 × 218 and 4 energy groups could be completed about 900 s by using 125 CPUs, and its parallel efficiency is maintained at about 90%. (authors)

  20. Room temperature ferromagnetic gadolinium silicide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadimani, Magundappa Ravi L.; Gupta, Shalabh; Harstad, Shane; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Jiles, David C.

    2018-03-06

    A particle usable as T1 and T2 contrast agents is provided. The particle is a gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particle that is ferromagnetic at temperatures up to 290 K and is less than 2 .mu.m in diameter. An MRI contrast agent that includes a plurality of gadolinium silicide (Gd.sub.5Si.sub.4) particles that are less than 1 .mu.m in diameter is also provided. A method for creating gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particles is also provided. The method includes the steps of providing a Gd5Si4 bulk alloy; grinding the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy into a powder; and milling the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy powder for a time of approximately 20 minutes or less.

  1. LEU fuel fabrication in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giorsetti, D.R.; Gomez, J.O.; Marajofsky, A.; Kohut, C.

    1985-01-01

    As an Institution, aiming to meet with its own needs, CNEA has been intensively developing reduced enriched fuel to use in its own research and test reactors. Development of the fabrication technology as well as the design, installation and operation of the manufacturing plant, have been carried out with its own funds. Irradiation and post-irradiation of test miniplates have been taking place within the framework of the RERTR program. During the last years, CNEA has developed three LEU fuel types. In the previous RERTR meetings, we presented the technological results obtained with these fuel types. This paper focuses on CNEA LEU fuel element manufacturing status and the trained personnel we can offer in design and manufacture fuel capability. CNEA has its own fuel manufacturing technology; the necessary facilities to start the fuel fabrication; qualified technicians and professionals for: fuel design and behaviour analysis; fuel manufacturing and QA; international recognition of its fuel development and manufacturing capability through its ORR miniplate irradiation; its own natural uranium and the future possibility to enrich up to 20% U 235 ; the probability to offer a competitive fuel manufacturing cost in the international market; the disposition to cooperate with all countries that wish to take part and aim to reach an self-sufficiency in their own fuel supply needs

  2. LEU fuel development at CERCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Jean Pierre; Ottone, J.C.; Mahe, M.; Ferraz, G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to detail the recent progress on both U 3 Si 2 high loaded fuels and new γ phase fuels. Concerning high density density silicide plates up to 6 g Ut/cm 3 , the CEA irradiation programme is completed. Data are still under analysis but one can state that the behaviour was globally similar to conventional fuels known in SILOE and OSIRIS reactors. From the new γ fuel point of view, after demonstration feasibility in 1997 of U Mo thermally stable plates loaded up to 8.3 g Ut/cm3, CERCA has analysed the technical ability of quality inspection means assuming that is of an utmost interest for the insurance of a proper use of high performances fuel in reactors. There are mainly two differences between U Mo fuels (and more generally γ fuels) and conventional ones. Firstly, X-ray diffraction analysis on the fuel powder are needed because the chemical analysis is not sufficient to characterise the γ structure requested. Secondly, the physical limits of the Ultrasonic inspection have been reached due to transitory effect between the meat and the edges. Therefore this technic can not applied in the transitory areas. From that knowledge, the manufacture specifications for a plate dedicated to an irradiation plan can be discussed with a clearer view of the main differences with the U 3 Si 2 fuel reference. (author)

  3. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Schuller International Inc. targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. Current experimental emphasis is on the development and characterization of MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites, the plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, and the joining of MoSi{sub 2} materials to metals.

  4. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing high enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.

  5. RERTR program activities related to the development and application of new LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1983-01-01

    The statue of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U 3 Si 2 -Al and U 3 Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm 3 each year, from the current 1.7 g U/cm 3 to the 7.0 g U/cm 3 which will be reached in late 1988. The technical needs of research and test reactors for HEU exports are also forecasted to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years

  6. Development of U6Fe-Al dispersions for the use of LEU in research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazare, S.

    1983-01-01

    For some time now, efforts are being made to develop fuel dispersions that would permit the use of low (approx. 20% 235-U) enriched uranium (LEU) instead of the currently used highly (approx. 93% 235-U) enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. Since penalties in the performance of the reactor have to be avoided, the 235-U content in the dispersion has at least to be retained at current levels. On account of their high U-densities, the major development effort has been focussed on the uranium silicides (U 3 Si, U 3 Si(Al), and U 3 Si 2 -based dispersions). With silicides as dispersants, it is possible to fabricate fuel element plates with U-densities in the dispersion of about 6.0 gU/cm 3 . In comparison to the silicides, the U 6 Fe-phase offers several advantages namely: higher U-density (approx. 17.0 gU/cm 3 ); relative ease of formation compared to U 3 Si; possible advantages with regard to reprocessing of the spent fuel due to the absence of silicon. The studies outlined here were performed with a view to investigating the preparation, reaction behavior and dimensional stability after heat treatment of U 6 Fe-Al dispersions

  7. Development of U6Fe-Al dispersions for the use of LEU in research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazare, S.

    1983-01-01

    For some time now, efforts are being made to develop fuel dispersions that would permit the use of low (∼ 20% 235-U) enriched uranium (LEU) instead of the currently used highly (∼ 93% 235-U) enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. Since penalties in the performance of the reactor have to be avoided, the 235-U content in the dispersion has at least to be retained at current levels. On account of their high U-densities, the major development effort has been focussed on the uranium silicides [U 3 Si, U 3 Si(Al), and U 3 Si 2 - based dispersions. With silicides as dispersants, it is possible to fabricate fuel element plates with U-densities in the dispersion of about 6.0 g U/cm 3 . In comparison to the silicides, the U 6 Fe-phase offers several advantages namely: - higher U-density (∼ 17.0 g U/cm 3 ); - relative ease of formation compared to U 3 Si; - possible advantages with regard to reprocessing of the spent fuel due to the absence of silicon. The studies outlined here were therefore performed with a view to investigating the preparation, reaction behaviour and dimensional stability after heat treatment of U 6 Fe-Al dispersions

  8. Irradiation behavior of miniature experimental uranium silicide fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Neimark, L.A.; Mattas, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium silicides, because of their relatively high uranium density, were selected as candidate dispersion fuels for the higher fuel densities required in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Irradiation experience with this type of fuel, however, was limited to relatively modest fission densities in the bulk from, on the order of 7 x 10 20 cm -3 , far short of the approximately 20 x 10 20 cm -3 goal established for the RERTR program. The purpose of the irradiation experiments on silicide fuels on the ORR, therefore, was to investigate the intrinsic irradiation behavior of uranium silicide as a dispersion fuel. Of particular interest was the interaction between the silicide particles and the aluminum matrix, the swelling behavior of the silicide particles, and the maximum volume fraction of silicide particles that could be contained in the aluminum matrix

  9. Palladium silicide - a new contact for semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totterdell, D.H.J.

    1981-11-01

    Silicide layers can be used as low resistance contacts in semiconductor devices. The formation of a metal rich palladium silicide Pd 2 Si is discussed. A palladium film 100A thick is deposited at 300 0 C and the resulting silicide layer used as an ohmic contact in an n + p silicon detector. This rugged contact has electrical characteristics comparable with existing evaporated gold contacts and enables the use of more reproducible bonding techniques. (author)

  10. Followup calculations for the UVAR LEU conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydin, R.; Hosticka, B.; Burns, T; Hubbard, T.; Mulder, R

    2004-01-01

    The UVAR reactor was successfully converted to LEU fuel in April 1994. Void coefficient measurements were made on the 4- by-4 fully-graphite-reflected LEU-1 core configuration, and an isothermal temperature coefficient measurement was made on the operational 4-by-5 partially-graphite-reflected LEU-2 core configuration. Both of these experiments have now been modeled in their critical configurations using the 3DBUM code. The LEU cores were also modeled using the Monte Carlo code MCNP in order to obtain a neutron/gamma source for BNCT filter design calculations. Advanced BNCT filters have been evaluated using both MCNP and the discrete ordinates code DORT. The results indicate that the UVAR would be an ideal source for the BNCT treatment of brain tumors. (author)

  11. Followup calculations for the UVAR LEU conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rydin, R.A.; Hosticka, B.; Burns, T.

    1995-01-01

    The UVAR reactor was successfully converted to LEU fuel in April 1994. Void coefficient measurements were made on the 4-by-4 fully-graphite-reflected LEU-1 core configuration, and an isothermal temperature coefficient measurement was made on the operational 4-by-5 partially-graphite-reflected LEU-2 core configuration. Both of these experiments have now been modeled in their critical configurations using the 3DBUM code. The LEU cores were also modeled using the Monte Carlo code MCNP in order to obtain a neutron/gamma source for BNCT filter design calculations. Advanced BNCT filters have been evaluated using both MCNP and the discrete ordinates code DORT. The results indicate that the UVAR would be an ideal source for the BNCT treatment of brain tumors

  12. Solvent extraction studies of RERTR silicide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, Anthony P.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium silicide fuels, which are candidate RERTR fuel compositions, may require special considerations in solvent extraction reprocessing. Since Savannah River Plant may be reprocessing RERTR fuels as early as 1985, studies have been conducted at Savannah River Laboratory to demonstrate the solvent extraction behavior of this fuel. Results of solvent extraction studies with both unirradiated and irradiated fuel are presented along with the preliminary RERTR solvent extraction reprocessing flow sheet for Savannah River Plant. (author)

  13. Room temperature ferromagnetic gadolinium silicide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadimani, Magundappa Ravi L.; Gupta, Shalabh; Harstad, Shane; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Jiles, David C.

    2018-03-06

    A particle usable as T1 and T2 contrast agents is provided. The particle is a gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particle that is ferromagnetic at temperatures up to 290 K and is less than 2 .mu.m in diameter. An MRI contrast agent that includes a plurality of gadolinium silicide (Gd.sub.5Si.sub.4) particles that are less than 1 .mu.m in diameter is also provided. A method for creating gadolinium silicide (Gd5Si4) particles is also provided. The method includes the steps of providing a Gd5Si4 bulk alloy; grinding the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy into a powder; and milling the Gd5Si4 bulk alloy powder for a time of approximately 20 minutes or less.

  14. Performance Analysis of Fission and Surface Source Iteration Method for Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Whole-Core Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Yu Gwon; Oh, Yoo Min; Park, Hyang Kyu; Park, Kang Soon; Cho, Nam Zin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, two issues in the FSS iteration method, i.e., the waiting time for surface source data and the variance biases in local tallies are investigated for the domain decomposed, 3-D continuous-energy whole-core calculation. The fission sources are provided as usual, while the surface sources are provided by banking MC particles crossing local domain boundaries. The surface sources serve as boundary conditions for nonoverlapping local problems, so that each local problem can be solved independently. In this paper, two issues in the FSS iteration are investigated. One is quantifying the waiting time of processors to receive surface source data. By using nonblocking communication, 'time penalty' to wait for the arrival of the surface source data is reduced. The other important issue is underestimation of the sample variance of the tally because of additional inter-iteration correlations in surface sources. From the numerical results on a 3-D whole-core test problem, it is observed that the time penalty is negligible in the FSS iteration method and that the real variances of both pin powers and assembly powers are estimated by the HB method. For those purposes, three cases; Case 1 (1 local domain), Case 2 (4 local domains), Case 3 (16 local domains) are tested. For both Cases 2 and 3, the time penalties for waiting are negligible compared to the source-tracking times. However, for finer divisions of local domains, the loss of parallel efficiency caused by the different number of sources for local domains in symmetric locations becomes larger due to the stochastic errors in source distributions. For all test cases, the HB method very well estimates the real variances of local tallies. However, it is also noted that the real variances of local tallies estimated by the HB method show slightly smaller than the real variances obtained from 30 independent batch runs and the deviations become larger for finer divisions of local domains. The batch size used for the HB

  15. Mechanical energy yields and pressure volume and pressure time curves for whole core fuel-coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coddington, P [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1979-10-15

    In determining the damage consequences of a whole core Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI), one measure of the strength of a FCI that can be used and is independent of the system geometry is the constant volume mixing mechanical yield (often referred to as the Hicks-Menzies yield), which represents a near upper limit to the mechanical work of a FCI. This paper presents a recalculation of the Hicks-Menzies yields for UO{sub 2} and sodium for a range of initial fuel temperatures and fuel to coolant mass ratios, using recently published UO{sub 2} and sodium equation of state data. The work presented here takes a small number of postulated FCIs with as wide range as possible of thermal interaction parameters and determines their pressure-volume P(V) and pressure-time P(t) relations, using geometrical constraints representative of the reactor. Then by examining these P(V) and P(t) curves a representative pressure-relative volume curve or range of possible curves, for use in containment analysis, is recommended

  16. Comparison of Non-overlapping and Overlapping Local/Global Iteration Schemes for Whole-Core Deterministic Transport Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuk, Seung Su; Cho, Bumhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2013-01-01

    In the case of deterministic transport model, fixed-k problem formulation is necessary and the overlapping local domain is chosen. However, as mentioned in, the partial current-based Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (p-CMFD) procedure enables also non-overlapping local/global (NLG) iteration. In this paper, NLG iteration is combined with p-CMFD and with CMFD (augmented with a concept of p-CMFD), respectively, and compared to OLG iteration on a 2-D test problem. Non-overlapping local/global iteration with p-CMFD and CMFD global calculation is introduced and tested on a 2-D deterministic transport problem. The modified C5G7 problem is analyzed with both NLG and OLG methods and the solutions converge to the reference solution except for some cases of NLG with CMFD. NLG with CMFD gives the best performance if the solution converges. But if fission-source iteration in local calculation is not enough, it is prone to diverge. The p-CMFD global solver gives unconditional convergence (for both OLG and NLG). A study of switching scheme is in progress, where NLG/p-CMFD is used as 'starter' and then switched to NLG/CMFD to render the whole-core transport calculation more efficient and robust. Parallel computation is another obvious future work

  17. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 3. Coupling core module with primary heat transport system module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaka, Masahiko; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    1998-10-01

    A whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT is being developed for the purpose of evaluating detailed in-core thermal hydraulic phenomena of fast reactors including inter-wrapper flow under various reactor operation conditions. In this work, the core module as a main part of the ACT developed last year, which simulates thermal-hydraulics in the subassemblies and the inter-subassembly gaps, was coupled with an one dimensional plant system thermal-hydraulic analysis code LEDHER to simulate transients in the primary heat transport system and to give appropriate boundary conditions to the core model. The effective algorithm to couple these two calculation modules was developed, which required minimum modification of them. In order to couple these two calculation modules on the computing system, parallel computing technique using PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) programming environment was applied. The code system was applied to analyze an out-of-pile sodium experiment simulating core with 7 subassemblies under transient condition for code verification. It was confirmed that the analytical results show a similar tendency of experimental results. (author)

  18. Whole Core Thermal-Hydraulic Design of a Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Considering the Gamma Energy Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Rock; Back, Min Ho; Park, Won Seok; Kim, Sang Ji

    2012-01-01

    Since a fuel cladding failure is the most important parameter in a core thermal-hydraulic design, the conceptual design stage only involves fuel assemblies. However, although non-fuel assemblies such as control rod, reflector, and B4C generate a relatively smaller thermal power compared to fuel assemblies, they also require independent flow allocation to properly cool down each assembly. The thermal power in non-fuel assemblies is produced from both neutron and gamma energy, and thus the core thermal-hydraulic design including non-fuel assemblies should consider an energy redistribution by the gamma energy transport. To design non-fuel assemblies, the design-limiting parameters should be determined considering the thermal failure modes. While fuel assemblies set a limiting factor with cladding creep temperature to prevent a fission product ejection from the fuel rods, non-fuel assemblies restrict their outlet temperature to minimize thermally induced stress on the upper internal structure (UIS). This work employs a heat generation distribution reflecting both neutron and gamma transport. The whole core thermal-hydraulic design including fuel and non-fuel assemblies is then conducted using the SLTHEN (Steady-State LMR Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code Based on ENERGY Model) code. The other procedures follow from the previous conceptual design

  19. Molybdenum silicide based materials and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Z.; Stiglich, J.; Sudarshan, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) is a promising candidate material for high temperature structural applications. It is a high melting point (2030 C) material with excellent oxidation resistance and a moderate density (6.24 g/cm 3 ). However, low toughness at low temperatures and high creep rates at elevated temperatures have hindered its commercialization in structural applications. Much effort has been invested in MoSi 2 composites as alternatives to pure molybdenum disilicide for oxidizing and aggressive environments. Molybdenum disilicide-based heating elements have been used extensively in high-temperature furnaces. The low electrical resistance of silicides in combination with high thermal stability, electron-migration resistance, and excellent diffusion-barrier characteristics is important for microelectronic applications. Projected applications of MoSi 2 -based materials include turbine airfoils, combustion chamber components in oxidizing environments, missile nozzles, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing. On this paper, synthesis, fabrication, and properties of the monolithic and composite molybdenum silicides are reviewed

  20. Subsurface contributions in epitaxial rare-earth silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebben, Olaf; Shvets, Igor V. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland); Cerda, Jorge I. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Chaika, Alexander N. [Institute of Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Metallic thin films of heavy rare-earth silicides epitaxially grown on Si(111) substrates have been widely studied in recent years because of their appealing properties: unusually low values of the Schottky barrier height, an abrupt interface, and a small lattice mismatch. Previous studies also showed that these silicides present very similar atomic and electronic structures. Here, we examine one of these silicides (Gd{sub 3}Si{sub 5}) using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) image simulations that go beyond the Tersoff-Hamann approach. These simulations strongly indicate an unusual STM depth sensitivity for this system.

  1. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 4. Simplified fuel assembly model and parallelization by MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2001-10-01

    A whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT is being developed for the purpose of evaluating detailed in-core thermal hydraulic phenomena of fast reactors including the effect of the flow between wrapper-tube walls (inter-wrapper flow) under various reactor operation conditions. As appropriate boundary conditions in addition to a detailed modeling of the core are essential for accurate simulations of in-core thermal hydraulics, ACT consists of not only fuel assembly and inter-wrapper flow analysis modules but also a heat transport system analysis module that gives response of the plant dynamics to the core model. This report describes incorporation of a simplified model to the fuel assembly analysis module and program parallelization by a message passing method toward large-scale simulations. ACT has a fuel assembly analysis module which can simulate a whole fuel pin bundle in each fuel assembly of the core and, however, it may take much CPU time for a large-scale core simulation. Therefore, a simplified fuel assembly model that is thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the detailed one has been incorporated in order to save the simulation time and resources. This simplified model is applied to several parts of fuel assemblies in a core where the detailed simulation results are not required. With regard to the program parallelization, the calculation load and the data flow of ACT were analyzed and the optimum parallelization has been done including the improvement of the numerical simulation algorithm of ACT. Message Passing Interface (MPI) is applied to data communication between processes and synchronization in parallel calculations. Parallelized ACT was verified through a comparison simulation with the original one. In addition to the above works, input manuals of the core analysis module and the heat transport system analysis module have been prepared. (author)

  2. Analysis of the TREAT LEU Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kontogeorgakos, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadias, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Strons, P. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fei, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Analyses were performed to evaluate the performance of the low enriched uranium (LEU) conceptual design fuel for the conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) from its current highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. TREAT is an experimental nuclear reactor designed to produce high neutron flux transients for the testing of reactor fuels and other materials. TREAT is currently in non-operational standby, but is being restarted under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Resumption of Transient Testing Program. The conversion of TREAT is being pursued in keeping with the mission of the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program. The focus of this study was to demonstrate that the converted LEU core is capable of maintaining the performance of the existing HEU core, while continuing to operate safely. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic simulations have been performed to evaluate the performance of the LEU conceptual-design core under both steady-state and transient conditions, for both normal operation and reactivity insertion accident scenarios. In addition, ancillary safety analyses which were performed for previous LEU design concepts have been reviewed and updated as-needed, in order to evaluate if the converted LEU core will function safely with all existing facility systems. Simulations were also performed to evaluate the detailed behavior of the UO2-graphite fuel, to support future fuel manufacturing decisions regarding particle size specifications. The results of these analyses will be used in conjunction with work being performed at Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory, in order to develop the Conceptual Design Report project deliverable.

  3. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-01-01

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti Γ point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi 2 -monolayer and the Dy 3 Si 5 -multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi 2 /Si(111) and Er 3 Si 5 /Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the vector k parallel space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti Γ point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas of the sample surface, which are oriented

  4. Far-infrared spectroscopy of thermally annealed tungsten silicide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiotti, M.; Borghesi, A.; Guizzetti, G.; Nava, F.; Santoro, G.

    1991-01-01

    The far-infrared transmittance spectrum of tungsten silicide has been observed for the first time. WSi 2 polycrystalline films were prepared by coevaporation and chemical-vapour deposition on silicon wafers, and subsequently thermally annealed at different temperatures. The observed structures are interpreted, on the basis of the symmetry properties of the crystal, such as infrared-active vibrational modes. Moreover, the marked lineshape dependence on annealing temperature enables this technique to analyse the formation of the solid silicide phases

  5. Determination of accurate metal silicide layer thickness by RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, J.F.; Baumann, S.M.; Evans, C.; Ward, I.; Coveney, P.

    1995-01-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is a proven useful analytical tool for determining compositional information of a wide variety of materials. One of the most widely utilized applications of RBS is the study of the composition of metal silicides (MSi x ), also referred to as polycides. A key quantity obtained from an analysis of a metal silicide is the ratio of silicon to metal (Si/M). Although compositional information is very reliable in these applications, determination of metal silicide layer thickness by RBS techniques can differ from true layer thicknesses by more than 40%. The cause of these differences lies in how the densities utilized in the RBS analysis are calculated. The standard RBS analysis software packages calculate layer densities by assuming each element's bulk densities weighted by the fractional atomic presence. This calculation causes large thickness discrepancies in metal silicide thicknesses because most films form into crystal structures with distinct densities. Assuming a constant layer density for a full spectrum of Si/M values for metal silicide samples improves layer thickness determination but ignores the underlying physics of the films. We will present results of RBS determination of the thickness various metal silicide films with a range of Si/M values using a physically accurate model for the calculation of layer densities. The thicknesses are compared to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) cross-section micrographs. We have also developed supporting software that incorporates these calculations into routine analyses. (orig.)

  6. Recent Advances in Nb-silicide in-situ composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bewlay, B.P.; Jackson, M.R.; Subramanian, P.R.; Briant, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    In-situ composites based on Nb silicides have great potential for future high-temperature applications. These Nb-silicide composites combine a ductile Nb-based matrix with high-strength silicides. With the appropriate combination of alloying elements, such as Ti, Hf, Cr, AI, it is possible to achieve a promising balance of fracture toughness, high-temperature creep performance, and oxidation resistance. This paper will describe the effect of volume fraction of silicide on microstructure, high-temperature creep performance, and oxidation resistance. The ratio of Nb:(W+Ti) is critical in determining both creep rate and oxidation performance. If this ratio goes below ∼1.5, the creep rate increases substantially. In more complex silicide-based systems, other intermetallics, such as laves phases and a boron-rich T-2 phase, are added for oxidation resistance. To understand the role of each phase on the creep resistance and oxidation performance of these composites, we determined the creep and oxidation behavior of the individual phases and composites at temperatures up to 1200 o C. These data allow quantification of the load-bearing capability of the individual phases in the Nb-silicide based in-situ composites. (author)

  7. Influence of impurities on silicide contact formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazdaev, Kh.R.; Meermanov, G.B.; Kazdaev, R.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    Research objectives of this work are to investigate the influence of light impurities implantation on peculiarities of the silicides formation in molybdenum monocrystal implanted by silicon, and in molybdenum films sputtered on silicon substrate at subsequent annealing. Implantation of the molybdenum samples was performed with silicon ions (90 keV, 5x10 17 cm -2 ). Phase identification was performed by X ray analysis with photographic method of registration. Analysis of the results has shown the formation of the molybdenum silicide Mo 3 Si at 900 deg. C. To find out the influence of impurities present in the atmosphere (C,N,O) on investigated processes we have applied combined implantation. At first, molybdenum was implanted with ions of the basic component (silicon) and then -- with impurities ions. Acceleration energies (40keV for C, 45 keV for N and 50 keV for O) were chosen to obtain the same distribution profiles for basic and impurities ions. Ion doses were 5x10 17 cm -2 for Si-ions and 5x10 16 cm -2 - for impurities. The most important results are reported here. The first, for all three kinds of impurities the decreased formation temperatures of the phase Mo 3 Si were observed; in the case of C and N it was ∼100 deg. and in the case of nitrogen - ∼200 deg. Further, simultaneously with the Mo 3 Si phase, the appearance of the rich-metal phase Mo 5 Si 3 was registered (not observed in the samples without additional implantation). In case of Mo/Si-structure, the implantation of the impurities (N,O) was performed to create the peak concentration (∼4at/%) located in the middle of the molybdenum film (∼ 150nm) deposited on silicon substrate. Investigation carried out on unimplanted samples showed the formation of the silicide molybdenum MoSi 2 , observed after annealing at temperatures 900/1000 deg. C, higher than values 500-600 deg. C reported in other works. It is discovered that electrical conductivity of Mo 5 Si 3 -films synthesized after impurities

  8. Phase transformations in Higher Manganese Silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allam, A. [MADIREL, UMR 7246 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); IM2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Boulet, P. [MADIREL, UMR 7246 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Nunes, C.A. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais (DEMAR), Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Caixa Postal 116, 12600-970 Lorena, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sopousek, J.; Broz, P. [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kolarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Masaryk University, Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC, Kamenice 753/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Record, M.-C., E-mail: m-c.record@univ-cezanne.fr [IM2NP, UMR 7334 CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, av Normandie-Niemen, Case 142, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2013-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transitions of the Higher Manganese Silicides were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples were characterised by XRD, DTA and DSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is the stable phase at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At around 800 Degree-Sign C, Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is transformed into Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phase transition is of a second order. - Abstract: This work is an investigation of the phase transformations of the Higher Manganese Silicides in the temperature range [100-1200 Degree-Sign C]. Several complementary experimental techniques were used, namely in situ X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The evolution of both the lattice parameters and the thermal expansion coefficients was determined from in situ XRD measurements. The stability of the samples was investigated by thermal analysis (DTA) and Cp measurements (DSC). This study shows that Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} which is the stable phase at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure undergoes a phase transformation at around 800 Degree-Sign C. Mn{sub 27}Si{sub 47} is transformed into Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26}. This phase transformation seems to be of a second order one. Indeed it was not evidenced by DTA and by contrast it appears on the Cp curve.

  9. Performance, Accuracy and Efficiency Evaluation of a Three-Dimensional Whole-Core Neutron Transport Code AGENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevremovic, Tatjana; Hursin, Mathieu; Satvat, Nader; Hopkins, John; Xiao, Shanjie; Gert, Godfree

    2006-01-01

    The AGENT (Arbitrary Geometry Neutron Transport) an open-architecture reactor modeling tool is deterministic neutron transport code for two or three-dimensional heterogeneous neutronic design and analysis of the whole reactor cores regardless of geometry types and material configurations. The AGENT neutron transport methodology is applicable to all generations of nuclear power and research reactors. It combines three theories: (1) the theory of R-functions used to generate real three-dimensional whole-cores of square, hexagonal or triangular cross sections, (2) the planar method of characteristics used to solve isotropic neutron transport in non-homogenized 2D) reactor slices, and (3) the one-dimensional diffusion theory used to couple the planar and axial neutron tracks through the transverse leakage and angular mesh-wise flux values. The R-function-geometrical module allows a sequential building of the layers of geometry and automatic sub-meshing based on the network of domain functions. The simplicity of geometry description and selection of parameters for accurate treatment of neutron propagation is achieved through the Boolean algebraic hierarchically organized simple primitives into complex domains (both being represented with corresponding domain functions). The accuracy is comparable to Monte Carlo codes and is obtained by following neutron propagation through real geometrical domains that does not require homogenization or simplifications. The efficiency is maintained through a set of acceleration techniques introduced at all important calculation levels. The flux solution incorporates power iteration with two different acceleration techniques: Coarse Mesh Re-balancing (CMR) and Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD). The stand-alone originally developed graphical user interface of the AGENT code design environment allows the user to view and verify input data by displaying the geometry and material distribution. The user can also view the output data such

  10. Evaluation of CANDU6 PCR (power coefficient of reactivity) with a 3-D whole-core Monte Carlo Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motalab, Mohammad Abdul; Kim, Woosong; Kim, Yonghee

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The PCR of the CANDU6 reactor is slightly negative at low power, e.g. <80% P. • Doppler broadening of scattering resonances improves noticeably the FTC and make the PCR more negative or less positive in CANDU6. • The elevated inlet coolant condition can worsen significantly the PCR of CANDU6. • Improved design tools are needed for the safety evaluation of CANDU6 reactor. - Abstract: The power coefficient of reactivity (PCR) is a very important parameter for inherent safety and stability of nuclear reactors. The combined effect of a relatively less negative fuel temperature coefficient and a positive coolant temperature coefficient make the CANDU6 (CANada Deuterium Uranium) PCR very close to zero. In the original CANDU6 design, the PCR was calculated to be clearly negative. However, the latest physics design tools predict that the PCR is slightly positive for a wide operational range of reactor power. It is upon this contradictory observation that the CANDU6 PCR is re-evaluated in this work. In our previous study, the CANDU6 PCR was evaluated through a standard lattice analysis at mid-burnup and was found to be negative at low power. In this paper, the study was extended to a detailed 3-D CANDU6 whole-core model using the Monte Carlo code Serpent2. The Doppler broadening rejection correction (DBRC) method was implemented in the Serpent2 code in order to take into account thermal motion of the heavy uranium nucleus in the neutron-U scattering reactions. Time-average equilibrium core was considered for the evaluation of the representative PCR of CANDU6. Two thermal hydraulic models were considered in this work: one at design condition and the other at operating condition. Bundle-wise distributions of the coolant properties are modeled and the bundle-wise fuel temperature is also considered in this study. The evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0 was used throughout this Serpent2 evaluation. In these Monte Carlo calculations, a large number

  11. Status of LEU conversion program at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, I.C.

    1991-01-01

    After briefly reviewing the salient features of the NRU Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), the progress of our LEU fuel development and testing program is described. The results (to date) of full-size prototype fuel-rod irradiations are reviewed, and the status of the new fuel-fabrication facility on the site is updated. Although development work is proceeding on U 3 Si 2 dispersions, all indications so far are that CRNL's U 3 Si fuel is fully acceptable for reactor operation. Fuel rods from the new fabrication shop will be installed in NRU in 1990, and the complete core conversion of NRU to LEU driver fuel is expected by 1991. (orig.)

  12. HEU to LEU fuel conversion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, R.U.

    1994-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a ruling, effective March 27, 1986, that all U.S. non-power reactors convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel. A Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program was conducted by the Department of Energy at Argonne National Laboratory to coordinate the development of the high density LEU fuel and assist in the development of Safety Analysis Reports for the smaller non-power reactors. Several meetings were held at Argonne in 1987 with the non-power reactor community to discuss the conversion and to set up a conversion schedule for university reactors. EG&G at Idaho was assigned the coordination of the fuel element redesigns. The fuel elements were manufactured by the Babcock & Wilcox Company in Lynchburg, Virginia. The University of Virginia was awarded a grant by the DOE Idaho Operations Office in 1988 to perform safety analysis studies for the LEU conversion for its 2 MW UVAR and 100 Watt CAVALIER reactors. The University subsequently decided to shut down the CAVALIER reactor. A preliminary SAR on the UVAR, along with Technical Specification changes, was submitted to the NRC in November, 1990. An updated SAR was approved by the NRC in January, 1991. In September, 1992, representatives from the fuel manufacturer (B&W) and the fuel designer (EG&G, Idaho) came to the UVAR facility to observe trial fittings of new 22 plate LEU mock fuel elements. B&W fabricated two non-fuel bearing elements, a regular 22 plate element and a control rod element. The elements were checked against the drawings and test fitted in the UVAR grid plate. The dimensions were acceptable and the elements fit in the grid plate with no problems. The staff made several suggestions for minor construction changes to the end pieces on the elements, which were incorporated into the final design of the actual fuel elements. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. HEU to LEU fuel conversion. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, R.U.

    1994-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a ruling, effective March 27, 1986, that all U.S. non-power reactors convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel. A Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program was conducted by the Department of Energy at Argonne National Laboratory to coordinate the development of the high density LEU fuel and assist in the development of Safety Analysis Reports for the smaller non-power reactors. Several meetings were held at Argonne in 1987 with the non-power reactor community to discuss the conversion and to set up a conversion schedule for university reactors. EG ampersand G at Idaho was assigned the coordination of the fuel element redesigns. The fuel elements were manufactured by the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company in Lynchburg, Virginia. The University of Virginia was awarded a grant by the DOE Idaho Operations Office in 1988 to perform safety analysis studies for the LEU conversion for its 2 MW UVAR and 100 Watt CAVALIER reactors. The University subsequently decided to shut down the CAVALIER reactor. A preliminary SAR on the UVAR, along with Technical Specification changes, was submitted to the NRC in November, 1990. An updated SAR was approved by the NRC in January, 1991. In September, 1992, representatives from the fuel manufacturer (B ampersand W) and the fuel designer (EG ampersand G, Idaho) came to the UVAR facility to observe trial fittings of new 22 plate LEU mock fuel elements. B ampersand W fabricated two non-fuel bearing elements, a regular 22 plate element and a control rod element. The elements were checked against the drawings and test fitted in the UVAR grid plate. The dimensions were acceptable and the elements fit in the grid plate with no problems. The staff made several suggestions for minor construction changes to the end pieces on the elements, which were incorporated into the final design of the actual fuel elements. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology

  14. Performance of PARR-1 with LEU Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervez, S.; Latif, M.; Bokhari, I.H.; Bakhtyar, S.

    2005-01-01

    Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) went critical in 1965 with HEU fuel. The reactor core was converted to LEU fuel with power upgradation from 5 MW to 10 MW in 1992. The reactor has been operated with LEU fuel for about 10,000 hours and has produced about 66,000 MWh energy up to now. Average burn up of the irradiated fuel is about 42 %. The fuel performance during the last 12 years has been excellent. Post irradiation visual inspection of the fuel has revealed no abnormality. During operation there have been no signs of releases in the pool water establishing the full integrity of this fuel. The reactor has been mainly utilized for radioisotope production, beam tube experiments including neutron diffraction studies, neutron radiography etc. Studies have been completed to operate the reactor with a mixed core (HEU + LEU) to utilize the less burned HEU fuel elements. A major project of production of fission Moly using PARR-1 is in the final stages. (author)

  15. [Leu31, Pro34]neuropeptide Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhlendorff, J; Gether, U; Aakerlund, L

    1990-01-01

    Two types of binding sites have previously been described for 36-amino acid neuropeptide Y (NPY), called Y1 and Y2 receptors. Y2 receptors can bind long C-terminal fragments of NPY-e.g., NPY-(13-36)-peptide. In contrast, Y1 receptors have until now only been characterized as NPY receptors that do...... not bind such fragments. In the present study an NPY analog is presented, [Leu31, Pro34]NPY, which in a series of human neuroblastoma cell lines and on rat PC-12 cells can displace radiolabeled NPY only from cells that express Y1 receptors and not from those expressing Y2 receptors. The radiolabeled analog......, [125I-Tyr36] monoiodo-[Leu31, Pro34]NPY, also binds specifically only to cells with Y1 receptors. The binding of this analog to Y1 receptors on human neuroblastoma cells is associated with a transient increase in cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations similar to the response observed with NPY. [Leu31...

  16. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings.

  17. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings

  18. HEU/LEU-conversion of BER II successfully finished

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.; Fischer, C.-O.; Krohn, H.

    2000-01-01

    The BER II (Berliner Experimental Reactor) research reactor is a swimming pool type reactor located in Berlin, Germany. The reactor operates with a thermal power of 10 MW and is primarily used to produce neutrons for neutron scattering experiments. The conversion from HEU- to LEU-fuel elements began in August, 1997. At the last RERTR Meeting 1999 in Budapest, Hungary, Hahn-Meitner-Institut (HMI) presented a 'Status Report' on the conversion of 10 HEU/LEU mixed cores. In February 2000, HMI finished the HEU/LEU-conversion. Hereby, the first pure LEU-standard-core went into operation. Our second LEU-core just ends its operation at the end of July. The third LEU-core will be built up in the beginning of August. The average burn-up rate was improved from 50 - 55% (HEU) to 60 - 65% (LEU). Therefore, only 14 elements/year are now used instead of 28/year. The following report describes our first steps in building pure LEU-cores from mixed HEU/LEU-cores, as well as our initial experience using the pure LEU-cores. (author)

  19. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-11-10

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti {gamma} point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi{sub 2}-monolayer and the Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi{sub 2}/Si(111) and Er{sub 3}Si{sub 5}/Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the (vector)k {sub parallel} space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti {gamma} point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas

  20. Irradiation behavior of experimental miniature uranium silicide fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Neimark, L.A.; Mattas, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium silicides, because of their relatively high uranium density, were selected as candidate dispersion fuels for the higher fuel densities required in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Irradiation experience with this type of fuel, however, was limited to relatively modest fission densities in the bulk form, on the order of 7 x 10 20 cm -3 , far short of he approximately 20 x 10 20 cm -3 goal established for the RERTR Program. The purpose of the irradiation experiments on silicide fuels in the ORR, therefore, was to investigate the intrinsic irradiation behavior of uranium silicide as a dispersion fuel. Of particular interest was the interaction between the silicide particles and the aluminum matrix, the swelling behavior of the silicide particles, and the maximum volume fraction of silicide particles that could be contained in the aluminum matrix. The first group of experimental 'mini' fuel plates have recently reached the program's goal burnup and are in various stages of examination. Although the results to date indicate some limitations, it appears that within the range of parameters examined thus far the uranium silicide dispersion holds promise for satisfying most of the needs of the RERTR Program. The twelve experimental silicide dispersion fuel plates that were irradiated to approximately their goal exposure show the 30-vol % U 3 Si-Al plates to be in a stage of relatively rapid fission-gas-driven swelling at a fission density of 2 x 10 20 cm -3 . This fuel swelling will likely result in unacceptably large plate-thickness increases. The U 3 Si plates appear to be superior in this respect; however, they, too, are starting to move into the rapid fuel-swelling stage. Analysis of the currently available post irradiation data indicates that a 40-vol % dispersed fuel may offer an acceptable margin to the onset of unstable thickness changes at exposures of 2 x 10 21 fission/cm 3 . The interdiffusion between fuel and matrix

  1. LEU-plate irradiation at FRJ-2 (DIDO) under the German AF-programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groos, E; Krug, W; Seferiadis, J; Thamm, G

    1985-07-01

    10 LEU fuel plates (8 with uranium silicides max. U-density 6.1 g/cm{sup 3}) have been irradiated at FRJ-2 (DIDO) of KFA-Juelich till end of October 1984 during 321 full power days up to max. burnup of 2.41x10{sup 27} fissions/m{sup 3} without major interruptions and troubles. PIE began recently in KFA hot cells. Visual inspections revealed no damage or greater deformation for the majority of the plates, but red/brown coloured layers (partially peeled off) on the cladding over the fuel. Aluminium (oxide) is the chief constituent of the layer with smaller portions of Ni and Fe the latter causing the red/brown colour. The major part of the layer ({approx}50 {mu}m) most probably has been formed during 20 h immediately after experiment start-up under abnormal conditions of the coolant water. Gamma scanning has been completed. Dimensional measurements are under way confirming first observations of severe swelling (pillowing) of 1 plate. Density and blister testing as well as metallography and burnup analysis remain to be accomplished end of 1985/beginning of 1986. (author)

  2. Ferromagnetic properties of manganese doped iron silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Reyes, Angel; Fonseca, Luis F.; Sabirianov, Renat

    We report the synthesis of high quality Iron silicide (FeSi) nanowires via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The materials exhibits excellent magnetic response at room temperature, especially when doped with manganese showing values of 2.0 X 10-04 emu for the FexMnySi nanowires. SEM and TEM characterization indicates that the synthesized nanowires have a diameter of approximately 80nm. MFM measurements present a clear description of the magnetic domains when the nanowires are doped with manganese. Electron Diffraction and XRD measurements confirms that the nanowires are single crystal forming a simple cubic structure with space group P213. First-principle calculations were performed on (111) FeSi surface using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP). The exchange correlations were treated under the Ceperley-Alder (CA) local density approximation (LDA). The Brillouin Zone was sampled with 8x8x1 k-point grid. A total magnetic moment of about 10 μB was obtained for three different surface configuration in which the Iron atom nearest to the surface present the higher magnetization. To study the effect of Mn doping, Fe atom was replaced for a Mn. Stronger magnetization is presented when the Mn atom is close to the surface. The exchange coupling constant have been evaluated calculating the energy difference between the ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic configurations.

  3. Submicron Features in Higher Manganese Silicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatir Sadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world energy crisis had increased the demand for alternative energy sources and as such is one of the topics at the forefront of research. One way for reducing energy consumption is by thermoelectricity. Thermoelectric effects enable direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy. Higher manganese silicide (HMS, MnSi1.75 is one of the promising materials for applications in the field of thermoelectricity. The abundance and low cost of the elements, combined with good thermoelectric properties and high mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, make it very attractive for thermoelectric applications. Recent studies have shown that Si-rich HMS has improved thermoelectric properties. The most interesting of which is the unusual reduction in thermal conductivity. In the current research, transmission (TEM and scanning (SEM electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction methods were applied for investigation of the govern mechanisms resulting in very low thermal conductivity values of an Si-rich HMS composition, following arc melting and hot-pressing procedures. In this paper, it is shown that there is a presence of sub-micron dislocations walls, stacking faults, and silicon and HMS precipitates inside each other apparent in the matrix, following a high temperature (0.9 Tm hot pressing for an hour. These are not just responsible for the low thermal conductivity values observed but also indicate the ability to create complicate nano-structures that will last during the production process and possibly during the application.

  4. Nickel silicide formation in silicon implanted nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Z.; Williams, J. S.; Pogany, A. P.; Sood, D. K.; Collins, G. A.

    1995-04-01

    Nickel silicide formation during the annealing of very high dose (≥4.5×1017 ions/cm2) Si implanted Ni has been investigated, using ion beam analytical techniques, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. An initial amorphous Si-Ni alloy, formed as a result of high dose ion implantation, first crystallized to Ni2Si upon annealing in the temperature region of 200-300 °C. This was followed by the formation of Ni5Si2 in the temperature region of 300-400 °C and then by Ni3Si at 400-600 °C. The Ni3Si layer was found to have an epitaxial relationship with the substrate Ni, which was determined as Ni3Si∥Ni and Ni3Si∥Ni for Ni(100) samples. The minimum channeling yield in the 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectra of this epitaxial layer improved with higher annealing temperatures up to 600 °C, and reached a best value measured at about 8%. However, the epitaxial Ni3Si dissolved after long time annealing at 600 °C or annealing at higher temperatures to liberate soluble Si into the Ni substrate. The epitaxy is attributed to the excellent lattice match between the Ni3Si and the Ni. The annealing behavior follows the predictions of the Ni-Si phase diagram for this nickel-rich binary system.

  5. Characterization of uranium silicide powder using XRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Rafael H.L.; Saliba-Silva, Adonis M.; Carvalho, Elita F.U.; Lima, Nelson B.; Ichikawa, Rodrigo U.; Martinez, Luiz G.

    2013-01-01

    Uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) is an intermetallic used as nuclear fuel in most modern MTR - Materials Test Reactor. Dispersed in aluminum, this fuel allows high uranium densities, up to 4.8 gU/cm 3 . At IPEN, the fabrication of fuel elements based on U 3 Si 2 for the IEA-R1 reactor is carried out in the Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN), by vacuum induction melting of uranium and silicon, followed by grinding. Before employed in a nuclear reactor, U 3 Si 2 must be submitted to a strict quality control, which includes granulometry, density, X-ray radiography for dispersion homogeneity, chemical and crystallographic characterization. Concerning phase composition for a qualified fuel, the fraction of U 3 Si 2 should be higher than 80wt.%. Aiming at the development of a routine methodology for quantification of phases via analysis of XRD data using the Rietved method, six samples from two production baths of CCN were submitted to X-ray diffraction. The data were analyzed using software GSAS and line profile analysis methods. The results suggest that fusion product have preferred orientation and grinding step is important for a better refinement. (author)

  6. Trace metal assay of uranium silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M.J.; Argekar, A.A.; Thulasidas, S.K.; Dhawale, B.A.; Rajeswari, B.; Adya, V.C.; Purohit, P.J.; Neelam, G.; Bangia, T.R.; Page, A.G.; Sastry, M.D.; Iyer, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive trace metal assay of uranium silicide, a fuel for nuclear research reactors that employs low-enrichment uranium, is carried out by atomic spectrometry. Of the list of specification elements, 21 metallic elements are determined by a direct current (dc) arc carrier distillation technique; the rare earths yttrium and zirconium are chemically separated from the major matrix followed by a dc arc/inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) excitation technique in atomic emission spectrometry (AES); silver is determined by electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) without prior chemical separation of the major matrix. Gamma radioactive tracers are used to check the recovery of rare earths during the chemical separation procedure. The detection limits for trace metallics vary in the 0.1- to 40-ppm range. The precision of the determinations as evaluated from the analysis of the synthetic sample with intermediate range analyte concentration is better than 25% relative standard deviation (RSD) for most of the elements employing dc arc-AES, while that for silver determination by ETS-AAS is 10% RSD. The precision of the determinations for four crucially important rare earths by ICP-AES is better than 3% RSD

  7. Si-Ge Nano-Structured with Tungsten Silicide Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Traditional silicon germanium high temperature thermoelectrics have potential for improvements in figure of merit via nano-structuring with a silicide phase. A second phase of nano-sized silicides can theoretically reduce the lattice component of thermal conductivity without significantly reducing the electrical conductivity. However, experimentally achieving such improvements in line with the theory is complicated by factors such as control of silicide size during sintering, dopant segregation, matrix homogeneity, and sintering kinetics. Samples are prepared using powder metallurgy techniques; including mechanochemical alloying via ball milling and spark plasma sintering for densification. In addition to microstructural development, thermal stability of thermoelectric transport properties are reported, as well as couple and device level characterization.

  8. Magnesium silicide production and silane synthesis on its basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taurbaev, T.I.; Mukashev, F.A.; Manakov, S.M.; Francev, U.V.; Kalblanbekov, B.M.; Akhter, P.; Abbas, M.; Hussain, A.

    2003-01-01

    We had developed an alternative method of production of magnesium silicide with use of ferroalloys of silicon. Magnesium silicide is raw material for silane synthesis. The essence of the method consist of sintering FS -75 (ferrosilicium with 75 % of silicon and 25 % of iron, made by ferroalloy factories) with metal magnesium at temperature of 650 deg. C. The X-ray analysis has shown formation of magnesium silicide. That is further used for synthesis of silane. The output of silane is 60 % in respect of the contents of silicon. After removing the water vapors the mass-spectrometer analysis has estimated the purity of silane as 99.95 % with no detection of phosphine and diborane. (author)

  9. TiSi2 integrity within a doped silicide process step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crean, G.M.; Cole, P.D.; Stoemenos, J.

    1993-01-01

    Degradation of arsenic implanted titanium silicide (TiSi 2 ) thin films as a result of thermal processing for shallow junction formation is investigated. Significant arsenic diffusion from the silicide overlayer into the silicon substrate has been detected by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry at drive-in temperatures > 1,050 C. Cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs have shown the silicide film become increasingly non-uniform as the thermal budget increases, ultimately leading to discontinuities forming in the silicide film. This observed degradation of the titanium silicide film is also supported by sheet resistance measurements which show the film to degrade significantly above a threshold thermal budget

  10. Morphology of Si/tungsten-silicides/Si interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodore, N.; Secco d'Aragona, F.; Blackstone, S.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten and tungsten-silicides are of interest for semiconductor technology because of their refractory nature, low electrical-resistivity and high electromigration-resistance. This paper presents the first formation of buried tungsten-silicide layers in silicon, by proximity adhesion. The interlayers, created by a combination of chemical vapor-deposition (CVD) and proximity-adhesion were studied using transmission electron-microscopy (TEM). The behavior of the layers in the presence and absence of an adjacent silicon-dioxide interlayer was also investigated. Buried silicide layers were successfully formed with or without the adjacent silicon-dioxide. The silicide formed continuous layers with single grains encompassing the width of the interlayer. Individual grains were globular, with cusps at grain boundaries. This caused interlayer-thicknesses to be non-uniform, with lower thickness values being present at the cusps. Occasional voids were observed at grain-boundary cusps. The voids were smaller and less frequent in the presence of an adjacent oxide-layer, due to flow of the oxide during proximity adhesion. Electron-diffraction revealed a predominance of tungsten-disilicide in the interlayers, with some free tungsten being present. Stresses in the silicide layers caused occasional glide dislocations to propagate into the silicon substrate beneath the interlayers. The dislocations propagate only ∼100 nm into the substrate and therefore should not be detrimental to use of the buried layers. Occasional precipitates were observed at the end of glide-loops. These possibly arise due to excess tungsten from the interlayer diffusion down the glide dislocation to finally precipitate out as tungsten-silicide

  11. Oxidation behavior of molybdenum silicides and their composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Deevi, S. C.

    2000-01-01

    A key materials issue associated with the future of high-temperature structural silicides is the resistance of these materials to oxidation at low temperatures. Oxidation tests were conducted on Mo-based silicides over a wide temperature range to evaluate the effects of alloy composition and temperature on the protective scaling characteristics and testing regime for the materials. The study included Mo 5 Si 3 alloys that contained several concentrations of B. In addition, oxidation characteristics of MoSi 2 -Si 3 N 4 composites that contained 20--80 vol.% Si 3 N 4 were evaluated at 500--1,400 C

  12. Formation of silicides in a cavity applicator microwave system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.C.; Kim, H.C.; Alford, T.L.; Mayer, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Metal silicides of nickel and cobalt are formed in a cavity applicator microwave system with a magnetron power of 1200 W and a frequency of 2.45 GHz. X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and four-point-probe measurements are used to identify the silicide phase present and layer thicknesses. Additional processing confirmed that the products attained from heating by microwaves do not differ appreciably from those attained in heating by thermal processes. Materials properties are used to explain microwave power absorption and demonstrate how to tailor a robust process in which thin film reactions can be attained and specific products isolated

  13. Development of production of {sup 99}Mo from LEU target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adang, H G; Mutalib, A; Lubis, H [Radioisotope Production Centre, National Atomic Energy Agency, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong (Indonesia); and others

    1998-10-01

    {sup 99}TC, the most popular radioisotope in nuclear medicine, is daughter of {sup 99}Mo. {sup 99}Mo is produced in research reactor by irradiating of high enriched uranium (HEU). However, in recent year, strict regulation that has been implemented by USA DOE and NPT has led to the difficulty in getting HEU. Therefore, BATAN has tried to develop the production of {sup 99}Mo by using low enriched uranium (LEU). The research involves the use of LEU in the production of {sup 99}Mo. This research was started in 1994 by joint-research between BATAN and Argonne National Laboratory USA. This program is divided into three research groups. The first group emphasizes its research on fabrication of LEU foil that is going to be irradiated. The second group studies the irradiation`s aspects and physical characteristic of irradiated LEU foils. The third group studies the radiochemical separation process of fission product {sup 99}Mo from solution of irradiated LEU foils. There are five steps that are carried out in studying of radiochemical separation of {sup 99}Mo from irradiated LEU. First is designing a dissolver that is going to be used in dissolving of LEU foil and testing its reliability. Second is dissolving LEU in the new design dissolver. Third is evaluation the modified of Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process of {sup 99}Mo from LEU. Forth is modifying the Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process of {sup 99}Mo from the solution of irradiated LEU. And fifth is using the modified of Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process for separation {sup 99}Mo from solution of irradiated LEU. The first through the forth steps of experiments were already carried out and will be reported in this workshop, whereas the fifth step of experiment is going to be conducted in February 1998. (author)

  14. 31 CFR 540.308 - Low Enriched Uranium (LEU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low Enriched Uranium (LEU). 540.308... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.308 Low Enriched Uranium (LEU). The term low enriched...

  15. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

  16. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation

  17. Silicide Schottky Contacts to Silicon: Screened Pinning at Defect Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, T.J.

    1999-03-11

    Silicide Schottky contacts can be as large as 0.955 eV (E{sub v} + 0.165 eV) on n-type silicon and as large as 1.05 eV (E{sub c} {minus} 0.07 eV) on p-type silicon. Current models of Schottky barrier formation do not provide a satisfactory explanation of occurrence of this wide variation. A model for understanding Schottky contacts via screened pinning at defect levels is presented. In the present paper it is shown that most transition metal silicides are pinned approximately 0.48 eV above the valence band by interstitial Si clusters. Rare earth disilicides pin close to the divacancy acceptor level 0.41 eV below the conduction band edge while high work function silicides of Ir and Pt pin close to the divacancy donor level 0.21 eV above the valence band edge. Selection of a particular defect pinning level depends strongly on the relative positions of the silicide work function and the defect energy level on an absolute energy scale.

  18. The electronic structure of 4d and 5d silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speier, W.; Kumar, L.; Sarma, D.D.; Groot, R.A. de; Fuggle, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic experimental and theoretical study of the electronic structure of stoichiometric silicides with Nb, Mo, Ta and W is presented. We have employed x-ray photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy as experimental techniques and interpreted the measured data by calculation of

  19. Neutronic design of the RSG-GAS silicide core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sembiring, T.M.; Kuntoro, I.; Hastowo, H. [Center for Development of Research Reactor Technology National Nuclear Energy Agency BATAN, PUSPIPTEK Serpong Tangerang, 15310 (Indonesia)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of core conversion program of the RSG-GAS multipurpose reactor is to convert the fuel from oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al to silicide, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al. The aim of the program is to gain longer operation cycle by having, which is technically possible for silicide fuel, a higher density. Upon constraints of the existing reactor system and utilization, an optimal fuel density in amount of 3.55 g U/cc was found. This paper describes the neutronic parameter design of the silicide equilibrium core and the design of its transition cores as well. From reactivity control point of view, a modification of control rod system is also discussed. All calculations are carried out by means of diffusion codes, Batan-EQUIL-2D, Batan-2DIFF and -3DIFF. The silicide core shows that longer operation cycle of 32 full power days can be achieved without decreasing the safety criteria and utilization capabilities. (author)

  20. Texture in thin film silicides and germanides: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Schutter, B., E-mail: bob.deschutter@ugent.be; De Keyser, K.; Detavernier, C. [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Lavoie, C. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Silicides and germanides are compounds consisting of a metal and silicon or germanium. In the microelectronics industry, silicides are the material of choice for contacting silicon based devices (over the years, CoSi{sub 2}, C54-TiSi{sub 2}, and NiSi have been adopted), while germanides are considered as a top candidate for contacting future germanium based electronics. Since also strain engineering through the use of Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} in the source/drain/gate regions of MOSFET devices is an important technique for improving device characteristics in modern Si-based microelectronics industry, a profound understanding of the formation of silicide/germanide contacts to silicon and germanium is of utmost importance. The crystallographic texture of these films, which is defined as the statistical distribution of the orientation of the grains in the film, has been the subject of scientific studies since the 1970s. Different types of texture like epitaxy, axiotaxy, fiber, or combinations thereof have been observed in such films. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that film texture can have a profound influence on the formation and stability of silicide/germanide contacts, as it controls the type and orientation of grain boundaries (affecting diffusion and agglomeration) and the interface energy (affecting nucleation during the solid-state reaction). Furthermore, the texture also has an impact on the electrical characteristics of the contact, as the orientation and size of individual grains influences functional properties such as contact resistance and sheet resistance and will induce local variations in strain and Schottky barrier height. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of the scientific work that has been published in the field of texture studies on thin film silicide/germanide contacts.

  1. Texture in thin film silicides and germanides: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Schutter, B.; De Keyser, K.; Detavernier, C.; Lavoie, C.

    2016-01-01

    Silicides and germanides are compounds consisting of a metal and silicon or germanium. In the microelectronics industry, silicides are the material of choice for contacting silicon based devices (over the years, CoSi_2, C54-TiSi_2, and NiSi have been adopted), while germanides are considered as a top candidate for contacting future germanium based electronics. Since also strain engineering through the use of Si_1_−_xGe_x in the source/drain/gate regions of MOSFET devices is an important technique for improving device characteristics in modern Si-based microelectronics industry, a profound understanding of the formation of silicide/germanide contacts to silicon and germanium is of utmost importance. The crystallographic texture of these films, which is defined as the statistical distribution of the orientation of the grains in the film, has been the subject of scientific studies since the 1970s. Different types of texture like epitaxy, axiotaxy, fiber, or combinations thereof have been observed in such films. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that film texture can have a profound influence on the formation and stability of silicide/germanide contacts, as it controls the type and orientation of grain boundaries (affecting diffusion and agglomeration) and the interface energy (affecting nucleation during the solid-state reaction). Furthermore, the texture also has an impact on the electrical characteristics of the contact, as the orientation and size of individual grains influences functional properties such as contact resistance and sheet resistance and will induce local variations in strain and Schottky barrier height. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of the scientific work that has been published in the field of texture studies on thin film silicide/germanide contacts.

  2. Texture in thin film silicides and germanides: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schutter, B.; De Keyser, K.; Lavoie, C.; Detavernier, C.

    2016-09-01

    Silicides and germanides are compounds consisting of a metal and silicon or germanium. In the microelectronics industry, silicides are the material of choice for contacting silicon based devices (over the years, CoSi2, C54-TiSi2, and NiSi have been adopted), while germanides are considered as a top candidate for contacting future germanium based electronics. Since also strain engineering through the use of Si1-xGex in the source/drain/gate regions of MOSFET devices is an important technique for improving device characteristics in modern Si-based microelectronics industry, a profound understanding of the formation of silicide/germanide contacts to silicon and germanium is of utmost importance. The crystallographic texture of these films, which is defined as the statistical distribution of the orientation of the grains in the film, has been the subject of scientific studies since the 1970s. Different types of texture like epitaxy, axiotaxy, fiber, or combinations thereof have been observed in such films. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that film texture can have a profound influence on the formation and stability of silicide/germanide contacts, as it controls the type and orientation of grain boundaries (affecting diffusion and agglomeration) and the interface energy (affecting nucleation during the solid-state reaction). Furthermore, the texture also has an impact on the electrical characteristics of the contact, as the orientation and size of individual grains influences functional properties such as contact resistance and sheet resistance and will induce local variations in strain and Schottky barrier height. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of the scientific work that has been published in the field of texture studies on thin film silicide/germanide contacts.

  3. Development of Fission Mo-99 Process for LEU Dispersion Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Kon; Lee, Su Seung; Hong, Soon Bog; Jang, Kyung Duk; Park, Ul Jae; Lee, Jun Sig [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is developing LEU-based fission {sup 99}Mo production process which is connected to the new research reactor (Kijang New Research Reactor, KJRR), which is being constructed in Gijang, Busan, Korea. Historically, the most fission {sup 99}Mo producers have been used highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets so far. However, to reduce the use of HEU in private sector for non-proliferation, {sup 99}Mo producers are forced to convert their HEU-based process to use low enriched uranium (LEU) targets. Economic impact of a target conversion from HEU to LEU is significant. Overall cost for the production of the fission {sup 99}Mo increases significantly with the conversion of fission {sup 99}Mo targets from HEU to LEU. It is not only because the yield of LEU is only 50% of HEU, but also because radioactive waste production increases 200%. On the basis, worldwide efforts on the development of {sup 99}Mo production process that is optimized for the LEU target become an important issue. In this study, fission {sup 99}Mo process with non-irradiated LEU targets was presented except separation and purification steps. Pre- and post-irradiation tests of the fission {sup 99}Mo target will be done in 4th quarter of 2016.

  4. Development of Fission Mo-99 Process for LEU Dispersion Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Kon; Lee, Su Seung; Hong, Soon Bog; Jang, Kyung Duk; Park, Ul Jae; Lee, Jun Sig

    2016-01-01

    KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is developing LEU-based fission 99 Mo production process which is connected to the new research reactor (Kijang New Research Reactor, KJRR), which is being constructed in Gijang, Busan, Korea. Historically, the most fission 99 Mo producers have been used highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets so far. However, to reduce the use of HEU in private sector for non-proliferation, 99 Mo producers are forced to convert their HEU-based process to use low enriched uranium (LEU) targets. Economic impact of a target conversion from HEU to LEU is significant. Overall cost for the production of the fission 99 Mo increases significantly with the conversion of fission 99 Mo targets from HEU to LEU. It is not only because the yield of LEU is only 50% of HEU, but also because radioactive waste production increases 200%. On the basis, worldwide efforts on the development of 99 Mo production process that is optimized for the LEU target become an important issue. In this study, fission 99 Mo process with non-irradiated LEU targets was presented except separation and purification steps. Pre- and post-irradiation tests of the fission 99 Mo target will be done in 4th quarter of 2016

  5. Status of HEU-LEU conversion of FRJ-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, G.; Nabbi, R.

    2002-01-01

    The operator of the German FRJ-2 research reactor, 'Research Center Juelich', has participated from the beginning in the RERTR programme and made comprehensive contributions to the test and use of LEU fuel for HEU-LEU-conversion measures. The originally planned time scale for the conversion of FRJ-2 was significantly delayed because of a change of the manufacturer of the LEU fuel elements and a 4 years shutdown of the reactor for refurbishment purposes. In the meantime the new LEU fuel elements are qualified and tested in the reactor. In the moment calculations for the safety report are made and it is planned to apply for the license of FRJ-2 operation with LEU fuel at the beginning of 2003. In order to get most reliable results a sophisticated computational method based on a MCNP model coupled with the depletion code BURN was developed for reactor physical calculations, core conversion studies and fuel element performance analysis and applied to the mixed and LEU core. The licensing schedule and results of latest calculations for the conversion study will be presented. The simulations shows that the thermal flux in the LEU core is about 19% resulting in a lower burnup rate. But in the reflector area around the core and in the center of the cold n source the neutron flux reduction remains limited to 6%. Due to a harder neutron spectrum in the LEU core the kinetic and safety related parameters are slightly reduced. Using the ORIGEN code it could be shown that the increase of the total fission products inventory amounts to about 6% compared to a HEU core. As a consequence of the high amount of U-238, the amount of U-235 in the LEU core has to be about 27% higher than in the HEU core but the U-235 burnup is approx. 5% lower due to the contribution of fissile plutonium. (author)

  6. Radiological consequence analysis with HEU and LEU fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W.L.; Warinner, D.K.; Matos, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A model for estimating the radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident in HEU and LEU fueled research and test reactors is presented. Simple hand calculations based on fission product yield table inventories and non-site specific dispersion data may be adequate in many cases. However, more detailed inventories and site specific data on meteorological conditions and release rates and heights can result in substantial reductions in the dose estimates. LEU fuel gives essentially the same doses as HEU fuel. The plutonium buildup in the LEU fuel does not significantly increase the radiological consequences. The dose to the thyroid is the limiting dose. 10 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.

  7. Preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism in obese Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Dae-Sun; Kim, Se-Lim; Kim, Sun-Young; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Lee, Kee-Hyoung; Lee, Dae-Yeol

    2005-11-01

    Ghrelin is a novel gut-brain peptide that has somatotropic, orexigenic, and adipogenic effects. We examined the preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism in 222 obese Korean children to determine whether it is associated with obesity. The frequencies of the Leu72Met polymorphism were 29.3% in obese, 32.3% in overweight, and 32.5% in lean Korean children. No significant difference was found between Met72 carrier and non-carrier obese children with respect to BMI, total body fat, serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, or LDL-cholesterol levels. Our data suggest that the preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism is not associated with obesity in children.

  8. Radiological consequence analysis with HEU and LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.L.; Warinner, D.K.; Matos, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A model for estimating the radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident in HEU and LEU fueled research and test reactors is presented. Simple hand calculations based on fission product yield table inventories and non-site specific dispersion data may be adequate in many cases. However, more detailed inventories and site specific data on meteorological conditions and release rates and heights can result in substantial reductions in the dose estimates. LEU fuel gives essentially the same doses as HEU fuel. The plutonium buildup in the LEU fuel does not significantly increase the radiological consequences. The dose to the thyroid is the limiting dose. 10 references, 3 figures, 7 tables

  9. A radiological consequence analysis with HEU and LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, W.L.; Warinner, D.K.; Matos, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    A model for estimating the radiological consequences from a hypothetical accident in HEU and LEU fueled research and test reactors is presented. Simple hand calculations based on fission product yield table inventories and nonsite specific dispersion data may be adequate in many cases. However, more detailed inventories and site specific data on meteorological conditions and release rates and heights can result in substantial reductions in the dose estimates. LEU fuel gives essentially the same doses as HEU fuel. The plutonium buildup in the LEU fuel does not significantly increase the radiological consequences. The dose to the thyroid is the limiting dose. (author)

  10. Evaluation of anomalies during nickel and titanium silicide formation using the effective heat of formation mode

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, R

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available , as well as the observed sequence of growth of different silicide phases, are not in agree- ment with thermodynamic considerations [26]. In the case of the nickel silicides Ni,Si is nearly always found to be the first... to determine how the oxygen content in the silicon affects phase formation. We also show how the anomalous behaviour of titanium and nickel silicide formation can be explained thermodynamically by using the ?effective heat...

  11. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S., E-mail: asozcan@us.ibm.com [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Lavoie, Christian; Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Alptekin, Emre; Zhu, Frank [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M. [TEL Epion Inc., 900 Middlesex Turnpike, Bldg. 6, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  12. A study of CoSix silicide formed by recoil implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    This work investigated the formation of CoSi x silicides on n-Si by recoil implantation through a thin cobalt layer using an inert gas ion beam. The results suggest the formation of a very shallow (35 to 45 nm) silicide surface layer under the specific conditions of preparation. The surface layer resistivity was comparable to values reported for Co 2 Si and CoSi, although below the surface, the resistivity decreased. This appeared to suggest a change-over from cobalt-rich silicides near the surface to a more conducting silicide (CoSi 2 ) at the interface. (author)

  13. Analysis of reactivity accidents of the RSG-GAS core with silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran

    2002-01-01

    The fuels of RSG-GAS reactor is changed from uranium oxide to uranium silicide. For time being, the fuel of RSG-GAS core are mixed up between oxide and silicide fuels with 250 gr of loading and 2.96 g U/cm 3 of density, respectively. While, silicide fuel with 300 gr of loading is still under research. The advantages of silicide fuels are can be used in high density, so that, it can be stayed longer in the core at higher burn-up, therefore, the length of cycle is longer. The silicide fuel in RSG-GAS core is used in step-wise by using mixed up core. Firstly, it is used silicide fuel with 250 gr of loading and then, silicide fuel with 300 gr of loading (3.55 g U/cm 3 of density). In every step-wise of fuel loading must be analysed its safety margin. In this occasion, it is analysed the reactivity accident of RSG-GAS core with 300 gr of silicide fuel loading. The calculation was done by using POKDYN code which available at P2TRR. The calculation was done by reactivity insertion at start up and power rangers. From all cases which were have been done, the results of analysis showed that there is no anomaly and safety margin break at RSG-GAS core with 300 gr silicide fuel loading

  14. The manufacture of LEU fuel elements at Dounreay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.

    1997-08-01

    Two LEU test elements are being manufactured at Dounreay for test irradiation in the HFR at Petten, The Netherlands. This paper describes the installation of equipment and the development of the fabrication and inspection techniques necessary for the manufacture of LEU fuel plates. The author`s experience in overcoming the technical problems of stray fuel particles, dog-boning, uranium homogeneity and the measurement of uranium distribution is also described.

  15. RA-3 core with uranium silicide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, Maximo J.; Sbaffoni, Maria M.

    2000-01-01

    Following on with studies on uranium silicide fuel elements, this paper reports some comparisons between the use of standard ECN [U 3 O 8 ] fuel elements and type P-06 [from U 3 Si 2 ] fuel elements in the RA-3 core.The first results showed that the calculated overall mean burn up is in agreement with that reported for the facility, which gives more confidence to the successive ones. Comparing the mentioned cores, the silicide one presents several advantages such as: -) a mean burn up increase of 18 %; -) an extraction burn up increase of 20 %; -) 37.4 % increase in full power days, for mean burn up. All this is meritorious for this fuel. Moreover, grouped and homogenized libraries were prepared for CITVAP code that will be used for planning experiments and other bidimensional studies. Preliminary calculations were also performed. (author)

  16. No association of the neuropeptide Y (Leu7Pro) and ghrelin gene (Arg51Gln, Leu72Met, Gln90Leu) single nucleotide polymorphisms with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Jochen; Bailer, Ursula; de Zwaan, Martina; Fuchs, Karoline; Leisch, Friedrich; Grün, Bettina; Strnad, Alexandra; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Windisch, Julia; Lennkh-Wolfsberg, Claudia; El-Giamal, Nadja; Sieghart, Werner; Kasper, Siegfried; Aschauer, Harald

    2011-06-01

    Genetic factors likely contribute to the biological vulnerability of eating disorders. Case-control association study on one neuropeptide Y gene (Leu7Pro) polymorphism and three ghrelin gene (Arg51Gln, Leu72Met and Gln90Leu) polymorphisms. 114 eating disorder patients (46 with anorexia nervosa, 30 with bulimia nervosa, 38 with binge eating disorder) and 164 healthy controls were genotyped. No differences were detected between patients and controls for any of the four polymorphisms in allele frequency and genotype distribution (P > 0.05). Allele frequencies and genotypes had no significant influence on body mass index (P > 0.05) in eating disorder patients. Positive findings of former case-control studies of associations between ghrelin gene polymorphisms and eating disorders could not be replicated. Neuropeptide Y gene polymorphisms have not been investigated in eating disorders before.

  17. Fabrication and irradiation testing of LEU [low enriched uranium] fuels at CRNL status as of 1987 September

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Berthiaume, L.C.; Herbert, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories' (CRNL) program to develop and test low-enriched uranium (LEU), proliferation-resistant fuels for use in research reactors is reviewed. CRNL's fuel manufacturing process has been qualified by the successful demonstration irradiation of 7 full-size rods in the NRU reactor. Now industrial-scale production equipment has been commissioned, and a fuel-fabrication campaign for 30 NRU rods and a MAPLE-X core is underway. Excess capacity could be used for commercial fuel fabrication. In the irradiation testing program, mini-elements with deliberately included core surface defects performed well in-reactor, swelling by only 7 to 8 vol% at 93 atomic percent burnup of the original U-235. The additional restraint provided by the aluminium cladding which flowed into the defects during extrusion contributed to this good performance. Mini-elements containing a variety of particle size distributions were also successfully irradiated to 93 at% burnup in NRU, as part of a study to establish the optimum particle size distribution. Swelling was found to be proportional to the percentage of fines (<44μm particles) contained in the cores. The mini-elements containing the composition normally used at CRNL had swollen by 5.8 vol%, and mini-elements with a much higher percentage of fines had swollen by 6.8 vol%, at 93 at% burnup. Also, a program to develop LEU targets for Mo-99 production, via the technology developed to fabricate dispersed silicide fuel, has started, and preliminary scoping studies are underway. (Author)

  18. RERTR progress in Mo-99 production from LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Aase, S.; Bakel, A.; Bowers, D.; Freiberg, E.; Gelis, A.; Quigley, K.J.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The ANL RERTR program is performing R and D supporting conversion of {sup 99}Mo production from HEU to LEU targets. Irradiation and processing of LEU targets were demonstrated at the Argentine Ezeiza Atomic Center. Target irradiation and disassembly were flawless, but the processing is not fully developed. In addition to preparing for, assisting in, and analyzing results of the demonstration, we performed other R and D related to LEU conversion: (1) designing a prototype production dissolver for digesting irradiated LEU foils in alkaline solutions and developing means to simplify digestion, (2) modifying ion-exchange columns used in the CNEA recovery and purification of {sup 99}Mo to deal with the lower volumes generated from LEU-foil digestion, (3) measuring the performance of new inorganic sorbents that outperform alumina for recovering Mo(VI) from nitric acid solutions containing high concentrations of uranium nitrate, and (4) developing means to facilitate the concentration and calcination of waste nitric-acid/LEU-nitrate solutions from {sup 99} Mo production. (author)

  19. Secondary neutral mass spectrometry depth profile analysis of silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, P.; Kopnarski, M.; Oechsner, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Direct Bombardment Mode (DBM) of Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) has been applied for depth profile analysis of two different multilayer systems containing metal silicides. Due to the extremely high depth resolution obtained with low energy SNMS structural details down to only a few atomic distances are detected. Stoichiometric information on internal oxides and implanted material is supplied by the high quantificability of SNMS. (Author)

  20. Fracture of niobium-base silicide coated alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, A.D.; Zotov, Yu.P.; Ivashchenko, O.V.; Kushnareva, N.P.; Yarosh, I.P.

    1990-01-01

    Mechanical properties and character of fracture of Nb-W-Mo-Zr-C alloy composition with complex by composition and structure silicide coating under different states of stage-by-stage coating are studied. Structural features, character of fracture from ductile to quasibrittle transcrystalline one and, respectively, the composition plasticity level are defined by interrelation of fracture processes in coating, matrix plastic flow and possibility and way of stress relaxation on their boundary

  1. Development of Silicide Coating on Molybdenum Alloy Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woojin; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The molybdenum alloy is considered as one of the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding materials due to its high temperature mechanical properties. However, molybdenum has a weak oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. To modify the oxidation resistance of molybdenum cladding, silicide coating on the cladding is considered. Molybdenum silicide layers are oxidized to SiO 2 in an oxidation atmosphere. The SiO 2 protective layer isolates the substrate from the oxidizing atmosphere. Pack cementation deposition technique is widely adopted for silicide coating for molybdenum alloys due to its simple procedure, homogeneous coating quality and chemical compatibility. In this study, the pack cementation method was conducted to develop molybdenum silicide layers on molybdenum alloys. It was found that the Mo 3 Si layer was deposited on substrate instead of MoSi 2 because of short holding time. It means that through the extension of holding time, MoSi 2 layer can be formed on molybdenum substrate to enhance the oxidation resistance of molybdenum. The accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concept is to delay the process following an accident by reducing the oxidation rate at high temperatures and to delay swelling and rupture of fuel claddings. The current research for Atf can be categorized into three groups: First, modification of existing zirconium-based alloy cladding by improving the high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Second, replacing Zirconium based alloys with alternative metallic materials such as refractory elements with high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Third, designing alternative fuel structures using ceramic and composite systems

  2. Detailed analysis of uranium silicide dispersion fuel swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, G.L.; Ryu, Woo-Seog

    1991-01-01

    Swelling of U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 is analyzed. The growth of fission gas bubbles appears to be affected by fission rate, fuel loading, and micro structural change taking place in the fuel compounds during irradiation. Several mechanisms are explored to explain the observations. The present work is aimed at a better understanding of the basic swelling phenomenon in order to accurately model irradiation behavior of uranium silicide dispersion fuel. (orig.)

  3. Detailed analysis of uranium silicide dispersion fuel swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Ryu, Woo-Seog.

    1989-01-01

    Swelling of U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 is analyzed. The growth of fission gas bubbles appears to be affected by fission rate, fuel loading, and microstructural change taking place in the fuel compounds during irradiation. Several mechanisms are explored to explain the observations. The present work is aimed at a better understanding of the basic swelling phenomenon in order to accurately model irradiation behavior of uranium silicide disperson fuel. 5 refs., 10 figs

  4. Future U.S. supply of Mo-99 production through fission based LEU/LEU technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James Welsh; Bigles, C.I.; Alejandro Valderrabano

    2015-01-01

    Coqui RadioPharmaceuticals Corp. (Coqui) has the goal of establishing a medical isotope production facility for securing a continuous domestic supply of the radioisotope molybdenum-99 for U.S. citizens. Coqui will use an LEU/LEU proven and implemented open pool, light-water, 10 MW, reactor design. The facility is being designed with twin reactors for reliability an on-site hot lab chemical processing and a waste conditioning area and a possible generator producing radio-chemistry lab. Coqui identified a 25 acre site adjacent to an existing industrial park in northern central Florida. This land was gifted and transferred to Coqui by the University of Florida Foundation. We are in the process of developing licensing documents related to the facility. The construction permit application for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is currently being prepared. Submission is scheduled for mid to late 2015. Community reaction to the proposed development has been positive. We expect to create 220 permanent jobs and we have an anticipated to be operational by 2020. (author)

  5. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  6. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal

  7. Future U.S. supply of Mo-99 production through fission based LEU/LEU technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, James; Bigles, Carmen I; Valderrabano, Alejandro

    Coquí RadioPharmaceuticals Corp. (Coquí) has the goal of establishing a medical isotope production facility for securing a continuous domestic supply of the radioisotope molybdenum-99 for U.S. citizens. Coquí will use an LEU/LEU proven and implemented open pool, light-water, 10 MW, reactor design. The facility is being designed with twin reactors for reliability an on-site hot lab chemical processing and a waste conditioning area and a possible generator producing radio-chemistry lab. Coquí identified a 25 acre site adjacent to an existing industrial park in northern central Florida. This land was gifted and transferred to Coquí by the University of Florida Foundation. We are in the process of developing licensing documents related to the facility. The construction permit application for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is currently being prepared. Submission is scheduled for mid to late 2015. Community reaction to the proposed development has been positive. We expect to create 220 permanent jobs and we have an anticipated to be operational by 2020.

  8. Estimation of reactor core calculation by HELIOS/MASTER at power generating condition through DeCART, whole-core transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. Y.; Joo, H. G.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. Y.; Jang, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    The reactivity and power distribution errors of the HELIOS/MASTER core calculation under power generating conditions are assessed using a whole core transport code DeCART. For this work, the cross section tablesets were generated for a medium sized PWR following the standard procedure and two group nodal core calculations were performed. The test cases include the HELIOS calculations for 2-D assemblies at constant thermal conditions, MASTER 3D assembly calculations at power generating conditions, and the core calculations at HZP, HFP, and an abnormal power conditions. In all these cases, the results of the DeCART code in which pinwise thermal feedback effects are incorporated are used as the reference. The core reactivity, assemblywise power distribution, axial power distribution, peaking factor, and thermal feedback effects are then compared. The comparison shows that the error of the HELIOS/MASTER system in the core reactivity, assembly wise power distribution, pin peaking factor are only 100∼300 pcm, 3%, and 2%, respectively. As far as the detailed pinwise power distribution is concerned, however, errors greater than 15% are observed

  9. Mechanoactivation of chromium silicide formation in the SiC-Cr-Si system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of simultaneous grinding of the components of a SiC-Cr-Si mixture and further temperature treatment in the temperature range 1073-1793 K were studied by X-ray phase analysis, IR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. It was established that, during grinding of the mixture, chromium silicides form. A temperature treatment completes the process. Silicide formation proceeds within the framework of the diffusion of silicon into chromium. In the presence of SiO2 in the mixture, silicide formation occurs also as a result of the reduction of silica by silicon and silicon carbide. The sintering of synthesized composite SiC-chromium silicides powders at a high temperature under a high pressure (T = 2073 K, P = 5 GPa is accompanied by the destruction of cc-SiC particles, the cc/3 transition in silicon carbide and deformation distortions of the lattices of chromium silicides.

  10. Neutronic Analysis and Radiological Safety of RSG-GAS Reactor on 300 Grams Uranium Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande Made Udiyani; Lily Suparlina; Rokhmadi

    2007-01-01

    As starting of usage silicide U 250 g fuel element in the core of RSG-GAS and will be continued with usage of silicide U 300 g fuel element, hence done beforehand neutronic analyse and radiological safety of RSG-GAS. Calculation done by ORIGEN2.1 code to calculate source term, and also by PC-COSYMA code to calculate radiological safety of radioactive dispersion from RSG-GAS. Calculation of radioactive dispersion done at condition of reactor is postulated be happened an accident of LOCA causing one fuel element to melt. Neutronic analysis indicate that silicide U 250 g full core shall to be operated beforehand during 625 MWD before converted to silicide U 300 g core. During operation of transition core with mixture of silicide U 250 g and 300 g, all parameter fulfill criterion of safety Designed Balance core of silicide U 300 g will be reached at the time of fifth full core. Result of calculation indicate that through mixture core of silicide U 250 and 300 g proposed can form silicide U 300 g balance core of reactor RSG-GAS safely. Calculation of radiology safety by deterministic for silicide U 300 g balance core, and accident postulation which is equal to core of silicide U 250 g yield output in the form of radiation activity (radionuclide concentration in the air and deposition on the ground), radiation dose (collective and individual), radiation effect (short- and long-range), which accepted by society in each perceived sector. Result of calculation indicated that dose accepted by society is not pass permitted boundary for public society if happened accident. (author)

  11. Exploitation of a self-limiting process for reproducible formation of ultrathin Ni1-xPtx silicide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhen; Zhu Yu; Rossnagel, Steve; Murray, Conal; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Yang, Bin; Gaudet, Simon; Desjardins, Patrick; Kellock, Andrew J.; Ozcan, Ahmet; Zhang Shili; Lavoie, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This letter reports on a process scheme to obtain highly reproducible Ni 1-x Pt x silicide films of 3-6 nm thickness formed on a Si(100) substrate. Such ultrathin silicide films are readily attained by sputter deposition of metal films, metal stripping in wet chemicals, and final silicidation by rapid thermal processing. This process sequence warrants an invariant amount of metal intermixed with Si in the substrate surface region independent of the initial metal thickness, thereby leading to a self-limiting formation of ultrathin silicide films. The crystallographic structure, thickness, uniformity, and morphological stability of the final silicide films depend sensitively on the initial Pt fraction.

  12. Mechanochemical synthesis and spark plasma sintering of the cerium silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alanko, Gordon A.; Jaques, Brian; Bateman, Allyssa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: darrylbutt@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Boulevard, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Ce{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, CeSi, CeSi{sub 2−x} and CeSi{sub 2} were mechanochemically synthesized. • Temperature and pressure were monitored to investigate reaction progress. • All syntheses proceeded through a MSR event followed by rapid solid-state diffusion. • Milling time before MSR correlates well with effective heat of formation. • Some synthesized material was densified by spark plasma sintering. - Abstract: The cerium silicides, Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Ce{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, CeSi, CeSi{sub 2−y}, and CeSi{sub 2−x}, have been prepared from the elements by mechanochemical processing in a planetary ball mill. Preparation of the cerium silicide Ce{sub 5}Si{sub 4} was unsuccessfully attempted and potential reasons for this are discussed. Temperature and pressure of the milling vial were monitored in situ to gain insight into the mechanochemical reaction kinetics, which include a mechanically-induced self-propagating reaction (MSR). Some prepared powders were consolidated by spark plasma sintering to high density. Starting materials, as-milled powders, and consolidated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results obtained help elucidate key questions in mechanochemical processing of intermetallics, showing first phase formation similar to thin films, MSR ignition times that are composition- and milling speed-dependent, and sensitivity of stable compound formation on the impact pressure. The results demonstrate mechanochemical synthesis as a viable technique for rare earth silicides.

  13. Immobilization of Uranium Silicide in Sintered Iron-Phosphate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateos, Patricia; Russo, Diego; Rodriguez, Diego; Heredia, A; Sanfilippo, M.; Sterba, Mario

    2003-01-01

    This work is a continuation of a previous one performed in vitrification of uranium silicide in borosilicate and iron-silicate glasses, by sintering.We present the results obtained with an iron-phosphate glass developed at our laboratory and we compare this results with those obtained with the above mentioned glasses. The main objective was to develop a method as simple as possible, so as to get a monolithic glass block with the appropriate properties to be disposed in a deep geological repository.The thermal transformation of the uranium silicide was characterized by DTA/TG analysis and X-ray diffraction.We determined the evolution of the crystalline phases and the change in weight.Calcined uranium silicide was mixed with natural U 3 O 8 , the amount of U 3 O 8 was calculated to simulate an isotopic dilution of 4%.This material was mixed with powdered iron-phosphate glass (in wt.%: 64,9 P 2 O 5 ; 22,7 Fe 2 O 3 ; 8,1 Al 2 O 3 ; 4,3 Na 2 O) in different proportions (in wt%): 7%, 10% y 15%.The powders were pressed and sintered at temperatures between 585 y 670 °C. Samples of the sintered pellet were prepared for the lixiviation tests (MCC-1P: monolithic samples; deionised water; 90° C; 7, 14 and 28 days).The samples showed a quite good durability (0,6 g.m -2 .day -1 ), similar to borosilicate glasses.The microstructure of the glass samples showed that the uranium particles are much better integrated to the glass matrix in the iron-phosphate glasses than in the borosilicate or iron-silicate glasses.We can conclude that the sintered product obtained could be a good alternative for the immobilization of nuclear wastes with high content of uranium, as the ones arising from the conditioning of research reactors spent fuels

  14. Synthesis of high specific active tritiated Leu-enkephalin in the leucine residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, S.; Hasegawa, H.; Shinohara, Y. (Tokyo Coll. of Pharmacy (Japan))

    1989-12-01

    Leu-enkephalin labelled with tritium in the Leu residue has been prepared. Synthesis of the precursor peptide, (4,5-dehydroLeu{sup 5}-)Leu-enkephalin, was carried out by solid phase synthesis using Fmoc amino acid derivatives. The peptide was tritiated catalytically yielding {sup 3}H-Leu-enkephalin with a specific radioactivity of 4.39 TBq/mmol. The distribution of tritium label was investigated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with a synchronized accumulating radioisotope detector following acidic and enzymatic hydrolysis, which confirmed that the tritium label was entirely located at the Leu residue. (author).

  15. Mo-99 production on a LEU solution reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.W.; Thome, L.A.; Khvostionov, V.Y.

    2005-01-01

    A pilot homogenous reactor utilizing LEU has been developed by the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow along with their commercial partner TCI Medical. This solution reactor operates at levels up to 50 kilowatts and has successfully produced high quality Mo-99 and Sr-89. Radiochemical extraction of medical radionuclides from the reactor solution is performed by passing the solution across a series of inorganic sorbents. This reactor has commercial potential for medical radionuclide production using LEU UO 2 SO 4 fuel. Additional development work is needed to optimize multiple 50 kilowatt cores while at the same time, optimizing production efficiency and capital expenditure. (author)

  16. Postirradiation analysis of experimental uranium-silicide dispersion fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Neimark, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Low-enriched uranium silicide dispersion fuel plates were irradiated to maximum burnups of 96% of 235 U. Fuel plates containing 33 v/o U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 behaved very well up to this burnup. Plates containing 33 v/o U 3 Si-Al pillowed between 90 and 96% burnup of the fissile atoms. More highly loaded U 3 Si-Al plates, up to 50 v/o were found to pillow at lower burnups. Plates containing 40 v/o U 3 Si showed an increase swelling rate around 85% burnup. 5 refs., 10 figs

  17. Progress in doping of ruthenium silicide (Ru2Si3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vining, C.B.; Allevato, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that ruthenium silicide (Ru 2 Si 3 ) is currently under development as a promising thermoelectric material suitable for space power applications. Key to realizing the potentially high figure of merit values of this material is the development of appropriate doping techniques. In this study, manganese and iridium have been identified as useful p- and n-type dopants, respectively. Resistivity values have been reduced by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Anomalous Hall effect results, however, complicate interpretation of some of the results and further effort is required to achieve optimum doping levels

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of molybdenum silicides with Al additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, I.; Bahena, D.; Colin, J.

    2007-01-01

    Several molybdenum silicides alloys with different aluminum additions were produced by the arc-cast method. Microstructure observed in the alloys presented a variation of the precipitated second phase respect to the aluminum content. Evaluation of the compressive behavior at high temperature of the alloys shows an important improvement in its ductility, approximately of 20%. Fracture toughness was increased proportionally with Al content. In addition at room temperature the alloys show a better mechanical behavior in comparison with the sample unalloyed. In general, Al additions result to be a good alternative to improve the resistance of these intermetallic alloys. The results are interpreted on the base of the analysis of second phase strengthening

  19. Structural and electronic properties of rare-earth silicide thin films at Si(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dues, Christof; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Sanna, Simone [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Paderborn (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Rare-earth (RE) silicides thin films on silicon surfaces are currently of high interest. They grow nearly defect-free because of the small lattice mismatch, and exhibit very low Schottky-barriers on n-type silicon. They even give rise to the self-organized formation of RE silicide nanowires on the Si(001) and vicinal surfaces. Depending on the amount of deposited RE atoms, a plethora of reconstructions are observed for the RE silicide. While one monolayer leads to the formation of a 1 x 1-reconstruction, several monolayer thick silicides crystallize in a √(3) x √(3) R30 {sup circle} superstructure. Submonolayer RE deposition leads to different periodicities. In this work we investigate the formation of RE silicides thin films on Si(111) within the density functional theory. The energetically favored adsorption site for RE adatoms is determined calculating the potential energy surface. As prototypical RE, Dysprosium is used. Additional calculations are performed for silicides formed by different RE elements. We calculate structural properties, electronic band structures and compare measured and simulated STM images. We consider different terminations for the 5 x 2 reconstruction occurring in the submonolayer regime and investigate their stability by means of ab initio thermodynamics. The same method is employed to predict the stable silicide structure as a function of the deposited RE atoms.

  20. Facility safeguards at an LEU fuel fabrication facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroi, H.; Osabe, T.

    1984-01-01

    A facility description of a Japanese LEU BWR-type fuel fabrication plant focusing on safeguards viewpoints is presented. Procedures and practices of MC and A plan, measurement program, inventory taking, and the report and record system are described. Procedures and practices of safeguards inspection are discussed and lessons learned from past experiences are reviewed

  1. A mixed core conversion study with HEU and LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a mixed core study are presented for gradual replacement of HEU fuel with LEU fuel using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. The key parameters show that the transition can be accomplished safely and economically. (author)

  2. Mixed core conversion study with HEU and LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mixed core study are presented for gradual replacement of HEU fuel with LEU fuel using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. The key parameters show that the transition can be accomplished safely and economically

  3. Status of LEU fuel development and conversion of NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Herbert, L.N.; Vaillancourt, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the LEU conversion program and the progress made in the fuel development program over the last year. The results from post-irradiation examinations of prototype NRU fuel rods containing Al-U 3 Si dispersion fuel, and of mini-elements containing Al-U 3 Si 2 dispersion fuel, are presented. (orig.)

  4. The Environment Shapes the Inner Vestibule of LeuT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohail, Azmat; Jayaraman, Kumaresan; Venkatesan, Santhoshkannan

    2016-01-01

    Human neurotransmitter transporters are found in the nervous system terminating synaptic signals by rapid removal of neurotransmitter molecules from the synaptic cleft. The homologous transporter LeuT, found in Aquifex aeolicus, was crystallized in different conformations. Here, we investigated t...... showed TM1A movements, consistent with the simulations, confirming a substantially different inward-open conformation in lipid bilayer from that inferred from the crystal structure....... the inward-open state of LeuT. We compared LeuT in membranes and micelles using molecular dynamics simulations and lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). Simulations of micelle-solubilized LeuT revealed a stable and widely open inward-facing conformation. However, this conformation was unstable...... in a membrane environment. The helix dipole and the charged amino acid of the first transmembrane helix (TM1A) partitioned out of the hydrophobic membrane core. Free energy calculations showed that movement of TM1A by 0.30 nm was driven by a free energy difference of ~15 kJ/mol. Distance measurements by LRET...

  5. Analysis of the Ford Nuclear Reactor LEU core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathkopf, J A; Drumm, C R; Martin, W R; Lee, J C [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1983-09-01

    This paper has summarized the current status of the effort to analyze the FNR HEU/LEU cores and to compare the calculated results with measurements. In general, calculated predictions of experimental results are quite good, especially for global parameters such as reactivity, as seen in the single HEU/LEU element substitution experiment and the LEU full core critical loading. Shim rod worths are predicted well for two of the rods but too high for a third rod possibly due to inaccurate thermal flux distribution calculation. The calculated thermal flux maps show excellent agreement with experiment throughout the FNR core. In the heavy water tank, however, experimental values for the thermal flux obtained by different methods are inconsistent among themselves as well as with the calculated finding. Work is under.way to use our computational tools to correct the discrepancies between the various measurement techniques and to improve the computational results for flux distribution and the rod worth experiment. Although uncertainties exist in our analysis, as evidenced by the discrepancies mentioned above, we consider our present calculational package to be a useful, reasonably accurate, and efficient system for performing analyses of MTR LEU/HEU core configurations.

  6. Influence of IR-laser irradiation on α-SiC-chromium silicides ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasova, M.; Marquez Aguilar, P.A.; Resendiz-Gonzalez, M.C.; Kakazey, M.; Bykov, A.; Gonzalez Morales, I.

    2005-01-01

    This project investigated the influence of IR-laser irradiation (λ = 1064 nm, P = 240 mW) on composite ceramics SiC-chromium silicides (CrSi 2 , CrSi, Cr 5 Si 3 ) by methods of X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. Samples were irradiated in air. It was established that a surface temperature of 1990 K was required to melt chromium silicides, evaporate silicon from SiC, oxidize chromium silicides, and enrich superficial layer by carbon and chromium oxide

  7. Genetic interaction between the ero1-1 and leu2 mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C

    2007-01-01

    of the ero1-1 mutation were carried out in a leu2 mutant. The ero1-1 leu2 strain does not grow in standard synthetic complete medium at 30 degrees C, a defect that can be remedied by increasing the L-leucine concentration in the medium or by transforming the ero1-1 leu2 strain with the LEU2 wild-type allele...

  8. Prediction of barrier inhomogeneities and carrier transport in Ni-silicided Schottky diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.R.; Dimitriu, C.B.; Horsfall, A.B.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Wright, N.G.; O'Neill, A.G.; Maiti, C.K.

    2006-01-01

    Based on Quantum Mechanical (QM) carrier transport and the effects of interface states, a theoretical model has been developed to predict the anomalous current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a non-ideal Ni-silicided Schottky diode at low temperatures. Physical parameters such as barrier height, ideality factor, series resistance and effective Richardson constant of a silicided Schottky diode were extracted from forward I-V characteristics and are subsequently used for the simulation of both forward and reverse I-V characteristics using a QM transport model in which the effects of interface state and bias dependent barrier reduction are incorporated. The present analysis indicates that the effects of barrier inhomogeneity caused by incomplete silicide formation at the junction and the interface states may change the conventional current transport process, leading to anomalous forward and reverse I-V characteristics for the Ni-silicided Schottky diode

  9. NMOS contact resistance reduction with selenium implant into NiPt silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. V.; Khaja, F. A.; Ni, C. N.; Muthukrishnan, S.; Darlark, A.; Lei, J.; Peidous, I.; Brand, A.; Henry, T.; Variam, N.; Erokhin, Y.

    2012-11-01

    A 25% reduction in NMOS contact resistance (Rc) was achieved by Selenium implantation into NiPt silicide film in VIISta Trident high-current single-wafer implanter. The Trident implanter is designed for shallow high-dose implants with high beam currents to maintain high throughput (for low CoO), with improved micro-uniformity and no energy contamination. The integration of Se implant was realized using a test chip dedicated to investigating silicide/junction related electrical properties and testable after silicidation. The silicide module processes were optimized, including the pre-clean (prior to RF PVD NiPt dep) and pre- and post-implant anneals. A 270°C soak anneal was used for RTP1, whereas a msec laser anneal was employed for RTP2 with sufficient process window (800-850°C), while maintaining excellent junction characteristics without Rs degradation.

  10. Peptide (Lys-Leu) and amino acids (Lys and Leu) supplementations improve physiological activity and fermentation performance of brewer's yeast during very high-gravity (VHG) wort fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huirong; Zong, Xuyan; Cui, Chun; Mu, Lixia; Zhao, Haifeng

    2017-12-22

    Lys and Leu were generally considered as the key amino acids for brewer's yeast during beer brewing. In the present study, peptide Lys-Leu and a free amino acid (FAA) mixture of Lys and Leu (Lys + Leu) were supplemented in 24 °P wort to examine their effects on physiological activity and fermentation performance of brewer's yeast during very high-gravity (VHG) wort fermentation. Results showed that although both peptide Lys-Leu and their FAA mixture supplementations could increase the growth and viability, intracellular trehalose and glycerol content, wort fermentability, and ethanol content for brewer's yeast during VHG wort fermentation, and peptide was better than their FAA mixture at promoting growth and fermentation for brewer's yeast when the same dose was kept. Moreover, peptide Lys-Leu supplementation significantly increased the assimilation of Asp, but decreased the assimilation of Gly, Ala, Val, (Cys)2, Ile, Leu, Tyr, Phe, Lys, Arg, and Pro. However, the FAA mixture supplementation only promoted the assimilation of Lys and Leu, while reduced the absorption of total amino acids to a greater extent. Thus, the peptide Lys-Leu was more effective than their FAA mixture on the improvement of physiological activity, fermentation performance, and nitrogen metabolism of brewer's yeast during VHG wort fermentation. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of the oxide and silicide fuels reactivity in the RSG-GAS core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S, Tukiran; M S, Tagor; S, Lily; Pinem, S.

    2000-01-01

    Fuel exchange of The RSG-GAS reactor core from uranium oxide to uranium silicide in the same loading, density, and enrichment, that is, 250 gr, 2.98 gr/cm 3 , and 19.75 % respectively, will be performed in-step wise. In every cycle of exchange with 5/l mode, it is needed to evaluate the parameter of reactor core operation. One of the important operation parameters is fuel reactivity that gives effect to the core reactivity. The experiment was performed at core no. 36, BOC, low power which exist 2 silicide fuels. The evaluation was done based on the RSG-GAS control rod calibration consisting of 40 fuels and 8 control rod.s. From 40 fuels in the core, there are 2 silicide fuels, RI-225/A-9 and RI-224/C-3. For inserting 2 silicide fuels, the reactivity effect to the core must be know. To know this effect , it was performed fuels reactivity experiment, which based on control rod calibration. But in this case the RSG-GAS has no other fresh oxide fuel so that configuration of the RSG-GAS core was rearranged by taking out the both silicide fuels and this configuration is used as reference core. Then silicide fuel RI-224 was inserted to position F-3 replacing the fresh oxide fuel RI-260 so the different reactivity of the fuels is obtained. The experiment result showed that the fuel reactivity change is in amount of 12.85 cent (0.098 % ) The experiment result was compared to the calculation result, using IAFUEL code which amount to 13.49 cent (0.103 %) The result showed that the reactivity change of oxide to silicide fuel is small so that the fuel exchange from uranium oxide to uranium silicide in the first step can be done without any significant change of the operation parameter

  12. Information for irradiation and post-irradiation of the silicide fuel element prototype P-07

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, Maximo J.; Sbaffoni, Maria M.

    2003-01-01

    Included in the 'Silicides' Project, developed by the Nuclear Fuels Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), it is foreseen the qualification of this type of fuel for research reactors in order to be used in the Argentine RA-3 reactor and to confirm the CNEA as an international supplier. The paper presents basic information on several parameters corresponding to the new silicide prototype, called P-07, to be taken into account for its irradiation, postirradiation and qualification. (author)

  13. Thermoelectric characteristics of Pt-silicide/silicon multi-layer structured p-type silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Wonchul; Jun, Dongseok; Kim, Soojung; Shin, Mincheol; Jang, Moongyu

    2015-01-01

    Electric and thermoelectric properties of silicide/silicon multi-layer structured devices were investigated with the variation of silicide/silicon heterojunction numbers from 3 to 12 layers. For the fabrication of silicide/silicon multi-layered structure, platinum and silicon layers are repeatedly sputtered on the (100) silicon bulk substrate and rapid thermal annealing is carried out for the silicidation. The manufactured devices show ohmic current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. The Seebeck coefficient of bulk Si is evaluated as 195.8 ± 15.3 μV/K at 300 K, whereas the 12 layered silicide/silicon multi-layer structured device is evaluated as 201.8 ± 9.1 μV/K. As the temperature increases to 400 K, the Seebeck coefficient increases to 237.2 ± 4.7 μV/K and 277.0 ± 1.1 μV/K for bulk and 12 layered devices, respectively. The increase of Seebeck coefficient in multi-layered structure is mainly attributed to the electron filtering effect due to the Schottky barrier at Pt-silicide/silicon interface. At 400 K, the thermal conductivity is reduced by about half of magnitude compared to bulk in multi-layered device which shows the efficient suppression of phonon propagation by using Pt-silicide/silicon hetero-junctions. - Highlights: • Silicide/silicon multi-layer structured is proposed for thermoelectric devices. • Electric and thermoelectric properties with the number of layer are investigated. • An increase of Seebeck coefficient is mainly attributed the Schottky barrier. • Phonon propagation is suppressed with the existence of Schottky barrier. • Thermal conductivity is reduced due to the suppression of phonon propagation

  14. Kinetics of nickel silicide growth in silicon nanowires: From linear to square root growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaish, Y. E.; Beregovsky, M.; Katsman, A.; Cohen, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The common practice for nickel silicide formation in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) relies on axial growth of silicide along the wire that is initiated from nickel reservoirs at the source and drain contacts. In the present work the silicide intrusions were studied for various parameters including wire diameter (25-50 nm), annealing time (15-120 s), annealing temperature (300-440 deg. C), and the quality of the initial Ni/Si interface. The silicide formation was investigated by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy. The main part of the intrusion formed at 420 deg. C consists of monosilicide NiSi, as was confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy STEM, selected area diffraction TEM, and electrical resistance measurements of fully silicided SiNWs. The kinetics of nickel silicide axial growth in the SiNWs was analyzed in the framework of a diffusion model through constrictions. The model calculates the time dependence of the intrusion length, L, and predicts crossover from linear to square root time dependency for different wire parameters, as confirmed by the experimental data.

  15. Attempt to produce silicide fuel elements in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soentono, S.; Suripto, A.

    1991-01-01

    After the successful experiment to produce U 3 Si 2 powder and U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel plates using depleted U and Si of semiconductor quality, silicide fuel was synthesized using x -Al available at the Fuel Element Production Installation (FEPI) at Serpong, Indonesia. Two full-size U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel elements, having similar specifications to the ones of U 3 O 8 -Al for the RSG-GAS (formerly known as MPR-30), have been produced at the FEPI. All quality controls required have been imposed to the feeds, intermediate, as well as final products throughout the production processes of the two fuel elements. The current results show that these fuel elements are qualified from fabrication point of view, therefore it is expected that they will be permitted to be tested in the RSG-GAS, sometime by the end of 1989, for normal (∝50%) and above normal burn-up. (orig.)

  16. Status of the atomized uranium silicide fuel development at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.K.; Kim, K.H.; Park, H.D.; Kuk, I.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    While developing KMRR fuel fabrication technology an atomizing technique has been applied in order to eliminate the difficulties relating to the tough property of U{sub 3}Si and to take advantage of the rapid solidification effect of atomization. The comparison between the conventionally comminuted powder dispersion fuel and the atomized powder dispersion fuel has been made. As the result, the processes, uranium silicide powdering and heat treatment for U{sub 3}Si transformation, become simplified. The workability, the thermal conductivity and the thermal compatibility of fuel meat have been investigated and found to be improved due to the spherical shape of atomized powder. In this presentation the overall developments of atomized U{sub 3}Si dispersion fuel and the planned activities for applying the atomizing technique to the real fuel fabrication are described.

  17. Characterization of tungsten silicides formed by rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, M.; Santiago, J.J.; VanDerSpiegel, J.

    1986-01-01

    Tungsten silicide samples were formed by sputter depositing 80 nm W metal onto (100) oriented, 5 ohm-cm Si wafers. After deposition, the samples were fast radiatively processed in an RTA system using quartz-halogen tungsten lamps as radiation sources for time intervals ranging from 20 to 60s under high vacuum. Films processed at 22-25 W/cm 2 radiation with the film side of the samples oriented away from the lamps result in films which are metallic or cloudy in color, and have mixed composition as evidenced by x-ray diffraction (W, W 5 Si 3 and WSi 2 ). Films processed with the film side oriented toward the lamps show the occurrence of a phase transformation clearly nucleated at the film edge

  18. Development of molecular dynamics potential for uranium silicide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jianguo; Zhang, Yongfeng; Hales, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    Use of uranium–silicide (U-Si) in place of uranium dioxide (UO2) is one of the promising concepts being proposed to increase the accident tolerance of nuclear fuels. This is due to a higher thermal conductivity than UO2 that results in lower centerline temperatures. U-Si also has a higher fissile density, which may enable some new cladding concepts that would otherwise require increased enrichment limits to compensate for their neutronic penalty. However, many critical material properties for U-Si have not been determined experimentally. For example, silicide compounds (U3Si2 and U3Si) are known to become amorphous under irradiation. There was clear independent experimental evidence to support a crystalline to amorphous transformation in those compounds. However, it is still not well understood how the amorphous transformation will affect on fuel behavior. It is anticipated that modeling and simulation may deliver guidance on the importance of various properties and help prioritize experimental work. In order to develop knowledge-based models for use at the engineering scale with a minimum of empirical parameters and increase the predictive capabilities of the developed model, inputs from atomistic simulations are essential. First-principles based density functional theory (DFT) calculations will provide the most reliable information. However, it is probably not possible to obtain kinetic information such as amorphization under irradiation directly from DFT simulations due to size and time limitations. Thus, a more feasible way may be to employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Unfortunately, so far no MD potential is available for U-Si to discover the underlying mechanisms. Here, we will present our recent progress in developing a U-Si potential from ab initio data. This work is supported by the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy.

  19. Establishing a LEU MTR fuel manufacturing facility in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamie, R.W.; Kocher, A.

    2010-01-01

    The South African MTR Fuel Manufacturing Facility was established in the 1970's to supply SAFARI-1 with Fuel Elements and Control Rods. South African capability was developed in parallel with the uranium enrichment program to meet the needs of the Reactor. Further to the July 2005 decision by the South African Governmnent to convert both SAFARI-1 and the Fuel Plant to LEU, the SAFARI-1 phase has been successfully completed and Necsa has commenced with the conversion of the MTR Fuel Manufacturing Facility. In order to establish, validate and qualify the facility, Necsa has entered into a co-operation and technology transfer agreement with AREVA CERCA, the French manufacturer of Research Reactor fuel elements. Past experiences, conversion challenges and the status of the MTR Fuel Facility Project are discussed. On-going co-operation with AREVA CERCA to implement the local manufacture of LEU fuel is explained and elaborated on. (author)

  20. Production of leu high density fuels at Babcock and Wilcox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freim, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A large number of fuel elements of all types are produced for both international and domestic customers by Nuclear Fuel Division of Babcock and Wilcox. A brief history of the division, included previous and present research reactor fuel element fabrication experience is discussed. The manufacturing facilities are briefly described. The fabrication of LEU fuels and economic analysis of the production are included. (A.J.)

  1. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the JMTR improved LEU-core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabata, Toshio; Nagao, Yoshiharu; Komukai, Bunsaku; Naka, Michihiro; Fujiki, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Takeda, Takashi [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    After the investigation of the new core arrangement for the JMTR reactor in order to enhance the fuel burn-up and consequently extend the operation period, the ''improved LEU core'' that utilized 2 additional fuel elements instead of formerly installed reflector elements, was adopted. This report describes the results of the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the improved LEU core as a part of safety analysis for the licensing. The analysis covers steady state, abnormal operational transients and accidents, which were described in the annexes of the licensing documents as design bases events. Calculation conditions for the computer codes were conservatively determined based on the neutronic analysis results and others. The results of the analysis, that revealed the safety criteria were satisfied on the fuel temperature, DNBR and primary coolant temperature, were used in the licensing. The operation license of the JMTR with the improved LEU core was granted in March 2001, and the reactor operation with new core started in November 2001 as 142nd operation cycle. (author)

  2. Neutronics Study on LEU Nuclear Thermal Rocket Fuel Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Howe, Steven [CSNR, Idaho (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This has resulted in a non-trivial simplification of the tasks needed to develop such an engine and the quick initial development of the concept. There are, however, a series of key core-design choices that are currently under scrutiny in the field that have to be resolved in order for the LEU-NTR to be fully developed. The most important of these is the choice of fuel: carbide composite or tungsten cermet. This study presents a first comparison of the two fuel types specifically in the neutronic application to the LEU-NTR, keeping in mind the unique neutronic environment and the system requirements of the system. The scope of the study itself is limited to a neutronics study of the two fuels and only a cursory overview of the material properties of the fuels themselves... The results of this study have led to two major conclusions. First of all is that the carbide composite fuel is, from a neutronics standpoint, a much better fuel. It has a low absorption cross-section, is inherently a strong moderator, is able to achieve a higher reactivity using smaller amounts of fissile material, and can potentially enable a smaller reactor. Second is that despite its neutronic difficulties (high absorption, inferior moderating abilities, and lower k-infinity values) the tungsten cermet fuel is still able to perform satisfactorily in an LEU-NTR, largely due to its ability to have an extremely high fuel loading.

  3. LEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies burnable test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanov, G.A.; Konoplev, K.A.; Pikulik, R.G.; Sajkov, Yu. P.; Tchmshkyan, D.V.; Tedoradze, L.V.; Zakharov, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    The results of in-pile irradiation tests of LEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies with reduced enrichment of fuel are submitted in the report. The tests are made according to the Russian Program on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). United States Department of Energy and the Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation jointly fund this Program. The irradiation tests of 5 WWR-M2 experimental assemblies are carried out at WWR-M reactor of the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). The information on assembly design and technique of irradiation tests is presented. In the irradiation tests the integrity of fuel assemblies is periodically measured. The report presents the data for the integrity maintained during the burnup of 5 fuel assemblies up to 45%. These results demonstrate the high reliability of the experimental fuel assemblies within the guaranteed burnup limits specified by the manufacturer. The tests are still in progress; it is planned to test and analyze the change in integrity for burnup of up to 70% - 75% or more. LEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies are to be offered for export by their Novosibirsk manufacturer. Currently, HEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies are used in Hungary, Ukraine and Vietnam. LEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies were designed as a possible replacement for the HEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies in those countries, but their use can be extended to other research reactors. (author)

  4. Development of technology of high density LEU dispersion fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.; Totev, T.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Materials Fabrication Facilities at Argonne National Laboratory have been involved in development of LEU dispersion fuel for research and test reactors from the beginning of RERTR program. This paper presents development of technology of high density LEU dispersion fuel fabrication for full size plate type fuel elements. A brief description of Advanced Materials Fabrication Facilities where development of the technology was carried out is given. A flow diagram of the manufacturing process is presented. U-Mo powder was manufactured by the rotating electrode process. The atomization produced a U-Mo alloy powder with a relatively uniform size distribution and a nearly spherical shape. Test plates were fabricated using tungsten and depleted U-7 wt.% Mo alloy, 4043 Al and Al-2 wt% Si matrices with Al 6061 aluminum alloy for the cladding. During the development of the technology of manufacturing of full size high density LEU dispersion fuel plates special attention was paid to meet the required homogeneity, bonding, dimensions, fuel out of zone and other mechanical characteristics of the plates.

  5. Nickel silicide thin films as masking and structural layers for silicon bulk micro-machining by potassium hydroxide wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskaran, M; Sriram, S; Sim, L W

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of using titanium and nickel silicide thin films as mask materials for silicon bulk micro-machining. Thin films of nickel silicide were found to be more resistant to wet etching in potassium hydroxide. The use of nickel silicide as a structural material, by fabricating micro-beams of varying dimensions, is demonstrated. The micro-structures were realized using these thin films with wet etching using potassium hydroxide solution on (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) silicon substrates. These results show that nickel silicide is a suitable alternative to silicon nitride for silicon bulk micro-machining

  6. Induction of CD4 suppressor T cells with anti-Leu-8 antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanof, M.E.; Strober, W.; James, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the conditions under which CD4 T cells suppress polyclonal immunoglobulin synthesis, we investigated the capacity of CD4 T cells that coexpress the surface antigen recognized by the monoclonal antibody anti-Leu-8 to mediate suppression. In an in vitro system devoid of CD8 T cells, CD4, Leu-8+ T cells suppressed pokeweed mitogen-induced immunoglobulin synthesis. Similarly, suppressor function was induced in unfractionated CD4 T cell populations after incubation with anti-Leu-8 antibody under cross-linking conditions. This induction of suppressor function by anti-Leu-8 antibody was not due to expansion of the CD4, Leu-8+ T cell population because CD4 T cells did not proliferate in response to anti-Leu-8 antibody. However, CD4, Leu-8+ T cell-mediated suppression was radiosensitive. Finally, CD4, Leu-8+ T cells do not inhibit immunoglobulin synthesis when T cell lymphokines were used in place of helper CD4 T cells (CD4, Leu-8- T cells), suggesting that CD4 T cell-mediated suppression occurs at the T cell level. We conclude that CD4 T cells can be induced to suppress immunoglobulin synthesis by modulation of the membrane antigen recognized by anti-Leu-8 antibody

  7. Technology CAD of silicided Schottky barrier MOSFET for elevated source-drain engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, A.R.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Bose, C.; Maiti, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    Technology CAD has been used to study the performance of a silicided Schottky barrier (SB) MOSFET with gate, source and drain contacts realized with nickel-silicide. Elevated source-drain structures have been used towards the S/D engineering of CMOS devices. A full process-to-device simulation has been employed to predict the performance of sub-micron SB n-MOSFETs for the first time. A model for the diffusion and alloy growth kinetics has been incorporated in SILVACO-ATLAS and ATHENA to explore the processing and design parameter space for the Ni-silicided MOSFETs. The temperature and concentration dependent diffusion model for NiSi have been developed and necessary material parameters for nickel-silicide and epitaxial-Si have been incorporated through the C-interpreter function. Two-dimensional (2D) process-to-device simulations have also been used to study the dc and ac (RF) performance of silicided Schottky barrier (SB) n-MOSFETs. The extracted sheet resistivity, as a function of annealing temperature of the silicided S/D contacts, is found to be lower than the conventional contacts currently in use. It is also shown that the Technology CAD has the full capability to predict the possible dc and ac performance enhancement of a MOSFET with elevated S/D structures. While the simulated dc performance shows a clear enhancement, the RF analyses show no performance degradation in the cut-off frequency/propagation delay and also improve the ac performance due to the incorporation of silicide contacts in the S/D region

  8. Technology CAD of silicided Schottky barrier MOSFET for elevated source-drain engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A.R. [Department of Electronics and ECE, IIT, Kharagpur 721302 (India)]. E-mail: ars.iitkgp@gmail.com; Chattopadhyay, S. [Department of Electronics and ECE, IIT, Kharagpur 721302 (India); School of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Bose, C. [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Calcutta 700032 (India); Maiti, C.K. [Department of Electronics and ECE, IIT, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2005-12-05

    Technology CAD has been used to study the performance of a silicided Schottky barrier (SB) MOSFET with gate, source and drain contacts realized with nickel-silicide. Elevated source-drain structures have been used towards the S/D engineering of CMOS devices. A full process-to-device simulation has been employed to predict the performance of sub-micron SB n-MOSFETs for the first time. A model for the diffusion and alloy growth kinetics has been incorporated in SILVACO-ATLAS and ATHENA to explore the processing and design parameter space for the Ni-silicided MOSFETs. The temperature and concentration dependent diffusion model for NiSi have been developed and necessary material parameters for nickel-silicide and epitaxial-Si have been incorporated through the C-interpreter function. Two-dimensional (2D) process-to-device simulations have also been used to study the dc and ac (RF) performance of silicided Schottky barrier (SB) n-MOSFETs. The extracted sheet resistivity, as a function of annealing temperature of the silicided S/D contacts, is found to be lower than the conventional contacts currently in use. It is also shown that the Technology CAD has the full capability to predict the possible dc and ac performance enhancement of a MOSFET with elevated S/D structures. While the simulated dc performance shows a clear enhancement, the RF analyses show no performance degradation in the cut-off frequency/propagation delay and also improve the ac performance due to the incorporation of silicide contacts in the S/D region.

  9. Capacitance-voltage characterization of fully silicided gated MOS capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baomin; Ru Guoping; Jiang Yulong; Qu Xinping; Li Bingzong; Liu Ran

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement on fully silicided (FUSI) gated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors and the applicability of MOS capacitor models. When the oxide leakage current of an MOS capacitor is large, two-element parallel or series model cannot be used to obtain its real C-V characteristic. A three-element model simultaneously consisting of parallel conductance and series resistance or a four-element model with further consideration of a series inductance should be used. We employed the three-element and the four-element models with the help of two-frequency technique to measure the Ni FUSI gated MOS capacitors. The results indicate that the capacitance of the MOS capacitors extracted by the three-element model still shows some frequency dispersion, while that extracted by the four-element model is close to the real capacitance, showing little frequency dispersion. The obtained capacitance can be used to calculate the dielectric thickness with quantum effect correction by NCSU C-V program. We also investigated the influence of MOS capacitor's area on the measurement accuracy. The results indicate that the decrease of capacitor area can reduce the dissipation factor and improve the measurement accuracy. As a result, the frequency dispersion of the measured capacitance is significantly reduced, and real C-V characteristic can be obtained directly by the series model. In addition, this paper investigates the quasi-static C-V measurement and the photonic high-frequency C-V measurement on Ni FUSI metal gated MOS capacitor with a thin leaky oxide. The results indicate that the large tunneling current through the gate oxide significantly perturbs the accurate measurement of the displacement current, which is essential for the quasi-static C-V measurement. On the other hand, the photonic high-frequency C-V measurement can bypass the leakage problem, and get reliable low-frequency C-V characteristic, which can be used to

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of metal/oxide and metal/silicide interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, L.; Miracle, D.; Abbaschian, R.

    1995-01-01

    Fracture energies of Al 2 O 3 /Nb interfaces and MoSi 2 /Nb interfaces with and without Al 2 O 3 coating were measured using sandwich-type chevron-notched specimens. The relations between the mechanical properties, microstructures, types of bonds at the interface and processing routes were explored. The fracture energy of the Al 2 O 3 /Nb interface was determined to be 9 J/m 2 and changed to 16 J/m 2 when Nb was pre-oxidized before the formation of the Al 2 O 3 /Nb interface. The fracture energy of the MoSi 2 /Nb interface could not be determined directly because of the formation of the interfacial compounds. However, the fracture energy at the MoSi 2 /Nb interfacial region was found to depend on the interfacial bond strength, roughness of interfaces and microstructure of interfacial compounds. The interfacial fracture energies of Al 2 O 3 with silicides, MoSi 2 , Nb 5 Si 3 , or (Nb, Mo)Si 2 were estimated to be about 16 J/m 2 , while the interfacial fracture energies between two silicides or between Nb and a silicide were larger than 34 J/m 2 . The measured fracture energies between two silicides or between Nb and a silicide were larger than 34 J/m 2 . The measured fracture energies of the various interfaces are discussed in terms of the interfacial microstructures and types of bonds at the interfaces

  11. Improvement of Silicide Coating Method as Diffusion Barrier for U-Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Ti, or Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of the interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-Mo-Ti alloy powders were coated with silicide layers. The coating process was improved when compared to the previous coating in terms of the ball milling and heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, silicide coated U-Mo-Ti powders and pure aluminum powders were mixed and made into a compact for the annealing test. The compacts were annealed at 550 .deg. C for 2hr, and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). 1. Uniform, homogeneous, thickness controllable silicide layers were successfully coated on the surface of U-7wt%Mo-1wt%Ti powders. 2. U{sub 3}Si, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} silicide layers formed on the surface of U-7wt%Mo-1wt%Ti powders, and were identified by XRD and EDS analyses.

  12. Synthesis of molybdenum borides and molybdenum silicides in molten salts and their oxidation behavior in an air-water mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.; Rebrov, E.V.; Mies, M.J.M.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of various coatings in molybdenum-boron and molybdenum-silicon systems was investigated. Boronizing and siliciding treatments were conducted in molten salts under inert gas atm. in the 850-1050 DegC temp. range for 7 h. The presence of boride (e.g. Mo2B, MoB, Mo2B5) and silicide

  13. Neutronic design of mixed oxide-silicide cores for the core conversion of rsg-gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Tukiran; Pinem surian; Febrianto

    2001-01-01

    The core conversion of rsg-gas reactor from an all-oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) core, through a series of mixed oxide-silicide core, to an all-silicide (U 3 Si 2 -Al) core for the same meat density of 2.96 g U/cc is in progress. The conversion is first step of the step-wise conversion and will be followed by the second step that is the core conversion from low meat density of silicide core, through a series of mixed lower-higher density of silicide core, to an all-higher meat density of 3.55 g/cc core. Therefore, the objectives of this work is to design the mixed cores on the neutronic performance to achieve safety a first full-silicide core for the reactor with the low uranium meat density of 2.96gU/cc. The neutronic design of the mixed cores was performed by means of Batan-EQUIL-2D and Batan-3DIFF computer codes for 2 and 3 dimension diffusion calculation, respectively. The result shows that all mixed oxide-silicide cores will be feasible to achieve safety a fist full-silicide core. The core performs the same neutronic core parameters as those of the equilibrium silicide core. Therefore, the reactor availability and utilization during the core conversion is not changed

  14. Fuel conversion of JRR-4 from HEU to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Hiroki; Nakajima, Teruo

    1997-01-01

    Japanese JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor No.4) is a pool type, light water moderated and cooled, ETR type fuel reactor used for Shielding experiments, isotope production, neutron activation analyses, Si doping, reactor students training. It acieved first criticality on January 28, 1965 with maximum thermal power 3.5MW. The standard core consistes of 20 Fuel elements, 7 control rods 5 Irradiation holes, neutron source, graphite reflectors. Available thermal flux is 7x1013 n/cm2/s. Within the RERTR program plans are made for core conversion from HEU to LEU

  15. TRIGA high wt -% LEU fuel development program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.B.

    1980-07-01

    The principal purpose of this work was to investigate the characteristics of TRIGA fuel where the contained U-235 was in a relatively high weight percent (wt %) of LEU (low enriched uranium - enrichment of less than 20%) rather than a relatively low weight percent of HEU (high enriched uranium). Fuel with up to 45 wt % U was fabricated and found to be acceptable after metallurgical examinations, fission product retention tests and physical property examinations. Design and safety analysis studies also indicated acceptable prompt negative temperature coefficient and core lifetime characteristics for these fuels

  16. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  17. Nanoscale investigation of the interface situation of plated nickel and thermally formed nickel silicide for silicon solar cell metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondon, A., E-mail: andrew.mondon@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer ISE, Heidenhofst. 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Wang, D. [Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), H.-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zuschlag, A. [Universität Konstanz FB Physik, Jacob-Burckhardt-Str. 27, D-78464 Konstanz (Germany); Bartsch, J.; Glatthaar, M.; Glunz, S.W. [Fraunhofer ISE, Heidenhofst. 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-12-30

    Highlights: • Adhesion of metallization of fully plated nickel–copper contacts on silicon solar cells can be achieved by formation of nickel silicide at the cost of degraded cell performance. • Understanding of silicide growth mechanisms and controlled growth may lead to high performance together with excellent adhesion. • Silicide formation is well known from CMOS production from PVD-Ni on flat surfaces. Yet the deposition methods and therefore layer characteristics and the surface topography are different for plated metallization. • TEM analysis is performed for differently processed samples. • A nickel silicide growth model is created for plated Ni on textured silicon solar cells. - Abstract: In the context of nickel silicide formation from plated nickel layers for solar cell metallization, there are several open questions regarding contact adhesion and electrical properties. Nanoscale characterization by transmission electron microscopy has been employed to support these investigations. Interfacial oxides and silicide phases were investigated on differently prepared samples by different analytical methods associated with transmission electron microscopy analysis. Processing variations included the pre-treatment of samples before nickel plating, the used plating solution and the thermal budget for the nickel–silicon solid-state reaction. It was shown that interface oxides of only few nm thickness on both silicon and nickel silicide are present on the samples, depending on the chosen process sequence, which have been shown to play an important role in adhesion of nickel on silicide in an earlier publication. From sample pretreatment variations, conclusions about the role of an interfacial oxide in silicide formation and its influence on phase formation were drawn. Such an oxide layer hinders silicide formation except for pinhole sites. This reduces the availability of Ni and causes a silicide with low Ni content to form. Without an interfacial oxide

  18. Irradiation of an uranium silicide prototype in RA-3 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, R.; Estrik, G.; Notari, C.

    1996-01-01

    The factibility of irradiation of an uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) prototype in the RA-3 reactor was studied. The standard RA-3 fuel element uses U 3 O 8 as fissible material. The enrichment of both standard and prototype is the same: 20% U 235 and also the frame geometry and number of plates is identical. The differences are in the plate dimensions and the fissile content which is higher in the prototype. The cooling conditions of the core allow the insertion of the prototype in any core position, even near the water trap, if the overall power is kept below 5Mw. Nevertheless, the recommendation was to begin irradiation near the periphery and later on move the prototype towards more central positions in order to increase the burnup rate. The prototype was effectively introduced in a peripheral position and the thermal fluxes were measured between plates with the foil activation technique. These were also evaluated with the fuel management codes and a reasonable agreement was found. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Milling uranium silicide powder for dispersion nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, E.; Silva, D.G.; Souza, J.A.B.; Durazzo, M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Riella, H.G. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Uranium silicide (U3Si2) is presently considered the best fuel qualified so far in terms of uranium loading and performance. Stability of the U3Si2 fuel with uranium density of 4.8 g/cm3 was confirmed by burnup stability tests performed during the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. This fuel was chosen to compose the first core of the new Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), planned to be constructed in the next years. This new reactor will consume bigger quantities of U3Si2 powder, when compared with the small consumption of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP, the unique MTR type research reactor operating in the country. At the present time, the milling operation of U3Si2 ingots is made manually. In order to increase the powder production capacity, the manual milling must be replaced by an automated procedure. This paper describes a new milling machine and procedure developed to produce U3Si2 powder with higher efficiency. (author)

  20. Mixing of Al into uranium silicides reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, F.R.; Birtcher, R.C.; Kestel, B.J.; Baldo, P.M.

    1996-11-01

    SEM observations have shown that irradiation induced interaction of the aluminum cladding with uranium silicide reactor fuels strongly affects both fission gas and fuel swelling behaviors during fuel burn-up. The authors have used ion beam mixing, by 1.5 MeV Kr, to study this phenomena. RBS and the 27 Al(p, γ) 28 Si resonance nuclear reaction were used to measure radiation induced mixing of Al into U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 after irradiation at 300 C. Initially U mixes into the Al layer and Al mixes into the U 3 Si. At a low dose, the Al layer is converted into UAl 4 type compound while near the interface the phase U(Al .93 Si .07 ) 3 grows. Under irradiation, Al diffuses out of the UAl 4 surface layer, and the lower density ternary, which is stable under irradiation, is the final product. Al mixing into U 3 Si 2 is slower than in U 3 Si, but after high dose irradiation the Al concentration extends much farther into the bulk. In both systems Al mixing and diffusion is controlled by phase formation and growth. The Al mixing rates into the two alloys are similar to that of Al into pure uranium where similar aluminide phases are formed

  1. Simulated Fission Gas Behavior in Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harp, Jason [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-15

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well-understood. However, existing experimental post-irradiation examination (PIE) data are limited to the research reactor conditions, which involve lower fuel temperature compared to LWR conditions. This lack of appropriate experimental data significantly affects the development of fuel performance codes that can precisely predict the microstructure evolution and property degradation at LWR conditions, and therefore evaluate the qualification of U3Si2 as an AFT for LWRs. Considering the high cost, long timescale, and restrictive access of the in-pile irradiation experiments, this study aims to utilize ion irradiation to simulate the inpile behavior of the U3Si2 fuel. Both in situ TEM ion irradiation and ex situ high-energy ATLAS ion irradiation experiments were employed to simulate different types of microstructure modifications in U3Si2. Multiple PIE techniques were used or will be used to quantitatively analyze the microstructure evolution induced by ion irradiation so as to provide valuable reference for the development of fuel performance code prior to the availability of the in-pile irradiation data.

  2. Production of MO-99 from LEU targets-base-side processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, George F.; Koma, Yoshikazu; Cols, Hector; Conner, Cliff; Aase, Scott; Peter, Magdalin; Walker, David; Leonard, Ralph A.; Snelgrove, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is cooperating with the Argentine Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) to convert their 99 Mo production process, which uses high enriched uranium (HEU), to low-enriched uranium (LEU). Progress discussed in this year's paper includes optimization of (1) the digestion of LEU foil by sodium hydroxide solution and (2) the primary recovery of molybdenum by anion exchange. Also discussed are ANL/CNEA plans for demonstrating the irradiation and digestion of LEU-foil targets and recovering 99 Mo in Argentina later this year. Our results show that, up to this point in our study, conversion of the CNEA process to LEU appears viable. (author)

  3. Preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism in Chinese subjects with coronary artery disease and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Na-Ping; Wang, Lian-Sheng; Yang, Li; Gu, Hai-Juan; Zhu, Huai-Jun; Zhou, Bo; Sun, Qing-Min; Cong, Ri-Hong; Wang, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, is considered to exert a protective effect against atherosclerosis. The Leu72Met (+408C>A) polymorphic variant of the preproghrelin, the gene for the ghrelin precursor, has been linked to obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. However, it is unclear whether this polymorphism is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). We conducted a case-control study with 317 CAD patients and 323 controls to investigate the potential association of the Leu72Met polymorphism with the occurrence of CAD and CAD-related phenotypes in Chinese population. No significant difference in the Leu72Met genotype frequency was observed between CAD patients and controls (P=NS). The Leu72Met polymorphism was not associated with hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, the number of diseased vessels, plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol or fasting glucose levels in CAD patients. However, among CAD patients, those with variant genotypes (Leu72Met and Met72Met) had lower BMI (24.4+/-0.3 kg/m(2)) than Leu72Leu carriers (25.4+/-0.2 kg/m(2), adjusted P=0.033). Our data indicate that the preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism is not associated with CAD in Chinese population. However, the Leu72Met variant is associated with BMI among CAD patients.

  4. Nanoscale investigation of the interface situation of plated nickel and thermally formed nickel silicide for silicon solar cell metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondon, A.; Wang, D.; Zuschlag, A.; Bartsch, J.; Glatthaar, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of nickel silicide formation from plated nickel layers for solar cell metallization, there are several open questions regarding contact adhesion and electrical properties. Nanoscale characterization by transmission electron microscopy has been employed to support these investigations. Interfacial oxides and silicide phases were investigated on differently prepared samples by different analytical methods associated with transmission electron microscopy analysis. Processing variations included the pre-treatment of samples before nickel plating, the used plating solution and the thermal budget for the nickel-silicon solid-state reaction. It was shown that interface oxides of only few nm thickness on both silicon and nickel silicide are present on the samples, depending on the chosen process sequence, which have been shown to play an important role in adhesion of nickel on silicide in an earlier publication. From sample pretreatment variations, conclusions about the role of an interfacial oxide in silicide formation and its influence on phase formation were drawn. Such an oxide layer hinders silicide formation except for pinhole sites. This reduces the availability of Ni and causes a silicide with low Ni content to form. Without an interfacial oxide a continuous nickel silicide of greater depth, polycrystalline modification and expected phase according to thermal budget is formed. Information about the nature of silicide growth on typical solar cell surfaces could be obtained from silicide phase and geometric observations, which were supported by FIB tomography. The theory of isotropic NiSi growth and orientation dependent NiSi2 growth was derived. By this, a very well performing low-cost metallization for silicon solar cells has been brought an important step closer to industrial introduction.

  5. Analysis of impurity effect on Silicide fuels of the RSG-GAS core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran-Surbakti

    2003-01-01

    Simulation of impurity effect on silicide fuel of the RSG-GAS core has been done. The aim of this research is to know impurity effect of the U-234 and U-236 isotopes in the silicide fuels on the core criticality. The silicide fuels of 250 g U loading and 19.75 of enrichment is used in this simulation. Cross section constant of fuels and non-structure material of core are generated by WIMSD/4 computer code, meanwhile impurity concentration was arranged from 0.01% to 2%. From the result of analysis can be concluded that the isotopes impurity in the fuels could make trouble in the core and the core can not be operated at critical after a half of its cycle length (350 MW D)

  6. Self-organized patterns along sidewalls of iron silicide nanowires on Si(110) and their origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debolina; Mahato, J. C.; Bisi, Bhaskar; Dev, B. N., E-mail: msbnd@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700032 (India); Satpati, B. [Surface Physics and Material Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-11-10

    Iron silicide (cubic FeSi{sub 2}) nanowires have been grown on Si(110) by reactive deposition epitaxy and investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning/transmission electron microscopy. On an otherwise uniform nanowire, a semi-periodic pattern along the edges of FeSi{sub 2} nanowires has been discovered. The origin of such growth patterns has been traced to initial growth of silicide nanodots with a pyramidal Si base at the chevron-like atomic arrangement of a clean reconstructed Si(110) surface. The pyramidal base evolves into a comb-like structure along the edges of the nanowires. This causes the semi-periodic structure of the iron silicide nanowires along their edges.

  7. Fission product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Due to present international concerns over nuclear proliferation, TRIGA reactor fuels will utilize only low-enriched uranium (LEU) (enrichment <20%). This requires increased total uranium loading per unit volume of fuel in order to maintain the appropriate fissile loading. Tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing up to 45 wt-% uranium. These tests, performed in late 1977 and early 1978, were similar to those conducted earlier on TRIGA fuels with 8.5 wt-% U. Fission gas release measurements were made on prototypic specimens from room temperature to 1100 deg. C in the TRIGA King Furnace Facility. The fuel specimens were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at a low power level. The fractional releases of the gaseous nuclides of krypton and xenon were measured under steady-state operating conditions. Clean helium was used to sweep the fission gases released during irradiation from the furnace into a standard gas collection trap for gamma counting. The results of these tests on TRIGA-LEU fuel agree well with data from the similar, earlier tests on TRIGA fuel. The correlation used to calculate the release of fission products from 8.5 wt-% U TRIGA fuel applies equally well for U contents up to 45 wt-%. (author)

  8. LEU-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 modelling with MCNP4A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, J.R.M.; Bonin, H.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Following the commissioning of the Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) Fueled SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at Royal Military College,excess reactivity measurements were conducted over a range of temperature and power. Given the advance in computer technology, the use of Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System MCNP 4A appeared possible for the simulation of the LEU-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core, and this work demonstrates that this is indeed the case. MCNP 4A is a full three dimensional program allowing the user to enter a large amount of complexity. The limit on the geometry complexity is the computing time required to achieve a reasonable standard deviation. To this point several models of the SLOWPOKE-2 have been developed giving some insight on the sensitivity of the code. MCNP4A can use various cross section libraries. The aim of this work is to calculate accurately the reactivity of the core and reproduce The temperature trend of the reactivity. The model preserved as much as possible the details of the core and facility in order to allow further study in the flux mapping

  9. Evaluation Of Oxide And Silicide Mixed Fuels Of The RSG-GAS Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Suparlina, Lily

    2000-01-01

    Fuel exchange of the RSG-GAS reactor core from uranium oxide to uranium silicide in the same loading, density, and enrichment, that is 250 gr, 2.98 gr/cm 3 , and 19.75%, respectively, will be performed in-step wise. In every cycle of exchange with 5/1 mode, it is needed to evaluate the parameter of reactor core operation. The parameters of the reactor operation observed are criticality mass of fuels, reactivity balance, and fuel reactivity that give effect to the reactor operation. The evaluation was done at beginning of cycle of the first and second transition core with compared between experiment and calculation results. The experiments were performed at transition core I and II, BOC, and low power. At transition core I, there are 2 silicide fuels (RI-224 and R1-225) in the core and then, added five silicide fuels (R1-226, R1-252, R1-263, and R1-264) to the core, so that there are seven silicide fuels in the transition core II. The evaluation was done based on the experiment of criticality, control rod calibration, fuel reactivity of the RSG-GAS transition core. For inserting 2 silicide fuels in the transition core I dan 7 fuels in the transition core II, the operation of RSG-GAS core fulfilled the safety margin and the parameter of reactor operation change is not occur drastically in experiment and calculation results. So that, the reactor was operated during 36 days at 15 MW, 540 MWD at the first transition core. The general result showed that the parameter of reactor operation change is small so that the fuel exchange from uranium oxide to uranium silicide in the next step can be done

  10. A Study on Silicide Coatings as Diffusion barrier for U-7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Ju Jin; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Ki Nam; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Chong Tak [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gamma phase U-Mo alloys are regarded as one of the promising candidates for advanced research reactor fuel when it comes to the irradiation performance. However, it has been reported that interaction layer formation between the UMo alloys and Al matrix degrades the irradiation performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel. The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of the interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-7Mo alloy powders were coated with silicide layers at 900 .deg. C for 1hr. U-Mo alloy powder was mixed with MoSi{sub 2}, Si and ZrSi{sub 2} powders and subsequently heat-treated to form uranium-silicide coating layers on the surface of U-Mo alloy particles. Silicide coated U-Mo powders and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The ZrSi{sub 2} coating layers has a thickness of about 1∼ 2μm. The surface of a silicide coated particle was very rough and silicide powder attached to the surface of the coating layer. 3. The XRD analysis of the coating layers showed that, they consisted of compounds such as U3Si{sub 2}, USi{sub 2}.

  11. Effects of Silicide Coating on the Interdiffusion between U-7Mo and Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Ki Nam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to and excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Ti, or Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide, or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-7Mo alloy powders were coated with silicide layers at varying T (T = 900 and 1000 .deg. C) for 30 min, respectively. U-Mo alloy powder was blended with Si powders and subsequently heat-treated to form uranium-silicide coating layers on the surface of U-Mo alloy particles. For an annealing test, silicide-coated U-Mo alloy powders were made into a compact, and Al powders were used as a matrix. From EDS results, transformed uranium aluminide intermetallic compounds were mainly U(Al,Si)3. U(Al,Si)3 phase left the silicide coating layer behind, and formed inside of U-7Mo particles, as shown in Fig. 3(a) and (b). In the case of sample B, Al could not penetrate the silicide coating layer and the coating layers were remained constant, as shown in Fig. 3(c) and (d). From the results, we made a comparison between the compacts of sample A and B, and it was shown that Al can easily diffuse into unreacted Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 5} mixed layer while U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} acted as a good diffusion barrier at 550 .deg. C though those layers had the same thickness.

  12. Effects of Silicide Coating on the Interdiffusion between U-7Mo and Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Ki Nam

    2015-01-01

    The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to and excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Ti, or Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide, or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-7Mo alloy powders were coated with silicide layers at varying T (T = 900 and 1000 .deg. C) for 30 min, respectively. U-Mo alloy powder was blended with Si powders and subsequently heat-treated to form uranium-silicide coating layers on the surface of U-Mo alloy particles. For an annealing test, silicide-coated U-Mo alloy powders were made into a compact, and Al powders were used as a matrix. From EDS results, transformed uranium aluminide intermetallic compounds were mainly U(Al,Si)3. U(Al,Si)3 phase left the silicide coating layer behind, and formed inside of U-7Mo particles, as shown in Fig. 3(a) and (b). In the case of sample B, Al could not penetrate the silicide coating layer and the coating layers were remained constant, as shown in Fig. 3(c) and (d). From the results, we made a comparison between the compacts of sample A and B, and it was shown that Al can easily diffuse into unreacted Si and U 3 Si 5 mixed layer while U 3 Si 2 acted as a good diffusion barrier at 550 .deg. C though those layers had the same thickness

  13. Formation of copper silicides by high dose metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Chun; Zhang Jizhong; Li Wenzhi

    2003-01-01

    Si(1 1 1) was implanted by copper ions with different doses and copper distribution in silicon matrix was obtained. The as-implanted samples were annealed at 300 and 540 deg. C, respectively. Formation of copper silicides in as-implanted and annealed samples were studied. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the reaction were found to be different from reaction at copper-silicon interface that was applied in conventional studies of copper-silicon interaction. The defects in silicon induced by implantation and formation of copper silicides were recognized by Si(2 2 2) X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  14. The influence of alloying on the phase formation sequence of ultra-thin nickel silicide films and on the inheritance of texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, F. A.; Solano, E.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Lavoie, C.; Mocuta, C.; Detavernier, C.

    2018-05-01

    The controlled formation of silicide materials is an ongoing challenge to facilitate the electrical contact of Si-based transistors. Due to the ongoing miniaturisation of the transistor, the silicide is trending to ever-thinner thickness's. The corresponding increase in surface-to-volume ratio emphasises the importance of low-energetic interfaces. Intriguingly, the thickness reduction of nickel silicides results in an abrupt change in phase sequence. This paper investigates the sequence of the silicides phases and their preferential orientation with respect to the Si(001) substrate, for both "thin" (i.e., 9 nm) and "ultra-thin" (i.e., 3 nm) Ni films. Furthermore, as the addition of ternary elements is often considered in order to tailor the silicides' properties, additives of Al, Co, and Pt are also included in this study. Our results show that the first silicide formed is epitaxial θ-Ni2Si, regardless of initial thickness or alloyed composition. The transformations towards subsequent silicides are changed through the additive elements, which can be understood through solubility arguments and classical nucleation theory. The crystalline alignment of the formed silicides with the substrate significantly differs through alloying. The observed textures of sequential silicides could be linked through texture inheritance. Our study illustrates the nucleation of a new phase drive to reduce the interfacial energy at the silicide-substrate interface as well as at the interface with the silicide which is being consumed for these sub-10 nm thin films.

  15. Irradiation behavior of uranium-silicide dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Neimark, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes the irradiation behavior of experimental fuel plates containing U 3 Si, U 3 Si-1.5 w/o Al, and U 3 Si 2 particulate fuel dispersed and clad in aluminum. The fuel is nominally 19.9%-enriched 235 U and the fuel volume fraction in the central ''meat'' section of the plates is approximately 33%. Sets of fuel plates were removed from the Oak Ridge Research reactor at burnup levels of 35, 83, and 94% 235 U depletion and examined at the Alpha-Gamma Hot-Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The results of the examination may be summarized as follows. The dimensional stability of the U 3 Si 2 and pure U 3 Si fuel was excellent throughout the entire burnup range, with uniform plate thickness increases up to a maximum of 4 mils at the highest burnup level (94% 235 U depletion). This corresponds to a meat volume increase of 11%. The swelling was partially due to solid fission products but to a larger extent to fission gas bubbles. The fission gas bubbles in U 3 Si 2 were small (submicrometer size) and very uniformly distributed, indicating great stability. To a large extent this was also the case for U 3 Si; however, larger bubbles ( 3 Si-1.5 w/o Al fuel became unstable at the higher burnup levels. Fission gas bubbles were larger than in the other two fuels and were present throughout the fuel particles. At 94% 235 U depletion, the formation of fission gas bubbles with diameters up to 20 mils caused the plates to pillow. It is proposed that aluminum in U 3 Si destabilizes fission gas bubble formation to the point of severe breakaway swelling in the prealloyed silicide fuel. (author)

  16. Radiation Re-solution Calculation in Uranium-Silicide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Christopher; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar; Unal, Cetin

    2017-01-01

    The release of fission gas from nuclear fuels is of primary concern for safe operation of nuclear power plants. Although the production of fission gas atoms can be easily calculated from the fission rate in the fuel and the average yield of fission gas, the actual diffusion, behavior, and ultimate escape of fission gas from nuclear fuel depends on many other variables. As fission gas diffuses through the fuel grain, it tends to collect into intra-granular bubbles, as portrayed in Figure 1.1. These bubbles continue to grow due to absorption of single gas atoms. Simultaneously, passing fission fragments can cause collisions in the bubble that result in gas atoms being knocked back into the grain. This so called ''re-solution'' event results in a transient equilibrium of single gas atoms within the grain. As single gas atoms progress through the grain, they will eventually collect along grain boundaries, creating inter-granular bubbles. As the inter-granular bubbles grow over time, they will interconnect with other grain-face bubbles until a pathway is created to the outside of the fuel surface, at which point the highly pressurized inter-granular bubbles will expel their contents into the fuel plenum. This last process is the primary cause of fission gas release. From the simple description above, it is clear there are several parameters that ultimately affect fission gas release, including the diffusivity of single gas atoms, the absorption and knockout rate of single gas atoms in intra-granular bubbles, and the growth and interlinkage of intergranular bubbles. Of these, the knockout, or re-solution rate has an particularly important role in determining the transient concentration of single gas atoms in the grain. The re-solution rate will be explored in the following sections with regards to uranium-silicide fuels in order to support future models of fission gas bubble behavior.

  17. Preparation results for lifetime test of conversion LEU fuel in plutonium production reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A.; Stetskiy, Yu.; Kukharkin, N.; Kalougin, A.; Gavrilov, P.; Ivanov, A.

    1999-01-01

    The program of converting Russian production reactors for the purpose to stop their plutonium fabrication is currently in progress. The program also provides for operation of these reactors under the conversion mode with using of low-enriched fuel (LEU). LEU fuel elements were developed and activities related to their preparation for reactor tests were carried out. (author)

  18. Supply of low enriched (LEU) and highly enriched uranium (HEU) for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1997-01-01

    Enriched uranium for research reactors in the form of LEU /= low enriched uranium at 19.75% U-235) and HEU (= highly enriched uranium at 90 to 93% U-235) was and is - due to its high U-235 enrichment - a political fuel other than enriched uranium for power reactors. The sufficient availability of LEU and HEU is a vital question for research reactors, especially in Europe, in order to perform their peaceful research reactor programs. In the past the USA were in the Western hemisphere sole supplier of LEU and HEU. Today the USA have de facto stopped the supply of LEU and HEU, for HEU mainly due to political reasons. This paper deals, among others, with the present availability of LEU and HEU for European research reactors and touches the following topics: - historical US supplies, - influence of the RERTR-program, - characteristics of LEU and HEU, - military HEU enters the civil market, -what is the supply situation for LEU and HEU today? - outlook for safe supplies of LEU and HEU. (author)

  19. Analysis Of Core Management For The Transition Cores Of RSG-GAS Reactor To Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malem Sembiring, Tagor; Suparlina, Lily; Tukiran

    2001-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 g U/cc is still doing. At the end of 2000, the reactor has been operated for 3 transition cores which is the mixed core of oxide-silicide. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 10 transition cores to achieve a full-silicide core. The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters such as excess reactivity and shutdown margin. The measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safety to a full-silicide core

  20. The Accident Analysis Due to Reactivity Insertion of RSG GAS 3.55 g U/cc Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endiah Puji-Hastuti; Surbakti, Tukiran

    2004-01-01

    The fuels of RSG-GAS reactor was changed from uranium oxide with 250 g U of loading or 2.96 g U/cc of fuel loading to uranium silicide with the same loading. The silicide fuels can be used in higher density, staying longer in the reactor core and hence having a longer cycle length. The silicide fuel in RSG-GAS core was made up in step-wise by using mixed up core Firstly, it was used silicide fuel with 250 g U of loading and then, silicide fuel with 300 g U of loading (3.55 g U/cc of fuel loading). In every step-wise of fuel loading, it must be analyzed its safety margin. In this occasion, the reactivity accident of RSG-GAS core with 300 g U of silicide fuel loading is analyzed. The calculation was done using EUREKA-2/RR code available at P2TRR. The calculation was done by reactivity insertion at start up and power rangers. The worst case accident is transient due to control rod with drawl failure at start up by means of lowest initial power (0.1 W), either in power range. From all cases which have been done, the results of analysis showed that there is no anomaly and safety margin break at RSG-GAS core with 300 g U silicide fuel loading. (author)

  1. Thermal stability of Ni-Pt-Ta alloy silicides on epi-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jung-Ho; Chang, Hyun-Jin [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byoung-Gi [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jusung Engineering Co., Ltd., 49, Neungpyeong-ri, Opo-eup, Gwangju-Si, Kyunggi-do 464-892 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Dae-Hong [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: dhko@yonsei.ac.kr; Cho, Mann-Ho [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Hyunchul [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Wan [Jusung Engineering Co., Ltd., 49, Neungpyeong-ri, Opo-eup, Gwangju-Si, Kyunggi-do 464-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-05

    We investigated the silicide formation in Ni/epi-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} systems. Ni-Pt and Ni-Pt-Ta films were deposited on epi-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}/Si substrates by DC magnetron sputtering and processed at various temperatures. The sheet resistance of the silicide from the Ni alloy/epi-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} systems was maintained at low values compared to that from Ni/Si systems. By TEM and EDS analyses, we confirmed the presence of a Pt alloy layer at the top of the Ni-silicide layer. The stability of the silicide layer in the Ni alloy/epi-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} system is explained by not only the Pt rich layer on the top of the Ni-silicide layer, but also by the presence of a small amount of Pt in the Ni-silicide layer or at the grain boundaries. And both the thermal stability and the morphology of silicide were greatly improved by the addition of Ta in Ni-Pt films.

  2. Thermal stability of Ni-Pt-Ta alloy silicides on epi-Si1-xCx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jung-Ho; Chang, Hyun-Jin; Min, Byoung-Gi; Ko, Dae-Hong; Cho, Mann-Ho; Sohn, Hyunchul; Lee, Tae-Wan

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the silicide formation in Ni/epi-Si 1-x C x systems. Ni-Pt and Ni-Pt-Ta films were deposited on epi-Si 1-x C x /Si substrates by DC magnetron sputtering and processed at various temperatures. The sheet resistance of the silicide from the Ni alloy/epi-Si 1-x C x systems was maintained at low values compared to that from Ni/Si systems. By TEM and EDS analyses, we confirmed the presence of a Pt alloy layer at the top of the Ni-silicide layer. The stability of the silicide layer in the Ni alloy/epi-Si 1-x C x system is explained by not only the Pt rich layer on the top of the Ni-silicide layer, but also by the presence of a small amount of Pt in the Ni-silicide layer or at the grain boundaries. And both the thermal stability and the morphology of silicide were greatly improved by the addition of Ta in Ni-Pt films

  3. Progress in chemical processing of LEU targets for 99Mo production - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Wygmans, D.G.; Wu, D.; Iskander, F.; Landsberger, S.

    1997-01-01

    Presented here are recent experimental results of our continuing development activities associated with converting current processes for producing fission-product 99 Mo from targets using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). Studies were focused in four areas: (1) measuring the chemical behavior of iodine, rhodium, and silver in the LEU-modified Cintichem process, (2) performing experiments and calculations to assess the suitability of zinc fission barriers for LEU metal foil targets, (3) developing an actinide separations method for measuring alpha contamination of the purified 99 Mo product, and (4) developing a cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory that will lead to approval by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration for production of 99 Mo from LEU targets. Experimental results continue to show the technical feasibility of converting current HEU processes to LEU. (author)

  4. LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics were calculated for reference HEU and two proposed LEU fuel cycles using an 11-group diffusion-theory neutron flux solution in hexagonal-Z geometry. The diffusion theory model was benchmarked with a detailed Monte Carlo core model. The two proposed LEU fuel designs increased the 235 U loading 20% and the fuel meat volume 51%. The first LEU design used 10 B as a burnable absorber. Either proposed LEU fuel element would provide equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics similar to those of the HEU fuel cycle. Irradiation rates of Co control followers and Ir disks in the center of the core were reduced 6 ± 1% in the LEU equilibrium core compared to reference HEU core. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Full core operation in JRR-3 with LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Y.; Issiki, M.

    1995-01-01

    The new JRR-3 a 20MWT swimming pool type research reactor, is made up of plate type LEU fuel elements with U-Al x fuel at 2.2 gU/cm 3 . Reconstruction work for the new JR-3 was a good success, and common operation started in November 1990, and 7 cycles (26 days operation/cycle) have passed. We have no experience in using such a high uranium density fuel element with aluminide fuel. So we plan to examine the condition of the irradiated fuel elements with three methods, that is, measurement of the value of FFD in operation, observation of external view of the fuels in refueling work and postirradiation examination after maximum burn-up will be established. In the results of the first two methods, the fuel elements of JRR-3 is burned up normally and have no evidence of failure. (author)

  6. HEU benchmark calculations and LEU preliminary calculations for IRR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caner, M.; Shapira, M.; Bettan, M.; Nagler, A.; Gilat, J.

    2004-01-01

    We performed neutronics calculations for the Soreq Research Reactor, IRR-1. The calculations were done for the purpose of upgrading and benchmarking our codes and methods. The codes used were mainly WIMS-D/4 for cell calculations and the three dimensional diffusion code CITATION for full core calculations. The experimental flux was obtained by gold wire activation methods and compared with our calculated flux profile. The IRR-1 is loaded with highly enriched uranium fuel assemblies, of the plate type. In the framework of preparation for conversion to low enrichment fuel, additional calculations were done assuming the presence of LEU fresh fuel. In these preliminary calculations we investigated the effect on the criticality and flux distributions of the increase of U-238 loading, and the corresponding uranium density.(author)

  7. White Paper – Use of LEU for a Space Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-11

    Historically space reactors flown or designed for the U.S. and Russia used Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) for fuel. HEU almost always produces a small and lighter reactor. Since mass increases launch costs or decreases science payloads, HEU was the natural choice. However in today’s environment, the proliferation of HEU has become a major concern for the U.S. government and hence a policy issue. In addition, launch costs are being reduced as the space community moves toward commercial launch vehicles. HEU also carries a heavy security cost to process, test, transport and launch. Together these issues have called for a re-investigation into space reactors the use Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel.

  8. Safety analysis of JMTR LEU fuel core, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Noboru; Shiraishi, Tadao; Takahashi, Yutaka; Inada, Seiji; Saito, Minoru; Futamura, Yoshiaki; Kitano, Kyoshiro.

    1992-10-01

    Dose analysis in the safety evaluation and the site evaluation were performed for the JMTR core conversion from MEU fuel to LEU fuel. In the safety evaluation, the effective dose equivalents for the public surrounding the site were estimated in fuel handling accident and flow blockage to coolant channel which were selected as the design basis accidents with release of radioactive fission products to the environment. In the site evaluation, the flow blockage to coolant channel was selected as siting basis events, since this accident had the possibility of spreading radioactive release. Maximum exposure doses for the public were estimated assuming large amounts of fission products to release. It was confirmed that risk of radiation exposure of the public is negligible and the siting is appropriate. (author)

  9. Qualification status of LEU [low enriched uranium] fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Sufficient data has been obtained from tests of high-density, low-enriched fuels for research and test reactors to declare them qualified for use. These fuels include UZrH x (TRIGA fuel) and UO 2 (SPERT fuel) for rod-type reactors and UAl x , U 3 O 8 , U 3 Si 2 , and U 3 Si dispersed in aluminium for plate-type reactors. Except for U 3 Si, the allowable fission density for LEU applications is limited only by the available 235 U. Several reactors are now using these fuels, and additional conversions are in progress. The basic performance characteristics and limits, if any, of the qualified low-enriched (and medium-enriched) fuels are discussed. Continuing and planned work to qualify additional fuels is also discussed. (Author)

  10. The French UMo group contribution to new LEU fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamy, J.M.; Lemoine, P.; Huet, F.; Jarousse, C.; Emin, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The French UMo Group was based on a close collaboration between CEA and AREVA's companies strongly involved in the MTR field. The aim of this program was to deliver industrially a high performance LEU UMo fuel able to be reprocessed, and suitable for a wide range of Research Reactor, covering the expected needs for MTR next generation. Since 1999, the program has been focused on industrial aspects with the intention to deal with the whole fuel cycle: manufacturing, irradiation behaviour, fuel characterisation, code development and reprocessing validation. It has been based on the fabrication of full-sized U-7%Mo fuel plates with a density up to 8 gU/cm 3 . The dedicated and advanced R and D means provided by the CEA have been used intensively with the contribution of HFR and BR2 facilities in Europe. This paper presents a synthesis of the program and the corresponding significant results obtained. These results have played a major role as regards the UMo dispersion fuel qualification route by issuing, for the first time, evidence of severe performance limitations. Consequently, the global international effort to develop and qualify a high density LEU UMo fuel has been definitively re-routed and forced to overcome these discrepancies by exploring new technical solutions. A French extended program sustained by a CEA and CERCA collaboration has been launched in 2004 in order to develop a suitable UMo fuel solution. UMo dispersion and monolithic fuel are both investigated through three new full-sized plate irradiations planned in OSIRIS. (author)

  11. Distinguishing Isomeric Peptides: The Unimolecular Reactivity and Structures of (LeuPro)M+ and (ProLeu)M+ (M = Alkali Metal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jami-Alahmadi, Yasaman; Linford, Bryan D; Fridgen, Travis D

    2016-12-29

    The unimolecular chemistries and structures of gas-phase (ProLeu)M + and (LeuPro)M + complexes when M = Li, Na, Rb, and Cs have been explored using a combination of SORI-CID, IRMPD spectroscopy, and computational methods. CID of both (LeuPro)M + and (ProLeu)M + showed identical fragmentation pathways and could not be differentiated. Two of the fragmentation routes of both peptides produced ions at the same nominal mass as (Pro)M + and (Leu)M + , respectively. For the litiated peptides, experiments revealed identical IRMPD spectra for each of the m/z 122 and 138 ions coming from both peptides. Comparison with computed IR spectra identified them as the (Pro)Li + and (Leu)Li + , and it is concluded that both zwitterionic and canonical forms of (Pro)Li + exist in the ion population from CID of both (ProLeu)Li + and (LeuPro)Li + . The two isomeric peptide complexes could be distinguished using IRMPD spectroscopy in both the fingerprint and the CH/NH/OH regions. The computed IR spectra for the lowest energy structures of each charge solvated complexes are consistent with the IRMPD spectra in both regions for all metal cation complexes. Through comparison between the experimental spectra, it was determined that in lithiated and sodiated ProLeu, metal cation is bound to both carbonyl oxygens and the amine nitrogen. In contrast, the larger metal cations are bound to the two carbonyls, while the amine nitrogen is hydrogen bonded to the amide hydrogen. In the lithiated and sodiated LeuPro complexes, the metal cation is bound to the amide carbonyl and the amine nitrogen while the amine nitrogen is hydrogen bonded to the carboxylic acid carbonyl. However, there is no hydrogen bond in the rubidiated and cesiated complexes; the metal cation is bound to both carbonyl oxygens and the amine nitrogen. Details of the position of the carboxylic acid C═O stretch were especially informative in the spectroscopic confirmation of the lowest energy computed structures.

  12. Impact of Nickel silicide Rear Metallization on Series Resistance of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabry, Rabab R; Hanna, Amir N; Kutbee, Arwa T; Gumus, Abdurrahman; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    the electrical characteristics of nickel mono-silicide (NiSi)/Cu-Al ohmic contact on the rear side of c-Si solar cells. We observe a significant enhancement in the fill factor of around 6.5% for NiSi/Cu-Al rear contacts leading to increasing the efficiency by 1.2

  13. Role of Ti 3 Al/silicides on tensile properties of Timetal 834 at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extremely fine coherent precipitates of ordered Ti3Al and relatively coarse incoherent precipitates of 2 silicide exist together in the near -titanium alloy, Timetal 834, in the dual phase matrix of primary and transformed . In order to assess the role of these precipitates, three heat treatments viz. WQ, WQ–A and WQ–OA, ...

  14. Core-hole effects in the x-ray-absorption spectra of transition-metal silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEIJS, PJW; CZYZYK, MT; VANACKER, JF; SPEIER, W; GOEDKOOP, JB; VANLEUKEN, H; HENDRIX, HJM; DEGROOT, RA; VANDERLAAN, G; BUSCHOW, KHJ; WIECH, G; FUGGLE, JC

    1990-01-01

    We report systematic differences between the shape of the Si K x-ray-absorption spectra of transition-metal silicides and broadened partial densities of Si p states. We use a variety of calculations to show that the origin of these discrepancies is the core-hole potential appropriate to the final

  15. Cross-Bridge Kelvin Resistor (CBKR) structures for silicide-semiconductor junctions characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavitski, N.; van Dal, M.J.H.; Klootwijk, J.H.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2006-01-01

    Analyzing the contact geometry factors for the conventional CBKR structures, it appeared that the contact geometries conventionally used for the metal-to-silicide contact resistance measurements were not always satisfactory to reveal the specific contact resistance values. To investigate these

  16. X-ray-emission studies of chemical bonding in transition-metal silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.W.; Leuken, H. van; Groot, R.A. de; Fuggle, J.C.; Reiter, S.; Wiech, G.; Buschow, K.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    We present Si L2,3 emission-band spectra of a series of 3d and 4d transition-metal (TM) silicides, together wtih Si K emission-band spectra of four 3d TM disilicides. The data are compared with augmented-spherical-wave density-of-states (DOS) calculations, and good agreement is found. The trends we

  17. Kinetics of low pressure chemical vapor deposition of tungsten silicide from dichlorocilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, D.; Raupp, G.B.; Hillman, J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report on experiments to determine the intrinsic surface reaction rate dependences and film properties' dependence on local reactant partial pressures and wafer temperature in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten silicide from dichlorosilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Films were deposited in a commercial-scale Spectrum CVD cold wall single wafer reactor under near differential, gradientless conditions. Over the range of process conditions investigated, deposition rate was found to be first order in dichlorosillane and negative second order in tungsten hexafluoride partial pressure. The apparent activation energy in the surface reaction limited regime was found to be 70-120 kcal/mol. The silicon to tungsten ratio of as deposited silicide films ranged from 1.1 to 2.4, and increased with increasing temperature and dichlorosillane partial pressure, and decreased with increasing tungsten hexafluoride pressure. These results suggest that the apparent silicide deposition rate and composition are controlled by the relative rates of at least two competing reactions which deposit stoichiometric tungsten silicides and/or silicon

  18. Waste Photovoltaic Panels for Ultrapure Silicon and Hydrogen through the Low-Temperature Magnesium Silicide.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dytrych, Pavel; Bumba, Jakub; Kaštánek, František; Fajgar, Radek; Koštejn, Martin; Šolcová, Olga

    Roč. 56, č. 45 ( 2017 ), s. 12863-12869 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14228S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : magnesium silicide * waste photovoltaic panels * ultrapure silicon Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 2.843, year: 2016

  19. High pressure studies on uranium and thorium silicide compounds: Experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagoubi, S.; Heathman, S.; Svane, A.

    2013-01-01

    The actinide silicides ThSi, USi and USi2 have been studied under high pressure using both theory and experiment. High pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed on polycrystalline samples in diamond anvil cells at room temperature and for pressures up to 54, 52 and 26 GPa...

  20. Near surface silicide formation after off-normal Fe-implantation of Si(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbabaee, B., E-mail: khanbabaee@physik.uni-siegen.de; Pietsch, U. [Solid State Physics, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Hübner, R.; Grenzer, J.; Facsko, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-14

    We report on formation of non-crystalline Fe-silicides of various stoichiometries below the amorphized surface of crystalline Si(001) after irradiation with 5 keV Fe{sup +} ions under off-normal incidence. We examined samples prepared with ion fluences of 0.1 × 10{sup 17} and 5 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2} exhibiting a flat and patterned surface morphology, respectively. Whereas the iron silicides are found across the whole surface of the flat sample, they are concentrated at the top of ridges at the rippled surface. A depth resolved analysis of the chemical states of Si and Fe atoms in the near surface region was performed by combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The chemical shift and the line shape of the Si 2p core levels and valence bands were measured and associated with the formation of silicide bonds of different stoichiometric composition changing from an Fe-rich silicides (Fe{sub 3}Si) close to the surface into a Si-rich silicide (FeSi{sub 2}) towards the inner interface to the Si(001) substrate. This finding is supported by XAS analysis at the Fe K-edge which shows changes of the chemical environment and the near order atomic coordination of the Fe atoms in the region close to surface. Because a similar Fe depth profile has been found for samples co-sputtered with Fe during Kr{sup +} ion irradiation, our results suggest the importance of chemically bonded Fe in the surface region for the process of ripple formation.

  1. Comparison of the FRM-II HEU design with an alternative LEU design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, S.C.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The FRM-II reactor design of the Technical University of Munich has a compact core that utilizes fuel plates containing highly-enriched uranium (HEU, 93%). This paper presents an alternative core design utilizing low-enriched uranium (LEU, 3 that provides nearly the same neutron flux for experiments as the HEU design, but has a less favourable fuel cycle economy. If an LEU fuel with a uranium density of 6.0 - 6.5 g/cm 3 . were developed, the alternative design would provide the same neutron flux and use the same number of cores per year as the HEU design. The results of this study show that there are attractive possibilities for using LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel in the FRM-II. Further optimization of the LEU design and near-term availability of LEU fuel with a uranium density greater than 4.8 g/cm 3 would enhance the performance of the LEU core. The REKIR Program is ready to exchange information with the Technical University of Munich to resolve any differences that may exist and to identify design modifications that would optimize reactor performance utilizing LEU fuel. (author)

  2. Leu-9 (CD 7) positivity in acute leukemias: a marker of T-cell lineage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ezra, J; Winberg, C D; Wu, A; Rappaport, H

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody Leu-9 (CD 7) has been reported to be a sensitive and specific marker for T-cell lineage in leukemic processes, since it is positive in patients whose leukemic cells fail to express other T-cell antigens. To test whether Leu-9 is indeed specific for T-cell leukemias, we examined in detail 10 cases of acute leukemia in which reactions were positive for Leu-9 and negative for other T-cell-associated markers including T-11, Leu-1, T-3, and E-rosettes. Morphologically and cytochemically, 2 of these 10 leukemias were classified as lymphoblastic, 4 as myeloblastic, 2 as monoblastic, 1 as megakaryoblastic, and 1 as undifferentiated. The case of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia is the first reported case to be Leu-9 positive. None of the 10 were TdT positive. Of six cases (two monoblastic, one lymphoblastic, one myeloblastic, one megakaryoblastic, and one undifferentiated) in which we evaluated for DNA gene rearrangements, only one, a peroxidase-positive leukemia, showed a novel band on study of the T-cell-receptor beta-chain gene. We therefore conclude that Leu-9 is not a specific marker to T-cell lineage and that, in the absence of other supporting data, Leu-9 positivity should not be used as the sole basis of classifying an acute leukemia as being T-cell derived.

  3. Preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola, O; Kesäniemi, Y A

    2003-10-01

    The association between the Leu72Met polymorphism of the preproghrelin gene and diabetic complications was examined in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 258 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 522 control subjects were screened. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction technique. The diagnosis of coronary heart disease was based on clinical and ECG criteria. Laboratory analyses were carried out in the hospital laboratory. No differences in the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of the preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism were found between type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and controls. The polymorphism was not associated with macro- or micro-angiopathy or hypertension. However, Leu72Met polymorphism was associated with serum creatinine (P = 0.006) and lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels (P = 0.006) with Leu72Leu subjects showing the highest values. This association was observed only amongst diabetic group. The Leu72Met polymorphism of the preproghrelin gene was not related to cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Leu72Met polymorphism was, however, associated with serum creatinine and Lp(a) levels in diabetic patients. The mechanism might be associated with a possible change in ghrelin product and its somatotropic effect.

  4. Pressure effect on the conformational equilibrium of [Leu]{sup 5}-enkephalin in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, A [Department of Environmental Engineering for Symbiosis, Soka University, 1-326 Tangi-cho, Hachioji, Tokyo, 192-8577 (Japan); Takekiyo, T; Yoshimura, Y [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Defence Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, 239-8686 (Japan); Kato, M; Taniguchi, Y, E-mail: shimizu@soka.ac.j, E-mail: take214@nda.ac.j [Department of Applied Chemistry, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    The conformational stability of [Leu]{sup 5}-enkephalin,Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu, in water have been investigated under high pressure by FTIR spectroscopy. Three peaks at 1638, 1650, and 1680 cm{sup -1} were determined by second derivative FTIR spectra in the amide I' region of [Leu]{sup 5}-enkephalin. The peaks at 1637 and 1680 cm{sup -1} are assigned to the {beta}-strand and turn structures, respectively. These peaks mean that [Leu]{sup 5}-enkephalin takes a {beta}-hairpin-like structure in water. Moreover, the absorbance at 1638 cm{sup -1} increases with increasing pressure, and this change shows a sigmoidal curve. Thus, we concluded that [Leu]{sup 5}-enkephalin has the {beta}-hairpin-like and disordered structures in water. From the FTIR profile at high pressures, the {beta}-hairpin-like structure of [Leu]{sup 5}-enkephalin is stabilized by a high pressures. Our result shows that the folded structures such as {alpha}-helix and {beta}-hairpin structures of short peptide such as [Leu]{sup 5}-enkephalin are stabilized at high pressures.

  5. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm 3 in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept. (author)

  6. Oral delivery of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3, synthetic peptide leptin mimetics: Immunofluorescent localization in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian M; Jacobson, Lauren; Novakovic, Zachary M; Grasso, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    This study describes the localization of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3, synthetic peptide leptin mimetics, in the hypothalamus of Swiss Webster and C57BL/6J wild-type mice, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, and leptin-resistant diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. The mice were given [D-Leu-4]-OB3 or MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 in 0.3% dodecyl maltoside by oral gavage. Once peak serum concentrations were reached, the mice received a lethal dose of pentobarbital and were subjected to intracardiac perfusion fixation. The brains were excised, post-fixed in paraformaldehyde, and cryo-protected in sucrose. Free-floating frozen coronal sections were cut at 25-µm and processed for imaging by immunofluorescence microscopy. In all four strains of mice, dense staining was concentrated in the area of the median eminence, at the base and/or along the inner wall of the third ventricle, and in the brain parenchyma at the level of the arcuate nucleus. These results indicate that [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 cross the blood-brain barrier and concentrate in an area of the hypothalamus known to regulate energy balance and glucose homeostasis. Most noteworthy is the localization of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 immunoreactivity within the hypothalamus of DIO mice via a conduit that is closed to leptin in this rodent model, and in most cases of human obesity. Together with our previous studies describing the effects of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 on energy balance, glucose regulation, and signal transduction pathway activation, these findings are consistent with a central mechanism of action for these synthetic peptide leptin mimetics, and suggest their potential usefulness in the management of leptin-resistant obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electron spectroscopy in the X-ray range for occupied and free levels and the application to transition metal silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speier, W.

    1988-03-01

    Intermetallic compounds of transition metals are investigated by means of XPS, Bremsstrahlung Isochromate Spectroscopy and XAS. Occupied and free levels are characterized and moreover a systematic overview over the electronic structure of the transition element silicides is given. (BHO)

  8. Poliovirus Polymerase Leu420 Facilitates RNA Recombination and Ribavirin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Brian J.; Peersen, Olve B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA recombination is important in the formation of picornavirus species groups and the ongoing evolution of viruses within species groups. In this study, we examined the structure and function of poliovirus polymerase, 3Dpol, as it relates to RNA recombination. Recombination occurs when nascent RNA products exchange one viral RNA template for another during RNA replication. Because recombination is a natural aspect of picornavirus replication, we hypothesized that some features of 3Dpol may exist, in part, to facilitate RNA recombination. Furthermore, we reasoned that alanine substitution mutations that disrupt 3Dpol-RNA interactions within the polymerase elongation complex might increase and/or decrease the magnitudes of recombination. We found that an L420A mutation in 3Dpol decreased the frequency of RNA recombination, whereas alanine substitutions at other sites in 3Dpol increased the frequency of recombination. The 3Dpol Leu420 side chain interacts with a ribose in the nascent RNA product 3 nucleotides from the active site of the polymerase. Notably, the L420A mutation that reduced recombination also rendered the virus more susceptible to inhibition by ribavirin, coincident with the accumulation of ribavirin-induced G→A and C→U mutations in viral RNA. We conclude that 3Dpol Leu420 is critically important for RNA recombination and that RNA recombination contributes to ribavirin resistance. IMPORTANCE Recombination contributes to the formation of picornavirus species groups and the emergence of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs). The recombinant viruses that arise in nature are occasionally more fit than either parental strain, especially when the two partners in recombination are closely related, i.e., members of characteristic species groups, such as enterovirus species groups A to H or rhinovirus species groups A to C. Our study shows that RNA recombination requires conserved features of the viral polymerase. Furthermore, a

  9. How LeuT shapes our understanding of the mechanisms of sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are ion-coupled symporters that drive the uptake of neurotransmitters from neural synapses. In the past decade, the structure of a bacterial amino acid transporter, leucine transporter (LeuT), has given valuable insights into the understanding of architecture and mechanism of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters. Different conformations of LeuT, including a substrate-free state, inward-open state, and competitive and non-competitive inhibitor-bound states, have revealed a mechanistic framework for the transport and transport inhibition of neurotransmitters. The current review integrates our understanding of the mechanistic and pharmacological properties of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters obtained through structural snapshots of LeuT.

  10. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Design Using LEU Tungsten Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yonghee; Husemeyer, Peter and others

    2013-01-01

    This would then open the possibility for the commercial development and implementation of an NTR. The result was a design for a 114.66 kN thrust rocket engine, with an optimized specific impulse of 801 second, and a thrust-to-weight ratio 5.08. The development and analysis of the reactor was done using an integrated neutronics and thermal hydraulics code that combines MCNP5 using ENDF-B/VI cross sections with a purpose-built thermal hydraulics code. A proof of concept has been proposed for W LEU-NTR design. The current design is built upon traditional NTR design work and implements many of the proven design characteristics and materials from previous designs. Despite the current reactor design being preliminary, it already shows promise in being able to have similar, if not better performance characteristics than current and previous NTR designs. Future work will involve the flattening of radial power profile, optimization of the axial power profile, researching methods to address the full water immersion accident scenario, and further studies regarding the breeding potential in the reactor

  11. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Design Using LEU Tungsten Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yonghee; Husemeyer, Peter and others

    2013-10-15

    This would then open the possibility for the commercial development and implementation of an NTR. The result was a design for a 114.66 kN thrust rocket engine, with an optimized specific impulse of 801 second, and a thrust-to-weight ratio 5.08. The development and analysis of the reactor was done using an integrated neutronics and thermal hydraulics code that combines MCNP5 using ENDF-B/VI cross sections with a purpose-built thermal hydraulics code. A proof of concept has been proposed for W LEU-NTR design. The current design is built upon traditional NTR design work and implements many of the proven design characteristics and materials from previous designs. Despite the current reactor design being preliminary, it already shows promise in being able to have similar, if not better performance characteristics than current and previous NTR designs. Future work will involve the flattening of radial power profile, optimization of the axial power profile, researching methods to address the full water immersion accident scenario, and further studies regarding the breeding potential in the reactor.

  12. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-01-14

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm{sup 3} or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study.

  13. ANL progress in developing a target and process for converting CNEA Mo-99 production to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Gelis, A.; Aase, S.; Bakel, A.; Freiberg, E.; Conner, C.

    2002-01-01

    The primary mission of the Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program is to facilitate the conversion of research and test reactor fuel and targets from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). One of the current goals at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is to convert 99 Mo production at Argentine Commission Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) from HEU to LEU targets. Specifically addressed in this paper is ANL R and D related to this conversion: (1) designing a prototype production vessel for digesting irradiated LEU foils in alkaline solutions, (2) developing means to improve digestion efficiency, and (3) modifying ion-exchange processes used in the CNEA recovery and purification of 99 Mo to deal with the lower volumes generated from LEU-foil digestion. (author)

  14. Core management and reactor physics aspects of the conversion of the NRU reactor to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atfield, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Results of work done to assess the effects of converting the NRU reactor to LEU are presented. The effects are small, and the operational rules and safety analysis, appropriate to the HEU core, will still apply. (author)

  15. Total synthesis of fully tritiated Leu-enkephalin by enzymatic coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellio, F.; Lecocq, G.; Morgat, J.L.; Gueguen, P. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Biochimie)

    1990-09-01

    This paper describes the total enzymatic synthesis of Leu-enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) in which all residues were labelled with tritium. Carboxypeptidase Y from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the coupling enzyme. ({sup 3}H)-Tyr-NH{sub 2}, ({sup 3}H)-Gly-Oet, ({sup 3}H)-Phe-NH{sub 2} and ({sup 3}H)-Leu-NH{sub 2} were prepared with specific radioactivities ranging between 20 and 60 Ci/mmol (740 to 2220 GBq/mmol). Using a microscale procedure, we obtained a fully tritiated hormone having a specific radioactivity equal to 139 Ci/mmol (5143 GBq/mmol), in agreement with the summation of the specific radioactivities of constituting residue. The radioactive hormone had antigenic properties identical to those of native Leu-enkephalin. It also bound to rat brain opiate receptors like the parental hormone. (author).

  16. ANL progress in developing an LEU target and process for Mo-99 production: Cooperation with CNEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelis, A.V.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Aase, S.B.; Bakel, A.J.; Falkenberg, J.R.; Regalbuto, M.C.; Quigley, K.J.

    2003-01-01

    The primary mission of the Reduced Enrichment in Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program is to facilitate the conversion of research and test-reactor fuel and targets from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). One of the current goals at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is to assist the Argentine Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) in developing an LEU foil target and a process for 99 Mo production. Specifically addressed in this paper is ANL R and D related to this conversion: (1) designing a prototype production vessel for digesting irradiated LEU foils in alkaline solutions and (2) developing a new digestion method to address all issues related to HEU to LEU conversion. (author)

  17. Syntheses of deuterated leu-enkephalins and their use as internal standards for the quantification of leu-enkephalin by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benfenati, E. (Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Bergamo (Italy) Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan (Italy)); Icardi, G.; Chen, S. (Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Bergamo (Italy)); Fanelli, R. (Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan (Italy))

    1990-04-01

    We have developed a synthetic method for the preparation of di- and pentadeuterated leu-enkephalin (LE), Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu, by proton-deuterium exchange using CF[sub 3]COOO[sup 2]H. Four to six deuterium atoms are introduced using a reaction temperature of 120[sup o]C and if 5% of [sup 2]H[sub 2]O is added the di-deuterated LE is obtained. These deuterated compounds are used as internal standards to plot calibration curves of LE using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. (author).

  18. Evaluation of In-Core Fuel Management for the Transition Cores of RSG-GAS Reactor to Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S, Tukiran; MS, Tagor; P, Surian

    2003-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 gU/cc has been done. The core-of RSG-GAS reactor has been operated full core of silicide fuels which is started with the mixed core of oxide-silicide start from core 36. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 9 transition cores (core 36 - 44) to achieve a full-silicide core (core 45). The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters. Conversion core was achieved by transition cores mixed oxide-silicide fuels. Each transition core is calculated and measured core parameter such as, excess reactivity and shutdown margin. Calculation done by Batan-EQUIL-2D code and measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The results of calculation and experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safely to a full-silicide core

  19. The global threat reduction initiative and conversion of isotope production to LEU targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperman, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has given a decisive impetus to the RERTR program's longstanding goal of converting worldwide production of medical radioisotopes from reliance on bomb-grade, highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) unsuitable for weapons. Although the four major; isotope producers continue to resist calls for conversion, they face mounting pressure from a variety of fronts including: (1) GTRI; (2) a related, multilateral U.S. initiative to forge agreement on conversion among the states that are home to the major producers; (3) an IAEA effort to provide technical assistance that will facilitate large-scale production of medical isotopes using LEU by producers who seek to do so; (4) planned production in the United States of substantial quantities of medical isotopes using LEU; and (5) pending U.S. legislation that would prohibit the export of HEU for production of isotopes as soon as alternative, LEU-produced isotopes are available. Accordingly, it now appears inevitable that worldwide isotope production will be converted from reliance on HEU to LEU. The only remaining question is which producers will be the first to reliably deliver sizeable quantities of LEU-produced isotopes and thereby capture global market share from the others. (author)

  20. Preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism is not associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Young; Jo, Dae-Sun; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Park, Ji Hyun; Park, Sung Kwang; Yi, Ho Keun; Lee, Dae-Yeol

    2006-03-01

    Ghrelin is a novel gut-brain peptide, which exerts somatotropic, orexigenic, and adipogenic effects. Genetic variants of ghrelin have been associated with both obesity and insulin metabolism. In this study, we determined a role of preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism on type 2 diabetes mellitus and its relationship to variables studied. Genotypes were assessed by polymerase chain reaction. Frequencies of the Leu72Met polymorphism were found to be 35.4% in the type 2 diabetic patients and 32.5% in the normal controls. The Leu72Met polymorphism was not associated with hypertension, macroangiopathy, retinopathy, serum cholesterol, triglyceride, blood urea nitrogen, HbA(1c), lipoprotein (a), fasting insulin, or 24-hour urinary protein levels in the type 2 diabetic group. However, the Leu72Met polymorphism was clearly associated with serum creatinine levels in the diabetic group, as the Met72 carriers exhibited lower serum creatinine levels than the Met72 noncarriers. Our data indicate that the preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism is not associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the Leu72Met polymorphism is associated with serum creatinine levels. These data suggest that Met72 carrier status may be a predictable marker for diabetic nephropathy or renal impairment in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  1. Association of ghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Jia; Tian, Li-min; Liu, Ju-xiang; Bing, Ya-jun; Zhang, Ji-ping; Wang, Yun-Fang; Zhang, Lu-yan

    2012-08-10

    Ghrelin, a novel endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, is considered to implicate the development of the type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The Leu72Met (+408C>A) polymorphism of the preproghrelin, has been linked to obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. To investigate the distribution of ghrelin gene Leu72Met polymorphism and its association with the type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese population. We conducted a case-control study on 877 patients with T2DM and 864 controls, which were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and DNA sequence analysis. Laboratory analyses were carried out in the hospital laboratory. No significant difference in the Leu72Met genotype distributions and allele frequency was observed between type 2 diabetes mellitus and controls (both P>0.05). The polymorphism was not associated with T2DM. However, among the T2DM group, the patients carrying Leu72Leu genotype had significantly increased levels of FPG and serum creatinine compared with variant genotypes (Leu72Met and Met72Met) (Ppolymorphism of the preproghrelin gene was not associated with T2DM in Chinese population. However, it may have some roles in the etiology of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reactivity And Neutron Flux At Silicide Fuel Element In The Core Of RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamzah, Amir

    2000-01-01

    In order to 4.8 and 5.2 gr U/cm exp 3 loading of U 3 Si 2 --Al fuel plates characterization, he core reactivity change and neutron flux depression had been done. Control rod calibration method was used to reactivity change measurement and neutron flux distribution was measured using foil activation method. Measurement of insertion of A-type of testing fuel element with U-loading above cannot be done due to technical reason, so the measurement using full type silicide fuel element of 2.96 gr U/cm exp 3 loading. The reactivity change measurement result of insertion in A-9 and C-3 is + 2.67 cent. The flux depression at silicide fuel in A-9 is 1.69 times bigger than oxide and in C-3 is 0.68 times lower than oxide

  3. Babcock and Wilcox plate fabrication experience with uranium silicide spherical fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, Lawrence E.; Pace, Brett W.

    1996-01-01

    This report is written to present the fuel fabrication experience of Babcock and Wilcox using atomized spherical uranium silicide powder. The intent is to demonstrate the ability to fabricate fuel plates using spherical powder and to provide useful information proceeding into the next phase of work using this type of fuel. The limited quantity of resources- spherical powder and time, did not allow for much process optimizing in this work scope. However, the information contained within provides optimism for the future of spherical uranium silicide fuel plate fabrication at Babcock and Wilcox.The success of assembling fuel elements with spherical powder will enable Babcock and Wilcox to reduce overall costs to its customers while still maintaining our reputation for providing high quality research and test reactor products. (author)

  4. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe{sub 3}Si clusters during ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakirev, N. [Kazan National Research Technological University, K.Marx st. 68, Kazan 420015 (Russian Federation); Zhikharev, V., E-mail: valzhik@mail.ru [Kazan National Research Technological University, K.Marx st. 68, Kazan 420015 (Russian Federation); Gumarov, G. [Zavoiskii Physico-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, 10/7 Sibirskii trakt st., Kazan 420029 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe{sub 3}Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field.

  5. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakirev, N.; Zhikharev, V.; Gumarov, G.

    2014-05-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field.

  6. RA-3 reactor core with uranium silicide fuel elements P-07 type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, Maximo J.; Sbaffoni, Maria M.

    2003-01-01

    Following the studies on the utilization of fuel elements (FE) containing uranium silicide, core of the RA-3 was analyzed with several calculation models. At first, the present situation, i.e. the core charged with normal FE (U 3 O 8 ), has been analyzed to validate the simulation methodology comparing with experimental results and to establish reference data to 5 and 10 MW able to be compared with future new situations. Also, CITVAP's nuclear data libraries to be used in irradiation experiment planning were completed. The results were satisfactory and were applied to the study of the core containing P-07 FE [U 3 Si 2 ], in face of a future core change. Comparing with the performance of the U 3 O 8 FE, the silicides ones show the following advantages: - average burnup: 45 % greater; -extraction burnup increase 12 %; and, -the residence time [in full power days] could be a 117 % greater. (author)

  7. The formation of magnetic silicide Fe3Si clusters during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakirev, N.; Zhikharev, V.; Gumarov, G.

    2014-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional model of the formation of magnetic silicide Fe 3 Si clusters during high-dose Fe ion implantation into silicon has been proposed and the cluster growth process has been computer simulated. The model takes into account the interaction between the cluster magnetization and magnetic moments of Fe atoms random walking in the implanted layer. If the clusters are formed in the presence of the external magnetic field parallel to the implanted layer, the model predicts the elongation of the growing cluster in the field direction. It has been proposed that the cluster elongation results in the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in the plane of the implanted layer, which is observed in iron silicide films ion-beam synthesized in the external magnetic field

  8. A long-term ultrahigh temperature application of layered silicide coated Nb alloy in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia; Fu, Qian-Gang; Li, Tao; Wang, Chen; Huo, Cai-Xia; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Guan-Jun; Sun, Le

    2018-05-01

    Nb-based alloy possessed limited application service life at ultrahigh temperature (>1400 °C) in air even taking the effective protective coating strategy into consideration for last decades. In this work a long duration of above 128 h at 1500 °C in air was successfully achieved on Nb-based alloy thanked to multi-layered silicide coating. Through optimizing interfaces, the MoSi2/NbSi2 silicide coating with Al2O3-adsorbed-particles layer exhibited three-times higher of oxidation resistance capacity than the one without it. In MoSi2-Al2O3-NbSi2 multilayer coating, the Al2O3-adsorbed-particles layer playing as an element-diffusion barrier role, as well as the formed porous Nb5Si3 layer as a stress transition zone, contributed to the significant improvement.

  9. Study of optical and luminescence properties of silicon — semiconducting silicide — silicon multilayer nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, N.G.; Galkin, K.N.; Dotsenko, S.A.; Goroshko, D.L.; Shevlyagin, A.V.; Chusovitin, E.A.; Chernev, I.M.

    2017-01-01

    By method of in situ differential spectroscopy it was established that at the formation of monolayer Fe, Cr, Ca, Mg silicide and Mg stannide islands on the atomically clean silicon surface an appearance of loss peaks characteristic for these materials in the energy range of 1.1-2.6 eV is observed. An optimization of growth processes permit to grow monolithic double nanoheterostructures (DNHS) with embedded Fe, Cr and Ca nanocrystals, and also polycrystalline DNHS with NC of Mg silicide and Mg stannide and Ca disilicide. By methods of optical spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy it was shown that embedded NC form intensive peaks in the reflectance spectra at energies up to 2.5 eV and Raman peaks. In DNS with β-FeSi2 NC a photoluminescence and electroluminescence at room temperature were firstly observed.

  10. Whole core burnup calculations using 'MCNP'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haran, O.; Shaham, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Core parameters such as the reactivity, the power distribution and different reactivity coefficients calculated in simulations play an important role in the nuclear reactor handling. Operational safety margins are decided upon, based on the calculated parameters. Thus, the ability to accurately calculate those parameters is of uppermost importance. Such ability exists for fresh cores, using the Monte-Carlo method. The change in the core parameters that results from the core burnup is nowadays calculated within transport codes that simplifies the transport process by using approximations such as the diffusion approximation. The inaccuracy in the burned core parameters arising from the use of such approximations is hard to quantify, leading to an increased gap between the operational routines and the safety limits. A Monte Carlo transport code that caries out accurate static calculations in three dimensional geometries using continuous-energy neutron cross-section data such as the MCNP can be used to generate accurate reaction rates for burnup purposes. Monte Carlo method is statistical by nature, so that the reaction rates calculated will be accurate only to a certain known extent. The purpose of this work was to create a burnup routine that uses the capabilities of the Monte Carlo based MCNP code. It should be noted that burnup using Monte Carlo has been reported in the literatures, but this work is the result of an independent effort (authors)

  11. Whole core burnup calculations using `MCNP`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haran, O; Shaham, Y [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba (Israel). Nuclear Research Center-Negev

    1996-12-01

    Core parameters such as the reactivity, the power distribution and different reactivity coefficients calculated in simulations play an important role in the nuclear reactor handling. Operational safety margins are decided upon, based on the calculated parameters. Thus, the ability to accurately calculate those parameters is of uppermost importance. Such ability exists for fresh cores, using the Monte-Carlo method. The change in the core parameters that results from the core burnup is nowadays calculated within transport codes that simplifies the transport process by using approximations such as the diffusion approximation. The inaccuracy in the burned core parameters arising from the use of such approximations is hard to quantify, leading to an increased gap between the operational routines and the safety limits. A Monte Carlo transport code that caries out accurate static calculations in three dimensional geometries using continuous-energy neutron cross-section data such as the MCNP can be used to generate accurate reaction rates for burnup purposes. Monte Carlo method is statistical by nature, so that the reaction rates calculated will be accurate only to a certain known extent. The purpose of this work was to create a burnup routine that uses the capabilities of the Monte Carlo based MCNP code. It should be noted that burnup using Monte Carlo has been reported in the literatures, but this work is the result of an independent effort (authors).

  12. High-Temperature Compatible Nickel Silicide Thermometer And Heater For Catalytic Chemical Microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Quaade, U.J.; Hansen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Integration of heaters and thermometers is important for agile and accurate control and measurement of the thermal reaction conditions in microfabricated chemical reactors (microreactors). This paper describes development and operation of nickel silicide heaters and temperature sensors...... for temperatures exceeding 700 °C. The heaters and thermometers are integrated with chemical microreactors for heterogeneous catalytic conversion of gasses, and thermally activated catalytic conversion of CO to CO2 in the reactors is demonstrated. The heaters and thermometers are shown to be compatible...

  13. Optical anisotropy of quasi-1D rare-earth silicide nanostructures on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, S., E-mail: sandhya.chandola@isas.de [Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften – ISAS – e.V., Schwarzschildstraße 8, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Speiser, E.; Esser, N. [Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften – ISAS – e.V., Schwarzschildstraße 8, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Appelfeller, S.; Franz, M.; Dähne, M. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) is capable of distinguishing optically between the semiconducting wetting layer and the metallic nanowires of rare earth (Tb and Dy) silicide nanostructures grown on vicinal Si(001). • The spectra of the wetting layer show a distinctive line shape with a large peak appearing at 3.8 eV, which is assigned to the formation of 2 × 3 and 2 × 4-like subunits of the 2 × 7 reconstruction. The spectra of the metallic nanowires show peaks at the E{sub 1} and E{sub 2} transitions of bulk Si which is assigned to strong substrate strain induced by the nanowires. • The optical anisotropy of the Tb nanowires is larger than for the Dy nanowires, which is related to the preferential formation of more strained bundles as well as larger areas of clean Si surfaces in the case of Tb. • RAS is shown to be a powerful addition to surface science techniques for studying the formation of rare-earth silicide nanostructures. Its surface sensitivity and rapidity of response make it an ideal complement to the slower but higher resolution of scanning probes of STM and AFM. - Abstract: Rare earth metals are known to interact strongly with Si(001) surfaces to form different types of silicide nanostructures. Using STM to structurally characterize Dy and Tb silicide nanostructures on vicinal Si(001), it will be shown that reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) can be used as an optical fingerprint technique to clearly distinguish between the formation of a semiconducting two-dimensional wetting layer and the metallic one-dimensional nanowires. Moreover, the distinctive spectral features can be related to structural units of the nanostructures. RAS spectra of Tb and Dy nanostructures are found to show similar features.

  14. Behavior of silicon in nitric media. Application to uranium silicides fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheroux, L.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium silicides are used in some research reactors. Reprocessing them is a solution for their cycle end. A list of reprocessing scenarios has been set the most realistic being a nitric dissolution close to the classic spent fuel reprocessing. This uranium silicide fuel contains a lot of silicon and few things are known about polymerization of silicic acid in concentrated nitric acid. The study of this polymerization allows to point out the main parameters: acidity, temperature, silicon concentration. The presence of aluminum seems to speed up heavily the polymerization. It has been impossible to find an analytical technique smart and fast enough to characterize the first steps of silicic acid polymerization. However the action of silicic species on emulsions stabilization formed by mixing them with an organic phase containing TBP has been studied, Silicon slows down the phase separation by means of oligomeric species forming complex with TBP. The existence of these intermediate species is short and heating can avoid any stabilization. When non irradiated uranium silicide fuel is attacked by a nitric solution, aluminum and uranium are quickly dissolved whereas silicon mainly stands in solid state. That builds a gangue of hydrated silica around the uranium silicide particulates without preventing uranium dissolution. A small part of silicon passes into the solution and polymerize towards the highly poly-condensed forms, just 2% of initial silicon is still in molecular form at the end of the dissolution. A thermal treatment of the fuel element, by forming inter-metallic phases U-Al-Si, allows the whole silicon to pass into the solution and next to precipitate. The behavior of silicon in spent fuels should be between these two situations. (author)

  15. Formation of (Nd,Y)-silicides by sequential channeled implantation of Y and Nd ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, S.; Bender, H.; Wu, M.F.; Vantomme, A.; Langouche, G.

    2000-01-01

    A buried hexagonal Nd 0.32 Y 0.68 Si 1.7 layer is formed by a sequential implantation of Y and Nd ions into (1 1 1)-oriented silicon wafers. The orientation relationship between the epitaxial Nd 0.32 Y 0.68 Si 1.7 and the silicon is (0 0 0 1) Nd 0.32 Y 0.68 Si 1.7 //(1 1 1) Si with Nd 0.32 Y 0.68 Si 1.7 // Si . High temperature annealing (1000 deg. C) results in a gradual transition into an orthorhombic ternary (Nd,Y)-silicide. Between the orthorhombic (Nd,Y)-silicide and the Si a preferential orientation relationship exists: (1 1 0) orth //(1 1(bar) 0) Si with orth // Si . However, as not all orthorhombic silicide grains follow this epitaxial relationship, the minimum yield in the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) spectrum increases compared to the results after a low temperature annealing

  16. Formation of (Nd,Y)-silicides by sequential channeled implantation of Y and Nd ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Bender, H.; Wu, M. F.; Vantomme, A.; Langouche, G.

    2000-03-01

    A buried hexagonal Nd0.32Y0.68Si1.7 layer is formed by a sequential implantation of Y and Nd ions into (1 1 1)-oriented silicon wafers. The orientation relationship between the epitaxial Nd0.32Y0.68Si1.7 and the silicon is (0 0 0 1)Nd0.32Y0.68Si1.7//(1 1 1)Si with Nd0.32Y0.68Si1.7//Si. High temperature annealing (1000°C) results in a gradual transition into an orthorhombic ternary (Nd,Y)-silicide. Between the orthorhombic (Nd,Y)-silicide and the Si a preferential orientation relationship exists: (1 1 0)orth//(1 1¯ 0)Si with orth//Si. However, as not all orthorhombic silicide grains follow this epitaxial relationship, the minimum yield in the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) spectrum increases compared to the results after a low temperature annealing.

  17. Pt silicide/poly-Si Schottky diodes as temperature sensors for bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuryev, V. A., E-mail: vyuryev@kapella.gpi.ru; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Mironov, S. A.; Dubkov, V. P.; Uvarov, O. V.; Kalinushkin, V. P. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Senkov, V. M. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 53 Leninskiy Avenue, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nalivaiko, O. Y. [JSC “Integral” – “Integral” Holding Management Company, 121A, Kazintsa I. P. Street, Minsk 220108 (Belarus); Novikau, A. G.; Gaiduk, P. I. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Avenue, 220030 Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-05-28

    Platinum silicide Schottky diodes formed on films of polycrystalline Si doped by phosphorus are demonstrated to be efficient and manufacturable CMOS-compatible temperature sensors for microbolometer detectors of radiation. Thin-film platinum silicide/poly-Si diodes have been produced by a CMOS-compatible process on artificial Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates simulating the bolometer cells. Layer structure and phase composition of the original Pt/poly-Si films and the Pt silicide/poly-Si films synthesized by a low-temperature process have been studied by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy; they have also been explored by means of the two-wavelength X-ray structural phase analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Temperature coefficient of voltage for the forward current of a single diode is shown to reach the value of about −2%/ °C in the temperature interval from 25 to 50 °C.

  18. Multi-layered silicides coating for vanadium alloys for generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, S.; Chaia, N.; Vilasi, M.; Le Flem, M.

    2012-01-01

    The halide-activated pack-cementation technique was employed to fabricate a diffusion coating that is resistant both to isothermal and to cyclic oxidation in air at 650 degrees C on the surface of the V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy that is a potential core component of future nuclear systems. A thermodynamic assessment determined the deposit conditions in terms of master alloy, activator, filler and temperature. The partial pressures of the main gaseous species (SiCl 4 , SiCl 2 and VCl 2 ) in the pack were calculated with the master alloy Si and the mixture VSi 2 + Si. The VSi 2 + Si master alloy was used to limit vanadium loss from the surface. The obtained coating consisted of multi-layered V x Si y silicides with an outer layer of VSi 2 . This silicide developed a protective layer of silica at 650 degrees C in air and was not susceptible to the pest phenomenon, unlike other refractory silicides (MoSi 2 , NbSi 2 ). We suggest that VSi 2 exhibits no risk of rapid degradation in the gas fast reactor (GFR) conditions. (authors)

  19. Silicide/Silicon Heterointerfaces, Reaction Kinetics and Ultra-short Channel Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei

    Nickel silicide is one of the electrical contact materials widely used on very large scale integration (VLSI) of Si devices in microelectronic industry. This is because the silicide/silicon interface can be formed in a highly controlled manner to ensure reproducibility of optimal structural and electrical properties of the metal-Si contacts. These advantages can be inherited to Si nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FET) device. Due to the technological importance of nickel silicides, fundamental materials science of nickel silicides formation (Ni-Si reaction), especially in nanoscale, has raised wide interest and stimulate new insights and understandings. In this dissertation, in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with FET device characterization will be demonstrated as useful tools in nano-device fabrication as well as in gaining insights into the process of nickel silicide formation. The shortest transistor channel length (17 nm) fabricated on a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown silicon nanowire (NW) has been demonstrated by controlled reaction with Ni leads on an in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) heating stage at a moderate temperature of 400 ºC. NiSi2 is the leading phase, and the silicide-silicon interface is an atomically sharp type-A interface. At such channel lengths, high maximum on-currents of 890 (microA/microm) and a maximum transconductance of 430 (microS/microm) were obtained, which pushes forward the performance of bottom-up Si NW Schottky barrier field-effect transistors (SB-FETs). Through accurate control over the silicidation reaction, we provide a systematic study of channel length dependent carrier transport in a large number of SB-FETs with channel lengths in the range of (17 nm -- 3.6 microm). Our device results corroborate with our transport simulations and reveal a characteristic type of short channel effects in SB-FETs, both in on- and off-state, which is different from that in conventional MOSFETs

  20. Safeguarding subcriticality during loading and shuffling operations in the higher density of the RSG-GAS's silicide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, T.M.; Kuntoro, I.

    2003-01-01

    The core conversion program of the RSG-GAS reactor is to convert the all-oxide to all-silicide core. The silicide equilibrium core with fuel meat density of 3.55 gU cm -3 is an optimal core for RSG-GAS reactor and it can significantly increase the operation cycle length from 25 to 32 full power days. Nevertheless, the subcriticality of the shutdown core and the shutdown margin are lower than of the oxide core. Therefore, the deviation of subcriticality condition in the higher silicide core caused by the fuel loading and shuffling error should be reanalysed. The objective of this work is to analyse the sufficiency of the subcriticality condition of the shutdown core to face the worst condition caused by an error during loading and shuffling operations. The calculations were carried out using the 2-dimensional multigroup neutron diffusion code of Batan-FUEL. In the fuel handling error, the calculated results showed that the subcriticality condition of the shutdown higher density silicide equilibrium core of RSG-GAS can be maintained. Therefore, all fuel management steps are fixed in the present reactor operation manual can be applied in the higher silicide equilibrium core of RSG-GAS reactor. (author)

  1. Local solid phase growth of few-layer graphene on silicon carbide from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobedo-Cousin, Enrique; Vassilevski, Konstantin; Hopf, Toby; Wright, Nick; O'Neill, Anthony; Horsfall, Alton; Goss, Jonathan; Cumpson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Patterned few-layer graphene (FLG) films were obtained by local solid phase growth from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon, following a fabrication scheme, which allows the formation of self-aligned ohmic contacts on FLG and is compatible with conventional SiC device processing methods. The process was realised by the deposition and patterning of thin Ni films on semi-insulating 6H-SiC wafers followed by annealing and the selective removal of the resulting nickel silicide by wet chemistry. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm both the formation and subsequent removal of nickel silicide. The impact of process parameters such as the thickness of the initial Ni layer, annealing temperature, and cooling rates on the FLG films was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the final FLG film estimated from the Raman spectra varied from 1 to 4 monolayers for initial Ni layers between 3 and 20 nm thick. Self-aligned contacts were formed on these patterned films by contact photolithography and wet etching of nickel silicide, which enabled the fabrication of test structures to measure the carrier concentration and mobility in the FLG films. A simple model of diffusion-driven solid phase chemical reaction was used to explain formation of the FLG film at the interface between nickel silicide and silicon carbide.

  2. The University of Missouri Research Reactor HEU to LEU conversion project status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, James C; Kutikkad, Kiratadas; Foyto, Leslie P; Peters, Nickie J; Solbrekken, Gary L; Kennedy, John [University of Missouri Research Reactor, Missouri (United States); Stillman, John A; Feldman, Earl E; Tzanos, Constantine P; Stevens, John G [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) is one of five U.S. high performance research and test reactors that are actively collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to find a suitable low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel replacement for the currently required highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. A conversion feasibility study based on U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel was completed in 2009. It was concluded that the proposed LEU fuel assembly design, in conjunction with an increase in power level from 10 to 12 MWth, will (1) maintain safety margins during operation, (2) allow operating fuel cycle lengths to be maintained for efficient and effective use of the facility, and (3) preserve an acceptable level and spectrum of key neutron fluxes to meet the scientific mission of the facility. The MURR and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) team is continuing to work toward realization of the conversion. The 'Preliminary Safety Analysis Report Methodologies and Scenarios for LEU Conversion of MURR' was completed in June 2011. This report documents design parameter values critical to the Fuel Development (FD), Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) and Hydromechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF) projects. The report also provides a preliminary evaluation of safety analysis techniques and data that will be needed to complete the fuel conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR), especially those related to the U-10Mo monolithic LEU fuel. Specific studies are underway to validate the proposed path to an LEU fuel conversion. Coupled fluid-structure simulations and experiments are being conducted to understand the hydrodynamic plate deformation risk for 0.965 mm (38 mil) thick fuel plates. Methodologies that were recently developed to answer the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Request for Additional Information (RAI) regarding the MURR 2006 relicensing submittal will be used in the LEU conversion effort. Transition LEU fuel elements that will have a minimal impact on

  3. Standardization of specifications and inspection procedures for LEU plate-type research reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    With the transition to high density uranium LEU fuel, fabrication costs of research reactor fuel elements have a tendency to increase because of two reasons. First, the amount of the powder of the uranium compound required increases by more than a factor of five. Second, fabrication requirements are in many cases nearer the fabrication limits. Therefore, it is important that measures be undertaken to eliminate or reduce unnecessary requirements in the specification or inspection procedures of research reactor fuel elements utilizing LEU. An additional stimulus for standardizing specifications and inspection procedures at this time is provided by the fact that most LEU conversions will occur within a short time span, and that nearly all of them will require preparation of new specifications and inspection procedures. In this sense, the LEU conversions offer an opportunity for improving the rationality and efficiency of the fuel fabrication and inspection processes. This report focuses on the standardization of specifications and inspection processes of high uranium density LEU fuels for research reactors. However, in many cases the results can also be extended directly to other research reactor fuels. 15 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  4. Substrate-modulated unwinding of transmembrane helices in the NSS transporter LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Patrick S; Gotfryd, Kamil; Cuendet, Michel A; Leth-Espensen, Katrine Z; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Rand, Kasper D

    2018-05-01

    LeuT, a prokaryotic member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family, is an established structural model for mammalian NSS counterparts. We investigate the substrate translocation mechanism of LeuT by measuring the solution-phase structural dynamics of the transporter in distinct functional states by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Our HDX-MS data pinpoint LeuT segments involved in substrate transport and reveal for the first time a comprehensive and detailed view of the dynamics associated with transition of the transporter between outward- and inward-facing configurations in a Na + - and K + -dependent manner. The results suggest that partial unwinding of transmembrane helices 1/5/6/7 drives LeuT from a substrate-bound, outward-facing occluded conformation toward an inward-facing open state. These hitherto unknown, large-scale conformational changes in functionally important transmembrane segments, observed for LeuT in detergent-solubilized form and when embedded in a native-like phospholipid bilayer, could be of physiological relevance for the translocation process.

  5. Progress in chemical treatment of LEU targets by the modified Cintichem process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    Presented here are recent experimental results on tests of a modified Cintichem process for producing 99 Mo from low enriched uranium (LEU). Studies were focused in three areas: (1) testing the effects on 99 Mo recovery and purity of dissolving LEU foil in nitric acid alone, rather than in the sulfuric/nitric acid mixture currently used, (2) measuring decontamination factors for radionuclide impurities in each purification step, and (3) testing the effects on processing of adding barrier materials to the LEU metal-foil target. The experimental results show that switching from dissolving the target in the sulfuric/nitric mixture to using nitric acid alone should cause no significant difference in 99 Mo product yield or purity. Further, the results show that overall decontamination factors for gamma emitters in the LEU-target processing are high enough to meet the purity requirements for the 99 Mo product. The results also show that the selected barrier materials, Cu, Fe, and Ni, do not interfere with 99 Mo recovery and can be removed during chemical processing of the LEU target

  6. Irradiation experiment conceptual design parameters for MURR LEU U-Mo fuel conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, J.; Feldman, E.; Stevens, J.; Wilson, E.

    2013-03-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance calculations for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MURR. This report presents the nominal steady-state irradiation conditions of a key set of plates containing peak irradiation parameters found in MURR cores fueled with the LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo.

  7. Preliminary LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel cycle calculations have been performed with reference HEU fuel and LEU fuel using Cd wires or boron as burnable absorbers. The 235 U content in the LEU element has increased 20% to 480g compared to the reference HEU element. The number of fuel plates has remained unchanged while the fuel meat thickness has increased to 0.76 mm from 0.51 mm. The LEU meat density is 5.1 Mg U/m 3 . The reference fuel cycle was a 31 element core operating at 56 MW with a 19.8 day cycle length and eight fresh elements loaded per cycle. Comparable fuel cycle characteristics can be achieved using the proposed LEU fuel element with either Cd wires or boron burnable absorbers. The neutron flux for E/sub n/ > 1 eV changes very little (<5%) in LEU relative to HEU cores. Thermal flux reductions are 5 to 10% in non-fueled positions, and 20 to 30% in fuel elements

  8. Neutronic analysis for core conversion (HEU–LEU of the low power research reactor using the MCNP4C code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldawahra Saadou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies for conversion of the fuel from HEU to LEU in the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR have been performed using the MCNP4C code. The HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched with Al clad and LEU (UO2 12.6% enriched with zircaloy-4 alloy clad cores have been analyzed in this study. The existing HEU core of MNSR was analyzed to validate the neutronic model of reactor, while the LEU core was studied to prove the possibility of fuel conversion of the existing HEU core. The proposed LEU core contained the same number of fuel pins as the HEU core. All other structure materials and dimensions of HEU and LEU cores were the same except the increase in the radius of control rod material from 0.195 to 0.205 cm and keeping the outer diameter of the control rod unchanged in the LEU core. The effective multiplication factor (keff, excess reactivity (ρex, control rod worth (CRW, shutdown margin (SDM, safety reactivity factor (SRF, delayed neutron fraction (βeff and the neutron fluxes in the irradiation tubes for the existing and the potential LEU fuel were investigated. The results showed that the safety parameters and the neutron fluxes in the irradiation tubes of the LEU fuels were in good agreements with the HEU results. Therefore, the LEU fuel was validated to be a suitable choice for fuel conversion of the MNSR in the future.

  9. Preliminary Multiphysics Analyses of HFIR LEU Fuel Conversion using COMSOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freels, James D [ORNL; Bodey, Isaac T [ORNL; Arimilli, Rao V [ORNL; Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL; Ekici, Kivanc [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    4 of this report. The HFIR LEU conversion project has also obtained the services of Dr. Prashant K. Jain of the Reactor & Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD) of ORNL. Prashant has quickly adapted to the COMSOL tools and has been focusing on thermal-structure interaction (TSI) issues and development of alternative 3D model approaches that could yield faster-running solutions. Prashant is the primary contributor to Section 5 of the report. And finally, while incorporating findings from all members of the COMSOL team (i.e., the team) and contributing as the senior COMSOL leader and advocate, Dr. James D. Freels has focused on the 3D model development, cluster deployment, and has contributed primarily to Section 3 and overall integration of this report. The team has migrated to the current release of COMSOL at version 4.1 for all the work described in this report, except where stated otherwise. Just as in the performance of the research, each of the respective sections has been originally authored by the respective authors. Therefore, the reader will observe a contrast in writing style throughout this document.

  10. Preliminary design study for a carbide LEU-nuclear thermal rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, P.F.; Kim, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear space propulsion is a requirement for the successful exploration of the solar system. It offers the possibility of having both a high specific impulse and a relatively high thrust, allowing rapid transit times with a minimum usage of fuel. This paper proposes a nuclear thermal rocket design based on heritage NERVA rockets that makes use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The Carbide LEU Nuclear Thermal Rocket (C-LEU-NTR) is designed to fulfill the rocket requirements as set forth in the NASA 2009 Mars Mission Design Reference Architecture 5.0, that is provide 25,000 lbf of thrust, operate at full power condition for at least two hours, and have a specific impulse close to 900 s. The neutronics analysis was done using MCNP5 with the ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron library. The thermal hydraulic calculations and size optimization were completed with a finite difference code being developed at the Center for Space Nuclear Research. (authors)

  11. Neutronic design of a LEU [low enriched uranium] core for the Ohio State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, M.D.; Aybar, H.S.; Aldemir, T.

    1987-01-01

    The 10 kw HEU fuelled Ohio State University Reactor (OSURR) will be upgraded to operate at 500 kW with standardized 125 g 235 U LEU U 3 Si 2 fuel plates. An earlier scoping study based on two-dimensional diffusion calculations has identified the potential LEU core configurations for the conversion/upgrade of OSURR using the standardized plates in a 16-plate (+ 2 dummy plates) standard and 10-scoping study is improved for a more precise determination of the excess reactivities and safety rod worths for these potential configurations. Comparison of the results obtained by the improved model to experimental results and to the results of full-core Monte Carlo simulations shows excellent agreement. The results also indicate that the conversion/upgrade of OSURR can be realized with three possible LEU core configurations while maintaining a cold, clean shutdown margin of 1.57-1.91 % Δ k/k, depending on the configuration used. (Author)

  12. Neutronic performance of a 14 MW TRIGA reactor: LEU vs HEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Cornella, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A primary objective of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is to develop means for replacing, wherever possible, currently used highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel ( 235 U enrichment > 90%) with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel ( 235 U enrichment < 20%) without significantly degrading the performance of research and test reactors. The General Atomic Company has developed a low-enriched but high uranium content Er-U-ZrH/sub 1.6/ fuel to enable the conversion of TRIGA reactors (and others) from HEU to LEU. One possible application is to the water-moderated 14 MW TRIGA Steady State Reactor (SSR) at the Romanian Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors. The work reported here was undertaken for the purpose of comparing the neutronic performance of the SSR for HEU fuel with that for LEU fuel. In order to make these relative comparisons as valid as possible, identical methods and models were used for the neutronic calculations

  13. Preliminary investigations for technology assessment of 99Mo production from LEU [low enriched uranium] targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chaiko, D.J.; Heinrich, R.R.; Kucera, E.T.; Jensen, K.J.; Poa, D.S.; Varma, R.; Vissers, D.R.

    1986-11-01

    This paper presents the results of preliminary studies on the effects of substituting low enriched uranium (LEU) for highly enriched uranium (HEU) in targets for the production of fission product 99 Mo. Issues that were addressed are: (1) purity and yield of the 99 Mo//sup 99m/Tc product, (2) fabrication of LEU targets and related concerns, and (3) radioactive waste. Laboratory experimentation was part of the efforts for issues (1) and (2); thus far, radioactive waste disposal has only been addressed in a paper study. Although the reported results are still preliminary, there is reason to be optimistic about the feasibility of utilizing LEU targets for 99 Mo production. 37 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  14. Preliminary Results of Ancillary Safety Analyses Supporting TREAT LEU Conversion Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fei, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Strons, P. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadias, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kontogeorgakos, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a test facility designed to evaluate the performance of reactor fuels and materials under transient accident conditions. The facility, an air-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor designed to utilize fuel containing high-enriched uranium (HEU), has been in non-operational standby status since 1994. Currently, in support of the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, a new core design is being developed for TREAT that will utilize low-enriched uranium (LEU). The primary objective of this conversion effort is to design an LEU core that is capable of meeting the performance characteristics of the existing HEU core. Minimal, if any, changes are anticipated for the supporting systems (e.g. reactor trip system, filtration/cooling system, etc.); therefore, the LEU core must also be able to function with the existing supporting systems, and must also satisfy acceptable safety limits. In support of the LEU conversion effort, a range of ancillary safety analyses are required to evaluate the LEU core operation relative to that of the existing facility. These analyses cover neutronics, shielding, and thermal hydraulic topics that have been identified as having the potential to have reduced safety margins due to conversion to LEU fuel, or are required to support the required safety analyses documentation. The majority of these ancillary tasks have been identified in [1] and [2]. The purpose of this report is to document the ancillary safety analyses that have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory during the early stages of the LEU design effort, and to describe ongoing and anticipated analyses. For all analyses presented in this report, methodologies are utilized that are consistent with, or improved from, those used in analyses for the HEU Final Safety Analysis

  15. Processing of LEU targets for 99Mo production--testing and modification of the Cintichem process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Buchholz, B.

    1995-09-01

    Recent experimental results on testing and modification of the Cintichem process to allow substitution of low enriched uranium (LEU) for high enriched uranium (HEU) targets are presented in this report. The main focus is on 99 Mo recovery and purification by its precipitation with α-benzoin oxime. Parameters that were studied include concentrations of nitric and sulfuric acids, partial neutralization of the acids, molybdenum and uranium concentrations, and the ratio of α-benzoin oxime to molybdenum. Decontamination factors for uranium, neptunium, and various fission products were measured. Experiments with tracer levels of irradiated LEU were conducted for testing the 99 Mo recovery and purification during each step of the Cintichem process. Improving the process with additional processing steps was also attempted. The results indicate that the conversion of molybdenum chemical processing from HEU to LEU targets is possible

  16. Post-pulse detail metallographic examinations of low-enriched uranium silicide plate-type miniature fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1991-10-01

    Pulse irradiation at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) was performed using low-enriched (19.89 w% 235 U) unirradiated silicide plate-type miniature fuel which had a density of 4.8 gU/cm 3 . Experimental aims are to understand the dimensional stability and to clarify the failure threshold of the silicide plate-type miniature fuel under power transient conditions through post-pulse detail metallographic examinations. A silicide plate-type miniature fuel was loaded into an irradiation capsule and irradiated by a single pulse. Deposited energies given in the experiments were 62, 77, 116 and 154 cal/g·fuel, which lead to corresponding peak fuel plate temperatures, 201 ± 28degC, 187 ± 10degC, 418 ± 74degC and 871 ± 74degC, respectively. Below 400degC, reliability and dimensional stability of the silicide plate fuel was sustained, and the silicide plate fuel was intact. Up to 540degC, wall-through intergranular crackings occurred in the Al-3%Mg alloy cladding. With the increase of the temperature, the melting of the aluminum cladding followed by recrystallization, the denudation of fuel core and the plate-through intergranular cracking were observed. With the increase of the temperature beyond 400degC, the bowing of fuel plate became significant. Above the temperature of 640degC molten aluminum partially reacted with the fuel core, partially flowed downward under the influence of surface tension and gravity, and partially formed agglomerations. Judging from these experimental observations, the fuel-plate above 400degC tends to reduce its dimensional stability. Despite of the apparent silicide fuel-plate failure, neither generation of pressure pulse nor that of mechanical energy occurred at all. (J.P.N.)

  17. Quantitative EPMA of Nano-Phase Iron-Silicides in Apollo 16 Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopon, P.; Fournelle, J.; Valley, J. W.; Pinard, P. T.; Sobol, P.; Horn, W.; Spicuzza, M.; Llovet, X.; Richter, S.

    2013-12-01

    Until recently, quantitative EPMA of phases under a few microns in size has been extremely difficult. In order to achieve analytical volumes to analyze sub-micron features, accelerating voltages between 5 and 8 keV need to be used. At these voltages the normally used K X-ray transitions (of higher Z elements) are no longer excited, and we must rely of outer shell transitions (L and M). These outer shell transitions are difficult to use for quantitative EPMA because they are strongly affected by different bonding environments, the error associated with their mass attenuation coefficients (MAC), and their proximity to absorption edges. These problems are especially prevalent for the transition metals, because of the unfilled M5 electron shell where the Lα transition originates. Previous studies have tried to overcome these limitations by using standards that almost exactly matched their unknowns. This, however, is cumbersome and requires accurate knowledge of the composition of your sample beforehand, as well as an exorbitant number of well characterized standards. Using a 5 keV electron beam and utilizing non-standard X-ray transitions (Ll) for the transition metals, we are able to conduct accurate quantitative analyses of phases down to ~300nm. The Ll transition in the transition metals behaves more like a core-state transition, and unlike the Lα/β lines, is unaffected by bonding effects and does not lie near an absorption edge. This allows for quantitative analysis using standards do not have to exactly match the unknown. In our case pure metal standards were used for all elements except phosphorus. We present here data on iron-silicides in two Apollo 16 regolith grains. These plagioclase grains (A6-7 and A6-8) were collected between North and South Ray Craters, in the lunar highlands, and thus are associated with one or more large impact events. We report the presence of carbon, nickel, and phosphorus (in order of abundance) in these iron-silicide phases

  18. Production of MO-99 from LEU targets - Acid-side processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Wiencek, T.C.

    2000-01-01

    During 2000, additional targets of the new annular design containing low enriched uranium (LEU) foils were irradiated in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. This new design significantly decreases the target fabrication cost. This irradiation allowed us to compare the irradiation performance of several batches of LEU foil. We also processed one of the irradiated foils to recover 99 Mo using a slightly modified Cintichem process. Finally, we measured some important physical properties of uranyl nitrate solutions (i.e., density and solubility), which will be useful in future efforts to further increase the amount of uranium that can be processed by the Cintichem process. (author)

  19. Neutronics analysis of the proposed 25-MW leu TRIGA Multipurpose Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurdin, M.; Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    More than two years ago the government of Indonesia announced plans to purchase a research reactor for the Puspiptek Research Center in Serpong Indonesia to be used for isotope production, materials testing, neutron physics measurements, and reactor operator training. Reactors using low-enriched uranium (LEU) plate-type and rod-type fuel elements were considered. This paper deals with the neutronic evaluation of the rod-type 25-MW LEU TRIGA Multipurpose Research Reactor (MPRR) proposed by the General Atomic Company of the United States of America

  20. A neutronics study of LEU fuel options for the HFR-Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The standard HEU fuel cycle characteristics are compared with those of several different LEU fuel cycles in the new vessel configuration. The primary design goals were to provide similar reactivity performance and neutron flux profiles with a minimal increase in 235 U loading. The fuel cycle advantages of Cd burnable absorbers over 10 B are presented. The LEU fuel cycle requirements were calculated also for an extended 32-day cycle and for a reload batch size reduction from six to five standard elements for the standard 26-day cycle. The effects of typical in-core experiments upon neutron flux profiles and fuel loading requirements are also presented. (author)

  1. Neutronic feasibility studies for LEU conversion of the HFR Petten reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Deen, J.R.; Matos, J.E.; Hendriks, J.A.; Thijssen, P.J.M.; Wijtsma, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    Design and safety analyses to determine an optimum LEU fuel assembly design using U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel with up to 4.8 g/cm 3 for conversion of the HFR Petten reactor were performed by the RERTR program in cooperation with the Joint Research Centre and NRG. Credibility of the calculational methods and models were established by comparing calculations with recent measurements by NRG for a core configuration set up for this purpose. This model and methodology were then used to study various LEU fissile loading and burnable poison options that would satisfy specific design criteria. (author)

  2. The Pai-associated leuX specific tRNA5(Leu) affects type 1fimbriation in pathogenic Escherichia coli by control of FimB recombinase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, A.; Gally, D.; Olsen, Peter Bjarke

    1997-01-01

    The uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536 (06:K15:H31) carries two large chromosomalpathogenicity islands (Pais). Both Pais are flanked by tRNA genes. Spontaneous deletion of Pai IIresults in truncation of the leuX tRNA5Leu gene. This tRNA is required for the expression of type 1fimbriae (Fim...

  3. The fabrication and performance of Canadian silicide dispersion fuel for test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wood, J.C.; Berthiaume, L.C.; Herbert, L.N.; Schaefer, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Fuel fabrication effort is now concentrated on the commissioning of large-scale process equipment, defining product specifications, developing a quality assurance plan, and setting up a mini-computer material accountancy system. In the irradiation testing program, full-size NRU assemblies containing 20% enriched silicide dispersion fuel have been Irradiated successfully to burnups in the range 65-80 atomic percent. Irradiations have also been conducted on mini-elements having 1.2 mm diameter holes In their mid-sections, some drilled before irradiation and others after irradiation to 22-83 atomic percent burnup. Uranium was lost to the coolant in direct proportion to the surface area of exposed core material. Pre-irradiation in the intact condition appeared to reduce in-reactor corrosion. Fuel cores developed for the NRU reactor are dimensionally very stable, swelling by only 6-8% at the very high burnup of 93 atomic percent. Two important factors contributing to this good performance are cylindrical clad restraint and coarse silicide particles. Thermal ramping tests were conducted on irradiated silicide aspersion fuels. Small segments of fuel cores released 85 Kr starting at about 520 deg. C and peaking at about 680 deg C. After a holding period of 1 hour at 720 deg. C a secondary 85 Kr peak occurred during cooling (at about 330 deg. C) probably due to thermal contraction cracking. Whole mini-elements irradiated to 93 atomic percent burnup were also ramped thermally, with encouraging results. After about 0.25 h at 530 deg. C the aluminum cladding developed very localized small blisters, some with penetrating pin-hole cracks preventing gross pillowing or ballooning. (author)

  4. Silicon-germanium and platinum silicide nanostructures for silicon based photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storozhevykh, M. S.; Dubkov, V. P.; Arapkina, L. V.; Chizh, K. V.; Mironov, S. A.; Chapnin, V. A.; Yuryev, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports a study of two types of silicon based nanostructures prospective for applications in photonics. The first ones are Ge/Si(001) structures forming at room temperature and reconstructing after annealing at 600°C. Germanium, being deposited from a molecular beam at room temperature on the Si(001) surface, forms a thin granular film composed of Ge particles with sizes of a few nanometers. A characteristic feature of these films is that they demonstrate signs of the 2 x 1 structure in their RHEED patterns. After short-term annealing at 600°C under the closed system conditions, the granular films reconstruct to heterostructures consisting of a Ge wetting layer and oval clusters of Ge. A mixed type c(4x2) + p(2x2) reconstruction typical to the low-temperature MBE (Tgr Ge. The other type of the studied nanostructures is based on Pt silicides. This class of materials is one of the friendliest to silicon technology. But as silicide film thickness reaches a few nanometers, low resistivity becomes of primary importance. Pt3Si has the lowest sheet resistance among the Pt silicides. However, the development of a process of thin Pt3Si films formation is a challenging task. This paper describes formation of a thin Pt3Si/Pt2Si structures at room temperature on poly-Si films. Special attention is paid upon formation of poly-Si and amorphous Si films on Si3N4 substrates at low temperatures.

  5. The fabrication and performance of Canadian silicide dispersion fuel for test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, D F; Wood, J C; Berthiaume, L C; Herbert, L N; Schaefer, J D

    1985-07-01

    Fuel fabrication effort is now concentrated on the commissioning of large-scale process equipment, defining product specifications, developing a quality assurance plan, and setting up a mini-computer material accountancy system. In the irradiation testing program, full-size NRU assemblies containing 20% enriched silicide dispersion fuel have been Irradiated successfully to burnups in the range 65-80 atomic percent. Irradiations have also been conducted on mini-elements having 1.2 mm diameter holes In their mid-sections, some drilled before irradiation and others after irradiation to 22-83 atomic percent burnup. Uranium was lost to the coolant in direct proportion to the surface area of exposed core material. Pre-irradiation in the intact condition appeared to reduce in-reactor corrosion. Fuel cores developed for the NRU reactor are dimensionally very stable, swelling by only 6-8% at the very high burnup of 93 atomic percent. Two important factors contributing to this good performance are cylindrical clad restraint and coarse silicide particles. Thermal ramping tests were conducted on irradiated silicide aspersion fuels. Small segments of fuel cores released {sup 85}Kr starting at about 520 deg. C and peaking at about 680 deg C. After a holding period of 1 hour at 720 deg. C a secondary {sup 85}Kr peak occurred during cooling (at about 330 deg. C) probably due to thermal contraction cracking. Whole mini-elements irradiated to 93 atomic percent burnup were also ramped thermally, with encouraging results. After about 0.25 h at 530 deg. C the aluminum cladding developed very localized small blisters, some with penetrating pin-hole cracks preventing gross pillowing or ballooning. (author)

  6. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi 2 exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 μΩ-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 μΩ-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick open-quotes as isclose quotes industrial samples

  7. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi{sub 2} exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 {mu}{Omega}-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 {mu}{Omega}-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} industrial samples.

  8. Tungsten silicide contacts to polycrystalline silicon and silicon-germanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Bain, M.F.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Baine, P.; Armstrong, B.M.; Gamble, H.S.; McNeill, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Silicon-germanium alloy layers will be employed in the source-drain engineering of future MOS transistors. The use of this technology offers advantages in reducing series resistance and decreasing junction depth resulting in reduction in punch-through and SCE problems. The contact resistance of metal or metal silicides to the raised source-drain material is a serious issue at sub-micron dimensions and must be minimised. In this work, tungsten silicide produced by chemical vapour deposition has been investigated as a contact metallization scheme to both boron and phosphorus doped polycrystalline Si 1- x Ge x , with 0 ≤x ≤ 0.3. Cross bridge Kelvin resistor (CKBR) structures were fabricated incorporating CVD WSi 2 and polycrystalline SiGe. Tungsten silicide contacts to control polysilicon CKBR structures have been shown to be of high quality with specific contact resistance ρ c values 3 x 10 -7 ohm cm 2 and 6 x 10 -7 ohm cm 2 obtained to boron and phosphorus implanted samples respectively. The SiGe CKBR structures show that the inclusion of Ge yields a reduction in ρ c for both dopant types. The boron doped SiGe exhibits a reduction in ρ c from 3 x 10 -7 to 5 x 10 -8 ohm cm 2 as Ge fraction is increased from 0 to 0.3. The reduction in ρ c has been shown to be due to (i) the lowering of the tungsten silicide Schottky barrier height to p-type SiGe resulting from the energy band gap reduction, and (ii) increased activation of the implanted boron with increased Ge fraction. The phosphorus implanted samples show less sensitivity of ρ c to Ge fraction with a lowest value in this work of 3 x 10 -7 ohm cm 2 for a Ge fraction of 0.3. The reduction in specific contact resistance to the phosphorus implanted samples has been shown to be due to increased dopant activation alone

  9. Current enhancement in crystalline silicon photovoltaic by low-cost nickel silicide back contact

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabry, R. R.; Gumus, A.; Kutbee, A. T.; Wehbe, N.; Ahmed, S. M.; Ghoneim, M. T.; Lee, K. -T.; Rogers, J. A.; Hussain, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report short circuit current (Jsc) enhancement in crystalline silicon (C-Si) photovoltaic (PV) using low-cost Ohmic contact engineering by integration of Nickel mono-silicide (NiSi) for back contact metallization as an alternative to the status quo of using expensive screen printed silver (Ag). We show 2.6 mA/cm2 enhancement in the short circuit current (Jsc) and 1.2 % increment in the efficiency by improving the current collection due to the low specific contact resistance of the NiSi on the heavily Boron (B) doped Silicon (Si) interface.

  10. Current enhancement in crystalline silicon photovoltaic by low-cost nickel silicide back contact

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabry, R. R.

    2016-11-30

    We report short circuit current (Jsc) enhancement in crystalline silicon (C-Si) photovoltaic (PV) using low-cost Ohmic contact engineering by integration of Nickel mono-silicide (NiSi) for back contact metallization as an alternative to the status quo of using expensive screen printed silver (Ag). We show 2.6 mA/cm2 enhancement in the short circuit current (Jsc) and 1.2 % increment in the efficiency by improving the current collection due to the low specific contact resistance of the NiSi on the heavily Boron (B) doped Silicon (Si) interface.

  11. Estimations on uranium silicide fuel prototypes for their irradiation and postirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbaffoni, Maria M.

    2000-01-01

    The 'Silicide' project includes the qualification of this type of research reactor fuel to be used i.e. in the Argentine RA-3 and to confirm CNEA's role as an international supplier. The present paper shows complementary basic information for P-04 prototype post-irradiation, which is already under way, and some parameter values related to the new P-06 prototype to be taken into account for planning its irradiation and post-irradiation. The reliability of these values has been evaluated through comparison with experimental results. The reported results contribute, also, to a parallel study on the nuclear data libraries used in calculations for this type of reactor. (author)

  12. Effect of Utilization of Silicide Fuel with the Density 4.8 gU/cc on the Kinetic Parameters of RSG-GAS Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyanto; Sembiring, Tagor M.; Pinem, Surian

    2007-01-01

    Presently, the RSG-GAS reactor using silicide fuel element of 2.96 gU/cc. For increasing reactor operation time, its planning to change to higher density fuel. The kinetic calculation of silicide core with density 4.8 gU/cc has been carried out, since it has an influence on the reactor operation safety. The calculated kinetic parameters are the effective delayed neutron fraction, the delayed neutron decay constant, prompt neutron lifetime and feedback reactivity coefficient very important for reactor operation safety. the calculation is performed in 2-dimensional neutron diffusion-perturbation method using modified Batan-2DIFF code. The calculation showed that the effective delayed neutron fraction is 7. 03256x10 -03 , total delay neutron time constant is 7.85820x10 -02 s -1 and the prompt neutron lifetime is 55.4900 μs. The result of prompt neutron lifetime smaller 10 % compare with silicide fuel of 4.8 gU/cc. The calculated results showed that all of the feedback reactivity coefficient silicide core 4.8 gU/cc is negative. Totally, the feedback reactivity coefficient of silicide fuel of 4.8 gU/cc is 10% less than that of silicide fuel of 2.96 gU/cc. The results shown that kinetic parameters result decrease compared with the silicide core with density 2.96 gU/cc, but no significant influence in the RSG-GAS reactor operation. (author)

  13. Heat-transfer analysis of the existing HEU and proposed LEU cores of Pakistan research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Nabbi, R.

    1987-02-01

    In connection with conversion of Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR) from the use of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of both existing HEU and proposed LEU cores has been carried out. Keeping in mind the possibility of power upgrading, the performance of proposed LEU core, under 10 MW operating conditions, has also been evaluated. Computer code HEATHYD has been used for this purpose. In order to verify the reliability of the code, IAEA benchmark 2 MW reactor was analyzed. The cooling parameters evaluated include: coolant velocity, critical velocity, pressure drop, temperature distribution in the core, heat fluxes at onset of nucleate boiling, flow instability and burnout and corresponding safety margins. From the results of the study it can be concluded that the conversion of the core to LEU fuel will result in higher safety margins, as compared to existing HEU core, mainly because the increased number of fuel plates in the proposed design will reduce the average heat flux significantly. Anyhow upgrading of the reactor power to 10 MW will need the flow rate to be adjusted between 850 to 900 m 3 /hr, to achieve reasonable safety margins, at least, comparable with the existing HEU core. (orig.)

  14. Neutronic and thermo-hydraulic design of LEU core for Japan Research Reactor 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arigane, Kenji; Watanabe, Shukichi; Tsuruta, Harumichi

    1988-04-01

    As a part of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program in JAERI, the enrichment reduction for Japan Research Reactor 4 (JRR-4) is in progress. A fuel element using a 19.75 % enriched UAlx-Al dispersion type with a uranium density of 2.2 g/cm 3 was designed as the LEU fuel and the neutronic and thermo-hydraulic performances of the LEU core were compared with those of the current HEU core. The results of the neutronic design are as follows: (1) the excess reactivity of the LEU core becomes about 1 % Δk/k less, (2) the thermal neutron flux in the fuel region decreases about 25 % on the average, (3) the thermal neutron fluxes in the irradiation pipes are almost the same and (4) the core burnup lifetime becomes about 20 % longer. The thermo-hydraulic design also shows that: (1) the fuel plate surface temperature decreases about 10 deg C due to the increase of the number of fuel plates and (2) the temperature margin with respect to the ONB temperature increases. Therefore, it is confirmed that the same utilization performance as the HEU core is attainable with the LEU core. (author)

  15. A conversion development program to LEU targets for medical isotope production in the MAPLE Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). The molybdenum extraction process from the HEU targets provided predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. A reliable supply of HEU for the NRU research reactor targets has enabled MDS Nordion to develop a secure chain of medical isotope supply for the international nuclear medicine community. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to patient application, has been established on a proven method of HEU target irradiation and processing. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, the design of the MAPLE facilities was based on our established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a program to convert the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets. An initial feasibility study was initiated to identify the technical issues to convert the MAPLE targets from HEU to LEU. This paper will present the results of the feasibility study. It will also describe future challenges and opportunities in converting the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets for large scale, commercial medical isotope production. (author)

  16. Infantile presentation of the mtDNA A3243G tRNA(Leu (UUR)) mutation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okhuijsen-Kroes, E.J.; Trijbels, J.M.F.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Wendel, U.A.H.; Koch, G.; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders are clinically very heterogeneous, ranging from single organ involvement to severe multisystem disease. One of the most frequently observed mtDNA mutations is the A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the tRNA(Leu (UUR)) gene. This mutation is often related to

  17. Progress in the neutronic core conversion (HEU-LEU) analysis of Ghana research reactor-1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anim-Sampong, S.; Maakuu, B. T.; Akaho, E. H. K.; Andam, A.; Liaw, J. J. R.; Matos, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Ghana Atomic Energy Commission; Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology

    2006-01-01

    The Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) and has operated at different power levels since its commissioning in March 1995. As required for all nuclear reactors, neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis are being performed for the HEU-LEU core conversion studies of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) facility, which is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). Stochastic Monte Carlo particle transport methods and tools (MCNP4c/MCNP5) were used to fine-tune a previously developed 3-D MCNP model of the GHARR-1 facility and perform neutronic analysis of the 90.2% HEU reference and candidate LEU (UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, U-9Mo) fresh cores with varying enrichments from 12.6%-19.75%. In this paper, the results of the progress made in the Monte Carlo neutronic analysis of the HEU reference and candidate LEU fuels are presented. In particular, a comparative performance assessment of the LEU with respect to neutron flux variations in the fission chamber and experimental irradiation channels are highlighted.

  18. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the SAFARI-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.; Ball, G.

    2000-01-01

    A neutronic feasibility study to convert the SAFARI-1 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with NECSA. Comparisons were made of the reactor performance with the current 90% enriched HEU fuel type (UAl) and two 19.75% enriched LEU fuel types (U 3 Si 2 and U7Mo). The thermal fluxes with the LEU fuels were 3 - 9% lower than with the current HEU fuel. For the same fuel assembly design, a uranium density of approximately 4.5 g/cm 3 was required with U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel and a uranium density of about 4.6 g/cm 3 was required with U7Mo-Al fuel to match the 24.6-day cycle of the UAl-alloy fuel with 0.92 gU/cm 3 . The selection of a suitable LEU fuel and the decision to convert SAFARI-1 will be an economic matter that depends upon the fuel type, fuel assembly design, experiment performance and fuel cycle costs. (author)

  19. Vibrational absorption spectra, DFT and SCC-DFTB conformational study and analysis of [Leu]enkephalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Niehaus, T.A.; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2003-01-01

    . Ab initio (DFT at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory) and semi-empirical (SCC-DFTB) with and without dispersion correction were applied to simulate the VA spectra of [Leu] enkephalin. In these calculations structures taken from X-ray measurements for different conformers of the molecule were used...

  20. Conformational determination of [Leu]enkephalin based on theoretical and experimental VA and VCD spectral analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Jalkanen, Karl J.; Cao, X.

    2004-01-01

    Conformational determination of [Leu]enkephalin in DMSO-d6 is carried out using VA and VCD spectral analyses. Conformational energies, vibrational frequencies and VA and VCD intensities are calculated using DFT at B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. Comparison between the measured spectra...

  1. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the WWR-M reactor at Gatchina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Erykalov, A.N.; Onegin, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    In this report we present the results of computations of the full scale reactor core with HEU (90%), MEU (36%) and LEU (19.75%) fuel. The reactor computer model for the MCU RFFI Monte Carlo code includes all peculiarities of the core. Calculations show that a uranium density of 3.3gU/cm 3 of MEU (36%) fuel and 8/25gU/cm 3 of LEU (19.75%) in WWR-M5 fuel assembly (FA) geometry is required to match the fuel cycle length of the HEU (90%) case with the same end of cycle (EOEC) excess reactivity. For the equilibrium fuel cycle the fuel burnup and poisoning, the fast and thermal neutron fluxes, the reactivity worth of control rods were calculated for the reference case with HEU (90%) FA and for the MEU and LEU FA. The relative accuracy of this neutronic feasibility study of fuel enrichment reduction of the WWR-M reactor in Gatchina is sufficient to start the fabrication feasibility study of MEU (36%) WWR-M5 fuel assemblies. At the present stage of technology it seems hardly possible to manufacture LEU (19.75%) fuel elements in WWR-M5 geometry due to too high uranium density. Only a future R and D can solve the problem. (author)

  2. Energy levels and quantum states of [Leu]enkephalin conformations based on theoretical and experimental investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Bohr, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical and experimental study of [Leu]enkephalin conformations with respect to the quantum estates of the atomic structure of the peptide. Results from vibrational absorption measurements and quantum calculations are used to outline a quantum picture and to assign vibr...

  3. Foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of US-origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides estimates of the quantities and types of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing HEU and LEU of US-origin that are anticipated during the period beginning in January 1996 and extending for 10-15 years

  4. Simple and effective procedure for conformational search of macromolecules. Application to Met- and Leu-Enkephalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirovitch, H.; Meirovitch, E. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)); Michel, A.G. (Institut de Recherches Serrier, Suresnes (France)); Vasquez, M. (Protein Design Lab., Mountain View, CA (United States))

    1994-06-23

    A simple and efficient method for searching the conformational space of macromolecules is presented. With this method an initial set of relatively low-energy structures is generated, and their energies are further minimized with a procedure that enables escaping from local energy minima. Illustrative calculations are described for Met- and Leu-enkephalin. 37 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Factor XIII Val34Leu is a genetic factor involved in the etiology of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, R. F.; Reitsma, P. H.; Lourenço, D.; Maffei, F. H.; Morelli, V.; Tavella, M. H.; Araújo, A. G.; Piccinato, C. E.; Zago, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    A mutation in the factor XIII gene (FXIII Val34Leu) gene was recently reported to confer protection against myocardial infarction, but its relationship with venous thrombosis is unknown. In addition, a mutation in the 5'-untranslated region of the FXII gene (46 C->T) was identified which is

  6. Intercomparison of rod-worth measurement techniques in a LEU-HTR assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.; Chawla, R.

    1994-01-01

    The measurement of absorber-rod worths in the radial reflector of a LEU-HTR pebble bed system is described. Particular emphasis is placed on the choice of complementary measurement techniques to ensure that sensitivities to systematic errors in the calculated parameters used in the analysis are minimised. (author) 3 figs., 3 tabs., 8 refs

  7. Conversion and start up of Tehran Research Reactor with LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaker, M.

    2004-01-01

    The MW Tehran Research Reactor, Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel has been converted to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel using U 3 0 8 -Al with less than 20% enriched uranium. Measured value of excess reactivity, control rod worth and other parameters indicate good agreement with computational predictions. (author)

  8. Innovative nuclear thermal rocket concept utilizing LEU fuel for space application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Choi, Jae Young; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung

    2015-01-01

    Space is one of the best places for humanity to turn to keep learning and exploiting. A Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a viable and more efficient option for human space exploration than the existing Chemical Rockets (CRs) which are highly inefficient for long-term manned missions such as to Mars and its satellites. NERVA derived NTR engines have been studied for the human missions as a mainstream in the United States of America (USA). Actually, the NERVA technology has already been developed and successfully tested since 1950s. The state-of-the-art technology is based on a Hydrogen gas (H_2) cooled high temperature reactor with solid core utilizing High-Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to reduce heavy metal mass and to use fast or epithermal neutron spectrums enabling simple core designs. However, even though the NTR designs utilizing HEU is the best option in terms of rocket performance, they inevitably provoke nuclear proliferation obstacles on all Research and Development (R and D) activities by civilians and non-nuclear weapon states, and its eventual commercialization. To surmount the security issue to use HEU fuel for a NTR, a concept of the innovative NTR engine, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket utilizing Low-Enriched Uranium fuel (KANUTER-LEU) is presented in this paper. The design goal of KANUTER-LEU is to make use of a LEU fuel for its compact reactor, but does not sacrifice the rocket performance relative to the traditional NTRs utilizing HEU. KANUTER-LEU mainly consists of a fission reactor utilizing H_2 propellant, a propulsion system and an optional Electricity Generation System as a bimodal engine. To implement LEU fuel for the reactor, the innovative engine adopts W-UO_2 CERMET fuel to drastically increase uranium density and thermal neutron spectrum to improve neutron economy in the core. The moderator and structural material selections also consider neutronic and thermo-physical characteristics to reduce non-fission neutron loss and

  9. Conceptual designs parameters for MURR LEU U-Mo fuel conversion design demonstration experiment. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, J.; Feldman, E.; Stevens, J.

    2013-01-01

    The design parameters for the conceptual design of a fuel assembly containing U-10Mo fuel foils with low-enriched uranium (LEU) for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) are described. The Design Demonstration Experiment (MURR-DDE) will use a prototypic MURR-LEU element manufactured according to the parameters specified here. Also provided are calculated performance parameters for the LEU element in the MURR, and a set of goals for the MURR-DDE related to those parameters. The conversion objectives are to develop a fuel element design that will ensure safe reactor operations, as well as maintaining existing performance. The element was designed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. A set of manufacturing assumptions were provided by the Fuel Development (FD) and Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) pillars of the GTRI Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program to reliably manufacture the fuel plates. The proposed LEU fuel element has an overall design and exterior dimensions that are similar to those of the current highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. There are 23 fuel plates in the LEU design. The overall thickness of each plate is 44 mil, except for the exterior plate that is furthest from the center flux trap (plate 23), which is 49 mil thick. The proposed LEU fuel plates have U-10Mo monolithic fuel foils with a 235U enrichment of 19.75% varying from 9 mil to 20 mil thick, and clad with Al-6061 aluminum. A thin layer of zirconium exists between the fuel foils and the aluminum as a diffusion barrier. The thinnest nominal combined zirconium and aluminum clad thickness on each side of the fuel plates is 12 mil. The LEU U-10Mo monolithic fuel is not yet qualified as driver fuel in research reactors, but is under intense development under the auspices of the GTRI FD and FFC programs.

  10. Microstructure of the irradiated U 3Si 2/Al silicide dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Jue, J.-F.; Robinson, A. B.; Madden, J. W.; Medvedev, P. G.; Wachs, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The silicide dispersion fuel of U 3Si 2/Al is recognized as the best performance fuel for many nuclear research and test reactors with up to 4.8 gU/cm 3 fuel loading. An irradiated U 3Si 2/Al dispersion fuel ( 235U ˜ 75%) from the high-flux side of a fuel plate (U0R040) from the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-8 test was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) for 105 days. The average irradiation temperature and fission density of the U 3Si 2 fuel particles for the TEM sample are estimated to be approximately 110 °C and 5.4 × 10 27 f/m 3. The characterization was performed using a 200-kV TEM. The U/Si ratio for the fuel particle and (Si + Al)/U for the fuel-matrix-interaction layer are approximately 1.1 and 4-10, respectively. The estimated average diameter, number density and volume fraction for small bubbles (<1 μm) in the fuel particle are ˜94 nm, 1.05 × 10 20 m -3 and ˜11%, respectively. The results and their implication on the performance of the U 3Si 2/Al silicide dispersion fuel are discussed.

  11. Prospect of Uranium Silicide fuel element with hypostoichiometric (Si ≤3.7%)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Sardjono; Martoyo

    1996-01-01

    An attempt to obtain high uranium-loading in silicide dispersion fuel element using the fabrication technology applicable nowadays can reach Uranium-loading slightly above 5 gU/cm 3 . It is difficult to achieve a higher uranium-loading than that because of fabricability constraints. To overcome those difficulties, the use of uranium silicide U 3 Si based is considered. The excess of U is obtained by synthesising U 3 Si 2 in Si-hypostoichiometric stage, without applying heat treatment to the ingot as it can generate undesired U 3 Si. The U U will react with the matrix to form U al x compound, that its pressure is tolerable. This experiment is to consider possibilities of employing the U 3 Si 2 as nuclear fuel element which have been performed by synthesising U 3 Si 2 -U with the composition of 3.7 % weigh and 3 % weigh U. The ingot was obtained and converted into powder form which then was fabricated into experimental plate nuclear fuel element. The interaction between free U and Al-matrix during heat-treatment is the rolling phase of the fuel element was observed. The study of the next phase will be conducted later

  12. CEMS Investigations of Fe-Silicide Phases Formed by the Method of Concentration Controlled Phase Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moodley, M. K.; Bharuth-Ram, K. [University of Durban-Westville, Physics Department (South Africa); Waal, H. de; Pretorius, R. [University of Stellenbosch, Physics Department (South Africa)

    2002-03-15

    Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) measurements have been made on Fe-silicide samples formed using the method of concentration controlled phase selection. To prepare the samples a 10 nm layer of Fe{sub 30}M{sub 70} (M=Cr, Ni) was evaporated onto Si(100) surfaces, followed by evaporation of a 60 nm Fe layer. Diffusion of the Fe into the Si substrate and the formation of different Fe-Si phases was achieved by subjecting the evaporated samples to a series of heating stages, which consisted of (a) a 10 min anneal at 800 deg. C plus etch of the residual surface layer, (b) a further 3 hr anneal at 800 deg. C, (c) a 60 mJ excimer laser anneal to an energy density of 0.8 J/cm{sup 2}, and (d) a final 3 hr anneal at 800 deg. C. CEMS measurements were used to track the Fe-silicide phases formed. The CEMS spectra consisted of doublets which, based on established hyperfine parameters, could be assigned to {alpha}- or {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} or cubic FeSi. The spectra showed that {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} had formed already at the first annealing stage. Excimer laser annealing resulted in the formation of a phase with hyperfine parameters consistent with those of {alpha}-FeSi{sub 2}. A further 3 hr anneal at 800 deg. C resulted in complete reversal to the semiconducting {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} phase.

  13. Mössbauer spectroscopy study of surfactant sputtering induced Fe silicide formation on a Si surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, C.; Zhang, K. [2nd Institute of Physics, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Hofsäss, H., E-mail: hans.hofsaess@phys.uni-goettingen.de [2nd Institute of Physics, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Brüsewitz, C.; Vetter, U. [2nd Institute of Physics, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Bharuth-Ram, K. [Physics Department, Durban University of Technology, Durban 4001 (South Africa)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • We study the formation of self-organized nanoscale dot and ripple patterns on Si. • Patterns are created by keV noble gas ion irradiation and simultaneous {sup 57}Fe co-deposition. • Ion-induced phase separation and the formation of a-FeSi{sub 2} is identified as relevant process. - Abstract: The formation of Fe silicides in surface ripple patterns, generated by erosion of a Si surface with keV Ar and Xe ions and simultaneous co-deposition of Fe, was investigated with conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. For the dot and ripple patterns studied, we find an average Fe concentration in the irradiated layer between 6 and 25 at.%. The Mössbauer spectra clearly show evidence of the formation of Fe disilicides with Fe content close to 33 at.%, but very little evidence of the formation of metallic Fe particles. The results support the process of ion-induced phase separation toward an amorphous Fe disilicide phase as pattern generation mechanism. The observed amorphous phase is in agreement with thermodynamic calculations of amorphous Fe silicides.

  14. Impact of Nickel silicide Rear Metallization on Series Resistance of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabry, Rabab R

    2018-01-11

    The Silicon-based solar cell is one of the most important enablers toward high efficiency and low-cost clean energy resource. Metallization of silicon-based solar cells typically utilizes screen printed silver-Aluminium (Ag-Al) which affects the optimal electrical performance. To date, metal silicide-based ohmic contacts are occasionally used as an alternative candidate only to the front contact grid lines in crystalline silicon (c-Si) based solar cells. In this paper, we investigate the electrical characteristics of nickel mono-silicide (NiSi)/Cu-Al ohmic contact on the rear side of c-Si solar cells. We observe a significant enhancement in the fill factor of around 6.5% for NiSi/Cu-Al rear contacts leading to increasing the efficiency by 1.2% compared to Ag-Al. This is attributed to the improvement of the parasitic resistance in which the series resistance decreased by 0.737 Ω.cm². Further, we complement experimental observation with a simulation of different contact resistance values, which manifests NiSi/Cu-Al rear contact as a promising low-cost metallization for c-Si solar cells with enhanced efficiency.

  15. Magnesium and Manganese Silicides For Efficient And Low Cost Thermo-Electric Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Sudhir B. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Kutcher, Susan W. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Rosemeier, Cory A. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Mayers, David [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Singh, Jogender [Pennsylvania State University

    2013-12-02

    Thermoelectric Power Generation (TEPG) is the most efficient and commercially deployable power generation technology for harvesting wasted heat from such things as automobile exhausts, industrial furnaces, and incinerators, and converting it into usable electrical power. We investigated the materials magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) and manganese silicide (MnSi) for TEG. MgSi2 and MnSi are environmentally friendly, have constituent elements that are abundant in the earth's crust, non-toxic, lighter and cheaper. In Phase I, we successfully produced Mg2Si and MnSi material with good TE properties. We developed a novel technique to synthesize Mg2Si with good crystalline quality, which is normally very difficult due to high Mg vapor pressure and its corrosive nature. We produced n-type Mg2Si and p-type MnSi nanocomposite pellets using FAST. Measurements of resistivity and voltage under a temperature gradient indicated a Seebeck coefficient of roughly 120 V/K on average per leg, which is quite respectable. Results indicated however, that issues related to bonding resulted in high resistivity contacts. Determining a bonding process and bonding material that can provide ohmic contact from room temperature to the operating temperature is an essential part of successful device fabrication. Work continues in the development of a process for reproducibly obtaining low resistance electrical contacts.

  16. Irradiation testing of LEU fuels in the SILOE Reactor - Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francis; Baas, Claude; Martel, Patrick

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of uranium-silicide fuels has continued in the SILOE reactor during the past year. Thickness vs. fission density data from four U 3 Si plates containing 5.5 and 6.0 g U/cm 3 have been analyzed, and the results are presented. The irradiation of a full 60 g U/cm 3 U 3 Si element has begun. In addition, four U 3 Si 2 plates containing 20 to 54 g U/cm 3 are now being irradiated. These irradiations and future plans are discussed in the paper. (author)

  17. Influence of iron and beryllium additions on heat resistance of silicide coatings on TsMB-30 molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtseva, A.L.; Fedorchuk, N.M.; Lazarev, Eh.M.; Korotkov, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Alloying of titanium modified silicide coatings on TsMB-30 molybdenum alloy with iron or beryllium is stated to improve their protective properties. Coatings with low content of alloying elements have the best protective properties. Service life of coatings is determined by the formed oxide film and phase transformations taking place in the coating

  18. Aluminium alloyed iron-silicide/silicon solar cells: A simple approach for low cost environmental-friendly photovoltaic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Dalapati, Goutam; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Kumar, Avishek; Cheh Tan, Cheng; Ru Tan, Hui; Chi, Dongzhi

    2015-12-03

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of silicide/silicon based solar cell towards the development of low cost and environmental friendly photovoltaic technology. A heterostructure solar cells using metallic alpha phase (α-phase) aluminum alloyed iron silicide (FeSi(Al)) on n-type silicon is fabricated with an efficiency of 0.8%. The fabricated device has an open circuit voltage and fill-factor of 240 mV and 60%, respectively. Performance of the device was improved by about 7 fold to 5.1% through the interface engineering. The α-phase FeSi(Al)/silicon solar cell devices have promising photovoltaic characteristic with an open circuit voltage, short-circuit current and a fill factor (FF) of 425 mV, 18.5 mA/cm(2), and 64%, respectively. The significant improvement of α-phase FeSi(Al)/n-Si solar cells is due to the formation p(+-)n homojunction through the formation of re-grown crystalline silicon layer (~5-10 nm) at the silicide/silicon interface. Thickness of the regrown silicon layer is crucial for the silicide/silicon based photovoltaic devices. Performance of the α-FeSi(Al)/n-Si solar cells significantly depends on the thickness of α-FeSi(Al) layer and process temperature during the device fabrication. This study will open up new opportunities for the Si based photovoltaic technology using a simple, sustainable, and los cost method.

  19. Towards the improvement of the oxidation resistance of Nb-silicides in situ composites: A solid state diffusion approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, S.; Knittel, S.; François, M.; Portebois, L.; Mathieu, S.; Vilasi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Local equilibrium is attained during oxidation at phase boundaries (steady state conditions). •A solid state diffusion model explains the oxidation mechanism of Nb-silicides composites. •The Nb ss fraction is not the only parameters governing the oxidation rate of Nb-silicides. •Aluminium increases the thermodynamic activity of Si in the Nb-silicides composites. •The results indicate the need to develop a Nb–Ti–Hf–Al–Cr–Si thermodynamic database. -- Abstract: The present study focuses on the oxidation mechanism of Nb-silicide composites and on the effect of the composition on the oxidation rate at 1100 °C. A theoretical approach is proposed based on experimental results and used to optimise the oxidation resistance. The growth model based on multiphase diffusion was experimentally tested and confirmed by manufacturing seven composites with different compositions. It was also found that the effect of the composition has to be evaluated at 1100 °C within a short time duration (50 h), where the oxide scale and the internal oxidation zone both grow according to parabolic kinetics

  20. SMOPY, a new NDA tool for safeguards of LEU and MOX spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, A.; Merelli, M.; Szabo, J.-L.; Huver, M.; Arenas-Carrasco, J.

    2001-01-01

    Upon IAEA request, the French support program to IAEA Safeguards has developed a new device for control of the irradiated LEU and MOX fuels. The Safeguards Mox Python (SMOPY) is the achievement of a 4 years R and D program supported by CEA and COGEMA in partnership with Eurisys Mesures. The SMOPY system is based on the combination of 2 NDA techniques (passive neutron and room temperature gamma spectrometry) and on line interpretation tools (automatic gamma spectrum interpretation, depletion code EVO). Through the measurement managing software, all this contributes to the fully automatic measurement, interpretation and characterization of any kind of spent fuel. The device is transportable (50 kg, 60 cm) and is composed of four parts: 1. the measurement head with one high efficiency fission chamber and a micro room temperature gamma spectrometric probe; 2. the carrier which carries the measurement head. The carrier bottom fits the racks for accurate positioning and its top fits operator's fuel moving tool; 3. the portable electronic cabinet which includes both neutron and gamma electronic cards; 4. the portable PC which gets inspectors data, controls the measurement, get measured values, interprets them and immediately provides the inspector with worthwhile info for appropriate on the field decisions. Main features of SMOPY are: Discrimination of MOX versus LEU irradiated fuels in any case (conservative case is one cycle MOX versus three cycles LEU after short cooling time); Full characterization of irradiated LEU (burnup, cooling time, Pu amounts ...); Partial Defect Test on LEU fuels. A first version of SMOPY has been tested in industrial condition during summer 2000. This tests shown a need of shielding improvement around the gamma detector. A new version has been build a will be qualified during a new field test and then the system will be ready for routine operation in IAEA and commercial delivery. After giving details about the system itself, this paper

  1. Waste Treatment of Acidic Solutions from the Dissolution of Irradiated LEU Targets for 99-Mo Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, Allen J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Conner, Cliff [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-10-01

    One of the missions of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program (and now the National Nuclear Security Administrations Material Management and Minimization program) is to facilitate the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) targets for 99Mo production. The conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU targets will require five to six times more uranium to produce an equivalent amount of 99Mo. The work discussed here addresses the technical challenges encountered in the treatment of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH)/nitric acid solutions remaining after the dissolution of LEU targets. Specifically, the focus of this work is the calcination of the uranium waste from 99Mo production using LEU foil targets and the Modified Cintichem Process. Work with our calciner system showed that high furnace temperature, a large vent tube, and a mechanical shield are beneficial for calciner operation. One- and two-step direct calcination processes were evaluated. The high-temperature one-step process led to contamination of the calciner system. The two-step direct calcination process operated stably and resulted in a relatively large amount of material in the calciner cup. Chemically assisted calcination using peroxide was rejected for further work due to the difficulty in handling the products. Chemically assisted calcination using formic acid was rejected due to unstable operation. Chemically assisted calcination using oxalic acid was recommended, although a better understanding of its chemistry is needed. Overall, this work showed that the two-step direct calcination and the in-cup oxalic acid processes are the best approaches for the treatment of the UNH/nitric acid waste solutions remaining from dissolution of LEU targets for 99Mo production.

  2. Influence of Al addition on phase transformation and thermal stability of nickel silicides on Si(0 0 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shih-Hsien; Twan, Sheng-Chen; Cheng, Shao-Liang; Lee, Tu; Hu, Jung-Chih; Chen, Lien-Tai; Lee, Sheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: ► The presence of Al slows down the Ni 2 Si–NiSi phase transformation but significantly promotes the NiSi 2−x Al x formation. ► The behavior of phase transformation strongly depends on the Al concentration of the initial Ni 1−x Al x alloys. ► The Ni 0.91 Al 0.09 /Si system exhibits remarkably improved thermal stability, even after high temperature annealing for 1000 s. ► The relationship between microstructures, electrical property, and thermal stability of Ni(Al) silicides is discussed. -- Abstract: The influence of Al addition on the phase transformation and thermal stability of Ni silicides on (0 0 1)Si has been systematically investigated. The presence of Al atoms is found to slow down the Ni 2 Si–NiSi phase transformation but significantly promote the NiSi 2−x Al x formation during annealing. The behavior of phase transformation strongly depends on the Al concentration of the initial Ni 1−x Al x alloys. Compared to the Ni 0.95 Pt 0.05 /Si and Ni 0.95 Al 0.05 /Si system, the Ni 0.91 Al 0.09 /Si sample exhibits remarkably enhanced thermal stability, even after high temperature annealing for 1000 s. The relationship between microstructures, electrical property, and thermal stability of Ni silicides is discussed to elucidate the role of Al during the Ni 1−x Al x alloy silicidation. This work demonstrated that thermally stable Ni 1−x Al x alloy silicides would be a promising candidate as source/drain (S/D) contacts in advanced complementary metal–oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices

  3. [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3, small molecule synthetic peptide leptin mimetics, improve glycemic control in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anke; Anderson, Brian M; Novakovic, Zachary M; Grasso, Patricia

    2018-03-01

    We have previously shown that following oral delivery in dodecyl maltoside (DDM), [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and its myristic acid conjugate, MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3, improved energy balance and glucose homeostasis in genetically obese/diabetic mouse models. More recently, we have provided immunohistochemical evidence indicating that these synthetic peptide leptin mimetics cross the blood-brain barrier and concentrate in the area of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in normal C57BL/6J and Swiss Webster mice, in genetically obese ob/ob mice, and in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. In the present study, we describe the effects of oral delivery of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 on glycemic control in diet-induced (DIO) mice, a non-genetic rodent model of obesity and its associated insulin resistance, which more closely recapitulates common obesity and diabetes in humans. Male C57BL/6J and DIO mice, 17, 20, and 28 weeks of age, were maintained on a low-fat or high-fat diet and given vehicle (DDM) alone or [D-Leu-4]-OB3 or MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 in DDM by oral gavage for 12 or 14 days. Body weight gain, food and water intake, fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance, and serum insulin levels were measured. Our data indicate that (1) [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 restore glucose tolerance in male DIO mice maintained on a high-fat diet to levels comparable to those of non-obese C57BL/6J wild-type mice of the same age and sex maintained on a low-fat diet; and (2) the influence of [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 on glycemic control appears to be independent of their effects on energy balance. These results suggest that [D-Leu-4]-OB3 and/or MA-[D-Leu-4]-OB3 may have application to the management of the majority of cases of common obesity in humans, a state characterized at least in part, by leptin resistance resulting from a defect in leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier. They further suggest that these small molecule synthetic peptide leptin mimetics, through their

  4. The LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A reliable supply of HEU metal from the United States used in the manufacture of targets for the NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to ultimate use by the physician, has been established using this proven and established method of HEU target irradiation and processing to extract molybdenum-99. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the construction of two MAPLE reactors and a New Processing Facility. The design of the MAPLE facilities was based on an established process developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a three phase LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. Phase 1, the Initial Feasibility Study, which identified the technical issues to convert the MAPLE reactor targets from HEU to LEU for large scale commercial production was reported on at the RERTR- 2000 conference. The second phase of the LEU Target Development and Conversion Program was developed with extensive consultation and involvement of experts knowledgeable in target development, process system design, enriched uranium conversion chemistry and commercial scale reactor operations and molybdenum production. This paper will provide an overview of the Phase 2 Conversion Development Program, report on progress to date, and further

  5. Core conversion study from silicide to molybdenum fuel in the Indonesian 30 MW multipurpose reactor G.A. Siwabessy (RSG-GAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, T.M.; Kuntoro, I.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the core conversion from silicide to molybdenum core through a series of silicide (2.96 gU cm -3 ) - molybdenum (3.55 gUcm -3 ) mixed transition cores for the Indonesian 30 MW-Multipurpose G.A. Siwabessy (RSGGAS) reactor. The core calculations are carried out using the two-dimensional multigroup neutron diffusion method code of Batan-EQUIL-2D. The calculated results showed that the proposed silicide-molybdenum mixed transition cores, using the same refueling/reshuffling scheme, meet the safety criteria and it can be used in safely converting from an all-silicide core to an all-molybdenum core. (author)

  6. Performance and economic penalties of some LEU [low enriched uranium] conversion options for the Australian Reactor HIFAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Robinson, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    Performance calculations for the conversion of HIFAR to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel have been extended to a wide range of 235 U loadings per fuel element. Using a simple approximate algorithm for the likely costs of LEU compared with highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements, the increases in annual fuelling costs for LEU compared with HEU fuel are examined for a range of conversion options involving different performance penalties. No significant operational/safety problems were found for any of the options canvassed. (Author)

  7. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo

  8. Purification in the interaction between yttria mould and Nb-silicide-based alloy during directional solidification: A novel effect of yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Limin; Tang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Bin; Jia, Lina; Yuan, Sainan; Zhang, Hu

    2012-01-01

    Nb-silicide-based alloys were directionally solidified in yttria moulds. As a result of thermal dissociation of yttria, the alloys were slightly contaminated with oxygen, which caused a competitive oxidation between yttrium and hafnium. The addition of 0.15 at.% yttrium reduced the oxygen increment by 42%, because the buoyant inclusions concentrated around the top surface. The yttrium addition caused a significant purification of the interaction between the yttria mould and the Nb-silicide-based alloys during the directional solidification.

  9. A comparison of the radiological consequences of a HEU and LEU fueled research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollas, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the design basis accident radiological consequences of the HEU and LEU fueled Greek Research Reactor is presented. Doses and individual cancer risk from exposure to the passing radioactive cloud are estimated up to a distance of 20 km from the reactor site. Collective exposure and latent health effects are estimated for the total Athens area of 3081000 inhabitants. The results indicate that the plutonium isotopes buildup in the LEU fuel does not increase appreciably the consequences in respect to the HEU fueled reactor. The plutonium impact concerns mainly bone effects and secondly lung and whole body effects. The contribution to the limiting thyroid dose and the corresponding thyroid effects is insignificant. (author)

  10. Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Papastergiou, C.

    1992-01-01

    The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed

  11. Performance and Fabrication Status of TREAT LEU Conversion Conceptual Design Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IJ van Rooyen; SR Morrell; AE Wright; E. P Luther; K Jamison; AL Crawford; HT III Hartman

    2014-10-01

    Resumption of transient testing at the TREAT facility was approved in February 2014 to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) objectives. The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program is evaluating conversion of TREAT from its existing highly enriched uranium (HEU) core to a new core containing low enriched uranium (LEU). This paper describes briefly the initial pre-conceptual designs screening decisions with more detailed discussions on current feasibility, qualification and fabrication approaches. Feasible fabrication will be shown for a LEU fuel element assembly that can meet TREAT design, performance, and safety requirements. The statement of feasibility recognizes that further development, analysis, and testing must be completed to refine the conceptual design. Engineering challenges such as cladding oxidation, high temperature material properties, and fuel block fabrication along with neutronics performance, will be highlighted. Preliminary engineering and supply chain evaluation provided confidence that the conceptual designs can be achieved.

  12. Fuel Management Strategies for a Possible Future LEU Core of a TRIGA Mark II Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R.; Villa, M.; Steinhauser, G.; Boeck, H. [Vienna University of Technology-Atominstitut (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    The Vienna University of Technology/Atominstitut (VUT/ATI) operates a TRIGA Mark II research reactor. It is operated with a completely mixed core of three different types of fuel. Due to the US fuel return program, the ATI have to return its High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel latest by 2019. As an alternate, the Low Enrich Uranium (LEU) fuel is under consideration. The detailed results of the core conversion study are presented at the RRFM 2011 conference. This paper describes the burn up calculations of the new fuel to predict the future burn up behavior and core life time. It also develops an effective and optimized fuel management strategy for a possible future operation of the TRIGA Mark II with a LEU core. This work is performed by the combination of MCNP5 and diffusion based neutronics code TRIGLAV. (author)

  13. Main results and status of the development of LEU fuel for Russian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A.; Morozov, A.; Suprun, V.; Dobrikova, I.

    2005-01-01

    VNIINM develops low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel on base U-Mo alloys and a novel design of pin-type fuel elements. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. The work is carried on the following main directions: - irradiate LEU U-Mo dispersion fuel (the uranium density up to 6,0 g/cm 3 ) in two Russian research reactors: MIR (RIAR, Dimitrovgrad) as pin type fuel mini-elements and in WWR-M (PINP, Gatchina) within full-scaled fuel assembly (FA) with pin type fuel elements; - finalize development of design and fabrication process of IRT type FA with pin type fuel elements; - develop methods of reducing of U-Mo fuel --Al matrix interaction under irradiation; - develop fabricating methods of fuel elements on base of monolithic U-Mo fuel. The paper generally reviews the results of calculation, design and technology investigations accomplished by now. (author)

  14. Fuel element burnup determination in HEU-LEU mixed TRIGA research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, Tomaz; Ravnik, Matjaz

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a burnup calculations and burnup measurements for TRIGA FLIP HEU fuel elements and standard TRIGA LEU fuel elements used simultaneously in small TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenija. The fuel element burnup for approximately 15 years of operation was calculated with two different in house computer codes TRIGAP and TRIGLAV (both codes are available at OECD NEA Data Bank). The calculation is performed in one-dimensional radial geometry in TRIGAP and in two-dimensional (r,φ) geometry in TRIGLAV. Inter-comparison of results shows important influence of in-core water gaps, irradiation channels and mixed rings on burnup calculation accuracy. Burnup of 5 HEU and 27 LEU fuel elements was also measured with reactivity method. Measured and calculated burnup values are inter-compared for these elements (author)

  15. Alternating access mechanisms of LeuT-fold transporters: trailblazing towards the promised energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmier, Kelli; Claxton, Derek P; Mchaourab, Hassane S

    2017-08-01

    Secondary active transporters couple the uphill translocation of substrates to electrochemical ion gradients. Transporter conformational motion, generically referred to as alternating access, enables a central ligand binding site to change its orientation relative to the membrane. Here we review themes of alternating access and the transduction of ion gradient energy to power this process in the LeuT-fold class of transporters where crystallographic, computational and spectroscopic approaches have converged to yield detailed models of transport cycles. Specifically, we compare findings for the Na + -coupled amino acid transporter LeuT and the Na + -coupled hydantoin transporter Mhp1. Although these studies have illuminated multiple aspects of transporter structures and dynamics, a number of questions remain unresolved that so far hinder understanding transport mechanisms in an energy landscape perspective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutronic analysis of the conversion of HEU to LEU fuel for a 5-MW MTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazirandeh, A.; Bartsch, G.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, due to cessation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel supply, practical steps have been taken to substitute HEU fuel in almost all research reactors by medium-enriched uranium or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. In this study, a neutronic calculation of a 5-MW research reactor core fueled with HEU (93% 235 U) is presented. In order to assess the performance of the core with the LEU ( 235 U loadings were examined. The core consists of 22 standard fuel elements (SFEs) and 6 control fuel elements (CFEs). Each fuel elements has 18 curved plates of which two end plates are dummies. Initial 235 U content is 195 g 235 U/SFE and 9.7 g 235 U/CFE or /PFE. In all calculations the permitted changes to the fuel elements are (a) 18 active plates per SFE, (b) fuel plates assumed to be flat, and (c) 8 or 9 active plates per CFE

  17. The Leakage Current Improvement of a Ni-Silicided SiGe/Si Junction Using a Si Cap Layer and the PAI Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Jian-Guang; Wu Chun-Bo; Ji Xiao-Li; Ma Hao-Wen; Yan Feng; Shi Yi; Zhang Rong

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the leakage current of ultra-shallow Ni-silicided SiGe/Si junctions for 45 nm CMOS technology using a Si cap layer and the pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) process. It is found that with the conventional Ni silicide method, the leakage current of a p + (SiGe)—n(Si) junction is large and attributed to band-to-band tunneling and the generation-recombination process. The two leakage contributors can be suppressed quite effectively when a Si cap layer is added in the Ni silicide method. The leakage reduction is about one order of magnitude and could be associated with the suppression of the agglomeration of the Ni germano-silicide film. In addition, the PAI process after the application of a Si cap layer has little effect on improving the junction leakage but reduces the sheet resistance of the silicide film. As a result, the novel Ni silicide method using a Si cap combined with PAI is a promising choice for SiGe junctions in advanced technology. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  18. Interaction of copper metallization with rare-earth metals and silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, G. L.; Peto, G.; Zsoldos, E.; Horvath, Z. E.

    2001-01-01

    Solid-phase reactions of copper films with underlying gadolinium, erbium, and erbium - silicide layers on Si(100) substrates were investigated. For the phase analysis, x-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy were used. In the case of Cu/Gd/Si(100), an orthorhombic GdSi 2 formed, and, at higher temperatures, copper aggregated into islands. Annealed Cu/Er/Si(100) samples resulted in a hexagonal Er 5 Si 3 phase. In the Cu/ErSi 2-x /Si system, the copper catalyzes the transformation of the highly oriented hexagonal ErSi 2-x phase into hexagonal Er 5 Si 3 . Diverse phase developments of the samples with Gd and Er are based on reactivity differences of the two rare-earth metals. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  19. A study of strain in thin epitaxial films of yttrium silicide on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michelle F.; Martínez-Miranda, L. J.; Santiago-Avilés, J. J.; Graham, W. R.; Siegal, M. P.

    1994-02-01

    We present the results of an x-ray diffraction analysis of epitaxial yttrium silicide films grown on Si(111), with thicknesses ranging from 14 to 100 Å. The macroscopic strain along the out-of-plane direction for films containing pits or pinholes follows the trend observed previously in films of thicknesses up to 510 Å. The out-of-plane lattice parameter decreases linearly with film thickness. We show preliminary evidence that pinhole-free films do not follow the above trend, and that strain in these films has the opposite sign than in films with pinholes. Finally, our results also indicate that the mode of growth, coupled to the interfacial thermal properties of the films, affects the observed value for the strain in the films.

  20. A study of strain in thin epitaxial films of yttrium silicide on Si(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, M.F.; Martinez-Miranda, L.J.; Santiago-Aviles, J.J.; Graham, W.R.; Siegal, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of an x-ray diffraction analysis of epitaxial yttrium silicide films grown on Si(111), with thicknesses ranging from 14 to 100 A. The macroscopic strain along the out-of-plane direction for films containing pits or pinholes follows the trend observed previously in films of thicknesses up to 510 A. The out-of-plane lattice parameter decreases linearly with film thickness. We show preliminary evidence that pinhole-free films do not follow the above trend, and that strain in these films has the opposite sign than in films with pinholes. Finally, our results also indicate that the mode of growth, coupled to the interfacial thermal properties of the films, affects the observed value for the strain in the films

  1. Safety analysis of RSG-GAS Silicide core using one line cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endiah-Puji-Hastuti

    2003-01-01

    In the frame of minimizing the operation-cost, operation mode using one line cooling system is being evaluated. Maximum reactor has been determined and to continuing this program, steady state and transient analysis were done. The analysis was done by means of a core thermal hydraulic code, COOLOD-N, and PARET. The codes solves core thermal hydraulic equation at steady state conditions and transient, respectively. By using silicide core data and coast down flow rate as the input, thermal hydraulics parameters such as fuel cladding and fuel meat temperatures as well as safety margin against flow instability were calculated. Imposing the safety criteria to the results of steady state and transient analysis, maximum permissible power for this operation was obtained as much as 17.1 MW

  2. The fabrication of metal silicide nanodot arrays using localized ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jin; Kim, Tae-Gon; Min, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Sang Jo

    2010-01-01

    We propose a process for fabricating nanodot arrays with a pitch size of less than 25 nm. The process consists of localized ion implantation in a metal thin film on a Si wafer using a focused ion beam (FIB), followed by chemical etching. This process utilizes the etching resistivity changes of the ion beam irradiated region that result from metal silicide formation by ion implantation. To control the nanodot diameter, a threshold ion dose model is proposed using the Gaussian distribution of the ion beam intensities. The process is verified by fabricating nanodots with various diameters. The mechanism of etching resistivity is investigated via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  3. Study of surface segregation of Si on palladium silicide using Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhaya, S; Amarendra, G; Gopalan, Padma; Reddy, G L N; Saroja, S

    2004-01-01

    The transformation of Pd/Si to Pd 2 Si/Si is studied using Auger electron spectroscopy over a wide temperature range of 370-1020 K. The Pd film gets totally converted to Pd 2 Si upon annealing at 520 K, and beyond 570 K, Si starts segregating on the surface of silicide. It is found that the presence of surface oxygen influences the segregation of Si. The time evolution study of Si segregation reveals that segregation kinetics is very fast and the segregated Si concentration increases as the temperature is increased. Scanning electron microscopy measurements show that Pd 2 Si is formed in the form of islands, which grow as the annealing temperature is increased

  4. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  5. Contributions to the preparation of 241americium metal and a few 241americium silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    In order to take a closer look at the americium-silicon system, three further silicides of americium: Am 5 Si 3 , Am 2 Si 3 and AmSi 2 were prepared in addition to the already known americium monosilicide and starting from the knowledge gained from the latters preparation. Radiographic investigations were carried out into the temperature region of 900 0 C. They showed no change of structure in the three compounds. It was possible to prepare residue-free americium metal by reducing AmF 3 with Si, whereby the SiF 4 formed can be easily separated off as volatile compound, and the Am metal is brought into a very pure form by sublimation suitable for spectrochemical investigations. Attempts to prepare binary germanides and gallides of 241 americium were unsuccessful. (RB) [de

  6. First-principles investigations of the physical properties of binary uranium silicide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin; Long, Jianping; Yang, Lijun; Li, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Total density of states for USi 2 . Display Omitted -- Abstract: The structural, elastic properties and the Debye temperature of binary Uranium Silicide (U-Si) alloys are investigated by using the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential density function theory within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The ground states properties are found to agree with the available experimental data. The mechanical properties like shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio σ and ratio B/G are also calculated. Finally, The averaged sound velocity (v m ), the longitudinal sound velocity (v l ), transverse sound velocity (v t ) and the Debye temperature (θ D ) are obtained. However, the theoretical values are slightly different from few existed experiment data because the latter was obtained at room temperature while the former one at 0 K

  7. Hydrogen generation systems and methods utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2017-12-19

    Systems, devices, and methods combine thermally stable reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen and a non-toxic liquid by-product. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Springs and other pressurization mechanisms pressurize and deliver an aqueous solution to the reaction. A check valve and other pressure regulation mechanisms regulate the pressure of the aqueous solution delivered to the reactant fuel material in the reactor based upon characteristics of the pressurization mechanisms and can regulate the pressure of the delivered aqueous solution as a steady decay associated with the pressurization force. The pressure regulation mechanism can also prevent hydrogen gas from deflecting the pressure regulation mechanism.

  8. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies of cobalt silicide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naftel, S.J.; Coulthard, I.; Hu, Y.; Sham, T.K.; Zinke-Allmang, M.

    1998-01-01

    Cobalt silicide thin films, prepared on Si(100) wafers, have been studied by X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) at the Si K-, L 2,3 - and Co K-edges utilizing both total electron (TEY) and fluorescence yield (FLY) detection as well as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Co K-edge. Samples made using DC sputter deposition on clean Si surfaces and MBE were studied along with a bulk CoSi 2 sample. XANES and EXAFS provide information about the electronic structure and morphology of the films. It was found that the films studied have essentially the same structure as bulk CoSi 2 . Both the spectroscopy and materials characterization aspects of XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structures) are discussed

  9. Burn-up analysis of uranium silicide fuels 20% 235U, in the LFR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amor, Ricardo A.; Bouza, Edgardo; Cabrejas, Julian L.; Devida, Claudio A.; Gil, Daniel A.; Stankevicius, Alejandro; Gautier, Eduardo; Garavaglia, Ricardo N.; Lobo, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    The LFR Facility is a laboratory designed and constructed with a Hot-Cells line, a Globe-Box and a Fume-Hood, all of them suited to work with radioactive materials such as samples of irradiated silicide MTR fuel elements. A series of dissolutions of this material was performed. From the resulting solutions, two fractions were separated by HPLC. One contained U + Pu, and other the fission product Nd. The concentrations of these elements were obtained by isotopic dilution and mass spectrometry (IDMS). It is concluded that this technique is very powerful and accurate when properly applied, and makes the validation of burn-up calculation codes possible. It is worth remarking the Lfr capacity to carry on different Research and Development (R + D) tasks in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle field. (author)

  10. Natural convection cooling of LEU cores for Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Bokhari, I.H.; Akhtar, K.M.

    1991-08-01

    The first high power and equilibrium LEU cores of PARR-1 have been analysed to assess the maximum operating power based on natural convection cooling, need for forced cooling to remove the decay heat and to estimate safety margins that commensurate with the predetermined power limit. Computer code NATCON and standard correlations have been used for the analysis. The parameters studied includes coolant velocity, temperature distribution in the core, heat fluxes at onset of nucleate boiling, pulsed boiling and burnup. (author)

  11. Neutron flux measurement in the central channel (XC-1) of TRIGA 14 MW LEU core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARBOS, D.; BUSUIOC, P.; ROTH, Cs.; PAUNOIU, C.

    2008-01-01

    The TRIGA 14 MW reactor, operated by Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Romania, is a pool type reactor, and has a rectangular shape which holds fuel bundles and is surrounded with beryllium reflectors. Each fuel bundle is composed of 25 nuclear fuel rods. The TRIGA 14 MW reactor was commissioned 28 years ago with HEU fuel rods. The conversion was gradually achieved, starting in February 1992 and completed in March 2006. The full conversion of the 14 MW TRIGA Research Reactor was completed in May 2006 and each step of the conversion was achieved by removal of HEU fuel, replaced by LEU fuel, accompanied by a large set of theoretical evaluation and physical measurements intended to confirm the performances of gradual conversion. After the core full conversion, a program of measurements and comparisons with previous results of core physics and measurements is underway, allowing data acquisition for normal operation, demonstration of safety and economics of the converted core. Neutron flux spectrum measurements in the XC in the XC-1 water 1 water-filled channel were performed using multi multi-foil activation techniques. The neutron spectra and flux are obtained by unfolding from measured reaction rates using SAND II computer code. The integral neutron flux value for LEU core is greater of 13% than for the standard HEU core. Also thermal neutron flux value for converted LEU core is smaller by 0.38% than for the standard HEU core. These differences appear because the foil activation detectors have been irradiated using a pneumatic rabbit having a diameter of 32 mm, whereas foil irradiations in standard HEU core has been performed with a pneumatic rabbit having a diameter of 14 mm, and therefore the neutron spectra in LEU core is less thermalized and the weight of fast neutron is greater

  12. Comparison of HEU and LEU neutron spectra in irradiation facilities at the Oregon State TRIGA® Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schickler, R.A.; Marcum, W.R.; Reese, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The Oregon State TRIGA ® Reactor neutron spectra is characterized herein. • Neutron spectra between highly enriched uranium and low enriched uranium cores are compared. • Discussion is given as to differences between HEU and LEU core spectra results and impact on experiments. -- Abstract: In 2008, the Oregon State TRIGA ® Reactor (OSTR) was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel lifetime improvement plan (FLIP) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort was driven and supported by the Department of Energy's (DoE's) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The basis behind the RERTR program's ongoing conversion effort is to reduce the nuclear proliferation risk of civilian research and test reactors. The original intent of the HEU FLIP fuel was to provide fuel to research reactors that could be utilized for many years before a necessary refueling cycle. As a research reactor, the OSTR provides irradiation facilities for a variety of applications, such as activation analysis, fission-track dating, commercial isotope production, neutron radiography, prompt gamma characterization, and many others. In order to accurately perform these research functions, several studies had been conducted on the HEU FLIP fuel core to characterize the neutron spectra in various experimental facilities of the OSTR (Tiyapun, 1997; Ashbaker, 2005). As useful as these analyses were, they are no longer valid due to the change in fuel composition and the resulting alteration of core performance characteristics. Additionally, the core configuration (fuel reconfiguration) was altered between the HEU and LEU cores. This study characterizes the neutron spectra in various experimental facilities within and around the current LEU core. It also compares the spectra to that which was yielded in the HEU core through use of Monte Carlo n-Particle 5 (MCNP5) and experimental adjustment via a least-squares technique. The quantification of

  13. Simultaneous extraction of. beta. -endorphin and leu- and met-enkephalins from human and rat plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhathena, S.J.; Smith, P.M.; Kennedy, B.W. (Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (USA)); Voyles, N.R.; Recant, L. (Diabetes Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    A simple, rapid and reliable procedure is described to simultaneously concentrated and purify {beta}-endorphin, leu-and met-enkephalins from small volumes of human and rat plasma before radioimmunoassay is performed. It uses C{sub 18} Sep-Pak reverse phase cartridges. The effectiveness of different protease inhibitors in preventing degradation of opiates by plasma and different solvent systems for eluting opiates is also evaluated.

  14. The beginning of the LEU fuel elements manufacturing in the Chilean Commission of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, H.; Chavez, J.C.; Marin, J.; Lisboa, J.; Olivares, L.; Jimenez, O.

    1998-01-01

    The U 3 Si 2 LEU fuel fabrication program at CCHEN has started with the assembly of four leaders fuel elements for the RECH-1 reactor. This activity has involved a stage of fuel plates qualification, to evaluate fabrication procedures and quality controls and quality assurance. The qualification extent was 50% of the fuel plates, equivalent to the number of plates required for the assembly of two fuel elements. (author)

  15. Intermetallic nickel silicide nanocatalyst-A non-noble metal-based general hydrogenation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchuk, Pavel; Agostini, Giovanni; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Lund, Henrik; Agapova, Anastasiya; Junge, Henrik; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    Hydrogenation reactions are essential processes in the chemical industry, giving access to a variety of valuable compounds including fine chemicals, agrochemicals, and pharmachemicals. On an industrial scale, hydrogenations are typically performed with precious metal catalysts or with base metal catalysts, such as Raney nickel, which requires special handling due to its pyrophoric nature. We report a stable and highly active intermetallic nickel silicide catalyst that can be used for hydrogenations of a wide range of unsaturated compounds. The catalyst is prepared via a straightforward procedure using SiO 2 as the silicon atom source. The process involves thermal reduction of Si-O bonds in the presence of Ni nanoparticles at temperatures below 1000°C. The presence of silicon as a secondary component in the nickel metal lattice plays the key role in its properties and is of crucial importance for improved catalytic activity. This novel catalyst allows for efficient reduction of nitroarenes, carbonyls, nitriles, N-containing heterocycles, and unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. Moreover, the reported catalyst can be used for oxidation reactions in the presence of molecular oxygen and is capable of promoting acceptorless dehydrogenation of unsaturated N-containing heterocycles, opening avenues for H 2 storage in organic compounds. The generality of the nickel silicide catalyst is demonstrated in the hydrogenation of over a hundred of structurally diverse unsaturated compounds. The wide application scope and high catalytic activity of this novel catalyst make it a nice alternative to known general hydrogenation catalysts, such as Raney nickel and noble metal-based catalysts.

  16. The ability of silicide coating to delay the catastrophic oxidation of vanadium under severe conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaia, N., E-mail: nabil.chaia@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour – UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Mathieu, S., E-mail: stephane.mathieu@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour – UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Rouillard, F., E-mail: fabien.rouillard@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vilasi, M., E-mail: michel.vilasi@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour – UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Oxidation protection is due to the formation of a pure silica layer. • V–4Cr–4Ti with V{sub x}Si{sub y} silicide coating withstands 400 1-h cycles (1100 °C-T{sub amb}) in air. • Three-point flexure testing at 950 °C and 75 MPa does not induce coating breakdown. • No delamination between coating and substrate is observed in any test. - Abstract: V–4Cr–4Ti vanadium alloy is a potential cladding material for sodium-cooled fast-neutron reactors (SFRs). However, its affinity for oxygen and the subsequent embrittlement that oxygen induces causes a need for an oxygen diffusion barrier, which can be obtained by manufacturing a multi-layered silicide coating. The present work aims to evaluate the effects of thermal cycling (using a cyclic oxidation device) and tensile and compressive stresses (using the three-point flexure test) on the coated alloy system. Tests were performed in air up to 1100 °C, which is 200 °C higher than the accidental temperature for SFR applications. The results showed that the VSi{sub 2} coating was able to protect the vanadium substrate from oxidation for more than 400 1-h cycles between 1100 °C and room temperature. The severe bending applied to the coated alloy at 950 °C using a load of 75 MPa did not lead to specimen breakage. It can be suggested that the VSi{sub 2} coating has mechanical properties compatible with the V–4Cr–4Ti alloy for SFR applications.

  17. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Nasonov, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons for the IR-8 research reactor were made for HEU (90%), HEU (36%), and LEU (19.75%) fuel assembly (FA) designs using three dimensional multi-group diffusion theory models benchmarked to detailed Monte Carlo models of the reactor. Comparisons were made of changes in reactivity, cycle length, average 235 U discharge burnup, thermal neutron flux, and control rod worths for the 90% and 36% enriched IRT-3M fuel assembly and the 19.75% enriched IRT-4M fuel assembly with the same fuel management strategy. The results of these comparisons showed that a uranium density of 3.5 g/cm 3 in the fuel meat would be required in the LEU IRT-4M fuel assembly to match the cycle length of the HEU (90%) IRT-3M FA and an LEU density of 3.7 g/cm 3 is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU (36%) IRT-3M FA. (author)

  18. Thermal analysis of LEU modified Cintichem target irradiated in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catana, A; Toma, C.

    2009-01-01

    Actions conceived during last years at international level for conversion of Molybdenum fabrication process from HEU to LEU targets utilization created opportunities for INR to get access to information and participating to international discussions under IAEA auspices. Concrete steps for developing fission Molybdenum technology were facilitated. Institute of Nuclear Research bringing together a number of conditions like suitable irradiation possibilities, direct communication between reactor and hot cell facility, handling capacity of high radioactive sources, and simultaneously the existence of an expanding internal market, decided to undertake the necessary steps in order to produce fission molybdenum. Over the course of last years of efforts in this direction we developed the steps for fission Molybdenum technology development based on modified Cintichem process in accordance with the Argonne National Laboratory proved methodology. Progress made by INR to heat transfer computations of annular target using is presented. An advanced thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to estimate the heat removal capability for an enriched uranium (LEU) foil annular target irradiated in TRIGA reactor core. As a result, the present analysis provides an upper limit estimate of the LEU-foil and external target surface temperatures during irradiation in TRIGA 14 MW reactor. (authors)

  19. The Leu72Met polymorphism of the ghrelin gene is significantly associated with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Tortorella, Alfonso; Castaldo, Eloisa; Di Filippo, Carmela; Maj, Mario

    2007-02-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying binge eating disorder are poorly understood. Evidence exists for the fact that abnormalities in peptides involved in the regulation of appetite, including ghrelin, may play a role in binge eating behavior. Genes involved in the ghrelin physiology may therefore contribute to the biological vulnerability to binge eating disorder. We examined whether two polymorphisms of the ghrelin gene, the G152A (Arg51Gln) and C214A (Leu72Met), were associated with binge eating disorder. Ninety obese or nonobese women with binge eating disorder and 119 normal weight women were genotyped at the ghrelin gene. Statistical analyses showed that the Leu72Met ghrelin gene variant was significantly more frequent in binge eating disorder patients (chi2=5.940; d.f.=1, P=0.01) and was associated with a moderate, but significant risk to develop binge eating disorder (odds ratio=2.725, 95% confidence interval: 1.168-6.350). Although these data should be regarded as preliminary because of the small sample size, they suggest that the Leu72Met ghrelin gene variant may contribute to the genetic susceptibility to binge eating disorder.

  20. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of research reactor core with different LEU fuel types using RELAP5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sahlamy, Neama M. [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-11-15

    In the current work, comparisons between the core performances when using different LEU fuels are done. The fuels tested are UA1{sub X}-A1, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuels with 19.7 % enrichment. Calculations are done using RELAP5 code to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the IAEA benchmark 10 MW reactor. First, a reassessment of the slow reactivity insertion transient with UA1{sub X}-A1 LEU fuel to compare the results with those reported in the IAEA TECDOC [1]. Then, comparisons between the thermal-hydraulic core performances when using the three LEU fuels are done. The assessment is performed at initial power of 1.0 W. The reactor power is calculated using the RELAP5 point kinetic model. The reactivity feedback, from changes in water density and fuel temperature, is considered for all cases. From the results it is noticed that U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel gives the best fuel performance since it has the minimum value of peak fuel temperature and the minimum peak clad surface temperature, as operating parameters. Also, it gives the maximum value of the Critical Heat Flux Ratio and the lowest tendency to flow instability occurrence.

  1. Dysregulated autophagy in restrictive cardiomyopathy due to Pro209Leu mutation in BAG3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schänzer, A; Rupp, S; Gräf, S; Zengeler, D; Jux, C; Akintürk, H; Gulatz, L; Mazhari, N; Acker, T; Van Coster, R; Garvalov, B K; Hahn, A

    2018-03-01

    Myofibrillary myopathies (MFM) are hereditary myopathies histologically characterized by degeneration of myofibrils and aggregation of proteins in striated muscle. Cardiomyopathy is common in MFM but the pathophysiological mechanisms are not well understood. The BAG3-Pro209Leu mutation is associated with early onset MFM and severe restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), often necessitating heart transplantation during childhood. We report on a young male patient with a BAG3-Pro209Leu mutation who underwent heart transplantation at eight years of age. Detailed morphological analyses of the explanted heart tissue showed intracytoplasmic inclusions, aggregation of BAG3 and desmin, disintegration of myofibers and Z-disk alterations. The presence of undegraded autophagosomes, seen by electron microscopy, as well as increased levels of p62, LC3-I and WIPI1, detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses, indicated a dysregulation of autophagy. Parkin and PINK1, proteins involved in mitophagy, were slightly increased whereas mitochondrial OXPHOS activities were not altered. These findings indicate that altered autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis and rapid progression of RCM in MFM caused by the BAG3-Pro209Leu mutation, which could have implications for future therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of the effectiveness of the LEU Reform Rule and its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.; Nations, J.O.; Hammond, G.A.

    1993-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended its material control and accounting (MC ampersand A) requirements in 1985 for licensees possessing and using special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance in quantities larger than one effective kilogram (kg). The goal of the Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) Reform Rule (i.e., 10CFR 74.31) was to establish MC ampersand A requirements for the LEU licensees at a level consistent with the safeguards risk associated with the relatively low strategic importance of such material. The amended requirements were written in a performance-oriented manner, rather than a prescriptive one, in an effort to allow the licensees the opportunity to choose the most cost-effective means of satisfying the requirements. The LEU Reform Rule was implemented in January 1988 and the fuel cycle facilities have had sufficient experience in implementing the rule to allow a meaningful review of its effectiveness. This document provides technical analysis and recommendations to assist the NRC in making a determination if the rule is achieving its intended purpose, and if not, to make the necessary changes to accomplish this

  3. Calculation of mixed HEU-LEU cores for the HOR research reactor with the scale code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leege, P.F.A. de; Gibcus, H.P.M.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Vries, J.W. de

    1997-01-01

    The HOR reactor of Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI), Delft, The Netherlands, will be converted to use low enriched fuel (LEU) assemblies. As there are still many usable high enriched (HEU) fuel assemblies present, there will be a considerable reactor operation time with mixed cores with both HEU and LEU fuel assemblies. At IRI a comprehensive reactor physics code system and evaluated nuclear data is implemented for detailed core calculations. One of the backbones of the IRI code system is the well-known SCALE code system package. Full core calculations are performed with the diffusion theory code BOLD VENTURE, the nodal code SILWER, and the Monte Carlo code KENO Va. Results are displayed of a strategy from a HEU core to a mixed HEU-LEU core and eventually a LEU core. (author)

  4. What the difference to use LEU and HEU fuel elements separately or together in a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, S.; Uestuen, G.

    2005-01-01

    Concerning of nuclear material safety, most of the research reactors are advised to shift from HEU (high enriched-%93 U-235) to LEU (low enriched-%20 U-235) fuel elements. When LEU and HEU fuel elements are to be used together in a research reactor, some design and safety problems are encountered. According to use of the reactor, some research reactors such as MTR type may not show any considerable difference for HEU or LEU fuel elements, but the efficiency of radioisotope production generated by thermal neutron interaction may decrease about twenty-thirty percent when LEU fuel elements are used. Here, fine mesh-sized 3D neutronic analysis of TR-2 research reactor is presented to indicate the arising problem when LEU end HEU fuel elements are used together in a research reactor. Partial thermohydraulic analysis of the reactor is also given to show the betterness of the LEU fuel element design. However, there might be some points that should be noticed for safer operation of plate type fuelled research reactors. (author)

  5. Oxidation-resistant Ge-doped silicide coating on Cr-Cr2Nb alloys by pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yirong

    1997-01-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on Cr-Cr 2 Nb alloys in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the pack composition and processing schedule and also on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi 2 and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. Under cyclic and isothermal oxidation conditions, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation and from pesting by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. (orig.)

  6. Optical metrology of Ni and NiSi thin films used in the self-aligned silicidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamineni, V. K.; Bersch, E. J.; Diebold, A. C.; Raymond, M.; Doris, B. B.

    2010-01-01

    The thickness-dependent optical properties of nickel metal and nickel monosilicide (NiSi) thin films, used for self-aligned silicidation process, were characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The thickness-dependent complex dielectric function of nickel metal films is shown to be correlated with the change in Drude free electron relaxation time. The change in relaxation time can be traced to the change in grain boundary (GB) reflection coefficient and grain size. A resistivity based model was used as the complementary method to the thickness-dependent optical model to trace the change in GB reflection coefficient and grain size. After silicidation, the complex dielectric function of NiSi films exhibit non-Drude behavior due to superimposition of interband absorptions arising at lower frequencies. The Optical models of the complete film stack were refined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattered spectroscopy, and x-ray reflectivity (XRR).

  7. Evaluation of powder metallurgical processing routes for multi-component niobium silicide-based high-temperature alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemueller, Hans Christoph Maximilian

    2016-03-22

    Niobium silicide-based composites are potential candidates to replace nickel-base superalloys for turbine applications. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and differences in ensuing properties of various powder metallurgical processing techniques that are capable of manufacturing net-shape turbine components. Two routes for powder production, mechanical alloying and gas atomization were combined with compaction via hot isostatic pressing and powder injection molding.

  8. Controlling the formation and stability of ultra-thin nickel silicides - An alloying strategy for preventing agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, F. A.; van Stiphout, K.; Nanakoudis, A.; Bals, S.; Vantomme, A.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Lavoie, C.; Detavernier, C.

    2018-02-01

    The electrical contact of the source and drain regions in state-of-the-art CMOS transistors is nowadays facilitated through NiSi, which is often alloyed with Pt in order to avoid morphological agglomeration of the silicide film. However, the solid-state reaction between as-deposited Ni and the Si substrate exhibits a peculiar change for as-deposited Ni films thinner than a critical thickness of tc = 5 nm. Whereas thicker films form polycrystalline NiSi upon annealing above 450 ° C , thinner films form epitaxial NiSi2 films that exhibit a high resistance toward agglomeration. For industrial applications, it is therefore of utmost importance to assess the critical thickness with high certainty and find novel methodologies to either increase or decrease its value, depending on the aimed silicide formation. This paper investigates Ni films between 0 and 15 nm initial thickness by use of "thickness gradients," which provide semi-continuous information on silicide formation and stability as a function of as-deposited layer thickness. The alloying of these Ni layers with 10% Al, Co, Ge, Pd, or Pt renders a significant change in the phase sequence as a function of thickness and dependent on the alloying element. The addition of these ternary impurities therefore changes the critical thickness tc. The results are discussed in the framework of classical nucleation theory.

  9. A Study on Characterization of Light-Induced Electroless Plated Ni Seed Layer and Silicide Formation for Solar Cell Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaloo, Ashkan Vakilipour; Joo, Seung Ki; Es, Firat; Turan, Rasit; Lee, Doo Won

    2018-03-01

    Light-induced electroless plating (LIEP) is an easy and inexpensive method that has been widely used for seed layer deposition of Nickel/Copper (Ni/Cu)-based metallization in the solar cell. In this study, material characterization aspects of the Ni seed layer and Ni silicide formation at different bath conditions and annealing temperatures on the n-side of a silicon diode structure have been examined to achieve the optimum cell contacts. The effects of morphology and chemical composition of Ni film on its electrical conductivity were evaluated and described by a quantum mechanical model. It has been found that correlation exists between the theoretical and experimental conductivity of Ni film. Residual stress and phase transformation of Ni silicide as a function of annealing temperature were evaluated using Raman and XRD techniques. Finally, transmission line measurement (TLM) technique was employed to determine the contact resistance of Ni/Si stack after thermal treatment and to understand its correlation with the chemical-structural properties. Results indicated that low electrical resistive mono-silicide (NiSi) phase as low as 5 mΩ.cm2 was obtained.

  10. Electrical and optical properties of sub-10 nm nickel silicide films for silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahmi, Hatem; Ravipati, Srikanth; Yarali, Milad; Wang, Weijie; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Mavrokefalos, Anastassios; Shervin, Shahab

    2017-01-01

    Highly conductive and transparent films of ultra-thin p-type nickel silicide films have been prepared by RF magnetron sputtering of nickel on silicon substrates followed by rapid thermal annealing in an inert environment in the temperature range 400–600 °C. The films are uniform throughout the wafer with thicknesses in the range of 3–6 nm. The electrical and optical properties are presented for nickel silicide films with varying thickness. The Drude–Lorentz model and Fresnel equations were used to calculate the dielectric properties, sheet resistance, absorption and transmission of the films. These ultrathin nickel silicide films have excellent optoelectronic properties for p-type contacts with optical transparencies up to 80% and sheet resistance as low as ∼0.15 µΩ cm. Furthermore, it was shown that the use of a simple anti-reflection (AR) coating can recover most of the reflected light approaching the values of a standard Si solar cell with the same AR coating. Overall, the combination of ultra-low thickness, high transmittance, low sheet resistance and ability to recover the reflected light by utilizing standard AR coating makes them ideal for utilization in silicon based photovoltaic technologies as a p-type transparent conductor. (paper)

  11. Electrical and optical properties of sub-10 nm nickel silicide films for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Hatem; Ravipati, Srikanth; Yarali, Milad; Shervin, Shahab; Wang, Weijie; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Mavrokefalos, Anastassios

    2017-01-01

    Highly conductive and transparent films of ultra-thin p-type nickel silicide films have been prepared by RF magnetron sputtering of nickel on silicon substrates followed by rapid thermal annealing in an inert environment in the temperature range 400-600 °C. The films are uniform throughout the wafer with thicknesses in the range of 3-6 nm. The electrical and optical properties are presented for nickel silicide films with varying thickness. The Drude-Lorentz model and Fresnel equations were used to calculate the dielectric properties, sheet resistance, absorption and transmission of the films. These ultrathin nickel silicide films have excellent optoelectronic properties for p-type contacts with optical transparencies up to 80% and sheet resistance as low as ~0.15 µΩ cm. Furthermore, it was shown that the use of a simple anti-reflection (AR) coating can recover most of the reflected light approaching the values of a standard Si solar cell with the same AR coating. Overall, the combination of ultra-low thickness, high transmittance, low sheet resistance and ability to recover the reflected light by utilizing standard AR coating makes them ideal for utilization in silicon based photovoltaic technologies as a p-type transparent conductor.

  12. Investigations of uraniumsilicide-based dispersion fuels for the use of low enrichment uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazare, S.

    1982-07-01

    The work presents at the outset, a review of the preparation and properties of uranium silicides (U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 ) in so far as these are relevant for their use as dispersants in research reactor fuels. The experimental work deals with the preparation and powder metallurgical processing of Al-clad miniature fuel element plates with U 3 Si- und U 3 Si-Al up to U-densities of 6.0 g U/cm 3 . The compatibility of these silicides with the Al-matrix under equilibrium conditions (873 K) and the influence of the reaction on the dimensional stability of the miniplates is described and discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. Role of Annular Lipids in the Functional Properties of Leucine Transporter LeuT Proteomicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Michael V; Khelashvili, George; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Javitch, Jonathan A; Weinstein, Harel

    2016-02-16

    Recent work has shown that the choice of the type and concentration of detergent used for the solubilization of membrane proteins can strongly influence the results of functional experiments. In particular, the amino acid transporter LeuT can bind two substrate molecules in low concentrations of n-dodecyl β-d-maltopyranoside (DDM), whereas high concentrations reduce the molar binding stoichiometry to 1:1. Subsequent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of LeuT in DDM proteomicelles revealed that DDM can penetrate to the extracellular vestibule and make stable contacts in the functionally important secondary substrate binding site (S2), suggesting a potential competitive mechanism for the reduction in binding stoichiometry. Because annular lipids can be retained during solubilization, we performed MD simulations of LeuT proteomicelles at various stages of the solubilization process. We find that at low DDM concentrations, lipids are retained around the protein and penetration of detergent into the S2 site does not occur, whereas at high concentrations, lipids are displaced and the probability of DDM binding in the S2 site is increased. This behavior is dependent on the type of detergent, however, as we find in the simulations that the detergent lauryl maltose-neopentyl glycol, which is approximately twice the size of DDM and structurally more closely resembles lipids, does not penetrate the protein even at very high concentrations. We present functional studies that confirm the computational findings, emphasizing the need for careful consideration of experimental conditions, and for cautious interpretation of data in gathering mechanistic information about membrane proteins.

  14. Microcystis aeruginos strain [D-Leu1] Mcyst-LR producer, from Buenos Aires province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rosso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To show the toxicological and phylogenetic characterization of a native Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa strain (named CAAT 2005-3 isolated from a water body of Buenos Aires province, Argentine. Methods: A M. aeruginosa strain was isolated from the drainage canal of the sewage treatment in the town of Pila, Buenos Aires province, Argentina and acclimated to laboratory conditions. The amplification of cpcBA-IGS Phcocyanin (PC, intergenic spacer and flanking regions was carried out in order to build a phylogenetic tree. An exactive/orbitrap mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Bremen, Germany was used for the LC/ESI-HRMS microcystins analysis. The number of cell/mL and [D-Leu1] Mcyst-LR production obtained as a function of time was modelled using the Gompertz equation. Results: The phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequence clustered with others M. aeruginosa sequences obtained from NCBI. The first Argentinian strain of M. aeruginosa (CAAT 2005-3 growing under culture conditions maintains the typical colonial architecture of M. aeruginosa with profuse mucilage. M. aeruginosa CAAT 2005-3 expresses a toxin variant, that was identified by LC-HRMS/Orbitrapas as [D-Leu1] microcystin-LR ([M+H]+=1 037.8 m/z. Conclusions: [D-Leu1] microcystin-LR has been also detected in M. aeruginosa samples from Canada, Brazil and Argentina. This work provides the basis for technological development and production of analytical standards of toxins present in our region.

  15. Documentation Experiences for Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 Conversion from HEU to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, T.-A.; Dennis, H.; Antoine, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Jamaican SLOWPOKE–2 (JM–1) is a 20 kW research reactor manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and has been operating since March 1984, in the department of the International Centre for Environmental and Nuclear Sciences (ICENS), at the University of the West Indies, Mona Campus in Kingston, Jamaica. The pool type reactor has been primarily used for Neutron Activation Analysis in environmental, agricultural, geochemical, health-related studies and mineral exploration. The University, assisted by the IAEA under the GTRI/RERTR program, is currently in the process of converting from HEU to LEU. Extensive documentation on policies, general requirements, elements of the conversion quality assurance (QA) system and conversion QA administrative procedures is required for the conversion. The core conversion activities are being carried out in accordance with current international standards and regulatory guidelines of the newly established Jamaican Radiation Safety Authority (RSA) with agreement between the RSA and IAEA or DOE related to Nuclear Safety and Control. The documentation structure has taken into consideration nuclear safety and licensing, LEU fuel design and conversion analysis, LEU fuel procurement and fabrication, removal of HEU fuel and reactor maintenance and conversion and commissioning, with the conversion QA manual at the apex of the structure. To a large extent, the documentation format will adhere to that of the IAEA applicable regulatory standards and guidance documents. The major challenge of the conversion activities, it is envisioned, will come from the absence of any previous regulatory framework in Jamaica; however, a timeline for the process, which includes training and equipping of regulators, will guide operation. (author)

  16. The LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    The availability of isotope grade, Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), from the United States for use in the manufacture of targets for molybdenum-99 production in AECL's NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a reliable, secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets is a proven and established method that has reliably produced medical isotopes for several decades. The HEU process provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume, molybdenum-99 production. Other medical isotopes such as I-131 and Xe-133, which play an important role in nuclear medicine applications, are also produced from irradiated HEU targets as a by-product of the molybdenum-99 process. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the commissioning of two MAPLE reactors and an associated isotope processing facility (the New Processing Facility). The new MAPLE facilities, which will be dedicated exclusively to medical isotope production, will provide an essential contribution to a secure, robust global healthcare system. Design and construction of these facilities has been based on a life cycle management philosophy for the isotope production process. This includes target irradiation, isotope extraction and waste management. The MAPLE reactors will operate with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, a significant contribution to the objectives of the RERTR program. The design of the isotope production process in the MAPLE facilities is based on an established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. This is a proven technology that has been demonstrated over more than three decades of operation. However, in support of the RERTR program and in compliance with U.S. legislation, MDS Nordion has undertaken a LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. This paper will provide an

  17. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mei, Zhigang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident

  18. Performance of Estimation of distribution algorithm for initial core loading optimization of AHWR-LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Amit; Singh, Baltej; Gupta, Anurag; Duggal, Vibhuti; Bhatt, Kislay; Krishnani, P.D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • EDA has been applied to optimize initial core of AHWR-LEU. • Suitable value of weighing factor ‘α’ and population size in EDA was estimated. • The effect of varying initial distribution function on optimized solution was studied. • For comparison, Genetic algorithm was also applied. - Abstract: Population based evolutionary algorithms now form an integral part of fuel management in nuclear reactors and are frequently being used for fuel loading pattern optimization (LPO) problems. In this paper we have applied Estimation of distribution algorithm (EDA) to optimize initial core loading pattern (LP) of AHWR-LEU. In EDA, new solutions are generated by sampling the probability distribution model estimated from the selected best candidate solutions. The weighing factor ‘α’ decides the fraction of current best solution for updating the probability distribution function after each generation. A wider use of EDA warrants a comprehensive study on parameters like population size, weighing factor ‘α’ and initial probability distribution function. In the present study, we have done an extensive analysis on these parameters (population size, weighing factor ‘α’ and initial probability distribution function) in EDA. It is observed that choosing a very small value of ‘α’ may limit the search of optimized solutions in the near vicinity of initial probability distribution function and better loading patterns which are away from initial distribution function may not be considered with due weightage. It is also observed that increasing the population size improves the optimized loading pattern, however the algorithm still fails if the initial distribution function is not close to the expected optimized solution. We have tried to find out the suitable values for ‘α’ and population size to be considered for AHWR-LEU initial core loading pattern optimization problem. For sake of comparison and completeness, we have also addressed the

  19. Present status of the use of LEU in aqueous reactors to produce Mo-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Russell M.; Pavshook, V.A.; Khvostionov, V.Ye.

    1998-01-01

    An operating aqueous homogeneous reactor, the ARGUS at Kurchatov Institute, has been used to produce fission product molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), widely used in nuclear medicine to produce technetium-99m (Tc-99m). The Mo-99 has been extracted from the sulfate solution using an organic sorbent after operation at 1 kW/liter. after purification, the material has been assayed and the result is well within required specification of the USPharmacopaeia. Operation calculation are presented to show the sources and quantity of alpha activity when LEU is used. (author)

  20. Experience in producing LEU fuel elements for the RSG-GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suripto, A.; Soentono, S.

    1991-01-01

    To achieve a self-reliance in the operation of the 30 MW Multipurpose Research Reactor at Serpong (the RSG-GAS), a fuel element production facility has been constructed nearby. The main task of the facility is to produce MTR type fuel and control elements containing U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion LEU fuel for the RSG-GAS. The hot commissioning activity has started in early 1988 after completion of the cold commissioning using depleted uranium in 1987, marking the beginning of the real production activity. This paper briefly describes the main features of the fuel production facility, the production experience gained so far, and its current production activity. (orig.)

  1. Selection of LEU/Th reference fuel for the HTGR-SC/C lead plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.F.; Neylan, A.J.; Baxter, A.M.; McEachern, D.W.; Stansfield, O.M.

    1983-05-01

    This paper describes the reference fuel materials for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant for steam cycle/cogeneration (SC/C). A development and testing program carried out in 1978 through 1982 led to the selection of coated fuel particles of uranium-oxycarbide (UCO) for fissile materials and thorium oxide (ThO 2 ) for fertiel materials. Low-enriched uranium (LEU) is the enrichment basis for the HTGR-SC/C application. While UC 2 and UO 2 would also meet the essential criteria for fissile fuel, the UCO, alternative was selected on the basis of improved performance, economics, and process conditions

  2. Irradiation of MEU and LEU test fuel elements in DR 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haack, K.

    1984-01-01

    Irradiation of three MEU and three LEU fuel elements in the Danish reactor DR 3. Thermal and fast neutron flux density scans of the core have been made and the results, related to the U235-content of each fuel element, are compared with the values from HEU fuel elements. The test elements were taken to burn-up percentages of 50-60%. Reactivity values of the test elements at charge and at discharge have been measured and the values are compared with those of HEU fuel elements. (author)

  3. Analytical analyses of startup measurements associated with the first use of LEU fuel in Romania's 14-MW TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Ciocanescu, M.

    1992-01-01

    The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) is located in Pitesti, Romania. Beginning with an HEU core (10 wt% U), the reactor first went critical in November 1979 but was shut down ten years later because of insufficient excess reactivity. Last November the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR), which operates the SSR, received from the ANL RERTR program a shipment of 125 LEU pins fabricated by General Atomics and of the same geometry as the original fuel but with an enrichment of 19.7% 235U and a loading of 45 wt% U. Using 100 of these pins, four LEU clusters, each containing a 5 x 5 square array of fuel rods, were assembled. These four LEU clusters replaced the four most highly burned HEU elements in the SSR. The reactor resumed operations last February with a 35-element mixed HEU/LEU core configuration. In preparation for full power operation of the SSR with this mixed HEU/LEU core, a number of measurements were made. These included control rod calibrations, excess reactivity determinations, worths of experiment facilities, reaction rate distributions, and themocouple measurements of fuel temperatures as a function of reactor power. This paper deals with a comparison of some of these measured reactor parameters with corresponding analytical calculations

  4. Preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism predicts a lower rate of developing renal dysfunction in type 2 diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Yeol; Kim, Sun-Young; Jo, Dae-Sun; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Park, Sung Kwang

    2006-07-01

    Ghrelin is a novel peptide hormone, which exerts somatotropic, orexigenic and adipogenic effects. Recent studies have shown that the preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism is associated with serum creatinine (Scr) concentration in type 2 diabetes; 72Met carriers exhibited lower Scr levels as compared with the 72Met non-carriers. We hypothesized that the preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism is associated with a lower rate of developing renal dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. The preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism was investigated using PCR techniques in 138 patients with diabetic nephropathy divided into two groups, one with normal renal function and the other with renal dysfunction. Determination of the frequency of the preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism was the main outcome measure. The frequency of the Leu72Met polymorphism in diabetic nephropathy was significantly lower in patients with renal dysfunction (15.9%, P polymorphism was also associated with serum total cholesterol levels in diabetic nephropathy patients with renal dysfunction; the 72Met carriers had lower total cholesterol levels than the 72Met non-carriers (P < 0.05). These data suggest that 72Met carrier status may be used as a marker predicting a lower chance of developing renal dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Development of a chromosomally integrated metabolite-inducible Leu3p-alpha-IPM "off-on" gene switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Poulou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Present technology uses mostly chimeric proteins as regulators and hormones or antibiotics as signals to induce spatial and temporal gene expression.Here, we show that a chromosomally integrated yeast 'Leu3p-alpha-IotaRhoMu' system constitutes a ligand-inducible regulatory "off-on" genetic switch with an extensively dynamic action area. We find that Leu3p acts as an active transcriptional repressor in the absence and as an activator in the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate (alpha-IotaRhoMu in primary fibroblasts isolated from double transgenic mouse embryos bearing ubiquitously expressing Leu3p and a Leu3p regulated GFP reporter. In the absence of the branched amino acid biosynthetic pathway in animals, metabolically stable alpha-IPM presents an EC(50 equal to 0.8837 mM and fast "OFF-ON" kinetics (t(50ON = 43 min, t(50OFF = 2.18 h, it enters the cells via passive diffusion, while it is non-toxic to mammalian cells and to fertilized mouse eggs cultured ex vivo.Our results demonstrate that the 'Leu3p-alpha-IotaRhoMu' constitutes a simpler and safer system for inducible gene expression in biomedical applications.

  6. Comparison of thermohydraulic and nuclear aspects in a standard HEU core and a typical LEU core for the HFR Petten. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruimboom, H.; Tas, A.

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of the RERTR program various HEU-LEU core calculations have been performed by ANL in a cooperative effort with ECN and JRC Petten. The main purpose of this work has been to gain competence in analysing HEU-LEU core conversion for high power Materials Testing Reactors and to assist in a possible HEU-LEU conversion of the HFR Petten. For reference purposes the present HFR standard core (HEU) in the 'old' vessel geometry was calculated at first. As a next step the new vessel geometry and the increased fuel weights were taken into account. Subsequently various LEU HFR core options have been analysed. Main parameters in the LEU study were the uranium loading in the meat, the fuel type, the thickness of the meat, the number of fuel plates per element and the type of burnable poison applied. Though the study has not yet been completed, one of its striking preliminary results concerns the increased power peaking in the LEU fuel elements as compared with the HEU situation. A preliminary analysis of the thermal characteristics of a typical LEU core as compared with a standard HEU core has been made and is presented in the paper. A short survey of the various HEU and LEU calculations is given. The thermal safety analysis procedure for the HFR, as based on the flow instability criterion, is clarified. Finally, the thermal comparison HEU versus LEU and the resulting conclusions are presented. (author)

  7. Agonist properties of a stable hexapeptide analog of neurotensin, N alpha MeArg-Lys-Pro-Trp-tLeu-Leu (NT1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunne, H C; Demattos, S B; Whetzel, S Z; Wustrow, D J; Davis, D M; Wise, L D; Cody, W L; Pugsley, T A; Heffner, T G

    1995-04-18

    The major signal transduction pathway for neurotensin (NT) receptors is the G-protein-dependent stimulation of phospholipase C, leading to the mobilization of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and the stimulation of cyclic GMP. We investigated the functional actions of an analog of NT(8-13), N alpha MeArg-Lys-Pro-Trp-tLeu-Leu (NT1), and other NT related analogs by quantitative measurement of the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration in HT-29 (human colonic adenocarcinoma) cells using the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fura-2/AM and by effects on cyclic GMP levels in rat cerebellar slices. The NT receptor binding affinities for these analogs to HT-29 cell membranes and newborn (10-day-old) mouse brain membranes were also investigated. Data obtained from HT-29 cell and mouse brain membrane preparations showed saturable single high-affinity sites and binding densities (Bmax) of 130.2 and 87.5 fmol/mg protein, respectively. The respective KD values were 0.47 and 0.39 nM, and the Hill coefficients were 0.99 and 0.92. The low-affinity levocabastine-sensitive site was not present (K1 > 10,000) in either membrane preparation. Although the correlation of binding between HT-29 cell membranes and mouse brain membranes was quite significant (r = 0.92), some of the reference agents had lower binding affinities in the HT-29 cell membranes. The metabolically stable compound NT1 plus other NT analogs and related peptides [NT, NT(8-13), xenopsin, neuromedin N, NT(9-13), kinetensin and (D-Trp11)-NT] increased intracellular Ca2+ levels in HT-29 cells, indicating NT receptor agonist properties. The effect of NT1 in mobilizing [Ca2+]i blocked by SR 48692, a non-peptide NT antagonist. Receptor binding affinities of NT analogs to HT-29 cell membranes were positively correlated with potencies for mobilizing intracellular calcium in the same cells. In addition, NT1 increased cyclic GMP levels in rat cerebellar slices, confirming the latter findings of its NT agonist action. These results substantiate

  8. Reactivity management and burn-up management on JRR-3 silicide-fuel-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoaki; Araki, Masaaki; Izumo, Hironobu; Kinase, Masami; Torii, Yoshiya; Murayama, Yoji

    2007-08-01

    On the conversion from uranium-aluminum-dispersion-type fuel (aluminide fuel) to uranium-silicon-aluminum-dispersion-type fuel (silicide fuel), uranium density was increased from 2.2 to 4.8 g/cm 3 with keeping uranium-235 enrichment of 20%. So, burnable absorbers (cadmium wire) were introduced for decreasing excess reactivity caused by the increasing of uranium density. The burnable absorbers influence reactivity during reactor operation. So, the burning of the burnable absorbers was studied and the influence on reactor operation was made cleared. Furthermore, necessary excess reactivity on beginning of operation cycle and the time limit for restart after unplanned reactor shutdown was calculated. On the conversion, limit of fuel burn-up was increased from 50% to 60%. And the fuel exchange procedure was changed from the six-batch dispersion procedure to the fuel burn-up management procedure. The previous estimation of fuel burn-up was required for the planning of fuel exchange, so that the estimation was carried out by means of past operation data. Finally, a new fuel exchange procedure was proposed for effective use of fuel elements. On the procedure, burn-up of spent fuel was defined for each loading position. The average length of fuel's staying in the core can be increased by two percent on the procedure. (author)

  9. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between oxide and silicide nuclear fuels with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L. [Univ. of Wisconsi, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Given some transient power/cooling mismatch is a nuclear reactor and its inability to establish the necessary core cooling, energetic fuel-coolant interactions (FCI`s commonly called `vapor explosions`) could occur as a result of the core melting and coolant contact. Although a large number of studies have been done on energetic FCI`s, very few experiments have been performed with the actual fuel materials postulated to be produced in severe accidents. Because of the scarcity of well-characterized FCI data for uranium allows in noncommercial reactors (cermet and silicide fuels), we have conducted a series of experiments to provide a data base for the foregoing materials. An existing 1-D shock-tube facility was modified to handle depleted radioactive materials (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al). Our objectives have been to determine the effects of the initial fuel composition and temperature and the driving pressure (triggering) on the explosion work output, dynamic pressures, transient temperatures, and the hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate limited energetics, mainly thermal interactions, for these fuel materials as compared to aluminum where more chemical reactions occur between the molten aluminum and water.

  10. Oxidation behavior of niobium aluminide intermetallics protected by aluminide and silicide diffusion coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Soboyejo, W.; Rapp, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of a new class of damage-tolerant niobium aluminide (Nb 3 Al-xTi-yCr) intermetallics is studied between 650 C and 850 C. Protective diffusion coatings were deposited by pack cementation to achieve the siliciding or aluminizing of substrates with or without intervening Mo or Ni layers, respectively. The compositions and microstructures of the resulting coatings and oxidized surfaces were characterized. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics indicate that uncoated Nb-40Ti-15Al-based intermetallics may be used up to ∼750 C. Alloying with Cr improves the isothermal oxidation resistance between 650 C and 850 C. The most significant improvement in oxidation resistance is achieved by the aluminization of electroplated Ni interlayers. The results suggest that the high-temperature limit of niobium aluminide-based alloys may be increased to 800 C to 850 C by aluminide-based diffusion coatings on ductile Ni interlayers. Indentation fracture experiments also indicate that the ductile nickel interlayers are resistant to crack propagation in multilayered aluminide-based coatings

  11. The Comparison Of Silicon Analysis For The Uranium Silicide Fuel Using Spectrophotometrical And Gravimetrical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putro, P. K.; Suripto, A.; Putra, S.; Gunanjar

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of silicon content in the uranium silicide fuel spectro-photometrical and gravimetrical method have been performed. The nitrous oxide-acetylene was used in the atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) on the wave length of 251.6 nm, and the mixture of ammonium hepta molybdate complexes and SnC1 2 as reductor were applied during analysis by UV-VIS spectrophotometry (UV-VIS) on the wave length of 757.5 mm. The reagent of HCLO 4 and HNO 3 were used for determining Si content by gravimetrical methods. The results of this comparison is as follows: the accuracy result is around 96.37 % + 0.24 % for the Si concentration up to 300 ppm (the AAS), is 138.60 % = 0.43 % for the Si concentration range between 0.1-1.5 ppm (UV-VIS), and is 51.13 % + 0.8 % for 1 gram of Si (gravimetry). The results also show that the lowest analytical error is obtained by AAS method

  12. Silicide formation by Ar/sup +/ ion bombardment of Pd/Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R Y; Whang, C N; Kim, H K; Smith, R J

    1988-08-01

    Palladium films, 45 nm thick, evaporated on to Si(111) were irradiated to various doses with 78 keV Ar/sup +/ ions to promote silicide formation. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) shows that intermixing has occurred across the Pd/Si interface at room temperature. The mixing behaviour is increased with dose which coincides well with the theoretical model of cascade mixing. The absence of deep RBS tails for palladium and the small area of this for silicon spectra indicate that short-range mixing occurs. From the calculated damage profiles computed with TRIM code, the dominant diffusion species is found to be silicon atoms in the Pd/Si system. It is also found that the initial compound formed by Ar/sup +/ irradiation is Pd/sub 2/Si which increases with dose. At a dose of 1 x 10/sup 16/ Ar/sup +/ cm/sup -2/, a 48 nm thickness of Pd/sub 2/Si was formed by ion-beam mixing at room temperature.

  13. Analysis Of Temperature Effects On Reactivity Of The Rsg-Gas Core Using Silicide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surbakti, Tukiran; Pinem, Surian

    2001-01-01

    RSG-GAS has been operating using new silicide fuels so that it is necessary to estimate and to measure the effect of temperature on reactivity of the core. The parameters to be determined due to temperature effect are reactivity coefficient of moderator temperature, temperature coefficient of fuel element and power reactivity coefficient. By doing a couple compensation method, determination of reactivity coefficient as well as the reactivity coefficient of moderator temperature can be obtained. Furthermore, coefficient of the reactivity was successfully estimated using the combination of WIMS-D4 and Batan-2DIFF. The cell calculation was done by using WIMS-D4 code to get macroscopic cross section and Batan-2DIFF code is used for core calculation. The calculation and experimental results of reactivity coefficient do not show any deviation from RSG-GAS safety margin. The results are -2,84 sen/ o C, -1,29 sen/MW and -0,64 sen/ o C for reactivity coefficients of temperature, power, fuel element and moderator temperature, respectively. All of 3 parameters are absolutely met with safety criteria

  14. Prompt Neutron Decay Constant Determination Of Silicide Transition Core Using Noise Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jujuratisbela, Uju; Yulianto, Yusi Eko; Cahyana

    2001-01-01

    Chairman of BATAN had decided to replace the Oxide fuel element type of RSG-GAS into silicide element type step by step. The replacement will create core transitions. Kinetic characteristic of the transition cores have to be monitored in order to know the deviation of core behavior. For that reason, the kinetic parameters have to be measured. Prompt neutron decay constant (alpha) is one of the kinetic parameters that has to be monitored continuously in the transition cores. In order not to disturb the normal operation of reactor, alpha parameter should be measured by using noise analysis method. The voltage of neutron flux at power of 15 MW is connected to preamplifier and filter then to the Dynamic Signal Analyzer Version-2 and then the auto power spectral density (APSD) was determined by using Fast Fourier transform. From the APSD curve of each channel of JKT03, the cut off frequency of each channel can be determined by using linear regression technique such that the prompt neutron decay constant can be estimated

  15. Large-format platinum silicide microwave kinetic inductance detectors for optical to near-IR astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szypryt, P; Meeker, S R; Coiffard, G; Fruitwala, N; Bumble, B; Ulbricht, G; Walter, A B; Daal, M; Bockstiegel, C; Collura, G; Zobrist, N; Lipartito, I; Mazin, B A

    2017-10-16

    We have fabricated and characterized 10,000 and 20,440 pixel Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) arrays for the Dark-speckle Near-IR Energy-resolved Superconducting Spectrophotometer (DARKNESS) and the MKID Exoplanet Camera (MEC). These instruments are designed to sit behind adaptive optics systems with the goal of directly imaging exoplanets in a 800-1400 nm band. Previous large optical and near-IR MKID arrays were fabricated using substoichiometric titanium nitride (TiN) on a silicon substrate. These arrays, however, suffered from severe non-uniformities in the TiN critical temperature, causing resonances to shift away from their designed values and lowering usable detector yield. We have begun fabricating DARKNESS and MEC arrays using platinum silicide (PtSi) on sapphire instead of TiN. Not only do these arrays have much higher uniformity than the TiN arrays, resulting in higher pixel yields, they have demonstrated better spectral resolution than TiN MKIDs of similar design. PtSi MKIDs also do not display the hot pixel effects seen when illuminating TiN on silicon MKIDs with photons with wavelengths shorter than 1 µm.

  16. Characterization of titanium silicide thin films by X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis deals with characterization techniques of thin films by means of X-ray diffraction. This includes phase identification and residual stress, microstress and crystallite size calculations. The techniques developed were applied on the study of the titanium silicide formation obtained by means of Rapidy Thermal Processing (RTP) pf Ti films deposited on silicon substratum. The different phases were studied in relation with processing temperature and time in one and two anneling steps. The low resistivity TiSi 2 phase was observed for temperature of 700 0 C and higher. The experimental results indicate that the residual stress of TiSi 2 films doesn't vary significantly with the annealing conditions. On the other hand, the microstress is reduced with annealing time at 800 0 C, while the crystallite size is almost not affected. For the microstress and the crystallite size determination technique, two methods were implemented and compared. The Riella's method appeared to be very efficient, while the Gangulle's method seemed to be inadequate, because the results oscillate too much [pt

  17. Neutron irradiated uranium silicides studied by neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Mueller, M.H.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; Faber, J. Jr.

    1989-11-01

    Uranium silicides have been considered for use as reactor fuels in both high power and low enrichment applications. However, U 3 Si was found to become amorphous under irradiation and to become mechanically unstable to rapid growth by plastic flow. U 2 Si 2 appears to be stable against amorphization at low displacement rates, but the extent of this stability is uncertain. Although the mechanisms responsible for plastic flow in U 3 Si and other amorphous systems are unknown, as is the importance of crystal structure for amorphization, it may not be surprising that these materials amorphize, in light of the fact that many radioactive nuclide - containing minerals are known to metaminctize (lose crystallinity) under irradiation. The present experiment follows the detailed changes in the crystal structures of U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 introduced by neutron bombardment and subsequent uranium fission at room temperature. U-Si seems the ideal system for a neutron diffraction investigation since the crystallographic and amorphous forms can be studied simultaneously by combining conventional Rietveld refinement of the crystallographic phases with Fourier-filtering of the non-crystalline scattering component

  18. The tetrapeptide Arg-Leu-Tyr-Glu inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Yi-Yong; Lee, Dong-Keon; So, Ju-Hoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Choe, Jongseon; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong

    2015-01-01

    Kringle 5, derived from plasminogen, is highly capable of inhibiting angiogenesis. Here, we have designed and synthesized 10 tetrapeptides, based on the amino acid properties of the core tetrapeptide Lys-Leu-Tyr-Asp (KLYD) originating from anti-angiogenic kringle 5 of human plasminogen. Of these, Arg-Leu-Tyr-Glu (RLYE) effectively inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation, with an IC 50 of 0.06–0.08 nM, which was about ten-fold lower than that of the control peptide KLYD (0.79 nM), as well as suppressed developmental angiogenesis in a zebrafish model. Furthermore, this peptide effectively inhibited the cellular events that precede angiogenesis, such as ERK and eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide production, in endothelial cells stimulated with VEGF. Collectively, these data demonstrate that RLYE is a potent anti-angiogenic peptide that targets the VEGF signaling pathway. - Highlights: • The tetrapeptide RLYE inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro. • RLYE also suppressed neovascularization in a zebrafish model. • Its effect was correlated with inhibition of VEGF-induced ERK and eNOS activation. • RLYE may be used as a therapeutic drug for angiogenesis-related diseases

  19. DART-TM: A thermomechanical version of DART for LEU VHD dispersed and monolithic fuel analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba, Roberto; Taboada, Horacio; Moscarda, Ma.Virginia; Rest, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    A collaboration agreement between ANL/USDOE and CNEA Argentina, in the area of Low Enriched Uranium Advanced Fuels has been in place since October 16, 1997 under the 'Implementation Arrangement for Technical Exchange and Cooperation in the Area of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy'. An annex concerning DART code optimization has been operative since February 8, 1999. Previously, as a part of this annex a visual thermal FASTDART version was developed that includes mechanistic models for the calculation of the fission-gas-bubble and fuel particle size distribution, reaction layer thickness, and meat thermal conductivity. FASTDART was presented at the last RERTR Meeting that included validation against RERTR 3 irradiation data. The thermal FASTDART version was assessed as an adequate tool for modeling the behavior of LEU U-Mo dispersed fuels under irradiation against PIE RERTR irradiation data. During this past year the development of a 3-D thermo-mechanical version of the code for modeling the irradiation behavior of LEU U-Mo monolithic and dispersion fuel was initiated. Some preliminary results of this work will be shown during RERTR-2003 meeting. (author)

  20. Core instrumentation and pre-operational procedures for core conversion HEU to LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report is intended for the reactor operator, to be used as a manual or checklist for general guidance on pre-startup activities that need to be addressed in preparation for conversion to Low Enriched Fuel (LEU). All nuclear, thermodynamic and safety calculations should have been performed prior to this stage of the core conversion process. During these calculations and certainly before ordering the new LEU fuel elements the reactor operator needs to very carefully consider additional important factors concerning the new fuel: fuel reliability, reliability of fuel fabricator, reprocessing contract or fuel element storage and disposal, economics of the new fuel cycle. At this stage, too, a preoperational experimental programme has to be developed and presented to the regulatory authorities for approval. This experimental programme could lead to additional requirements on: in-core instrumentation, out-of-core instrumentation or additional experimental devices. Detailed instructions on specific tests and measurements are not provided in this report since much information on the subject is available in the open literature

  1. The progesterone receptor Val660→Leu polymorphism and breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, Immaculata; Hankinson, Susan E; Colditz, Graham A; Hunter, David J

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a role for progesterone in breast cancer development and tumorigenesis. Progesterone exerts its effect on target cells by interacting with its receptor; thus, genetic variations, which might cause alterations in the biological function in the progesterone receptor (PGR), can potentially contribute to an individual's susceptibility to breast cancer. It has been reported that the PROGINS allele, which is in complete linkage disequilibrium with a missense substitution in exon 4 (G/T, valine→leucine, at codon 660), is associated with a decreased risk for breast cancer. Using a nested case-control study design within the Nurses' Health Study cohort, we genotyped 1252 cases and 1660 matched controls with the use of the Taqman assay. We did not observe any association of breast cancer risk with carrying the G/T (Val660→Leu) polymorphism (odds ratio 1.10, 95% confidence interval 0.93–1.30). In addition, we did not observe an interaction between this allele and menopausal status and family history of breast cancer as reported previously. Overall, our study does not support an association between the Val660→Leu PROGINS polymorphism and breast cancer risk

  2. Association between ghrelin gene (Leu72Met) polymorphism and ghrelin serum level with coronary artery diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatizadeh-Omran, Akbar; Rafiei, Alireza; Khajavi, Rezvan; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza; Mokhberi, Vahid; Moradzadeh, Kambiz

    2014-02-01

    Research shows that ghrelin gene polymorphism has some association with coronary artery diseases (CAD). Due to genetic differences among nations and the high prevalence of CAD, we conducted this study to examine the possible association between the polymorphism of ghrelin gene Leu72Met and CAD among an Iranian population. This case-control study was undertaken with patients who were referred to referral heart center, in 2011, with chest pain or a positive exercise test. Patients with risk factors for heart disease or who were surgery candidates, who underwent angiography and echocardiography, were also included. DNA extractions were performed using a modified salting out method, and the ghrelin region was amplified using polymerase chain reaction. The presence of the Leu72Met polymorphism and the serum levels of ghrelin were determined using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The results indicated that in CAD patients, the incidence of heart failure was significantly different between the groups with genotypes CC or AA+CA (p=0.041). Mean serum level of ghrelin in the CAD group was significantly higher than that in the control group (pghrelin genotypes and serum levels of ghrelin in both the CAD and control groups (ppolymorphism, as well as an increase in serum levels of ghrelin associated with genotype distribution such that ghrelin levels have an inverse relationship with the frequency of the CC genotype.

  3. The tetrapeptide Arg-Leu-Tyr-Glu inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Yi-Yong; Lee, Dong-Keon [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); So, Ju-Hoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee [Department of Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Jeoung, Dooil [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansoo [Department of Life Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Jongseon [Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Won, Moo-Ho [Department of Neurobiology, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Kwon-Soo [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Guen [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Myeong, E-mail: ymkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Kringle 5, derived from plasminogen, is highly capable of inhibiting angiogenesis. Here, we have designed and synthesized 10 tetrapeptides, based on the amino acid properties of the core tetrapeptide Lys-Leu-Tyr-Asp (KLYD) originating from anti-angiogenic kringle 5 of human plasminogen. Of these, Arg-Leu-Tyr-Glu (RLYE) effectively inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and tube formation, with an IC{sub 50} of 0.06–0.08 nM, which was about ten-fold lower than that of the control peptide KLYD (0.79 nM), as well as suppressed developmental angiogenesis in a zebrafish model. Furthermore, this peptide effectively inhibited the cellular events that precede angiogenesis, such as ERK and eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide production, in endothelial cells stimulated with VEGF. Collectively, these data demonstrate that RLYE is a potent anti-angiogenic peptide that targets the VEGF signaling pathway. - Highlights: • The tetrapeptide RLYE inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro. • RLYE also suppressed neovascularization in a zebrafish model. • Its effect was correlated with inhibition of VEGF-induced ERK and eNOS activation. • RLYE may be used as a therapeutic drug for angiogenesis-related diseases.

  4. Antidepressant Specificity of Serotonin Transporter Suggested by Three LeuT-SSRI Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Zhen, J; Karpowich, N; Law, C; Reith, M; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine are selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that are widely prescribed to treat depression. They exert their effects by inhibiting the presynaptic plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT). All SSRIs possess halogen atoms at specific positions, which are key determinants for the drugs' specificity for SERT. For the SERT protein, however, the structural basis of its specificity for SSRIs is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial SERT homolog, in complex with sertraline, R-fluoxetine or S-fluoxetine. The SSRI halogens all bind to exactly the same pocket within LeuT. Mutation at this halogen-binding pocket (HBP) in SERT markedly reduces the transporter's affinity for SSRIs but not for tricyclic antidepressants. Conversely, when the only nonconserved HBP residue in both norepinephrine and dopamine transporters is mutated into that found in SERT, their affinities for all the three SSRIs increase uniformly. Thus, the specificity of SERT for SSRIs is dependent largely on interaction of the drug halogens with the protein's HBP.

  5. LEU-HTR critical experiment program for the PROTEUS facility in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogli, R.; Bucher, K.H.; Chawla, R.; Foskolos, K.; Luchsinger, H.; Mathews, D.; Sarlos, G.; Seiler, R.

    1990-01-01

    New critical experiments in the framework of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program on 'Validation of Safety Related Reactor Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTRs' are planned at the PSI PROTEUS facility. The experiments are designed to supplement the experimental data base and reduce the design and licensing uncertainties for small- and medium-sized helium-cooled reactors using low-enriched uranium (LEU) and graphite high temperature fuel. The main objectives of the new experiments are to provide first-of-a-kind high quality experimental data on: 1) The criticality of simple, easy to interpret, single core region LEU HTR systems for several moderator-to-fuel ratios and several lattice geometries; 2) the changes in reactivity, neutron balance components and control rod effectiveness caused by water ingress into this type of reactor, and 3) the effects of the boron and/or hafnium absorbers that are used to modify the reactivity and the power distributions in typical HTR systems. Work on the design and licensing of the modified PROTEUS critical facility is now in progress with the HTR experiments scheduled to begin early in 1991. Several international partners will be involved in the planning, execution and analysis of these experiments in order to insure that they are relevant and cost effective with respect to the various gas cooled reactor national programs. (author)

  6. Stimulation of Escherichia coli F-18Col- Type-1 fimbriae synthesis by leuX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Joseph V.; Burghoff, Robert L.; Pallesen, Lars

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli F-18, a normal human fecal isolate, is an excellent colonizer of the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine. E. coli F-18Col-, a derivative of E. coli F-18 which no longer makes the E. coli F-18 colicin, colonizes the large intestine as well as E. coli F-18 when fed to mice...... alone but is eliminated when fed together with E. coli F-18. Recently we randomly cloned E. coli F-18 DNA into E. coli F-18Col- and let the mouse intestine select the best colonizer. In this way, we isolated a 6.5-kb E. coli F-18 DNA sequence that simultaneously stimulated synthesis of type 1 fimbriae...... and enhanced E. coli F-18Col- colonizing ability. In the present investigation we show that the gene responsible for stimulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis appears to be leuX, which encodes a tRNA specific for the rare leucine codon UUG. Moreover, it appears that expression of leuX may be regulated by two...

  7. LEU-HTR critical experiment program for the PROTEUS facility in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogli, R; Bucher, K H; Chawla, R; Foskolos, K; Luchsinger, H; Mathews, D; Sarlos, G; Seiler, R [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Technology Wuerenlingen and Villigen, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    1990-07-01

    New critical experiments in the framework of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program on 'Validation of Safety Related Reactor Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTRs' are planned at the PSI PROTEUS facility. The experiments are designed to supplement the experimental data base and reduce the design and licensing uncertainties for small- and medium-sized helium-cooled reactors using low-enriched uranium (LEU) and graphite high temperature fuel. The main objectives of the new experiments are to provide first-of-a-kind high quality experimental data on: 1) The criticality of simple, easy to interpret, single core region LEU HTR systems for several moderator-to-fuel ratios and several lattice geometries; 2) the changes in reactivity, neutron balance components and control rod effectiveness caused by water ingress into this type of reactor, and 3) the effects of the boron and/or hafnium absorbers that are used to modify the reactivity and the power distributions in typical HTR systems. Work on the design and licensing of the modified PROTEUS critical facility is now in progress with the HTR experiments scheduled to begin early in 1991. Several international partners will be involved in the planning, execution and analysis of these experiments in order to insure that they are relevant and cost effective with respect to the various gas cooled reactor national programs. (author)

  8. Transition from HEU to LEU fuel in Romania's 14-MW TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The 14-MW TRIGA steady state reactor (SSR) located in Pitesti, Romania, first went critical in the fall of 1979. Initially, the core configuration for full power operation used 29 fuel clusters each containing a 5 x 5 square array of HEU U (10 wt% - ZrH - Er 2.8 wt%) fuel-moderator rods (1.295 cm o.d.) clad in Incoloy. With a total inventory of 35 HEU fuel clusters, burnup, considerations required a gradual expansion of the core from 29 to 32 and finally to 35 clusters before the reactor was shut down because of insufficient excess reactivity. At this time each of the original 29 fuel clusters had an average 235 U burnup in the range from 50 to 62%. Because of the U.S. policy regarding the export of highly enriched uranium, fresh HEU TRIGA replacement fuel is not available. After a number of safety-related measurements, the SSR is expected to resume full power operation in the near future using a mixed core containing five LEU TRIGA clusters of the same geometry as the original fuel but with fuel-moderator rods containing 45 wt% U (19.7% 235 U enrichment) and 1.1 wt% Er. Rods for 14 additional LEU fuel clusters will be fabricated by General Atomics. In support of the SSR mixed core operation numerous neutronic calculations have been performed. This paper presents some of the results of those calculations. (author)

  9. HEU and Leu FueL Shielding Comparative Study Applied for Spent Fuel Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.; Margeanu, S.; Barbos, D.

    2009-01-01

    INR Pitesti owns and operates a TRIGA dual-core Research Reactor for material testing, power reactor fuel and nuclear safety studies. The dual core concept involves the operation of a 14 MW TRIGA steady-state, high flux research and material testing reactor at one end of a large pool, and the independent operation of an annular-core pulsing reactor (TRIGA-ACPR) at the other end of the pool. The steady-state reactor is mostly used for long term testing of power reactor fuel components (pellets, pins, subassemblies and fuel assemblies) followed by post-irradiation examination. Following the general trend to replace the He fuel type (High Enriched Uranium) by Leu fuel type (Low Enriched Uranium), in the light of international agreements between IAEA and the states using He fuel in their nuclear reactors, Inr Past's have been accomplished the TRIGA research reactor core full conversion on May 2006. The He fuel repatriation in US in the frame of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Return Programme effectively started in 1999, the final stage being achieved in summer of 2008. Taking into account for the possible impact on the human and environment, in all activities associated to nuclear fuel cycle, the spent fuel or radioactive waste characteristics must be well known. Shielding calculations basic tasks consist in radiation doses calculation, in order to prevent any risks both for personnel protection and impact on the environment during the spent fuel manipulation, transport and storage. The paper is a comparative study of Leu and He fuel utilization effects for the shielding analysis during spent fuel transport. A comparison against the measured data for He spent fuel, available from the last stage of the spent fuel repatriation, is presented. All the geometrical and material data related on the spent fuel shipping cask were considered according to the Nac-Lt Cask approved model. The shielding analysis estimates radiation doses to shipping cask wall surface

  10. Key considerations in the conversion to LEU of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor: SAFARI-1 of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, W.E.; Vermaak, A.P.; Ball, G.

    2000-01-01

    Apart from the technological demands and considerations associated with the conversion of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor to LEU, a number of commercial challenges also need to be addressed. This is particularly the case when the reactor is primarily used as a source for the production, on an uninterrupted basis, of significant quantities of Mo-99 to satisfy long term commitments to a range of global customers. This paper highlights key business considerations which are applicable in the conversion process of firstly, reactor fuel to LEU and secondly target plates for Mo-99, also to LEU, using the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa as a typical example of such a commercially utilized reactor. (author)

  11. Key considerations in the conversion to LEU of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor: SAFARI-1 of South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, W E; Vermaak, A P; Ball, G [NECSA, PO Box 582, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2000-10-01

    Apart from the technological demands and considerations associated with the conversion of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor to LEU, a number of commercial challenges also need to be addressed. This is particularly the case when the reactor is primarily used as a source for the production, on an uninterrupted basis, of significant quantities of Mo-99 to satisfy long term commitments to a range of global customers. This paper highlights key business considerations which are applicable in the conversion process of firstly, reactor fuel to LEU and secondly target plates for Mo-99, also to LEU, using the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa as a typical example of such a commercially utilized reactor. (author)

  12. Fuel cycle flexibility in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) with the use of Th-LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, A.; Singh, B.; Pushpam, N.P.; Bharti, V.; Kannan, U.; Krishnani, P.D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is being designed for large scale commercial utilization of thorium (Th) and integrated technological demonstration of the thorium cycle in India. The AHWR is a 920 MW(th), vertical pressure tube type cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water. Heat removal through natural circulation and on-line fuelling are some of the salient features of AHWR design. The physics design of AHWR offers considerable flexibility to accommodate different kinds of fuel cycles. Our recent efforts have been directed towards a case study for the use of Th-LEU fuel cycle in a once-through mode. The discharged Uranium from Th-LEU cycle has proliferation resistant characteristics. This paper gives the initial core, fuel cycle characteristics and online refueling strategy of Th-LEU fuel in AHWR. (author)

  13. A Conserved Leucine Occupies the Empty Substrate Site of LeuT in the Na+-free Return State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinauskaite, Lina; Said, Saida; Sahin, Caglanur

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial members of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family perform Na+-dependent amino-acid uptake and extrude H+ in return. Previous NSS structures represent intermediates of Na+/substrate binding or intracellular release, but not the inward-to-outward return transition. Here we...... report crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus LeuT in an outward-oriented, Na+- and substrate-free state likely to be H+-occluded. We find a remarkable rotation of the conserved Leu25 into the empty substrate-binding pocket and rearrangements of the empty Na+ sites. Mutational studies of the equivalent...

  14. On the interdiffusion in multilayered silicide coatings for the vanadium-based alloy V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaia, N., E-mail: nabil.chaia@usp.br [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, Universidade de São Paulo, Pólo Urbo-Industrial Gleba AI-6, 12602-810 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Portebois, L., E-mail: leo.portebois@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, Cedex (France); Mathieu, S., E-mail: stephane.mathieu@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, Cedex (France); David, N., E-mail: nicolas.david@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, Cedex (France); Vilasi, M., E-mail: michel.vilasi@univ-lorraine.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, UMR7198, Boulevard des Aiguillettes, BP70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, Cedex (France)

    2017-02-15

    To provide protection against corrosion at high temperatures, silicide diffusion coatings were developed for the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, which can be used as the fuel cladding in next-generation sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. The multilayered coatings were prepared by halide-activated pack cementation using MgF{sub 2} as the transport agent and pure silicon (high activity) as the master alloy. Coated pure vanadium and coated V-4Cr-4Ti alloy were studied and compared as substrates. In both cases, the growth of the silicide layers (V{sub 3}Si, V{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, V{sub 6}Si{sub 5} and VSi{sub 2}) was controlled exclusively by solid-state diffusion, and the growth kinetics followed a parabolic law. Wagner's analysis was adopted to calculate the integrated diffusion coefficients for all silicides. The estimated values of the integrated diffusion coefficients range from approximately 10{sup −9} to 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}. Then, a diffusion-based numerical approach was used to evaluate the growth and consumption of the layers when the coated substrates were exposed at critical temperatures. The estimated lifetimes of the upper VSi{sub 2} layer were 400 h and 280 h for pure vanadium and the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, respectively. The result from the numeric simulation was in good agreement with the layer thicknesses measured after aging the coated samples at 1150 °C under vacuum. - Highlights: • The pack cementation technique is implemented to study interdiffusion in V/Si and V-4Cr-4Ti/Si couples. • Interdiffusion coefficients of vanadium silicides were experimentally determined within the range 1100–1250 °C. • For either V/Si or V-4Cr-4Ti/Si couples, the VSi{sub 2} layer has the highest growth rate. • The Cr and Ti alloying elements mainly modified the V{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and V{sub 6}Si{sub 5} growth rate. • Numerical simulation allows for a confident assessment of the VSi{sub 2} coating lifetime on V-4Cr-4Ti.

  15. TRIGA Research Reactor Conversion to LEU and Modernization of Safety Related Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanda, R. M. [Institute for Nuclear Research Piteşti (SCN-Piteşti), Piteşti (Romania)

    2014-08-15

    The USA and IAEA proposed an international programme to reduce the enrichment of uranium in research reactors by converting nuclear fuel containing HEU into fuel containing 20% enriched uranium. The Government of Romania joined the programme and actively supported political, scientific, technical and economic actions that led to the conversion of the active area of the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at the Institute for Nuclear Research in Piteşti in May 2006. This confirmed the continuity of the Romanian Government’s non-proliferation policy and their active support of international cooperation. Conversion of the Piteşti research reactor was made possible by completion of milestones in the Research Agreement for Reactor Conversion, a contract signed with the US Department of Energy and Argonne National Laboratory. This agreement provided scientific and technical support and the possibility of delivery of all HEU TRIGA fuel to the United States. Additionally, about 65% of the fresh LEU fuel needed to start the conversion was delivered in the period 1992–1994. Furthermore, conversion was promoted through IAEA Technical Cooperation project ROM/4/024 project funded primarily by the United States that supported technical and scientific efforts and the delivery of the remaining required LEU nuclear fuel to complete the conversion. Nuclear fuel to complete the conversion was made by the French company CERCA with a tripartite contract among the IAEA, CERCA and Romania. The contract was funded by the US Department of Energy with a voluntary contribution by the Romanian Government. The contract stipulated manufacturing and delivery of LEU fuel by CERCA with compliance measures for quality, delivery schedule and safety requirements set by IAEA standards and Romanian legislation. The project was supported by the ongoing technical cooperation, safeguards, legal and procurement assistance of the IAEA, in particular its Department of Nuclear Safety. For Romanian research, the

  16. Integrin beta3 Leu33Pro polymorphism and risk of hip fracture: 25 years follow-up of 9233 adults from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofteng, Charlotte L; Bach-Mortensen, Pernille; Bojesen, Stig E

    2007-01-01

    for the integrin beta3 Leu33Pro polymorphism have a two-fold risk of hip fracture, mainly confined to postmenopausal women. Integrin beta3 Leu33Pro homozygosity could prove a useful marker for risk of future hip fracture and may contribute to pharmacogenetic variation in effects of integrin alphavbeta3 antagonists....

  17. Loading rate and test temperature effects on fracture of in situ niobium silicide-niobium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, J.D.; Lewandowski, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Arc cast, extruded, and heat-treated in situ composites of niobium silicide (Nb 5 Si 3 ) intermetallic with niobium phases (primary--Nb p and secondary--Nb s ) exhibited high fracture resistance in comparison to monolithic Nb 5 Si 3 . In toughness tests conducted at 298 K and slow applied loading rates, the fracture process proceeded by the microcracking of the Nb 5 Si 3 and plastic deformation of the Nb p and Nb s phases, producing resistance-curve behavior and toughnesses of 28 MPa√m with damage zone lengths less than 500 microm. The effects of changes in the Nb p yield strength and fracture behavior on the measured toughnesses were investigated by varying the loading rates during fracture tests at both 77 and 298 K. Quantitative fractography was utilized to completely characterize each fracture surface created at 298 K in order to determine the type of fracture mode (i.e., dimpled, cleavage) exhibited by the Nb p . Specimens tested at either higher loading rates or lower test temperatures consistently exhibited a greater amount of cleavage fracture in the Nb p , while the Nb s always remained ductile. However, the fracture toughness values determined from experiments spanning six orders of magnitude in loading rate at 298 and 77 K exhibited little variation, even under conditions when the majority of Nb p phases failed by cleavage at 77 K. The changes in fracture mode with increasing loading rate and/or decreasing test temperature and their effects on fracture toughness are rationalized by comparison to existing theoretical models

  18. Effects of ball milling on microstructures and thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xi; Shi, Li; Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The already low κ L of HMS can be suppressed further by decreasing the grain size. • The ball milling process can lead to the formation of secondary MnSi and W/C-rich phases. • The formation of the MnSi ad W/C rich phases is found to suppress the thermoelectric power factor. - Abstract: Bulk nanostructured higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples with different grain size are prepared by melting, subsequent ball milling (BM), and followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of BM time on the microstructures and thermoelectric properties of these samples are investigated. It is found that BM effectively reduces the grain size to about 90 nm in the sample after SPS, which leads to a decrease in both the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. By prolonging the BM time, MnSi and tungsten/carbon-rich impurity phases are formed due to the impact-induced decomposition of HMS and contamination from the tungsten carbide jar and balls during the BM, respectively. These impurities result in a reduced Seebeck coefficient and increased thermal conductivity above room temperature. The measured size-dependent lattice thermal conductivities agree qualitatively with the reported calculation results based on a combined phonon and diffuson model. The size effects are found to be increasingly significant as temperature decreases. Because of the formation of the impurity phases and a relatively large grain size, the ZT values are not improved in the ball-milled HMS samples. These findings suggest the need of alternative approaches for the synthesis of pure HMS with further reduced grain size and controlled impurity doping in order to enhance the thermoelectric figure-of-merit of HMS via nanostructuring

  19. Development of silicide coating over molybdenum based refractory alloy and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.P.; Banerjee, S.; Sharma, I.G.; Suri, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Molybdenum based refractory alloys are potential candidate materials for structural applications in high temperature compact nuclear reactors and fusion reactors. However, these alloys being highly susceptible to oxidation in air or oxygen at elevated temperature, undergoes severe losses from highly volatile molybdenum trioxide species. Present investigation, therefore, examines the feasibility of development of silicide type of coating over molybdenum base TZM alloy shape (Mo > 99 wt.%) using pack cementation coating technique. TZM alloy was synthesized in this laboratory from oxide intermediates of MoO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 in presence of requisite amount of carbon, by alumino-thermic reduction smelting technique. The arc melted and homogenized samples of TZM alloy substrate was then embedded in the chosen and intimately mixed pack composition consisting of inert matrix (Al 2 O 3 ), coating powder (Si) and activator (NH 4 Cl) taken in the judicious proportion. The sealed charge packs contained in an alumina crucible were heated at temperatures of 1000 o C for 8-16 h heating cycle to develop the coating. The coating phase was confirmed to be of made of MoSi 2 by XRD analysis. The morphology of the coating was studied by SEM characterization. It had revealed that the coating was diffusion bonded where Si from coating diffused inward and Mo from TZM substrate diffused outward to form the coating. The coating was found to be resistant to oxidation when tested in air up to 1200 o C. A maximum 100 μm of coating thickness was achieved on each side of the substrate.

  20. Fuel loading and homogeneity analysis of HFIR design fuel plates loaded with uranium silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, P.E.

    1995-08-01

    Twelve nuclear reactor fuel plates were analyzed for fuel loading and fuel loading homogeneity by measuring the attenuation of a collimated X-ray beam as it passed through the plates. The plates were identical to those used by the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) but were loaded with uranium silicide rather than with HFIR's uranium oxide fuel. Systematic deviations from nominal fuel loading were observed as higher loading near the center of the plates and underloading near the radial edges. These deviations were within those allowed by HFIR specifications. The report begins with a brief background on the thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor that motivated a statistical description of fuel loading and homogeneity. The body of the report addresses the homogeneity measurement techniques employed, the numerical correction required to account for a difference in fuel types, and the statistical analysis of the resulting data. This statistical analysis pertains to local variation in fuel loading, as well as to ''hot segment'' analysis of narrow axial regions along the plate and ''hot streak'' analysis, the cumulative effect of hot segment loading variation. The data for all twelve plates were compiled and divided into 20 regions for analysis, with each region represented by a mean and a standard deviation to report percent deviation from nominal fuel loading. The central regions of the plates showed mean values of about +3% deviation, while the edge regions showed mean values of about -7% deviation. The data within these regions roughly approximated random samplings from normal distributions, although the chi-square (χ 2 ) test for goodness of fit to normal distributions was not satisfied

  1. Electronic structure and bonding in the ternary silicide YNiSi3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Gi Hong; Kang, Dae Bok

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the electronic structure and bonding in the ternary silicide YNiSi 3 is made, using extended Hueckel tight-binding calculations. The YNiSi 3 structure consists of Ni-capped Si 2 dimer layers and Si zigzag chains. Significant bonding interactions are present between the silicon atoms in the structure. The oxidation state formalism of (Y 3+ )(Ni 0 )(Si 3 ) 3- for YNiSi 3 constitutes a good starting point to describe its electronic structure. Si atoms receive electrons form the most electropositive Y in YNiSi 3 , and Ni 3d and Si 3p states dominate below the Fermi level. There is an interesting electron balance between the two Si and Ni sublattices. Since the π orbitals in the Si chain and the Ni d and s block levels are almost completely occupied, the charge balance for YNiSi 3 can be rewritten as (Y 3+ )(Ni 2- )(Si 2- )(Si-Si) + , making the Si 2 layers oxidized. These results suggest that the Si zigzag chain contains single bonds and the Si 2 double layer possesses single bonds within a dimer with a partial double bond character. Stronger Si-Si and Ni-Si bonding interactions are important for giving stability to the structure, while essentially no metal-metal bonding exists at all. The 2D metallic behavior of this compound is due to the Si-Si interaction leading to dispersion of the several Si 2 π bands crossing the Fermi level in the plane perpendicular to the crystallographic b axis

  2. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulation of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Gamble, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation; Mei, Zhi-Gang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-08-29

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well understood. In this report, rate theory model was developed based on existing experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations so as to predict the fission gas behavior in U3Si2 at LWR conditions. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 can be divided into three temperature regimes. During steady-state operation, the majority of the fission gas stays in intragranular bubbles, whereas the dominance of intergranular bubbles and fission gas release only occurs beyond 1000 K. The steady-state rate theory model was also used as reference to establish a gaseous swelling correlation of U3Si2 for the BISON code. Meanwhile, the overpressurized bubble model was also developed so that the fission gas behavior at LOCA can be simulated. LOCA simulation showed that intragranular bubbles are still dominant after a 70 second LOCA, resulting in a controllable gaseous swelling. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is benign according to the rate theory prediction at both steady-state and LOCA conditions, which provides important references to the qualification of U3Si2 as a LWR fuel material with excellent fuel performance and enhanced accident tolerance.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of β-phase iron silicide nano-particles by chemical reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Gogurla, Narendar; Banerji, Pallab; Guha, Prasanta K.; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • β-FeSi 2 nano-particle was synthesized by reducing with Mg and by diluting with MgO. • XRD profile shows the iron di-silicide phase to be semiconducting β-FeSi 2 . • HRTEM and FESEM images indicate the β-FeSi 2 average particle size to be 60–70 nm. • Absorption, reflectance and PL spectroscopy show band gap to be direct 0.87 eV. • Nano-β-FeSi 2 is p-type with hole density of 4.38 × 10 18 cm −3 and mobility 8.9 cm 2 /V s. - Abstract: Nano-particles of β-FeSi 2 have been synthesized by chemical reduction of a glassy phase of [Fe 2 O 3 , 4SiO 2 ] by Mg-metal where MgO is used as diluent to prevent the agglomeration of nano crystallites into micro-particles and also act as a negative catalyst for the formation of other phases. The sample is characterized by XRD, FESEM, HRTEM, EDX, ultra-violet-visible-infrared and PL spectroscopy and electronic properties have been investigated by Hall measurement. XRD profile shows that the synthesized powder consists of purely β-FeSi 2 semiconducting phase. The average crystallite size of β-FeSi 2 is determined to be around 65.4 nm from XRD peaks as well as from FESEM also. The optical absorption and PL spectroscopy shows that synthesized β-FeSi 2 phase is a direct band gap semiconductor with a value of 0.87 eV. Hall measurements show that β-FeSi 2 nano-particles is p-type with hole concentration of 4.38 × 10 18 cm −3 and average hole mobility of 8.9 cm 2 /V s at 300 K

  4. Effects of ball milling on microstructures and thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Shi, Li, E-mail: lishi@mail.utexas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Highlights: • The already low κ{sub L} of HMS can be suppressed further by decreasing the grain size. • The ball milling process can lead to the formation of secondary MnSi and W/C-rich phases. • The formation of the MnSi ad W/C rich phases is found to suppress the thermoelectric power factor. - Abstract: Bulk nanostructured higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples with different grain size are prepared by melting, subsequent ball milling (BM), and followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of BM time on the microstructures and thermoelectric properties of these samples are investigated. It is found that BM effectively reduces the grain size to about 90 nm in the sample after SPS, which leads to a decrease in both the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. By prolonging the BM time, MnSi and tungsten/carbon-rich impurity phases are formed due to the impact-induced decomposition of HMS and contamination from the tungsten carbide jar and balls during the BM, respectively. These impurities result in a reduced Seebeck coefficient and increased thermal conductivity above room temperature. The measured size-dependent lattice thermal conductivities agree qualitatively with the reported calculation results based on a combined phonon and diffuson model. The size effects are found to be increasingly significant as temperature decreases. Because of the formation of the impurity phases and a relatively large grain size, the ZT values are not improved in the ball-milled HMS samples. These findings suggest the need of alternative approaches for the synthesis of pure HMS with further reduced grain size and controlled impurity doping in order to enhance the thermoelectric figure-of-merit of HMS via nanostructuring.

  5. Significant enhancement in thermoelectric performance of nanostructured higher manganese silicides synthesized employing a melt spinning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthiah, Saravanan; Singh, R C; Pathak, B D; Avasthi, Piyush Kumar; Kumar, Rishikesh; Kumar, Anil; Srivastava, A K; Dhar, Ajay

    2018-01-25

    The limited thermoelectric performance of p-type Higher Manganese Silicides (HMS) in terms of their low figure-of-merit (ZT), which is far below unity, is the main bottle-neck for realising an efficient HMS based thermoelectric generator, which has been recognized as the most promising material for harnessing waste-heat in the mid-temperature range, owing to its thermal stability, earth-abundant and environmentally friendly nature of its constituent elements. We report a significant enhancement in the thermoelectric performance of nanostructured HMS synthesized using rapid solidification by optimizing the cooling rates during melt-spinning followed by spark plasma sintering of the resulting melt-spun ribbons. By employing this experimental strategy, an unprecedented ZT ∼ 0.82 at 800 K was realized in spark plasma sintered 5 at% Al-doped MnSi 1.73 HMS, melt spun at an optimized high cooling rate of ∼2 × 10 7 K s -1 . This enhancement in ZT represents a ∼25% increase over the best reported values thus far for HMS and primarily originates from a nano-crystalline microstructure consisting of a HMS matrix (20-40 nm) with excess Si (3-9 nm) uniformly distributed in it. This nanostructure, resulting from the high cooling rates employed during the melt-spinning of HMS, introduces a high density of nano-crystallite boundaries in a wide spectrum of nano-scale dimensions, which scatter the low-to-mid-wavelength heat-carrying phonons. This abundant phonon scattering results in a significantly reduced thermal conductivity of ∼1.5 W m -1 K -1 at 800 K, which primarily contributes to the enhancement in ZT.

  6. Evaluation of steam corrosion and water quenching behavior of zirconium-silicide coated LWR fuel claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Hwasung; Lockhart, Cody; Mariani, Robert; Xu, Peng; Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates steam corrosion of bulk ZrSi2, pure Si, and zirconium-silicide coatings as well as water quenching behavior of ZrSi2 coatings to evaluate its feasibility as a potential accident-tolerant fuel cladding coating material in light water nuclear reactor. The ZrSi2 coating and Zr2Si-ZrSi2 coating were deposited on Zircaloy-4 flats, SiC flats, and cylindrical Zircaloy-4 rodlets using magnetron sputter deposition. Bulk ZrSi2 and pure Si samples showed weight loss after the corrosion test in pure steam at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 72 h. Silicon depletion on the ZrSi2 surface during the steam test was related to the surface recession observed in the silicon samples. ZrSi2 coating (∼3.9 μm) pre-oxidized in 700 °C air prevented substrate oxidation but thin porous ZrO2 formed on the coating. The only condition which achieved complete silicon immobilization in the oxide scale in aqueous environments was the formation of ZrSiO4 via ZrSi2 coating oxidation in 1400 °C air. In addition, ZrSi2 coatings were beneficial in enhancing quenching heat transfer - the minimum film boiling temperature increased by 6-8% in the three different environmental conditions tested. During repeated thermal cycles (water quenching from 700 °C to 85 °C for 20 s) performed as a part of quench tests, no spallation and cracking was observed and the coating prevented oxidation of the underlying Zircaloy-4 substrate.

  7. IRT‑Sofia, HEU to LEU conversion: regulatory approval tasks solution overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitev, Mladen; Belousov, Sergey; Dimitrov, Dobromir

    2014-01-01

    The HEU to LEU conversion of the IRT–Sofia research reactor of the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was jointly studied with the Argonne National Laboratory as a part of the RERTR Programme. The main purpose of the collaboration consisted in accomplishment of safety analyses and preparation of documents used for regulatory approval tasks solution. The main steps and results which are fundamental for the preparation of IRT–Sofia Safety Analyses Report including Operating Limits and Conditions are presented in this paper. The documents prepared by INRNE in accordance with the European nuclear safety requirements and IAEA recommendations were submitted for approval to the Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency at the end of 2010. Key words: research reactor, safety analyses report, Nuclear Regulatory Agency

  8. Analysis of the loss of coolant accident for LEU cores of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Bokhari, I.H.; Raza, S.H.

    1993-12-01

    Response of LEU cores for PARR-1 to a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) has been studied. It has been assumed that pool water drains out to double ended rupture of primary coolant pipe or complete shearing of an experimental beam tube. Results show that for an operating power level of 10 MW, both the first high power and equilibrium cores would enter into melting conditions if the pool drain time is less than 22 h and 11 h respectively. However, an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) capable of spraying the core at flow rate of 8.3 m/sup 3/h, for the above mentioned duration, would keep the peak core temperature much below the critical value. Maximum operating power levels below which melting would not occur have been assessed to 3.4 MW and 4.8 MW, respectively, for the first high power and equilibrium cores. (author) 5 figs

  9. Analysis of the critical and first full power operating cores for PARR using leu oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, L.A.; Qazi, M.K.; Bokhari, I.H.; Fazal, R.

    1989-10-01

    This paper explains the analysis for determining the first full power operating core for PARR using LEU oxide fuel. The core configuration selected for this first full power operation contains about 6.13 kg of U-235 distributed in 19 standard and five control fuel elements. The neutron flux level is doubled when core is shifted from 5MW to 10 MW. Total nuclear power peaking factor of the core is 2.03. The analysis shows that the core can be operated safely at 5 MW with a flow rate of 520 meter cube per hour and at 10 MW with a flow rate of 900 meter cube per hour. (A.B.). 10 figs

  10. RHF RELAP5 model and preliminary loss-of-offsite-power simulation results for LEU conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Dionne, B. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div.; Thomas, F. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (Switzerland). RHF Reactor Dept.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the RELAP5 model for the Institut Laue-Langevin High Flux Reactor (RHF) located in Grenoble, France, and provide an update to the key information required to complete, for example, simulations for a loss of offsite power (LOOP) accident. A previous status report identified a list of 22 items to be resolved in order to complete the RELAP5 model. Most of these items have been resolved by ANL and the RHF team. Enough information was available to perform preliminary safety analyses and define the key items that are still required. Section 2 of this document describes the RELAP5 model of RHF. The final part of this section briefly summarizes previous model issues and resolutions. Section 3 of this document describes preliminary LOOP simulations for both HEU and LEU fuel at beginning of cycle conditions.

  11. Core physics analysis in support of the FNR HEU-LEU demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losey, David C.; Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.; Lee, John C.

    1983-01-01

    A core neutronics analysis has been undertaken to assess the impact of low-enrichment fuel on the performance and utilization of the FNR As part of this analytic effort a computer code system has been assembled which will be of general use in analyzing research reactors with MTR-type fuel. The code system has been extensively tested and verified in calculations for the present high enrichment core. The analysis presented here compares the high-and-low enrichment fuels in batch and equilibrium core configurations which model the actual FNR operating conditions. The two fuels are compared for cycle length, fuel burnup, and flux and power distributions, as well as for the reactivity effects which are important in assessing the impact of LEU fuel on reactor shutdown margin. (author)

  12. Core physics analysis in support of the FNR HEU-LEU demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losey, David C; Brown, Forrest B; Martin, William R; Lee, John C [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan (United States)

    1983-08-01

    A core neutronics analysis has been undertaken to assess the impact of low-enrichment fuel on the performance and utilization of the FNR As part of this analytic effort a computer code system has been assembled which will be of general use in analyzing research reactors with MTR-type fuel. The code system has been extensively tested and verified in calculations for the present high enrichment core. The analysis presented here compares the high-and-low enrichment fuels in batch and equilibrium core configurations which model the actual FNR operating conditions. The two fuels are compared for cycle length, fuel burnup, and flux and power distributions, as well as for the reactivity effects which are important in assessing the impact of LEU fuel on reactor shutdown margin. (author)

  13. Manufacturing and investigation of U-Mo LEU fuel granules by hydride-dehydride processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetskiy, Y.A.; Trifonov, Y.I.; Mitrofanov, A.V.; Samarin, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    Investigations of hydride-dehydride processing for comminution of U-Mo alloys with Mo content in the range 1.9/9.2% have been performed. Some regularities of the process as a function of Mo content have been determined as well as some parameters elaborated. Hydride-dehydride processing has been shown to provide necessary phase and chemical compositions of U-Mo fuel granules to be used in disperse fuel elements for research reactors. Pin type disperse mini-fuel elements for irradiation tests in the loop of 'MIR' reactor (Dmitrovgrad) have been fabricated using U-Mo LEU fuel granules obtained by hydride-dehydride processing. Irradiation tests of these mini-fuel elements loaded to 4 g U tot /cm 3 are planned to start by the end of this year. (author)

  14. A neutronics feasibility study for the LEU conversion of Poland's Maria research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    The MARIA reactor is a high-flux multipurpose research reactor which is water-cooled and moderated with both beryllium and water. Standard HEU (80% 235 U)fuel assemblies consist of six concentric fuel tubes of a U-Al alloy clad in aluminum. Although the inventory of HEU (80%) fuel is nearly exhausted, a supply of highly-loaded 36%-enriched fuel assemblies is available at the reactor site. Neutronic equilibrium studies have been made to determine the relative performance of fuels with enrichments of 80%, 36% and 19.7%. These studies indicate that LEU (19.7%) densities of about 2.5 gU/cm 3 and 3.8 gU/cm 3 are required to match the performance of the MARIA reactor with 80%-enriched and with 36%-enriched fuels, respectively

  15. LEU fuel fabrication program for the RECH-1 reactor. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, J.C.; Barrera, M.; Jimenez, O.; Lisboa, J.; Marin, J.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995 a 50 LEU U 3 Si 2 fuel elements fabrication program for the RECH-1 research reactor was established at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CCHEN. After a fabrication process qualification stage, in 1998, four elements were early delivered to the reactor in order to start an irradiation qualification stage. The irradiation has reached an estimated 10% burn-up and no fabrication problems have been detected up to this burn-up level. During 1999 and up to the first quarter of 2000, 19 fuel elements were produced and 7 fuel elements are expected for the end of 2000. This report presents an updated summary of the main results obtained in this fuel fabrication program. A summary of other activities generated by this program, such as in core follow-up of the four leader fuel elements, ISO 9001 implementation for the fabrication process and a fabrication and qualification optimization planning, is also presented here. (author)

  16. US Progress on Property Characterization to Support LEU U-10 Mo Monolithic Fuel Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Laboratory; Rabin, Barry H [Idaho National Laboratory; Smith, James Arthur [Idaho National Laboratory; Scott, Clark Landon [Idaho National Laboratory; Benefiel, Bradley Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Larsen, Eric David [Idaho National Laboratory; Lind, Robert Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Sell, David Alan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    The US High Performance Research Reactor program is pursuing development and qualification of a new high density monolithic LEU fuel to facilitate conversion of five higher power research reactors located in the US (ATR, HFIR, NBSR, MIT and MURR). In order to support fabrication development and fuel performance evaluations, new testing capabilities are being developed to evaluate the properties of fuel specimens. Residual stress and fuel-cladding bond strength are two characteristics related to fuel performance that are being investigated. In this overview, new measurement capabilities being developed to assess these characteristics in both fresh and irradiated fuel are described. Progress on fresh fuel testing is summarized and on-going hot-cell implementation efforts to support future PIE campaigns are detailed. It is anticipated that benchmarking of as-fabricated fuel characteristics will be critical to establishing technical bases for specifications that optimize fuel fabrication and ensure acceptable in-reactor fuel performance.

  17. Supplemental Thermal-Hydraulic Transient Analyses of BR2 in Support of Conversion to LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The RELAP5/Mod 3.3 code has been used to perform transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. A RELAP5 model of BR2 has been validated against select transient BR2 reactor experiments performed in 1963 by showing agreement with measured cladding temperatures. Following the validation, the RELAP5 model was then updated to represent the current use of the reactor; taking into account core configuration, neutronic parameters, trip settings, component changes, etc. Simulations of the 1963 experiments were repeated with this updated model to re-evaluate the boiling risks associated with the currently allowed maximum heat flux limit of 470 W/cm2 and temporary heat flux limit of 600 W/cm2. This document provides analysis of additional transient simulations that are required as part of a modern BR2 safety analysis report (SAR). The additional simulations included in this report are effect of pool temperature, reduced steady-state flow rate, in-pool loss of coolant accidents, and loss of external cooling. The simulations described in this document have been performed for both an HEU- and LEU-fueled core.

  18. Criticality Calculations of Fresh LEU and MOX Assemblies for Transport and Storage at the Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goluoglu, S.

    2001-01-11

    Transportation of low-enriched uranium (LEU) and mixed-oxide (MOX) assemblies to and within the VVER-1000-type Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant is investigated. Effective multiplication factors for fresh fuel assemblies on the railroad platform, fresh fuel assemblies in the fuel transportation vehicle, and fresh fuel assemblies in the spent fuel storage pool are calculated. If there is no absorber between the units, the configurations with all MOX assemblies result in higher effective multiplication factors than the configurations with all LEU assemblies when the system is dry. When the system is flooded, the configurations with all LEU assemblies result in higher effective multiplication factors. For normal operating conditions, effective multiplication factors for all configurations are below the presumed upper subcritical limit of 0.95. For an accident condition of a fully loaded fuel transportation vehicle that is flooded with low-density water (possibly from a fire suppression system), the presumed upper subcritical limit is exceeded by configurations containing LEU assemblies.

  19. Structures of LeuT in bicelles define conformation and substrate binding in a membrane-like context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Elferich, Johannes; Gouaux, Eric (Oregon HSU)

    2012-02-13

    Neurotransmitter sodium symporters (NSSs) catalyze the uptake of neurotransmitters into cells, terminating neurotransmission at chemical synapses. Consistent with the role of NSSs in the central nervous system, they are implicated in multiple diseases and disorders. LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, is a prokaryotic ortholog of the NSS family and has contributed to our understanding of the structure, mechanism and pharmacology of NSSs. At present, however, the functional state of LeuT in crystals grown in the presence of n-octyl-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside ({beta}-OG) and the number of substrate binding sites are controversial issues. Here we present crystal structures of LeuT grown in DMPC-CHAPSO bicelles and demonstrate that the conformations of LeuT-substrate complexes in lipid bicelles and in {beta}-OG detergent micelles are nearly identical. Furthermore, using crystals grown in bicelles and the substrate leucine or the substrate analog selenomethionine, we find only a single substrate molecule in the primary binding site.

  20. Direct assessment of substrate binding to the Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporter LeuT by solid state NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Simon; Gotfryd, Kamil; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann

    2017-01-01

    The Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSSs) represent an important class of proteins mediating sodium-dependent uptake of neurotransmitters from the extracellular space. The substrate binding stoichiometry of the bacterial NSS protein, LeuT, and thus the principal transport mechanism, has been...

  1. Accelerating the design and testing of LEU fuel assemblies for conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, J.E

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies proposed geometries and loading specifications of LEU tube-type and pin-type test assemblies that would be suitable for accelerating the conversion of Russian-designed research reactors outside of Russia if these fuels are manufactured, qualified by irradiation testing, and made commercially available in Russia. (author)

  2. Feasibility study for LEU conversion of the WWR-K reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kazakhstan using a 5-tube fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Liaw, J.R.; Matos, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    A feasibility study by the RERTR program for possible LEU conversion of the 6 MW WWR-K reactor concludes that conversion is feasible using an LEU 5-tube Russian fuel assembly design. This 5-tube design is one of several LEU fuel assembly designs being studied (Ref. 1) for possible use in this reactor. The 5-tube assembly contains 200 g 235 U with an enrichment of 19.7% in four cylindrical inner tubes and an outer hexagonal tube with the same external dimensions as the current HEU (36%) 5-tube fuel assembly, which contains 112.5 g 235 U. The fuel meat material, LEU UO 2 -Al dispersion fuel with ∼ 2.5 g U/cm 3 , has been extensively irradiation tested in a number of reactors with uranium enrichments of 36% and 19.7%. Since the 235 U loading of the LEU assemblies is much larger than the HEU assemblies, a smaller LEU core with five rows of fuel assemblies is possible (instead of six rows of fuel assemblies in the HEU core). This smaller LEU core would consume about 60% as many fuel assemblies per year as the current HEU core and provide thermal neutron fluxes in the inner irradiation channels that are ∼ 17% larger than with the present HEU core. The current 21 day cycle length would be maintained and the average discharge burnup would be ∼ 42%. Neutron fluxes in the five outer irradiation channels would be smaller in the LEU core unless these channels can be moved closer to the LEU fuel assemblies. Results show that the smaller LEU core would meet the reactor's shutdown margin requirements and would have an adequate thermal-hydraulic safety margin to onset of nucleate boiling. (author)

  3. The Leu72Met polymorphism of the GHRL gene prevents the development of diabetic nephropathy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Langen; Li, Ming; Yu, Changhua; Li, Can; Zhao, Mingming; Lu, Ming; Zheng, Taishan; Zhang, Rong; Zhao, Weijing; Bao, Yuqian; Xiang, Kunsan; Jia, Weiping; Wang, Niansong; Liu, Limei

    2014-02-01

    The preproghrelin (GHRL) Leu72Met polymorphism (rs 696217) is associated with obesity, reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion in healthy or diabetic subjects, and reduced serum creatinine (Scr) levels in type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the association of the Leu72Met polymorphism with measures of insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic control individuals and type 2 diabetics, and whether this variation contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in type 2 diabetes. A case-control study was performed of 291 non-diabetic control subjects and 466 patients with type 2 diabetes, of whom 238 had DN with overt albuminuria (DN group; albuminuric excretion rate [AER] ≥ 300 mg/24 h) and 228 did not have DN, but had diabetes for more than 10 years (non-DN group). Genotyping was performed using a TaqMan PCR assay. The Leu/Leu, Leu/Met, and Met/Met genotype frequencies were significantly different between the non-DN and DN groups (p = 0.011). The frequency of the variant genotypes (Leu/Met, Met/Met) was significantly lower in the DN group than the non-DN group (23.5 vs. 36.0 %, p = 0.003). Met/Met non-diabetic control subjects had lower BMI and Scr levels and higher eGFR level than Leu/Leu or Leu/Met individuals (p GHRL Leu72Met polymorphism may help to maintain normal renal function and may protect against the development of DN by reducing albuminuria and improving renal function in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Radioactive Waste Issues related to Production of Fission-based Mo-99 by using Low Enriched Uranium (LEU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Muhmood ul; Ryu, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In order to produce fission-based Mo-99 from research reactors, two types of targets are being used and they are highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets with {sup 235}U enrichment more than 90wt% of {sup 235}U and low enriched uranium (LEU) targets with {sup 235}U enrichment less than 20wt% of {sup 235}U. It is worth noting that medium enriched uranium i.e. 36wt% of {sup 235}U as being used in South Africa is also regarded as non-LEU from a nuclear security point of view. In order to cope with the proliferation issues, international nuclear security policy is promoting the use of LEU targets in order to minimize the civilian use of HEU. It is noteworthy that Mo-99 yield of the LEU target is less than 20% of the HEU target, which requires approximately five times more LEU targets to be irradiated and consequently results in increased volume of waste. The waste generated from fission Mo-99 production can be mainly due to: target fabrication, assembling of target, irradiation in reactor and processing of irradiated targets. During the fission of U-235 in a reactor, a large number of radionuclides with different chemical and physical properties are formed. The waste produced from these practices may be a combination of low level waste (LLW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) comprised of all three types, i.e., solid, liquid and gas. Handling and treatment of the generated waste are dependent on its form and activity. In case of the large production facility, waste storage facility should be constructed in order to limit the radiation exposures of the workers and the environment. In this study, we discuss and compare mainly the radioactive waste generated by alkaline digestion of both HEU and LEU targets to assist in planning and deciding the choice of the technology with better arrangements for proper handling and disposal of generated waste. With the use of the LEU targets in Mo-99 production facility, significant increase in liquid and solid waste has been expected.

  5. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition: limits and opportunities of protecting the tungsten catalyzer from silicide with a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigeri, P.A.; Nos, O.; Bengoechea, S.; Frevert, C.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) is one of the most promising techniques for depositing the intrinsic microcrystalline silicon layer for the production of micro-morph solar cells. However, the silicide formation at the colder ends of the tungsten wire drastically reduces the lifetime of the catalyzer, thus limiting its industrial exploitation. A simple but interesting strategy to decrease the silicide formation is to hide the electrical contacts of the catalyzer in a long narrow cavity which reduces the probability of the silane molecules to reach the colder ends of the wire. In this paper, the working mechanism of the cavity is elucidated. Measurements of the thickness profile of the silicon deposited in the internal walls of the cavity have been compared with those predicted using a simple diffusion model based on the assumption of Knudsen flow. A lifetime study of the protected and unprotected wires has been carried out. The different mechanisms which determine the deterioration of the catalyzer have been identified and discussed.

  6. Silicide induced surface defects in FePt nanoparticle fcc-to-fct thermally activated phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shu; Lee, Stephen L.; André, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MnPs) are relevant to a wide range of applications including high density information storage and magnetic resonance imaging to name but a few. Among the materials available to prepare MnPs, FePt is attracting growing attention. However, to harvest the strongest magnetic properties of FePt MnPs, a thermal annealing is often required to convert face-centered cubic as synthesized nPs into its tetragonal phase. Rarely addressed are the potential side effects of such treatments on the magnetic properties. In this study, we focus on the impact of silica shells often used in strategies aiming at overcoming MnP coalescence during the thermal annealing. While we show that this shell does prevent sintering, and that fcc-to-fct conversion does occur, we also reveal the formation of silicide, which can prevent the stronger magnetic properties of fct-FePt MnPs from being fully realised. This report therefore sheds lights on poorly investigated and understood interfacial phenomena occurring during the thermal annealing of MnPs and, by doing so, also highlights the benefits of developing new strategies to avoid silicide formation.

  7. Silicide induced surface defects in FePt nanoparticle fcc-to-fct thermally activated phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shu; Lee, Stephen L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); André, Pascal, E-mail: pjpandre@riken.jp [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, CNRS-Ewha International Research Center (CERC), Ewha W. University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MnPs) are relevant to a wide range of applications including high density information storage and magnetic resonance imaging to name but a few. Among the materials available to prepare MnPs, FePt is attracting growing attention. However, to harvest the strongest magnetic properties of FePt MnPs, a thermal annealing is often required to convert face-centered cubic as synthesized nPs into its tetragonal phase. Rarely addressed are the potential side effects of such treatments on the magnetic properties. In this study, we focus on the impact of silica shells often used in strategies aiming at overcoming MnP coalescence during the thermal annealing. While we show that this shell does prevent sintering, and that fcc-to-fct conversion does occur, we also reveal the formation of silicide, which can prevent the stronger magnetic properties of fct-FePt MnPs from being fully realised. This report therefore sheds lights on poorly investigated and understood interfacial phenomena occurring during the thermal annealing of MnPs and, by doing so, also highlights the benefits of developing new strategies to avoid silicide formation.

  8. Surface effect on the electronic and the magnetic properties of rock-salt alkaline-earth metal silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialek, Beata; Lee, Jaeil

    2011-01-01

    An all electron ab-initio method was employed to study the electronic and the magnetic properties of the (001) surface of alkaline-earth metal silicides, CaSi, SrSi, and BaSi, in the rock-salt structure. The three compounds retain their ferromagnetic metallic properties at the surface. Due to the surface effects, the magnetism of the topmost layer is changed as compared with the bulk. This is a short-range effect. In CaSi, the magnetism of the surface layer is noticeably reduced, as compared with the bulk: magnetic moments (MMs) on both Ca and Si atoms are reduced. In SrSi (001), the polarization of electrons in the surface atoms is similar to that in the bulk atoms, and the values of MMs on the component atoms in the topmost layer do not change as much as in CaSi. In BaSi (001), the magnetic properties of Si surface atoms are enhanced slightly, and the magnetism of Ba atoms is not affected considerably by the surface effect. The calculated densities of states confirm the short-range effect of the surface on the electronic properties of the metal silicides.

  9. Ytterbium silicide (YbSi{sub 2}). A promising thermoelectric material with a high power factor at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanusilp, Sora-at; Ohishi, Yuji; Muta, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yamanaka, Shinsuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Tsuruga (Japan); Nishide, Akinori [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Center for Exploratory Research, Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo (Japan); Hayakawa, Jun [Center for Exploratory Research, Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo (Japan); Kurosaki, Ken [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui, Tsuruga (Japan); JST, PRESTO, Kawaguchi, Saitama (Japan)

    2018-02-15

    Metal silicide-based thermoelectric (TE) materials have attracted attention in the past two decades, because they are less toxic, with low production cost and high chemical stability. Here, we study the TE properties of ytterbium silicide YbSi{sub 2} with a specific layered structure and the mixed valence state of Yb{sup 2+} and Yb{sup 3+}. YbSi{sub 2} exhibits large Seebeck coefficient, S, accompanied by high electrical conductivity, σ, leading to high power factor, S{sup 2}σ, of 2.2 mW m{sup -1} K{sup -2} at room temperature, which is comparable to those of state-of-the-art TE materials such as Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and PbTe. Moreover, YbSi{sub 2} exhibits high Grueneisen parameter of 1.57, which leads to relatively low lattice thermal conductivity, κ{sub lat}, of 3.0 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1} at room temperature. The present study reveals that YbSi{sub 2} can be a good candidate of TE materials working near room temperature. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Technical report: technical development on the silicide plate-type fuel experiment at nuclear safety research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Hiroki

    1991-08-01

    According to a reduction of fuel enrichment from 45 w/o 235 U to 20 w/o, an aluminide plate-type fuel used currently in the domestic research and material testing reactors will be replaced by a silicide plate-type one. One of the major concern arisen from this alternation is to understand the fuel behavior under simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, this is strongly necessary from the safety and licensing point of view. The in-core RIA experiments are, therefore, carried out at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The silicide plate-type fuel consisted of the ternary alloy of U-Al-Si as a meat with uranium density up to 4.8 g/cm 3 having thickness by 0.51 mm and the binary alloy of Al-3%Mg as a cladding by thickness of 0.38 mm. Comparison of the physical properties of this metallic plate fuel with the UO 2 -zircaloy fuel rod used conventionally in commercial light water reactors shows that the heat conductivity of the former is of the order of about 13 times greater than the latter, however the melting temperature is only one-half (1570degC). Prior to in-core RIA experiments, there were some difficulties lay in our technical path. This report summarized the technical achievements obtained through our four years work. (J.P.N.)

  11. An update on the LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Eng, B.Sc; Eng, P.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada, has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A reliable supply of HEU metal from the United States used in the manufacture of targets for the NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to ultimate use by the physician, has been established using this proven and established method of HEU target irradiation and processing to extract molybdenum-99. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the construction of two MAPLE reactors and a New Processing Facility. The design of the MAPLE facilities was based on an established process developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL)-extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a three phase LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. Phase 1, the Initial Feasibility Study, which identified the technical issues to convert the MAPLE reactor targets from HEU to LEU for large scale commercial production was reported on at the RERTR-2000 conference. The second phase of the LEU Target Development and Conversion Program was developed with extensive consultation and involvement of experts knowledgeable in target development, process system design, enriched uranium conversion chemistry and commercial scale reactor operations and molybdenum production. This paper will provide an overview of the Phase 2 Conversion Development Program, report on progress to date, and further

  12. The Leu72Met polymorphism of the ghrelin gene is associated with a decreased risk for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, Heiner K; Giannakidou, Eleni; Krone, Wilhelm; Mantzoros, Christos S; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin is involved in several metabolic and cardiovascular processes. The Leu72Met polymorphism of its gene was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (DM2) in some, but not all studies. Its association with atherosclerosis is not known. We investigated 420 Caucasian subjects with DM2 and 430 controls without diabetes (56.6% male, age 62+/-10 years). The Leu72Leu genotype frequencies were 89.76/84.65%, the Leu72Met 9.52/15.12% and the Met72Met 0.71/0.23% (P=0.029) in the DM2 and controls groups, respectively. In subjects with Met72+ genotypes the risk of DM2 was significantly decreased (univariate OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42-0.95, P=0.026). In a logistic regression model, body mass index, hypertension and a positive family history for diabetes were predictors of diabetes while the polymorphism remained negatively associated with the disease (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.97, P=0.036). After adjusting for known risk factors for atherosclerosis, the Met72+ variant was not associated with atherosclerotic disease (OR 1.41, 95% CI 0.78-2.54, P=0.25). Ghrelin concentrations were not associated with the polymorphism, DM2 or atherosclerotic disease. The Leu72Met polymorphism of the ghrelin gene is associated with a decreased risk for DM2. There is no association between the variant and atherosclerotic disease or ghrelin concentrations.

  13. High-temperature oxidation of silicide-aluminide layer on the TiAl6V4 alloy prepared by liquid-phase siliconizing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubatík, Tomáš František

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2016), s. 257-261 ISSN 1580-2949 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : TiAl6V4 * silicides * high-temperature oxidation * liquid-phase silicon izing Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.436, year: 2016

  14. Phase analyses of silicide or nitride coated U–Mo and U–Mo–Ti particle dispersion fuel after out-of-pile annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Jeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Palancher, Hervé [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Ryu, Ho Jin, E-mail: hojinryu@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Man; Nam, Ji Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Bonnin, Anne [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); ESRF, 6, rue J. Horowitz, F-38000 Grenoble Cedex (France); Honkimäki, Veijo [ESRF, 6, rue J. Horowitz, F-38000 Grenoble Cedex (France); Charollais, François [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lemoine, Patrick [CEA, DEN, DISN, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Silicide or nitride layers were coated on atomized U–Mo or U–Mo–Ti powder. • The constituent phases after annealing were identified through high-energy XRD. • U{sub 3}Si{sub 5} and U{sub 4}Mo(Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x})Si{sub 2} were identified in the silicide coating layers. • UN was identified for U–Mo particles and UN and U{sub 4}N{sub 7} formed on U–Mo–Ti particles. -- Abstract: The coating of silicide or nitride layers on U–7 wt%Mo or U–7 wt%Mo–1 wt%Ti particles has been proposed for the minimization of the interaction phase growth in U–Mo/Al dispersion fuel during irradiation. Out-of-pile annealing tests show reduced inter-diffusion by forming silicide or nitride protective layers on U–Mo and U–Mo–Ti particles. To characterize the constituent phases of the coated layers on U–Mo and U–Mo–Ti particles and the interaction phases of coated U–Mo and U–Mo–Ti particle dispersed Al matrix fuel, synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed. It was identified that silicide coating layers consisted mainly of U{sub 3}Si{sub 5} and U{sub 4}Mo(Mo{sub x}Si{sub 1−x})Si{sub 2}, and nitride coating layers were composed of mainly UN and U{sub 4}N{sub 7}. The interaction phases obtained after annealing of coated U–Mo and U–Mo–Ti particle dispersion samples were identical to those found in U–Mo/Al–Si and U–Mo/Al systems. Nitride-coated particles showed less interaction formation than silicide-coated particles after annealing at 580 °C for 1 h owing to the higher susceptibility to breakage of the silicide coating layers during hot extrusion.

  15. Thermal expansion and elastic moduli of the silicide based intermetallic alloys Ti5Si3(X) and Nb5Si3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Wu, J.

    1997-01-01

    Silicides are among those potential candidates for high temperature application because of their high melting temperature, low density and good oxidation resistance. Recent interest is focused on molybdenum silicides and titanium silicides. Extensive investigation has been carried out on MoSi 2 , yet comparatively less work was performed on titanium silicides such as Ti 5 Si 3 and Ti 3 and TiSi 2 which are of lower density than MoSi 2 . Fundamental understanding of the titanium silicides' properties for further evaluation their potential for practical application are thus needed. The thermal expansion coefficients and elastic moduli of intermetallic compounds are two properties important for evaluation as a first step. The thermal expansion determines the possible stress that might arise during cooling for these high melting point compounds, which is crucial to the preparation of defect free specimens; and the elastic moduli are usually reflections of the cohesion in crystal. In Frommeyer's work and some works afterwards, the coefficients of thermal expansion were measured on both polycrystalline and single crystal Ti 5 Si 3 . The elastic modulus of polycrystalline Ti 5 Si 3 was measured by Frommeyer and Rosenkranz. However, in the above works, the referred Ti 5 Si 3 was the binary one, no alloying effect has been reported on this matter. Moreover, the above parameters (coefficient of thermal expansion and elastic modulus) of Nb 5 Si 3 remain unreported so far. In this paper, the authors try to extend the knowledge of alloyed Ti 5 Si 3 compounds with Nb and Cr additions. Results on the coefficients of thermal expansion and elastic moduli of Ti 5 Si 3 compounds and Nb 5 Si 3 are presented and the discussion is focused on the alloying effect

  16. Effects of (Al,Ge) double doping on the thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Salta, Daniel; Zhang, Libin [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Weathers, Annie [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B.; Shi, Li [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas Materials Institute, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    Experiments and analysis have been carried out to investigate the effects of Al and (Al,Ge) doping on the microstructure and thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples, which were prepared by solid-state reaction, ball milling, and followed by spark plasma sintering. It has been found that Al doping effectively increases the hole concentration, which leads to an increase in the electrical conductivity and power factor. By introducing the second dopant Ge into Al-doped HMS, the electrical conductivity is increased, and the Seebeck coefficient is decreased as a result of further increased hole concentration. The peak power factor is found to occur at a hole concentration between 1.8 × 10{sup 21} and 2.2 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} measured at room temperature. The (Al,Ge)-doped HMS samples show lower power factors owing to their higher hole concentrations. The mobility of Mn(Al{sub 0.0035}Ge{sub y}Si{sub 0.9965-y}){sub 1.8} with y = 0.035 varies approximately as T{sup −3/2} above 200 K, suggesting acoustic phonon scattering is the dominant scattering mechanism. The thermal conductivity of HMS does not change appreciably by Al or (Al,Ge) doping. The maximum ZT of (Al,Ge)-doped HMS is 0.57 at 823 K, which is similar to the highest value found in the Al-doped HMS samples. The ZT values were reduced in the Mn(Al{sub 0.0035}Ge{sub y}Si{sub 0.9965-y}){sub 1.8} samples with high Ge concentration of y = 0.025 and 0.035, because of reduced power factor. In addition, a two-band model was employed to show that the hole contribution to the thermal conductivity dominates the bipolar and electron contributions for all samples from 300 to 823 K and accounts for about 12% of the total thermal conductivity at about 800 K.

  17. Effects of (Al,Ge) double doping on the thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xi; Salta, Daniel; Zhang, Libin; Weathers, Annie; Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B.; Shi, Li

    2013-01-01

    Experiments and analysis have been carried out to investigate the effects of Al and (Al,Ge) doping on the microstructure and thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline higher manganese silicide (HMS) samples, which were prepared by solid-state reaction, ball milling, and followed by spark plasma sintering. It has been found that Al doping effectively increases the hole concentration, which leads to an increase in the electrical conductivity and power factor. By introducing the second dopant Ge into Al-doped HMS, the electrical conductivity is increased, and the Seebeck coefficient is decreased as a result of further increased hole concentration. The peak power factor is found to occur at a hole concentration between 1.8 × 10 21 and 2.2 × 10 21  cm −3 measured at room temperature. The (Al,Ge)-doped HMS samples show lower power factors owing to their higher hole concentrations. The mobility of Mn(Al 0.0035 Ge y Si 0.9965-y ) 1.8 with y = 0.035 varies approximately as T −3/2 above 200 K, suggesting acoustic phonon scattering is the dominant scattering mechanism. The thermal conductivity of HMS does not change appreciably by Al or (Al,Ge) doping. The maximum ZT of (Al,Ge)-doped HMS is 0.57 at 823 K, which is similar to the highest value found in the Al-doped HMS samples. The ZT values were reduced in the Mn(Al 0.0035 Ge y Si 0.9965-y ) 1.8 samples with high Ge concentration of y = 0.025 and 0.035, because of reduced power factor. In addition, a two-band model was employed to show that the hole contribution to the thermal conductivity dominates the bipolar and electron contributions for all samples from 300 to 823 K and accounts for about 12% of the total thermal conductivity at about 800 K

  18. LAPTM4b recruits the LAT1-4F2hc Leu transporter to lysosomes and promotes mTORC1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkereit, Ruth; Persaud, Avinash; Vanoaica, Liviu; Guetg, Adriano; Verrey, Francois; Rotin, Daniela

    2015-05-22

    Mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTORC1), a master regulator of cellular growth, is activated downstream of growth factors, energy signalling and intracellular essential amino acids (EAAs) such as Leu. mTORC1 activation occurs at the lysosomal membrane, and involves V-ATPase stimulation by intra-lysosomal EAA (inside-out activation), leading to activation of the Ragulator, RagA/B-GTP and mTORC1 via Rheb-GTP. How Leu enters the lysosomes is unknown. Here we identified the lysosomal protein LAPTM4b as a binding partner for the Leu transporter, LAT1-4F2hc (SLC7A5-SLAC3A2). We show that LAPTM4b recruits LAT1-4F2hc to lysosomes, leading to uptake of Leu into lysosomes, and is required for mTORC1 activation via V-ATPase following EAA or Leu stimulation. These results demonstrate a functional Leu transporter at the lysosome, and help explain the inside-out lysosomal activation of mTORC1 by Leu/EAA.

  19. Associations of Leu72Met Polymorphism of Preproghrelin with Ratios of Plasma Lipids Are Diversified by a High-Carbohydrate Diet in Healthy Chinese Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mi; Qiu, Li; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Zhen; Liu, Xiao Juan; Lin, Jia; Fang, Ding Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The association of preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism with plasma lipids profile was inconsistently reported and needs more studies to be confirmed. Our study was to investigate the changes of plasma lipids ratios after a high-carbohydrate (high-CHO) diet in healthy Chinese adolescents with different genotypes of this polymorphism. Fifty-three healthy university students were given a washout diet of 54.1% carbohydrate for 7 days, followed by a high-CHO diet of 70.1% carbohydrate for 6 days. The anthropometric and biological parameters were analyzed at baseline and before and after the high-CHO diet. When compared with those before the high-CHO diet, body mass index (BMI) decreased in the male and female Met72 allele carriers. Decreased low-/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C/HDL-C) was observed in all participants except the female subjects with the Leu72Leu genotype. TG/HDL-C and log (TG/HDL-C) were increased only in the female subjects with the Leu72Leu genotype. These results suggest that the Met72 allele of preproghrelin Leu72Met polymorphism may be associated with decreased BMI induced by the high-CHO diet in male and female adolescents, while the Leu72 allele with increased TG/HDL-C and log (TG/HDL-C) in the female adolescents only. Furthermore, the decreasing effect of the high-CHO diet on LDL/HDL-C may be eliminated in the female Leu72Leu homozygotes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Data Compilation for AGR-1 Baseline Coated Particle Composite LEU01-46T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunn, John D.; Lowden, Richard Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This document is a compilation of characterization data for the AGR-1 baseline coated particle composite LEU01-46T, a composite of four batches of TRISO-coated 350 (micro)m 19.7% low enrichment uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (LEUCO). The AGR-1 TRISO-coated particles consist of a spherical kernel coated with a ∼ 50% dense carbon buffer layer (100 (micro)m nominal thickness) followed by a dense inner pyrocarbonlayer (40 (micro)m nominal thickness) followed by a SiC layer (35 (micro)m nominal thickness) followed by another dense outer pyrocarbon layer (40 (micro)m nominal thickness). The coated particles, were produced by ORNL for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) program to be put into compacts for insertion in the first irradiation test capsule, AGR-1. The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite (G73D-20-69302). The BWXT kernel lot G73D-20-69302 was riffled into sublots for characterization and coating by ORNL and identified as LEU01-?? (where ?? is a series of integers beginning with 01). Additional particle batches were coated with only buffer or buffer plus inner pyrocarbon (IPyC) layers using similar process conditions as used for the full TRISO batches comprising the LEU01-46T composite. These batches were fabricated in order to qualify that the process conditions used for buffer and IPyC would produce acceptable densities, as described in sections 8 and 9. These qualifying batches used 350 (micro)m natural uranium oxide/uranium carbide kernels (NUCO). The kernels were obtained from BWXT and identified as composite G73B-NU-69300. The use of NUCO surrogate kernels is not expected to significantly effect the densities of the buffer and IPyC coatings. Confirmatory batches using LEUCO kernels from G73D-20-69302 were coated and characterized to verify this assumption. The AGR-1 Fuel Product Specification and Characterization Guidance (INL EDF-4380, Rev. 6) provides the requirements necessary for acceptance