WorldWideScience

Sample records for whole-body thallium imaging

  1. Whole body imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Luca, P.C.; Stoddart, H.F.; Jeffries, D.

    1976-01-01

    A whole body imaging system rapidly forms a quality image of the bony structure, soft tissue or specific organs of a patient who has been injected with a suitable radioactive tracer chemical. A radiation detector head assembly includes a number of detector subassemblies, each having a lead collimator with tapered holes for admitting gamma radiation from a small area of the patient to a scintillation crystal that converts the gamma rays admitted by the collimator into visible or ultraviolet energy pulses. A photomultiplier converts these pulses into electrical pulses. A row of equally spaced detector subassemblies reciprocate within a nonreciprocating lead shield along the long axis of the array over a distance substantially equal to the separation between adjacent ones of the small areas. Associated electronic and electromechanical apparatus control the reciprocating motion and the longitudinal motion of the radiation detector head assembly, and process the photodetected signals to produce in a relatively short time a visible image of the radiant energy emanating from the whole body of the patient scanned

  2. The evolution of whole-body imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Deirdre E

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the evolution of whole-body imaging, discussing the history and development of radiography, nuclear medicine, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), combined PET-CT, and magnetic resonance imaging. The obstacles hindering progress toward whole-body imaging using each of these modalities, and the technical advances that were developed to overcome them, are reviewed. The effectiveness and the limitations of whole-body imaging with each of these techniques are also briefly discussed.

  3. Evaluation of myocardial and skeletal muscular involvement with thallium-201 myocardial emission computed tomography and whole body scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Matsushima, Hideo; Sotobata, Iwao; Suzuki, Akio; Indo, Toshikatsu; Matsuoka, Yukihiko

    1986-01-01

    Thallium-201 (Tl-201) myocardial emission computed tomography and whole body scintigraphy were performed using a rotating gamma camera in 64 patients with neurologic disease and 14 normal subjects. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion defects were seen in 40 % of the muscular involvement in 47 patients with muscular dystrophy (MD), in whom morphological abnormality of the heart was common. There was strong relationship between the degree of left ventricular perfusion defects and the degree of pulmonary uptake of Tl-201. Thallium-201 whole body scintigraphy showed homogeneous distribution of Tl-201 in the extremities in normal subjects, and perfusion defects in 73 % of the muscular lesions in MD patients. Muscular and skeletal lesions for MD appear to progress independently. Thallium-201 imaging seems to be of clinical value in assessing the muscular and skeletal lesions. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Whole body imaging system mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carman, R.W.; Doherty, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    A radioisotope scanning apparatus for use in nuclear medicine is described in detail. The apparatus enables the quantification and spatial location of the radioactivity in a body section of a patient to be determined with high sensitivity. It consists of an array of highly focussed collimators arranged such that adjacent collimators move in the same circumferential but opposite radial directions. The explicit movements of the gantry are described in detail and may be controlled by a general purpose computer. The use of highly focussed collimators allows both a reasonable solid angle of acceptance and also high target to background images; additionally, dual radionuclide pharmaceutical studies can be performed simultaneously. It is claimed that the high sensitivity of the system permits the early diagnosis of pathological changes and the images obtained show accurately the location and shape of physiological abnormalities. (U.K.)

  5. Comparison of whole-body-imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.; Hoffer, P.

    1977-01-01

    Currently there are four different devices that have found clinical utility in whole-body imaging. These are the rectilinear scanner, the multicrystal whole-body scanner, the Anger-type camera with a whole-body-imaging table, and the tomoscanner. In this text, the basic theory of operation and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages in whole-body imaging is presented for each device. When applicable, a comparative assessment of the various devices is also presented. As with all else in life, there is no simple answer to the question ''which total body imaging device is best.'' Institutions with a very heavy total-body-imaging load may prefer to use an already available dual-headed rectilinear scanner system for these studies, rather than invest in a new instrument. Institutions with moderate total-body-imaging loads may wish to invest in moving table or moving camera devices which make total body imaging more convenient but retain the basic flexibility of the camera. The large-field Anger camera with or without motion offers another flexible option to these institutions. The laboratory with a very heavy total body imaging load may select efficiency over flexibility, thereby freeing up other instruments for additional studies. Finally, reliability as well as availability and quality of local service must be considered. After all, design features of an instrument become irrelevant when it is broken down and awaiting repair

  6. Whole body MR imaging in diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckbach, Sabine; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cardiovascular risk factor and one of the major causes for morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic complications have not only major impact on the quality of life of diabetic patients, but are also potentially life-threatening. Therefore prevention, diagnosis and therapy of these long-term complications are of high importance. However, diagnosis of the variety of complications from diabetes mellitus remains a diagnostic challenge and usually several diagnostic steps are necessary to diagnose or exclude these complications. In the last years whole body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) including whole body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) has been introduced for cardiovascular imaging and is now increasingly applied in clinical routine for the workup of patients with cardiovascular disease and for cardiovascular screening. The article summarizes rationales for WB-MRI in diabetes mellitus, technical concepts of disease specific cardiovascular WB-MRI in diabetes mellitus and discusses potential clinical consequences.

  7. Whole-body intravoxel incoherent motion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Wurnig, Moritz C.; Eberhardt, Christian; Guggenberger, Roman; Boss, Andreas [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Luechinger, Roger [University and ETH Zurich, Institute of Biomedical Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the technical feasibility of whole-body intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging. Whole-body MR images of eight healthy volunteers were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with eight b-values. Coronal parametrical whole-body maps of diffusion (D), pseudodiffusion (D*), and the perfusion fraction (F{sub p}) were calculated. Image quality was rated qualitatively by two independent radiologists, and inter-reader reliability was tested with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in the brain, liver, kidney, and erector spinae muscle. Depiction of anatomic structures was rated as good on D maps and good to fair on D* and F{sub p} maps. Exemplary mean D (10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), D* (10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and F{sub p} (%) values (± standard deviation) of the renal cortex were as follows: 1.7 ± 0.2; 15.6 ± 6.5; 20.9 ± 4.4. Inter-observer agreement was ''substantial'' to ''almost perfect'' (ICC = 0.80 - 0.92). The coefficient of variation of D* was significantly lower with the proposed algorithm compared to the conventional algorithm (p < 0.001), indicating higher stability. The proposed IVIM protocol allows computation of parametrical maps with good to fair image quality. Potential future clinical applications may include characterization of widespread disease such as metastatic tumours or inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of skeletal muscular involvement in neuromuscular disorders with thallium-201 whole body scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sotobata, Iwao; Indo, Toshikatsu; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Matsushima, Hideo; Suzuki, Akio; Abe, Tetsutaro; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1986-01-01

    The extent as well as severity of pathologic changes of skeletal muscles were analyzed with thallium-201 whole body scintigraphy (WBS) in 29 cases of various types of neuromuscular diseases (18 cases of myogenic and 11 cases of neurogenic muscular diseases) and 14 cases of normal controls. After intravenous injection of 2 mCi of thallium-201 chloride, WBS was performed for 15 minutes using a gamma camera with twin-opposed large rectangular detectors. Counts at brachia, forearms, thighs, and calves were assessed after reconstruction of the scintigram of the whole body by taking the geometric mean of the anterior and posterior data. WBS showed uniform tracer activities in the 4 extremities in 12 cases among 14 controls. Laterality in distribution of counts of both legs and arms was noted in the remaining 2 controls. WBS revealed decrease of perfusion in the extremities with muscular atrophy and/or weakness in neuromuscular diseases. The overall diagnostic accuracy of WBS for evaluation of skeletal muscle involvement was 75 to 80 % except for the bilateral brachia for which it decreased to 65 %. All of the three cases of muscular dystrophy with pseudohypertrophy of the calves or thighs showed unequivocal decrease of perfusion of those regions in WBS. In conclusion, thallium-201 WBS was considered to be a useful clinical means in evaluating the extent and severity of muscular involvement of various types of neuromuscular disorders. (author)

  9. Clinical evaluation of exercise thallium-201 whole body scintigraphy in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kenzo; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Kondo, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate whole body distribution and kinetics of Thallium-201 at exercise and redistribution, whole body scintigraphy (WB-S) was performed on 12 normal subjects (N), 19 patients with angina pectoris (AP) and 18 patients with old myocardial infarction (MI). WB-S was obtained using a gamma camera OMEGA 500 and analized by ADAC System IV. We estimated the following parameters from WB-S; 1) %Distribution (%D): the ratio of whole body counts to organ counts 2) washout rate (WR) in each organ. %D of the heart in N, AP and MI was similar at rest and exercise. At exercise, %D of the lung and the liver decreased and %D of thighs increased remarkably than at rest. At supine exercise, the lung indicated high %D and thinghs indicated low %D compared with at upright exercise. WR of the heart in AP and MI was significantly lower than in N (p<0.005, p<0.01) and further decreased proportionally to the number of stenotic coronary arteries and related to the ischemic ST depression of exercise ECG. WR of the heart was not correlation with pressure rate product and this finding suggested that WR of the heart was not prescribed by the tolerance of exercise but related to coronary flow at exercise a certain degree. WR of the lung in MI was significantly higher (p<0.025) and WR of thighs in AP and MI was significantly lower (p<0.025, p<0.05) compared with N. (author)

  10. Whole-body MR imaging of bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.P.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Reiser, M.F.; Baur-Melnyk, A.

    2005-01-01

    In clinical routine, multimodality algorithms, including X-ray, computed tomography, scintigraphy and MRI, are used in case of suspected bone marrow malignancy. Skeletal scintigraphy is widely used to asses metastatic disease to the bone, CT is the technique of choice to assess criteria of osseous destruction and bone stability. MRI is the only imaging technique that allows direct visualization of bone marrow and its components with high spatial resolution. The combination of unenhanced T1-weighted-spin echo- and turbo-STIR-sequences have shown to be most useful for the detection of bone marrow abnormalities and are able to discriminate benign from malignant bone marrow changes. Originally, whole-body MRI bone marrow screening was performed in sequential scanning techniques of five body levels with time consuming coil rearrangement and repositioning of the patient. The introduction of a rolling platform mounted on top of a conventional MRI examination table facilitated whole-body MR imaging and, with the use of fast gradient echo, T1-weighted and STIR-imaging techniques, for the first time allowed whole-body imaging within less than one hour. With the development of parallel imaging techniques (PAT) in combination with global matrix coil concepts, acquisition time could be reduced substantially without compromises in spatial resolution, enabling the implementation of more complex and flexible examination protocols. Whole-body MRI represents a new alternative to the stepwise multimodality concept for the detection of metastatic disease, multiple myeloma and lymphoma of the bone with high diagnostic accuracy

  11. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in axial spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Østergaard, Mikkel; Eshed, Iris

    2018-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether adalimumab (ADA) reduces whole-body (WB-) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indices for inflammation in the entheses, peripheral joints, sacroiliac joints, spine, and the entire body in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). Methods. An investigator-initia...

  12. Dipyridamole thallium imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, S.G.; Heo, J.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole has been approved recently for clinical use. Oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg and the optimal oral dose is 300-375 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole-thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging has also been useful in identifying high-risk patients undergoing major elective vascular surgery. The relative merits of dipyridamole imaging versus exercise testing after acute myocardial infarction require further studies.83 references

  13. Whole-body and multispectral photoacoustic imaging of adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; Xi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Zebrafish is a top vertebrate model to study developmental biology and genetics, and it is becoming increasingly popular for studying human diseases due to its high genome similarity to that of humans and the optical transparency in embryonic stages. However, it becomes difficult for pure optical imaging techniques to volumetric visualize the internal organs and structures of wild-type zebrafish in juvenile and adult stages with excellent resolution and penetration depth. Even with the establishment of mutant lines which remain transparent over the life cycle, it is still a challenge for pure optical imaging modalities to image the whole body of adult zebrafish with micro-scale resolution. However, the method called photoacoustic imaging that combines all the advantages of the optical imaging and ultrasonic imaging provides a new way to image the whole body of the zebrafish. In this work, we developed a non-invasive photoacoustic imaging system with optimized near-infrared illumination and cylindrical scanning to image the zebrafish. The lateral and axial resolution yield to 80 μm and 600 μm, respectively. Multispectral strategy with wavelengths from 690 nm to 930 nm was employed to image various organs inside the zebrafish. From the reconstructed images, most major organs and structures inside the body can be precisely imaged. Quantitative and statistical analysis of absorption for organs under illumination with different wavelengths were carried out.

  14. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Eshed, Iris; Althoff, Christian E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) is a relatively new technique that can enable assessment of the overall inflammatory status of people with arthritis, but standards for image acquisition, definitions of key pathologies, and a quantification system are required. Our aim...... was to perform a systematic literature review (SLR) and to develop consensus definitions of key pathologies, anatomical locations for assessment, a set of MRI sequences and imaging planes for the different body regions, and a preliminary scoring system for WB-MRI in inflammatory arthritis. Methods: An SLR...

  15. Image fusion between whole body FDG PET images and whole body MRI images using a full-automatic mutual information-based multimodality image registration software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Yoshitaka; Nakano, Yoshitada; Fujibuchi, Toshiou; Isobe, Tomoko; Kazama, Toshiki; Ito, Hisao

    2006-01-01

    We attempted image fusion between whole body PET and whole body MRI of thirty patients using a full-automatic mutual information (MI) -based multimodality image registration software and evaluated accuracy of this method and impact of the coregistrated imaging on diagnostic accuracy. For 25 of 30 fused images in body area, translating gaps were within 6 mm in all axes and rotating gaps were within 2 degrees around all axes. In head and neck area, considerably much gaps caused by difference of head inclination at imaging occurred in 16 patients, however these gaps were able to decrease by fused separately. In 6 patients, diagnostic accuracy using PET/MRI fused images was superior compared by PET image alone. This work shows that whole body FDG PET images and whole body MRI images can be automatically fused using MI-based multimodality image registration software accurately and this technique can add useful information when evaluating FDG PET images. (author)

  16. Thallium-201 infusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazraki, N.; Kralios, A.; Wooten, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    To test the accuracy of Thallium-201 coronary artery infusion imaging of the earth during rapid changes in blood flow through a major coronary artery, the author performed a study in dogs correlating electromagnetic flow probe recordings with 201 Tl scintillation camera acquisitions. Hyperemic vascular response was produced experimentally in a major coronary artery by occlusion and release interventions which altered flow from baseline to zero during occlusion (20 seconds), followed by rapid flow increases approaching three times baseline immediately upon release of the occlusion. Flow returned to the baseline level within 60 seconds following release. Flow was also altered in a controlled fashion by other interventions. Recordings of Thallium uptake in the myocardium were displayed as a time histogram (counts per second squared vs time) which correlated very closely with electromagnetic flow probe recordings of flow (R=o.82-0.97). These experiments demonstrate a high degree of accuracy in Thallium infusion imaging to detect rapid changes in flow through a major coronary artery

  17. Study on the usefulness of whole body SPECT coronal image, MIP image in 67Ga scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Seiji

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined the usefulness of whole body coronal images and whole body cine display MIP images (CMIP) upon which image processing was carried out after whole body SPECT in comparison to the usefulness of whole body images (WB/SC) compensated by scattered radiation in tumor/inflammation scintigraphy with 67 Ga-citrate ( 67 Ga). Image interpretation was performed for the 120 patients with confirmed diagnoses, and the accuracy of their diagnoses was studied by three nuclear medical physicians and two clinical radiological technologists by means of sensitivity, specificity and ROC analysis. The resultant data show that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under the ROC curve Az in the WB/SC were approximately 65%, 86%, 74% and 0.724, respectively, whereas sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Az of the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method were approximately 93%, 95%, 94% and 0.860, respectively. Furthermore, coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method tended to be superior to those produced by the FBP method in both diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. In conclusion, the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method was shown to be superior in diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. Our data suggest that whole body SPECT is an excellent technique as an alternative to WB/SC. (author)

  18. [Application of GVF snake model in segmentation of whole body bone SPECT image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunmei; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Lifei; Ye, Guangchun; Mao, Zongyuan

    2008-02-01

    Limited by the imaging principle of whole body bone SPECT image, the gray value of bladder area is quite high, which affects the image's brightness, contrast and readability. In the meantime, the similarity between bladder area and focus makes it difficult for some images to be segmented automatically. In this paper, an improved Snake model, GVF Snake, is adopted to automatically segment bladder area, preparing for further processing of whole body bone SPECT images.

  19. Whole-body imaging of the musculoskeletal system: the value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Gerwin P.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea [University Hospitals Munich/Grosshadern, LMU, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    In clinical practice various modalities are used for whole-body imaging of the musculoskeletal system, including radiography, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Multislice CT is far more sensitive than radiographs in the assessment of trabecular and cortical bone destruction and allows for evaluation of fracture risk. The introduction of combined PET-CT scanners has markedly increased diagnostic accuracy for the detection of skeletal metastases compared with PET alone. The unique soft-tissue contrast of MRI enables for precise assessment of bone marrow infiltration and adjacent soft tissue structures so that alterations within the bone marrow may be detected before osseous destruction becomes apparent in CT or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or PET scan. Improvements in hard- and software, including parallel image acquisition acceleration, have made high resolution whole-body MRI clinically feasible. Whole-body MRI has successfully been applied for bone marrow screening of metastasis and systemic primary bone malignancies, like multiple myeloma. Furthermore, it has recently been proposed for the assessment of systemic bone diseases predisposing for malignancy (e.g., multiple cartilaginous exostoses) and muscle disease (e.g., muscle dystrophy). The following article gives an overview on state-of-the-art whole-body imaging of the musculoskeletal system and highlights present and potential future applications, especially in the field of whole-body MRI. (orig.)

  20. Direct molecular analysis of whole-body animal tissue sections by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyzer, Michelle L; Chaurand, Pierre; Angel, Peggi M; Caprioli, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    The determination of the localization of various compounds in a whole animal is valuable for many applications, including pharmaceutical absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies and biomarker discovery. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for localizing compounds of biological interest with molecular specificity and relatively high resolution. Utilizing imaging mass spectrometry for whole-body animal sections offers considerable analytical advantages compared to traditional methods, such as whole-body autoradiography, but the experiment is not straightforward. This chapter addresses the advantages and unique challenges that the application of imaging mass spectrometry to whole-body animal sections entails, including discussions of sample preparation, matrix application, signal normalization, and image generation. Lipid and protein images obtained from whole-body tissue sections of mouse pups are presented along with detailed protocols for the experiments.

  1. Comparison of whole body MR diffusion weighted imaging and skeletal scintigraphy in detecting bone metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xian; Ma Lin; Zhang Jinshan; Cai Youquan; Cheng Liuquan; Guo Xinggao; Xu Baixuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application of whole body MR diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the detection of bone metastasis using skeletal scintigraphy as the reference. Methods: Forty-two healthy volunteers and 38 patients with malignant tumors were enrolled in our study. All the patients received MR examination and skeletal scintigraphy within one week. MR examination was performed on GE signa 3.0T MR scanner using a build-in body coil. The skeletal system was divided into eight regions and the images of the whole body MR DWI and skeletal scintigraphy were reviewed to compare the two modalities patient by patient and region by region. The images were reviewed separately by two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physicians, who were blinded to the results of another imaging modality. Results: A total of 169 metastatic lesions in 69 regions of 30 patients were detected by whole body MR DWI while 156 lesions in 68 regions of 29 patients were identified by skeletal scintigraphy. There were two cases negative in scintigraphy but positive in whole body MR DWI and one case positive in scintigraphy only. There were eight lesions negative in scintigraphy but positive in whole body MR DWI, mainly located in the spine, pelvis and femur. Seven lesions were only detected by scintigraphy, mainly located in the skull, sternum, clavicle and scapula. Conclusion: The whole body MR DWI reveals excellent consistency with skeletal scintigraphy regarding bone metastasis, and the two modalities are complementary for each other. (authors)

  2. Image artifacts from MR-based attenuation correction in clinical, whole-body PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Adam E

    2013-01-01

    Integrated whole-body PET/MRI tomographs have become available. PET/MR imaging has the potential to supplement, or even replace combined PET/CT imaging in selected clinical indications. However, this is true only if methodological pitfalls and image artifacts arising from novel MR-based attenuation...

  3. Whole-body MR imaging for patients with rheumatism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckbach, Sabine [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Unversity Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: sabine.weckbach@umm.de

    2009-06-15

    WB-MRI in rheumatic diseases is still an emerging imaging tool. So far, WB-MRI in rheumatism is mainly used in seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In these diseases it has the ability to visualize the majority of involved joints and soft tissue structures (both active inflammatory changes and chronic structural abnormalities) in one examination, making it suitable for imaging of different forms of spondylopathies, allowing different types of joint involvement to be recognized and assessing both the acute symptoms of disease and the longer-term consequences. Its role in daily practice is not yet clear. WB-MRI is not recommended as a first line investigation in every patient suffering from a form of spondyloarthropathy, but may add important information in difficult cases. Moreover, WB-MRI might obtain a stronger role in the early diagnosis of spondyloarthritides and in the assessment of treatment response. Other rheumatic diseases where WB-MRI may play a role in the future are polymyositis/dermatomyositis, CRMO and certain forms of systemic vasculitis. WB-MRI in rheumatism is a promising tool with great potential, however further systematic evaluation of its abilities and limitations in different forms of rheumatic diseases is awaited.

  4. Whole-body MR imaging for patients with rheumatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckbach, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    WB-MRI in rheumatic diseases is still an emerging imaging tool. So far, WB-MRI in rheumatism is mainly used in seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In these diseases it has the ability to visualize the majority of involved joints and soft tissue structures (both active inflammatory changes and chronic structural abnormalities) in one examination, making it suitable for imaging of different forms of spondylopathies, allowing different types of joint involvement to be recognized and assessing both the acute symptoms of disease and the longer-term consequences. Its role in daily practice is not yet clear. WB-MRI is not recommended as a first line investigation in every patient suffering from a form of spondyloarthropathy, but may add important information in difficult cases. Moreover, WB-MRI might obtain a stronger role in the early diagnosis of spondyloarthritides and in the assessment of treatment response. Other rheumatic diseases where WB-MRI may play a role in the future are polymyositis/dermatomyositis, CRMO and certain forms of systemic vasculitis. WB-MRI in rheumatism is a promising tool with great potential, however further systematic evaluation of its abilities and limitations in different forms of rheumatic diseases is awaited.

  5. Whole Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Parsonage Turner Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.; Twair, A.; Nelson, E.; Brennan, D.; Eustace, S.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with suspected Parsonage Turner syndrome and to emphasize the value of an additional whole body MR scan to improve specificity of this diagnosis. Material and Methods: Three patients with proven Parsonage Turner syndrome referred for conventional MRI of the shoulder girdle and additional whole body turboSTIR MRI were included for study. Results: In each case, imaging revealed edema in the muscles of the shoulder girdle. Whole body turboSTIR MRI scan confirmed localized unilateral changes in each case improving specificity and confidence in the diagnosis of Parsonage Turner syndrome in each case. Conclusion: Whole body turboSTIR MR imaging is a useful diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected Parsonage Turner syndrome. Inclusion of the brain, neck, brachial plexus, and extremity musculature at whole body imaging allows differentiation from polymyositis and elimination of additional causes of shoulder girdle pain and weakness including gross lesions in the brain, neck, and brachial plexus by a single non-invasive study

  6. Evaluation of whole-body MR to CT deformable image registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbarzadeh, A.; Gutierrez, D.; Baskin, A.; Ay, M. R.; Ahmadian, A.; Alam, N. Riahi; Loevblad, K. O.; Zaidi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Multimodality image registration plays a crucial role in various clinical and research applications. The aim of this study is to present an optimized MR to CT whole-body deformable image registration algorithm and its validation using clinical studies. A 3D intermodality registration technique based

  7. Usefulness of Ga-67 citrate whole body imaging, chest spot imaging, and chest SPECT in sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Kyoichi; Nishi, Koichi; Namura, Masanobu; Kawashima, Yoshio; Kurumaya, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity, and the relative role of Ga-67 whole body, chest spot imaging, and chest SPECT, we retrospectively studied 34 cases of sarcoidosis (24 biopsy proven, 10 clinically diagnosed) with Ga-67 (111 MBq), and compared the results of lung (25 cases), muscle (25 cases), skin (3 cases), and myocardial (2 cases) biopsies. Ga-67 chest SPECT (single photon emission CT) were done in 17 cases with Siemens MultiSPECT3. Ga-67 planar imaging visualized only 2 of 12 (16.7%) lung biopsy-positive cases, 5 of 12 (41.6%) muscle biopsy-positive cases, 2 of 3 (66.7%) skin biopsy-positive cases. However, Ga-67 imaging revealed the lesions in 1 of 9 (11.1%) of muscle biopsy-negative cases, in 2 of 3 (66.7%) of skin biopsy-negative cases, and in 1 of 2 myocardial biopsy-negative cases. Ga-67 chest SPECT visualized 14 hilar lymphadenopathy (LN), 3 supraclavicular LN, and 1 myocardial sarcoidosis. Although both SPECT, and planar spot imaging detected the lesions equally, the former showed them more clearly. Compared with various biopsies, the sensitivity of Ga-67 imaging was not so high. However, Ga-67 imaging is non-invasive, easy to perform the whole body imaging, and can detect the activity of the lesions. Ga-67 SPECT showed clear imaging of the hilar, mediastinal LN, and potentially fatal myocardial sarcoidosis. (author)

  8. The four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms and its application in medical imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chongguo; Wu Dake

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging simulation is a powerful tool for characterizing,evaluating,and optimizing medical imaging devices and techniques. A vital aspect of simulation is to have a realistic phantom or model of the subject's anatomy. Four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms provide realistic models of the mouse anatomy and physiology for imaging studies. When combined with accurate models for the imaging process,are capable of providing a wealth of realistic imaging data from subjects with various anatomies and motions (cardiac and respiratory) in health and disease. With this ability, the four-dimensional mouse whole-body phantoms have enormous potential to study the effects of anatomical, physiological and physical factors on medical and small animal imaging and to research new instrumentation, image acquisition strategies, image processing, reconstruction methods, image visualization and interpretation techniques. (authors)

  9. Study on the usefulness of whole body SPECT coronal image, MIP image in {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Seiji [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Hospital; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Kurata, Seiji; Morita, Seiichirou; Hayabuchi, Naofumi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Fukushima, Shigehiro [Kyushu Inst. of Design, Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Auditory and Visual Communication Sciences; Umezaki, Noriyoshi [Daiichi Coll. of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we examined the usefulness of whole body coronal images and whole body cine display MIP images (CMIP) upon which image processing was carried out after whole body SPECT in comparison to the usefulness of whole body images (WB/SC) compensated by scattered radiation in tumor/inflammation scintigraphy with {sup 67}Ga-citrate ({sup 67}Ga). Image interpretation was performed for the 120 patients with confirmed diagnoses, and the accuracy of their diagnoses was studied by three nuclear medical physicians and two clinical radiological technologists by means of sensitivity, specificity and ROC analysis. The resultant data show that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under the ROC curve Az in the WB/SC were approximately 65%, 86%, 74% and 0.724, respectively, whereas sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Az of the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method were approximately 93%, 95%, 94% and 0.860, respectively. Furthermore, coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method tended to be superior to those produced by the FBP method in both diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. In conclusion, the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method was shown to be superior in diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. Our data suggest that whole body SPECT is an excellent technique as an alternative to WB/SC. (author)

  10. Segmentation of rodent whole-body dynamic PET images: an unsupervised method based on voxel dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maroy, Renaud; Boisgard, Raphaël; Comtat, Claude

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful tool for pharmacokinetics studies in rodents during the preclinical phase of drug and tracer development. However, rodent organs are small as compared to the scanner's intrinsic resolution and are affected by physiological movements. We present a new...... method for the segmentation of rodent whole-body PET images that takes these two difficulties into account by estimating the pharmacokinetics far from organ borders. The segmentation method proved efficient on whole-body numerical rat phantom simulations, including 3-14 organs, together...

  11. Generalized whole-body Patlak parametric imaging for enhanced quantification in clinical PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Zhou, Yun; Lodge, Martin A.; Casey, Michael E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Zaidi, Habib; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-01-01

    We recently developed a dynamic multi-bed PET data acquisition framework to translate the quantitative benefits of Patlak voxel-wise analysis to the domain of routine clinical whole-body (WB) imaging. The standard Patlak (sPatlak) linear graphical analysis assumes irreversible PET tracer uptake,

  12. Trial making of a positive drawing phantom and its application to whole-body imaging devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, Kenji; Arimizu, Noboru; Nakata, Tsuneo; Toyama, Haruo; Shiina, Isamu.

    1980-01-01

    In whole-body RI imaging, there are more instances of the positive pictures detecting the radioisotopes accumulating in morbid positions, such as Tc-99m bone scanning. The phantoms used to mutually compare RI imaging devices and to test their performance employ negative drawing targets embedded rather than positive ones. A simple positive drawing phantom has been made for trial, and applying this to whole-body scanning devices, the performance and the target drawing ability under different scanning conditions were comparatively examined. Though similar to Rollo's phantom, the phantom made for positive drawing uses acryl plate for its outer structure and target portions. The positive targets are cylindrical, and the diameters are 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm, and the subject contrasts are 5, 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.2. The aqueous solution of Tc-99m of about 2 mCi was injected into the phantom, and this was scanned with a whole-body camera and a multi-detector type whole-body scanner. With the phantom pictures close to actual clinical condition, the positive drawing phantom is conveniently capable of comparing the respective imaging devices for intended purposes. (J.P.N.)

  13. From whole-body counting to imaging: The computer aided collimation gamma camera project (CACAO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanguillaume, C.; Begot, S.; Quartuccio, M.; Douiri, A.; Ballongue, P

    2000-07-01

    Whole-body counting is the method of choice for in vivo detection of contamination. To extend this well established method, the possible advantages of imaging radiocontaminants are examined. The use of the CACAO project is then studied. A comparison of simulated reconstructed images obtained by the CACAO project and by a conventional gamma camera used in nuclear medicine follows. Imaging a radionuclide contaminant with a geometrical sensitivity of 10{sup -2} seems possible in the near future. (author)

  14. From whole-body counting to imaging: The computer aided collimation gamma camera project (CACAO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanguillaume, C.; Begot, S.; Quartuccio, M.; Douiri, A.; Ballongue, P.

    2000-01-01

    Whole-body counting is the method of choice for in vivo detection of contamination. To extend this well established method, the possible advantages of imaging radiocontaminants are examined. The use of the CACAO project is then studied. A comparison of simulated reconstructed images obtained by the CACAO project and by a conventional gamma camera used in nuclear medicine follows. Imaging a radionuclide contaminant with a geometrical sensitivity of 10 -2 seems possible in the near future. (author)

  15. Patient-Specific Biomechanical Model as Whole-Body CT Image Registration Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mao; Miller, Karol; Joldes, Grand Roman; Doyle, Barry; Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Kikinis, Ron; Wittek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body computed tomography (CT) image registration is important for cancer diagnosis, therapy planning and treatment. Such registration requires accounting for large differences between source and target images caused by deformations of soft organs/tissues and articulated motion of skeletal structures. The registration algorithms relying solely on image processing methods exhibit deficiencies in accounting for such deformations and motion. We propose to predict the deformations and moveme...

  16. Computational anatomy based on whole body imaging basic principles of computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Masutani, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    This book deals with computational anatomy, an emerging discipline recognized in medical science as a derivative of conventional anatomy. It is also a completely new research area on the boundaries of several sciences and technologies, such as medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics. Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging highlights the underlying principles, basic theories, and fundamental techniques in computational anatomy, which are derived from conventional anatomy, medical imaging, computer vision, and applied mathematics, in addition to various examples of applications in clinical data. The book will cover topics on the basics and applications of the new discipline. Drawing from areas in multidisciplinary fields, it provides comprehensive, integrated coverage of innovative approaches to computational anatomy. As well,Computational Anatomy Based on Whole Body Imaging serves as a valuable resource for researchers including graduate students in the field and a connection with ...

  17. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.; Zhao, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  18. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huiqian [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China and Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Udupa, Jayaram K., E-mail: jay@mail.med.upenn.edu; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A. [Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Zhao, Liming [Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 and Research Center of Intelligent System and Robotics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  19. Imaging technique of whole-body scintigram in the event of breakdown of the photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Syoichi; Tonami, Syuichi; Yasui, Masakazu; Sugishita, Kouki; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto

    1997-01-01

    When the PMT and preamplifier are out of order, it is impossible to make a correct diagnosis because of defects on the scintigram. However, repair of the equipment may take a long time. In order to perform emergent whole-body scintigrams in the event of such breakdowns, we have developed a new approach named the lead-shield method. The major principles of this method involve placing a lead shield on the gamma camera such that it corresponds to the area of the abnormal PMT and making use of the normal area of the detector. The lead shield, 2 mm thick and 1.5 times as wide as the defect on a planar image, was situated perpendicular to the scan plane of the whole-body scintigram. The results showed that whole-body scintigrams obtained by the lead-shield method had the same quality as those obtained by the conventional method, and the spatial resolution and uniformity showed nearly no change despite some disadvantages such as lower sensitivity and shorter scan length. The lead-shield method can be a useful tool for the performance of whole-body scintigrams in cases of emergency when the PMT and preamplifier are out of order. (author)

  20. Imaging technique of whole-body scintigram in the event of breakdown of the photomultiplier tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Syoichi; Tonami, Syuichi; Yasui, Masakazu; Sugishita, Kouki; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    1997-10-01

    When the PMT and preamplifier are out of order, it is impossible to make a correct diagnosis because of defects on the scintigram. However, repair of the equipment may take a long time. In order to perform emergent whole-body scintigrams in the event of such breakdowns, we have developed a new approach named the lead-shield method. The major principles of this method involve placing a lead shield on the gamma camera such that it corresponds to the area of the abnormal PMT and making use of the normal area of the detector. The lead shield, 2 mm thick and 1.5 times as wide as the defect on a planar image, was situated perpendicular to the scan plane of the whole-body scintigram. The results showed that whole-body scintigrams obtained by the lead-shield method had the same quality as those obtained by the conventional method, and the spatial resolution and uniformity showed nearly no change despite some disadvantages such as lower sensitivity and shorter scan length. The lead-shield method can be a useful tool for the performance of whole-body scintigrams in cases of emergency when the PMT and preamplifier are out of order. (author)

  1. Improved quality of image got through whole-body CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahina, Kiyotaka

    1980-01-01

    The quality of brain images taken with a whole-body CT scanner has so far been generally inferior in quality to those got through a CT scanner exclusively used for brains. In order to improve the whole-body CT scanner so as to get better brain image, its detection system has been made multichannel; the capacity of its X-ray tube, increased; and its software, innovated. As a result, the spatial resolution has been improved from 5.51 p/cm to 9.01 p/cm, the contrast resolution has been improved from 3.2 mm% to 1.5 mm%, with the noise maintained at 0.5%. In clinical examination, the image quality has been improved equally well for brains, abdomens and lungs. Especially high appreciation is given to the diagnosis information got through this new scanner. (author)

  2. Optimized workflow and imaging protocols for whole-body oncologic PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Shirou; Hara, Takamitsu; Nanbu, Takeyuki; Suenaga, Hiroki; Sugawara, Shigeyasu; Kuroiwa, Daichi; Sekino, Hirofumi; Miyajima, Masayuki; Kubo, Hitoshi; Oriuchi, Noboru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Although PET/MRI has the advantages of a simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI, high soft-tissue contrast of the MRI images, and reduction of radiation exposure, its low profitability and long acquisition time are significant problems in clinical settings. Thus, MRI protocols that meet oncological purposes need to be used in order to reduce examination time while securing detectability. Currently, half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo and 3D-T1 volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination may be the most commonly used sequences for whole-body imaging due to their shorter acquisition time and higher diagnostic accuracy. Although there have been several reports that adding diffusion weighted image (DWI) to PET/MRI protocol has had no effect on tumor detection to date, in cases of liver, kidney, bladder, and prostate cancer, the use of DWI may be beneficial in detecting lesions. Another possible option is to scan each region with different MRI sequences instead of scanning the whole body using one sequence continuously. We herein report a workflow and imaging protocols for whole-body oncologic PET/MRI using an integrated system in the clinical routine, designed for the detection, for example by cancer screening, of metastatic lesions, in order to help future users optimize their workflow and imaging protocols.

  3. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (~15-20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final Ki parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion study

  4. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (∼15–20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final K i parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion

  5. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in children: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Reis Teixeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Whole-body imaging in children was classically performed with radiography, positron-emission tomography, either combined or not with computed tomography, the latter with the disadvantage of exposure to ionizing radiation. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, in association with the recently developed metabolic and functional techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, has brought the advantage of a comprehensive evaluation of pediatric patients without the risks inherent to ionizing radiation usually present in other conventional imaging methods. It is a rapid and sensitive method, particularly in pediatrics, for detecting and monitoring multifocal lesions in the body as a whole. In pediatrics, it is utilized for both oncologic and non-oncologic indications such as screening and diagnosis of tumors in patients with genetic syndromes, evaluation of disease extent and staging, evaluation of therapeutic response and post-therapy follow-up, evaluation of non neoplastic diseases such as multifocal osteomyelitis, vascular malformations and syndromes affecting multiple regions of the body. The present review was aimed at describing the major indications of whole-body MRI in pediatrics added of technical considerations.

  6. Thallium-201 imaging in children with osteogenic sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, M.K.; Koutsiofi, M.; Rossleigh, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Thallium(Tl)-201 scintigraphy has been utilised in the imaging of a variety of tumours. This study evaluates its usefulness in children with osteogenic sarcoma. Five patients (3 male, 2 female) whose ages ranged from 11 to 15 years were investigated. Each child underwent a baseline 201 Tl study at diagnosis to determine the initial avidity of the tumour and a follow up study following chemotherapy, just prior to surgical excision, to assess tumour response to chemotherapy. This tumour response was confirmed by histopathological examination of the operative specimen. 201 Tl scintigraphy was undertaken 20 minutes following the intravenous administration of a weight adjusted dose of 201 Tl (minimum dose 20 MBq, adult dose 120 MBq). Whole body studies as well as planar images of the primary tumour were performed. All primary tumours were thallium avid on the baseline study. On the follow-up examination after therapy, a variety of patterns of uptake were seen and these correlated with the pathological findings. In one patient, complete loss of thallium accumulation following treatment corresponded to 100% tumour necrosis histologically. In another patient, persistent thallium uptake in the tumour following chemotherapy correlated with viable tumour cells on pathology and this patient died of his disease. In the other 3 patients, intermediate grade thallium appearances were demonstrated. In conclusion, 201 Tl scintigraphy is an excellent marker of osteogenic sarcoma and follow-up studies after chemotherapy accurately reflect residual tumour activity when correlated with histology. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackers, F.J.Th.

    1980-01-01

    Three views are routinely obtained for 201 Tl scintigraphy: 0 0 anterior, 45 0 left-anterior-oblique, both views with the patient supine and a left-lateral view, with the patient lying on his right side. Following intravenous injection of 201 Tl, the scintiscans of a normal subject only demonstrate the left ventricle. In patients with normal myocardial perfusion, the left ventricle appears horseshoe or ovoid in shape. The central area of decreased activity represents the left ventricular cavity and is normal. The accumulation of 201 Tl in the normal left ventricle is usually homogeneous. However, some areas with apparent diminished uptake may occur in the normal subject. These variations of the normal image are discussed. The right ventricle, because of its smaller myocardial mass and relatively less 201 Tl accumulation per gram of tissue, is usually on a resting study not, or only faintly, visualized. However, following exercise, the right ventricle is clearly visualized. (Auth.)

  8. Small-animal whole-body imaging using a photoacoustic full ring array system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Guo, Zijian; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In this report, we present a novel 3D photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system for small-animal whole-body imaging. The PACT system, based on a 512-element full-ring transducer array, received photoacoustic signals primarily from a 2-mm-thick slice. The light was generated by a pulse laser, and can either illuminate from the top or be reshaped to illuminate the sample from the side, using a conical lens and an optical condenser. The PACT system was capable of acquiring an in-plane image in 1.6 s; by scanning the sample in the elevational direction, a 3D tomographic image could be constructed. We tested the system by imaging a cylindrical phantom made of human hairs immersed in a scattering medium. The reconstructed image achieved an in-plane resolution of 0.1 mm and an elevational resolution of 1 mm. After deconvolution in the elevational direction, the 3D image was found to match well with the phantom. The system was also used to image a baby mouse in situ; the spinal cord and ribs can be seen easily in the reconstructed image. Our results demonstrate that the PACT system has the potential to be used for fast small-animal whole-body tomographic imaging.

  9. [Segmentation of whole body bone SPECT image based on BP neural network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunmei; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; He, Yuanlie; Wang, Lifei; Ye, Guangchun; Mao, Zongyuan

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, BP neural network is used to segment whole body bone SPECT image so that the lesion area can be recognized automatically. For the uncertain characteristics of SPECT images, it is hard to achieve good segmentation result if only the BP neural network is employed. Therefore, the segmentation process is divided into three steps: first, the optimal gray threshold segmentation method is employed for preprocessing, then BP neural network is used to roughly identify the lesions, and finally template match method and symmetry-removing program are adopted to delete the wrongly recognized areas.

  10. Evaluation of whole-body MR to CT deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh, A; Gutierrez, D; Baskin, A; Ay, M R; Ahmadian, A; Riahi Alam, N; Lövblad, K O; Zaidi, H

    2013-07-08

    Multimodality image registration plays a crucial role in various clinical and research applications. The aim of this study is to present an optimized MR to CT whole-body deformable image registration algorithm and its validation using clinical studies. A 3D intermodality registration technique based on B-spline transformation was performed using optimized parameters of the elastix package based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK) framework. Twenty-eight (17 male and 11 female) clinical studies were used in this work. The registration was evaluated using anatomical landmarks and segmented organs. In addition to 16 anatomical landmarks, three key organs (brain, lungs, and kidneys) and the entire body volume were segmented for evaluation. Several parameters--such as the Euclidean distance between anatomical landmarks, target overlap, Dice and Jaccard coefficients, false positives and false negatives, volume similarity, distance error, and Hausdorff distance--were calculated to quantify the quality of the registration algorithm. Dice coefficients for the majority of patients (> 75%) were in the 0.8-1 range for the whole body, brain, and lungs, which satisfies the criteria to achieve excellent alignment. On the other hand, for kidneys, Dice coefficients for volumes of 25% of the patients meet excellent volume agreement requirement, while the majority of patients satisfy good agreement criteria (> 0.6). For all patients, the distance error was in 0-10 mm range for all segmented organs. In summary, we optimized and evaluated the accuracy of an MR to CT deformable registration algorithm. The registered images constitute a useful 3D whole-body MR-CT atlas suitable for the development and evaluation of novel MR-guided attenuation correction procedures on hybrid PET-MR systems.

  11. Thallium-201 stress imaging in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, D.S.; Francis, C.K.; Black, H.R.; Wackers, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    To assess the potential effect of hypertension on the results of thallium-201 stress imaging in patients with chest pain, 272 thallium-201 stress tests performed in 133 hypertensive patients and 139 normotensive patients over a 1-year period were reviewed. Normotensive and hypertensive patients were similar in age, gender distribution, prevalence of cardiac risk factors (tobacco smoking, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus), medications, and clinical symptoms of coronary disease. Electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy were present in 16 hypertensive patients. Stepwise probability analysis was used to determine the likelihood of coronary artery disease for each patient. In patients with mid to high likelihood of coronary disease (greater than 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 54 of 60 (90%) hypertensive patients compared with 51 of 64 (80%) normotensive patients. However, in 73 patients with a low likelihood of coronary disease (less than or equal to 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 21 patients (29%) of the hypertensive group compared with only 5 of 75 (7%) of the normotensive patients (p less than 0.001). These findings suggest that in patients with a mid to high likelihood of coronary artery disease, coexistent hypertension does not affect the results of thallium-201 exercise stress testing. However, in patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease, abnormal thallium-201 stress images are obtained more frequently in hypertensive patients than in normotensive patients

  12. System for whole body imaging and count profiling with a scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, E.; Cooke, M.B.D.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of and apparatus for the radionuclide imaging of the whole body of a patient using an unmodified scintillation camera which permits a patient to be continuously moved under or over the stationary camera face along one axis at a time, parallel passes being made to increase the dimension of the other axis. The system includes a unique electrical circuit which makes it possible to digitally generate new matrix coordinates by summing the coordinates of a first fixed reference frame and the coordinates of a second moving reference frame. 19 claims, 7 figures

  13. A 2-Tesla active shield magnet for whole body imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, F.J.; Elliott, R.T.; Hawksworth, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and testing of a 2T superconducting Active Shield magnet, with a 0.99m diameter warm bore for whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The magnet and cryostat were designed to meet the same performance standards as existing MRI magnets, but with the volume of the stray field region reduced to less than 4% of that for an unshielded magnet. The 0.5 mT stray field contour is within 5m axially and 3m radially of the magnet center. The system weight is only 14 tonnes

  14. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  15. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  16. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ∼15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ∼45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different

  17. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  18. Compact whole-body fluorescent imaging of nude mice bearing EGFP expressing tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanping; Xiong, Tao; Chu, Jun; Yu, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Issue of tumor has been a hotspot of current medicine. It is important for tumor research to detect tumors bearing in animal models easily, fast, repetitively and noninvasivly. Many researchers have paid their increasing interests on the detecting. Some contrast agents, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Discosoma red fluorescent protein (Dsred) were applied to enhance image quality. Three main kinds of imaging scheme were adopted to visualize fluorescent protein expressing tumors in vivo. These schemes based on fluorescence stereo microscope, cooled charge-coupled-device (CCD) or camera as imaging set, and laser or mercury lamp as excitation light source. Fluorescence stereo microscope, laser and cooled CCD are expensive to many institutes. The authors set up an inexpensive compact whole-body fluorescent imaging tool, which consisted of a Kodak digital camera (model DC290), fluorescence filters(B and G2;HB Optical, Shenyang, Liaoning, P.R. China) and a mercury 50-W lamp power supply (U-LH50HG;Olympus Optical, Japan) as excitation light source. The EGFP was excited directly by mercury lamp with D455/70 nm band-pass filter and fluorescence was recorded by digital camera with 520nm long-pass filter. By this easy operation tool, the authors imaged, in real time, fluorescent tumors growing in live mice. The imaging system is external and noninvasive. For half a year our experiments suggested the imaging scheme was feasible. Whole-body fluorescence optical imaging for fluorescent expressing tumors in nude mouse is an ideal tool for antitumor, antimetastatic, and antiangiogenesis drug screening.

  19. Segmentation of rodent whole-body dynamic PET images: an unsupervised method based on voxel dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroy, R.; Boisgard, R.; Comtat, C.; Dolle, F.; Trebossen, R.; Tavitian, B.; Frouin, V.; Cathier, P.; Duchesnay, E.; D; Nielsen, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful tool for pharmacokinetics studies in rodents during the preclinical phase of drug and tracer development. However, rodent organs are small as compared to the scanner's intrinsic resolution and are affected by physiological movements. We present a new method for the segmentation of rodent whole-body PET images that takes these two difficulties into account by estimating the pharmacokinetics far from organ borders. The segmentation method proved efficient on whole-body numerical rat phantom simulations, including 3-14 organs, together with physiological movements (heart beating, breathing, and bladder filling). The method was resistant to spillover and physiological movements, while other methods failed to obtain a correct segmentation. The radioactivity concentrations calculated with this method also showed an excellent correlation with the manual delineation of organs in a large set of preclinical images. In addition, it was faster, detected more organs, and extracted organs' mean time activity curves with a better confidence on the measure than manual delineation. (authors)

  20. Whole-body MRI in adult inflammatory myopathies: Do we need imaging of the trunk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filli, Lukas; Manoliu, Andrei; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman; Maurer, Britta

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether imaging of the trunk could be omitted in patients with inflammatory myopathies without losing diagnostic accuracy using a restricted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (rWB-MRI) protocol. After approval by the institutional review board, this study was performed in 63 patients (male/female, 13/50; median age, 52 years; range, 20-81 years) with new-onset myopathic symptoms (group 1, n = 41) or previously diagnosed inflammatory myopathy (group 2, n = 22). After performing whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) at 3.0 Tesla, myositis and fatty atrophy were evaluated in different muscles by two independent radiologists. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to evaluate inter-observer reliability. Acquisition time was 56:01 minutes for WB-MRI and 37:37 minutes (32.8 % shorter) for rWB-MRI. In group 1, 14 patients were diagnosed with inflammatory myopathy based on muscle biopsy. rWB-MRI and WB-MRI showed equal sensitivity (42.9 %) and specificity (100 %) for myositis, and showed equal sensitivity (71.4 %) and similar specificity (63.0 % and 48.1 %, respectively) for fatty atrophy. No myositis was found in the body trunk in any patient. Inter-observer reliability was between substantial and perfect (ICC, 0.77-1.00). rWB-MRI showed diagnostic accuracy similar to WB-MRI for inflammatory myopathy at markedly reduced overall acquisition time. (orig.)

  1. Whole-body MRI in adult inflammatory myopathies: Do we need imaging of the trunk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Manoliu, Andrei; Andreisek, Gustav; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Maurer, Britta [University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Division of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate whether imaging of the trunk could be omitted in patients with inflammatory myopathies without losing diagnostic accuracy using a restricted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (rWB-MRI) protocol. After approval by the institutional review board, this study was performed in 63 patients (male/female, 13/50; median age, 52 years; range, 20-81 years) with new-onset myopathic symptoms (group 1, n = 41) or previously diagnosed inflammatory myopathy (group 2, n = 22). After performing whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) at 3.0 Tesla, myositis and fatty atrophy were evaluated in different muscles by two independent radiologists. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to evaluate inter-observer reliability. Acquisition time was 56:01 minutes for WB-MRI and 37:37 minutes (32.8 % shorter) for rWB-MRI. In group 1, 14 patients were diagnosed with inflammatory myopathy based on muscle biopsy. rWB-MRI and WB-MRI showed equal sensitivity (42.9 %) and specificity (100 %) for myositis, and showed equal sensitivity (71.4 %) and similar specificity (63.0 % and 48.1 %, respectively) for fatty atrophy. No myositis was found in the body trunk in any patient. Inter-observer reliability was between substantial and perfect (ICC, 0.77-1.00). rWB-MRI showed diagnostic accuracy similar to WB-MRI for inflammatory myopathy at markedly reduced overall acquisition time. (orig.)

  2. Factors affecting gastric uptake in whole body FDG-PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Mami; Nakahara, Tadaki; Wu, Jin; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Uno, Kimiichi; Abe, Kinji; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi [Nishidai Clinic Diagnostic Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is very useful for the detection and staging of tumors. However, FDG is also accumulated in the normal tissues in various degrees. This physiological FDG uptake is often seen in intestine, making confusion with malignant tumor. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the stomach. A total of 136 people who underwent cancer screening or staging of tumors except for gastric cancer using FDG whole-body PET was examined (mean age: 55.6 yrs). All subjects fasted for at least 4 hours before the PET study and were administrated with FDG intravenously (mean FDG dose: 308.9 MBq). Emission images were acquired on a whole-body PET scanner and images were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The intensity of gastric uptake of FDG whole-body PET image was visually classified into 3 grades; grade 2 = the intensity of gastric uptake more than pulmonary uptake, grade 1 = the intensity of gastric uptake equal to or less than pulmonary uptake, grade 0 = no contrast between gastric uptake and background. Twenty-eight subjects (20.6%) were classified into grade 2, 42 subjects (30.9%) were grade 1 and 66 subjects (48.5%) were grade 0. Subjects' age, fasting time, FDG dose, serum glucose level, free fatty acid level and insulin level were not significantly correlated with the intensity of gastric uptake. But the subjects with higher gastric uptake tended to have anti-Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) antibodies. The rate of having anti-H.pylori antibodies in the grade 2 group is significantly higher than the grade 1 group (85.7% vs. 72.5%, p<0.05), and that of the grade 1 group is significantly higher than the grade 0 group (72.5% vs. 42.2%, p<0.01). Gastric uptake was observed in about half of subjects. Especially, approximately 20% of all showed high gastric uptake, which was associated with H.pylori infection. Therefore, most of the subjects

  3. Factors affecting gastric uptake in whole body FDG-PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomemori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Mami; Nakahara, Tadaki; Wu, Jin; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Uno, Kimiichi; Abe, Kinji; Tomiyoshi, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) is very useful for the detection and staging of tumors. However, FDG is also accumulated in the normal tissues in various degrees. This physiological FDG uptake is often seen in intestine, making confusion with malignant tumor. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing physiological FDG uptake in the stomach. A total of 136 people who underwent cancer screening or staging of tumors except for gastric cancer using FDG whole-body PET was examined (mean age: 55.6 yrs). All subjects fasted for at least 4 hours before the PET study and were administrated with FDG intravenously (mean FDG dose: 308.9 MBq). Emission images were acquired on a whole-body PET scanner and images were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The intensity of gastric uptake of FDG whole-body PET image was visually classified into 3 grades; grade 2 = the intensity of gastric uptake more than pulmonary uptake, grade 1 = the intensity of gastric uptake equal to or less than pulmonary uptake, grade 0 = no contrast between gastric uptake and background. Twenty-eight subjects (20.6%) were classified into grade 2, 42 subjects (30.9%) were grade 1 and 66 subjects (48.5%) were grade 0. Subjects' age, fasting time, FDG dose, serum glucose level, free fatty acid level and insulin level were not significantly correlated with the intensity of gastric uptake. But the subjects with higher gastric uptake tended to have anti-Helicobactor pylori (H. pylori) antibodies. The rate of having anti-H.pylori antibodies in the grade 2 group is significantly higher than the grade 1 group (85.7% vs. 72.5%, p<0.05), and that of the grade 1 group is significantly higher than the grade 0 group (72.5% vs. 42.2%, p<0.01). Gastric uptake was observed in about half of subjects. Especially, approximately 20% of all showed high gastric uptake, which was associated with H.pylori infection. Therefore, most of the subjects with high

  4. Whole-body MR imaging in psoriatic arthritis: Additional value for therapeutic decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckbach, Sabine; Schewe, Stefan; Michaely, Henrik J.; Steffinger, Denise; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Glaser, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In psoriatic arthritis (PsA) multiple locations may show inflammatory changes not always readily accessible to clinical exam. Often, clinical exam is inconclusive and the decision to initiate or adapt therapy is difficult. Whole body (WB)-MRI may help in this situation by providing a comprehensive overview of affected areas/joints. The purpose of this study was to make a proof of concept whether WB-MRI in psoriatic arthritis is feasible and can provide additional information compared to clinical examination alone with regard to therapeutic decision making in patients with PsA and inconclusive clinical situation. Materials and Methods: 30 patients with PsA and diffuse musculoskeletal pain were examined. A WB-MRI protocol was implemented on a 1.5 Tesla scanner using coronal and sagittal STIR- (TR: 5800, TE: 54, matrix 384 2 pixels, FOV 400 mm) and pre- and steady-state-post-Gadolinium-VIBE sequences (TR: 9.82, TE: 4.53, matrix 384 x 307 pixels, FOV: 400 mm). MRI was evaluated for image quality and inflammatory findings by two readers in consensus and compared to clinical exam. Results: The WB-MR-exam was well tolerated by all patients. Image quality was rated good to excellent in 26 of 30 patients (86.6%). WB-MRI detected significantly (p < 0.001) more areas of synovitis/enthesitis than clinical exam except for the hands and feet. MRI was able to detect unknown destructive bony changes in 10 patients (53%). In 22 patients (73.3%) the therapy regimen was modified, in 18 patients (62%) TNF-alpha-inhibitors were started. Conclusion: Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) may be integrated in the diagnostic work-up of patients with psoriatic arthropathy facilitating individual adaptation of therapeutic strategy.

  5. High spatial resolution whole-body MR angiography featuring parallel imaging: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, H.H.; Vogt, F.M.; Madewald, S.; Herborn, C.U.; Bosk, S.; Goehde, S.; Debatin, J.F.; Ladd, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Materials and methods: whole-body multi-station MRA was performed with a rolling table platform (AngioSURF) on 5 volunteers in two imaging series: 1) standard imaging protocol, 2) modified high-resolution protocol employing PAT using the generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) algorithm with an acceleration factor of 3. For an intra-individual comparison of the two MR examinations, the arterial vasculature was divided into 30 segments. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated for all 30 arterial segments of each subject. Vessel segment depiction was qualitatively assessed applying a 5-point scale to each of the segments. Image reconstruction times were recorded for the standard as well as the PAT protocol. Results: compared to the standard protocol, PAT allowed for increased spatial resolution through a 3-fold reduction in mean voxel size for each of the 5 stations. Mean SNR and CNR values over all specified vessel segments decreased by a factor of 1.58 and 1.56, respectively. Despite the reduced SNR and CNR, the depiction of all specified vessel segments increased in PAT images, reflecting the increased spatial resolution. Qualitative comparison of standard and PAT images showed an increase in vessel segment conspicuity with more detailed depiction of intramuscular arterial branches in all volunteers. The time for image data reconstruction of all 5 stations was significantly increased from about 10 minutes to 40 minutes when using the PAT acquisition. (orig.) [de

  6. Evaluation of quantitative planar 90Y bremsstrahlung whole-body imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minarik, D; Ljungberg, M; Gleisner, K Sjoegreen; Segars, P

    2009-01-01

    With high-dose administration of 90 Y labeled antibodies, it is possible to image 90 Y without an admixture of 111 In. We have earlier shown that it is possible to perform quantitative 90 Y bremsstrahlung SPECT for dosimetry purposes with reasonable accuracy. However, whole-body (WB) activity quantification with the conjugate view method is not as time consuming as SPECT and has been the method of choice for dosimetry. We have investigated the possibility of using a conjugate view method where scatter-, backscatter- and septal-penetration compensations are performed by inverse filtering and attenuation correction is performed with a WB x-ray image, for total-body and organ activity quantification of 90 Y. The method was evaluated using both Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera images using realistic source distributions, and by an experimental phantom study. The method was evaluated in terms of image quality and accuracy of the activity quantification. The experimental phantom study was performed using the RSD torso phantom with 90 Y activity uniformly distributed in the liver insert. A GE Discovery VH/Hawkeye system was used to acquire the image. The simulation study was performed for a realistic activity distribution in the NCAT anthropomorphic phantom where 90 Y bremsstrahlung images were generated using the SIMIND MC program. Two different phantom configurations and two activity distributions were simulated. To mimic the RSD phantom experiment one simulation study was also made with 90 Y activity located only in the liver. The SIMIND program was configured to resemble a GE Discovery VH/Hawkeye system. An x-ray projector program was used to generate whole-body x-ray images from the NCAT phantom for attenuation correction in the conjugate view method. Organ activities were calculated from ROIs that exactly covered the organs. Corrections for background activity, overlapping activity and source extension in the depth direction were applied on the ROI data

  7. Effect of eating on thallium myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.A.; Sullivan, P.J.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Morris, C.; Pohost, G.M.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    To determine if eating between initial and delayed thallium images alters the appearance of the delayed thallium scan, a prospective study was performed; 184 subjects sent for routine thallium imaging were randomized into two groups, those who ate a meal high in carbohydrates between initial and delayed thallium myocardial images (n = 106), and those who fasted (n = 78). The 201 Tl images were interpreted in blinded fashion for global myocardial and pulmonary clearance of 201 Tl myocardial defects. The eating group had a significantly lower incidence of transient myocardial defects compared to the noneating group (7 percent vs 18 percent, respectively; p less than 0.05). The time between initial and delayed images and the incidence of exercise-induced ischemic ST-segment depression or pathologic Q waves on the electrocardiogram were not significantly different between the two groups. These data suggest that eating a high-carbohydrate meal between initial and delayed 201 Tl images causes increased 201 Tl myocardial clearance rates and may alter 201 Tl myocardial redistribution over time

  8. Comparison of SPECT and whole-body planar imaging in radioimmunoscintigraphy with Tc-labeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacic, K.; Bokulic, T.; Lukac, J.; Dakovic, N.; Kusic, Z.

    1994-01-01

    The authors of some recent clinical studies suggested 20-24 hours SPECT imaging as a mandatory procedure in radioimmunoscintigraphy with Tc-labeled antibodies. The aim of our study was to compare whole-body (WB) planar imaging versus SPECT as well as 4-6 hours SPECT to 20-24 hours one. For this purpose we analyzed 33 lesions in 12 postsurgical patients with colorectal carcinoma. Each patient received intravenously 0.5-1.0 mg anti-CEA BW 431/26 murine monoclonal IgG-antibodies labeled with Tc-99m (814-1110 MBq). WB and SPECT imaging were performed at 4-6 and 20-24 hours post infusion. 20-24 hours WB scan imaged more 'hot' and less 'cold' lesions than 4-6 hours one. SPECT scan showed significantly more lesions than WB scan. 20-24 hours SPECT scan detected more 'hot' lesions than 4-6 hours SPECT. At the same time the number of 'cold' lesions decreased in 20-24 hours SPECT in comparison to 4-6 hours one. As a conclusion we can say that our results suggest a superiority of SPECT imaging in comparison to WB scan. Except that, in our opinion performing of a 20-24 hours SPECT scan in radioimmunoscintigraphy with Tc-labeled antibodies should be mandatory. (author)

  9. Comparison of SPECT and whole-body planar imaging in radioimmunoscintigraphy with Tc-labeled antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacic, K; Bokulic, T; Lukac, J; Dakovic, N; Kusic, Z [Clinical Hospital Sestre Milosrdnice, Zagreb (Croatia). Dept. of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine

    1994-10-01

    The authors of some recent clinical studies suggested 20-24 hours SPECT imaging as a mandatory procedure in radioimmunoscintigraphy with Tc-labeled antibodies. The aim of our study was to compare whole-body (WB) planar imaging versus SPECT as well as 4-6 hours SPECT to 20-24 hours one. For this purpose we analyzed 33 lesions in 12 postsurgical patients with colorectal carcinoma. Each patient received intravenously 0.5-1.0 mg anti-CEA BW 431/26 murine monoclonal IgG-antibodies labeled with Tc-99m (814-1110 MBq). WB and SPECT imaging were performed at 4-6 and 20-24 hours post infusion. 20-24 hours WB scan imaged more `hot` and less `cold` lesions than 4-6 hours one. SPECT scan showed significantly more lesions than WB scan. 20-24 hours SPECT scan detected more `hot` lesions than 4-6 hours SPECT. At the same time the number of `cold` lesions decreased in 20-24 hours SPECT in comparison to 4-6 hours one. As a conclusion we can say that our results suggest a superiority of SPECT imaging in comparison to WB scan. Except that, in our opinion performing of a 20-24 hours SPECT scan in radioimmunoscintigraphy with Tc-labeled antibodies should be mandatory. (author).

  10. A gamma camera count rate saturation correction method for whole-body planar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Baechler, Sébastien; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Prideaux, Andrew R.; Esaias, Caroline E.; Reinhardt, Melvin; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Sgouros, George

    2010-02-01

    Whole-body (WB) planar imaging has long been one of the staple methods of dosimetry, and its quantification has been formalized by the MIRD Committee in pamphlet no 16. One of the issues not specifically addressed in the formalism occurs when the count rates reaching the detector are sufficiently high to result in camera count saturation. Camera dead-time effects have been extensively studied, but all of the developed correction methods assume static acquisitions. However, during WB planar (sweep) imaging, a variable amount of imaged activity exists in the detector's field of view as a function of time and therefore the camera saturation is time dependent. A new time-dependent algorithm was developed to correct for dead-time effects during WB planar acquisitions that accounts for relative motion between detector heads and imaged object. Static camera dead-time parameters were acquired by imaging decaying activity in a phantom and obtaining a saturation curve. Using these parameters, an iterative algorithm akin to Newton's method was developed, which takes into account the variable count rate seen by the detector as a function of time. The algorithm was tested on simulated data as well as on a whole-body scan of high activity Samarium-153 in an ellipsoid phantom. A complete set of parameters from unsaturated phantom data necessary for count rate to activity conversion was also obtained, including build-up and attenuation coefficients, in order to convert corrected count rate values to activity. The algorithm proved successful in accounting for motion- and time-dependent saturation effects in both the simulated and measured data and converged to any desired degree of precision. The clearance half-life calculated from the ellipsoid phantom data was calculated to be 45.1 h after dead-time correction and 51.4 h with no correction; the physical decay half-life of Samarium-153 is 46.3 h. Accurate WB planar dosimetry of high activities relies on successfully compensating

  11. Constrained non-rigid registration for whole body image registration: method and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd E.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2007-03-01

    3D intra- and inter-subject registration of image volumes is important for tasks that include measurements and quantification of temporal/longitudinal changes, atlas-based segmentation, deriving population averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. A number of methods have been proposed to tackle this problem but few of them have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These image volumes typically contain a large number of articulated structures, which makes registration more difficult than the registration of head images, to which the vast majority of registration algorithms have been applied. To solve this problem, we have previously proposed an approach, which initializes an intensity-based non-rigid registration algorithm with a point based registration technique [1, 2]. In this paper, we introduce new constraints into our non-rigid registration algorithm to prevent the bones from being deformed inaccurately. Results we have obtained show that the new constrained algorithm leads to better registration results than the previous one.

  12. Whole-body imaging of whole-organ, subresolution, basic functional unit (BFU) perfusion characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yue; Ritman, Erik L.

    2008-08-01

    A BFU is an organ's smallest assembly of diverse cells that functions like the organ, such as the liver's hepatic lobules. There are approximately 107 BFUs in a human organ. These 100-200 μm structures are perfused by capillaries fed by a terminal arteriole (15μm diameter). BFU sizes, function and number per organ vary with disease, either by loss of BFUs and/or their decrease in function. The BFU is the upper limit of a spherical assembly of cells, immersed in a suitably nutrient medium, which can survive without its own blood supply. However, each BFU has its own blood supply to support the extra energy and/or solutes needed for providing its physiological function (e.g., contraction or secretion). A BFU function is best evaluated by its micro-perfusion, which can be readily evaluated with whole-body CT. Resolution of individual BFUs within in-situ organs, using clinical imaging devices, would require high radiation doses and/or the intolerably long scan-durations needed for suitable signal-to-noise image-data. However, it is possible to obtain a statistical description of the BFU number, size and function from wholebody CT by way of a model. In this study we demonstrate this capability by using the distribution of myocardial terminal arteriolar perfusion territories by way of a nested, multiple, regions-of-interest analysis of the heart wall imaged during transient opacification of its blood supply.

  13. Whole-body direct 4D parametric PET imaging employing nested generalized Patlak expectation-maximization reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Casey, Michael E.; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body (WB) dynamic PET has recently demonstrated its potential in translating the quantitative benefits of parametric imaging to the clinic. Post-reconstruction standard Patlak (sPatlak) WB graphical analysis utilizes multi-bed multi-pass PET acquisition to produce quantitative WB images of the

  14. ECAT III: A new PET system for heart and whole body dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.J.; Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Collard, P.E.; Bidaut, L.M.; Schwab, R.L.; Schwaiger, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    A new whole body PET system has been developed and is being evaluated. The ECAT III consists of 1 to 4 rings of 512-5.6 x 29 x 30 mm BGO detectors per 100 cm diameter ring. The system has a unique data collection scheme in which all events are buffered in a 512 by 32 data matrix. The 512 dimension corresponds to detector number and the 32 dimension corresponds to 8 nsec time bins. A dedicated microprocessor searches the array (1) to determine which detectors had events simultaneously +- 8 nsec to establish coincidences, (2) to determine accidentals by determining the probability of off-time events, which can be determined with a statistical accuracy improvement of a factor of 10 by using a larger ''software'' time window, and (3) to determine and distinguish between adjacent detector crosstalk and random triple events. System can process 500 K coincident events/sec/per image plane. Data are collected in list mode and scan parameter information, such as time, wobble position and occurrence of gating signals are inserted in data. Wobble position is divided in 1000 parts per rotation, minimizing positioning error in binning events, timing information allows retrospective choice of time frame for dynamic studies and cardiac gate data allows retrospective choice of framing. ECAT III has an image resolution of 4.5 mm when system is wobbled and 7.2 mm when system is stationary. Loss of efficiency due to nearest neighbor cross talk is 8 to 12%. Axial resolution is selectable with remotely driven side shielding, and interchangeable interplane sept allow different configurations to accomodate a variety of imaging conditions

  15. Accuracy and reproducibility of adipose tissue measurements in young infants by whole body magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan Stefan; Noël, Peter Benjamin; Vollhardt, Christiane; Much, Daniela; Degirmenci, Saliha; Brunner, Stefanie; Rummeny, Ernst Josef; Hauner, Hans

    2015-01-01

    MR might be well suited to obtain reproducible and accurate measures of fat tissues in infants. This study evaluates MR-measurements of adipose tissue in young infants in vitro and in vivo. MR images of ten phantoms simulating subcutaneous fat of an infant's torso were obtained using a 1.5T MR scanner with and without simulated breathing. Scans consisted of a cartesian water-suppression turbo spin echo (wsTSE) sequence, and a PROPELLER wsTSE sequence. Fat volume was quantified directly and by MR imaging using k-means clustering and threshold-based segmentation procedures to calculate accuracy in vitro. Whole body MR was obtained in sleeping young infants (average age 67±30 days). This study was approved by the local review board. All parents gave written informed consent. To obtain reproducibility in vivo, cartesian and PROPELLER wsTSE sequences were repeated in seven and four young infants, respectively. Overall, 21 repetitions were performed for the cartesian sequence and 13 repetitions for the PROPELLER sequence. In vitro accuracy errors depended on the chosen segmentation procedure, ranging from 5.4% to 76%, while the sequence showed no significant influence. Artificial breathing increased the minimal accuracy error to 9.1%. In vivo reproducibility errors for total fat volume of the sleeping infants ranged from 2.6% to 3.4%. Neither segmentation nor sequence significantly influenced reproducibility. With both cartesian and PROPELLER sequences an accurate and reproducible measure of body fat was achieved. Adequate segmentation was mandatory for high accuracy.

  16. Accuracy and reproducibility of adipose tissue measurements in young infants by whole body magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stefan Bauer

    Full Text Available MR might be well suited to obtain reproducible and accurate measures of fat tissues in infants. This study evaluates MR-measurements of adipose tissue in young infants in vitro and in vivo.MR images of ten phantoms simulating subcutaneous fat of an infant's torso were obtained using a 1.5T MR scanner with and without simulated breathing. Scans consisted of a cartesian water-suppression turbo spin echo (wsTSE sequence, and a PROPELLER wsTSE sequence. Fat volume was quantified directly and by MR imaging using k-means clustering and threshold-based segmentation procedures to calculate accuracy in vitro. Whole body MR was obtained in sleeping young infants (average age 67±30 days. This study was approved by the local review board. All parents gave written informed consent. To obtain reproducibility in vivo, cartesian and PROPELLER wsTSE sequences were repeated in seven and four young infants, respectively. Overall, 21 repetitions were performed for the cartesian sequence and 13 repetitions for the PROPELLER sequence.In vitro accuracy errors depended on the chosen segmentation procedure, ranging from 5.4% to 76%, while the sequence showed no significant influence. Artificial breathing increased the minimal accuracy error to 9.1%. In vivo reproducibility errors for total fat volume of the sleeping infants ranged from 2.6% to 3.4%. Neither segmentation nor sequence significantly influenced reproducibility.With both cartesian and PROPELLER sequences an accurate and reproducible measure of body fat was achieved. Adequate segmentation was mandatory for high accuracy.

  17. Optimization of whole-body PET imaging protocol for the detection of 18F-FDG overlappings in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartizien, C.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging modality that allows studying in vivo cellular metabolic and biochemical processes. During the 90's, there has been a growing interest in the applications of PET in oncology related to the use of a glucose analog (FDG) labeled with the positron emitter 18 F. This tracer of the glucose metabolism is trapped in the cancer cells characterized by a deregulated glycolytic activity. This allows detecting tumors and metastases. The interest of PET in oncology has lead to develop imaging systems and protocols to perform whole-body acquisitions of the patient. Whole-body PET imaging has been limited in practice by the high level of statistical noise that affects the detection of small lesions due to limited radioactive dose injected to the patient and short acquisition time. In this context, our work focused on the optimization of detection performances in whole-body 18 F-FDG PET images. We have first developed an original method to evaluate detectability based on the psychophysical approach of the ROC methodology and adapted to the specificity of whole-body PET images. This method was used to evaluate detection performances of different reconstruction algorithms used for whole-body imaging. We have also studied the influence of the acquisition mode, namely the 2D and the 3D modes. To that purpose, we have used the NEC index to select relevant statistical acquisition conditions in both acquisition modes as a function of the injected dose to the patient. Then, we have compared the detection performances of these different acquisition conditions based on our psychophysical evaluation technique. (author) [fr

  18. Disseminated cysticercosis in a child: whole-body MR diagnosis with the use of parallel imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Atin; Goenka, Ajit Harishkumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, New Delhi, Delhi (India); Choudhary, Anita; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Gulati, Sheffali [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Paediatrics, New Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2010-02-15

    Cysticercosis is a parasitic disease caused by infestation with the encysted larval stage of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium. Disseminated cysticercosis is an exceptional expression of this disease characterized by high morbidity due to massive symptomatic parasite burden in the central nervous system, striated muscles, subcutaneous tissues and other organs. Less than 50 such cases have been reported worldwide, and fewer than 10 children. We report on the whole-body MR diagnosis of extensively disseminated cysticercosis in a child. The critical role of whole-body MR as a stand-alone modality in the diagnosis and management of this pleomorphic disease is highlighted. Whole-body MR diagnosis of an infectious disease is unique. (orig.)

  19. Whole-Body MR Imaging Including Angiography: Predicting Recurrent Events in Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheau, Robert C; Bamberg, Fabian; Lochner, Elena; Findeisen, Hannes M; Parhofer, Klaus G; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L

    2016-05-01

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30%) developed one, 8 (13%) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75%, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63%, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63%, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88%, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. • Patients with long-standing diabetes mellitus are at high risk for recurrent events. • Whole-body MRI predicts occurrence of recurrent events independently of clinical characteristics. • The vessel score derived from whole-body angiography is a good general risk-marker. • Whole-body MRI may also provide organ-specific risk assessment. • Current findings may indicate benefits of

  20. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  1. Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1

  2. Application of semiquantitative analysis of whole body bone imaging on distal femoral metaphysis osseous metastasis of neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Wang Huixiang; Zhou Tao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of semiquantitative analysis of whole body bone imaging on distal femoral metaphysis osseous metastasis of neuroblastoma. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with confirmed neuroblastoma by pathological reports were divided into group of metastasis and group of no metastasis by bone marrow slides, X-ray, CT, MRI or clinical follow-up. Whole body bone imaging was performed pre-or postoperation. All cases were analysed by two methods: (1) Semi-quantitative analysis: Regions of interest on bilateral distal femoral metaphysic and middle of femoral were drawn, and their average counts were measured. The ratio of radioactivity of distal femoral metaphysic to middle of femoral was calculated; (2) Visual analysis:Bilateral distal femoral metaphysic metastasis were diagnosed by visual analysis according to whole body bone imaging. The differences between this two methods were compared. Results: There were differences of the ratio of radioactivity of distal femoral metaphysic to middle of femoral between group of metastasis and group of no metastasis (t =8.334, P<0.01), and there was no significant difference between t the two methods (χ 2 =0.68, P>0.05). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of semiquantitative analysis in detecting osseous metastasis were 90.5% , 95.7% , 94.4% , 86.4% and 97.1% , while visual analysis were 81% , 100% , 95.6% , 100% and 94.5% . Conclusions: Radionuclide whole body bone imaging was of great importance in diagnosis of osseous metastasis of neuroblastoma. The diagnostic accuracy was improved by combination of visual analysis and semi-quantitative analysis. (authors)

  3. Multisite Thrombus Imaging and Fibrin Content Estimation With a Single Whole-Body PET Scan in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Francesco; Oliveira, Bruno L; Rietz, Tyson A; Rotile, Nicholas J; Naha, Pratap C; Cormode, David P; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian; Caravan, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current diagnostic strategies rely on imaging modalities that are specific for distinct vascular territories, but a thrombus-specific whole-body imaging approach is still missing. Moreover, imaging techniques to assess thrombus composition are underdeveloped, although therapeutic strategies may benefit from such technology. Therefore, our goal was to test whether positron emission tomography (PET) with the fibrin-binding probe (64)Cu-FBP8 allows multisite thrombus detection and fibrin content estimation. Thrombosis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=32) by ferric chloride application on both carotid artery and femoral vein. (64)Cu-FBP8-PET/CT imaging was performed 1, 3, or 7 days after thrombosis to detect thrombus location and to evaluate age-dependent changes in target uptake. Ex vivo biodistribution, autoradiography, and histopathology were performed to validate imaging results. Arterial and venous thrombi were localized on fused PET/CT images with high accuracy (97.6%; 95% confidence interval, 92-100). A single whole-body PET/MR imaging session was sufficient to reveal the location of both arterial and venous thrombi after (64)Cu-FBP8 administration. PET imaging showed that probe uptake was greater in younger clots than in older ones for both arterial and venous thrombosis (P<0.0001). Quantitative histopathology revealed an age-dependent reduction of thrombus fibrin content (P<0.001), consistent with PET results. Biodistribution and autoradiography further confirmed the imaging findings. We demonstrated that (64)Cu-FBP8-PET is a feasible approach for whole-body thrombus detection and that molecular imaging of fibrin can provide, noninvasively, insight into clot composition. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Minimum TE gradient-recalled phosphorus imaging sequence on a whole-body imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listerud, J.; Lenkinski, R.E.; Axel, L.

    1989-01-01

    To define the lower limits of spatial resolution in gradient-recalled echo phosphorus studies at 1.5 T, the authors have implemented a phosphorus gradient-recalled imaging sequence on the Signa imager. All gradient ramps for the section-selective rephasing lobe, the phase-encoding pulse, and the dephasing pulse of the frequency-encoding gradient are slowed at the maximal rate. Consequently, with a field of view of 24 cm, an in-plane resolution of 3 cm, an echo appropriately offset, an RF bandwidth of 1.2 KHz, and a section thickness of 5 cm, the echo time may be reduced to 1.35 msec. The reconstruction algorithm has been modified to support oversampled data of low spatial resolution appropriate for phosphorus imaging. The sequence will acquire H-1 images and supports the automatic and manual prescan features of the commercial instrument. To facilitate setup in the phosphorus imaging mode the sequence supports the product spectroscopic mode with a DRESS (depth recalled surface coil spectroscopy) sequence and a section profile sequence for appropriate shimming, receiver characteristics, and averaging requirements. The suitability for adaptation of this sequence to three-dimensional chemical shift imaging is discussed

  5. Whole-body MR imaging including angiography: Predicting recurrent events in diabetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertheau, Robert C.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Lochner, Elena [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Findeisen, Hannes M. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Muenster (Germany); Parhofer, Klaus G. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Internal Medicine II, Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30 %) developed one, 8 (13 %) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75 %, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63 %, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63 %, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88 %, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. (orig.)

  6. Whole-body MR imaging including angiography: Predicting recurrent events in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertheau, Robert C.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L.; Bamberg, Fabian; Lochner, Elena; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30 %) developed one, 8 (13 %) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75 %, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63 %, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63 %, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88 %, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. (orig.)

  7. Generating statements at whole-body imaging with a workflow-optimized software tool - first experiences with multireader analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Horvat, C.; Plathow, C.; Ludescher, B.; Lichy, M.P.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Canda, V.; Zindel, C.; Hahn, H.K.; Peitgen, H.O.; Kuhnigk, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Due to technical innovations in sectional diagram methods, whole-body imaging has increased in importance for clinical radiology, particularly for the diagnosis of systemic tumor disease. Large numbers of images have to be evaluated in increasingly shorter time periods. The aim was to create and evaluate a new software tool to assist and automate the process of diagnosing whole-body datasets. Material and Methods: Thirteen whole-body datasets were evaluated by 3 readers using the conventional system and the new software tool. The times for loading the datasets, examining 5 different regions (head, neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis/skeletal system) and retrieving a relevant finding for demonstration were acquired. Additionally a Student T-Test was performed. For qualitative analysis the 3 readers used a scale from 0 - 4 (0 = bad, 4 = very good) to assess dataset loading convenience, lesion location assistance, and ease of use. Additionally a kappa value was calculated. Results: The average loading time was 39.7 s (± 5.5) with the conventional system and 6.5 s (± 1.4) (p 0.9). The qualitative analysis showed a significant advantage with respect to convenience (p 0.9). (orig.)

  8. Quantification of mouse in vivo whole-body vibration amplitude from motion-blur using x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhengyi; Yuan, Xunhua; Pollmann, Steven I; Nikolov, Hristo N; Holdsworth, David W; Welch, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal effects of whole-body vibration on animals and humans have become an intensely studied topic recently, due to the potential of applying this method as a non-pharmacological therapy for strengthening bones. It is relatively easy to quantify the transmission of whole-body mechanical vibration through the human skeletal system using accelerometers. However, this is not the case for small-animal pre-clinical studies because currently available accelerometers have a large mass, relative to the mass of the animals, which causes the accelerometers themselves to affect the way vibration is transmitted. Additionally, live animals do not typically remain motionless for long periods, unless they are anesthetized, and they are required to maintain a static standing posture during these studies. These challenges provide the motivation for the development of a method to quantify vibrational transmission in small animals. We present a novel imaging technique to quantify whole-body vibration transmission in small animals using 280 μm diameter tungsten carbide beads implanted into the hind limbs of mice. Employing time-exposure digital x-ray imaging, vibrational amplitude is quantified based on the blurring of the implanted beads caused by the vibrational motion. Our in vivo results have shown this technique is capable of measuring vibration amplitudes as small as 0.1 mm, with precision as small as  ±10 μm, allowing us to distinguish differences in the transmitted vibration at different locations on the hindlimbs of mice. (paper)

  9. Quantification of mouse in vivo whole-body vibration amplitude from motion-blur using x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengyi; Welch, Ian; Yuan, Xunhua; Pollmann, Steven I.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal effects of whole-body vibration on animals and humans have become an intensely studied topic recently, due to the potential of applying this method as a non-pharmacological therapy for strengthening bones. It is relatively easy to quantify the transmission of whole-body mechanical vibration through the human skeletal system using accelerometers. However, this is not the case for small-animal pre-clinical studies because currently available accelerometers have a large mass, relative to the mass of the animals, which causes the accelerometers themselves to affect the way vibration is transmitted. Additionally, live animals do not typically remain motionless for long periods, unless they are anesthetized, and they are required to maintain a static standing posture during these studies. These challenges provide the motivation for the development of a method to quantify vibrational transmission in small animals. We present a novel imaging technique to quantify whole-body vibration transmission in small animals using 280 μm diameter tungsten carbide beads implanted into the hind limbs of mice. Employing time-exposure digital x-ray imaging, vibrational amplitude is quantified based on the blurring of the implanted beads caused by the vibrational motion. Our in vivo results have shown this technique is capable of measuring vibration amplitudes as small as 0.1 mm, with precision as small as  ±10 μm, allowing us to distinguish differences in the transmitted vibration at different locations on the hindlimbs of mice.

  10. A 4-Tesla superconducting whole-body magnet for MR imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, J.; Ries, G.; Reichert, T.

    1988-01-01

    Since January 87 a 4 tesla MR magnet with a 1.25 m diameter warm bore is in operation at the Siemens Research Laboratories. The magnet weighing 10 tons is part of a whole-body MR device devoted to in-vivo research studies at magnetic fields significantly higher than 2 tesla; the highest field strength presently used in standard MR whole-body systems. The stored energy of the adiabatically stable six-coil system is 39 MJ at 4 tesla. The rated current is 376 A. Superconducting and resistive shim-coils together with iron shims reduce the bare magnet inhomogeneity of 100 ppm down to less than 5 ppm in a 50 cm diameter spherical volume. The magnet operates in persistent mode with the current leads retracted. The field drift is less than 3 x 10/sup -8//h. A small helium refrigerator is used to cool both the two radiation shields of the cryostat and the current leads and to reliquify the evaporating helium gas. Results of coil design, analysis of forces and stresses, quench protection, cryostat design and magnet operation are reported

  11. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Li, Zhoubo; Chen, Baiyu; Yu, Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L; Gutjahr, Ralf; Kappler, Steffen; Halaweish, Ahmed F

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  12. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-21

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  13. Metamaterial-based transmit and receive system for whole-body magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Tim; Liebig, Thorsten; Mallow, Johannes; Bruns, Christian; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Svedja, Jan Taro; Chen, Zhichao; Rennings, Andreas; Scheich, Henning; Plaumann, Markus; Hauser, Marcus J B; Bernarding, Johannes; Erni, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high fields (UHF), such as 7 T, provides an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and has led to unprecedented high-resolution anatomic images and brain activation maps. Although a variety of radio frequency (RF) coil architectures have been developed for imaging at UHF conditions, they usually are specialized for small volumes of interests (VoI). So far, whole-body coil resonators are not available for commercial UHF human whole-body MRI systems. The goal of the present study was the development and validation of a transmit and receive system for large VoIs that operates at a 7 T human whole-body MRI system. A Metamaterial Ring Antenna System (MRAS) consisting of several ring antennas was developed, since it allows for the imaging of extended VoIs. Furthermore, the MRAS not only requires lower intensities of the irradiated RF energy, but also provides a more confined and focused injection of excitation energy on selected body parts. The MRAS consisted of several antennas with 50 cm inner diameter, 10 cm width and 0.5 cm depth. The position of the rings was freely adjustable. Conformal resonant right-/left-handed metamaterial was used for each ring antenna with two quadrature feeding ports for RF power. The system was successfully implemented and demonstrated with both a silicone oil and a water-NaCl-isopropanol phantom as well as in vivo by acquiring whole-body images of a crab-eating macaque. The potential for future neuroimaging applications was demonstrated by the acquired high-resolution anatomic images of the macaque's head. Phantom and in vivo measurements of crab-eating macaques provided high-resolution images with large VoIs up to 40 cm in xy-direction and 45 cm in z-direction. The results of this work demonstrate the feasibility of the MRAS system for UHF MRI as proof of principle. The MRAS shows a substantial potential for MR imaging of larger volumes at 7 T UHF. This new technique may provide new diagnostic potential

  14. A Registration Method Based on Contour Point Cloud for 3D Whole-Body PET and CT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The PET and CT fusion image, combining the anatomical and functional information, has important clinical meaning. An effective registration of PET and CT images is the basis of image fusion. This paper presents a multithread registration method based on contour point cloud for 3D whole-body PET and CT images. Firstly, a geometric feature-based segmentation (GFS method and a dynamic threshold denoising (DTD method are creatively proposed to preprocess CT and PET images, respectively. Next, a new automated trunk slices extraction method is presented for extracting feature point clouds. Finally, the multithread Iterative Closet Point is adopted to drive an affine transform. We compare our method with a multiresolution registration method based on Mattes Mutual Information on 13 pairs (246~286 slices per pair of 3D whole-body PET and CT data. Experimental results demonstrate the registration effectiveness of our method with lower negative normalization correlation (NC = −0.933 on feature images and less Euclidean distance error (ED = 2.826 on landmark points, outperforming the source data (NC = −0.496, ED = 25.847 and the compared method (NC = −0.614, ED = 16.085. Moreover, our method is about ten times faster than the compared one.

  15. The clinical value of "9"9Tc"m-MDP whole body bone imaging in diagnosing bone metastasis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yigang; Gou Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of whole body bone imaging on lung cancer bone metastases diagnosis, so as to evaluate the staging of lung cancer patients. Methods: A total of 113 cases of patients diagnosed with lung cancer received whole body imaging, alkaline phosphatase and blood calcium examination. Bone metastasis probability of lung cancer was assessed based on different pathological types. Accuracy rates of bone metastases was compared by whole body bone imaging and suspicious bone metastasis factors (Including one or several items in ostalgia, alkaline phosphatase rising and hypercalcemia). Results The occurrence rate of lung cancer bone metastasis is 36.7%, and the bone metastasis occurrence rate of adenocarcinoma of lung is higher than that of squamous cell lung carcinoma (P < 0.01). Whole body Imaging diagnose of lung cancer bone metastases had sensitivity (92.7%), specificity (83.2%) and accuracy (85.7%). Conclusion: "9"9Tc"m-MDP whole body imaging is a highly sensitive tool to review whole body bone. Lung cancer patients are recommended to receive routine whole body bone imaging. (authors)

  16. In vivo quantification of {sup 177}Lu with planar whole-body and SPECT/CT gamma camera imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Dale L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Cumberland, NSW (Australia); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); NETwork, Sydney Vital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hennessy, Thomas M.; Willowson, Kathy P.; Henry, E. Courtney [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Chan, David L.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); NETwork, Sydney Vital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Aslani, Alireza [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Roach, Paul J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065 (Australia); Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    2015-09-17

    Advances in gamma camera technology and the emergence of a number of new theranostic radiopharmaceutical pairings have re-awakened interest in in vivo quantification with single-photon-emitting radionuclides. We have implemented and validated methodology to provide quantitative imaging of {sup 177}Lu for 2D whole-body planar studies and for 3D tomographic imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT. Whole-body planar scans were performed on subjects to whom a known amount of [{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-octreotate had been administered for therapy. The total radioactivity estimated from the images was compared with the known amount of the radionuclide therapy administered. In separate studies, venous blood samples were withdrawn from subjects after administration of [{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-octreotate while a SPECT acquisition was in progress and the concentration of the radionuclide in the venous blood sample compared with that estimated from large blood pool structures in the SPECT reconstruction. The total radioactivity contained within an internal SPECT calibration standard was also assessed. In the whole-body planar scans (n = 28), the estimated total body radioactivity was accurate to within +4.6 ± 5.9 % (range −17.1 to +11.2 %) of the correct value. In the SPECT reconstructions (n = 12), the radioactivity concentration in the cardiac blood pool was accurate to within −4.0 ± 7.8 % (range −16.1 to +7.5 %) of the true value and the internal standard measurements (n = 89) were within 2.0 ± 8.5 % (range −16.3 to +24.2 %) of the known amount of radioactivity contained. In our hands, state-of-the-art hybrid SPECT/CT gamma cameras were able to provide accurate estimates of in vivo radioactivity to better than, on average, ±10 % for use in biodistribution and radionuclide dosimetry calculations.

  17. Cryo-sectioning of mice for whole-body imaging of drugs and metabolites with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging - a simplified approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okutan, Seda; Hansen, Harald S; Janfelt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented for whole-body imaging of drugs and metabolites in mice with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI). Unlike most previous approaches to whole-body imaging which are based on cryo-sectioning using a cryo-macrotome, the presented approach...... to simple, sensitive and highly selective whole-body imaging in drug distribution and metabolism studies....... is based on use of the cryo-microtome which is found in any histology lab. The tissue sections are collected on tape which is analyzed directly by DESI-MSI. The method is demonstrated on mice which have been dosed intraperitoneally with the antidepressive drug amitriptyline. By combining full...

  18. Starting up stress thallium cardiac imaging services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, R G; Neubecker, J S

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of alternative methods for a hospital to establish stress thallium cardiac imaging services at a group of physicians' office. Volume-cost-profit analysis, break-even analysis and capital budgeting techniques were used to determine the most feasible method from a financial perspective without sacrificing quality of services. The main focus of this evaluation centers upon three alternative methods of procuring an imaging camera: (1) purchasing a new camera, (2) purchasing used equipment, or (3) leasing a new camera. Budgeted income statements were constructed using relevant revenue and cost information for each alternative. The payback period, net present value and the internal rate of return for each method of procuring a camera was computed. In addition, the break-even point was also determined for each alternative. After the analysis was completed, it was concluded that the method of choice, without sacrificing quality of service delivery, was that of purchasing a used camera.

  19. From whole-body sections down to cellular level, multiscale imaging of phospholipids by MALDI mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurand, Pierre; Cornett, Dale S; Angel, Peggi M; Caprioli, Richard M

    2011-02-01

    Significant progress in instrumentation and sample preparation approaches have recently expanded the potential of MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to the analysis of phospholipids and other endogenous metabolites naturally occurring in tissue specimens. Here we explore some of the requirements necessary for the successful analysis and imaging of phospholipids from thin tissue sections of various dimensions by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We address methodology issues relative to the imaging of whole-body sections such as those cut from model laboratory animals, sections of intermediate dimensions typically prepared from individual organs, as well as the requirements for imaging areas of interests from these sections at a cellular scale spatial resolution. We also review existing limitations of MALDI imaging MS technology relative to compound identification. Finally, we conclude with a perspective on important issues relative to data exploitation and management that need to be solved to maximize biological understanding of the tissue specimen investigated.

  20. The clinical value of routine whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in palliative care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geitung, Jonn Terje (Department of Radiology, Haraldspass Deaconess (University) Hospital (Norway); Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen (Norway)), Email: jtgeit@online.no; Eikeland, Joakim (Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen (Norway)); Rosland, Jan Henrik (Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen (Norway); Sunniva Clinic for Palliative Care, Haraldsplass Deaconess (University) Hospital (Norway))

    2012-03-15

    Background. Whole-body MRI (WBMRI) has become an accessible method for detecting different types of pathologies both in the skeleton and the viscera, which may explain painful conditions, for example tumors and inflammation. Purpose. To assess a possible value of using WBMRI in order to improve palliative care. Material and Methods. Twenty patients (all eligible patients) admitted to the Department for Palliative Care were consecutively included in this study. They underwent a modified WBMRI, with fewer and shorter pulse sequences than in a standard WBMRI, to reduce patient stress. However, the patients' physicians were to exclude patients where little might be obtained and discomfort, distress, and pain could be induced. The treating physicians registered clinical utility directly after receiving the MRI report in a questionnaire. The registration was repeated after ended treatment. Results. Eighty percent had new findings detected, and 40% of the patients had a change in treatment due to the MRI result, mainly changes in analgesics and/or radiation therapy. Conclusion. The WBMRI helped the clinicians to improve treatment and a majority of the patients benefited from this. In eight patients the treatment was changed due to the results. The clinical value (utility) was indicated to be high

  1. Whole body [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine imaging of baboons: biodistribution and human radiation dosimetry estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, Rajan [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Harris, Paul; Leibel, Rudolph [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Simpson, Norman; Parsey, Ramin [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Mann, J.J. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Neuroscience, Division of Brain Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 abundance quantified using the radiotracer [{sup 11}C]-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) has been used to study diagnosis and pathogenesis of dementia and psychiatric disorders in humans. In addition, it may be a surrogate marker for insulin-producing pancreatic beta cell mass, useful for longitudinal measurements using positron emission tomography to track progression of autoimmune diabetes. To support the feasibility of long-term repeated administrations, we estimate the biodistribution and dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ in humans. Five baboon studies were acquired using a Siemens ECAT camera. After transmission scanning, 165-210 MBq of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ were injected, and dynamic whole body emission scans were conducted. Time-activity data were used to obtain residence times and estimate absorbed radiation dose according to the MIRD model. Most of the injected tracer localized to the liver and the lungs, followed by the intestines, brain, and kidneys. The highest estimated absorbed radiation dose was in the stomach wall. The largest radiation dose from [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ is to the stomach wall. This dose estimate, as well as the radiation dose to other radiosensitive organs, must be considered in evaluating the risks of multiple administrations. (orig.)

  2. Direct comparison of radiation dosimetry of six PET tracers using human whole-body imaging and murine biodistribution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Muneyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Toyohara, Jun; Ishii, Kenji; Nariai, Tadashi; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the whole-body biodistributions and radiation dosimetry of five 11 C-labeled and one 18 F-labeled radiotracers in human subjects, and compared the results to those obtained from murine biodistribution studies. The radiotracers investigated were 11 C-SA4503, 11 C-MPDX, 11 C-TMSX, 11 C-CHIBA-1001, 11 C-4DST, and 18 F-FBPA. Dynamic whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in three human subjects after a single bolus injection of each radiotracer. Emission scans were collected in two-dimensional mode in five bed positions. Regions of interest were placed over organs identified in reconstructed PET images. The OLINDA program was used to estimate radiation doses from the number of disintegrations of these source organs. These results were compared with the predicted human radiation doses on the basis of biodistribution data obtained from mice by dissection. The ratios of estimated effective doses from the human-derived data to those from the mouse-derived data ranged from 0.86 to 1.88. The critical organs that received the highest absorbed doses in the human- and mouse-derived studies differed for two of the six radiotracers. The differences between the human- and mouse-derived dosimetry involved not only the species differences, including faster systemic circulation of mice and differences in the metabolism, but also measurement methodologies. Although the mouse-derived effective doses were roughly comparable to the human-derived doses in most cases, considerable differences were found for critical organ dose estimates and pharmacokinetics in certain cases. Whole-body imaging for investigation of radiation dosimetry is desirable for the initial clinical evaluation of new PET probes prior to their application in subsequent clinical investigations. (author)

  3. Whole Body Counters (rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodburn, John H. [Walter Johnson High School, Rockville, MD; Lengemann, Frederick W. [Cornell University

    1967-01-01

    Whole body counters are radiation detecting and measuring instruments that provide information about the human body. This booklet describes different whole body counters, scientific principles that are applied to their design, and ways they are used.

  4. The role of embodied simulation in mental transformation of whole-body images: evidence from Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conson, Massimiliano; Trojano, Luigi; Vitale, Carmine; Mazzarella, Elisabetta; Allocca, Roberto; Barone, Paolo; Grossi, Dario; Santangelo, Gabriella

    2014-02-01

    It has been repeatedly demonstrated that mentally performing an action and mentally transforming body-parts entail simulation of one's own body movements, consistent with predictions of embodied cognition theories. However, the involvement of embodied simulation in mental transformation of whole-body images is still disputed. Here, we assessed own body transformation in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with symptoms most affecting the left or the right body side. PD patients were required to perform left-right judgments on front-facing or back-facing human figures, and a letter rotation task. Results demonstrated that PD patients were selectively impaired in judging the side of back-facing human figures corresponding to their own most affected side, but performed as well as healthy subjects on mental transformation of front-facing bodies and on letter rotation. These findings demonstrate a parallel impairment between motor and mental simulation mechanisms in PD patients, thus highlighting the specific contribution of embodied cognition to mental transformation of whole-body images. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  6. Image quality assessment of LaBr3-based whole-body 3D PET scanners: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S; Muehllehner, G

    2004-01-01

    The main thrust for this work is the investigation and design of a whole-body PET scanner based on new lanthanum bromide scintillators. We use Monte Carlo simulations to generate data for a 3D PET scanner based on LaBr 3 detectors, and to assess the count-rate capability and the reconstructed image quality of phantoms with hot and cold spheres using contrast and noise parameters. Previously we have shown that LaBr 3 has very high light output, excellent energy resolution and fast timing properties which can lead to the design of a time-of-flight (TOF) whole-body PET camera. The data presented here illustrate the performance of LaBr 3 without the additional benefit of TOF information, although our intention is to develop a scanner with TOF measurement capability. The only drawbacks of LaBr 3 are the lower stopping power and photo-fraction which affect both sensitivity and spatial resolution. However, in 3D PET imaging where energy resolution is very important for reducing scattered coincidences in the reconstructed image, the image quality attained in a non-TOF LaBr 3 scanner can potentially equal or surpass that achieved with other high sensitivity scanners. Our results show that there is a gain in NEC arising from the reduced scatter and random fractions in a LaBr 3 scanner. The reconstructed image resolution is slightly worse than a high-Z scintillator, but at increased count-rates, reduced pulse pileup leads to an image resolution similar to that of LSO. Image quality simulations predict reduced contrast for small hot spheres compared to an LSO scanner, but improved noise characteristics at similar clinical activity levels

  7. Influence of detector pixel size, TOF resolution and DOI on image quality in MR-compatible whole-body PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoen, Hendrik; Keereman, Vincent; Mollet, Pieter; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2013-09-21

    The optimization of a whole-body PET system remains a challenging task, as the imaging performance is influenced by a complex interaction of different design parameters. However, it is not always clear which parameters have the largest impact on image quality and are most eligible for optimization. To determine this, we need to be able to assess their influence on image quality. We performed Monte-Carlo simulations of a whole-body PET scanner to predict the influence on image quality of three detector parameters: the TOF resolution, the transverse pixel size and depth-of-interaction (DOI)-correction. The inner diameter of the PET scanner was 65 cm, small enough to allow physical integration into a simultaneous PET-MR system. Point sources were used to evaluate the influence of transverse pixel size and DOI-correction on spatial resolution as function of radial distance. To evaluate the influence on contrast recovery and pixel noise a cylindrical phantom of 35 cm diameter was used, representing a large patient. The phantom contained multiple hot lesions with 5 mm diameter. These lesions were placed at radial distances of 50, 100 and 150 mm from the center of the field-of-view, to be able to study the effects at different radial positions. The non-prewhitening (NPW) observer was used for objective analysis of the detectability of the hot lesions in the cylindrical phantom. Based on this analysis the NPW-SNR was used to quantify the relative improvements in image quality due to changes of the variable detector parameters. The image quality of a whole-body PET scanner can be improved significantly by reducing the transverse pixel size from 4 to 2.6 mm and improving the TOF resolution from 600 to 400 ps and further from 400 to 200 ps. Compared to pixel size, the TOF resolution has the larger potential to increase image quality for the simulated phantom. The introduction of two layer DOI-correction only leads to a modest improvement for the spheres at radial

  8. Influence of detector pixel size, TOF resolution and DOI on image quality in MR-compatible whole-body PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoen, Hendrik; Keereman, Vincent; Mollet, Pieter; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of a whole-body PET system remains a challenging task, as the imaging performance is influenced by a complex interaction of different design parameters. However, it is not always clear which parameters have the largest impact on image quality and are most eligible for optimization. To determine this, we need to be able to assess their influence on image quality. We performed Monte-Carlo simulations of a whole-body PET scanner to predict the influence on image quality of three detector parameters: the TOF resolution, the transverse pixel size and depth-of-interaction (DOI)-correction. The inner diameter of the PET scanner was 65 cm, small enough to allow physical integration into a simultaneous PET-MR system. Point sources were used to evaluate the influence of transverse pixel size and DOI-correction on spatial resolution as function of radial distance. To evaluate the influence on contrast recovery and pixel noise a cylindrical phantom of 35 cm diameter was used, representing a large patient. The phantom contained multiple hot lesions with 5 mm diameter. These lesions were placed at radial distances of 50, 100 and 150 mm from the center of the field-of-view, to be able to study the effects at different radial positions. The non-prewhitening (NPW) observer was used for objective analysis of the detectability of the hot lesions in the cylindrical phantom. Based on this analysis the NPW-SNR was used to quantify the relative improvements in image quality due to changes of the variable detector parameters. The image quality of a whole-body PET scanner can be improved significantly by reducing the transverse pixel size from 4 to 2.6 mm and improving the TOF resolution from 600 to 400 ps and further from 400 to 200 ps. Compared to pixel size, the TOF resolution has the larger potential to increase image quality for the simulated phantom. The introduction of two layer DOI-correction only leads to a modest improvement for the spheres at radial distance of

  9. Evaluation of the utility of temporal subtraction images in successive whole-body bone scans: a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, J.; Appelbaum, D.; Pu, Y.; Engelmann, R.; Li Qiang; Doi, K.

    2007-01-01

    We have begun a prospective clinical study for evaluating the clinical utility of temporal subtraction images in successive whole-body bone scans. The computerized temporal subtraction technique has been developed in order to highlight interval changes of abnormal lesions due to skeletal metastases, primary bone tumors, osteomyelitis, and fractures. In our initial preliminary results of the prospective study which was started on November 22, 2006 in our hospital, radiologists reported some interval changes which were not recognized in the initial standard readings, but were obvious when temporal subtraction images were viewed. The usefulness of the temporal subtraction images will be investigated in terms of its clinical utility by the prospective clinical study. (orig.)

  10. Automatic 2D scintillation camera and computed tomography whole-body image registration to perform dosimetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cismondi, F.; Mosconi, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In this work a software tool that has been developed to allow automatic registrations of 2D Scintillation Camera (SC) and Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. This tool, used with a dosimetric software with Integrated Activity or Residence Time as input data, allows the user to assess physicians about effects of radiodiagnostic or radiotherapeutic practices that involves nuclear medicine 'open sources'. Images are registered locally and globally, maximizing Mutual Information coefficient between regions been registered. In the regional case whole-body images are segmented into five regions: head, thorax, pelvis, left and right legs. Each region has its own registration parameters, which are optimized through Powell-Brent minimization method that 'maximizes' Mutual Information coefficient. This software tool allows the user to draw ROIs, input isotope characteristics and finally calculate Integrated Activity or Residence Time in one or many specific organ. These last values can be introduced in many dosimetric software to finally obtain Absorbed Dose values. (author)

  11. 5 years prognostic value of dipyridamole-thallium myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yifeng; Qian Zhonghao; Jiang Changying

    1993-01-01

    A prognostic study of dipyridamole-thallium myocardial imaging was conducted with the use of logistic regression. Over a 5 years follow-up period, cardiac events occurred in 13 patients within the 41 patients tested, death in 5 and myocardial infarction in 8. The results of this study indicates that dipyridamole-thallium imaging has significant prognostic utility and that an abnormal scan increased the relative risk for the development of subsequent myocardial infarction or cardiac death (O.R. 18.54). The presence of transient multiple thallium defects further increased the risk of a cardiac event. In conclusion , intravenous dipyridamole thallium imaging is a potentially useful diagnostic test to determine the presence and severity of coronary diseases, and this noninvasive method is also beneficial for prognosis

  12. Non rigid respiratory motion correction in whole body PET/MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Hadi; Schmidt, Holger; Wuerslin, Christian; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies include the use of respiratory synchronized gated frames which lead to low signal to noise ratio (SNR) given that each frame contains only part of the count available throughout an average PET acquisition. In this work, 4D MRI extracted elastic transformations were applied to list-mode data either inside the image reconstruction or to the reconstructed respiratory synchronized images to obtain respiration corrected PET images.

  13. Anatomical and metabolic small-animal whole-body imaging using ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the wide use of animals for human disease studies, small animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose metabolic information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image coregistration, the spatial resolution of the metabolic imaging modality is not improved. We present a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT) system that can provide both assessments in a single modality. Utilizing the novel design of confocal full-ring light delivery and ultrasound transducer array detection, RC-PACT provides full-view cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution. Scanning along the orthogonal direction provides three-dimensional imaging. While the mouse anatomy was imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, the glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. Through mouse tumor models, we demonstrate that RC-PACT may be a paradigm shifting imaging method for preclinical research.

  14. Cost-appropriateness of whole body vs limited bone imaging for suspected focal sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Bone imaging has been recognized as a useful diagnostic tool in detecting the presence of focal musculoskeletal injury when radiographs are normal. A retrospective review of bone images in a small number of amateur athletes indicates that secondary injuries were commonly detected at sites different from the site of musculoskeletal pain being evaluated for injury. While a larger study will be necessary to confirm the data, this review suggests that it is medically justified and cost-appropriate to perform imaging of the entire skeleton as opposed to imaging limited to the anatomic site of pain and suspected injury

  15. Whole Body MR Imaging Versus 99mTC-Methylene Diphosphonate Scintigraphy in Detection of Skeletal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SALEM, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of new chemotherapy protocols, which include both marrow and stem cell transplantation, has increased the demand for accurate and early detection of skeletal metastases, particularly metastases to marrow (Eustace et al., 1997). All existing methods of detection skeletal metastases have limitations. Metastases to bone only become apparent on radiographs after the loss of more than 50% of the bone mineral content at the site of the disease. Although CT allows earlier detection of cortical destruction by imaging in contiguous tomographic slices, its ability to detect early deposits in marrow is limited (Gold et al., 1990). The use of bone scintigraphy in the assessment of skeletal abnormalities is based on increased sensitivity in detecting abnormalities before other diagnostic imaging techniques. The pitfall of bone scintigraphy is its lack of specificity. There must be close correlation of scintigraphic findings with those of other imaging modalities (Nadel et al., 2001). The high spatial resolution and excellent soft-tissue contrast make MR imaging an ideal tool for the detection of osseous lesions. The limited field of view must be considered a major limitation of conventional MR imaging. Furthermore MR imaging approaches were limited by long acquisition times. Development in MR imaging, such as the development of turbo sequences, have led to renewed interest in MR imaging as a potential whole body screening tool (Johnson et al., 1997 and Lauenstein et al., 2004).

  16. Monitoring scanner calibration using the image-derived arterial blood SUV in whole-body FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Jens; Hofheinz, Frank; Apostolova, Ivayla; Kreissl, Michael C; Kotzerke, Jörg; van den Hoff, Jörg

    2018-05-15

    The current de facto standard for quantification of tumor metabolism in oncological whole-body PET is the standardized uptake value (SUV) approach. SUV determination requires accurate scanner calibration. Residual inaccuracies of the calibration lead to biased SUV values. Especially, this can adversely affect multicenter trials where it is difficult to ensure reliable cross-calibration across participating sites. The goal of the present work was the evaluation of a new method for monitoring scanner calibration utilizing the image-derived arterial blood SUV (BSUV) averaged over a sufficiently large number of whole-body FDG-PET investigations. Data of 681 patients from three sites which underwent routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT or PET/MR were retrospectively analyzed. BSUV was determined in the descending aorta using a three-dimensional ROI concentric to the aorta's centerline. The ROI was delineated in the CT or MRI images and transferred to the PET images. A minimum ROI volume of 5 mL and a concentric safety margin to the aortic wall was observed. Mean BSUV, standard deviation (SD), and standard error of the mean (SE) were computed for three groups of patients at each site, investigated 2 years apart, respectively, with group sizes between 53 and 100 patients. Differences of mean BSUV between the individual groups and sites were determined. SD (SE) of BSUV in the different groups ranged from 14.3 to 20.7% (1.7 to 2.8%). Differences of mean BSUV between intra-site groups were small (1.1-6.3%). Only one out of nine of these differences reached statistical significance. Inter-site differences were distinctly larger (12.6-25.1%) and highly significant (PPET investigations is a viable approach for ensuring consistent scanner calibration over time and across different sites. We propose this approach as a quality control and cross-calibration tool augmenting established phantom-based procedures.

  17. Advanced CUBIC protocols for whole-brain and whole-body clearing and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susaki, Etsuo A; Tainaka, Kazuki; Perrin, Dimitri; Yukinaga, Hiroko; Kuno, Akihiro; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a protocol for advanced CUBIC (Clear, Unobstructed Brain/Body Imaging Cocktails and Computational analysis). The CUBIC protocol enables simple and efficient organ clearing, rapid imaging by light-sheet microscopy and quantitative imaging analysis of multiple samples. The organ or body is cleared by immersion for 1-14 d, with the exact time required dependent on the sample type and the experimental purposes. A single imaging set can be completed in 30-60 min. Image processing and analysis can take whole-brain neural activities at single-cell resolution using Arc-dVenus transgenic (Tg) mice. CUBIC informatics calculated the Venus signal subtraction, comparing different brains at a whole-organ scale. These protocols provide a platform for organism-level systems biology by comprehensively detecting cells in a whole organ or body.

  18. Toward functional imaging using the optoacoustic 3D whole-body tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, R.; Brecht, H.-P.; Ermilov, S. A.; Nadvoretsky, V.; Conjusteau, A.; Oraevsky, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    In this report we demonstrate improved three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography in test samples. High quality tomographic data and images were obtained from phantom of mice being 2.5 cm in diameter. Capillaries filled with cupric sulfate, ferrous sulfate and nickel sulfate solutions, and immersed in a scattering medium were used for these tests. The brightness of reconstructed phantom images was found to match accurately the absorption profiles of test solutions. Hence, optoacoustic imaging can be applied in preclinical research to perform in vivo absorptivity measurements to deduce functional information on blood oxygen levels or concentration of contrast agents.

  19. Whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to stratify symptomatic and asymptomatic atherosclerotic burden in patients with isolated cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Duce, Suzanne L.; Gandy, Stephen J.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Cassidy, Deirdre B.; McCormick, Lynne; Belch, Jill J. F.; Struthers, Allan D.; Colhoun, Helen M.; Houston, J. Graeme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use whole body cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (WB CVMR) to assess the heart and arterial network in a single examination, so as to describe the burden of atherosclerosis and subclinical disease in participants with symptomatic single site vascular disease. 64 patients with a history of symptomatic single site vascular disease (38 coronary artery disease (CAD), 9 cerebrovascular disease, 17 peripheral arterial disease (PAD)) underwent whole body angiogram and cardiac MR in a 3 T scanner. The arterial tree was subdivided into 31 segments and each scored according to the degree of stenosis. From this a standardised atheroma score (SAS) was calculated. Cine and late gadolinium enhancement images of the left ventricle were obtained. Asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease with greater than 50 % stenosis in arteries other than that responsible for their presenting complain was detected in 37 % of CAD, 33 % of cerebrovascular and 47 % of PAD patients. Unrecognised myocardial infarcts were observed in 29 % of PAD patients. SAS was significantly higher in PAD patients 24 (17.5-30.5) compared to CAD 4 (2–11.25) or cerebrovascular disease patients 6 (2-10) (ANCOVA p < 0.001). Standardised atheroma score positively correlated with age (β 0.36 p = 0.002), smoking status (β 0.34 p = 0.002), and LV mass (β -0.61 p = 0.001) on multiple linear regression. WB CVMR is an effective method for the stratification of cardiovascular disease. The high prevalence of asymptomatic arterial disease, and silent myocardial infarctions, particularly in the peripheral arterial disease group, demonstrates the importance of a systematic approach to the assessment of cardiovascular disease

  20. Radio frequency absorption and penetration depth limits in whole body MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roschmann, P.

    1986-01-01

    There is a continual debate over the ultimate limits to MR imaging at higher field strengths owing to the problems of increasing radio frequency (RF) power deposition and decreasing depth of B/sub 1/ field penetration in the patient. The authors present experimental results of RF absorption and penetration studies in humans for frequencies (f) of 30 to 220 MHz. Results were mostly derived from RF measurements of the effects of loading different types of head, body, and surface coils during imaging of volunteers and metal phantoms. Imaging at 2 T (85 MHz) does not exhibit significant RF problems; the local SAR amounts to 0.06 W/kg for a π-pulse of 1 msec and a TR of 1 sec. RF measurements of coil loading yield SAR -- f/sup 2.2/. The derived effective penetration depth drops from 17 cm at 85 MHz to 7 cm at 220 MHz. Head imaging appears possible up to 220 MHz (5 T). Body and surface coil imaging is subjected to increasing limitations in size or depth above 100 MHz

  1. Cryo-sectioning of mice for whole-body imaging of drugs and metabolites with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging - a simplified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okutan, Seda; Hansen, Harald S; Janfelt, Christian

    2016-06-01

    A method is presented for whole-body imaging of drugs and metabolites in mice with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI). Unlike most previous approaches to whole-body imaging which are based on cryo-sectioning using a cryo-macrotome, the presented approach is based on use of the cryo-microtome which is found in any histology lab. The tissue sections are collected on tape which is analyzed directly by DESI-MSI. The method is demonstrated on mice which have been dosed intraperitoneally with the antidepressive drug amitriptyline. By combining full-scan detection with the more selective and sensitive MS/MS detection, a number of endogenous compounds (lipids) were imaged simultaneously with the drug and one of its metabolites. The sensitivity of this approach allowed for imaging of drug and the metabolite in a mouse dosed with 2.7 mg amitriptyline per kg bodyweight which is comparable to the normal prescribed human dose. The simultaneous imaging of endogenous and exogenous compounds facilitates registration of the drug images to certain organs in the body by colored-overlay of the two types of images. The method represents a relatively low-cost approach to simple, sensitive and highly selective whole-body imaging in drug distribution and metabolism studies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A superconducting magnet for whole-body magnetic-resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Hisao; Watanabe, Tsugio; Takechi, Moriaki; Ogino, Osamu; Yamada, Tadatoshi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic-resonance imaging is a promising new clinical diagnosis system that employs magnetic resonance to generate cross-sectional images of the object under examination. A large magnet plays a critical role in this system-it must supply a high-strength magnetic field that meets rigid standards of space and time uniformity. Mitsubishi Electric has developed a superconducting magnet that not only offers excellent magnetic characteristics but also features reduced helium consumption and a horizontal service port, and permits direct mounting of a magnetic shield. (author)

  3. Whole body imaging in the abdominal cancer patient: pitfalls of PET-CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2012-02-01

    Proper interpretation of PET-CT images requires knowledge of the normal physiological distribution of the tracer, frequently encountered physiological variants, and benign pathological causes of FDG uptake that can be confused with a malignant neoplasm. In addition, not all malignant processes are associated with avid tracer uptake. A basic knowledge of the technique of image acquisition is also required to avoid pitfalls such as misregistration of anatomical and scintigraphic data. This article reviews these potential pitfalls as they apply to the abdomen and pelvis of patients with cancer.

  4. An update on novel quantitative techniques in the context of evolving whole-body PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Hess, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Since its foundation PET has established itself as one of the standard imaging modalities enabling the quantitative assessment of molecular targets in vivo. In the past two decades, quantitative PET has become a necessity in clinical oncology. Despite introduction of various measures for quantifi...

  5. Whole body amyloid deposition imaging by 123I-SAP scintigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rheenen, Ronald; Glaudemans, Andor; Hazenberg, Bouke

    2011-01-01

    Amyloidosis is the name of a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Deposition of amyloid can be localized or systemic. The 123I-SAP-scan can be used to image extent and distribution of amyloid deposition in patients with systemic AA, AL and ATTR amyloidosis.

  6. Metabolic imaging in obesity: underlying mechanisms and consequences in the whole body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iozzo, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is a phenotype resulting from a series of causative factors with a variable risk of complications. Etiologic diversity requires personalized prevention and treatment. Imaging procedures offer the potential to investigate the interplay between organs and pathways underlying energy intake and consumption in an integrated manner, and may open the perspective to classify and treat obesity according to causative mechanisms. This review illustrates the contribution provided by imaging studies to the understanding of human obesity, starting with the regulation of food intake and intestinal metabolism, followed by the role of adipose tissue in storing, releasing, and utilizing substrates, including the interconversion of white and brown fat, and concluding with the examination of imaging risk indicators related to complications, including type 2 diabetes, liver pathologies, cardiac and kidney diseases, and sleep disorders. The imaging modalities include (1) positron emission tomography to quantify organ-specific perfusion and substrate metabolism; (2) computed tomography to assess tissue density as an indicator of fat content and browning/ whitening; (3) ultrasounds to examine liver steatosis, stiffness, and inflammation; and (4) magnetic resonance techniques to assess blood oxygenation levels in the brain, liver stiffness, and metabolite contents (triglycerides, fatty acids, glucose, phosphocreatine, ATP, and acetylcarnitine) in a variety of organs. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Whole Body Computed Tomography with Advanced Imaging Techniques: A Research Tool for Measuring Body Composition in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharma Purushothaman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computed tomography (CT to evaluate obesity in canines is limited. Traditional CT image analysis is cumbersome and uses prediction equations that require manual calculations. In order to overcome this, our study investigated the use of advanced image analysis software programs to determine body composition in dogs with an application to canine obesity research. Beagles and greyhounds were chosen for their differences in morphology and propensity to obesity. Whole body CT scans with regular intervals were performed on six beagles and six greyhounds that were subjected to a 28-day weight-gain protocol. The CT images obtained at days 0 and 28 were analyzed using software programs OsiriX, ImageJ, and AutoCAT. The CT scanning technique was able to differentiate bone, lean, and fat tissue in dogs and proved sensitive enough to detect increases in both lean and fat during weight gain over a short period. A significant difference in lean : fat ratio was observed between the two breeds on both days 0 and 28 (P<0.01. Therefore, CT and advanced image analysis proved useful in the current study for the estimation of body composition in dogs and has the potential to be used in canine obesity research.

  8. Clinical evaluation of 2D versus 3D whole-body PET image quality using a dedicated BGO PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visvikis, D.; Griffiths, D.; Costa, D.C.; Bomanji, J.; Ell, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3D PET) results in higher system sensitivity, with an associated increase in the detection of scatter and random coincidences. The objective of this work was to compare, from a clinical perspective, 3D and two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions in terms of whole-body (WB) PET image quality with a dedicated BGO PET system. 2D and 3D WB emission acquisitions were carried out in 70 patients. Variable acquisition parameters in terms of time of emission acquisition per axial field of view (aFOV) and slice overlap between sequential aFOVs were used during the 3D acquisitions. 3D and 2D images were reconstructed using FORE+WLS and OSEM respectively. Scatter correction was performed by convolution subtraction and a model-based scatter correction in 2D and 3D respectively. All WB images were attenuation corrected using segmented transmission scans. Images were blindly assessed by three observers for the presence of artefacts, confidence in lesion detection and overall image quality using a scoring system. Statistically significant differences between 2D and 3D image quality were only obtained for 3D emission acquisitions of 3 min. No statistically significant differences were observed for image artefacts or lesion detectability scores. Image quality correlated significantly with patient weight for both modes of operation. Finally, no differences were seen in image artefact scores for the different axial slice overlaps considered, suggesting the use of five slice overlaps in 3D WB acquisitions. 3D WB imaging using a dedicated BGO-based PET scanner offers similar image quality to that obtained in 2D considering similar overall times of acquisitions. (orig.)

  9. MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING USING A CLINICAL WHOLE-BODY SYSTEM - AN INTRODUCTION TO A USEFUL TECHNIQUE IN SMALL ANIMAL-EXPERIMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; LAM, KH; MOOYAART, EL; BLEICHRODT, RP; NIEUWENHUIS, P; SCHAKENRAAD, JM

    A clinical whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with high resolution coils was used to obtain non-invasive images of the living rat. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the set-up and the advantages of this new imaging technique: detailed information, no extra costs,

  10. Computed tomography whole body imaging in multi-trauma: 7 years experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, M.A. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: msampson@doctors.org.uk; Colquhoun, K.B.M. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Hennessy, N.L.M. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    AIM: To assess the impact of the introduction of a computed tomography (CT) imaging protocol for multi-trauma patients on the workload, overall diagnostic yield, and effect on detection of cervical spine injury and pneumothorax. METHOD: Between February 1997 and April 2004, all patients presenting acutely to the Emergency Department (ED) with haemodynamically stable trauma (Abbreviated Injury Scale 3 or more) involving more than two body systems were imaged with a comprehensive pre-set helical CT protocol (including non-contrast head, cervical spine: cranio-cervical and cervico-thoracic junctions; and oral and intravenous contrast-enhanced thoracic, abdomen and pelvis) after initial triage and a standard trauma series of radiographs (chest, lateral C-spine and pelvis). Diagnosis of cervical spine fracture and pneumothorax was noted before and after the CT protocol was carried out and findings from all studies were recorded prospectively. RESULTS: Over the 7-year period 296 multi-trauma CT studies were completed of which 41 (13.8%) were negative. Of the positive cases there were 127 (43%) head injuries; 25 cervical spine fractures (8%); 66 pelvic fractures (22%);48 thoracic or lumbar spine fractures (16%); 97 pneumothoraces (33%); 22 mediastinal injuries (7%) and 49 intra-abdominal injuries (17%) with 19 (6%) splenic tears/ruptures. Positive findings included many unsuspected injuries, including 19 cervical spine fractures which were not demonstrated on the standard lateral radiograph from the resuscitation room. Of the 97 CT detected pneumothoraces, 12 were bilateral, 52 already had a chest drain in situ and 36 were not detected on initial supine chest radiography in the resuscitation room. One undetected case had bilateral tension pneumothoraces that were promptly drained on the CT table. Only three patients did not complete their multi-trauma examination because of deterioration in clinical condition and these were all immediately returned to the resuscitation

  11. Computed tomography whole body imaging in multi-trauma: 7 years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, M.A.; Colquhoun, K.B.M.; Hennessy, N.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact of the introduction of a computed tomography (CT) imaging protocol for multi-trauma patients on the workload, overall diagnostic yield, and effect on detection of cervical spine injury and pneumothorax. METHOD: Between February 1997 and April 2004, all patients presenting acutely to the Emergency Department (ED) with haemodynamically stable trauma (Abbreviated Injury Scale 3 or more) involving more than two body systems were imaged with a comprehensive pre-set helical CT protocol (including non-contrast head, cervical spine: cranio-cervical and cervico-thoracic junctions; and oral and intravenous contrast-enhanced thoracic, abdomen and pelvis) after initial triage and a standard trauma series of radiographs (chest, lateral C-spine and pelvis). Diagnosis of cervical spine fracture and pneumothorax was noted before and after the CT protocol was carried out and findings from all studies were recorded prospectively. RESULTS: Over the 7-year period 296 multi-trauma CT studies were completed of which 41 (13.8%) were negative. Of the positive cases there were 127 (43%) head injuries; 25 cervical spine fractures (8%); 66 pelvic fractures (22%);48 thoracic or lumbar spine fractures (16%); 97 pneumothoraces (33%); 22 mediastinal injuries (7%) and 49 intra-abdominal injuries (17%) with 19 (6%) splenic tears/ruptures. Positive findings included many unsuspected injuries, including 19 cervical spine fractures which were not demonstrated on the standard lateral radiograph from the resuscitation room. Of the 97 CT detected pneumothoraces, 12 were bilateral, 52 already had a chest drain in situ and 36 were not detected on initial supine chest radiography in the resuscitation room. One undetected case had bilateral tension pneumothoraces that were promptly drained on the CT table. Only three patients did not complete their multi-trauma examination because of deterioration in clinical condition and these were all immediately returned to the resuscitation

  12. Maintenance of whole-body therapeutic hypothermia during patient transport and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tai-Wei; McLean, Claire; Friedlich, Philippe; Seri, Istvan; Grimm, John; Bluml, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become standard treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), with brain MRI commonly performed after the child has been rewarmed. However, early imaging during hypothermia might provide information important in designing clinical trials that refine and personalize therapeutic hypothermia. We tested a protocol to ensure safety and maintenance of hypothermia during in-hospital transport and MRI. MRI during therapeutic hypothermia was performed in 13 newborns on the 2nd-3rd postnatal days. Mean one-way transport time was 20.0 ± 3.3 min. Mean rectal temperatures ( C) leaving the unit, upon arrival at the MR suite, during MRI scan and upon return to the unit were 33.5 ± 0.3 C, 33.3 ± 0.3 C, 33.1 ± 0.4 C and 33.4 ± 0.3 C, respectively. Using our protocol therapeutic hypothermia was safely and effectively continued during in-hospital transport and MRI without adverse effects. (orig.)

  13. Maintenance of whole-body therapeutic hypothermia during patient transport and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tai-Wei; McLean, Claire; Friedlich, Philippe; Seri, Istvan [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Center for Fetal and Neonatal Medicine and the USC Division of Neonatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of Southern California, LAC/USC Medical Center, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Grimm, John; Bluml, Stefan [University of Southern California, LAC/USC Medical Center, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become standard treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), with brain MRI commonly performed after the child has been rewarmed. However, early imaging during hypothermia might provide information important in designing clinical trials that refine and personalize therapeutic hypothermia. We tested a protocol to ensure safety and maintenance of hypothermia during in-hospital transport and MRI. MRI during therapeutic hypothermia was performed in 13 newborns on the 2nd-3rd postnatal days. Mean one-way transport time was 20.0 ± 3.3 min. Mean rectal temperatures ( C) leaving the unit, upon arrival at the MR suite, during MRI scan and upon return to the unit were 33.5 ± 0.3 C, 33.3 ± 0.3 C, 33.1 ± 0.4 C and 33.4 ± 0.3 C, respectively. Using our protocol therapeutic hypothermia was safely and effectively continued during in-hospital transport and MRI without adverse effects. (orig.)

  14. Whole-body CT for lymphoma staging: Feasibility of halving radiation dose and risk by iterative image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M., E-mail: mathias.meyer@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Klein, S.A., E-mail: stefan.klein@umm.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Brix, G., E-mail: gbrix@bfs.de [Department of Medical and Occupational Radiation Protection, Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Fink, C., E-mail: Christian.Fink@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Pilz, L., E-mail: lothar.pilz@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Jafarov, H., E-mail: Hashim.Jafarov@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Hofmann, W.K., E-mail: w.k.hofmann@umm.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O., E-mail: Stefan.Schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2014-02-15

    Objectives: Patients with lymphoma are at higher-risk of secondary malignancies mainly due to effects of cancer therapy as well as frequent radiological surveillance. We thus aimed to investigate the objective and subjective image quality as well as radiation exposure and risk of full-dose standard (FDS), full-dose iterative (FDI), and half-dose iterative (HDI) image reconstruction in patients with lymphoma. Material and methods: In 100 lymphoma patients, contrast-enhanced whole-body staging was performed on a dual-source CT. To acquire full-dose and half-dose CT data simultaneously, the total current-time product was equally distributed on both tubes operating at 120 kV. HDI reconstructions were calculated by using only data from one tube. Quantitative image quality was assessed by measuring image noise in different tissues of the neck, thorax, and abdomen. Overall diagnostic image quality was assessed using a 5-point Likert scale. Radiation doses and risks were estimated for a male and female reference person. Results: For all anatomical regions apart from the lungs image noise was significantly lower and the overall subjective image quality significantly better when using FDI and HDI instead of FDS reconstruction (p < 0.05). For the half-dose protocol, the risk to develop a radiation-induced cancer was estimated to be less than 0.11/0.19% for an adult male/female. Conclusions: Image quality of FDI and more importantly of HDI is superior to FDS reconstruction, thus enabling to halve radiation dose and risk to lymphoma patients.

  15. Serial Myocardial Imaging after a Single Dose of Thallium-201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kamata

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy has been established for the detection of myocardial ischemia and viability, little is known regarding the myocardial thallium-201 kinetics during angioplasty. Herein, we report a 77-year old man with angina pectoris, in whom serial myocardial imaging after a single dose of thallium-201 was helpful in identifying not only the culprit lesion and myocardial viability, but also the dynamic changes in myocardial perfusion during angioplasty. Thallium-201 images after exercise showed a perfusion defect in the inferior wall, with a trivial redistribution 3 hours after the exercise and a marked improvement 24 hours later. Coronary angiography, performed 27 hours after exercise scintigraphy, showed severe stenosis in the right coronary artery. Guidewire crossing of the lesion interrupted the antegrade flow, which was restored after balloon dilation and stent implantation. Thallium-201 images, 2 hours after angioplasty (i.e., 30 hours after exercise, showed a decreased tracer uptake in the inferior wall, which improved the next day (i.e., 48 hours after exercise. Cardiac biomarkers were negative in the clinical course.

  16. A novel triple-modality reporter gene for whole-body fluorescent, bioluminescent, and nuclear noninvasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, Vladimir; Vider, Jelena; Shavrin, Aleksander; Ageyeva, Ludmila; Tourkova, Vilia; Doubrovin, Michael; Serganova, Inna; Beresten, Tatiana; Ivanova, Anna; Blasberg, Ronald; Balatoni, Julius; Bornmann, William; Gelovani Tjuvajev, Juri

    2004-01-01

    Two genetic reporter systems were developed for multimodality reporter gene imaging of different molecular-genetic processes using fluorescence, bioluminescence (BLI), and nuclear imaging techniques. The eGFP cDNA was fused at the N-terminus with HSV1-tk cDNA bearing a nuclear export signal from MAPKK (NES-HSV1-tk) or with truncation at the N-terminus of the first 45 amino acids (Δ45HSV1-tk) and with firefly luciferase at the C-terminus. A single fusion protein with three functional subunits is formed following transcription and translation from a single open reading frame. The NES-TGL (NES-TGL) or Δ45HSV1-tk/GFP/luciferase (Δ45-TGL) triple-fusion gene cDNAs were cloned into a MoMLV-based retrovirus, which was used for transduction of U87 human glioma cells. The integrity, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and enzymatic activity of the TGL reporter proteins were assessed in vitro. The predicted molecular weight of the fusion proteins (130 kDa) was confirmed by western blot. The U87-NES-TGL and U87-Δ45-TGL cells had cytoplasmic green fluorescence. The in vitro BLI was 7- and 13-fold higher in U87-NES-TGL and U87-Δ45-TGL cells compared to nontransduced control cells. The Ki of 14 C-FIAU was 0.49±0.02, 0.51±0.03, and 0.003±0.001 ml/min/g in U87-NES-TGL, U87-Δ45-TGL, and wild-type U87 cells, respectively. Multimodality in vivo imaging studies were performed in nu/nu mice bearing multiple s.c. xenografts established from U87-NES-TGL, U87-Δ45-TGL, and wild-type U87 cells. BLI was performed after administration of d-luciferin (150 mg/kg i.v.). Gamma camera or PET imaging was conducted at 2 h after i.v. administration of [ 131 I]FIAU (7.4 MBq/animal) or [ 124 I]FIAU (7.4 MBq/animal), respectively. Whole-body fluorescence imaging was performed in parallel with the BLI and radiotracer imaging studies. In vivo BLI and gamma camera imaging showed specific localization of luminescence and radioactivity to the TGL transduced xenografts with background levels of activity

  17. Evaluation of [18F]Nifene biodistribution and dosimetry based on whole-body PET imaging of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Garcia, Adriana; Mirbolooki, M. Reza; Pan, Min-Liang; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: [ 18 F]Nifene is a novel radiotracer specific to the nicotinic acetylcholine α4β2 receptor class. In preparation for using this tracer in humans we have performed whole-body PET studies in mice to evaluate the in vivo biodistribution and dosimetry of [ 18 F]Nifene. Methods: Seven BALB/c mice (3 males, 4 females) received IV tail injections of [ 18 F]Nifene and were scanned for 2 h in an Inveon dedicated PET scanner. Each animal also received a high resolution CT scan using an Inveon CT. The CT images were used to draw volume of interest (VOI) on the following organs: brain, large intestine, small intestine, stomach, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, pancreas, bone, spleen, testes, thymus, uterus and urinary bladder. All organ time activity curves had the decay correction reversed and were normalized to the injected activity. The area under the normalized curves was then used to compute the residence times in each organ. The absorbed doses in mouse organs were computed using the RAdiation Dose Assessment Resource (RADAR) animal models for dose assessment. The residence times in mouse organs were converted to human values using scale factors based on differences between organ and body weights. OLINDA 1.1 software was used to compute the absorbed human doses in multiple organs for both female and male phantoms. Results: The highest mouse residence times were found in urinary bladder, liver, bone, small intestine and kidneys. The largest doses in mice were found in urinary bladder and kidneys for both females and males. The elimination of radiotracer was primarily via kidney and urinary bladder with the urinary bladder being the limiting organ. The projected human effective doses were 1.51E-02 mSv/MBq for the adult male phantom and 1.65E-02 mSv/MBq for the adult female model phantom. Conclusion: This study indicates that the whole-body mouse imaging can be used as a preclinical tool for initial estimation of the absorbed doses of [ 18 F]Nifene in humans

  18. Targeted microbubbles for imaging tumor angiogenesis: assessment of whole-body biodistribution with dynamic micro-PET in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Cheng, Zhen; Davis, Corrine

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice.......To evaluate in vivo whole-body biodistribution of microbubbles (MBs) targeted to tumor angiogenesis-related vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by using dynamic micro-positron emission tomography (PET) in living mice....

  19. Optimization of a shorter variable-acquisition time for legs to achieve true whole-body PET/CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takuro; Miwa, Kenta; Murata, Taisuke; Miyaji, Noriaki; Wagatsuma, Kei; Motegi, Kazuki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate PET images as a function of acquisition time for various leg sizes, and to optimize a shorter variable-acquisition time protocol for legs to achieve better qualitative and quantitative accuracy of true whole-body PET/CT images. The diameters of legs to be modeled as phantoms were defined based on data derived from 53 patients. This study analyzed PET images of a NEMA phantom and three plastic bottle phantoms (diameter, 5.68, 8.54 and 10.7 cm) that simulated the human body and legs, respectively. The phantoms comprised two spheres (diameters, 10 and 17 mm) containing fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose solution with sphere-to-background ratios of 4 at a background radioactivity level of 2.65 kBq/mL. All PET data were reconstructed with acquisition times ranging from 10 to 180, and 1200 s. We visually evaluated image quality and determined the coefficient of variance (CV) of the background, contrast and the quantitative %error of the hot spheres, and then determined two shorter variable-acquisition protocols for legs. Lesion detectability and quantitative accuracy determined based on maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) in PET images of a patient using the proposed protocols were also evaluated. A larger phantom and a shorter acquisition time resulted in increased background noise on images and decreased the contrast in hot spheres. A visual score of ≥ 1.5 was obtained when the acquisition time was ≥ 30 s for three leg phantoms, and ≥ 120 s for the NEMA phantom. The quantitative %errors of the 10- and 17-mm spheres in the leg phantoms were ± 15 and ± 10%, respectively, in PET images with a high CV (scan mean SUV max of three lesions using the current fixed-acquisition and two proposed variable-acquisition time protocols in the clinical study were 3.1, 3.1 and 3.2, respectively, which did not significantly differ. Leg acquisition time per bed position of even 30-90

  20. Whole-body MRI screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, Ralf [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Hosten, Norbert (ed.) [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald (Germany). Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2014-07-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  1. Whole-body MRI screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, Ralf; Hosten, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  2. Lean body mass correction of standardized uptake value in simultaneous whole-body positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochimsen, Thies H.; Schulz, Jessica; Busse, Harald; Werner, Peter; Schaudinn, Alexander; Zeisig, Vilia; Kurch, Lars; Seese, Anita; Barthel, Henryk; Sattler, Bernhard; Sabri, Osama

    2015-06-01

    This study explores the possibility of using simultaneous positron emission tomography—magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) to estimate the lean body mass (LBM) in order to obtain a standardized uptake value (SUV) which is less dependent on the patients' adiposity. This approach is compared to (1) the commonly-used method based on a predictive equation for LBM, and (2) to using an LBM derived from PET-CT data. It is hypothesized that an MRI-based correction of SUV provides a robust method due to the high soft-tissue contrast of MRI. A straightforward approach to calculate an MRI-derived LBM is presented. It is based on the fat and water images computed from the two-point Dixon MRI primarily used for attenuation correction in PET-MRI. From these images, a water fraction was obtained for each voxel. Averaging over the whole body yielded the weight-normalized LBM. Performance of the new approach in terms of reducing variations of 18F-Fludeoxyglucose SUVs in brain and liver across 19 subjects was compared with results using predictive methods and PET-CT data to estimate the LBM. The MRI-based method reduced the coefficient of variation of SUVs in the brain by 41  ± 10% which is comparable to the reduction by the PET-CT method (35  ± 10%). The reduction of the predictive LBM method was 29  ± 8%. In the liver, the reduction was less clear, presumably due to other sources of variation. In conclusion, employing the Dixon data in simultaneous PET-MRI for calculation of lean body mass provides a brain SUV which is less dependent on patient adiposity. The reduced dependency is comparable to that obtained by CT and predictive equations. Therefore, it is more comparable across patients. The technique does not impose an overhead in measurement time and is straightforward to implement.

  3. Assessments of whole body scan images (PCI) obtained in patients undergoing treatment of radioiodine (pre and post-treatment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Fernanda Karolina Mendonca da; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand de Jesus; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Souza, Milena Thays Barbosa de

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty used for diagnosis and therapy of some diseases. For the treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary and follicular) Radioiodine therapy is employed, in order to eliminate the rest of thyroid tissue after removal of the thyroid (thyroidectomy). In radioiodine therapy is used radioisotope iodine-131 ( 131 I) as Sodium Iodide (NaI). The amount of the activity (dose) of 131 I administered is generally the responsibility of nuclear medicine, which is based on an image Research Length of the patient (pre-dose therapy PCI). PCI is also used after treatment (post-PCI therapeutic dose) to evaluate possible metastasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of biokinetic 131 I at length and in some organs of the patient, in order to note any similarity. Exams PCI pre-dose and post-dose were analyzed, the anterior and posterior projections of ten patients. Contours in these images (ROI - Region Of Interest) were made in the whole body and in areas with high uptake of 131 I. The total score was used in the calculation to obtain the percentage distribution of 13I in the organs of the patient. The results showed that there similarity on the biodistribution of 131 I between pre-dose and post-dose PCI. Therefore, it was found that it is valuable images of PCI pre-dose therapy as a way to assist the nuclear medicine physician in choosing the best activity to be administered to the patient in order to minimize the dose to adjacent organs. (author)

  4. Thallium imaging in management of post-revascularization patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazraki, N.; Krawczynska, E.

    1996-01-01

    The role of myocardial perfusion imaging in the evaluation of post revascularization patients has not been well defined. Published data with special emphasis on the results from the Emory Angioplasty versus Surgery Trial (EAST) indicate that the frequency of adverse cardiac events (death, MI, repeat revascularization) following PTCA or CABG is equal in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with ischemic thallium defects. Current American Heart Association Guidelines recommend radionuclide studies only in symptomatic patients. Recently reported data support the need for non invasive testing in asymptomatic as well as symptomatic patients at 1 year postrevascularization. Prognostic variables including transient and permanent left ventricular dilatation and thallium lung uptake in addition to stress perfusion defect reversibility on myocardial thallium SPECT scans are important prognostic indicators in post revascularization patients

  5. Whole body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi, Firas; Laurell, Anna; Ahlström, Håkan

    2015-11-01

    Whole body (WB) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become increasingly utilized in cancer imaging, yet the clinical utility of these techniques in follow-up of testicular cancer patients has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of WB MRI with continuous table movement (CTM) technique, including multistep DWI in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer. WB MRI including DWI was performed in follow-up of 71 consecutive patients (median age, 37 years; range 19-84) with histologically confirmed testicular cancer. WB MRI protocol included axial T1-Dixon and T2-BLADE sequences using CTM technique. Furthermore, multi-step DWI was performed using b-value 50 and 1000 s/mm(2). One criterion for feasibility was patient tolerance and satisfactory image quality. Another criterion was the accuracy in detection of any pathological mass, compared to standard of reference. Signal intensity in DWI was used for evaluation of residual mass activity. Clinical, laboratory and imaging follow-up were applied as standard of reference for the evaluation of WB MRI. WB MRI was tolerated in nearly all patients (69/71 patients, 97%) and the image quality was satisfactory. Metal artifacts deteriorated the image quality in six patients, but it did not influence the overall results. No case of clinical relapse was observed during the follow-up time. There was a good agreement between conventional WB MRI and standard of reference in all patients. Three patients showed residual masses and DWI signal was not restricted in these patients. Furthermore, DWI showed abnormally high signal intensity in a normal-sized retroperitoneal lymph node indicating metastasis. The subsequent (18)F-FDG PET/CT could verify the finding. WB MRI with CTM technique including multi-step DWI is feasible in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer. DWI may contribute to important added-value data to conventional MRI sequences

  6. Excess of Radiation Burden for Young Testicular Cancer Patients using Automatic Exposure Control and Contrast Agent on Whole-body Computed Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiniviita, Hannele; Kulmala, Jarmo; Pölönen, Tuukka; Määttänen, Heli; Järvinen, Hannu; Salminen, Eeva

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patient dose from whole-body computed tomography (CT) in association with patient size, automatic exposure control (AEC) and intravenous (IV) contrast agent. Sixty-five testicular cancer patients (mean age 28 years) underwent altogether 279 whole-body CT scans from April 2000 to April 2011. The mean number of repeated examinations was 4.3. The GE LightSpeed 16 equipped with AEC and the Siemens Plus 4 CT scanners were used for imaging. Whole-body scans were performed with (216) and without (63) IV contrast. The ImPACT software was used to determine the effective and organ doses. Patient doses were independent (p < 0.41) of patient size when the Plus 4 device (mean 7.4 mSv, SD 1.7 mSv) was used, but with the LightSpeed 16 AEC device, the dose (mean 14 mSv, SD 4.6 mSv) increased significantly (p < 0.001) with waist cirfumference. Imaging with the IV contrast agent caused significantly higher (13% Plus 4, 35% LightSpeed 16) exposure than non-contrast imaging (p < 0.001). Great caution on the use of IV contrast agent and careful set-up of the AEC modulation parameters is recommended to avoid excessive radiation exposure on the whole-body CT imaging of young patients.

  7. Automated analysis of whole skeletal muscle for muscular atrophy detection of ALS in whole-body CT images: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Naoki; Ieda, Kosuke; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamada, Megumi; Kato, Hiroki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Inuzuka, Takashi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes functional disorders such as difficulty in breathing and swallowing through the atrophy of voluntary muscles. ALS in its early stages is difficult to diagnose because of the difficulty in differentiating it from other muscular diseases. In addition, image inspection methods for aggressive diagnosis for ALS have not yet been established. The purpose of this study is to develop an automatic analysis system of the whole skeletal muscle to support the early differential diagnosis of ALS using whole-body CT images. In this study, the muscular atrophy parts including ALS patients are automatically identified by recognizing and segmenting whole skeletal muscle in the preliminary steps. First, the skeleton is identified by its gray value information. Second, the initial area of the body cavity is recognized by the deformation of the thoracic cavity based on the anatomical segmented skeleton. Third, the abdominal cavity boundary is recognized using ABM for precisely recognizing the body cavity. The body cavity is precisely recognized by non-rigid registration method based on the reference points of the abdominal cavity boundary. Fourth, the whole skeletal muscle is recognized by excluding the skeleton, the body cavity, and the subcutaneous fat. Additionally, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients are automatically identified by comparison of the muscle mass. The experiments were carried out for ten cases with abnormality in the skeletal muscle. Global recognition and segmentation of the whole skeletal muscle were well realized in eight cases. Moreover, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients were well identified in the lower limbs. As a result, this study indicated the basic technology to detect the muscle atrophy including ALS. In the future, it will be necessary to consider methods to differentiate other kinds of muscular atrophy as well as the clinical application of this detection method for early ALS

  8. Clinical significance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT whole body imaging in detecting thyroid incidentaloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Ge; Li Biao; Zhang Miao; Xu Haoping; Jiang Xufeng; Wang Chao; Ge Guizhi; Shun Chengwei; Zhu Chengmo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT is a noninvasive whole-body imaging technique used to evaluate various types of malignancies. Recent advances have rapidly developed it into a diagnostic imaging modality in ontology. The aims of this study were two. One was to estimate the detection rate of thyroid indoleacetamide and the risk of thyroid malignancy by 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and the other Was to further understand whether the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) would be helpful in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid tumor. Methods: From June 2007 to January 2008, a total of 1190 subjects who had no previous history of thyroid cancer and had 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan were included. All had visual interpretation and semiquantitative analyses by SUV max at thyroid incidentalomas detected by FDG PET/CT. Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman relation analysis were used. Results: The prevalence of thyroid incidentaloma on 18 F-FDG PET/CT wag 2.1% (25/1190). Of these 25 tumors, 20 had histologically proven. Of these 20 tumors, 9 were benign and 11 were malignant (papillary carcinoma of thyroid gland in 9, follicular carcinoma of thyroid gland in 1, metastatic squamous cell carcinoma from lung cancer in 1). Therefore,the cancer risk of thyroid incidentaloma was 55% (11/20). Significantly higher SUV max in malignant than in benign nodules were observed (Kruskal-Wallis test,χ 2 =8.8, P max (3.0-46.0) and maximal diameter (1.0-4.2 cm) of nodule findings was insignificant (r=0.25, P>0.01). Conclusion: Thyroid incidentaloma detected by 18 F-FDG PET/CT has higher risk rate for thyroid malignancy.(authors)

  9. Cerebral blood flow imaging with thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate SPECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Royen, E. A.; de Bruïne, J. F.; Hill, T. C.; Vyth, A.; Limburg, M.; Byse, B. L.; O'Leary, D. H.; de Jong, J. M.; Hijdra, A.; van der Schoot, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Thallium-201 diethyldithiocarbamate ([201TI]DDC) was studied in humans as an agent for cerebral blood flow imaging. Brain uptake proved to be complete 90 sec after injection with no appreciable washout or redistribution for hours. Intracarotid injection suggested an almost 100% extraction during the

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the measurement of whole body muscle mass: A comparison of interval gap methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmanns, K.; McBean, K.; Thoirs, K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is commonly used in body composition research to measure whole body skeletal muscle mass (SM). MRI calculation methods of SM can vary by analysing the images at different slice intervals (or interval gaps) along the length of the body. This study compared SM measurements made from MRI images of apparently healthy individuals using different interval gap methods to determine the error associated with each technique. It was anticipated that the results would inform researchers of optimum interval gap measurements to detect a predetermined minimum change in SM. Methods: A method comparison study was used to compare eight interval gap methods (interval gaps of 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 100, 120 and 140 mm) against a reference 10 mm interval gap method for measuring SM from twenty MRI image sets acquired from apparently healthy participants. Pearson product-moment correlation analysis was used to determine the association between methods. Total error was calculated as the sum of the bias (systematic error) and the random error (limits of agreement) of the mean differences. Percentage error was used to demonstrate proportional error. Results: Pearson product-moment correlation analysis between the reference method and all interval gap methods demonstrated strong and significant associations (r > 0.99, p < 0.0001). The 40 mm interval gap method was comparable with the 10 mm interval reference method and had a low error (total error 0.95 kg, −3.4%). Analysis methods using wider interval gap techniques demonstrated larger errors than reported for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), a technique which is more available, less expensive, and less time consuming than MRI analysis of SM. Conclusions: Researchers using MRI to measure SM can be confident in using a 40 mm interval gap technique when analysing the images to detect minimum changes less than 1 kg. The use of wider intervals will introduce error that is no better

  11. Prognostic implications of normal exercise thallium 201 images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, J.M.; Hakki, A.H.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of 455 patients (mean age, 51 years) in whom exercise thallium 201 scintigrams performed for suspected coronary artery disease were normal. Of those, 322 (71%) had typical or atypical angina pectoris and 68% achieved 85% or more maximal predicted heart rate. The exercise ECGs were abnormal in 68 patients (15%), normal in 229 (50%), and inconclusive in 158 (35%). Ventricular arrhythmias occurred during exercise in 194 patients (43%). After a mean follow-up period of 14 months, four patients had had cardiac events, sudden cardiac death in one and nonfatal myocardial infarctions in three. None of the four patients had abnormal exercise ECGs. Two had typical and two had atypical angina pectoris. Normal exercise thallium 201 images identify patients at a low risk for future cardiac events (0.8% per year), patients with abnormal exercise ECGs but normal thallium images have good prognoses, and exercise thallium 201 imaging is a better prognostic predictor than treadmill exercise testing alone, because of the high incidence of inconclusive exercise ECGs and the good prognosis in patients with abnormal exercise ECGs

  12. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging of healthy volunteers. Pilot study results from the population-based SHIP study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegenscheid, K.; Kuehn, J.P.; Hosten, N.; Puls, R. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ. Greifswald (Germany); Voelzke, H. [Inst. fuer Community Medicine, Universitaetsklinikum der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ. Greifswald (Germany); Biffar, R. [Zentrum fuer Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ. Greifswald (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: Approximately 4000 volunteers will undergo whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) within the next 3 years in the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Here we present a pilot study conducted (a) to determine the feasibility of adding a WB-MRI protocol to a large-scale population-based study, (b) to evaluate the reliability of standardized MRI interpretation, and (c) to establish an approach for handling pathological findings. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved the study, and oral and written informed consent was obtained from each participant. Two hundred healthy volunteers (99 women, 101 men; mean age 48.3 years) underwent a standardized WB-MRI protocol. The protocol was supplemented by contrast-enhanced cardiac MR1 and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in 61 men (60.4%) and cardiac MRI and MR mammography in 44 women (44.4%). MR scans were evaluated independently by two readers. Abnormalities were discussed by an advisory board and classified according to the need for further clinical work-up. Results: One hundred ninety-four (97.0%) WB-MRI examinations were successfully completed in a mean scan time per subject of 90 minutes. There were 431 pathological findings in 176 (88%) of the participants. Of those 45 (10.4%) required further clinical work-up and 386 (89.6%) characterized as benign lesions did not. The interobserver agreement for the detection of pathological findings was excellent (K = 0.799) (orig.)

  13. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging of healthy volunteers. Pilot study results from the population-based SHIP study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegenscheid, K.; Kuehn, J.P.; Hosten, N.; Puls, R.; Voelzke, H.; Biffar, R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 4000 volunteers will undergo whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) within the next 3 years in the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Here we present a pilot study conducted (a) to determine the feasibility of adding a WB-MRI protocol to a large-scale population-based study, (b) to evaluate the reliability of standardized MRI interpretation, and (c) to establish an approach for handling pathological findings. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved the study, and oral and written informed consent was obtained from each participant. Two hundred healthy volunteers (99 women, 101 men; mean age 48.3 years) underwent a standardized WB-MRI protocol. The protocol was supplemented by contrast-enhanced cardiac MR1 and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in 61 men (60.4%) and cardiac MRI and MR mammography in 44 women (44.4%). MR scans were evaluated independently by two readers. Abnormalities were discussed by an advisory board and classified according to the need for further clinical work-up. Results: One hundred ninety-four (97.0%) WB-MRI examinations were successfully completed in a mean scan time per subject of 90 minutes. There were 431 pathological findings in 176 (88%) of the participants. Of those 45 (10.4%) required further clinical work-up and 386 (89.6%) characterized as benign lesions did not. The interobserver agreement for the detection of pathological findings was excellent (K = 0.799) (orig.)

  14. Whole-body PET/MRI: The effect of bone attenuation during MR-based attenuation correction in oncology imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, M.C., E-mail: marianne.aznar@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy 3994, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Sersar, R., E-mail: rachidadk@hotmail.com [DTU Informatics, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Saabye, J., E-mail: julie_saa@hotmail.com [DTU Informatics, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Ladefoged, C.N., E-mail: claesnl@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Andersen, F.L., E-mail: Flemming.Andersen@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Rasmussen, J.H., E-mail: jacobrasmu@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy 3994, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Löfgren, J., E-mail: Johan.Loefgren@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Beyer, T., E-mail: thomas.beyer@meduniwien.ac.at [Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In combined PET/MRI standard PET attenuation correction (AC) is based on tissue segmentation following dedicated MR sequencing and, typically, bone tissue is not represented. We evaluate PET quantification in whole-body (WB)-PET/MRI following MR-AC without considering bone attenuation and then investigate different strategies to account for bone tissue in clinical PET/MR imaging. To this purpose, bone tissue representation was extracted from separate CT images, and different bone representations were simulated from hypothetically derived MR-based bone classifications. Methods: Twenty oncology patients referred for a PET/CT were injected with either [18F]-FDG or [18F]-NaF and imaged on PET/CT (Biograph TruePoint/mCT, Siemens) and PET/MRI (mMR, Siemens) following a standard single-injection, dual-imaging clinical WB-protocol. Routine MR-AC was based on in-/opposed-phase MR imaging (orgMR-AC). PET(/MRI) images were reconstructed (AW-OSEM, 3 iterations, 21 subsets, 4 mm Gaussian) following routine MR-AC and MR-AC based on four modified attenuation maps. These modified attenuation maps were created for each patient by non-linear co-registration of the CT images to the orgMR-AC images, and adding CT bone mask values representing cortical bone: 1200 HU (cortCT), spongiosa bone: 350 HU (spongCT), average CT value (meanCT) and original CT values (orgCT). Relative difference images of the PET following AC using the modified attenuation maps were compared. SUVmean was calculated in anatomical reference regions and for PET-positive lesions. Results: The relative differences in SUVmean across patients following orgMR-AC and orgCT in soft tissue lesions and in bone lesions were similar (range: 0.0% to −22.5%), with an average underestimation of SUVmean of 7.2% and 10.0%, respectively when using orgMR-AC. In bone lesions, spongCT values were closest to orgCT (median bias of 1.3%, range: –9.0% to 13.5%) while the overestimation of SUVmean with respect to orgCT was

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging as part of hybrid PET/MRI protocols for whole-body cancer staging: Does it benefit lesion detection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian, E-mail: christian.buchbender@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Hartung-Knemeyer, Verena, E-mail: verena.hartung@uk-essen.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Beiderwellen, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.beiderwellen@uk-essen.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.heusch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Kühl, Hilmar, E-mail: hilmar.kuehl@uni-due.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Lauenstein, Thomas C., E-mail: thomas.lauenstein@uk-essen.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael, E-mail: michael.forsting@uk-essen.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Heusner, Till A., E-mail: heusner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) requires efficient scan protocols for whole-body cancer staging. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the application of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) results in a diagnostic benefit for lesion detection in oncologic patients if added to a whole-body [18F]-fluorodesoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG) PET/MRI protocol. Methods: 25 consecutive oncologic patients (16 men, 9 women; age 57 ± 12 years) prospectively underwent whole-body [18F]-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner. A team of two readers assessed [18F]-FDG PET/MRI without DWI for primary tumors and metastases. In a second session, now considering DWI, readers reassessed [18F]-FDG PET/MRI accordingly. Additionally, the lesion-to-background contrast on [18F]-FDG PET and DWI was rated qualitatively (0, invisible; 1, low; 2, intermediate; 3, high). Wilcoxon's signed-rank test was performed to test for differences in the lesion-to-background contrast. Results: 49 lesions were detected in 16 patients (5 primaries, 44 metastases). All 49 lesions were concordantly detected by [18F]-FDG PET/MRI alone and [18F]-FDG PET/MRI with DWI. The lesion-to-background contrast on DWI compared to [18F]-FDG PET was rated lower in 22 (44.9%) of 49 detected lesions resulting in a significantly higher lesion-to-background contrast on [18F]-FDG PET compared to DWI (P = 0.001). Conclusions: DWI as part of whole-body [18F]-FDG PET/MRI does not benefit lesion detection. Given the necessity to optimize imaging protocols with regard to patient comfort and efficacy, DWI has to be questioned as a standard tool for whole-body staging in oncologic PET/MRI.

  16. Exercise thallium imaging in patients with diabetes mellitus. Prognostic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsher, J.; Meissner, M.D.; Hakki, A.H.; Heo, J.; Kane-Marsch, S.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    We used exercise thallium 201 imaging in 123 patients with diabetes mellitus (77 men and 46 women, aged 56 +/- 8 years), 75% of whom had angina pectoris (typical or atypical). During exercise testing, 18 patients (15%) had angina pectoris, 28 (23%) had ischemic ST changes, and 69 (56%) had abnormal thallium images. During follow-up (up to 36 months), there were 12 cardiac events; four patients died of cardiac causes and eight had nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis identified two independent predictors of cardiac events: the event rate was significantly less in patients with normal images and exercise heart rate over 120 beats per minute than in patients with abnormal images and exercise heart rate of 120 beats per minute or less (0% vs 22%). The patients with abnormal images or exercise heart rate of 120 beats per minute or less had an intermediate event rate (11.5%). Furthermore, two of the 54 patients with normal images and ten of 69 patients with abnormal images had subsequent cardiac events. Thus, exercise thallium imaging is useful in risk stratification in patients with diabetes mellitus

  17. Diabetes mellitus: long-term prognostic value of whole-body MR imaging for the occurrence of cardiac and cerebrovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Parhofer, Klaus G; Lochner, Elena; Marcus, Roy P; Theisen, Daniel; Findeisen, Hannes M; Hoffmann, Udo; Schönberg, Stefan O; Schlett, Christopher L; Reiser, Maximilian F; Weckbach, Sabine

    2013-12-01

    To study the predictive value of whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the occurrence of cardiac and cerebrovascular events in a cohort of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. Informed consent was obtained from all patients before enrollment into the study. The authors followed up 65 patients with DM (types 1 and 2) who underwent a comprehensive, contrast material-enhanced whole-body MR imaging protocol, including brain, cardiac, and vascular sequences at baseline. Follow-up was performed by phone interview. The primary endpoint was a major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE), which was defined as composite cardiac-cerebrovascular death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular event, or revascularization. MR images were assessed for the presence of systemic atherosclerotic vessel changes, white matter lesions, and myocardial changes. Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression analyses were performed to determine associations. Follow-up was completed in 61 patients (94%; median age, 67.5 years; 30 women [49%]; median follow-up, 70 months); 14 of the 61 patients (23%) experienced MACCE. Although normal whole-body MR imaging excluded MACCE during the follow-up period (0%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0%, 17%), any detectable ischemic and/or atherosclerotic changes at whole-body MR imaging (prevalence, 66%) conferred a cumulative event rate of 20% at 3 years and 35% at 6 years. Whole-body MR imaging summary estimate of disease was strongly predictive for MACCE (one increment of vessel score and each territory with atherosclerotic changes: hazard ratio, 13.2 [95% CI: 4.5, 40.1] and 3.9 [95% CI: 2.2, 7.5], respectively), also beyond clinical characteristics as well as individual cardiac or cerebrovascular MR findings. These initial data indicate that disease burden as assessed with whole-body MR imaging confers strong prognostic information in patients with DM. Online

  18. Comparison of drug distribution images from whole-body thin tissue sections obtained using desorption electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J; Vavrek, Marissa; Koeplinger, Kenneth A; Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R

    2008-07-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (DESI-MS/MS) and whole-body autoradiography (WBA) were used for chemical imaging of whole-body thin tissue sections of mice intravenously dosed with propranolol (7.5 mg/kg). DESI-MS/MS imaging utilized selected reaction monitoring detection performed on an AB/MDS SCIEX 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer equipped with a prototype extended length particle discriminator interface. Propranolol images of the tissue sections using DESI-MS/MS were obtained at surface scan rates of 0.1, 0.5, 2, and 7 mm/s. Although signal decreased with increasing scan rate, useful whole-body images for propranolol were obtained from the tissues even at 7 mm/s, which required just 79 min of analysis time. Attempts to detect and image the distribution of the known propranolol metabolites were unsuccessful. Regions of the tissue sections showing the most radioactivity from WBA sections were excised and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with radiochemical detection to determine relative levels of propranolol and metabolites present. Comparison of the DESI-MS/MS signal for propranolol and the radioactivity attributed to propranolol from WBA sections indicated nominal agreement between the two techniques for the amount of propranolol in the brain, lung, and liver. Data from the kidney showed an unexplained disparity between the two techniques. The results of this study show the feasibility of using DESI-MS/MS to obtain useful chemical images of a drug in whole-body thin tissue sections following drug administration at a pharmacologically relevant level. Further optimization to improve sensitivity and enable detection of the drug metabolites will be among the requirements necessary to move DESI-MS/MS chemical imaging forward as a practical tool in drug discovery.

  19. Prospective, blinded trial of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography positron emission tomography in staging primary and recurrent cancer of the head and neck.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the use of computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of head and neck cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January to July 2009, 15 consecutive head and neck cancer patients (11 men and four women; mean age 59 years; age range 19 to 81 years) underwent computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for pre-therapeutic evaluation. All scans were staged, as per the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumour-node-metastasis classification, by two blinded consultant radiologists, in two sittings. Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathological examination of endoscopic biopsies, and in some cases whole surgical specimens. RESULTS: Tumour staging showed a 74 per cent concordance, node staging an 80 per cent concordance and metastasis staging a 100 per cent concordance, comparing the two imaging modalities. CONCLUSION: This study found radiological staging discordance between the two imaging modalities. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging staging modality with superior visualisation of metastatic disease, which does not require exposure to ionising radiation.

  20. Clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI as a single-step imaging modality in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yen-Ming, Tsang; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Huang, Bing-Shen; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liao, Chun-Ta

    2018-03-03

    Both head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) play a crucial role in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this study, we sought to prospectively investigate the clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI for primary staging of NPC patients. We examined 113 patients with histologically confirmed NPC who underwent pretreatment, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI and PET/CT for primary tumor staging. The images obtained with the different imaging modalities were interpreted independently and compared with each other. PET/MRI increased the accuracy of head and neck MRI for assessment of primary tumor extent in four patients via addition of FDG uptake information to increase the conspicuity of morphologically subtle lesions. PET/MR images were more discernible than PET/CT images for mapping tumor extension, especially intracranial invasion. Regarding the N staging assessment, the sensitivity of PET/MRI (99.5%) was higher than that of head and neck MRI (94.2%) and PET/CT (90.9%). PET/MRI was particularly useful for distinguishing retropharyngeal nodal metastasis from adjacent nasopharyngeal tumors. For distant metastasis evaluation, PET/MRI exhibited a similar sensitivity (90% vs. 86.7% vs. 83.3%), but higher positive predictive value (93.1% vs. 78.8% vs. 83.3%) than whole-body MRI and PET/CT, respectively. For tumor staging of NPC, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI was more accurate than head and neck MRI and PET/CT, and may serve as a single-step staging modality.

  1. Technetium-99m tetrofosmin imaging in thyroid diseases: comparison with Tc-99m-pertechnetate, thallium-201 and Tc-99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klain, M.; Cuocolo, A.; Marzano, L.; Lombardi, G.; Salvatore, M.; Univ. di Napoli

    1996-01-01

    In this study, tetrofosmin whole-body scintigraphy was performed in 35 patients with evidence of thyroid diseases. All patients underwent laboratory evaluation of thyroid function as well as 99m Tc pertechnetate scan, thallium-201 99m Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) whole-body studies. Thyroid images were semi-quantitatively analysed by a 4-point score: 0=no significant uptake; 1=uptake increased but inferior to normal thyroid tissue; 2=uptake equal to normal thyroid tissue; 3=uptake superior to normal thyroid tissue. A total of 41 thyroid nodules were detected, of which 15 were goitre nodules, 13 adenomas and 13 malignant lesions. In goitre nodules, concordant results of tetrofosmin and pertechnetate uptake (score 1 or 0) were observed in the majority of lesions (87%). In function adenomas both tetrofosmin uptake and pertechnetate uptake were score 3. In non-function adenomas tetrofosmin uptake was score 3, while pertechnetate uptake was score 0. In six malignant lesions, tetrofosmin uptake was score 3, while pertechnetate uptake was score 0; in the other seven lesions, where a prevalence of goitre abnormalities was observed, results of tetrofosmin and pertechnetate uptake were similar (score 0 or 1). In (70%) patients with malignant nodules, whole-body tetrofosmin images showed increased abnormal uptake in a total of 28 extra-thyroid tumour sites, as subsequently confirmed by other techniques. When tetrofosmin images were compared to 201 Tl and 99m Tc-MIBI scans, concordant results were observed in all cases. In conclusion, tetrofosmin imaging may be particularly useful to characterize and stage patients with malignant thyroid nodules; it shows similar results to thallium but provides better image quality. Comparable findings were observed between tetrofosmin and MIBI studies. Thus, tetrofosmin may be an alternative to thallium and MIBI in the aforementioned patients. (orig.). With 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Myocardial infarction after dipyridamole-assisted thallium-201 imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Lanspa, T.J.; Mohiuddin, S.M.; Malesker, M.A.; Hilleman, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman with suspected coronary artery disease underwent an oral dipyridamole/thallium-201 myocardial imaging study. Approximately 75 minutes after ingestion of dipyridamole 300 mg suspension, the patient developed chest pain, hypotension, nausea, and diaphoresis. An electrocardiogram revealed ST-T wave changes suggestive of inferior ischemia. Appropriate therapeutic measures, including aminophylline and nitroglycerin, were instituted. Delayed thallium images revealed reversible ischemia in the anteroseptal and posterobasal regions with a fixed defect in the inferobasal region. Cardiac enzyme studies were also indicative of acute myocardial injury. The patient subsequently underwent coronary arteriography and four-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting and was discharged without further complication. This report raises concerns about the potential danger of dipyridamole in patients with severe coronary artery stenosis and collateral circulation. Prophylactic aminophylline should be considered in these patients

  3. Whole body monitoring - Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.N. de; Lourenco, M.C.; Bertelli Neto, L.; Lucena, E.A. de; Becker, P.H.B.

    1988-01-01

    Due to the radiological Cs accident in Goiania, Goias in September 1987, it became necessary to evaluate internal contamination levels of: - Individual from the general public that for any reason had direct or indirect involvement with the radioactive source (group 1). - Occupationally involved persons (group 2). For each of these groups, procedures of whole body monitoring were developped. In order to attend group 1 individuals, the IRD/CNEN installed a whole body unit in the INAMPS General Hospital of Goiania in 11.08.87, which was later transferred to 121,57 street, Central Sector in Goiania in 2.06.88. In this unit 547 people were monitored, 356 from group 1 and 241 from group 2, until 04.13.88. In the IRD whole body counter installation, 194 individuals were counted, 185 from group 2 and 9 from group 1. The frequency of monitoring of each individual was established according to the Cs activity present in the body or to the job to be assigned. In this paper we will present some burden activity curves for Cs 137 as a function of the time elapsed from the first measurement. There people from group 1 were measured in both counters, the IRD and the Goiania ones. The values obtained in both installations are compatible with the body activity x time curve. (author) [pt

  4. Whole-body biodistribution and dosimetry estimates of a novel radiotracer for imaging of serotonin 4 receptors in brain: [18F]MNI-698

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S.; Caillé, Fabien; Barret, Olivier; Papin, Caroline; Lee, Hsiaoju; Morley, Thomas J.; Fowles, Krista; Holden, Daniel; Seibyl, John P.; Alagille, David; Tamagnan, Gilles D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A new radiotracer for imaging the serotonin 4 receptors (5-HT 4 ) in brain, [ 18 F]MNI-698, was recently developed by our group. Evaluation in nonhuman primates indicates the novel radiotracer holds promise as an imaging agent of 5-HT 4 in brain. This paper aims to describe the whole-body biodistribution and dosimetry estimates of [ 18 F]MNI-698. Methods: Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) images were acquired over 240 minutes after intravenous bolus injection of [ 18 F]MNI-698 in adult rhesus monkeys. Different models were investigated for quantification of radiation absorbed and effective doses using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software. Results: The radiotracer main elimination route was found to be urinary and the critical organ was the urinary bladder. Modeling of the urinary bladder voiding interval had a considerable effect on the estimated effective dose. Normalization of rhesus monkeys’ organs and whole-body masses to human equivalent reduced the calculated dosimetry values. The effective dose ranged between 0.017 and 0.027 mSv/MBq. Conclusion: The dosimetry estimates, obtained when normalizing organ and whole-body weights and applying the urinary bladder model, indicate that the radiation doses from [ 18 F]MNI-698 comply with limits and guidelines recommended by key regulatory authorities that govern the translation of radiotracers to human clinical trials. The timing of urinary bladder emptying should be considered when designing future clinical protocols with [ 18 F]MNI-698, in order to minimize the subject absorbed doses

  5. Evaluation of brain and whole-body pharmacokinetics of 11C-labeled diphenylhydantoin in rats by means of planar positron imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yukinori; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hasegawa, Shinji; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kurachi, Yoshihisa; Hatazawa, Jun; Okamoto, Takashi; Matsui, Tamiko

    2008-01-01

    A planar positron imaging system (PPIS) enables whole-body dynamic imaging of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron-emitting nuclides. We evaluated the difference in the brain and whole-body pharmacokinetics of 11 C-diphenylhydantoin ( 11 C-DPH) between intravenous and duodenal administration in rats. Male Wistar rats (8 weeks old, mean body weight 250 g) were examined under anesthesia. A tracer amount of 11 C-DPH (2 μg or less; about 5 MBq) was injected into the tail vein (n=3) or duodenum (n=3). Immediately following the administration, PPIS scans were obtained for 20 min. Regions of interest (ROIs) were set on the brain, heart, liver, intestinal field, and urinary bladder, identified on the integrated images. The relative uptake value (RUV, %) was calculated as the regional count divided by the whole-body count multiplied by 100. Sequential changes in the RUV for each ROI were analyzed for the brain and other organs. Following intravenous injection of 11 C-DPH, the RUV in the brain was 1.59±0.07%, 1.53±0.09%, 1.40±0.09%, and 1.38±0.08% at 5 min, 10 min, 15 min, and 20 min after the injection, respectively. After duodenal administration, the corresponding values were 0.54±0.16%, 1.01±0.12%, 1.43±0.24%, and 1.52±0.06%, respectively. The 11 C-DPH distribution was significantly lower at 5 min and 10 min following duodenal administration than after intravenous injection (P 11 C-DPH between intravenous and duodenal administration in rats. Use of the PPIS is feasible for the evaluation of the pharmacokinetics in both the target organ and the whole body in small animals. (author)

  6. Whole body sodium MRI at 3T using an asymmetric birdcage resonator and short echo time sequence: first images of a male volunteer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterling, Friedrich; Corteville, Dominique M.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Rennings, Andreas; Konstandin, Simon; Nagel, Armin M.; Stark, Helmut; Schad, Lothar R.

    2012-07-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (23Na MRI) is a non-invasive technique which allows spatial resolution of the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in the human body. TSC measurements could potentially serve to monitor early treatment success of chemotherapy on patients who suffer from whole body metastases. Yet, the acquisition of whole body sodium (23Na) images has been hampered so far by the lack of large resonators and the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achieved with existing resonator systems. In this study, a 23Na resonator was constructed for whole body 23Na MRI at 3T comprising of a 16-leg, asymmetrical birdcage structure with 34 cm height, 47.5 cm width and 50 cm length. The resonator was driven in quadrature mode and could be used either as a transceiver resonator or, since active decoupling was included, as a transmit-only resonator in conjunction with a receive-only (RO) surface resonator. The relative B1-field profile was simulated and measured on phantoms, and 3D whole body 23Na MRI data of a healthy male volunteer were acquired in five segments with a nominal isotropic resolution of (6 × 6 × 6) mm3 and a 10 min acquisition time per scan. The measured SNR values in the 23Na-MR images varied from 9 ± 2 in calf muscle, 15 ± 2 in brain tissue, 23 ± 2 in the prostate and up to 42 ± 5 in the vertebral discs. Arms, legs, knees and hands could also be resolved with applied resonator and short time-to-echo (TE) (0.5 ms) radial sequence. Up to fivefold SNR improvement was achieved through combining the birdcage with local RO surface coil. In conclusion, 23Na MRI of the entire human body provides sub-cm spatial resolution, which allows resolution of all major human body parts with a scan time of less than 60 min.

  7. Role of exercise thallium 201 imaging in decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Segal, B.L.; Frankl, W.S.; Kane-Marsch, S.; Unger, J.

    1986-01-01

    This prospective study examined the impact of results of exercise thallium 201 imaging on the estimation of probability of coronary artery disease (CAD) and patient management among cardiologists and internists in our institution. Before exercise testing, the probability of CAD in the 100 patients enrolled in this study was considered low in 31, intermediate in 28, and high in 41 patients. The probability of CAD after exercise thallium imaging was different in four patients (10%) in the high group, 22 patients (79%) in the intermediate group, and three patients (10%) in the low group. Further, the results of exercise testing resulted in changes in patient management in 29 patients (71%) in the high group, 26 patients (93%) in the intermediate group, and 16 patients (52%) in the low group. Overall, the management changed in 71% of the patients. This change included changes in medications, physical activity, frequency of office visits, need for cardiac catheterization, and need for coronary arterial bypass grafting. Thus, exercise thallium imaging is useful in clinical decision making: the diagnostic certainty is improved in patients with intermediate pretest probability of CAD; and some degree of change in patient management is observed, even in patients in whom the probability of CAD is not altered

  8. Clinical study of 18F-FDG PET/CT whole-body imaging in disseminated carcinoma of unknown primary site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guohui; Liang Peiyan; Cai Yanjun; Zhang Weiguang; Xie Chuanmiao; Wu Peihong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) is not uncommon in usual clinical settings. They are, by definition, those cases with clinically suspected primary malignancy but not revealed by conventional investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of whole-body 18 F-fluoro- deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in detecting a primary neoplasm for these patients. Methods: A totle of 150 patients with retrievable records from 169 CUP patients were selected within a group of consecutive 2589 patients from Jan. 2006 to Jun. 2007. All cases underwent whole-body FDG PET/CT scan. The final diagnoses were confirmed by pathologic results, other imaging modalities or clinical follow-up. Results: Among 150 patients, primary tumor sites were successfully detected by whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan in 70 cases (46.7%), of which 52 were pathologically confirmed and 18 by clinical follow-up. And 38 cases (54.3%) were lung cancer, 8 (11.4%) were nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 13 (18.6%) in digestive sys- tem, and 11 (15.7%) in other systems. Three clinically suspected CUP cases with negative 18 F-FDG PET/ CT were subsequently confirmed of benign processes by clinical follow-up. Six patients were wrongly diagnosed by 18 F-FDG PET/CT, and 15 patients did not have a confirmed diagnosis by the end of research. The primary cause of malignancy after 18 F-FDG PET/CT remained obscure in 56 patients, only 3 of whom be- came known during the course of clinical follow-up (nasopharyngeal bladder and esophageal carcinoma). Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET/CT whole-body imaging plays an important role in patients with metastatic CUP. (authors)

  9. Estimating {sup 131}I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in thyroid cancer patients: probe detection versus image quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willegaignon, Jose; Pelissoni, Rogerio Alexandre; Lima, Beatriz Christine de Godoy Diniz; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Queiroz, Marcelo Araujo, E-mail: j.willegaignon@gmail.com [Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo Octavio Frias de Oliveira (ICESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to compare the probe detection method with the image quantification method when estimating {sup 131}I biokinetics and radiation doses to the red marrow and whole body in the treatment of thyroid cancer patients. Materials and methods: fourteen patients with metastatic thyroid cancer, without metastatic bone involvement, were submitted to therapy planning in order to tailor the therapeutic amount of {sup 131}I to each individual. Whole-body scans and probe measurements were performed at 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after {sup 131}I administration in order to estimate the effective half-life (T{sub eff}) and residence time of {sup 131}I in the body. Results: the mean values for T{sub eff} and residence time, respectively, were 19 ± 9 h and 28 ± 12 h for probe detection, compared with 20 ± 13 h and 29 ± 18 h for image quantification. The average dose to the red marrow and whole body, respectively, was 0.061 ± 0.041 mGy/MBq and 0.073 ± 0.040 mGy/MBq for probe detection, compared with 0.066 ± 0.055 mGy/MBq and 0.078 ± 0.056 mGy/MBq for image quantification. Statistical analysis proved that there were no significant differences between the two methods for estimating the T{sub eff} (p = 0.801), residence time (p = 0.801), dose to the red marrow (p = 0.708), and dose to the whole body (p = 0.811), even when we considered an optimized approach for calculating doses only at 4 h and 96 h after {sup 131}I administration (p > 0.914). Conclusion: there is full agreement as to the feasibility of using probe detection and image quantification when estimating {sup 131}I biokinetics and red-marrow/whole-body doses. However, because the probe detection method is ineffective in identifying tumor sites and critical organs during radionuclide therapy and therefore liable to skew adjustment of the amount of {sup 131}I to be administered to patients under such therapy, it should be used with caution. (author)

  10. CT dose modulation using automatic exposure control in whole-body PET/CT: effects of scout imaging direction and arm positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Nagahara, Kazunori; Kudo, Hiroko; Itoh, Hiroyasu

    2018-01-01

    Automatic exposure control (AEC) modulates tube current and consequently X-ray exposure in CT. We investigated the behavior of AEC systems in whole-body PET/CT. CT images of a whole-body phantom were acquired using AEC on two scanners from different manufactures. The effects of scout imaging direction and arm positioning on dose modulation were evaluated. Image noise was assessed in the chest and upper abdomen. On one scanner, AEC using two scout images in the posteroanterior (PA) and lateral (Lat) directions provided relatively constant image noise along the z-axis with the arms at the sides. Raising the arms increased tube current in the head and neck and decreased it in the body trunk. Image noise increased in the upper abdomen, suggesting excessive reduction in radiation exposure. AEC using the PA scout alone strikingly increased tube current and reduced image noise in the shoulder. Raising the arms did not substantially influence dose modulation and decreased noise in the abdomen. On the other scanner, AEC using the PA scout alone or Lat scout alone resulted in similar dose modulation. Raising the arms increased tube current in the head and neck and decreased it in the trunk. Image noise was higher in the upper abdomen than in the middle and lower chest, and was not influenced by arm positioning. CT dose modulation using AEC may vary greatly depending on scout direction. Raising the arms tended to decrease radiation exposure; however, the effect depends on scout direction and the AEC system.

  11. Simultaneous maximal exercise radionuclide angiography and thallium stress perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narahara, K.A.; Mena, I.; Maublant, J.C.; Brizendine, M.; Criley, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Gold-195m is a new ultra-short-lived radionuclide that can be used for cardiac studies. Accurate, reproducible ejection fraction and ventricular wall motion studies can be obtained from first-transit angiography using commercially available imaging and image-processing equipment. The short half-life of gold-195m (30.5 seconds) makes simultaneous dual isotope imaging possible and substantially reduces the radiation exposure from the isotope angiography. The feasibility and possible benefits of performing dual radionuclide studies were evaluated during a single exercise stress test in 24 subjects with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and in 20 normal volunteers. High-quality first-transit angiograms were obtained in all subjects. An 83% sensitivity and 95% specificity for detecting CAD with thallium-201 imaging was noted in this investigation, suggesting that its diagnostic accuracy was not altered by simultaneous dual isotone imaging. When segmental left ventricular (LV) wall motion was compared with thallium-201 perfusion imaging, divergent results were noted in 15 of 44 subjects. An analysis of the ejection fraction (EF) results at rest and stress provided additional information that could be useful in assessing the clinical significance of such differences in segmental wall motion and perfusion. Simultaneous dual isotope imaging appears to be appropriate for situations in which both LV perfusion and function require evaluation. The use of gold-195m allows such information to be obtained from a single exercise test and can thereby reduce the cost and time required for noninvasive evaluations of patients for CAD

  12. Whole-body MR imaging versus sequential multimodal diagnostic algorithm for staging patients with rectal cancer. Cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppertz, A.; Charite Universitaetsklinikum Berlin; Schmidt, M.; Schoeffski, O.; Wagner, M.; Asbach, P.; Maurer, M.H.; Puettcher, O.; Strassburg, J.; Stoeckmann, F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the direct costs of two diagnostic algorithms for pretherapeutic TNM staging of rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: In a study including 33 patients (mean age: 62.5 years), the direct fixed and variable costs of a sequential multimodal algorithm (rectoscopy, endoscopic and abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray, thoracic/abdominal CT in the case of positive findings in abdominal ultrasound or chest X-ray) were compared to those of a novel algorithm of rectoscopy followed by MRI using a whole-body scanner. MRI included T 2w sequences of the rectum, 3D T 1w sequences of the liver and chest after bolus injection of gadoxetic acid, and delayed phases of the liver. The personnel work times, material items, and work processes were tracked to the nearest minute by interviewing those responsible for the process (surgeon, gastroenterologist, two radiologists). The costs of labor and materials were determined from personnel reimbursement data and hospital accounting records. Fixed costs were determined from vendor pricing. Results: The mean MRI time was 55 min. CT was performed in 19 / 33 patients (57 %) causing an additional day of hospitalization (costs 374 Euro). The costs for equipment and material were higher for MRI compared to sequential algorithm (equipment 116 vs. 30 Euro; material 159 vs. 60 Euro per patient). The personnel costs were markedly lower for MRI (436 vs. 732 Euro per patient). Altogether, the absolute cost advantage of MRI was 31.3 % (711 vs. 1035 Euro for sequential algorithm). Conclusion: Substantial savings are achievable with the use of whole-body MRI for the preoperative TNM staging of patients with rectal cancer. (orig.)

  13. Whole-body biodistribution, radiation absorbed dose, and brain SPET imaging with [{sup 123}I]5-I-A-85380 in healthy human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Masahiro; Tamagnan, G.; Baldwin, R.M.; Khan, S.; Bozkurt, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine; Seibyl, J.P.; Early, M. [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT (United States); Vaupel, B.D.; Horti, A.G.; Mukhin, A.G.; Kimes, A.S. [Brain Imaging Center, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zoghbi, S.S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Koren, A.O.; London, E.D. [Brain Imaging Center, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD (United States); Departments of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Innis, R.B. [Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institutes of Mental Health (United States)

    2002-02-01

    The biodistribution of radioactivity after the administration of a new tracer for {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), [{sup 123}I]5-iodo-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine (5-I-A-85380), was studied in ten healthy human subjects. Following administration of 98{+-}6 MBq [{sup 123}I]5-I-A-85380, serial whole-body images were acquired over 24 h and corrected for attenuation. One to four brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) images were also acquired between 2.5 and 24 h. Estimates of radiation absorbed dose were calculated using MIRDOSE 3.1 with a dynamic bladder model and a dynamic gastrointestinal tract model. The estimates of the highest absorbed dose ({mu}Gy/MBq) were for the urinary bladder wall (71 and 140), lower large intestine wall (70 and 72), and upper large intestine wall (63 and 64), with 2.4-h and 4.8-h urine voiding intervals, respectively. The whole brain activity at the time of the initial whole-body imaging at 14 min was 5.0% of the injected dose. Consistent with the known distribution of {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs, SPET images showed the highest activity in the thalamus. These results suggest that [{sup 123}I]5-I-A-85380 is a promising SPET agent to image {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs in humans, with acceptable dosimetry and high brain uptake. (orig.)

  14. Whole body traveling wave magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength: homogeneity, efficiency, and energy deposition as compared with traditional excitation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Duan, Qi; Stoeckel, Bernd; Wiggins, Graham C

    2012-04-01

    In 7 T traveling wave imaging, waveguide modes supported by the scanner radiofrequency shield are used to excite an MR signal in samples or tissue which may be several meters away from the antenna used to drive radiofrequency power into the system. To explore the potential merits of traveling wave excitation for whole-body imaging at 7 T, we compare numerical simulations of traveling wave and TEM systems, and juxtapose full-wave electrodynamic simulations using a human body model with in vivo human traveling wave imaging at multiple stations covering the entire body. The simulated and in vivo traveling wave results correspond well, with strong signal at the periphery of the body and weak signal deep in the torso. These numerical results also illustrate the complicated wave behavior that emerges when a body is present. The TEM resonator simulation allowed comparison of traveling wave excitation with standard quadrature excitation, showing that while the traveling wave B +1 per unit drive voltage is much less than that of the TEM system, the square of the average B +1 compared to peak specific absorption rate (SAR) values can be comparable in certain imaging planes. Both systems produce highly inhomogeneous excitation of MR signal in the torso, suggesting that B(1) shimming or other parallel transmission methods are necessary for 7 T whole body imaging. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Preoperative evaluation of cardiac risk using dobutamine-thallium imaging in vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zellner, J.L.; Elliott, B.M.; Robison, J.G.; Hendrix, G.H.; Spicer, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is frequently present in patients undergoing evaluation for reconstructive peripheral vascular surgery. Dobutamine-thallium imaging has been shown to be a reliable and sensitive noninvasive method for the detection of significant coronary artery disease. Eighty-seven candidates for vascular reconstruction underwent dobutamine-thallium imaging. Forty-eight patients had an abnormal dobutamine-thallium scan. Twenty-two patients had infarct only, while 26 had reversible ischemia demonstrated on dobutamine-thallium imaging. Fourteen of 26 patients with reversible ischemia underwent cardiac catheterization and 11 showed significant coronary artery disease. Seven patients underwent preoperative coronary bypass grafting or angioplasty. There were no postoperative myocardial events in this group. Three patients were denied surgery on the basis of unreconstructible coronary artery disease, and one patient refused further intervention. Ten patients with reversible myocardial ischemia on dobutamine-thallium imaging underwent vascular surgical reconstruction without coronary revascularization and suffered a 40% incidence of postoperative myocardial ischemic events. Five patients were denied surgery because of presumed significant coronary artery disease on the basis of the dobutamine-thallium imaging and clinical evaluation alone. Thirty-nine patients with normal dobutamine-thallium scans underwent vascular reconstructive surgery with a 5% incidence of postoperative myocardial ischemia. Dobutamine-thallium imaging is a sensitive and reliable screening method which identifies those patients with coronary artery disease who are at high risk for perioperative myocardial ischemia following peripheral vascular surgery

  16. Clinical utility and problem of thallium myocardial imaging after coronary angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Tokuji; Tamai, Takuya; Nakamura, Mashio; Miyahara, Masatoshi; Isaka, Naoki; Nakano, Takeshi.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to assess the value and limits of stress thallium myocardial imaging in the diagnosis of reclosure after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and (2) to determine how myocardial viability, as determined on thallium imaging, influenced the therapeutic option. In study 1, 117 segments, which were treated with PTCA, were examined. Of 52 segments that showed thallium defects, 27 were treated with repeated PTCA. Of the other 25 segments, 12 were found to be reclosed. On the other hand, 65 other segments showed redistribution on thallium imaging, and 60 of these had no reclosure. The remaining 5 segments that were reclosed reflected no evidence of myocardial viability. These findings suggest that coronary arteriography may omitted when redistribution is seen on stress thallium imaging after PTCA. The population in Study 2 included 39 patients who were diagnosed as having myocardial necrosis on thallium imaging. In 22 of these patients, thallium findings ruled out coronary revascularization. One other patient did not undergo coronary revascularization because of technical problems. Thus, the remaining 16 patients were treated with coronary revascularization combined with bypass surgery for necrotic zones (n=10) or with PTCA for preserved collateral circulation (n=6). For necrotic zones evidenced on thallium imaging, factors other than necrosis were considered in determining coronary revascularization. (N.K.)

  17. Evaluation of thallium-201 imaging in nontransmural ischemia and infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidar, B.; Oldewurtel, H.A.; Moschos, C.B.; Lee, W.K.; Regan, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the validity of thallium-201 myocardial imaging in the diagnosis of nontransmural ischemia and infarction, the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery was partially occluded for 60 minutes with a balloon-tip catheter in intact anesthetized dogs in a basal state or during atrial pacing. In vivo scintigrams of myocardium were compared with those obtained in the isolated heart and in the incised ventricle spread flat. None of the animals with partial occlusion with or without pacing demonstrated abnormal scintiscans in vivo. Removal of background by isolating the heart increased positive images to 30%; positive images were associated with an isotope count ratio between ischemic and normal muscle of less than 0.67. Removal of superimposed nonischemic muscle in the heart enface increased image detection after pacing to 11 of 15. Since animals with subendocardial scar failed to demonstrate a cold area in vivo, unfavorable geometry as well as extent and degree of ischemia appear to be important. Thus, thallium radioactivity in superimposed and adjacent myocardium, as well as background, may limit the detection of nontransmural ischemia and scar

  18. Tumor segmentation of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients: tumor burden correlates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffler, Michael A.; Xi, Yin; Chhabra, Avneesh [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Le, Lu Q. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Segmentation of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to assess the feasibility, quantitate the total tumor volume (tumor burden) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and examine associations with demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features. A consecutive series of patients with NF1 underwent WBMRI and were reviewed for tumors. Tumors were segmented using a semiautomated software-based tool. Tumors were classified as superficial or deep and discrete or plexiform. Segmentation times were recorded. Segmentation yielded the quantity and tumor burden of superficial, internal and plexiform tumors. Correlations between segmentation data and demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features were examined. Fifteen patients were evaluated (42.3 ± 13.6 years, 10 female, 5 male). Segmentation times were a median of 30 min and yielded 2,328 tumors (1,582 superficial, 746 internal and 23 plexiform). One tumor was malignant. Tumor counts ranged from 14 to 397. Tumor burden ranged from 6.95 cm3 to 571 cm3. Individual tumor volume ranged from 0.0120 cm3 to 298 cm3. Significant correlation was found between the total volume of superficial tumors and height (ρ = 0.5966, p < 0.02). Male patients had higher overall tumor burdens (p < 0.05) and higher superficial tumor burden (p < 0.03). Patients with negative family history had more tumors (p < 0.05). Segmentation of WBMRI in patients with NF1 is feasible and elucidates meaningful relationships among disease phenotype, anthropomorphic and demographic features. (orig.)

  19. Tumor segmentation of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients: tumor burden correlates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffler, Michael A.; Xi, Yin; Chhabra, Avneesh; Le, Lu Q.

    2017-01-01

    Segmentation of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to assess the feasibility, quantitate the total tumor volume (tumor burden) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and examine associations with demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features. A consecutive series of patients with NF1 underwent WBMRI and were reviewed for tumors. Tumors were segmented using a semiautomated software-based tool. Tumors were classified as superficial or deep and discrete or plexiform. Segmentation times were recorded. Segmentation yielded the quantity and tumor burden of superficial, internal and plexiform tumors. Correlations between segmentation data and demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features were examined. Fifteen patients were evaluated (42.3 ± 13.6 years, 10 female, 5 male). Segmentation times were a median of 30 min and yielded 2,328 tumors (1,582 superficial, 746 internal and 23 plexiform). One tumor was malignant. Tumor counts ranged from 14 to 397. Tumor burden ranged from 6.95 cm3 to 571 cm3. Individual tumor volume ranged from 0.0120 cm3 to 298 cm3. Significant correlation was found between the total volume of superficial tumors and height (ρ = 0.5966, p < 0.02). Male patients had higher overall tumor burdens (p < 0.05) and higher superficial tumor burden (p < 0.03). Patients with negative family history had more tumors (p < 0.05). Segmentation of WBMRI in patients with NF1 is feasible and elucidates meaningful relationships among disease phenotype, anthropomorphic and demographic features. (orig.)

  20. Utility of Postmortem Autopsy via Whole-Body Imaging: Initial Observations Comparing MDCT and 3.0T MRI Findings with Autopsy Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Kim, Dong Hun; Paik, Sang Hyun

    2010-01-01

    We prospectively compared whole-body multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) images with autopsy findings. Five cadavers were subjected to whole-body, 16- channel MDCT and 3.0T MR imaging within two hours before an autopsy. A radiologist classified the MDCT and 3.0T MRI findings into major and minor findings, which were compared with autopsy findings. Most of the imaging findings, pertaining to head and neck, heart and vascular, chest, abdomen, spine, and musculoskeletal lesions, corresponded to autopsy findings. The causes of death that were determined on the bases of MDCT and 3.0T MRI findings were consistent with the autopsy findings in four of five cases. CT was useful in diagnosing fatal hemorrhage and pneumothorax, as well as determining the shapes and characteristics of the fractures and the direction of external force. MRI was effective in evaluating and tracing the route of a metallic object, soft tissue lesions, chronicity of hemorrhage, and bone bruises. A postmortem MDCT combined with MRI is a potentially powerful tool, providing noninvasive and objective measurements for forensic investigations

  1. Inter- and Intra-Observer Repeatability of Quantitative Whole-Body, Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (WBDWI in Metastatic Bone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Blackledge

    Full Text Available Quantitative whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WB-DWI is now possible using semi-automatic segmentation techniques. The method enables whole-body estimates of global Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (gADC and total Diffusion Volume (tDV, both of which have demonstrated considerable utility for assessing treatment response in patients with bone metastases from primary prostate and breast cancers. Here we investigate the agreement (inter-observer repeatability between two radiologists in their definition of Volumes Of Interest (VOIs and subsequent assessment of tDV and gADC on an exploratory patient cohort of nine. Furthermore, each radiologist was asked to repeat his or her measurements on the same patient data sets one month later to identify the intra-observer repeatability of the technique. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC estimation method provided full posterior probabilities of repeatability measures along with maximum a-posteriori values and 95% confidence intervals. Our estimates of the inter-observer Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICCinter for log-tDV and median gADC were 1.00 (0.97-1.00 and 0.99 (0.89-0.99 respectively, indicating excellent observer agreement for these metrics. Mean gADC values were found to have ICCinter = 0.97 (0.81-0.99 indicating a slight sensitivity to outliers in the derived distributions of gADC. Of the higher order gADC statistics, skewness was demonstrated to have good inter-user agreement with ICCinter = 0.99 (0.86-1.00, whereas gADC variance and kurtosis performed relatively poorly: 0.89 (0.39-0.97 and 0.96 (0.69-0.99 respectively. Estimates of intra-observer repeatability (ICCintra demonstrated similar results: 0.99 (0.95-1.00 for log-tDV, 0.98 (0.89-0.99 and 0.97 (0.83-0.99 for median and mean gADC respectively, 0.64 (0.25-0.88 for gADC variance, 0.85 (0.57-0.95 for gADC skewness and 0.85 (0.57-0.95 for gADC kurtosis. Further investigation of two anomalous patient cases revealed that a very small

  2. Influence of Desorption Conditions on Analyte Sensitivity and Internal Energy in Discrete Tissue or Whole Body Imaging by IR-MALDESI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Elias P.; Bokhart, Mark T.; Ghashghaei, H. Troy; Muddiman, David C.

    2015-06-01

    Analyte signal in a laser desorption/postionization scheme such as infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) is strongly coupled to the degree of overlap between the desorbed plume of neutral material from a sample and an orthogonal electrospray. In this work, we systematically examine the effect of desorption conditions on IR-MALDESI response to pharmaceutical drugs and endogenous lipids in biological tissue using a design of experiments approach. Optimized desorption conditions have then been used to conduct an untargeted lipidomic analysis of whole body sagittal sections of neonate mouse. IR-MALDESI response to a wide range of lipid classes has been demonstrated, with enhanced lipid coverage received by varying the laser wavelength used for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Targeted MS2 imaging (MS2I) of an analyte, cocaine, deposited beneath whole body sections allowed determination of tissue-specific ion response factors, and CID fragments of cocaine were monitored to comment on wavelength-dependent internal energy deposition based on the "survival yield" method.

  3. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for staging and follow-up of pediatric patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma: comparison of different sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava, Daniel; Oliveira, Heverton Cesar de

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to compare the performance of the T1, T2, STIR and DWIBS (diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression) sequences in the staging and follow-up of pediatric patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma in lymph node chains, parenchymal organs and bone marrow, and to evaluate interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: the authors studied 12 patients with confirmed diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma. The patients were referred for whole body magnetic resonance imaging with T1-weighted, T2-weighted, STIR and DWIBS sequences. Results: the number of lymph node sites characterized as affected by the disease on T1- and T2-weighted sequences showed similar results (8 sites for both sequences), but lower than DWIBS and STIR sequences (11 and 12 sites, respectively). The bone marrow involvement by lymphoma showed the same values for the T1-, T2-weighted and DWIBS sequences (17 lesions), higher than the value found on STIR (13 lesions). A high rate of interobserver agreement was observed as the four sequences were analyzed. Conclusion: STIR and DWIBS sequences detected the highest number of lymph node sites characterized as affected by the disease. Similar results were demonstrated by all the sequences in the evaluation of parenchymal organs and bone marrow. A high interobserver agreement was observed as the four sequences were analyzed. (author)

  4. A randomized, double-blind, crossover comparison of novel continuous bed motion versus traditional bed position whole-body PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatka, Imke; Weiberg, Desiree; Reichelt, Stephanie; Owsianski-Hille, Nicole; Derlin, Thorsten; Berding, Georg; Bengel, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous bed motion has recently been introduced for whole-body PET/CT, and represents a paradigm shift towards individualized and flexible acquisition without the limitations of bed position-based planning. Increased patient comfort due to lack of abrupt table position changes may be another albeit still unproven advantage. For robust clinical implementation, image quality and quantitative accuracy should at least be equal to the prior standard of bed position-based step-and-shoot imaging. The study included 68 consecutive patients referred for whole-body PET/CT for various malignancies. The patients underwent traditional step-and-shoot and novel continuous bed motion acquisition in the same session in a randomized crossover design. The patients and two independent observers were blinded to the sequence of scan techniques. Patient comfort/satisfaction was examined using a standardized questionnaire. SUVs were compared for reference tissue (liver, muscle) and tumour lesions. PET image quality and misalignment with CT images were evaluated on a scale of 1 - 4. Patients preferred continuous bed motion over step-and-shoot (P = 0.0001). It was considered to be more relaxing (38 % vs. 8 %), quieter (34 % vs. 8 %), and more fluid (64 % vs. 8 %). Image quality, SUV and CT misalignment did not differ between the techniques. Continuous bed motion resulted in better end-plane image quality (P < 0.0001). Regardless of the technique, second examinations had significantly higher tumour lesion SUVmax values (P = 0.0002), and a higher CT misalignment score (P = 0.0017). Oncological PET/CT with continuous bed motion enhances patient comfort and is associated with image quality at least comparable to that with traditional bed position-based step-and-shoot acquisition. (orig.)

  5. A randomized, double-blind, crossover comparison of novel continuous bed motion versus traditional bed position whole-body PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatka, Imke [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Charite, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Weiberg, Desiree; Reichelt, Stephanie; Owsianski-Hille, Nicole; Derlin, Thorsten; Berding, Georg; Bengel, Frank M. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Continuous bed motion has recently been introduced for whole-body PET/CT, and represents a paradigm shift towards individualized and flexible acquisition without the limitations of bed position-based planning. Increased patient comfort due to lack of abrupt table position changes may be another albeit still unproven advantage. For robust clinical implementation, image quality and quantitative accuracy should at least be equal to the prior standard of bed position-based step-and-shoot imaging. The study included 68 consecutive patients referred for whole-body PET/CT for various malignancies. The patients underwent traditional step-and-shoot and novel continuous bed motion acquisition in the same session in a randomized crossover design. The patients and two independent observers were blinded to the sequence of scan techniques. Patient comfort/satisfaction was examined using a standardized questionnaire. SUVs were compared for reference tissue (liver, muscle) and tumour lesions. PET image quality and misalignment with CT images were evaluated on a scale of 1 - 4. Patients preferred continuous bed motion over step-and-shoot (P = 0.0001). It was considered to be more relaxing (38 % vs. 8 %), quieter (34 % vs. 8 %), and more fluid (64 % vs. 8 %). Image quality, SUV and CT misalignment did not differ between the techniques. Continuous bed motion resulted in better end-plane image quality (P < 0.0001). Regardless of the technique, second examinations had significantly higher tumour lesion SUVmax values (P = 0.0002), and a higher CT misalignment score (P = 0.0017). Oncological PET/CT with continuous bed motion enhances patient comfort and is associated with image quality at least comparable to that with traditional bed position-based step-and-shoot acquisition. (orig.)

  6. Metabolic syndrome predicts vascular changes in whole body magnetic resonance imaging in patients with long standing diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findeisen Hannes M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although diabetic patients have an increased rate of cardio-vascular events, there is considerable heterogeneity with respect to cardiovascular risk, requiring new approaches to individual cardiovascular risk factor assessment. In this study we used whole body-MR-angiography (WB-MRA to assess the degree of atherosclerosis in patients with long-standing diabetes and to determine the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS and atherosclerotic burden. Methods Long standing (≥10 years type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients (n = 59; 31 males; 63.3 ± 1.7 years were examined by WB-MRA. Based on the findings in each vessel, we developed an overall score representing the patient's vascular atherosclerotic burden (MRI-score. The score's association with components of the MetS was assessed. Results The median MRI-score was 1.18 [range: 1.00-2.41] and MetS was present in 58% of the cohort (type 2 diabetics: 73%; type 1 diabetics: 26%. Age (p = 0.0002, HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.016, hypertension (p = 0.0008, nephropathy (p = 0.0093, CHD (p = 0.001 and MetS (p = 0.0011 were significantly associated with the score. Adjusted for age and sex, the score was significantly (p = 0.02 higher in diabetics with MetS (1.450 [1.328-1.572] compared to those without MetS (1.108 [0.966-1.50]. The number of MetS components was associated with a linear increase in the MRI-score (increase in score: 0.09/MetS component; r2 = 0.24, p = 0.038. Finally, using an established risk algorithm, we found a significant association between MRI-score and 10-year risk for CHD, fatal CHD and stroke. Conclusion In this high-risk diabetic population, WB-MRA revealed large heterogeneity in the degree of systemic atherosclerosis. Presence and number of traits of the MetS are associated with the extent of atherosclerotic burden. These results support the perspective that diabetic patients are a heterogeneous population with increased but varying prevalence of atherosclerosis

  7. Metabolic syndrome predicts vascular changes in whole body magnetic resonance imaging in patients with long standing diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Hannes M; Weckbach, Sabine; Stark, Renée G; Reiser, Maximilian F; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Parhofer, Klaus G

    2010-08-30

    Although diabetic patients have an increased rate of cardio-vascular events, there is considerable heterogeneity with respect to cardiovascular risk, requiring new approaches to individual cardiovascular risk factor assessment. In this study we used whole body-MR-angiography (WB-MRA) to assess the degree of atherosclerosis in patients with long-standing diabetes and to determine the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and atherosclerotic burden. Long standing (> or = 10 years) type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients (n = 59; 31 males; 63.3 +/- 1.7 years) were examined by WB-MRA. Based on the findings in each vessel, we developed an overall score representing the patient's vascular atherosclerotic burden (MRI-score). The score's association with components of the MetS was assessed. The median MRI-score was 1.18 [range: 1.00-2.41] and MetS was present in 58% of the cohort (type 2 diabetics: 73%; type 1 diabetics: 26%). Age (p = 0.0002), HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.016), hypertension (p = 0.0008), nephropathy (p = 0.0093), CHD (p = 0.001) and MetS (p = 0.0011) were significantly associated with the score. Adjusted for age and sex, the score was significantly (p = 0.02) higher in diabetics with MetS (1.450 [1.328-1.572]) compared to those without MetS (1.108 [0.966-1.50]). The number of MetS components was associated with a linear increase in the MRI-score (increase in score: 0.09/MetS component; r2 = 0.24, p = 0.038). Finally, using an established risk algorithm, we found a significant association between MRI-score and 10-year risk for CHD, fatal CHD and stroke. In this high-risk diabetic population, WB-MRA revealed large heterogeneity in the degree of systemic atherosclerosis. Presence and number of traits of the MetS are associated with the extent of atherosclerotic burden. These results support the perspective that diabetic patients are a heterogeneous population with increased but varying prevalence of atherosclerosis and risk.

  8. Automated Whole-Body Bone Lesion Detection for Multiple Myeloma on 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT Imaging Using Deep Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lina; Tetteh, Giles; Lipkova, Jana; Zhao, Yu; Li, Hongwei; Christ, Patrick; Piraud, Marie; Buck, Andreas; Shi, Kuangyu; Menze, Bjoern H

    2018-01-01

    The identification of bone lesions is crucial in the diagnostic assessment of multiple myeloma (MM). 68 Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT can capture the abnormal molecular expression of CXCR-4 in addition to anatomical changes. However, whole-body detection of dozens of lesions on hybrid imaging is tedious and error prone. It is even more difficult to identify lesions with a large heterogeneity. This study employed deep learning methods to automatically combine characteristics of PET and CT for whole-body MM bone lesion detection in a 3D manner. Two convolutional neural networks (CNNs), V-Net and W-Net, were adopted to segment and detect the lesions. The feasibility of deep learning for lesion detection on 68 Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT was first verified on digital phantoms generated using realistic PET simulation methods. Then the proposed methods were evaluated on real 68 Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT scans of MM patients. The preliminary results showed that deep learning method can leverage multimodal information for spatial feature representation, and W-Net obtained the best result for segmentation and lesion detection. It also outperformed traditional machine learning methods such as random forest classifier (RF), k -Nearest Neighbors ( k -NN), and support vector machine (SVM). The proof-of-concept study encourages further development of deep learning approach for MM lesion detection in population study.

  9. Automated Whole-Body Bone Lesion Detection for Multiple Myeloma on 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT Imaging Using Deep Learning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of bone lesions is crucial in the diagnostic assessment of multiple myeloma (MM. 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT can capture the abnormal molecular expression of CXCR-4 in addition to anatomical changes. However, whole-body detection of dozens of lesions on hybrid imaging is tedious and error prone. It is even more difficult to identify lesions with a large heterogeneity. This study employed deep learning methods to automatically combine characteristics of PET and CT for whole-body MM bone lesion detection in a 3D manner. Two convolutional neural networks (CNNs, V-Net and W-Net, were adopted to segment and detect the lesions. The feasibility of deep learning for lesion detection on 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT was first verified on digital phantoms generated using realistic PET simulation methods. Then the proposed methods were evaluated on real 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT scans of MM patients. The preliminary results showed that deep learning method can leverage multimodal information for spatial feature representation, and W-Net obtained the best result for segmentation and lesion detection. It also outperformed traditional machine learning methods such as random forest classifier (RF, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN, and support vector machine (SVM. The proof-of-concept study encourages further development of deep learning approach for MM lesion detection in population study.

  10. Comparison of exercise electrocardiography and quantitative thallium imaging for one-vessel coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, S.; Kiess, M.; Liu, P.; Guiney, T.E.; Pohost, G.M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The relative value of exercise electrocardiography and computer analyzed thallium-201 imaging was compared in 124 patients with 1-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD). Of these, 78 had left anterior descending (LAD), 32 right and 14 left circumflex (LC) CAD. In patients with no previous myocardial infarction (MI), thallium imaging was more sensitive than the electrocardiogram (78% vs 64%, p less than 0.01), but in patients with previous MI, sensitivity was similar. Further, thallium imaging was more sensitive only in LAD and LC disease. Redistribution was compared with ST-segment depression as a marker of ischemia. Only in patients with prior MI (76% vs 44%, p less than 0.01) and only in LC and right CAD did redistribution occur more often than ST depression. Thallium imaging was more accurate in localizing stenoses than the electrocardiogram (p less than 0.001), but did not always correctly predict coronary anatomy. Septal thallium defects were associated with LAD disease in 84%, inferior defects with right CAD in 40% and posterolateral lesion defects with LC CAD in 22%. The results indicate the overall superiority of thallium imaging in 1-vessel CAD compared with exercise electrocardiography; however, there is a wide spectrum of extent and location of perfusion defects associated with each coronary artery. Thallium imaging complements coronary angiography by demonstrating the functional impact of CAD on myocardial perfusion

  11. Whole-Body MRI Virtual Autopsy Using Diffusion-weighted Imaging With Background Suppression (DWIBS) at 3 T in a Child Succumbing to Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Kemp, Marnie L; Meiring, Michelle

    2017-03-01

    We report the use of diffusion-weighted imaging with background suppression (DWIBS) in pediatric virtual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) autopsy of a child who succumbed to chordoma. A 10-year-old girl who succumbed to relapse of a chordoma underwent whole-body virtual MRI autopsy 12 hours postmortem with short Tau inversion recovery (STIR) and DWIBS on 3 T, which demonstrated the primary mass, local and cardiac invasion, and metastatic disease to the thorax, abdomen, head/neck, and musculoskeletal system. Postmortem virtual MRI autopsy including DWIBS successfully demonstrated the transthoracic spread of chordoma and invasion of the heart, resulting in blood-borne metastases. Motion and respiratory artifact were not factors during virtual autopsy using DWIBS on 3 T, making ideal use of this technology.

  12. Whole-body FDG PET-MR oncologic imaging: pitfalls in clinical interpretation related to inaccurate MR-based attenuation correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenberger, Ulrike; Catana, Ciprian; Chandarana, Hersh; Catalano, Onofrio A; Friedman, Kent; Schonberg, Stefan A; Thrall, James; Salvatore, Marco; Rosen, Bruce R; Guimaraes, Alexander R

    2015-08-01

    Simultaneous data collection for positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) is now a reality. While the full benefits of concurrently acquiring PET and MR data and the potential added clinical value are still being evaluated, initial studies have identified several important potential pitfalls in the interpretation of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/MRI in oncologic whole-body imaging, the majority of which being related to the errors in the attenuation maps created from the MR data. The purpose of this article was to present such pitfalls and artifacts using case examples, describe their etiology, and discuss strategies to overcome them. Using a case-based approach, we will illustrate artifacts related to (1) Inaccurate bone tissue segmentation; (2) Inaccurate air cavities segmentation; (3) Motion-induced misregistration; (4) RF coils in the PET field of view; (5) B0 field inhomogeneity; (6) B1 field inhomogeneity; (7) Metallic implants; (8) MR contrast agents.

  13. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in acute-myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackers, F.J.Th.; Lie, K.I.; Sokole, E.B.; Wellens, H.J.J.; Samson, G.; Schoot, J.B. van der

    1980-01-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy has proven to be an early and highly sensitive technique to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with acute myocardial infarction. During the early phase of acute myocardial infarction, patients may be hemodynamically and electrically unstable. Therefore, scintigraphy is performed preferably at the bed side in the Coronary Care Unit using a mobile gamma camera. Additionally, in order to shorten imaging time in these often critically ill patients, the authors recommend injecting no less than 2 mCi of 201 Tl. Using this dosage, the imaging time per view will be approximately five minutes. Routinely, three views are taken: the first view is a supine 45 0 left-anterior-oblique view, followed by a supine anterior view and finally a left-lateral view, the latter with the patient turned on the right side. (Auth.)

  14. Thallium reinjection after stress-redistribution imaging. Does 24-hour delayed imaging after reinjection enhance detection of viable myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilsizian, V.; Smeltzer, W.R.; Freedman, N.M.; Dextras, R.; Bonow, R.O.

    1991-01-01

    Thallium reinjection immediately after conventional stress-redistribution imaging improves the detection of viable myocardium, as many myocardial regions with apparently 'irreversible' thallium defects on standard 3-4-hour redistribution images manifest enhanced thallium uptake after reinjection. Because the 10-minute period between reinjection and imaging may be too short, the present study was designed to determine whether 24-hour imaging after thallium reinjection provides additional information regarding myocardial viability beyond that obtained by imaging shortly after reinjection. We studied 50 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease undergoing exercise thallium tomography, radionuclide angiography, and coronary arteriography. Immediately after the 3-4-hour redistribution images were obtained, 1 mCi thallium was injected at rest, and images were reacquired at 10 minutes and 24 hours after reinjection. The stress, redistribution, reinjection, and 24-hour images were then analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Of the 127 abnormal myocardial regions on the stress images, 55 had persistent defects on redistribution images by qualitative analysis, of which 25 (45%) demonstrated improved thallium uptake after reinjection. At the 24-hour study, 23 of the 25 regions (92%) with previously improved thallium uptake by reinjection showed no further improvement. Similarly, of the 30 regions determined to have irreversible defects after reinjection, 29 (97%) remained irreversible on 24-hour images. These findings were confirmed by the quantitative analysis. The mean normalized thallium activity in regions with enhanced thallium activity after reinjection increased from 57 +/- 13% on redistribution studies to 70 +/- 14% after reinjection but did not change at 24 hours (71 +/- 14%)

  15. Diffusion-weighted whole-body MR imaging with background body signal suppression: a feasibility study at 3.0 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muertz, Petra; Krautmacher, Carsten; Traeber, Frank; Schild, Hans H.; Willinek, Winfried A.; Gieseke, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to provide a diffusion-weighted whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) at 3.0 Tesla. A diffusion-weighted spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence was combined with the following methods of fat suppression: short TI inversion recovery (STIR), spectral attenuated inversion recovery (SPAIR), and spectral presaturation by inversion recovery (SPIR). Optimized sequences were implemented on a 3.0- and a 1.5-Tesla system and evaluated in three healthy volunteers and six patients with various lesions in the neck, chest, and abdomen on the basis of reconstructed maximum intensity projection images. In one patient with metastases of malignant melanoma, DWIBS was compared with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Good fat suppression for all regions and diagnostic image quality in all cases could be obtained at 3.0 Tesla with the STIR method. In comparison with 1.5 Tesla, DWIBS images at 3.0 Tesla were judged to provide a better lesion-to-bone tissue contrast. However, larger susceptibility-induced image distortions and signal intensity losses, stronger blurring artifacts, and more pronounced motion artifacts degraded the image quality at 3.0 Tesla. A good correlation was found between the metastases as depicted by DWIBS and those as visualized by FDG-PET. DWIBS is feasible at 3.0 Tesla with diagnostic image quality. (orig.)

  16. Whole-body PET/MRI: The effect of bone attenuation during MR-based attenuation correction in oncology imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M.C.; Sersar, Rachida; Saabye, J.

    2014-01-01

    and then investigate different strategies to account for bone tissue in clinical PET/MR imaging. To this purpose, bone tissue representation was extracted from separate CT images, and different bone representations were simulated from hypothetically derived MR-based bone classifications. Methods: Twenty oncology...

  17. Using a whole-body 31P birdcage transmit coil and 16-element receive array for human cardiac metabolic imaging at 7T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Valkovič

    Full Text Available Cardiac phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS provides unique insight into the mechanisms of heart failure. Yet, clinical applications have been hindered by the restricted sensitivity of the surface radiofrequency-coils normally used. These permit the analysis of spectra only from the interventricular septum, or large volumes of myocardium, which may not be meaningful in focal disease. Löring et al. recently presented a prototype whole-body (52 cm diameter transmit/receive birdcage coil for 31P at 7T. We now present a new, easily-removable, whole-body 31P transmit radiofrequency-coil built into a patient-bed extension combined with a 16-element receive array for cardiac 31P-MRS.A fully-removable (55 cm diameter birdcage transmit coil was combined with a 16-element receive array on a Magnetom 7T scanner (Siemens, Germany. Electro-magnetic field simulations and phantom tests of the setup were performed. In vivo maps of B1+, metabolite signals, and saturation-band efficiency were acquired across the torsos of eight volunteers.The combined (volume-transmit, local receive array setup increased signal-to-noise ratio 2.6-fold 10 cm below the array (depth of the interventricular septum compared to using the birdcage coil in transceiver mode. The simulated coefficient of variation for B1+ of the whole-body coil across the heart was 46.7% (surface coil 129.0%; and the in vivo measured value was 38.4%. Metabolite images of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate clearly resolved the ventricular blood pools, and muscle tissue was visible in phosphocreatine (PCr maps. Amplitude-modulated saturation bands achieved 71±4% suppression of phosphocreatine PCr in chest-wall muscles. Subjects reported they were comfortable.This easy-to-assemble, volume-transmit, local receive array coil combination significantly improves the homogeneity and field-of-view for metabolic imaging of the human heart at 7T.

  18. Myocardial imaging in coronary heart disease with radionuclides, with emphasis on thallium-201

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wackers, F J.Th.; Sokole, E B; Samson, G; van der Schoot, J B; Wellens, H J.J. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis

    1976-09-01

    During the past few years there has been an increasing interest in cardiology for myocardial imaging with radionuclides. At present the experience with both negative (thallium-201) and positive (sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate) imaging of myocardial infarction is increasing rapidly. Since 1974, over 1100 patient studies with thallium-201 were performed. In this article a survey is presented of experience with thallium-201 in patients with acute and chronic coronary artery disease. In patients with acute myocardial infarction data from studies with sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate will be discussed as well.

  19. Vibration and Noise in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Vocal Tract: Differences between Whole-Body and Open-Air Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Přibil

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article compares open-air and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI equipment working with a weak magnetic field as regards the methods of its generation, spectral properties of mechanical vibration and acoustic noise produced by gradient coils during the scanning process, and the measured noise intensity. These devices are used for non-invasive MRI reconstruction of the human vocal tract during phonation with simultaneous speech recording. In this case, the vibration and noise have negative influence on quality of speech signal. Two basic measurement experiments were performed within the paper: mapping sound pressure levels in the MRI device vicinity and picking up vibration and noise signals in the MRI scanning area. Spectral characteristics of these signals are then analyzed statistically and compared visually and numerically.

  20. Vibration and Noise in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Vocal Tract: Differences between Whole-Body and Open-Air Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Přibil, Jiří; Přibilová, Anna; Frollo, Ivan

    2018-04-05

    This article compares open-air and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment working with a weak magnetic field as regards the methods of its generation, spectral properties of mechanical vibration and acoustic noise produced by gradient coils during the scanning process, and the measured noise intensity. These devices are used for non-invasive MRI reconstruction of the human vocal tract during phonation with simultaneous speech recording. In this case, the vibration and noise have negative influence on quality of speech signal. Two basic measurement experiments were performed within the paper: mapping sound pressure levels in the MRI device vicinity and picking up vibration and noise signals in the MRI scanning area. Spectral characteristics of these signals are then analyzed statistically and compared visually and numerically.

  1. Whole-body PET/MRI: The effect of bone attenuation during MR-based attenuation correction in oncology imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M.C.; Sersar, Rachida; Saabye, J.

    2014-01-01

    patients referred for a PET/CT were injected with either [18F]-FDG or [18F]-NaF and imaged on PET/CT (Biograph TruePoint/mCT, Siemens) and PET/MRI (mMR, Siemens) following a standard single-injection, dual-imaging clinical WB-protocol. Routine MR-AC was based on in-/opposed-phase MR imaging (orgMR-AC). PET...... and then investigate different strategies to account for bone tissue in clinical PET/MR imaging. To this purpose, bone tissue representation was extracted from separate CT images, and different bone representations were simulated from hypothetically derived MR-based bone classifications. Methods: Twenty oncology.......3%) and lowest for spongCT (–2.2%, range: 0.0% to –13.7%). Conclusions: In PET/MR imaging using standard MR-AC PET uptake values in soft lesions and bone lesions are underestimated by about 10%. In individual patients this bias can be as high as 22%, which is significant during clinical follow-up exams. If bone...

  2. Impact of body habitus on quantitative and qualitative image quality in whole-body FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Clark, Paul A.; Nakamoto, Yuji; Wahl, Richard L. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 601 N. Caroline St., Rm 3223, Baltimore, MD 21287-0817 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining consistent high image quality is desirable for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Body morphology may impact image quality. The purpose of this study was to define the average and the range of body sizes in patients undergoing tumor PET studies in our center and to determine how the body habitus affects the statistical and visual quality of PET images. Height, weight, body surface area (BSA), and body mass index (BMI) were determined in 101 male and 101 female patients (group 1) referred for clinical PET. The summed total counts from three consecutive transaxial slices on non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) 2D fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images, which included the largest liver section and no lesions, were determined and compared with body morphology and injected doses (ID) in a representative group of 30 male and 30 female patients (group 2) spanning a range of body morphologies. The visual quality of images was also evaluated using a scoring system by three readers. The average height, weight, and BSA were greater in male than in female patients, but the average BMI was not different between them in group 1. The largest value of weight or BMI was more than four times the smallest value in female patients. The total true counts were best correlated with ID/weight (mCi/kg) in group 2 (r=0.929, P<0.0001). Intermediate to high total counts (930,000 or more) corresponded to ID/weight of 0.22 or higher. The average visual score was positively correlated with the total counts ({rho}=0.63, P<0.0001) and with ID/weight ({rho}=0.68, P<0.0001) on NAC images. The image quality in 22 (84.6%) of 26 patients with intermediate to high total counts was adequate to good, whereas that in 21 (61.8%) of 34 patients with lower total counts was suboptimal. A wide variety of body morphologies was observed in patients referred for clinical FDG-PET tumor studies in our center. The total counts and average image visual score were negatively correlated with

  3. Pediatric whole-body magnetic resonance imaging: Intra-individual comparison of technical quality, artifacts, and fixed structure visibility at 1.5 and 3 T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMRI performed at 1.5 and 3 T for technical quality, artifacts, and visibility of selected fixed structures. Patients and Methods: 21 children who had WBMRI at both 1.5 and 3 T scanners within a relatively short interval (3-13 months; average-8.6 months were included. The images were objectively compared with scores from 4 to 1 for five parameters including severity of artifacts; visibility of liver, vertebral column, and marrow in legs; and overall image quality. Inter-observer agreement was calculated using Kendall's coefficient of Concordance (W and scores were compared using Signed Rank test. Results: There was substantial inter-observer agreement for all five categories at both field strengths. The difference between averages of mean scores of all five parameters for two field strengths was statistically significant (P < 0.05, indicating less artifact, better fixed structure visibility, and overall image quality at 1.5 T as compared to 3 T. However, scores at 3 T were also rated within a good range (around 3 indicating its feasibility for WBMRI in children. Conclusion: WBMRI at 1.5 T has significantly better image quality, fixed structure visibility, and fewer artifacts, as compared to WBMRI at 3 T in children. This difference is unlikely to significantly affect detection of pathology on 3 T WBMRI as the image quality score at 3 T was also within good range.

  4. Pediatric whole-body magnetic resonance imaging: Intra-individual comparison of technical quality, artifacts, and fixed structure visibility at 1.5 and 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Shyam; Moineddin, Rahim; Chavhan, Govind B

    2015-01-01

    To compare whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMRI) performed at 1.5 and 3 T for technical quality, artifacts, and visibility of selected fixed structures. 21 children who had WBMRI at both 1.5 and 3 T scanners within a relatively short interval (3-13 months; average-8.6 months) were included. The images were objectively compared with scores from 4 to 1 for five parameters including severity of artifacts; visibility of liver, vertebral column, and marrow in legs; and overall image quality. Inter-observer agreement was calculated using Kendall's coefficient of Concordance (W) and scores were compared using Signed Rank test. There was substantial inter-observer agreement for all five categories at both field strengths. The difference between averages of mean scores of all five parameters for two field strengths was statistically significant (P < 0.05), indicating less artifact, better fixed structure visibility, and overall image quality at 1.5 T as compared to 3 T. However, scores at 3 T were also rated within a good range (around 3) indicating its feasibility for WBMRI in children. WBMRI at 1.5 T has significantly better image quality, fixed structure visibility, and fewer artifacts, as compared to WBMRI at 3 T in children. This difference is unlikely to significantly affect detection of pathology on 3 T WBMRI as the image quality score at 3 T was also within good range

  5. Whole-body MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, and diffusion-weighted imaging for the staging of multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutoit, Julie C.; Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive imaging technique for the detection of bone marrow infiltration, and has therefore recently been included in the new diagnostic myeloma criteria, as proposed by the International Myeloma Working Group. Nevertheless, conventional MRI only provides anatomical information and is therefore only of limited use in the response assessment of patients with multiple myeloma. The additional information from functional MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, can improve the detection rate of bone marrow infiltration and the assessment of response. This can further enhance the sensitivity and specificity of MRI in the staging of multiple myeloma patients. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects of conventional and functional MRI techniques with practical recommendations. It reviews the diagnostic performance, prognostic value, and role in therapy assessment in multiple myeloma and its precursor stages. (orig.)

  6. Thallium-201 for myocardial imaging: appearance of the normal heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.J.; Bailey, I.; Strauss, H.W.; Rouleau, J.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Pitt, B.

    1976-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion images were obtained from 13 healthy adults after tracer administration both at rest and at maximal stress. On the rest-injected scan, tracer was seen in left ventricular myocardium, liver, and spleen. In two subjects with resting tachycardia, the right ventricular myocardium was slightly visualized after tracer injection at rest. When tracer was administered at stress, the left ventricular activity was more nearly homogeneous and the left ventricle was better defined on the scan. The left-ventricle-to-lung-background activity ratio increased from 2.4 at rest to 3.4 at stress. The right ventricular myocardium was seen on the stress-injected scan. Phantom studies, performed to define the optimum position for visualization of lesions, showed that small lesions were best defined when seen either en face or in tangent. Scans should be performed at stress whenever possible and multiple views are essential

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: cyang@tccn.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu-Chi College of Technology, 970, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shu-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital, 970, Hualien, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu-Chi College of Technology, 970, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S. P. [Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  8. Comparison of MR-based attenuation correction and CT-based attenuation correction of whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, New York, NY (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Sawiak, Stephen J. [University of Cambridge, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Joseph [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Narula, Jagat [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Fayad, Zahi A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the built-in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) included in the combined whole-body Ingenuity TF PET/MR scanner and compare it to the performance of CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) as the gold standard. Included in the study were 26 patients who underwent clinical whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging and subsequently PET/MR imaging (mean delay 100 min). Patients were separated into two groups: the alpha group (14 patients) without MR coils during PET/MR imaging and the beta group (12 patients) with MR coils present (neurovascular, spine, cardiac and torso coils). All images were coregistered to the same space (PET/MR). The two PET images from PET/MR reconstructed using MRAC and CTAC were compared by voxel-based and region-based methods (with ten regions of interest, ROIs). Lesions were also compared by an experienced clinician. Body mass index and lung density showed significant differences between the alpha and beta groups. Right and left lung densities were also significantly different within each group. The percentage differences in uptake values using MRAC in relation to those using CTAC were greater in the beta group than in the alpha group (alpha group -0.2 ± 33.6 %, R{sup 2} = 0.98, p < 0.001; beta group 10.31 ± 69.86 %, R{sup 2} = 0.97, p < 0.001). In comparison to CTAC, MRAC led to underestimation of the PET values by less than 10 % on average, although some ROIs and lesions did differ by more (including the spine, lung and heart). The beta group (imaged with coils present) showed increased overall PET quantification as well as increased variability compared to the alpha group (imaged without coils). PET data reconstructed with MRAC and CTAC showed some differences, mostly in relation to air pockets, metallic implants and attenuation differences in large bone areas (such as the pelvis and spine) due to the segmentation limitation of the MRAC method. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of MR-based attenuation correction and CT-based attenuation correction of whole-body PET/MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Joseph; Narula, Jagat; Fuster, Valentin; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the built-in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) included in the combined whole-body Ingenuity TF PET/MR scanner and compare it to the performance of CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) as the gold standard. Included in the study were 26 patients who underwent clinical whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging and subsequently PET/MR imaging (mean delay 100 min). Patients were separated into two groups: the alpha group (14 patients) without MR coils during PET/MR imaging and the beta group (12 patients) with MR coils present (neurovascular, spine, cardiac and torso coils). All images were coregistered to the same space (PET/MR). The two PET images from PET/MR reconstructed using MRAC and CTAC were compared by voxel-based and region-based methods (with ten regions of interest, ROIs). Lesions were also compared by an experienced clinician. Body mass index and lung density showed significant differences between the alpha and beta groups. Right and left lung densities were also significantly different within each group. The percentage differences in uptake values using MRAC in relation to those using CTAC were greater in the beta group than in the alpha group (alpha group -0.2 ± 33.6 %, R 2 = 0.98, p 2 = 0.97, p < 0.001). In comparison to CTAC, MRAC led to underestimation of the PET values by less than 10 % on average, although some ROIs and lesions did differ by more (including the spine, lung and heart). The beta group (imaged with coils present) showed increased overall PET quantification as well as increased variability compared to the alpha group (imaged without coils). PET data reconstructed with MRAC and CTAC showed some differences, mostly in relation to air pockets, metallic implants and attenuation differences in large bone areas (such as the pelvis and spine) due to the segmentation limitation of the MRAC method. (orig.)

  10. Whole-body radiation dosimetry of 2-[18F]Fluoro-A-85380 in human PET imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrzut, Sebastian L.; Koren, Andrei O.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Brody, Arthur L.; Hoh, Carl K.; London, Edythe D.

    2005-01-01

    2-[ 18 F]Fluoro-A-85380 (2-[ 18 F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine, 2-[ 18 F]FA) is a recently developed PET radioligand for noninvasive imaging of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Previous radiation absorbed dose estimates for 2-[ 18 F]FA were limited to evaluation of activity in only several critical organs. Here, we performed 2-[ 18 F]FA radiation dosimetry studies on two healthy human volunteers to obtain data for all important body organs. Intravenous injection of 2.9 MBq/kg of 2-[ 18 F]FA was followed by dynamic PET imaging. Regions of interest were placed over images of each organ to generate time-activity curves, from which we computed residence times. Radiation absorbed doses were calculated from the residence times using the MIRDOSE 3.0 program (version 3.0, ORISE, Oak Ridge, TN). The urinary bladder wall receives the highest radiation absorbed dose (0.153 mGy/MBq, 0.566 rad/mCi, for a 2.4-h voiding interval), followed by the liver (0.0496 mGy/MBq, 0.184 rad/mCi) and the kidneys (0.0470 mGy/MBq, 0.174 rad/mCi). The mean effective dose equivalent is estimated to be 0.0278 mSv/MBq (0.103 rem/mCi), indicating that radiation dosimetry associated with 2-[ 18 F]FA is within acceptable limits

  11. Determination of cardiac risk by dipyridamole-thallium imaging before peripheral vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, C.A.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate the severity of coronary artery disease in patients with severe peripheral vascular disease requiring surgery, preoperative dipyridamole-thallium imaging was performed in 54 stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Of the 54 patients, 48 had peripheral vascular surgery as scheduled without coronary angiography, of whom 8 (17 per cent) had postoperative cardiac ischemic events. The occurrence of these eight cardiac events could not have been predicted preoperatively by any clinical factors but did correlate with the presence of thallium redistribution. Eight of 16 patients with thallium redistribution had cardiac events, whereas there were no such events in 32 patients whose thallium scan either was normal or showed only persistent defects (P less than 0.0001). Six other patients also had thallium redistribution but underwent coronary angiography before vascular surgery. All had severe multivessel coronary artery disease, and four underwent coronary bypass surgery followed by uncomplicated peripheral vascular surgery. These data suggest that patients without thallium redistribution are at a low risk for postoperative ischemic events and may proceed to have vascular surgery. Patients with redistribution have a high incidence of postoperative ischemic events and should be considered for preoperative coronary angiography and myocardial revascularization in an effort to avoid postoperative myocardial ischemia and to improve survival. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging is superior to clinical assessment and is safer and less expensive than coronary angiography for the determination of cardiac risk

  12. Evaluation of treatment response to enzyme replacement therapy with Velaglucerase alfa in patients with Gaucher disease using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudemann, K; Moos, L; Mengel, E; Lollert, A; Hoffmann, C; Brixius-Huth, M; Wagner, D; Düber, C; Staatz, G

    2016-03-01

    This was a retrospective data analysis to evaluate the treatment response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with Velaglucerase alfa using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A baseline and follow-up MRI were performed on 18 Gaucher Type 1 patients at an interval of 11.6 months. The MRI score systems determined the Bone-Marrow-Burden (BMB) score, the Düsseldorf-Gaucher score (DGS), and the Vertebra-Disc-Ratio (VDR). The Severity Score Index Type 1 (GD-DS3) was also assessed. The baseline MRI medians were: BMB, 7.00; DGS, 3.00; and VDR: 1.70; while, the follow-up MRI medians were: BMB, 7.00; DGS, 3.00; and VDR: 1.73. The baseline GD-DS3 median was 2.40 (BMB excl.: 0.50) and the follow-up median was 2.00 (BMB excl.: 0.50). There was weak statistical significance with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for the DGS (p=0.034) and GD-DS3 (p=0.047) between both MRIs. Velaglucerase alfa therapy is a effective long-term treatment for Gaucher Type 1 patients who are newly diagnosed or switching therapies. Measurements with whole-body MRI and an objective scoring system were reliable tools for detecting early stage bone marrow activity. Further research is needed to evaluate the "Booster-Effect" of Velaglucerase alfa therapy in Gaucher skeletal disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: the effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su [Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  14. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: The effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-06-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  15. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: the effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-01-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  16. Evaluation of scatter limitation correction: a new method of correcting photopenic artifacts caused by patient motion during whole-body PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kenta; Umeda, Takuro; Murata, Taisuke; Wagatsuma, Kei; Miyaji, Noriaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    Overcorrection of scatter caused by patient motion during whole-body PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging can induce the appearance of photopenic artifacts in the PET images. The present study aimed to quantify the accuracy of scatter limitation correction (SLC) for eliminating photopenic artifacts. This study analyzed photopenic artifacts in (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT images acquired from 12 patients and from a National Electrical Manufacturers Association phantom with two peripheral plastic bottles that simulated the human body and arms, respectively. The phantom comprised a sphere (diameter, 10 or 37 mm) containing fluorine-18 solutions with target-to-background ratios of 2, 4, and 8. The plastic bottles were moved 10 cm posteriorly between CT and PET acquisitions. All PET data were reconstructed using model-based scatter correction (SC), no scatter correction (NSC), and SLC, and the presence or absence of artifacts on the PET images was visually evaluated. The SC and SLC images were also semiquantitatively evaluated using standardized uptake values (SUVs). Photopenic artifacts were not recognizable in any NSC and SLC image from all 12 patients in the clinical study. The SUVmax of mismatched SLC PET/CT images were almost equal to those of matched SC and SLC PET/CT images. Applying NSC and SLC substantially eliminated the photopenic artifacts on SC PET images in the phantom study. SLC improved the activity concentration of the sphere for all target-to-background ratios. The highest %errors of the 10 and 37-mm spheres were 93.3 and 58.3%, respectively, for mismatched SC, and 73.2 and 22.0%, respectively, for mismatched SLC. Photopenic artifacts caused by SC error induced by CT and PET image misalignment were corrected using SLC, indicating that this method is useful and practical for clinical qualitative and quantitative PET/CT assessment.

  17. Radiation dosimetry estimates of "1"8F-alfatide II based on whole-body PET imaging of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Si-yang; Bao, Xiao; Wang, Ming-wei; Zhang, Yong-ping; Zhang, Ying-jian; Zhang, Jian-ping

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the dosimetry of "1"8F-alfatide II with the method established by MIRD based on biodistribution data of mice. Six mice (three females and three males) were scanned for 160 min on an Inveon MicroPET/CT scanner after injection of "1"8F-alfatide II via tail vein. Eight source organs were delineated on the CT images and their residence times calculated. The data was then converted to human using scaling factors based on organ and body weight. The absorbed doses for human and the resulting effective dose were computed by OLINDA 1.1 software. The highest absorbed doses was observed in urinary bladder wall (male 0.102 mGy/MBq, female 0.147 mGy/MBq); and the lowest one was detected in brain (male 0.0030 mGy/MBq, female 0.0036). The total effective doses were 0.0127 mSv/MBq for male and 0.0166 mSv/MBq for female, respectively. A 370-MBq injection of "1"8F-alfatide II led to an estimated effective dose of 4.70 mSv for male and 6.14 mSv for female. The potential radiation burden associated with "1"8F-alfatide II/PET imaging therefore is comparable to other PET examinations. - Highlights: • We demonstrated a proper mice model to estimate human radiation dosimetry. • This is the first paper to estimate human radiation dosimetry of "1"8F-alfatide II. • Estimated effective dose are in the range of routine nuclear medicine studies.

  18. Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lois, Cristina [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Particle Physics, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, Ilja [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Max Plank Institute for Intelligent Systems, Department of Empirical Inference, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmidt, Holger [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Werner, Matthias K. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Kupferschlaeger, Juergen [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); cmi-experts GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    Clinical PET/MR acquisition protocols entail the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) that could potentially affect PET quantification following MR-based attenuation correction (AC). We assessed the effect of oral and intravenous (IV) MRCA on PET quantification in PET/MR imaging. We employed two MRCA: Lumirem {sup registered} (oral) and Gadovist {sup registered} (IV). First, we determined their reference PET attenuation values using a PET transmission scan (ECAT-EXACT HR+, Siemens) and a CT scan (PET/CT Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens). Second, we evaluated the attenuation of PET signals in the presence of MRCA. Phantoms were filled with clinically relevant concentrations of MRCA in a background of water and {sup 18}F-fluoride, and imaged using a PET/CT scanner (Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens) and a PET/MR scanner (Biograph mMR, Siemens). Third, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant volumes of MRCA on MR-based AC using human pilot data: a patient study employing Gadovist {sup registered} (IV) and a volunteer study employing two different oral MRCA (Lumirem {sup registered} and pineapple juice). MR-based attenuation maps were calculated following Dixon-based fat-water segmentation and an external atlas-based and pattern recognition (AT and PR) algorithm. IV and oral MRCA in clinically relevant concentrations were found to have PET attenuation values similar to those of water. The phantom experiments showed that under clinical conditions IV and oral MRCA did not yield additional attenuation of PET emission signals. Patient scans showed that PET attenuation maps are not biased after the administration of IV MRCA but may be biased, however, after ingestion of iron oxide-based oral MRCA when segmentation-based AC algorithms are used. Alternative AC algorithms, such as AT and PR, or alternative oral contrast agents, such as pineapple juice, can yield unbiased attenuation maps. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to markedly increased attenuation

  19. Hanford whole body counting manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, H.E.; Brim, C.P.; Rieksts, G.A.; Rhoads, M.C.

    1987-05-01

    This document, a reprint of the Whole Body Counting Manual, was compiled to train personnel, document operation procedures, and outline quality assurance procedures. The current manual contains information on: the location, availability, and scope of services of Hanford's whole body counting facilities; the administrative aspect of the whole body counting operation; Hanford's whole body counting facilities; the step-by-step procedure involved in the different types of in vivo measurements; the detectors, preamplifiers and amplifiers, and spectroscopy equipment; the quality assurance aspect of equipment calibration and recordkeeping; data processing, record storage, results verification, report preparation, count summaries, and unit cost accounting; and the topics of minimum detectable amount and measurement accuracy and precision. 12 refs., 13 tabs

  20. The ORNL whole body counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report is a non-technical document intended to provide an individual about to undergo a whole-body radiation count with a general understanding of the counting procedure and with the results obtained. 9 figs

  1. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced

  2. Fully automatic, multiorgan segmentation in normal whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using classification forests (CFs), convolutional neural networks (CNNs), and a multi-atlas (MA) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavdas, Ioannis; Glocker, Ben; Kamnitsas, Konstantinos; Rueckert, Daniel; Mair, Henrietta; Sandhu, Amandeep; Taylor, Stuart A; Aboagye, Eric O; Rockall, Andrea G

    2017-10-01

    As part of a program to implement automatic lesion detection methods for whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in oncology, we have developed, evaluated, and compared three algorithms for fully automatic, multiorgan segmentation in healthy volunteers. The first algorithm is based on classification forests (CFs), the second is based on 3D convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and the third algorithm is based on a multi-atlas (MA) approach. We examined data from 51 healthy volunteers, scanned prospectively with a standardized, multiparametric whole body MRI protocol at 1.5 T. The study was approved by the local ethics committee and written consent was obtained from the participants. MRI data were used as input data to the algorithms, while training was based on manual annotation of the anatomies of interest by clinical MRI experts. Fivefold cross-validation experiments were run on 34 artifact-free subjects. We report three overlap and three surface distance metrics to evaluate the agreement between the automatic and manual segmentations, namely the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), recall (RE), precision (PR), average surface distance (ASD), root-mean-square surface distance (RMSSD), and Hausdorff distance (HD). Analysis of variances was used to compare pooled label metrics between the three algorithms and the DSC on a 'per-organ' basis. A Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the pooled metrics between CFs and CNNs and the DSC on a 'per-organ' basis, when using different imaging combinations as input for training. All three algorithms resulted in robust segmenters that were effectively trained using a relatively small number of datasets, an important consideration in the clinical setting. Mean overlap metrics for all the segmented structures were: CFs: DSC = 0.70 ± 0.18, RE = 0.73 ± 0.18, PR = 0.71 ± 0.14, CNNs: DSC = 0.81 ± 0.13, RE = 0.83 ± 0.14, PR = 0.82 ± 0.10, MA: DSC = 0.71 ± 0.22, RE = 0.70 ± 0.34, PR = 0.77 ± 0.15. Mean surface distance

  3. Effect of exercise supplementation on dipyridamole thallium-201 image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, S.; Greenberg, I.D.; Corne, R.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the effect of different types of exercise supplementation on dipyridamole thallium image quality, 78 patients were prospectively randomized to one of three protocols: dipyridamole infusion alone, dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip, and dipyridamole with low-level treadmill exercise. Heart-to-lung, heart-to-liver, and heart-to-adjacent infradiaphragmatic activity ratios were generated from anterior images acquired immediately following the test. Additionally, heart-to-total infradiaphragmatic activity was graded semiquantitatively. Results showed a significantly higher ratio of heart to subdiaphragmatic activity in the treadmill group as compared with dipyridamole alone (p less than 0.001) and dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip exercise (p less than 0.001). No significant difference was observed between patients receiving the dipyridamole infusion, and dipyridamole supplemented with isometric handgrip exercise. The authors conclude that low-level treadmill exercise supplementation of dipyridamole infusion is an effective means of improving image quality. Supplementation with isometric handgrip does not improve image quality over dipyridamole alone

  4. Whole-body and Whole-Organ Clearing and Imaging Techniques with Single-Cell Resolution: Toward Organism-Level Systems Biology in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susaki, Etsuo A; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-01-21

    Organism-level systems biology aims to identify, analyze, control and design cellular circuits in organisms. Many experimental and computational approaches have been developed over the years to allow us to conduct these studies. Some of the most powerful methods are based on using optical imaging in combination with fluorescent labeling, and for those one of the long-standing stumbling blocks has been tissue opacity. Recently, the solutions to this problem have started to emerge based on whole-body and whole-organ clearing techniques that employ innovative tissue-clearing chemistry. Here, we review these advancements and discuss how combining new clearing techniques with high-performing fluorescent proteins or small molecule tags, rapid volume imaging and efficient image informatics is resulting in comprehensive and quantitative organ-wide, single-cell resolution experimental data. These technologies are starting to yield information on connectivity and dynamics in cellular circuits at unprecedented resolution, and bring us closer to system-level understanding of physiology and diseases of complex mammalian systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of 131I whole-body imaging, 131I SPECT/CT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of metastatic thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Chong, Ari; Kim, Jahae; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Song, Ho-Chun; Bom, Hee-Seung; Byun, Byung-Hyun; Hong, Sun-Pyo; Yoo, Su-Woong; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Min, Jung-Joon

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 131 I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS), WBS with 131 I single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of distant metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). A total of 140 patients with 258 foci of suspected distant metastases were evaluated. 131 I WBS, 131 I SPECT/CT, and 18 F-FDG PET/CT images were interpreted separately. The final diagnosis was obtained from histopathologic study, serum thyroglobulin level, other imaging modalities, and/or clinical follow-up. Of the 140 patients with 258 foci, 46 patients with 166 foci were diagnosed as positive for distant metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each imaging modality were 65, 55, and 59%, respectively, for 131 I WBS; 65, 95, and 85% for 131 I SPECT/CT, respectively; and 61, 98, and 86%, respectively, for 18 F-FDG PET/CT in patient-based analyses. Lesion-based analyses demonstrated that both SPECT/CT and PET/CT were superior to WBS (p 18 F-FDG PET/CT presented the highest diagnostic performance in patients who underwent multiple challenges of radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic imaging in polytrauma: comparison of radiation exposure from whole-body MSCT and conventional radiography with organ-specific CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedegaertner, U.; Lorenzen, M.; Weber, C.; Adam, G.; Nagel, H.D.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose of whole-body multislice CT (MSCT) and conventional radiography with organ-specific CT in polytrauma. Materials and Methods: The whole-body MSCT encompassing brain, neck and midface, chest, abdomen and pelvis was performed on a Somatom Volume Zoom (Siemens). Conventional radiography consisted of chest and cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine in two views as well as pelvis. Polymat, Siemens. Three combinations of organ specific CT were chosen: CT examination of (1) head and cervical spine, (2) head, cervical spine and chest, (3) head, cervical spine and abdomen. The effective doses of whole-body MSCT and conventional radiography with organ-specific CT were calculated. Results: Effective doses were 20 mSv for whole-body MSCT, 2 mSv for conventional x-ray, and 5 mSv for combination (1), 8 mSv for combination (2) and (3) 16 mSv for combination (3) of the organ-specific CT. The ratio of radiation dose between whole-body MSCT and radiography was 10: 1. This ratio was reduced to 3: 1, 2: 1 and 1: 1 when a combination of radiography and CT was performed. Conclusions: Whole-body MSCT in polytrauma compared to conventional radiography with organ-specific CT induces a threefold increased dose in unfavorable situations and no increased dose in favorable situations. Nevertheless, routine use of whole-body MSCT should be critically evaluated and should be adapted to the clinical benefit. (orig.) [de

  7. A serial changes of thallium-201 myocardial images in a patient with nontransmural myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Itoh, Yukiyoshi; Takayama, Yasuo

    1986-01-01

    A 66 year old man had suffered from inferior myocardial infarction one year ago and then suffered from effort angina. Recently rest angina attack frequently occurred and he was admitted because of angina attack refractory to TNG. The patient was diagnosed as broad nontransmural infarction. A serial thallium-201 myocardial imagings at rest and thallium-201 lung uptake imagings were performed and some interesting findings were obtained as followings. Myocardial imagings on 3rd day after admission showed no significant deffect, however EF was 34 %. Immediately after severe ischemic attack marked defect was noted at posterolateral region and ECG showed prominent precordial ST depression without accompanying significant ST change in II, III, aVF. On 3rd day after severe attack under hemodynamically and electrocardiographically stable state posterolateral defect improved, though still persisted. EF was 28 %. On 3rd day postop no marked defects were noted in myocardial imagings, so posterolateral defect at rest after severe ischemic attack was proved to be transient defect. In this case thallium-201 lung uptake was not noted before attack. Immediately after severe attack thallium lung uptake increased and maximal uptake was noted at basal zone of lung, however in chest X-P typical butterfly shadow was noted at upper zone of lung. On 3rd day after severe attack hemodynamics improved and butterfly shadow ceased, though thallium lung uptake increased and noted at upper zone of lung. After operation thallium lung uptake improved. (J.P.N.)

  8. Whole-body biodistribution and brain PET imaging with [{sup 18}F]AV-45, a novel amyloid imaging agent - a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, K.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Hsu, W.-C. [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T.; Wey, S.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Jin, L.-W. [M.I.N.D. Institute and Department of Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wai, Y.-Y. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Chang, H.-P.; Lo, C.-W.; Yao, C.H.; Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The compound (E)-4-(2-(6-(2-(2-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy) pyridin-3-yl)vinyl)-N-methylbenzenamine ([{sup 18}F]AV-45) is a novel radiopharmaceutical capable of selectively binding to {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques. This pilot study reports the safety, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 in human subjects. Methods: In vitro autoradiography and fluorescent staining of postmortem brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cognitively healthy subjects were performed to assess the specificity of the tracer. Biodistribution was assessed in three healthy elderly subjects (mean age: 60.0{+-}5.2 years) who underwent 3-h whole-body positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomographic (CT) scans after a bolus injection of 381.9{+-}13.9 MBq of [{sup 18}F]AV-45. Another six subjects (three AD patients and three healthy controls, mean age: 67.7{+-}13.6 years) underwent brain PET studies. Source organs were delineated on PET/CT. All subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for obtaining structural information. Results: In vitro autoradiography revealed exquisitely high specific binding of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 to postmortem AD brain sections, but not to the control sections. There were no serious adverse events throughout the study period. The peak uptake of the tracer in the brain was 5.12{+-}0.41% of the injected dose. The highest absorbed organ dose was to the gallbladder wall (184.7{+-}78.6 {mu}Gy/MBq, 4.8 h voiding interval). The effective dose equivalent and effective dose values for [{sup 18}F]AV-45 were 33.8{+-}3.4 {mu}Sv/MBq and 19.3{+-}1.3 {mu}Sv/MBq, respectively. Conclusion: [{sup 18}F]AV-45 binds specifically to A{beta} in vitro, and is a safe PET tracer for studying A{beta} distribution in human brain. The dosimetry is suitable for clinical and research application.

  9. Whole body line scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berninger, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bar-shaped scintillator converts incident collimated gamma rays to light pulses which are detected by a row of photoelectric tubes positioned along the output face of the scintillator wherein each tube has a convexly curved photocathode disposed in close proximity to the scintillator. Electronic circuitry connected to the output of phototubes develops the scintillation event x-axis position coordinate electrical signal with good linearity and with substantial independence of the spacing between the scintillator and photocathodes so that the phototubes can be positioned as close to the scintillator as possible to obtain reduced distortion in the field of view and improved spatial resolution. A mechanical drive of the scanner results in an image of the gamma ray source being formed by sequencing the developed scintillation position coordinate signals in the y-axis dimension

  10. Quantitative thallium-201 myocardial imaging in assessing right ventricular pressure in patients with congenital heart defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovitch, M.; Fischer, K.C.; Treves, S.

    1981-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was performed in patients with congenital heart defects to determine whether, by quantification of right ventricular isotope uptake, one could assess the degree of right ventricular hypertrophy and so predict the level of right ventricular pressure. It is shown that quantitative analysis of myocardial imaging with thallium-201 is of use clinically in patients with congenital heart defects, in assessing the severity of pulmonary stenosis or the presence of pulmonary artery hypertension. (author)

  11. Serial thallium-201 imaging after dipyridamole for coronary disease detection: quantitative analysis using myocardial clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, R.D.; Dai, Y.H.; Boucher, C.A.; Pohost, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    After dipyridamole, canine studies have demonstrated a slower rate of myocardial thallium-201 clearance from zones distal to a coronary artery stenosis compared to normal zones. To determine if criteria based on canine myocardial thallium-201 clearance rates could be applied clinically, 40 patients with and 26 patients without coronary artery disease (CAD) had serial thallium-201 images obtained for 2 to 5 hours after dipyridamole. Regions of interest were manually placed over six left ventricular segments in two projections for each of three imaging times. The myocardial thallium-201 clearance rate was calculated for each of the six segments and, using the clearance rate criterion found in canine studies, was considered abnormal if less than 6.5%/hr. Using this criterion alone, 22 of 26 patients (85%) without CAD had normal and 30 of 40 patients (75%) with CAD had abnormal myocardial thallium-201 clearance rates. A quantitative analysis of regional inhomogeneity in tracer distribution (normal was greater than or equal to 25% difference between segments) was negative in 24 of 26 patients (92%) without CAD and positive in 20 of 40 patients (50%) with CAD. When both clearance rate and regional inhomogeneity were considered, 21 of 26 patients (81%) without CAD had negative and 36 of 40 patients (90%) with CAD had positive results. Thus, post-dipyridamole myocardial clearance rate criteria derived from canine studies can be applied to clinical thallium imaging. Quantitative analysis of serial thallium-201 images after dipyridamole is optimized by using myocardial thallium-201 clearance rates. Such an approach is independent of regional inhomogeneities in tracer distribution

  12. Resting technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile cardiac imaging in chronic coronary artery disease: comparison with rest-redistribution thallium-201 scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuocolo, A.; Maurea, S.; Pace, L.; Nicolai, E.; Nappi, A.; Imbriaco, M.; Trimarco, B.; Salvatore, M.

    1993-01-01

    We studied 19 patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction 33%±8%) by resting technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile ( 99m Tc-MIBI) and rest-redistribution thallium-201 cardiac imaging. Thallium and 99m Tc-MIBI studies were visually analysed. Of 285 segments, 203 (71%) had normal thallium uptake, 48 (17%) showed reversible thallium defects and 34 (12%) showed irreversible thallium defects. Of these 34 irreversible thallium defects, 19 (56%) were moderate and 15 (44%) were severe. Of the corresponding 285 segments, 200 (70%) had normal 99m Tc-MIBI uptake, while 37 (13%) showed moderate and 48 (17%) showed severe reduction of MIBI uptake. Myocardial segmental agreement for regional uptake score between initial thallium and resting 99m Tc-MIBI images was 90% (κ=0.78). Segmental agreement between delayed thallium and resting 99m Tc-MIBI images was 77% (κ=0.44). In particular, in 26 (9%) segments 99m Tc-MIBI uptake was severely reduced while delayed thallium uptake was normal or only moderately reduced. These data suggest that although rest-redistribution thallium and resting 99m Tc-MIBI cardiac imaging provide concordant results in the majority of myocardial segments, some segments with severely reduced resting 99m Tc-MIBI uptake may contain viable but hypoperfused myocardium. Thus, conclusions on myocardial viability based on 99m Tc-MIBI uptake should be made with caution in chronic coronary artery disease. (orig.)

  13. Preoperative evaluation of myocardial viability by thallium-201 imaging in patients with old myocardial infarction who underwent coronary revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Hitoshi; Ohyanagi, Mitsumasa; Iwasaki, Tadaaki; Miyamoto, Takashi; Fukuchi, Minoru

    1992-01-01

    The myocardial uptake and redistribution in thallium scintigraphy and the regional wall motion by echocardiography were evaluated by a semi-quantitative method in 42 patients who previously had myocardial infarction (50 target vessels) and underwent coronary revascularization. The aim of this study was to elucidate the significance of the initial image, delayed image and redistribution on thallium-201 scintigraphy for clinical diagnosis of the myocardial viability. As a semi-quantitative analysis, we used a bull's-eye display for thallium image and centerline method for echocardiographic wall motion, and compared the results before and after revascularization. As a result, the thallium grade improved postoperatively in all 17 areas which preoperatively had showed redistribution, and also in 11 of the 32 areas without preoperative redistribution. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of preoperative thallium redistribution for predicting myocardial viability were 61%, 100% and 78%, respectively, when the postoperative improvement in the thallium grade was used as the standard. The postoperative probability of improvement in the thallium grade increased in proportion to the preoperative grade (delayed image)(p<0.01). There was no correlation between the preoperative thallium delayed image and postoperative improvement in wall motion. Postoperative improvement in thallium image and wall motion could not be predicted from the preoperative wall motion. Thus, postoperative improvement in thallium images can be anticipated if redistribution is present on the preoperative thallium image, and the preoperative thallium delayed image is useful for predicting myocardial viability. Improvement in wall motion could not be predicted preoperatively by these methods. (author)

  14. Evaluation of dual-source parallel RF excitation for diffusion-weighted whole-body MR imaging with background body signal suppression at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürtz, Petra; Kaschner, Marius; Träber, Frank; Kukuk, Guido M; Büdenbender, Sarah M; Skowasch, Dirk; Gieseke, Jürgen; Schild, Hans H; Willinek, Winfried A

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the use of dual-source parallel RF excitation (TX) for diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) at 3.0 T. Forty consecutive patients were examined on a clinical 3.0-T MRI system using a diffusion-weighted (DW) spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with a combination of short TI inversion recovery and slice-selective gradient reversal fat suppression. DWIBS of the neck (n=5), thorax (n=8), abdomen (n=6) and pelvis (n=21) was performed both with TX (2:56 min) and with standard single-source RF excitation (4:37 min). The quality of DW images and reconstructed inverted maximum intensity projections was visually judged by two readers (blinded to acquisition technique). Signal homogeneity and fat suppression were scored as "improved", "equal", "worse" or "ambiguous". Moreover, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured in muscles, urinary bladder, lymph nodes and lesions. By the use of TX, signal homogeneity was "improved" in 25/40 and "equal" in 15/40 cases. Fat suppression was "improved" in 17/40 and "equal" in 23/40 cases. These improvements were statistically significant (p3.0 T with respect to signal homogeneity and fat suppression, reduced scan time by approximately one-third, and did not influence the measured ADC values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Whole-body-MR imaging including DWIBS in the work-up of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noij, Daniel P., E-mail: d.noij@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boerhout, Els J., E-mail: e.boerhout@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pieters-van den Bos, Indra C., E-mail: i.pieters@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Comans, Emile F., E-mail: efi.comans@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oprea-Lager, Daniela, E-mail: d.oprea-lager@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reinhard, Rinze, E-mail: r.reinhard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Otto S., E-mail: os.hoekstra@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bree, Remco de, E-mail: r.debree@vumc.nl [Department Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Graaf, Pim de, E-mail: p.degraaf@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Castelijns, Jonas A., E-mail: j.castelijns@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Objectives: To assess the feasibility of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) including diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background-body-signal-suppression (DWIBS) for the evaluation of distant malignancies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); and to compare WB-MRI findings with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) and chest-CT. Methods: Thirty-three patients with high risk for metastatic spread (26 males; range 48–79 years, mean age 63 ± 7.9 years (mean ± standard deviation) years) were prospectively included with a follow-up of six months. WB-MRI protocol included short-TI inversion recovery and T1-weighted sequences in the coronal plane and half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo T2 and contrast-enhanced-T1-weighted sequences in the axial plane. Axial DWIBS was reformatted in the coronal plane. Interobserver variability was assessed using weighted kappa and the proportion specific agreement (PA). Results: Two second primary tumors and one metastasis were detected on WB-MRI. WB-MRI yielded seven clinically indeterminate lesions which did not progress at follow-up. The metastasis and one second primary tumor were found when combining {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT and chest-CT findings. Interobserver variability for WB-MRI was κ = 0.91 with PA ranging from 0.82 to 1.00. For {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT κ could not be calculated due to a constant variable in the table and PA ranged from 0.40 to 0.99. Conclusions: Our WB-MRI protocol with DWIBS is feasible in the work-up of HNSCC patients for detection and characterization of distant pathology. WB-MRI can be complementary to {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT, especially in the detection of non {sup 18}F-FDG avid second primary tumors.

  16. Lung uptake of thallium-201 on resting myocardial imaging in assessment of pulmonary edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Yamamoto, K. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital)

    1981-03-01

    We have noted increased lung uptake of thallium-201 on resting myocardial images in patients with congestive heart failure. To evaluate this phenomenon, lung uptake of thallium on resting myocardial imaging was examined in 328 patients with various cardiovascular diseases. Increased lung uptake was observed in 117 cases (78%) with myocardial infarction, 32 (37%) with angina pectoris, 6 (27%) with hypertensive heart disease, 7 (30%) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 6 (100%) with congestive cardiomyopathy, 11 (100%) with valvular heart disease, and 7 (71%) with congenital heart disease, however, only one (5%) of normal subjects revealed increased uptake. Left ventricular ejection fraction was evaluated in 32 cases with ischemic heart disease on the same day and it was significantly decreased as the lung uptake of thallium increased. Increased thallium activity in the lung seemed to be another noninvasive marker of lift heart failure in ischemic heart disease. Lung uptake of thallium was compared with pulmonary congestive signs on chest X-ray in 29 cases. The uptake was well correlated with the degree of pulmonary edema, and thallium myocardial image revealed remarkably increased lung uptake in all the patients accompanied with pulmonary interstitial edema on chest X-ray. Therefore, this phenomenon will demonstrate pulmonary edema, since thallium may be extracted to the increased interstitial distribution space of the lung as well as the myocardium in a patient with pulmonary edema. We conclude that thallium myocardial scintigraphy is useful not only in identification and localization of myocardial ischemia or infarction, but also in evaluation of pulmonary edema at the same time.

  17. Lung uptake of thallium-201 on resting myocardial imaging in assessment of pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Nagara; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    1981-01-01

    We have noted increased lung uptake of thallium-201 on resting myocardial images in patients with congestive heart failure. To evaluate this phenomenon, lung uptake of thallium on resting myocardial imaging was examined in 328 patients with various cardiovascular diseases. Increased lung uptake was observed in 117 cases (78%) with myocardial infarction, 32 (37%) with angina pectoris, 6 (27%) with hypertensive heart disease, 7 (30%) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 6 (100%) with congestive cardiomyopathy, 11 (100%) with valvular heart disease, and 7 (71%) with congenital heart disease, however, only one (5%) of normal subjects revealed increased uptake. Left ventricular ejection fraction was evaluated in 32 cases with ischemic heart disease on the same day and it was significantly decreased as the lung uptake of thallium increased. Increased thallium activity in the lung seemed to be another noninvasive marker of lift heart failure in ischemic heart disease. Lung uptake of thallium was compared with pulmonary congestive signs on chest X-ray in 29 cases. The uptake was well correlated with the degree of pulmonary edema, and thallium myocardial image revealed remarkably increased lung uptake in all the patients accompanied with pulmonary interstitial edema on chest X-ray. Therefore, this phenomenon will demonstrate pulmonary edema, since thallium may be extracted to the increased interstitial distribution space of the lung as well as the myocardium in a patient with pulmonary edema. We conclude that thallium myocardial scintigraphy is useful not only in identification and localization of myocardial ischemia or infarction, but also in evaluation of pulmonary edema at the same time. (author)

  18. Whole-body computed tomography in trauma patients: optimization of the patient scanning position significantly shortens examination time while maintaining diagnostic image quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickethier T

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tilman Hickethier,1,* Kamal Mammadov,1,* Bettina Baeßler,1 Thorsten Lichtenstein,1 Jochen Hinkelbein,2 Lucy Smith,3 Patrick Sven Plum,4 Seung-Hun Chon,4 David Maintz,1 De-Hua Chang1 1Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Canada; 4Department of General, Visceral and Cancer Surgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The study was conducted to compare examination time and artifact vulnerability of whole-body computed tomographies (wbCTs for trauma patients using conventional or optimized patient positioning. Patients and methods: Examination time was measured in 100 patients scanned with conventional protocol (Group A: arms positioned alongside the body for head and neck imaging and over the head for trunk imaging and 100 patients scanned with optimized protocol (Group B: arms flexed on a chest pillow without repositioning. Additionally, influence of two different scanning protocols on image quality in the most relevant body regions was assessed by two blinded readers. Results: Total wbCT duration was about 35% or 3:46 min shorter in B than in A. Artifacts in aorta (27 vs 6%, liver (40 vs 8% and spleen (27 vs 5% occurred significantly more often in B than in A. No incident of non-diagnostic image quality was reported, and no significant differences for lungs and spine were found. Conclusion: An optimized wbCT positioning protocol for trauma patients allows a significant reduction of examination time while still maintaining diagnostic image quality. Keywords: CT scan, polytrauma, acute care, time requirement, positioning

  19. Hanford whole body counting manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1990-06-01

    This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs

  20. Imaging children suffering from lymphoma: an evaluation of different 18F-FDG PET/MRI protocols compared to whole-body DW-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Julian; Deuschl, Cornelius; Schweiger, Bernd; Herrmann, Ken; Forsting, Michael; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald; Umutlu, Lale

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of different PET/MRI reading protocols, entailing non-enhanced / contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted 18 F-FDG PET/MR imaging and whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI for lesion detection and determination of the tumor stage in pediatric lymphoma patients. A total of 28 18 F-FDG PET/MRI datasets were included for analysis of four different reading protocols: (1) PET/MRI utilizing sole unenhanced T2w and T1w imaging, (2) PET/MRI utilizing additional contrast enhanced sequences, (3) PET/MR imaging utilizing unenhanced, contrast enhanced and DW imaging or (4) WB-DW-MRI. Statistical analyses were performed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. Follow-up and prior examinations as well as histopathology served as reference standards. PET/MRI correctly identified all 17 examinations with active lymphoma disease, while WB-DW-MRI correctly identified 15/17 examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 96.5%, 97%, 95%, and 96% for PET/MRI 1 ; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI 2 ; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI 3 and 77%, 96%, 96%, 78.5% and 86% for MRI-DWI. 18 F-FDG PET/MRI is superior to WB-DW-MRI in staging pediatric lymphoma patients. Neither application of contrast media nor DWI leads to a noticeable improvement of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI. Thus, unenhanced PET/MRI may play a crucial role for the diagnostic work-up of pediatric lymphoma patients in the future.

  1. Imaging children suffering from lymphoma: an evaluation of different {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI protocols compared to whole-body DW-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, Julian; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Deuschl, Cornelius; Schweiger, Bernd; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of different PET/MRI reading protocols, entailing non-enhanced / contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging and whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI for lesion detection and determination of the tumor stage in pediatric lymphoma patients. A total of 28 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI datasets were included for analysis of four different reading protocols: (1) PET/MRI utilizing sole unenhanced T2w and T1w imaging, (2) PET/MRI utilizing additional contrast enhanced sequences, (3) PET/MR imaging utilizing unenhanced, contrast enhanced and DW imaging or (4) WB-DW-MRI. Statistical analyses were performed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. Follow-up and prior examinations as well as histopathology served as reference standards. PET/MRI correctly identified all 17 examinations with active lymphoma disease, while WB-DW-MRI correctly identified 15/17 examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 96.5%, 97%, 95%, and 96% for PET/MRI{sub 1}; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI{sub 2}; 97%, 96.5%, 97%, 96.5%, and 97% for PET/MRI{sub 3} and 77%, 96%, 96%, 78.5% and 86% for MRI-DWI. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI is superior to WB-DW-MRI in staging pediatric lymphoma patients. Neither application of contrast media nor DWI leads to a noticeable improvement of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI. Thus, unenhanced PET/MRI may play a crucial role for the diagnostic work-up of pediatric lymphoma patients in the future. (orig.)

  2. Diagnostic value of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for detection of primary and metastatic malignancies: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: lllb146@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Li, Qiong [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Nie, Wei [Department of Respiratory Disease, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu, Shiyuan, E-mail: lsy20112077@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance of whole-body diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (WB-DWI) technique in detection of primary and metastatic malignancies compared with that of whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (WB-PET/CT). Materials and methods: Search Pubmed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library database from January 1984 to July 2013 for studies comparing WB-DWI with WB-PET/CT for detection of primary and metastatic malignancies. Methodological quality was assessed by the quality assessment of diagnostic studies (QUADAS) instrument. Sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and areas under the summary receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated. Potential threshold effect, heterogeneity and publication bias were investigated. Result: Thirteen eligible studies were included, with a total of 1067 patients. There was no significant threshold effect. WB-DWI had a similar AUC (0.966 (95% CI, 0.940–0.992) versus 0.984 (95% CI, 0.965–0.999)) with WB-PET/CT. No significant difference was detected between AUC of WB-DWI and WB-PET/CT. WB-DWI had a pooled sensitivity of 0.897 (95% CI, 0.876–0.916) and a pooled specificity of 0.954 (95% CI, 0.944–0.962). WB-PET/CT had a pooled sensitivity of 0.895 (95% CI, 0.865–0.920) and a pooled specificity of 0.975 (95% CI, 0.966–0.981). Heterogeneity was found to stem primarily from data type (per lesion versus per patient), MR sequence (DWIBS only and DWIBS with other sequence), and primary lesion type (single type and multiple type). The Deeks's funnel plots suggested the absence of publication bias. Conclusion: WB-DWI has similar, good diagnostic performance for the detection of primary and metastatic malignancies compared with WB-PET/CT. DWIBS with other MR sequences could further improve the diagnostic performance. More high-quality studies regarding comparison of WB-DWI and WB

  3. Evaluation of Tumor Viability for Primary and Bone Metastases in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Using Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromichi Iwamura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to bone scan and computed tomography (CT, which depend on osteoblastic response to detect bone metastasis, whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI may be able to directly detect viable tumors. A 75-year-old male who had progressive metastatic prostate cancer during primary androgen deprivation therapy was referred to our hospital. Although bone scan and CT showed multiple bone metastases, WB-MRI suggested nonviable bone metastasis and viable tumor of the primary lesion. Prostate needle biopsy demonstrated viable prostate cancer cells from 10 of 12 cores. In contrast, CT-guided needle biopsy from bone metastasis of the lumbar vertebra revealed no malignant cells. Based on these findings, we reasoned that viable tumor cells inducing disease progression may primarily exist in the primary lesions and not in the metastatic lesions, and combined prostate radiotherapy and systemic hormonal therapy resulted in successful clinical response and disease control. The use of WB-MRI to detect viable disease lesions may enable us to design optimal treatment strategies for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  4. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in the detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKillop, J.H.; Murray, R.G.; Turner, J.G.; Gray, H.W.; Bessent, R.G.; Lorimer, A.R.; Greig, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial imaging can detect abnormalities of myocardial perfusion. Visual interpretation of the images is complicated by some inhomogeneity of tracer uptake normally present. Using a quantitative approach we have established the regional variation of Thallium-201 uptake present in 23 normal controls and applied the same technique to 49 patients who had undergone selective coronary arteriography with left ventriculography because of chest pain. Half of the patients with significant coronary artery disease had abnormal rest Thallium-201 images, usually corresponding to areas of abnormal wall motion at ventriculography. Stress Thallium-201 images were abnormal in over 90% of patients with coronary artery disease. The stress image abnormalities and the arteriographic lesions correlated well in most patients with single and double vessel disease but in triple vessel disease the correspondence between the two studies was poor. Two of a group of patients with normal coronary arteriograms had abnormal Thallium-201 images due to other myocardial pathology. Our technique was highly sensitive in the non-invasive detection of significant coronary artery disease in a group of patients with chest pain. A small number of positive studies were also encountered due to other myocardial disorders. (author)

  5. Radiation exposure in whole body CT screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Pamidighantam; Ratnam, S V; Rao, K V J

    2011-04-01

    Using a technology that "takes a look" at people's insides and promises early warnings of cancer, cardiac disease, and other abnormalities, clinics and medical imaging facilities nationwide are touting a new service for health conscious people: "Whole body CT screening" this typically involves scanning the body from the chin to below the hips with a form of x-ray imaging that produces cross-sectional images. In USA direct-to-consumer marketing of whole body CT is occurring today in many metropolitan areas. Free standing CT screening centres are being sited in shopping malls and other high density public areas, and these centres are being advertised in the electronic and print media. In this context the present article discussed the pros and cons of having such centres in India with the advent of multislice CT leading to fast scan times.

  6. Whole-body counting 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, P.; Selnaes, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the doses from radiocesium in foods after the Chernobyl accident, four groups were chosen in 1987. Two groups, presumed to have a large consumption of food items with a high radiocesium content, were selected. These were Lapp reindeer breeders from central parts of Norway, and hunters a.o. from the municipality of Oeystre Slidre. Two other groups were randomly selected, one from the municipality of Sel, and one from Oslo. The persons in these two groups were presumed to have an average diet. The fall-out in Sel was fairly large (100 kBq/m 2 ), whereas in Oslo the fall-out level was low (2 kBq/m 2 ). The persons in each group were monitored once a year with whole-body counters, and in connection with these countings dietary surveys were preformed. In 1990 the Sel-group and the Lapps in central parts of Norway were followed. Average whole-body activity in each group is compared to earlier years's results, and an average yearly effective dose equivalent is computed. The Sel-group has an average whole-body activity of 2800 Bq for men, and 690 Bq for women. Compared to earlier years, there is a steady but slow decrease in whole-body activities. Yearly dose is calculated to 0.06 mSv for 1990. The Lapps in central parts of Norway have an average whole-body content of 23800 Bq for men and 13600 Bq for women. This results in an average yearly dose of 0.9 mSv for the individuals in the group. Compared to earlier years, the Lapp group show a decrease in whole-body contents since 1988. This decrease is larger among men than women. 5 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Evaluation of dual-source parallel RF excitation for diffusion-weighted whole-body MR imaging with background body signal suppression at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muertz, Petra, E-mail: petra.muertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Kaschner, Marius, E-mail: marius.kaschner@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Traeber, Frank, E-mail: frank.traeber@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Kukuk, Guido M., E-mail: guido.kukuk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Buedenbender, Sarah M., E-mail: sarah_m_buedenbender@yahoo.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Skowasch, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.skowasch@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, Juergen, E-mail: juergen.gieseke@philips.com [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Schild, Hans H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Willinek, Winfried A., E-mail: winfried.willinek@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of dual-source parallel RF excitation (TX) for diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) at 3.0 T. Materials and methods: Forty consecutive patients were examined on a clinical 3.0-T MRI system using a diffusion-weighted (DW) spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with a combination of short TI inversion recovery and slice-selective gradient reversal fat suppression. DWIBS of the neck (n = 5), thorax (n = 8), abdomen (n = 6) and pelvis (n = 21) was performed both with TX (2:56 min) and with standard single-source RF excitation (4:37 min). The quality of DW images and reconstructed inverted maximum intensity projections was visually judged by two readers (blinded to acquisition technique). Signal homogeneity and fat suppression were scored as 'improved', 'equal', 'worse' or 'ambiguous'. Moreover, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured in muscles, urinary bladder, lymph nodes and lesions. Results: By the use of TX, signal homogeneity was 'improved' in 25/40 and 'equal' in 15/40 cases. Fat suppression was 'improved' in 17/40 and 'equal' in 23/40 cases. These improvements were statistically significant (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). In five patients, fluid-related dielectric shading was present, which improved remarkably. The ADC values did not significantly differ for the two RF excitation methods (p = 0.630 over all data, pairwise Student's t-test). Conclusion: Dual-source parallel RF excitation improved image quality of DWIBS at 3.0 T with respect to signal homogeneity and fat suppression, reduced scan time by approximately one-third, and did not influence the measured ADC values.

  8. Whole-body computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegener, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    The vast literature on whole-body CT is presented in this bibliography which is published as a self-contained supplement to the monography entitled whole-body CT. For this documentation, the following journals have been scanned back to the year 1980: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography (JCAT), Fortschritte auf dem Gebiet der Roentgenstrahlen (RoeFo), Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), Der Radiologe, Neuroradiology, and American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR). The supplement includes keyword indexes that can be searched for terms indicating body organs, body regions, or certain lesions. The author index offers an additional access to the publication wanted. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging for evaluation of pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuno, Yoshiyasu

    1979-01-01

    Thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial scintigraphy (TMS) was performed in 54 patients. The images were analysed semi-quantitatively by measuring the extent of radioisotope concentration in the right ventricular free wall and the size of the right ventricular cavity. The extent of radioisotope concentration (four degrees) was expressed as the right ventricular activity score (RVAS) and the size of the right ventricular cavity (three degrees) was expressed as the right ventricular cavity score (RVCS). The scores were added for a right ventricular total score (RVTS). To establish criteria for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by means of TMS, these scores were compared with the values of pulmonary arterial mean pressure (PAMP). The criteria were evaluated by comparing them with conventional criteria for electrocardiographic diagnosis of right ventricular hypertrophy. Patients with a 2-point RVAS had a significantly higher PAMP than those with a 0 or 1-point RVAS (p 201 Tl myocardial scintigrams is a useful non-invasive method for evaluating PH and its severity. (J.P.N.)

  10. Pseudonormalization of transmitral flow pattern during exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Tsuguya; Takenaka, Katsu; Amano, Keiko; Amano, Wataru; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Otake, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Tsuneaki

    1993-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the usefulness of Doppler parameters and transmitral blood velocity for detecting abnormalities of left ventricular diastolic function during low-level exercise thallium-201 imaging. The study population consisted of 16 thallium perfusion defect patients with coronary artery disease (mean 61±8 years) and 21 age-matched control subjects (mean 55±5 years) without any thallium perfusion defect. Of the 16 thallium perfusion defect patients, 12 were examined by coronary arteriography, of whom single vessel coronary artery disease was seen in 2 and multivessel coronary artery disease in 10. Patients with mitral regurgitant murmurs were excluded from the study. Peak mitral blood flow velocity was measured in early diastole (E) and during atrial systole (A) and the A/E ratio was calculated. The changes in blood pressure and heart rate after low-level exercise were not significantly different between control and thallium perfusion defect groups. The A/E ratio increased slightly in control subjects from 93±14% at baseline to 100±15% during low-level exercise (p<0.05), whereas in patients with thallium perfusion defect, it decreased significantly from 119±33% at baseline to 92±23% during low-level exercise (p<0.01). Thus pseudonormalization of the A/E ratio during low-level exercise may be valuable in the evaluation of patients with severe or multivessel coronary artery disease. (author)

  11. Hybrid imaging for detection of carcinoma of unknown primary: A preliminary comparison trial of whole-body PET/MRI versus PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Bellendorf, Alexander; Grueneisen, Johannes; Sawicki, Lino M.; Grafe, Hong; Forsting, Michael; Bockisch, Andreas; Umutlu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MRI provide a comparable diagnostic ability for detection of primary cancer and metastases in CUP-syndrome. • Both imaging methods showed comparably high lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence (superior assessment of cervical lesions in PET/MRI). • PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative, particularly for therapy monitoring or surveillance considering the long-term cumulative dose. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of integrated whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/MRI to [18F]FDG-PET/CT for detection of a potential primary cancer and metastases in patients suspected for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Methods: A total of 20 patients (15 male, 5 female, age 53 ± 13 years) suspect for CUP underwent a dedicated head and neck & whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/CT (Biograph mCT 128, Siemens Healthcare) and a subsequent simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examination (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding the detection of the primary cancer and metastases, lesion conspicuity (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (3-point ordinal scale). PET analysis comprised the assessment of maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all PET-positive lesions using volume of interest (VOI) analysis derived from the PET/CT and PET/MR datasets. All available data considering histology and imaging including prior and clinical follow-up examinations served as reference standard. Statistical analysis included comparison of mean values using Mann-Whitney U test and correlation of SUVmax using Pearson‘s correlation. Results: In 14 out of 20 patients 49 malignant lesions were present. The primary cancer could be correctly identified in 11/20 patients with both PET/CT and PET/MRI. PET/CT enabled the detection of a total 38 metastases, PET/MR respectively of 37 metastases (one lung metastasis <5mm was missed). PET/CT and

  12. Hybrid imaging for detection of carcinoma of unknown primary: A preliminary comparison trial of whole-body PET/MRI versus PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Bellendorf, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Sawicki, Lino M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Dusseldorf, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Grafe, Hong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Umutlu, Lale, E-mail: verena.ruhlmann@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MRI provide a comparable diagnostic ability for detection of primary cancer and metastases in CUP-syndrome. • Both imaging methods showed comparably high lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence (superior assessment of cervical lesions in PET/MRI). • PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative, particularly for therapy monitoring or surveillance considering the long-term cumulative dose. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of integrated whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/MRI to [18F]FDG-PET/CT for detection of a potential primary cancer and metastases in patients suspected for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Methods: A total of 20 patients (15 male, 5 female, age 53 ± 13 years) suspect for CUP underwent a dedicated head and neck & whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/CT (Biograph mCT 128, Siemens Healthcare) and a subsequent simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examination (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding the detection of the primary cancer and metastases, lesion conspicuity (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (3-point ordinal scale). PET analysis comprised the assessment of maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all PET-positive lesions using volume of interest (VOI) analysis derived from the PET/CT and PET/MR datasets. All available data considering histology and imaging including prior and clinical follow-up examinations served as reference standard. Statistical analysis included comparison of mean values using Mann-Whitney U test and correlation of SUVmax using Pearson‘s correlation. Results: In 14 out of 20 patients 49 malignant lesions were present. The primary cancer could be correctly identified in 11/20 patients with both PET/CT and PET/MRI. PET/CT enabled the detection of a total 38 metastases, PET/MR respectively of 37 metastases (one lung metastasis <5mm was missed). PET/CT and

  13. Decrease in the ability to detect elevated lung thallium due to delay in commencing imaging after exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothendler, J.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.; Okada, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Post-exercise elevation of the lung/myocardial thallium ratio and a high lung clearance rate between initial and delayed images have been reported to be markers for exercise-induced left ventricular (LV) dysfunction associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). The authors performed thallium exercise tests on 60 patients, 42 with CAD, in order to determine the effect of delaying initial imaging on detection of elevated lung thallium. In addition to images obtained at 2 minutes and at 2 hours after exercise, 18-minute images were also obtained to simulate such a delay. Because of rapid isotope clearance in those with initially elevated lung activity, there was decreased sensitivity of both the initial lung/myocardial ratio and lung thallium clearance for detecting CAD, using the 18-minute image as the initial post exercise study. They conclude that initial imaging should be done in the anterior view early after exercise to optimize detection of elevated lung thallium

  14. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for detection of skeletal metastases in children and young people with primary solid tumors - systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smets, A.M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Slager, T.J.E.; Stoker, J.; Bipat, S. [Academic Medical Center (AMC), Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-02-15

    Many solid neoplasms have a propensity for osteomedullary metastases of which detection is important for staging and subsequent treatment. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has been shown to accurately detect osteomedullary metastases in adults, but these findings cannot be unconditionally extrapolated to staging of children with malignant solid tumors. To conduct a literature review on the sensitivity of WB-MRI for detecting skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors. Searches in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to 15 May 2017 were performed to identify studies on the diagnostic value of WB-MRI. Inclusion criteria were children and adolescents (age <21 years) with a primary solid tumor who were evaluated for skeletal metastases by WB-MRI and compared to any type of reference standard. The number of included patients had to be at least five and data on true positives, true negatives, false-positives and false-negatives had to be extractable. Five studies including 132 patients (96 patients with solid tumors) were eligible. Patient groups and used reference tests were heterogeneous, producing unclear or high risk of bias. Sensitivity of WB-MRI ranged between 82% and 100%. The positive predictive value of WB-MRI was variable among the studies and influenced by the used reference standard. Although WB-MRI may seem a promising radiation-free technique for the detection of skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors, published studies are small and too heterogeneous to provide conclusive evidence that WB-MRI can be an alternative to currently used imaging techniques. (orig.)

  15. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for detection of skeletal metastases in children and young people with primary solid tumors - systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smets, A.M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Slager, T.J.E.; Stoker, J.; Bipat, S.

    2018-01-01

    Many solid neoplasms have a propensity for osteomedullary metastases of which detection is important for staging and subsequent treatment. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has been shown to accurately detect osteomedullary metastases in adults, but these findings cannot be unconditionally extrapolated to staging of children with malignant solid tumors. To conduct a literature review on the sensitivity of WB-MRI for detecting skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors. Searches in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to 15 May 2017 were performed to identify studies on the diagnostic value of WB-MRI. Inclusion criteria were children and adolescents (age <21 years) with a primary solid tumor who were evaluated for skeletal metastases by WB-MRI and compared to any type of reference standard. The number of included patients had to be at least five and data on true positives, true negatives, false-positives and false-negatives had to be extractable. Five studies including 132 patients (96 patients with solid tumors) were eligible. Patient groups and used reference tests were heterogeneous, producing unclear or high risk of bias. Sensitivity of WB-MRI ranged between 82% and 100%. The positive predictive value of WB-MRI was variable among the studies and influenced by the used reference standard. Although WB-MRI may seem a promising radiation-free technique for the detection of skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors, published studies are small and too heterogeneous to provide conclusive evidence that WB-MRI can be an alternative to currently used imaging techniques. (orig.)

  16. UK quantitative WB-DWI technical workgroup: consensus meeting recommendations on optimisation, quality control, processing and analysis of quantitative whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Anna; Alonzi, Roberto; Blackledge, Matthew; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Collins, David J; Cook, Gary; Coutts, Glynn; Goh, Vicky; Graves, Martin; Kelly, Charles; Koh, Dow-Mu; McCallum, Hazel; Miquel, Marc E; O'Connor, James; Padhani, Anwar; Pearson, Rachel; Priest, Andrew; Rockall, Andrea; Stirling, James; Taylor, Stuart; Tunariu, Nina; van der Meulen, Jan; Walls, Darren; Winfield, Jessica; Punwani, Shonit

    2018-01-01

    Application of whole body diffusion-weighted MRI (WB-DWI) for oncology are rapidly increasing within both research and routine clinical domains. However, WB-DWI as a quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) has significantly slower adoption. To date, challenges relating to accuracy and reproducibility, essential criteria for a good QIB, have limited widespread clinical translation. In recognition, a UK workgroup was established in 2016 to provide technical consensus guidelines (to maximise accuracy and reproducibility of WB-MRI QIBs) and accelerate the clinical translation of quantitative WB-DWI applications for oncology. A panel of experts convened from cancer centres around the UK with subspecialty expertise in quantitative imaging and/or the use of WB-MRI with DWI. A formal consensus method was used to obtain consensus agreement regarding best practice. Questions were asked about the appropriateness or otherwise on scanner hardware and software, sequence optimisation, acquisition protocols, reporting, and ongoing quality control programs to monitor precision and accuracy and agreement on quality control. The consensus panel was able to reach consensus on 73% (255/351) items and based on consensus areas made recommendations to maximise accuracy and reproducibly of quantitative WB-DWI studies performed at 1.5T. The panel were unable to reach consensus on the majority of items related to quantitative WB-DWI performed at 3T. This UK Quantitative WB-DWI Technical Workgroup consensus provides guidance on maximising accuracy and reproducibly of quantitative WB-DWI for oncology. The consensus guidance can be used by researchers and clinicians to harmonise WB-DWI protocols which will accelerate clinical translation of WB-DWI-derived QIBs.

  17. Prognostic importance of silent myocardial ischemia detected by intravenous dipyridamole thallium myocardial imaging in asymptomatic patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, L.T.; Byers, S.; Shaw, L.; Barth, G.; Goodgold, H.; Chaitman, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    One hundred seven asymptomatic patients who underwent intravenous dipyridamole thallium imaging were evaluated to determine prognostic indicators of subsequent cardiac events over an average follow-up period of 14 +/- 10 months. Univariate analysis of 18 clinical, scintigraphic and angiographic variables revealed that a reversible thallium defect, a combined fixed and reversible thallium defect, number of segmental thallium defects and extent of coronary artery disease were significant predictors of subsequent cardiac events. Of the 13 patients who died or had a nonfatal infarction, 12 had a reversible thallium defect. Stepwise logistic regression analysis selected a reversible thallium defect as the only significant predictor of cardiac events. When death or myocardial infarction was the outcome variable, a combined fixed and reversible thallium defect was the only predictor of outcome. In patients without previous myocardial infarction, the cardiac event rate was significantly greater in those with an abnormal versus normal thallium scan (55% versus 12%, p less than 0.001). Thus, intravenous dipyridamole thallium scintigraphy is a useful noninvasive test to risk stratify asymptomatic patients with coronary artery disease. A reversible thallium defect most likely indicates silent myocardial ischemia in a sizable fraction of patients in this clinical subset and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis

  18. Prognostic value of intravenous dipyridamole thallium imaging in patients with diabetes mellitus considered for renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.D.; Garvin, P.J.; Hoff, J.; Marsh, J.; Byers, S.L.; Chaitman, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with diabetes and end-stage renal failure are known to have a high risk for cardiac morbidity and mortality associated with renal transplantation. The most efficient method to determine preoperative cardiac risk has not been established. To determine the effectiveness of intravenous dipyridamole thallium imaging in predicting cardiac events, 40 diabetic renal transplant candidates were studied preoperatively in a prospective trial. The study group consisted of 40 patients whose average age was 42 years (range 27 to 64); 34 (85%) were hypertensive and 21 (53%) were cigarette smokers. Cardiac history included chest pain in 6 patients and prior myocardial infarction in 3 patients. Dipyridamole thallium imaging showed reversible defects in 9 patients, fixed defects in 8 patients and normal scans in 23 patients. Dipyridamole thallium imaging was performed using 0.56 mg/kg of dipyridamole infused intravenously over 4 minutes. Cardiac events occurred only in patients with reversible thallium defects, of which there were 6. Of these 6 patients, 3 had cardiac events before transplantation and 3 had them in the early postoperative phase (within 6 weeks of surgery). Of 21 patients who underwent renal transplantation, 3 had cardiac events within 6 weeks of transplantation. The average duration of follow-up was 11 months (range 1 to 21). Thus, dipyridamole thallium imaging is an effective method of identifying renal transplant candidates likely to develop cardiac complications. Routine coronary angiography may not be necessary to screen all renal transplant candidates for coronary artery disease before surgery

  19. The assessment of whole body bone SPECT in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scortechini, Shonika

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: To assess the significance and practicability of oncology whole body bone SPECT as part of the standard skeletal survey and its impact on the traditional planar whole body bone imaging protocol. Method: Three consenting oncology patients were injected with a standard adult dose of Tc-99m MOP. Delayed Imaging of whole body sweep and SPECT acquisitions were performed on a Siemens Symbia T6. The patient was positioned supine with arms down with a SPECT scan length covering vortex to thighs. SPECT data was reconstructed and a single whole body zipped file created. Normal SPECT slices along with a cine/MIP of the zipped data were created for review. Results: Both image data sets were reviewed to assess if SPECT provided any further diagnostic clinical information not apparent in planer imaging. In our limited review, whole body SPECT did not add extra value to the planar whole body scans performed; it did however demonstrate vertebral involvement with greater resolution. The processing software and system limitations in seamlessly knitting data sets (creating image artefacts) was a major limiting factor in not pursuing further studies. Conclusion: Both imaging techniques offer differing advantages and limitations, however due to image artefact in the triple knitted SPECT approach with current software technology, it cannot be substituted for whole body imaging at this time.

  20. Whole-Body CT Screening--Should I or Shouldn't I Get One?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging Whole-Body CT Screening--Should I or shouldn't I ... What are the risks and benefits of whole-body CT screening? Many people believe incorrectly that a ...

  1. Transient mitral regurgitation: An adjunctive sign of myocardial ischemia during dipyridamole-thallium imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lette, J.; Gagnon, A.; Lapointe, J.; Cerino, M.

    1989-01-01

    A patient developed transient exacerbation of a mitral insufficiency murmur and a reversible posterior wall perfusion defect during dipyridamole-thallium imaging. Coronary angiography showed significant stenoses of both the right and the circumflex coronary arteries that supply the posterior papillary muscle. Cardiac auscultation for transient mitral incompetence, a sign of reversible papillary muscle dysfunction, is a simple and practical adjunctive test for myocardial ischemia during dipyridamole-thallium imaging. It may confirm that an isolated reversible posterior wall myocardial perfusion defect is truly ischemic in nature as opposed to an artifact resulting from attenuation by the diaphragm

  2. Radiation dosimetry of N-([{sup 11}C]methyl)benperidol as determined by whole-body PET imaging of primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antenor-Dorsey, Jo A.V. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Laforest, Richard; Moerlein, Stephen M. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Videen, Tom O. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Perlmutter, Joel S. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Program in Physical Therapy, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2008-04-15

    N-([{sup 11}C]methyl)benperidol ([{sup 11}C]NMB) can be used for positron emission tomography (PET) measurements of D{sub 2}-like dopamine receptor binding in vivo. We report the absorbed radiation dosimetry of i.v.-administered {sup 11}C-NMB, a critical step before applying this radioligand to imaging studies in humans. Whole-body PET imaging with a CTI/Siemens ECAT 953B scanner was done in a male and a female baboon. After i.v. injection of 444-1221 MBq of {sup 11}C-NMB, sequential images taken from the head to the pelvis were collected for 3 h. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were identified that entirely encompassed small organs (whole brain, striatum, eyes, and myocardium). Large organs (liver, lungs, kidneys, lower large intestine, and urinary bladder) were sampled by drawing representative regions within the organ volume. Time-activity curves for each VOI were extracted from the PET, and organ residence times were calculated by analytical integration of a multi-exponential fit of the time-activity curves. Human radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and the standard human model. Highest retention was observed in the blood and liver, each with total residence times of 1.5 min. The highest absorbed radiation doses were to the heart (10.5 mGy/kBq) and kidney (9.19 mGy/kBq), making these the critical organs for [{sup 11}C]NMB. A heart absorption of 50 mGy would result from an injected dose of 4,762 MBq [{sup 11}C]NMB. Thus, this study suggests that up to 4,762 MBq of [{sup 11}C]NMB can be safely administered to human subjects for PET studies. Total body dose and effective dose for [{sup 11}C]NMB are 2.82 mGy/kBq and 3.7 mSv/kBq, respectively. (orig.)

  3. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    OpenAIRE

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000?y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations...

  4. Whole body scan system based on γ camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Tianyu; Jin Yongjie

    2001-01-01

    Most existing domestic γ cameras can not perform whole body scan protocol, which is of important use in clinic. The authors designed a set of whole body scan system, which is made up of a scan bed, an ISA interface card controlling the scan bed and the data acquisition software based on a data acquisition and image processing system for γ cameras. The image was obtained in clinical experiment, and the authors think it meets the need of clinical diagnosis. Application of this system in γ cameras can provide whole body scan function at low cost

  5. Post-mortem whole-body magnetic resonance imaging of human fetuses: a comparison of 3-T vs. 1.5-T MR imaging with classical autopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Xin; Bevilacqua, Elisa; Cos Sanchez, Teresa; Jani, Jacques C. [University Hospital Brugmann, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Fetal Medicine Unit, Brussels (Belgium); Cannie, Mieke M. [University Hospital Brugmann, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Radiology, UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Arthurs, Owen J.; Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Segers, Valerie; Fourneau, Catherine [University Hospital Brugmann, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Department of Fetopathology, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-08-15

    To prospectively compare diagnostic accuracy of fetal post-mortem whole-body MRI at 3-T vs. 1.5-T. Between 2012 and 2015, post-mortem MRI at 1.5-T and 3-T was performed in fetuses after miscarriage/stillbirth or termination. Clinical MRI diagnoses were assessed using a confidence diagnostic score and compared with classical autopsy to derive a diagnostic error score. The relation of diagnostic error for each organ group with gestational age was calculated and 1.5-T with 3-T was compared with accuracy analysis. 135 fetuses at 12-41 weeks underwent post-mortem MRI (followed by conventional autopsy in 92 fetuses). For all organ groups except the brain, and for both modalities, the diagnostic error decreased with gestation (P < 0.0001). 3-T MRI diagnostic error was significantly lower than that of 1.5-T for all anatomic structures and organ groups, except the orbits and brain. This difference was maintained for fetuses <20 weeks gestation. Moreover, 3-T was associated with fewer non-diagnostic scans and greater concordance with classical autopsy than 1.5-T MRI, especially for the thorax, heart and abdomen in fetuses <20 weeks. Post-mortem fetal 3-T MRI improves confidence scores and overall accuracy compared with 1.5-T, mainly for the thorax, heart and abdomen of fetuses <20 weeks of gestation. (orig.)

  6. Post-mortem whole-body magnetic resonance imaging of human fetuses: a comparison of 3-T vs. 1.5-T MR imaging with classical autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xin; Cannie, Mieke M; Arthurs, Owen J; Segers, Valerie; Fourneau, Catherine; Bevilacqua, Elisa; Cos Sanchez, Teresa; Sebire, Neil J; Jani, Jacques C

    2017-08-01

    To prospectively compare diagnostic accuracy of fetal post-mortem whole-body MRI at 3-T vs. 1.5-T. Between 2012 and 2015, post-mortem MRI at 1.5-T and 3-T was performed in fetuses after miscarriage/stillbirth or termination. Clinical MRI diagnoses were assessed using a confidence diagnostic score and compared with classical autopsy to derive a diagnostic error score. The relation of diagnostic error for each organ group with gestational age was calculated and 1.5-T with 3-T was compared with accuracy analysis. 135 fetuses at 12-41 weeks underwent post-mortem MRI (followed by conventional autopsy in 92 fetuses). For all organ groups except the brain, and for both modalities, the diagnostic error decreased with gestation (P autopsy than 1.5-T MRI, especially for the thorax, heart and abdomen in fetuses autopsy increases with 3-T. • PM-MRI using 3-T is particularly interesting for thoracic and abdominal organs. • PM-MRI using 3-T is particularly interesting for fetuses < 20 weeks' gestation.

  7. Effects of ferumoxytol on quantitative PET measurements in simultaneous PET/MR whole-body imaging: a pilot study in a baboon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Ronald Jh; Cho, Hoon-Sung; Bowen, Spencer L; Attenberger, Ulrike; Arabasz, Grae; Catana, Ciprian; Josephson, Lee; Rosen, Bruce R; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Hooker, Jacob M

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous PET/MR imaging depends on MR-derived attenuation maps (mu-maps) for accurate attenuation correction of PET data. Currently, these maps are derived from gradient-echo-based MR sequences, which are sensitive to susceptibility changes. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have been used in the measurement of blood volume, tumor microvasculature, tumor-associated macrophages, and characterizing lymph nodes. Our aim in this study was to assess whether the susceptibility effects associated with iron oxide nanoparticles can potentially affect measured (18)F-FDG PET standardized uptake values (SUV) through effects on MR-derived attenuation maps. The study protocol was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Using a Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MR scanner, we evaluated the effects of increasing concentrations of ferumoxytol and ferumoxytol aggregates on MR-derived mu-maps using an agarose phantom. In addition, we performed a baboon experiment evaluating the effects of a single i.v. ferumoxytol dose (10 mg/kg) on the liver, spleen, and pancreas (18)F-FDG SUV at baseline (ferumoxytol-naïve), within the first hour and at 1, 3, 5, and 11 weeks. Phantom experiments showed mu-map artifacts starting at ferumoxytol aggregate concentrations of 10 to 20 mg/kg. The in vivo baboon data demonstrated a 53% decrease of observed (18)F-FDG SUV compared to baseline within the first hour in the liver, persisting at least 11 weeks. A single ferumoxytol dose can affect measured SUV for at least 3 months, which should be taken into account when administrating ferumoxytol in patients needing sequential PET/MR scans. Advances in knowledge 1. Ferumoxytol aggregates, but not ferumoxytol alone, produce significant artifacts in MR-derived attenuation correction maps at approximate clinical dose levels of 10 mg/kg. 2. When performing simultaneous whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/MR, a single dose of ferumoxytol can result in observed SUV decreases up to 53%, depending on the

  8. Comprehensive imaging of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body MRI at 1.5 and 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Gerwin P. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: gerwin.schmidt@med.uni-muenchen.de; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Haug, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bauerfeind, Ingo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy for the detection of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body-MRI (WB-MRI) at 1.5 or 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT. Materials and methods: Thirty-three female patients with breast cancer and suspicion of recurrence underwent FDG-PET-CT and WB-MRI. Coronal T1w-TSE- and STIR-sequences, HASTE-imaging of the lungs, contrast-enhanced T1w- and T2w-TSE-sequences of the liver, brain and abdomen were performed, using a WB-MRI-scanner at 1.5 (n = 23) or 3 T (n = 10). Presence of local recurrence, lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease was assessed using clinical and radiological follow-up as a standard of reference. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 20 of 33 patients. Overall 186 malignant foci were detected with WB-MRI and PET-CT. Both modalities revealed two recurrent tumors of the breast. PET-CT detected more lymph node metastases (n = 21) than WB-MRI (n = 16). WB-MRI was more precise in the detection of distant metastases (n = 154 versus n = 147). Sensitivity was 93% (172/186) and 91% (170/186) for WB-MRI and PET-CT, specificity was 86% (66/77) and 90% (69/77), respectively. Examination times for WB-MRI at 1.5 and 3 T were 51 and 43 min, respectively, examination time for PET-CT was 103 min. Conclusion: WB-MRI and PET-CT are useful for the detection of tumor recurrence in the follow-up of breast cancer. WB-MRI is highly sensitive to distant metastatic disease. PET-CT is more sensitive in detecting lymph node involvement. Tumor screening with WB-MRI is feasible at 1.5 and 3 T, scan time is further reduced at 3 T with identical resolution.

  9. Diagnostic performance of 18F-FDG PET/CT and whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging with background body suppression (DWIBS) in detection of lymph node and bone metastases from pediatric neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguchi, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinji; Kato, Katsuhiko; Sakurai, Yusuke; Kawai, Hisashi; Fujita, Naotoshi; Abe, Shinji; Narita, Atsushi; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Muramatsu, Hideki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Naganawa, Shinji

    2018-04-17

    Recent many studies have shown that whole body "diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression" (DWIBS) seems a beneficial tool having higher tumor detection sensitivity without ionizing radiation exposure for pediatric tumors. In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of whole body DWIBS and 18 F-FDG PET/CT for detecting lymph node and bone metastases in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. Subjects in this retrospective study comprised 13 consecutive pediatric patients with neuroblastoma (7 males, 6 females; mean age, 2.9 ± 2.0 years old) who underwent both 18 F-FDG PET/CT and whole-body DWIBS. All patients were diagnosed as neuroblastoma on the basis of pathological findings. Eight regions of lymph nodes and 17 segments of skeletons in all patients were evaluated. The images of 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy/SPECT-CT, bone scintigraphy/SPECT, and CT were used to confirm the presence of lymph node and bone metastases. Two radiologists trained in nuclear medicine evaluated independently the uptake of lesions in 18 F-FDG PET/CT and the signal-intensity of lesions in whole-body DWIBS visually. Interobserver difference was overcome through discussion to reach a consensus. The sensitivities, specificities, and overall accuracies of 18 F-FDG PET/CT and whole-body DWIBS were compared using McNemer's test. Positive predictive values (PPVs) and negative predictive values (NPVs) of both modalities were compared using Fisher's exact test. The total numbers of lymph node regions and bone segments which were confirmed to have metastasis in the total 13 patients were 19 and 75, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, overall accuracy, PPV, and NPV of 18 F-FDG PET/CT for detecting lymph node metastasis from pediatric neuroblastoma were 100, 98.7, 98.9, 95.0, and 100%, respectively, and those for detecting bone metastasis were 90.7, 73.1, 80.3, 70.1, and 91.9%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity, specificity, overall accuracy, PPV

  10. A comparative study of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and 99mTc-MDP whole-body bone scanning for imaging osteolytic bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Lihua; Xie, Qiao; Zhang, Yongke; Cheng, Lin; Li, Haitao; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) and 99m Tc-methylenediphosphonate (MDP) whole-body bone scanning (BS) for the detection of osteolytic bone metastases. Thirty-four patients with pathologically confirmed malignancies and suspected osteolytic bone metastases underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT and 99m Tc-MDP whole-body BS within 30 days. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy with respect to the diagnosis of osteolytic bone metastases and bone lesions were compared between the two imaging methods. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18 F-FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of osteolytic bone metastases were 94.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.6–96.2%), 83.3% (95% CI, 43.6–96.9%), and 94.2% (95% CI, 91.5–96.1%), respectively. It was found that 99m Tc-MDP whole-body BS could discriminate between patients with 50.2% (95% CI, 45.4–55.1%) sensitivity, 50.0% (95% CI, 18.8–81.2%) specificity, and 50.2% (95% CI, 45.5–55.1%) accuracy. 18 F-FDG PET/CT achieved higher sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in detecting osteolytic bone metastases than 99mTc-MDP whole-body BS (p<0.001). F-FDG PET/CT has a higher diagnostic value than 99m Tc-MDP whole-body BS in the detection of osteolytic bone metastases, especially in the vertebra

  11. Enhanced detection of ischemic but viable myocardium by the reinjection of thallium after stress-redistribution imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilsizian, V.; Rocco, T.P.; Freedman, N.M.; Leon, M.B.; Bonow, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    The identification of ischemic but viable myocardium by thallium exercise scintigraphy is often imprecise, since many of the perfusion defects that develop in ischemic myocardium during exercise do not fill in on subsequent redistribution images. We hypothesized that a second injection of thallium given after the redistribution images were taken might improve the detection of ischemic but viable myocardium. We studied 100 patients with coronary artery disease, using thallium exercise tomographic imaging and radionuclide angiography. Patients received 2 mCi of thallium intravenously during exercise, redistribution imaging was performed three to four hours later, and a second dose of 1 mCi of thallium was injected at rest immediately thereafter. The three sets of images (stress, redistribution, and reinjection) were then analyzed. Ninety-two of the 100 patients had exercise-induced perfusion defects. Of the 260 abnormal myocardial regions identified by stress imaging, 85 (33 percent) appeared to be irreversible on redistribution imaging three to four hours later. However, 42 of these apparently irreversible defects (49 percent) demonstrated improved or normal thallium uptake after the second injection of thallium, with an increase in mean regional uptake from 56 +/- 12 percent on redistribution studies to 64 +/- 10 percent on reinjection imaging (P less than 0.001). Twenty patients were restudied three to six months after coronary angioplasty. Of the 15 myocardial regions with defects on redistribution studies that were identified as viable by reinjection studies before angioplasty, 13 (87 percent) had normal thallium uptake and improved regional wall motion after angioplasty. In contrast, all eight regions with persistent defects on reinjection imaging before angioplasty had abnormal thallium uptake and abnormal regional wall motion after angioplasty

  12. The cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia: isotopic ventriculography and myocardial imaging with thallium-201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therriault, L.; Lamoureux, G.; Cote, M.; Plourde, G.; Lemieux, B.

    1984-01-01

    Myocardial scanning after the intravenous administration of Thallium 201 was used to evaluate regional myocardial perfusion in 14 patients with Friedreich's ataxia. Isotopic ventriculography was also used to assess left ventricular contractility. Myocardial images in patients with Friedreich's ataxia were found to be precociously abnormal irrespective of the degree of neurological impairment or of the severity of myocardial hypertrophy

  13. Persistent chest pain following oral dipyridamole for thallium 201 myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwai, A.H.; Jacobson, A.F.; McIntyre, K.M.; Williams, W.H.; Tow, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    A patient was admitted to the hospital with acute chest pain. After acute myocardial infarction was ruled out, he underwent a stress thallium 201 scintigraphy using oral dipyridamole and developed persistent angina with sedimentation time segement elevation. This complication has not been reported previously. It is recommended that appropriate intervention be available if severe ischemia develops following administration of dipyridamole for diagnostic imaging. (orig.)

  14. Whole body autoradiography, ch. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkman, J.H.G.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of 35 S-ringlabelled thiazinamium methylsulphate has been studied by means of whole body autoradiography in a squirrel and in mice. Accumulation of activity was found in liver, kidney and intestines (the excretion of pathways). High concentrations were also found in organs with high amount of acetylcholine receptors and in the glandular tissue. No radioactivity was seen in the central nervous system, indicating no passage through the 'blood-brain barrier'. This is the most significant difference with its tertiary analogue Prometharine hydrochloride. In pregnant mice, high concentrations were found in the placenta but only low amounts were found in liver and kidneys of the foetuses

  15. Serial thallium-201 myocardial imaging after dipyridamole infusion: diagnostic utility in detecting coronary stenoses and relationship to regional wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppo, J.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    After a 4-minute i.v. dipyridamole infusion, 0.14 mg/kg/min, serial thallium-201 scans were obtained in 60 patients undergoing cardia catheterization. Forty patients had significant (greater than or equal to50% stenosis) coronary artery disease (CAD), and 20 patients had normal coronary arteries or trivial lesions. The images were graded qualitatively for thallium activity by three observers. Sensitivity was 93% (37 of 40) and specificity was 80% (16 of 20). The sensitivity and specificity of the thallium-201 study were not affected by the extent of CAD, the presence of Q waves, or propranolol therapy. Twenty-seven of 37 patients who had initial defects (73%) had complete thallium redistribution of one or more defects. Patient-by-patient anlaysis using a regression model of all patients showed that the fate of a segmental thallium defect predicted abnormal wall motion by angiography better than ECG Q waves. The presence of propranolol therapy or collaterals did not significantly affect the thallium redistribution results. It is concluded that qualitative interpretation by multiple observers of thallium images after dipyridamole infusion is a highly sensitive and specific test for CAD. After dipyridamole, as with exercise stress, the extent of thallium redistribution is related to the degree of myocardial wall motion abnormality

  16. Estimation of absorbed dose for 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-d- glucose using whole-body positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deloar, H.M.; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Shidahara, Miho; Nakamura, Takashi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Narita, Yuichiro; Itoh, Masatoshi; Miyake, Masayasu; Watanuki, Shoichi

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the cumulated activity and absorbed dose in organs after i.v. administration of 18 F-FDG using whole-body PET and MRI. Whole-body dynamic emission scans for 18 F-FDG were performed in six normal volunteers after transmission scans. The total activity of a source organ was obtained from the activity concentration of the organ measured by whole-body PET and the volume of that organ measured by whole-body T1-weighted MRI. The cumulated activity of each source organ was calculated from the time-activity curve. Absorbed doses to the individuals were estimated by the MIRD (medical internal radiation dosimetry) method. Another calculation of cumulated activities and absorbed doses was performed using the organ volumes from the MIRD phantom and the ''Japanese reference man'' to investigate the discrepancy of actual individual results against the phantom results. The cumulated activities of 18 source organs were calculated, and absorbed doses of 27 target organs estimated. Among the target organs, bladder wall, brain and kidney received the highest doses for the above three sets of organ volumes. Using measured individual organ volumes, the average absorbed doses for those organs were found to be 3.1 x 10 -1 , 3.7 x 10 -2 and 2.8 x 10 -2 mGy/MBq, respectively. The mean effective doses in this study for individuals of average body weight (64.5 kg) and the MIRD phantom of 70 kg were the same, i.e. 2.9 x 10 -2 mSv/MBq, while for the Japanese reference man of 60 kg the effective dose was 2.1 x 10 -2 mSv/MBq. The results for measured organ volumes derived from MRI were comparable to those obtained for organ volumes from the MIRD phantom. Although this study considered 18 F-FDG, combined use of whole-body PET and MRI might be quite effective for improving the accuracy of estimations of the cumulated activity and absorbed dose of positron-labelled radiopharmaceuticals.(orig./MG) (orig.)

  17. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in evaluation of asymptomatic individuals with ischaemic ST segment depression on exercise electrocardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caralis, D.G.; Bailey, I.; Kennedy, H.L.; Pitt, B.

    1979-01-01

    This study showed that asymptomatic adults with normal physical examination, normal resting electrocardiogram, and normal routine laboratory evaluation who had a positive exercise electrocardiogram and abnormal exercise thallium-201 myocardial image had a very high probability of angiographically significant coronary artery disease. If, on the other hand, the exercise electrocardiogram was positive for 'ischaemic' ST segment changes, but the exercise thallium image was normal, the probability for coronary disease was low. The exercise electrocardiogram combined with thallium-201 myocardial image are safe non-invasive methods which can be performed on an out-patient basis. (author)

  18. Sex differences in the tracer distribution on stress thallium-201 imaging, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Nagara; Koda, Hideki; Adachi, Yukihide; Sugihara, Takao; Kato, Mihoko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamari, Kimimasa.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the sex differences in the tracer distribution on stress thallium-201 imaging, the studies of 18 normal males and 18 normal females were subjected to quantitative circumferential profile analysis in each projection image. Although the exercise duration was shorter in females (11±3 min) than in males (14±3 min) (p<0.01), the peak heart rate, peak systolic pressure and the lung-to-myocardial count ratio were similar between them. The averaged profile curves in female showed a significant reduction in tracer uptake in anterior and upper septal regions, particularly in the study of lateral view, which may be attributed to breast attenuation. In addition, the percent washout of thallium in 3 hours was higher in females (48±8%) than in males (43±7%) (p<0.01), particularly in the study of anterior view. We conclude that important differences in the pattern of thallium uptake and washout between males and females should be considered for interpretation of stress thallium imaging. (author)

  19. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold.

  20. Chest Pain with Normal Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion Image – Is It Really Normal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pang-Yen; Lin, Wen-Yu; Lin, Li-Fan; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Yang, Shih-Ping; Liou, Jun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion image (MPI) is commonly used to detect coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain. Although a normal thallium-201 MPI result is generally considered to be a good prognosis and further coronary angiogram is not recommended, there are still a few patients who suffer from unexpected acute coronary events. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical prognosis in patients with normal thallium-201 MPI. Methods From January 2006 to August 2012, a total 22,003 patients undergoing thallium-201 MPI in one tertiary center were screened. Of these, 8092 patients had normal results and were investigated retrospectively. During follow-up, 54 patients underwent coronary angiogram because of refractory typical angina pectoris or unexpected acute coronary events. These 54 patients were divided into 2 groups: group I consisted of 26 (48.1%) patients with angiography-proven significant coronary artery stenosis, and group II consisted of 28 (51.9%) patients without significant stenosis. Results Patients in group I had a higher prevalence of prior coronary stenting and electrocardiographic features of ST depression compared with patients in group II. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that both prior coronary stenting and ST depression were risk predictors of unexpected acute coronary events in the patients with normal thallium-201 MPI [odds ratio (OR), 5.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-34.06, p = 0.05 and OR, 7.10; 95% CI: 1.28-39.51, p = 0.03,respectively]. Conclusions Although there is a low incidence of unexpected acute coronary events in patients with chest pain and normal thallium-201 MPI, physicians should be aware of the potentials risk in certain patients in this specific population. PMID:27274174

  1. Whole-body biodistribution, dosimetry and metabolite correction of [11C]palmitate: A PET tracer for imaging of fatty acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Nana Louise; Jakobsen, Steen; Schacht, Anna Christina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite the decades long use of [11C]palmitate positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography in basic metabolism studies, only personal communications regarding dosimetry and biodistribution data have been published. METHODS: Dosimetry and biodistribution studies were...... performed in 2 pigs and 2 healthy volunteers by whole-body [11C]palmitate PET scans. Metabolite studies were performed in 40 participants (healthy and with type 2 diabetes) under basal and hyperinsulinemic conditions. Metabolites were estimated using 2 approaches and subsequently compared: Indirect [11C]CO2...

  2. Incidence and Imaging Findings of Costal Cartilage Fractures in Patients with Blunt Chest Trauma: A Retrospective Review of 1461 Consecutive Whole-Body CT Examinations for Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummela, Mari T; Bensch, Frank V; Pyhältö, Tuomo T; Koskinen, Seppo K

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To assess the incidence of costal cartilage (CC) fractures in whole-body computed tomographic (CT) examinations for blunt trauma and to evaluate distribution of CC fractures, concomitant injuries, mechanism of injury, accuracy of reporting, and the effect on 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. All whole-body CT examinations for blunt trauma over 36 months were reviewed retrospectively and chest trauma CT studies were evaluated by a second reader. Of 1461 patients who underwent a whole-body CT examination, 39% (574 of 1461) had signs of thoracic injuries (men, 74.0% [425 of 574]; mean age, 46.6 years; women, 26.0% [149 of 574]; mean age, 48.9 years). χ 2 and odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Interobserver agreement was calculated by using Cohen kappa values. Results A total of 114 patients (men, 86.8% [99 of 114]; mean age, 48.6 years; women, 13.2% [15 of 114]; mean age, 45.1 years) had 221 CC fractures. The incidence was 7.8% (114 of 1461) in all whole-body CT examinations and 19.9% (114 of 574) in patients with thoracic trauma. Cartilage of rib 7 (21.3%, 47 of 221) was most commonly injured. Bilateral multiple consecutive rib fractures occurred in 36% (41 of 114) versus 14% (64 of 460) in other patients with chest trauma (OR, 3.48; 95% CI: 2.18, 5.53; P chest trauma with CC fractures (13%, 15 of 114) versus patients with chest trauma without CC fractures (4%, 18 of 460) (OR, 3.72; 95% CI: 1.81, 7.64; P = .0001), as well as aortic injuries (n = 4 vs n = 0; P = .0015; OR, unavailable). Kappa value for interobserver agreement in detecting CC fractures was 0.65 (substantial agreement). CC fractures were documented in 39.5% (45 of 114) of primary reports. The 30-day mortality of patients with CC fractures was 7.02% (eight of 114) versus 4.78% (22 of 460) of other patients with chest trauma (OR, 1.50; 95% CI: 0.65, 3.47; P = .3371). Conclusion

  3. Tc99m-Tetrofosmin and Thallium-201 SPECT imaging of pituitary tumors: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarman, S.; Mudun, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: It has been reported that pituitary adenomas accumulate Thallium -201(Tl-201), Tc99m-sestamibi and In111-Octreotide. These agents maybe useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of pituitary adenomas. Tc99m-tetrofosmin also has been shown as an tumor seeking agent in various tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accumulation of Tc99m-tetrofosmin in pituitary adenomas and compare the results to Tl-201 SPECT. Methods: We performed Tc99m-Tetrofosmin and Tl-201 SPECT imaging on 5 patients (pts) with pituitary tumors, 3 patients with acromegaly, 1 patient with macro prolactinoma, and 1 patient with nonfunctional tumor (1 female, 4 male, age range: 26-50). SPECT imaging of cranium were obtained 20 min after intravenous injection of 111 MBq Tl-201 and 555 MBq Tc99m-Tetrofosmin on different days with a dual head gamma camera. All but one patient had surgical therapy. One patient had medical treatment. One patient had post surgical imaging with both Tetrofosmin and Tl-201 and 2 pts had only with Thallium. Semiquantitative analysis were performed by calculating tumor to background ratio from the mean counts of the created ROI's. Results: All adenomas showed prominent uptake with both Thallium and Tetrofosmin. The mean tumor to background ratios were 2.3 (range: 1.2-4.29) with Thallium and 3.57 (range: 1.6-6.86) with Tetrofosmin. Post therapy images showed no significant uptake in pituitary region with both agents in 2 patients. Post therapy mean Thallium uptake ratio in 3 pts was 1.64. One patient with acromegaly showed no decrease in thallium uptake, but showed some decrease in tetrofosmin uptake. Conclusion: Although our patient number is limited, these preliminary results indicate that Tc99m-tetrofosmin has also strong affinity for pituitary adenomas as does Thallium, either the adenoma is functioning or non-functioning. It may have a potential value to evaluate the response to therapy

  4. Prevalence and correlates of increased lung/heart ratio of thallium-201 during dipyridamole stress imaging for suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, F.S.; Kaul, S.; Smith, W.H.; Watson, D.D.; Varma, S.K.; Beller, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    There is little information concerning the prevalence and clinical correlates of increased pulmonary thallium-201 uptake during dipyridamole thallium-201 stress imaging. Accordingly, the clinical characteristics and quantitative thallium-201 findings were correlated with quantitative lung/heart thallium-201 ratio in 87 patients undergoing dipyridamole thallium-201 stress testing. Nineteen patients (22%) had an elevated ratio (greater than 0.51). These patients were more likely to have had an infarction, to be taking beta blockers, and have a lower rate-pressure product after dipyridamole administration than those with a normal ratio (p less than 0.03). An elevated ratio was associated with a greater likelihood of initial, redistribution and persistent defects, as well as left ventricular cavity dilatation on thallium-201 imaging (p less than 0.05). In addition, the number of myocardial segments demonstrating initial, redistribution and persistent defects was also greater in patients with increased ratios (p less than 0.03). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of redistribution and left ventricular cavity dilatation were the most significant correlates of lung/heart thallium-201 ratio. It is concluded that the prevalence of increased lung/heart thallium-201 ratio with dipyridamole thallium-201 stress imaging is similar to that seen with exercise stress imaging. As with exercise thallium-201 imaging, increased pulmonary thallium-201 uptake may be a marker of functionally more significant coronary artery disease

  5. Dipyridamole thallium imaging for detecting cardiac involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Matsubara, Noboru; Tani, Akihiro; Morozumi, Takakazu; Hori, Masatsugu; Kitabatake, Akira; Kamada, Takenobu; Kimura, Kazufumi; Kozuka, Takahiro (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1990-02-01

    Dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging was carried out in 21 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) to assess its value in detecting impaired myocardium and coronary microcirculation associated with PSS. Depending upon the degree of cardiac function, the patients were classified as having either ejection fraction of 50% or more (Group I, n=17) or less than 50% (Group II, n=4). In Group I, four patients had transient defect in which perfusion defects were seen on early images but not seen on delayed images; three had reverse redistribution in which defects were not seen on early images but seen on delayed images; and three had persistent defects which were seen on both early and delayed images. A decreased washout of thallium-201 was seen in 9 patients. In an analysis of both perfusion defects and washout rate, 13 patients (76%) in Group I were found to have abnormal findings. This suggests that disturbed coronary microcirculation or impaired myocardium may frequently develop even when EF is normal. All of the patients categorized as having a decreased cardiac function (Group II) had perfusion defect, suggesting the presence of myocardial fibrosis. In PSS, deterioration of cardiac function seemed to be associated with progression of myocardial fibrosis. Dipyridamole thallium imaging may be a sensitive method for detecting cardiac lesions in PSS. It also has the potential for detecting decreased coronary flow reserve or slightly impaired myocardium even without decreased EF. (N.K.).

  6. Thallium scintigraphy used in the evaluation of soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilloni, A.; Brooks, R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The use of thallium scintigraphy in tumour localisation is a promising diagnostic modality. Thallium has a good affinity for numerous tumour types including sarcomas. Its properties as a potassium analogue result in active uptake via the sodium- potassium ATP-ase pump enabling its use in evaluating tumour extent, viability, staging, localisation and treatment. This case illustrates the role of thallium in tumour staging. A 67-year-old woman with a fibrous histiocytoma resected from the right foot four months previously presented with pain in the ribs, lower back and feet. A bone scan was performed to assess the possibility of metastatic disease. Several abnormal foci were seen on the bone scan suggestive of metastatic disease. A thallium scan was performed to confirm the bone scan result after a subsequent CT scan showed no evidence of this extensive disease. Static images of the whole body were acquired on an Elscinct 400AG 20 minutes post i.v. injection of 3.5 mCi of thallium. Focal areas of increased thallium uptake were seen in the 11th rib posteriorly and in the left sacroiliac region corresponding with sites on the bone scan suggesting metastases. However, an extensive area of uptake was also observed in the right inguinal region which had no corresponding abnormalities in the bone study. This was thought to be tumour metastasis in an inguinal Iymph node, which was retrospectively confirmed on an earlier CT scan of the pelvis. This study demonstrates the usefulness of thallium in the detection of soft tissue tumours and metastases. Thallium also exhibits potential in the assessment of tumour extent and viability pre- and post-treatment. This potential needs to be explored further in patient management

  7. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging during transient coronary occlusion at the time of PTCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Hiroki; Inagaki, Suetsugu

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate myocardial perfusion during transient coronary arterial occlusion, thallium-201 was administered intravenously during percutaneous transluminall coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in 12 patients with effort angina, and the resulting perfusion images were compared with those of exercise stress obtained before PTCA. Thallium-201 was injected at the last inflation of an angioplastic baloon and occlusion was maintained for 60 to 90 sec. Three projections of planar images were obtained immediately after PTCA, using a portable gamma camera in an angiography room. These perfusion images obtained during PTCA and exercise were visually interpreted and compared. Myocardial perfusion defects due to the responsible vessel occlusion were observed at early imaging after PTCA, and were fully redistributed three hrs post injection. In 10 patients without angiographically imaged collateral vessels, there were no significatn differences in perfusion between images during PTCA and during exercise. Two patients whose collaterals were observed during coronary angiography before PTCA had higher perfusion scores during PTCA than during exercise. We concluded that intravenous injection of thallium-201 during PTCA is a useful means for assessing alteration of myocardial perfusion due to transient coronary occlusion without increasing the risk of angioplastic procedures, and that it provides more precise information about the jeopardized myocardium, perfused by antegrade blood flow. (author)

  8. Arm exercise-thallium imaging testing for the detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balady, G.J.; Weiner, D.A.; Rothendler, J.A.; Ryan, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with lower limb impairment are often unable to undergo a standard bicycle or treadmill test for the evaluation of coronary artery disease. To establish an alternative method of testing, 50 subjects (aged 56 +/- 10 years) performed arm ergometry testing in conjunction with myocardial thallium scintigraphy. All underwent coronary angiography; significant coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 70% stenosis) in at least one vessel was present in 41 (82%) of the 50 patients. Thallium scintigraphy was found to have an 83% sensitivity and 78% specificity for detecting coronary disease, compared with a sensitivity and specificity of 54% (p less than 0.01) and 67% (p = NS), respectively, for exercise electrocardiography. In the subgroup of 23 patients who had no prior myocardial infarction or left bundle branch block and were not taking digitalis, thallium scintigraphy had a sensitivity of 80% versus 50% for exercise electrocardiography. Scintigraphy yielded a sensitivity of 84, 74 and 90% for one, two and three vessel disease, respectively. Noninvasive arm ergometry exercise-thallium imaging testing appears to be reliable and useful and should be considered in the evaluation of coronary artery disease in patients with lower limb impairment

  9. Whole-body MR imaging in children with suspected osteonecrosis after intensive chemotherapy: preliminary results; Ganzkoerper-MRT bei Kindern mit Verdacht auf Osteonekrose nach intensiver Chemotherapie: Erste Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, M.; Stenzel, M.; Darge, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Girschick, H.; Schlegel, P.G. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Kinderklinik

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: use of multidrug chemotherapy poses the risk of avascular osseous necroses in children. Depiction of the whole body, including clinically non-apparent sites is mandatory for starting early and proper treatment, including surgical approaches in lesions near the joints. We analyzed the value of whole-body MRI in the detection of osteonecrosis, (1) in relation to conventional X-ray imaging and clinical symptoms, (2) using different MRI sequences, (3) with follow-up examinations. Materials and methods: 5 patients suffering from an oncological disease, 13 to 16 years old (3 x ALL, 1 x medulloblastoma, 1 x CML), and recently developing bone pain were examined with X-ray imaging of the particular region and a whole-body MRI (T2w TIRM, T1w TSE sequences, pre- and post-contrast GD-DTPA, including fat suppression techniques). Neck/thorax/abdomen/pelvis, and upper and lower extremities were acquired in the coronal plane, and the feet in sagittal orientation. 4 of 5 patients had at least one follow-up examination (in the mean after 10 {+-} 4 months). Results: none of the initial X-ray images revealed an abnormal finding. The whole-body MRI showed in 4 of 5 children bone marrow lesions compatible with osteonecrosis. The locations were around the knee joints (n = 3) and the tibiae/ankle joints (n = 4). In addition to the symptomatic sites, MRI revealed additional lesions at the following sites: humerus (n = 5), hip joints (n = 4), knee joints (n = 6), ankle joints (n = 4). The size varied from small focal lesions to lesions measuring 90% of the whole transverse diameter of the bone. The lesions were able to be detected most easily with heavily T2-weighted (TIRM) sequences, and the diagnosis was most easily established using the non-enhanced TSE T1-weighted sequences. As a consequence of the results of the whole-body MRI, all patients with lesions compatible with osteonecrosis received symptomatic (n = 2) or specific (n = 2) therapy. In the follow-up examinations, a

  10. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in Duchenne's progressive muscular dystrophy with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Naoki; Sotobata, Iwao; Okada, Mitsuhiro

    1985-01-01

    Myocardial involvement in progressive muscular dystrophy of the Duchenne type was evaluated in 19 patients using thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging. A qualitative analysis was performed from five projection images by three experienced physicians. Distinct perfusion defects were shown in 13 patients, especially in the LV posterolateral or posterior wall (11 patients). There was no significant relationship between the presence of perfusion defects and the skeletal muscle involvements or thoracic deformities assessed by transmission computed tomography. Extensive perfusion defects were shown in 2 patients who died of congestive heart failure 1 to 2 years after the scintigraphic study. Progression of the myocardial scintigraphic abnormalities were considered to be minimal in 7 of 9 patients who underwent two serial scintigraphic studies over 2 to 3 years. It was concluded that thallium myocardial perfusion imaging is a useful clinical technique to assess myocardial involvement in Duchenne's progressive muscular dystrophy. (author)

  11. Intracoronary thallium-201 assessment of thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction: a technique for imaging thallium distribution before and after therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.A.; Markis, J.E.; Silverman, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    Intracoronary administration of streptokinase during the acute phase of myocardial infarction results in recanalization of the occluded coronary artery in a high percentage of patients. A technique is developed to investigate the acute effect of thrombolysis on the perfusion to viable myocardium using intracoronary administration of thallium-201. With intracoronary administration a very small initial dose of thallium can be used. Thus, a second scan can be performed after therapy, using a normal dose with only minimal contribution from the baseline study

  12. Use of prediction equations to determine the accuracy of whole-body fat and fat-free mass and appendicular skeletal muscle mass measurements from a single abdominal image using computed tomography in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Robert D; Cardiff, Katrina; Rosenthall, Leonard; Lucar, Enriqueta; Trutschnigg, Barbara; Vigano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and single abdominal images from computed tomography (CT) in advanced cancer patients (ACP) have important diagnostic and prognostic value. The question arises as to whether CT scans can serve as surrogates for DXA in terms of whole-body fat-free mass (FFM), whole-body fat mass (FM), and appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM) mass. Predictive equations to estimate body composition for ACP from CT images have been proposed (Mourtzakis et al. 2008; Appl. Physiol. Nutr. Metabol. 33(5): 997-1006); however, these equations have yet to be validated in an independent cohort of ACP. Thus, this study evaluated the accuracy of these equations in estimating FFM, FM, and ASM mass using CT images at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae and compared these values with DXA measurements. FFM, FM, and ASM mass were estimated from the prediction equations proposed by Mourtzakis and colleagues (2008) using single abdominal CT images from 43 ACP and were compared with whole-body DXA scans using Spearman correlations and Bland-Altman analyses. Despite a moderate to high correlation between the actual (DXA) and predicted (CT) values for FM (rho = 0.93; p ≤ 0.001), FFM (rho = 0.78; p ≤ 0.001), and ASM mass (rho = 0.70; p ≤ 0.001), Bland-Altman analyses revealed large range-of-agreement differences between the 2 methods (29.39 kg for FFM, 15.47 kg for FM, and 3.99 kg for ASM mass). Based on the magnitude of these differences, we concluded that prediction equations using single abdominal CT images have poor accuracy, cannot be considered as surrogates for DXA, and may have limited clinical utility.

  13. Evaluation of initial uptake and redistribution on stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion images in patients with myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Tonooka, Ichiroh; Kanaya, Tohru; Tsuiki, Kai; Yasui, Shouji.

    1984-01-01

    Stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed on 29 patients with previous myocardial infarction and 29 patients with angina pectoris at exercise to evaluate thallium-201 kinetics in ischemic heart disease. Four views of thallium-201 images (right anterior oblique, antero-posterior, left anterior oblique and left lateral views) were obtained at 5 min after treadmill exercise with administration of 2 mCi of thallium-201 chloride (initial image) and at 3 hours later (delayed image). Myocardial images were divided into 6 segments (anterior, lateral, inferior, posterior, apical and septal segments) and initial uptake (IU) and redistribution index (RDI, the ratio of the maximal washout rate to a washout rate in each segment) were calculated in order to assess the relations of thallium-201 kinetics to wall motion abnormality and coronary artery stenosis. In myocardial infarction, IU and RDI were decreased in proportion to the severity of wall motion abnormality and coronary artery stenosis. Contrarily, in angina pectoris, IU was decreased but RDI was increased proportionally to the severity of coronary arterial stenosis. In conclusion, IU and redistribution of thallium-201 were affected essentially by both the grade of coronary arterial stenosis and the amount of residual viable heart muscle in patients with ischemic myocardial disease. (author)

  14. What is the most accurate whole-body imaging modality for assessment of local and distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer? A meta-analysis. Imaging for recurrent colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, Monique; Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Rutten, Iris J.G.; Cappendijk, Vincent C.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Nelemans, Patty J.; Beets, Geerard L.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET), PET/CT, CT and MRI as whole-body imaging modalities for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who have a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease, based on clinical findings or rise in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A meta-analysis was undertaken. PubMed and Embase were searched for studies on the accuracy of whole-body imaging for patients with suspected local and/or distant recurrence of their CRC. Additionally, studies had to have included at least 20 patients with CRC and 2 x 2 contingency tables had to be provided or derivable. Articles evaluating only local recurrence or liver metastasis were excluded. Summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed from the data on sensitivity and specificity of individual studies and pooled estimates of diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) were calculated. To test for heterogeneity the Cochran Q test was used. Fourteen observational studies were included which evaluated PET, PET/CT, CT and/or MRI. Study results were available in 12 studies for PET, in 5 studies for CT, in 5 studies for PET/CT and in 1 study for MRI. AUCs for PET, PET/CT and CT were 0.94 (0.90-0.97), 0.94 (0.87-0.98) and 0.83 (0.72-0.90), respectively. In patient based analyses PET/CT had a higher diagnostic performance than PET with an AUC of 0.95 (0.89-0.97) for PET/CT vs 0.92 (0.86-0.96) for PET. Both whole-body PET and PET/CT are very accurate for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in CRC patients with a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease. CT has the lowest diagnostic performance. This difference is probably mainly due to the lower accuracy of CT for detection of extrahepatic metastases (including local recurrence). For clinical practice PET/CT might be the modality of choice when evaluating patients with a (high

  15. Volumetry based biomarker speed of growth: Quantifying the change of total tumor volume in whole-body magnetic resonance imaging over time improves risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennmann, Markus; Kintzelé, Laurent; Piraud, Marie; Menze, Bjoern H; Hielscher, Thomas; Hofmanninger, Johannes; Wagner, Barbara; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Merz, Maximilian; Hillengass, Jens; Langs, Georg; Weber, Marc-André

    2018-05-18

    The purpose of this study was to improve risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients, introducing new 3D-volumetry based imaging biomarkers derived from whole-body MRI. Two-hundred twenty whole-body MRIs from 63 patients with smoldering multiple myeloma were retrospectively analyzed and all focal lesions >5mm were manually segmented for volume quantification. The imaging biomarkers total tumor volume, speed of growth (development of the total tumor volume over time), number of focal lesions, development of the number of focal lesions over time and the recent imaging biomarker '>1 focal lesion' of the International Myeloma Working Group were compared, taking 2-year progression rate, sensitivity and false positive rate into account. Speed of growth, using a cutoff of 114mm 3 /month, was able to isolate a high-risk group with a 2-year progression rate of 82.5%. Additionally, it showed by far the highest sensitivity in this study and in comparison to other biomarkers in the literature, detecting 63.2% of patients who progress within 2 years. Furthermore, its false positive rate (8.7%) was much lower compared to the recent imaging biomarker '>1 focal lesion' of the International Myeloma Working Group. Therefore, speed of growth is the preferable imaging biomarker for risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients.

  16. The superiority and benefits of whole body imaging after radioiodine -131 therapy over radioiodine 131 diagnostic imaging in management of thyroid carcinomas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleid, M A [Al-Mostansyria university, college of medicine P.O.Box 14132, Baghdad, (Iraq)

    1995-10-01

    A comparison between diagnostic and post therapeutic radioiodine imaging methods utilized in detection of thyroid metastases in 34 patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer was performed. The study revealed that the differences in detection on neck activity only between the two methods for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer were 35% and 27% respectively. While the overall detection percentages in both papillary and follicular thyroid cancers cases were 23% in diagnostic and 76% in post therapy scintigrams and the detection difference between the methods was 53% when all lesions throughout the body were seen on scintigram for only follicular thyroid cancer cases were counted, the detection percentage was increased up to 109%. It is clear that post therapeutic scans visualize an additional site activity not shown in diagnostic scans. There fore, post therapeutic imaging method is far superior to diagnostic imaging method and highly sensitive in visualization of thyroid metastases. On the other hand, this research also achieves many scientific and financial benefits. Therefore. This method should be adopted in management and follow up of well differentiated malignancies. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The superiority and benefits of whole body imaging after radioiodine -131 therapy over radioiodine 131 diagnostic imaging in management of thyroid carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleid, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    A comparison between diagnostic and post therapeutic radioiodine imaging methods utilized in detection of thyroid metastases in 34 patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer was performed. The study revealed that the differences in detection on neck activity only between the two methods for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer were 35% and 27% respectively. While the overall detection percentages in both papillary and follicular thyroid cancers cases were 23% in diagnostic and 76% in post therapy scintigrams and the detection difference between the methods was 53% when all lesions throughout the body were seen on scintigram for only follicular thyroid cancer cases were counted, the detection percentage was increased up to 109%. It is clear that post therapeutic scans visualize an additional site activity not shown in diagnostic scans. There fore, post therapeutic imaging method is far superior to diagnostic imaging method and highly sensitive in visualization of thyroid metastases. On the other hand, this research also achieves many scientific and financial benefits. Therefore. This method should be adopted in management and follow up of well differentiated malignancies. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging during pharmacologic coronary vasodilation: comparison of oral and intravenous administration of dipyridamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillefer, R.; Lette, J.; Phaneuf, D.C.; Leveille, J.; Lemire, F.; Essiambre, R.

    1986-01-01

    Although the diagnostic utility of thallium-201 myocardial imaging after dipyridamole infusion is well established, the intravenous form of the drug is not yet commercially available in North America. Fifty patients referred for coronary angiography were prospectively studied. Within a 2 week period, each patient underwent cardiac catheterization and thallium-201 myocardial imaging after both oral and intravenous dipyridamole administration. For the oral protocol, patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either 200 or 400 mg of dipyridamole in tablet form. Coronary artery stenoses of 70% or greater were considered significant. For the 25 patients who received a 200 mg oral dose of dipyridamole, the scintigraphic study showed perfusion defects in 65% of patients with significant coronary artery disease after the oral dose and in 85% of patients after the intravenous dose. For the 25 patients who received a 400 mg oral dose, the sensitivity of the scintigram was 84% after the oral dose and 79% after the intravenous dose. Except for headache and nausea, side effects were less severe and less frequent with oral (either 200 or 400 mg) than with intravenous dipyridamole. Because of the delayed and variable absorption of dipyridamole tablets, the oral studies required a longer period of medical supervision (45 to 60 minutes), and aminophylline was empirically administered after completion of the first set of thallium-201 images. It is concluded from this study that thallium-201 myocardial imaging after coronary vasodilation with a 400 mg oral dose of dipyridamole is a safe, widely available and reliable alternative for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in patients unable to achieve an adequate exercise level on stress testing

  19. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Naoki; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Okada, Mitsuhiro (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1983-12-01

    Myocardial involvement in progressive muscular dystrophy of the Duchenne type was evaluated in 19 patients using thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging. The qualitative analysis was performed in anterior, 3 left anterior oblique and left lateral projection images by three experienced physicians. Distinct perfusion defects were shown in 13 patients, especially in LV posterolateral or posterior walls (11 patients). There was no significant relationship between the presence of perfusion defects and the skeletal muscle changes or thoracic deformities assessed by transmission computed tomography. Slightly increased thallium-201 activity in RV free wall and lungs was shown in nine and one patient, respectively. The extensive perfusion defects were shown in 2 patients who died of congestive heart failure 1 to 2 years after the scintigraphic study. The myocardial scintigraphic changes were considered to be minimal in 7 of 9 patients who underwent two serial scintigraphic studies in 2 to 3 years. It was concluded that the thallium myocardial perfusion imaging was a useful clinical technique to evaluate the cardiomyopathy in Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy.

  20. Evaluation of myocardial involvement in Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Naoki; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Okada, Mitsuhiro

    1983-01-01

    Myocardial involvement in progressive muscular dystrophy of the Duchenne type was evaluated in 19 patients using thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging. The qualitative analysis was performed in anterior, 3 left anterior oblique and left lateral projection images by three experienced physicians. Distinct perfusion defects were shown in 13 patients, especially in LV posterolateral or posterior walls (11 patients). There was no significant relationship between the presence of perfusion defects and the skeletal muscle changes or thoracic deformities assessed by transmission computed tomography. Slightly increased thallium-201 activity in RV free wall and lungs was shown in nine and one patient, respectively. The extensive perfusion defects were shown in 2 patients who died of congestive heart failure 1 to 2 years after the scintigraphic study. The myocardial scintigraphic changes were considered to be minimal in 7 of 9 patients who underwent two serial scintigraphic studies in 2 to 3 years. It was concluded that the thallium myocardial perfusion imaging was a useful clinical technique to evaluate the cardiomyopathy in Duchenne progressive muscular dystrophy. (author)

  1. TU-H-207A-03: CT Hounsfield Unit Accuracy: Effect of Beam Hardening On Phantom and Clinical Whole-Body CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H; Wendt, R [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of beam hardening on measured CT HU values. Methods: An anthropomorphic knee phantom was scanned with the CT component of a GE Discovery 690 PET/CT scanner (120kVp, 300mAs, 40?0.625mm collimation, pitch=0.984, FOV=500mm, matrix=512?512) with four different scan setups, each of which induces different degrees of beam hardening by introducing additional attenuation media into the field of view. Homogeneous voxels representing “soft tissue” and “bone” were segmented by HU thresholding followed by a 3D morphological erosion operation which removes the non-homogenous voxels located on the interface of thresholded tissue mask. HU values of segmented “soft tissue” and “bone” were compared.Additionally, whole-body CT data with coverage from the skull apex to the end of toes were retrospectively retrieved from seven PET/CT exams to evaluate the effect of beam hardening in vivo. Homogeneous bone voxels were segmented with the same method previously described. Total In-Slice Attenuation (TISA) for each CT slice, defined as the summation of HU values over all voxels within a CT slice, was calculated for all slices of the seven whole-body CT datasets and evaluated against the mean HU values of homogeneous bone voxels within that slice. Results: HU values measured from the phantom showed that while “soft tissue” HU values were unaffected, added attenuation within the FOV caused noticeable decreases in the measured HU values of “bone” voxels. A linear relationship was observed between bone HU and TISA for slices of the torso and legs, but not of the skull. Conclusion: Beam hardening effect is not an issue of concern for voxels with HU in the soft tissue range, but should not be neglected for bone voxels. A linear relationship exists between bone HU and the associated TISA in non-skull CT slices, which can be exploited to develop a correction strategy.

  2. Prognostic value of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with unstable angina who respond to medical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although the prognostic value of thallium-201 imaging is well established, its ability to risk stratify patients who present with unstable angina is unclear. Fifty-two consecutive patients admitted with unstable angina who responded to medical treatment and underwent stress thallium-201 imaging within 1 week of discharge were studied. Patients were followed up for 39 +/- 11 months. Cardiac events included cardiac death (n = 3), nonfatal myocardial infarction (n = 4) and admission for unstable angina or revascularization (n = 17). The ability of thallium-201 data (redistribution, fixed defects, normal) to predict cardiac events was compared with clinical data (age, gender, prior myocardial infarction, anginal syndrome, rest and stress electrocardiogram) and cardiac catheterization data using logistic regression. Thallium-201 redistribution was the only significant predictor of cardiac death or nonfatal myocardial infarction (p less than 0.05). The number of myocardial segments with thallium-201 redistribution (p less than 0.0005) and a history of prior myocardial infarction (p less than 0.05) were the only significant predictors of all cardiac events. Cardiac death or nonfatal myocardial infarction occurred more frequently in patients with thallium-201 redistribution (6 [26%] of 23) than in those without redistribution (1 [3%] of 29, p less than 0.05). Similarly, total cardiac events developed more frequently in patients with thallium-201 redistribution (p less than 0.001). Stress thallium-201 imaging has important prognostic value in patients admitted with unstable angina who respond to medical therapy and can identify subgroups at high versus low risk for future cardiac events

  3. Whole body MRI in children; Ganzkoerper-MRT bei Kindern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Juergen F.; Tsiflikas, Ilias [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Bereich Kinderradiologie

    2014-09-15

    In pediatric patients whole body MRI has a relevant impact on both, diagnostic work-up and treatment. Using adapted sequence protocols comprehensive imaging without radiation exposure is possible avoiding additional examinations in many cases. Especially in bone marrow the differentiation between normal and abnormal finding can be difficult, therefore the knowledge of normal maturing of organs is important. Whole body diffusion weighted imaging particularly in neuroblastomas or sarcomas improves the low specificity of conventional MR-protocols. Technical prerequisites, examination protocol and strategies, image interpretation, indications and clinical relevance as well as advantages and disadvantages of whole body MRI will be discussed on the basis of application-oriented cases and the literature.

  4. Thallium-201 exercise myocardial imaging to evaluate myocardial perfusion after coronary artery bypass surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirzel, H.O.; Nuesch, K.; Sialer, G.; Horst, W.; Krayenbuehl, H.P.

    1980-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy in evaluating myocardial perfusion after coronary artery bypass surgery, imaging was performed after submaximal bicycle ergometry and at rest in 54 patients before and within 24 +- 10 (SD) weeks after operation. Scintigraphy identified 8 out of 20 patients who were symptom free after operation and showed normal exercise electrocardiograms as still having exercise-induced ischaemia and thus as having not truly benefited from the surgical intervention. In contrast, improvement in perfusion was documented in 17 out of 31 patients despite further complaints of chest pain and persistence of a pathological exercise electrocardiogram in 6 of them. Bypass graft patency rate paralleled the scintigraphic findings in the 35 patients who were restudied arteriographically. It was concluded that thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy is a useful technique to document changes in regional perfusion after surgery and is definitely superior to the clinical evaluation of patients including the exercise electrocardiogram. (author)

  5. 3D whole body scanners revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Haar, F.B. ter

    2013-01-01

    An overview of whole body scanners in 1998 (H.A.M. Daanen, G.J. Van De Water. Whole body scanners, Displays 19 (1998) 111-120) shortly after they emerged to the market revealed that the systems were bulky, slow, expensive and low in resolution. This update shows that new developments in sensing and

  6. VIP-Man: An image-based whole-body adult male model constructed from color photographs of the visible human project for multi-particle Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.G.; Chao, T.C.; Bozkurt, A.

    2000-01-01

    Human anatomical models have been indispensable to radiation protection dosimetry using Monte Carlo calculations. Existing MIRD-based mathematical models are easy to compute and standardize, but they are simplified and crude compared to human anatomy. This article describes the development of an image-based whole-body model, called VIP-Man, using transversal color photographic images obtained from the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project for Monte Carlo organ dose calculations involving photons, electron, neutrons, and protons. As the first of a series of papers on dose calculations based on VIP-Man, this article provides detailed information about how to construct an image-based model, as well as how to adopt it into well-tested Monte Carlo codes, EGS4, MCNP4B, and MCNPX

  7. Thallium 201 scintigraphy of the myocardium. A bibliographical survey for image optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, Luc.

    1979-01-01

    At the request of a Nuclear Medicine Service we compiled a review of the literature on thallium 201 myocardium scintigraphy in order to define the optimum parameters for image acquisition; included also are the bibliograhical references of studies on the sensitivities, specificities and accuracies of this technique as compared with electrocardiography in the diagnosis and evaluation of ischemic heart diseases. This examination seems to have a part to play at all stages in the evaluation of ischemic heart diseases, whether for the detection (ischemia) emergency handling (thrombosis) or post-surgical checking (permeability of an aorto-coronary transplant) of these diseases, the great frequency and gravity of which have no longer to be proved. This study covers the whole period since thallium scintigraphy began (1970) until June 1978. Thallium seems to have a great future in cardiology and may be even in other fields since its use is quoted (in only a few publications as yet) for brain, kidney and pancreas scintigraphy [fr

  8. Assessment of the significance of coronary collateral vessel by using thallium-201 myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoh, Yasushi; Shiotani, Hideyuki; Fukuzaki, Hisashi; Maeda, Kazumi.

    1988-01-01

    For functional assessment of coronary collateral vessels, twenty-three patients with effort angina pectoris who had total coronary obstruction were studied. The patients were divided depending on the degree of development of collateral vessels into two groups, i.e. good collateral group I (n = 13) and poor collateral group II (n = 10). Thallium-201 scan was performed immediately (Ex-1 image), 20 minutes (Ex-2 image) after exercise and after nitroglycerin administration (NTG image) respectively. In all images, the relative percent activity of thallium-201 in the collateral-dependent ischemic area to the normal myocardium were calculated and were compaired between two groups. Relative percent activities in group I and II were as follows : Ex-1 image ; 75.8 ± 3.5 % vs. 77.2 ± 2.9 % (NS), Ex-2 images ; 85.3 ± 4.5 % vs. 79.3 ± 3.9 % (p < 0.005), NTG image ; 97.3 ± 3.1 % vs. 96.4 ± 5.2 % (NS). From these results, it was elucidated that good collateral induced early partial redistribution in its perfusion area, suggesting that good collateral circulation may provide rapid recovery from myocardial ischemia. (author)

  9. Whole-body 35-GHz security scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Roger; Anderton, Rupert N.; Price, Sean; Sinclair, Gordon N.; Coward, Peter R.

    2004-08-01

    A 35GHz imager designed for Security Scanning has been previously demonstrated. That imager was based on a folded conical scan technology and was constructed from low cost materials such as expanded polystyrene and printed circuit board. In conjunction with an illumination chamber it was used to collect indoor imagery of people with weapons and contraband hidden under their clothing. That imager had a spot size of 20mm and covered a field of view of 20 x 10 degrees that partially covered the body of an adult from knees to shoulders. A new variant of this imager has been designed and constructed. It has a field of view of 36 x 18 degrees and is capable of covering the whole body of an adult. This was achieved by increasing the number of direct detection receivers from the 32 used in the previous design to 58, and by implementing an improved optical design. The optics consist of a front grid, a polarisation device which converts linear to circular polarisation and a rotating scanner. This new design uses high-density expanded polystyrene as a correcting element on the back of the front grid. This gives an added degree of freedom that allows the optical design to be diffraction limited over a very wide field of view. Obscuration by the receivers and associated components is minimised by integrating the post detection electronics at the receiver array.

  10. Effect of maintenance oral theophylline on dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial imaging using SPECT and dipyridamole-induced hemodynamic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, P.J.; Mahn, T.H.; Zielonka, J.S.; Krubsack, A.J.; Akhtar, R.; Bamrah, V.S.

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of maintenance oral theophylline therapy on the diagnostic efficacy of dipyridamole-thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging for coronary artery disease, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT imaging was performed in eight men with documented coronary artery disease before initiation of theophylline treatment and repeated while these patients were receiving therapeutic doses of oral theophylline. Before theophylline treatment, intravenous dipyridamole caused a significant increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, angina in seven of eight patients, and ST segment depression in four of eight patients. While they were being treated with theophylline, none of the patients had angina or ST segment depression, and there were no hemodynamic changes with intravenous dipyridamole. Before theophylline treatment, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT imaging showed reversible perfusion defects in myocardial segments supplied by stenotic coronary arteries. With theophylline treatment, dipyridamole-thallium-201 SPECT showed total absence of reversible perfusion defects. Treatment with theophylline markedly reduced the diagnostic accuracy of dipyridamole-thallium-201 imaging for coronary artery disease

  11. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging during coronary vasodilation induced by oral dipyridamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, K.L.; Sorenson, S.G.; Albro, P.; Caldwell, J.H.; Chaudhuri, T.; Hamilton, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging of 201 TI injected during maximum exercise has been an important diagnostic tool for coronary artery disease. Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation by i.v. infusion of dipyridamole may be used in lieu of exercise stress for purposes of diagnostic perfusion imaging. However, i.v. dipyridamole is not currently available from commercial sources for widespread routine use. Accordingly, this study was carried out in order to determine whether high dose, oral dipyridamole would be useful as a coronary vasodilator for purposes of diagnostic perfusion imaging. Fifty-eight patients undergoing diagnostic coronary arteriography also had myocardial perfusion imaging with 201TI under conditions of rest, maximum exercise stress, and high dose oral dipyridamole. Of those patients who had a defect on exercise thallium images, 75% also had a perfusion defect on thallium images after high dose oral dipyridamole. These results indicate that oral dipyridamole causes sufficient coronary arteriolar vasodilation and increase of coronary flow in nonstenotic arteries to identify perfusion defects comparable to those seen on maximum exercise stress in at least 75% of cases. In 25% of patients with exercise defects, no perfusion defect was seen after oral dipyridamole. Thus, oral dipyridamole is a potent coronary vasodilator, comparable to exercise stress in most cases, but in a minority of patients may not be comparable to exercise stress

  12. Quantification of interstitial fluid on whole body CT: comparison with whole body autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Gullo, Roberto; Mishra, Shelly; Lira, Diego A; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Singh, Sarabjeet; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Digumarthy, Subba R; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Stone, James R

    2015-12-01

    Interstitial fluid accumulation can occur in pleural, pericardial, and peritoneal spaces, and subcutaneous tissue planes. The purpose of the study was to assess if whole body CT examination in a postmortem setting could help determine the presence and severity of third space fluid accumulation in the body. Our study included 41 human cadavers (mean age 61 years, 25 males and 16 females) who had whole-body postmortem CT prior to autopsy. All bodies were maintained in the morgue in the time interval between death and autopsy. Two radiologists reviewed the whole-body CT examinations independently to grade third space fluid in the pleura, pericardium, peritoneum, and subcutaneous space using a 5-point grading system. Qualitative CT grading for third space fluid was correlated with the amount of fluid found on autopsy and the quantitative CT fluid volume, estimated using a dedicated software program (Volume, Syngo Explorer, Siemens Healthcare). Moderate and severe peripheral edema was seen in 16/41 and 7/41 cadavers respectively. It is not possible to quantify anasarca at autopsy. Correlation between imaging data for third space fluid and the quantity of fluid found during autopsy was 0.83 for pleural effusion, 0.4 for pericardial effusion and 0.9 for ascites. The degree of anasarca was significantly correlated with the severity of ascites (p < 0.0001) but not with pleural or pericardial effusion. There was strong correlation between volumetric estimation and qualitative grading for anasarca (p < 0.0001) and pleural effusion (p < 0.0001). Postmortem CT can help in accurate detection and quantification of third space fluid accumulation. The quantity of ascitic fluid on postmortem CT can predict the extent of anasarca.

  13. Simultaneous whole body (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugmire, Brian S; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Lim, Ruth; Friedmann, Alison M; Huang, Mary; Ebb, David; Weinstein, Howard; Catalano, Onofrio A; Mahmood, Umar; Catana, Ciprian; Gee, Michael S

    2016-03-28

    To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients. This prospective, observational, single-center study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to: (1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis; (2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and (3) be scheduled for clinically indicated (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PET-MRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PET-MRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard. A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years (range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions (R = 0.93). PET-MRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-CT reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions (780.2 + 326.6) was significantly lower than

  14. Simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugmire, Brian S; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Lim, Ruth; Friedmann, Alison M; Huang, Mary; Ebb, David; Weinstein, Howard; Catalano, Onofrio A; Mahmood, Umar; Catana, Ciprian; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: This prospective, observational, single-center study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to: (1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis; (2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and (3) be scheduled for clinically indicated 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PET-MRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PET-MRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard. RESULTS: A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years (range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions (R = 0.93). PET-MRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-CT reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions (780.2 + 326.6) was

  15. Peritoneal fluid causing inferior attenuation on SPECT thallium-201 myocardial imaging in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rab, S.T.; Alazraki, N.P.; Guertler-Krawczynska, E.

    1988-01-01

    On SPECT thallium images, myocardial left ventricular (LV) anterior wall attenuation due to breast tissue is common in women. In contrast, in men, inferior wall counts are normally decreased compared to anterior counts. The purpose of this report is to describe cases of inferior wall attenuation of counts in women caused by peritoneal fluid, not myocardial disease. Twelve consecutive SPECT thallium myocardial studies performed in women on peritoneal dialysis, being evaluated for kidney transplant, were included in this study. For all studies, 3.5 mCi 201Tl were injected intravenously. Thirty-two images were acquired over 180 degrees (45 degrees RAO progressing to 45 degrees LPO) at 40 sec per stop. SPECT images were reviewed in short axis, horizontal long and vertical long axes. Data were also displayed in bullseye format with quantitative comparison to gender-matched normal files. Ten of 12 female patients studied had inferior wall defects on images, confirmed by bullseye display. All patients had approximately 2 liters of peritoneal fluid. Review of planar rotational views showed diaphragm elevation and fluid margin attenuations affecting left ventricular inferior wall. Thus, peritoneal fluid is a cause of inferior attenuation on 201Tl cardiac imaging

  16. Quantitative whole body scintigraphy - a simplified approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marienhagen, J.; Maenner, P.; Bock, E.; Schoenberger, J.; Eilles, C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present investigations on a simplified method of quantitative whole body scintigraphy by using a dual head LFOV-gamma camera and a calibration algorithm without the need of additional attenuation or scatter correction. Validation of this approach to the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in patient studies showed a high accuracy concerning quantification of whole body activity (102.8% and 97.72%, resp.), by contrast organ activities were recovered with an error range up to 12%. The described method can be easily performed using commercially available software packages and is recommendable especially for quantitative whole body scintigraphy in a clinical setting. (orig.) [de

  17. Cardiovascular whole-body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Harald [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich - Grosshadern Campus, Ludwig Maxmilians University Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: harald.kramer@med.uni-muenchen.de; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich - Grosshadern Campus, Ludwig Maxmilians University Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Cardiovascular diseases still rank number one in mortality statistics in the industrialized world. In these countries the five most common causes of death are associated to atherosclerotic changes of the arterial vasculature. Due to its often long lasting treatment and the possible loss of ability to work atherosclerotic disease constitutes an economic factor which should not be disregarded. Thus screening for atherosclerotic disease seems to be reasonable because as known the potential to influence atherosclerotic changes is higher in an early stage of the disease. Not in every case it is possible to cure the disease but sometimes progression can be controlled and decelerated. Imaging of the arterial vasculature was limited to invasive procedures associated with ionizing radiation for a long time. Non-invasive exams like the 'ankle-brachial-index' (ABI) can indicate the presence of PAOD, an exact localization of the pathologic changes is only possible with imaging methods. For cardiac imaging likewise the only non-invasive exams have been ECG and auscultation. Certainly echocardiography is an excellent technique to access cardiac function but it depends very much on both, the examining physician and the patient. MRI constitutes a non-invasive imaging modality without ionizing radiation offering excellent reproducible image quality.

  18. Cardiovascular whole-body MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Harald; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases still rank number one in mortality statistics in the industrialized world. In these countries the five most common causes of death are associated to atherosclerotic changes of the arterial vasculature. Due to its often long lasting treatment and the possible loss of ability to work atherosclerotic disease constitutes an economic factor which should not be disregarded. Thus screening for atherosclerotic disease seems to be reasonable because as known the potential to influence atherosclerotic changes is higher in an early stage of the disease. Not in every case it is possible to cure the disease but sometimes progression can be controlled and decelerated. Imaging of the arterial vasculature was limited to invasive procedures associated with ionizing radiation for a long time. Non-invasive exams like the 'ankle-brachial-index' (ABI) can indicate the presence of PAOD, an exact localization of the pathologic changes is only possible with imaging methods. For cardiac imaging likewise the only non-invasive exams have been ECG and auscultation. Certainly echocardiography is an excellent technique to access cardiac function but it depends very much on both, the examining physician and the patient. MRI constitutes a non-invasive imaging modality without ionizing radiation offering excellent reproducible image quality.

  19. Safety and diagnostic accuracy of dipyridamole-thallium imaging in the elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, J.Y.; Chaitman, B.R.; Glaenzer, M.; Byers, S.; Fite, J.; Shah, Y.; Goodgold, H.; Samuels, L.

    1988-01-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease in the elderly can occasionally be difficult. Intravenous dipyridamole-thallium imaging is a potentially useful diagnostic test to determine presence and severity of coronary disease; however, the safety of the procedure has not been determined in an older population. The side effect profile and frequency of severe ischemic responses after 0.56 mg/kg of intravenous dipyridamole were compared in 101 patients greater than or equal to 70 years old and 236 patients less than 70 years old. There were no side effects in 64% and 62% of patients greater than or equal to 70 and less than 70 years old, respectively (p = NS). Among the 337 patients tested, there were no complications of myocardial infarction or death. The most common cardiac side effect was chest pain, which occurred in 21 (21%) of the 101 patients aged greater than or equal to 70 years and in 64 (27%) of the 236 patients less than 70 years (p = NS). Aminophylline was required to reverse cardiac or noncardiac side effects in 15 (15%) and 36 (15%) of the patients greater than or equal to 70 and less than 70 years old, respectively (p = NS). A severe ischemic response occurred in 2% and 2.5% of patients greater than or equal to 70 and less than 70 years old, respectively (p = NS). The sensitivity of intravenous dipyridamole-thallium imaging for obstructive coronary artery disease was 86% (25 of 29) and 83% (68 of 82) in older and younger patients, respectively (p = NS); the specificity was 75% (6 of 8) and 70% (16 of 23), respectively (p = NS). Thus, intravenous dipyridamole-thallium imaging is a safe noninvasive method for assessment of older patients with obstructive coronary disease; its side effect profile and diagnostic accuracy are similar to those seen in younger patients. The technique is associated with severe ischemic responses in only a small minority of patients

  20. Rest/exercise thallium myocardial perfusion imaging: a new and rapid technique to evaluate coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, G.M.; Zipkin, R.E.; Stanford Univ., CA

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-six patients underwent conventional exercise/4-h redistribution thallium myocardial perfusion imaging as well as rest/exercise imaging on different days. For the rest/exercise study, patients were inmaged 10 min after receiving 1 mCi thallium at rest. The resting study was immediately followed by symptom-limited treadmill exercise. Patients were injected with 2 mCi thallium at peak exercise and imaged 10 min later. The entire rest/exercise study was completed in 2 h. There was a high degree of correlation between the two studies. Of the 130 segments analysed, 84 were normal and 46 were abnormal by exercise/redistribution imaging whereas 88 were normal and 42 were abnormal by rest/exercise imaging. Among the 14 patients who had coronary arteriography, both exercise/redistribution and rest/exercise imaging correctly identified 23/35 segments as abnormal (sensitivity [pi003] 66% and 34/35 segments as normal (specificity=97%). Furthermore, abnormal segments were more likely to be reversible on the rest/exercise study. The results suggest that the accuracy of rest/exercise thallium imaging is equal to conventional exercise/redistribution imaging in the evaluation of coronary artery disease. The significant time economy and possible improvement in assessing myocardial viability are important potential advantages of this new technique. (Author)

  1. whole body vibration and spinal stabilisation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A range of exercise modalities is used in the rehabilitation of indi- viduals with chronic lower ... effects of whole body vibration (WBV) therapy and conventional ... with musculoskeletal, sensory, emotional, cognitive and behavioural components ...

  2. Simultaneous whole-body {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/MRI with integrated high-resolution multiparametric imaging of the prostatic fossa for comprehensive oncological staging of patients with prostate cancer. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Martin T.; Bonekamp, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kesch, Claudia; Radtke, Jan P.; Hohenfellner, Markus [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Cardinale, Jens; Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Flechsig, Paul; Kratochwil, Clemens; Giesel, Frederik [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Floca, Ralf [German Cancer Research Center, Medical Image Computing Group, Heidelberg (Germany); Eiber, Matthias [Technical University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Stenzinger, Albrecht [University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore the clinical feasibility and reproducibility of a comprehensive whole-body {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/MRI protocol for imaging prostate cancer (PC) patients. Eight patients with high-risk biopsy-proven PC underwent a whole-body PET/MRI (3 h p.i.) including a multi-parametric prostate MRI after {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/CT (1 h p.i.) which served as reference. Seven patients presented with non-treated PC, whereas one patient presented with biochemical recurrence. SUV{sub mean}-quantification was performed using a 3D-isocontour volume-of-interest. Imaging data was consulted for TNM-staging and compared with histopathology. PC was confirmed in 4/7 patients additionally by histopathology after surgery. PET-artifacts, co-registration of pelvic PET/MRI and MRI-data were assessed (PI-RADS 2.0). The examinations were well accepted by patients and comprised 1 h. SUV{sub mean}-values between PET/CT (1 h p.i.) and PET/MRI (3 h p.i.) were significantly correlated (p < 0.0001, respectively) and similar to literature of {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/CT 1 h vs 3 h p.i. The dominant intraprostatic lesion could be detected in all seven patients in both PET and MRI. T2c, T3a, T3b and T4 features were detected complimentarily by PET and MRI in five patients. PET/MRI demonstrated moderate photopenic PET-artifacts surrounding liver and kidneys representing high-contrast areas, no PET-artifacts were observed for PET/CT. Simultaneous PET-readout during prostate MRI achieved optimal co-registration results. The presented {sup 18}F-PSMA-1007-PET/MRI protocol combines efficient whole-body assessment with high-resolution co-registered PET/MRI of the prostatic fossa for comprehensive oncological staging of patients with PC. (orig.)

  3. Internal dosimetry by whole body counting techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Over decades, whole body counting and bioassay - the two principal methods of internal dosimetry have been most widely used to assess, limit and control the intakes of radioactive materials and the consequent internal doses by the workers in nuclear industry. This paper deals with the whole body counting techniques. The problems inherent in the interpretation of monitoring data and likely future directions of development in the assessments of internal doses by direct methods are outlined. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Whole-body counters in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, C.

    1986-08-01

    A compilation of whole-body counting existing across Canada was prepared by AECB (Atomic Energy Control Board) staff. This work was initiated so that AECB staff and other concerned parties would have this information readily available, especially during urgent situations. This report is to be used for reference purposes only, as it makes no attempt to judge the present state of the art of whole-body counting

  5. Whole-body computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanski, M.; Prokop, M.; Joergensen, M.; Koehler, A.; Leppert, A.; Lehmann, K.J.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Smekal, U. v.

    1998-01-01

    The textbook covers all aspects of the modern (spiral) CT methods: The technical principle, evaluation modalities and artefacts, specific diagnostic examinations such as CT angiography, CTAP, CT arthrography, CT-guided biopsy, as well as the principles guiding the analysis of the tomographic images are explained in the initial chapter on fundamentals. Further methodological information is given in the second chapter discussing the various examination strategies, and the value of the material is enhanced by a wealth of diagnostic image reproductions of latest available standard. The chapters devoted to the body organs of interest are arranged by organs and cover information on the normal anatomy, diagnostic examination techniques, contrast agent performance and, as a very important part, the full-detail CT morphology, supplemented by information describing the anatomy, pathophysiology and clinical aspects of relevance to the diagnostic decisions. There are as well many practical hints which readers may find useful in their practical work. Every chapter contains tables summarizing and showing at a glance information on indications, specific examination techniques, including the scan parameters for the spiral CT, and on differential diagnoses. (orig./CB) [de

  6. Diagnostic value of transient dilatation of the left ventricle in negative dipyridamole-thallium imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hiromi; Doi, Y.L.; Yonezawa, Yoshihiro; Chikamori, Taishiro; Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Ozawa, Toshio

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of a transient dilatation of the left ventricle during dipyridamole-thallium imaging (DTI) for detecting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with negative DTI results, 81 consecutive patients were studied. Twenty one patients (26%) had CAD and 60 patients had normal coronary anatomy (NCA). The initial/delayed ratio of the left ventricular dimension, which was measured as the distance between the 2 peaks of a count profile curve on a 45deg left anterior oblique planar image, was defined as the dilatation ratio (DR) of the left ventricle. Patients with CAD had a higher incidence of chest pain after dipyridamole infusion (35 vs 13%; p 1.03) when it was greater than the mean +2 standard deviations of the DR in NCA patients. Seventy-six percent of CAD patients had an abnormal DR. A stepwise discriminant analysis revealed that an abnormal DR alone had the same ability to predict CAD (sensitivity 76%, specificity 98%, chi-square 80.9, p 1.03) is a highly specific marker for detecting CAD, even in patients with negative dipyridamole-thallium imaging. (author)

  7. Occult primary tumors of the head and neck: accuracy of thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, S. A.; Balm, A. J.; Valdés Olmos, R. A.; Hoefnagel, C. A.; Hilgers, F. J.; Tan, I. B.; Pameijer, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography (thallium SPECT) and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) in the detection of occult primary tumors of the head and neck. Study of diagnostic tests. National Cancer Institute, Amsterdam,

  8. Exercise thallium-201 imaging in complete left bundle branch block and the prevalence of septal perfusion defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazmati, B.; Sadaniantz, A.; Emaus, S.P.; Heller, G.V.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of septal defects in a generalized referral population, the records of 93 consecutive patients with complete left bundle branch block (BBB) who underwent symptom-limited treadmill exercise testing with thallium-201 myocardial imaging over a 3-year period were reviewed. Segmental analysis of the planar thallium-201 images was performed in a blinded fashion with agreement by consensus. Computerized quantitative analysis of the images also was independently performed, and was correlated with the visual interpretations. Forty-seven patients (51%) had normal images, and 46 (49%) had defects of greater than or equal to 2 segments. In the abnormal studies, only 13 patients (14% of the total population) had septal defects, while a much higher number of patients, 33 (39%), had inferior or apical defects, or both. Coronary angiography was performed in 6 patients with septal defects: Significant narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery was found in 4 patients, a narrowed right coronary artery was found in 1, and normal coronary arteries were seen in the other patient. In conclusion, whereas previous studies have suggested a high percentage of false-positive septal defects in patients with left BBB, this study demonstrates a low prevalence (14%) of septal defects in a large population of unselected patients presenting for exercise thallium-201 imaging. Therefore, exercise thallium-201 imaging remains a useful procedure for evaluating patients with complete left BBB

  9. Liposomal encapsulation of a near-infrared fluorophore enhances fluorescence quenching and reliable whole body optical imaging upon activation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansi, Felista L; Rüger, Ronny; Rabenhold, Markus; Steiniger, Frank; Fahr, Alfred; Kaiser, Werner A; Hilger, Ingrid

    2013-11-11

    In the past decade, there has been significant progress in the development of water soluble near-infrared fluorochromes for use in a wide range of imaging applications. Fluorochromes with high photo and thermal stability, sensitivity, adequate pharmacological properties and absorption/emission maxima within the near infrared window (650-900 nm) are highly desired for in vivo imaging, since biological tissues show very low absorption and auto-fluorescence at this spectrum window. Taking these properties into consideration, a myriad of promising near infrared fluorescent probes has been developed recently. However, a hallmark of most of these probes is a rapid clearance in vivo, which hampers their application. It is hypothesized that encapsulation of the near infrared fluorescent dye DY-676-COOH, which undergoes fluorescence quenching at high concentrations, in the aqueous interior of liposomes will result in protection and fluorescence quenching, which upon degradation by phagocytes in vivo will lead to fluorescence activation and enable imaging of inflammation. Liposomes prepared with high concentrations of DY-676-COOH reveal strong fluorescence quenching. It is demonstrated that the non-targeted PEGylated fluorescence-activatable liposomes are taken up predominantly by phagocytosis and degraded in lysosomes. Furthermore, in zymosan-induced edema models in mice, the liposomes are taken up by monocytes and macrophages which migrate to the sites of inflammation. Opposed to free DY-676-COOH, prolonged stability and retention of liposomal-DY-676-COOH is reflected in a significant increase in fluorescence intensity of edema. Thus, protected delivery and fluorescence quenching make the DY-676-COOH-loaded liposomes a highly promising contrast agent for in vivo optical imaging of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle fatty degenerative changes using whole-body Dixon nuclear magnetic resonance imaging for an important reduction of the acquisition time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Pierre-Yves; Marty, Benjamin; Robert, Benjamin; Shukelovitch, Alexey; Carlier, Robert Y; Azzabou, Noura; Carlier, Pierre G

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, MRI has proven its usefulness for the diagnostic workup of patients with musculo-skeletal diseases, and also shown great promise as a non-invasive, quantitative outcome measure in clinical studies. The characterization of patterns of fatty degenerative lesions, which now plays an important part in the diagnosis of some diseases, is typically performed by the radiologist on routine T1-weighted images. We propose to rationalize acquisitions and reduce patients' time in the scanner by allowing radiologists to perform the qualitative grading of the muscles on images derived from fat/water acquisitions. These maps are color-coded, where the different colors correspond to classes of fatty infiltration degree. This allows a quick visual assessment of the muscles, equivalent to the standard method. Using the weighted Kappa agreement test, the agreement between the proposed method and the traditional one, as well as the reproducibility of the results with two raters, was measured on twenty patients suffering from various neuromuscular pathologies. The presented comparisons show that the use of color coded fat fraction maps is statistically equivalent to using the traditional T1-weighted images when performing visual assessment of degenerative lesions with fatty infiltrations in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dipyridamole thallium imaging may not be a reliable screening test for coronary artery disease in patients undergoing vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwick, T.H.; Underwood, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Dipyridamole thallium imaging has been proposed for cardiac risk stratification in patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgery. The purpose of this study was to define the benefit of this investigation in routine preoperative evaluation of these patients. The outcome of 86 patients undergoing vascular surgery procedures was examined in light of preoperative clinical assessment and dipyridamole SPECT thallium imaging (DST). Fifty-one patients (59%) were considered at high risk on clinical grounds, and 22 patients (26%) had perfusion defects. Ten patients suffered a perioperative coronary event, including unstable angina, myocardial infarction, or cardiac death. Seven of the patients with such events were among the 51 clinically high-risk subjects (14%). Three perioperative events occurred in the group of 19 patients with positive DST images who underwent surgery (16%), but the DST test failed to identify 7 patients who suffered coronary events. The frequency of abnormal thallium imaging was similar to the prevalence of angiographically significant coronary disease reported previously at this center, but considerably less than the rate of abnormal thallium imaging in past studies of vascular surgery patients. The application of the test to a low to moderate risk population is probably responsible for its lower predictive accuracy for coronary events. DST is not an ideal routine noninvasive technique for risk stratification in patients undergoing vascular surgery

  12. First results in postoperative functional imaging of parathyroid tissue with thallium-201-chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, K.D.; Michael, R.; Karsten, U.; Pietsch, P.; Brietzke, W.; Tredt, H.J.; Dabels, J.; Labes, K.

    1984-01-01

    On account of diagnostic uncertainties Se-75-methionine failed to become accepted clinically for detecting parathyroid adenomas. But recent reports in the literature suggested satisfactory results to be achieved with a double-nuclide technique using Thallium-201-chloride for parathyroid imaging. Data of 6 patients were evaluated to shed light on the usefulness of radio-Thallium for postoperative functional imaging of heterotopic parathyroid tissue. Analogous studies using Se-75-methionine had previously been carried out by other authors. Early results suggest the method to have clinical relavance. Four patients with cubital vein parathormone levels that were higher on the grafted versus the ungrafted side were found to have significantly elevated Tl-201 uptake in the region of the surgical scar on the forearm. Two patients with no or little difference in PTH concentrations between the 2 sides showed no or at best some slight activity increase. The place of this method as an alternative to differential cubital vein parathormone assaying still remains to be established. In view of the poor cubital veins of dialysis patients it appears to hold promises for assessing the function of parathyroid grafts in the forearm. (Author)

  13. Intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 SPECT imaging methodology, applications, and interpretations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockett, J.F.; Magill, H.L.; Loveless, V.S.; Murray, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Dipyridamole TI-201 imaging is an ideal alternative to exercise TI-201 scintigraphy in patients who are unwilling or unable to perform maximum exercise stress. The use of intravenous dipyridamole, alone or in combination with exercise, has not been approved for clinical practice by the Food and Drug Administration. Once approval is granted, the test will become a widely used and important component of the cardiac work-up. The indications, methodology, side effects, and utility of dipyridamole cardiac imaging in the clinical setting are discussed and a variety of examples presented.59 references

  14. Study on the Construction of a High-definition Whole-body Voxel Model based on Cadaver's Color Photographic Anatomical Slice Images and Monte Carlo Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun

    2007-08-01

    Ajou University School of Medicine made the serially sectioned anatomical images from the Visible Korean Human (VKH) Project in Korea. The VKH images, which are the high-resolution color photographic images, show the organs and tissues in the human body very clearly at 0.2 mm intervals. In this study, we constructed a high-quality voxel model (VKH-Man) with a total of 30 organs and tissues by manual and automatic segmentation method using the serially sectioned anatomical image data from the Visible Korean Human (VKH) project in Korea. The height and weight of VKH-Man voxel model is 164 cm and 57.6 kg, respectively, and the voxel resolution is 1.875 x 1.875 x 2 mm 3 . However, this voxel phantom can be used to calculate the organ and tissue doses of only one person. Therefore, in this study, we adjusted the voxel phantom to the 'Reference Korean' data to construct the voxel phantom that represents the radiation workers in Korea. The height and weight of the voxel model (HDRK-Man) that is finally developed are 171 cm and 68 kg, respectively, and the voxel resolution is 1.981 x 1.981 x 2.0854 mm 3 . VKH-Man and HDRK-Man voxel model were implemented in a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code for calculation of the organ and tissue doses in various irradiation geometries. The calculated values were compared with each other to see the effect of the adjustment and also compared with other computational models (KTMAN-2, ICRP-74 and VIP-Man). According to the results, the adjustment of the voxel model was found hardly affect the dose calculations and most of the organ and tissue equivalent doses showed some differences among the models. These results shows that the difference in figure, and organ topology affects the organ doses more than the organ size. The calculated values of the effective dose from VKH-Man and HDRK-Man according to the ICRP-60 and upcoming ICRP recommendation were compared. For the other radiation geometries (AP, LLAT, RLAT) except for PA

  15. HDRK-Woman: whole-body voxel model based on high-resolution color slice images of Korean adult female cadaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol; Ham, Bo Kyoung; Cho, Kun Woo; Hwang, Sung Bae

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we constructed a male reference Korean phantom; HDRK-Man (High-Definition Reference Korean-Man), to represent Korean adult males for radiation protection purposes. In the present study, a female phantom; HDRK-Woman (High-Definition Reference Korean-Woman), was constructed to represent Korean adult females. High-resolution color photographic images obtained by serial sectioning of a 26 year-old Korean adult female cadaver were utilized. The body height and weight, the skeletal mass, and the dimensions of the individual organs and tissues were adjusted to the reference Korean data. The phantom was then compared with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) female reference phantom in terms of calculated organ doses and organ-depth distributions. Additionally, the effective doses were calculated using both the HDRK-Man and HDRK-Woman phantoms, and the values were compared with those of the ICRP reference phantoms.

  16. HDRK-Woman: whole-body voxel model based on high-resolution color slice images of Korean adult female cadaver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Ham, Bo Kyoung; Cho, Kun Woo; Hwang, Sung Bae

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study, we constructed a male reference Korean phantom; HDRK-Man (High-Definition Reference Korean-Man), to represent Korean adult males for radiation protection purposes. In the present study, a female phantom; HDRK-Woman (High-Definition Reference Korean-Woman), was constructed to represent Korean adult females. High-resolution color photographic images obtained by serial sectioning of a 26 year-old Korean adult female cadaver were utilized. The body height and weight, the skeletal mass, and the dimensions of the individual organs and tissues were adjusted to the reference Korean data. The phantom was then compared with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) female reference phantom in terms of calculated organ doses and organ-depth distributions. Additionally, the effective doses were calculated using both the HDRK-Man and HDRK-Woman phantoms, and the values were compared with those of the ICRP reference phantoms. (paper)

  17. Dual isotopes imaging in whole-body autoradiography (WBARG). Distribution of 14C-benzo-a-pyrene and 113Sn-tributyltin in mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, H.H.P.; Ribeiro, C.A.O.; Rouleau, Claude; Desbiens, Isabelle; Pelletier, Emillien

    2016-01-01

    Tissue distributions of 14 C-BaP and 113 Sn-TBT, individually and together, were compared in mummichog by WBARG, after forced-feeding or intraperitoneal injection. Electron differential absorption (EDA) by metal foil was tested to visualize the distribution of 14 C and 113 Sn in tissue sections of animals exposed to both radiochemicals. Distribution of 14 C and 113 Sn in fish did not differ as a function of exposure route, but 14 C liver/blood and bile/ blood concentration ratios were lower in fish dosed with BaP + TBT. EDA allowed a clear differentiation of 14 C and 113 Sn signals and could be used to image other radionuclides pairs. (author)

  18. HDRK-Woman: whole-body voxel model based on high-resolution color slice images of Korean adult female cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Han, Min Cheol; Ham, Bo Kyoung; Cho, Kun Woo; Hwang, Sung Bae

    2014-07-21

    In a previous study, we constructed a male reference Korean phantom; HDRK-Man (High-Definition Reference Korean-Man), to represent Korean adult males for radiation protection purposes. In the present study, a female phantom; HDRK-Woman (High-Definition Reference Korean-Woman), was constructed to represent Korean adult females. High-resolution color photographic images obtained by serial sectioning of a 26 year-old Korean adult female cadaver were utilized. The body height and weight, the skeletal mass, and the dimensions of the individual organs and tissues were adjusted to the reference Korean data. The phantom was then compared with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) female reference phantom in terms of calculated organ doses and organ-depth distributions. Additionally, the effective doses were calculated using both the HDRK-Man and HDRK-Woman phantoms, and the values were compared with those of the ICRP reference phantoms.

  19. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in children with heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitomori, Toshihiro; Ono, Yasuo; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kozuka, Takahiro; Kohata, Tohru; Tanimoto, Takeshi.

    1985-01-01

    201-TlCl myocardial imaging studies were performed to evaluate systolic pressure of right ventricle on 107 patients including 89 patients with congenital cardiac disease, patients with primary pulmonary hypertension and 13 patients with history of MCLS with the age range of 2 months to 17 years. The congenital cardiac disease group included 30 patients with tetralogy of Fallot, 8 patients with pulmonary stenosis (included 1 patient with double chambered right ventricle), 20 patients with ventricular septal defect, 10 patients with patent ductus arteriosus, 9 patients with atrial septal defect and 12 patients with complete transposition of greate arteries. None of the patients with history of MCLS had coronary involvement. 50 μCi/kg of 201-TlCl was infused intravenously and after 15 minutes the images were obtained from 5 directions (anterior, LAO 30, LAO 45, LAO 60 and lateral). The angle was determined to demonstrate the intraventricular septum and ventricular free walls cleary separated. The image of end-diastolic phase was obtained with ECG syncronized gated method from that direction. The ROI (region of interest) was defined as a slice line by drawing two lines perpendicular to the septum and the counts of the left and right ventricular free wall (Cl and Cr) were analized to evaluate the pressure of right ventricle. The pressure of ventricles were obtained by cardiac catheterization performed at the same time with myocardial imaging. The ratio of Cl and Cr (Cr/Cl) had good correlation with the ratio of peak systolic pressure of left ventricle and right ventricle (regression equation Y=0.84X+0.08, r=0.87). In each congenital heart disease group, very good corelation was also demonstrated (Y=1.46X-0.30, r=0.96 in PS ; Y=0.70X0.20, r=0.91 in VSD ; Y=0.86X+0.15, r=0.78 in ASD and Y=0.72X+0.24, r=0.80 in PDA). Thus 201-TlCl myocardial imaging was useful method to evaluate right ventricular pressure noninvasively in congenital cardiac disease. (author)

  20. Myocardial imaging with thallium-201: an experimental model for analysis of the true myocardial and background image components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narahara, K.A.; Hamilton, G.W.; Williams, D.L.; Gould, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The true myocardial and background components of a resting thallium-201 myocardial image were determined in an experimental dog model. True background was determined by imaging after the heart had been removed and replaced with a water-filled balloon of equal size and shape. In all studies, the background estimated from the region surrounding the heart exceeded true background activity. Furthermore, the relationship between true myocardial background and that estimated from the pericardiac region was inconsistent. Background estimates based on the activity surrounding the heart were not accurate predictors of true background activity

  1. HDRK-Man: a whole-body voxel model based on high-resolution color slice images of a Korean adult male cadaver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Lee, Choonsik; Chung, Min Suk

    2008-01-01

    A Korean voxel model, named 'High-Definition Reference Korean-Man (HDRK-Man)', was constructed using high-resolution color photographic images that were obtained by serially sectioning the cadaver of a 33-year-old Korean adult male. The body height and weight, the skeletal mass and the dimensions of the individual organs and tissues were adjusted to the reference Korean data. The resulting model was then implemented into a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNPX, to calculate the dose conversion coefficients for the internal organs and tissues. The calculated values, overall, were reasonable in comparison with the values from other adult voxel models. HDRK-Man showed higher dose conversion coefficients than other models, due to the facts that HDRK-Man has a smaller torso and that the arms of HDRK-Man are shifted backward. The developed model is believed to adequately represent average Korean radiation workers and thus can be used for more accurate calculation of dose conversion coefficients for Korean radiation workers in the future

  2. HDRK-Man: a whole-body voxel model based on high-resolution color slice images of a Korean adult male cadaver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyoun [Department of radiation oncology, Inha University, 7-206, 3-ga, Shinheumg-dong, Jung-gu, Incheon, 400-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chung, Min Suk [Department of Anatomy, Ajou University School of Medicine, San 5 Wonchon-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr

    2008-08-07

    A Korean voxel model, named 'High-Definition Reference Korean-Man (HDRK-Man)', was constructed using high-resolution color photographic images that were obtained by serially sectioning the cadaver of a 33-year-old Korean adult male. The body height and weight, the skeletal mass and the dimensions of the individual organs and tissues were adjusted to the reference Korean data. The resulting model was then implemented into a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNPX, to calculate the dose conversion coefficients for the internal organs and tissues. The calculated values, overall, were reasonable in comparison with the values from other adult voxel models. HDRK-Man showed higher dose conversion coefficients than other models, due to the facts that HDRK-Man has a smaller torso and that the arms of HDRK-Man are shifted backward. The developed model is believed to adequately represent average Korean radiation workers and thus can be used for more accurate calculation of dose conversion coefficients for Korean radiation workers in the future.

  3. Assessment of myocardial viability by dynamic tomographic iodine 123 iodophenylpentadecanoic acid imaging: comparison with rest-redistribution thallium 201 imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandrian, A S; Powers, J; Cave, V; Wasserleben, V; Cassell, D; Heo, J

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the ability of dynamic 123I-labeled iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) imaging to detect myocardial viability in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction caused by coronary artery disease. Serial 180-degree single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images (five sets, 8 minutes each) were obtained starting 4 minutes after injection of 2 to 6 mCi 123I at rest in 21 patients with LV dysfunction (ejection fraction [EF] 34% +/- 11%). The segmental uptake was compared with that of rest-redistribution 201Tl images (20 segments/study). The number of perfusion defects (reversible and fixed) was similar by IPPA and thallium (11 +/- 5 vs 10 +/- 5 segments/patient; difference not significant). There was agreement between IPPA and thallium for presence or absence (kappa = 0.78 +/- 0.03) and nature (reversible, mild fixed, or severe fixed) of perfusion defects (kappa = 0.54 +/- 0.04). However, there were more reversible IPPA defects than reversible thallium defects (7 +/- 4 vs 3 +/- 4 segments/patient; p = 0.001). In 14 patients the EF (by gated pool imaging) improved after coronary revascularization from 33% +/- 11% to 39% +/- 12% (p = 0.002). The number of reversible IPPA defects was greater in the seven patients who had improvement in EF than in the patients without such improvement (10 +/- 4 vs 5 +/- 4 segments/patient; p = 0.075). 123I-labeled IPPA SPECT imaging is a promising new technique for assessment of viability. Reversible defects predict recovery of LV dysfunction after coronary revascularization.

  4. Prognostic value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Guiney, T.E.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate prognostic information is important in determining optimal management of patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain. In this study, the ability of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging to predict future cardiac events (cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) was correlated with clinical, coronary and left ventricular angiographic and exercise electrocardiographic data in 139 consecutive, nonsurgically managed patients followed-up over a 3 to 5 year period (mean follow-up, 3.7 +/- 0.9), using a logistic regression analysis. Among patients without prior myocardial infarction (100 of 139), the number of myocardial segments with transient thallium-201 defects was the only statistically significant predictor of future cardiac events when all patient variables were evaluated. Among patients with myocardial infarction before evaluation (39 of 139), angiographic ejection fraction was the only significant predictor of future cardiac events when all variables were considered. This study suggests an approach to evaluate the risk of future cardiac events in patients with possible ischemic heart disease

  5. Whole-body biodistribution and radiation dosimetry in monkeys and humans of the phosphodiesterase 4 radioligand [11C](R)-rolipram: comparison of two-dimensional planar, bisected and quadrisected image analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague, David R.; Fujita, Masahiro; Ryu, Yong Hoon; Liow, Jeih-San; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: [ 11 C](R)-Rolipram is a selective radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of phosphodiesterase 4, an enzyme that metabolizes 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate. The aim of this study was to estimate the human radiation absorbed dose of the radioligand based on its biodistribution in both monkeys and humans. Methods: Whole-body PET images were acquired for 2 h after injecting [ 11 C](R)-rolipram in eight healthy humans and three monkeys. The simple method of using a single two-dimensional (2D) planar image was compared to more time-consuming methods that used two (bisected) or four (quadrisected) tomographic images in the anteroposterior direction. Results: Effective dose was 4.8 μGy/MBq based on 2D planar images. The effective dose was only slightly lower by 1% and 5% using the bisected and quadrisected images, respectively. Nevertheless, the two tomographic methods may have more accurately estimated the exposure of some organs (e.g., kidneys) that are asymmetrically located in the body or have radioactivity that appears to overlap on 2D planar images. Monkeys had a different biodistribution pattern compared to humans (e.g., greater urinary excretion) such that their data overestimated the effective dose in humans by 40%. Conclusions: The effective dose of [ 11 C](R)-rolipram was modest and comparable to that of other 11 C-labeled radioligands. The simple and far less time-consuming 2D planar method provided accurate and somewhat more conservative estimates of effective dose than the two tomographic methods. Although monkeys are commonly used to estimate human radiation exposures, their data gave a considerable overestimation for this radioligand

  6. Segmentation and visual analysis of whole-body mouse skeleton microSPECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelinskii, A.; Groen, H.C.; De Jong, M.; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.

    2012-01-01

    Whole-body SPECT small animal imaging is used to study cancer, and plays an important role in the development of new drugs. Comparing and exploring whole-body datasets can be a difficult and time-consuming task due to the inherent heterogeneity of the data (high volume/throughput, multi-modality,

  7. Segmentation and Visual Analysis of Whole-Body Mouse Skeleton microSPECT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Khmelinskii (Artem); H.C. Groen (Harald); M. Baiker (Martin); M. de Jong (Marion); B.P.F. Lelieveldt (Boudewijn)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWhole-body SPECT small animal imaging is used to study cancer, and plays an important role in the development of new drugs. Comparing and exploring whole-body datasets can be a difficult and time-consuming task due to the inherent heterogeneity of the data (high volume/throughput,

  8. Thallium-201 infusion imaging and quantitation of experimental reactive hyperemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazraki, N.; Kralios, A.C.; Wooten, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate quantitation of coronary artery blood flow may be important complimentary information to percent vessel stenosis determined by coronary angiography. Whether T1-201 can be used to identify and quantify rapid changes in blood flow through a major coronary artery was examined experimentally in open chest dogs with a cannulated, servoperfursed circumflex or left anterior descending coronary artery at a constant coronary perfusion pressure of 80mmHg. Blood flow with T1-201 (5 μCi/cc of blood) through the coronary artery was continuously recorded using a tubular electromagnetic flow probe. A mobile scintillation camera interfaced to a nuclear medicine computer was used to image and record myocardial count accumulation plotted as a function of time during the T1-201 infusion. Blood flow was calculated as the slope of myocardial count accumulation against time. Simulating total occlusion, perfusion was stopped for several 20 sec. periods to elicit reactive hyperemic responses. The changes in flow as measured by the flow probe, and by T1-201 were compared. Results demonstrated that scintillation camera recordings depicted coronary flow changes with a high degree of correlation to electromagnetic flow probe recordings (r = 0.85). Reactive hyperemia reaching a three-fold increase in flow was accurately demonstrated by a three-fold increase in slope of the T1-201 counts plotted against time. Any flow change by T1-201 corresponded in time to detection of similar flow changes by flow probe recordings. These findings support further development of this technique for eventual clinical use

  9. Correction for patient and organ movement in SPECT: application to exercise thallium-201 cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geckle, W.J.; Frank, T.L.; Links, J.M.; Becker, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a technique for correction of artifacts in exercise 201 Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images arising from abrupt or gradual translational movement of the heart during acquisition. The procedure involves the tracking of the center of the heart in serial projection images using an algorithm which we call diverging squares. Each projection image is then realigned in the x-y plane so that the heart center conforms to the projected position of a fixed point in space. The shifted projections are reconstructed using the normal filtered backprojection algorithm. In validation studies, the motion correction procedure successfully eliminated movement artifacts in a heart phantom. Image quality was also improved in over one-half of 36 exercise thallium patient studies. The corrected images had smoother and more continuous left ventricular walls, greater clarity of the left ventricular cavity, and reduced streak artifacts. Rest injected or redistribution images, however, were often made worse, due to reduced heart to liver activity ratios and poor tracking of the heart center. Analysis of curves of heart position versus projection angle suggests that translation of the heart is common during imaging after exercise, and results from both abrupt patient movements, and a gradual upward shift of the heart. Our motion correction technique appears to represent a promising new approach for elimination of movement artifacts and enhancement of resolution in exercise 201 Tl cardiac SPECT images

  10. Tomographic and whole body imaging table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a scanning nuclear camera apparatus. A camera head for converting radiation from a subject into output signals indicative thereof; a subject supporting top having a head end, a foot end, and first and second sides; a gantry means for supporting and selectively moving the camera head longitudinally along upper and lower surfaces of the top, and peripherally around a central portion and the head end of the top; and an undercarriage for supporting the top without interfering with the movement of the camera head and without interfering with reception by the camera head of radiation events emanating from the supported subject during the peripheral movement of the camera head

  11. Phospholipid Topography of Whole-Body Sections of the Anopheles stephensi Mosquito, Characterized by High-Resolution Atmospheric-Pressure Scanning Microprobe Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Saleh M; Römpp, Andreas; Pretzel, Jette; Becker, Katja; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-11-17

    High-resolution atmospheric-pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) has been employed to study the molecular anatomical structure of rodent malaria vector Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. A dedicated sample preparation method was developed which suits both, the special tissue properties of the sample and the requirements of high-resolution MALDI imaging. Embedding in 5% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was used to maintain the tissue integrity of the whole mosquitoes, being very soft, fragile, and difficult to handle. Individual lipid compounds, specifically representing certain cell types, tissue areas, or organs, were detected and imaged in 20 μm-thick whole-body tissue sections at a spatial resolution of 12 μm per image pixel. Mass spectrometric data and information quality were based on a mass resolution of 70,000 (at m/z 200) and a mass accuracy of better than 2 ppm in positive-ion mode on an orbital trapping mass spectrometer. A total of 67 imaged lipids were assigned by database search and, in a number of cases, identified via additional MS/MS fragmentation studies directly from tissue. This is the first MSI study at 12 μm spatial resolution of the malaria vector Anopheles. The study provides insights into the molecular anatomy of Anopheles stephensi and the distribution and localization of major classes of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. These data can be a basis for future experiments, investigating, e.g., the metabolism of Plasmodium-infected and -uninfected Anopheles mosquitoes.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion and cardiac enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Nagata, Seiki; Sakakibara, Hiroshi

    1988-05-01

    Gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion, and 12 patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abnormal thickening of the septal wall and normal left ventricular dimensions, while the patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy had focal wall thinning (usually involving the apical-septal wall) and dilated left ventricle in addition to hypertrophied heart. The quantitative measurement for cardiac dimensions using MRI was similar to that found on echocardiography in all cases. In addition, inhomogeneous signal intensities at left ventricular wall were observed in 3 cases of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may suggest the existence of myocardial fibrosis. Gated MRI should be performed for early detection and follow-up of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, since some patients will progress from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to dilated cardiomyopathy.

  13. Simultaneous low level treadmill exercise and intravenous dipyridamole stress thallium imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casale, P.N.; Guiney, T.E.; Strauss, H.W.; Boucher, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Intravenous dipyridamole-thallium imaging unmasks ischemia in patients unable to exercise adequately. However, some of these patients can perform limited exercise, which, if added, may provide useful information. Treadmill exercise combined with dipyridamole-thallium imaging was performed in 100 patients and results compared with those of 100 other blindly age- and sex-matched patients who received dipyridamole alone. Exercise began after completion of the dipyridamole infusion. Mean +/- 1 standard deviation peak heart rate (109 +/- 19 vs 83 +/- 12 beats/min, p less than 0.0001) and peak systolic and diastolic blood pressure (146 +/- 28/77 +/- 14 vs 125 +/- 24/68 +/- 11 mm Hg, p less than 0.0001) were higher in the exercise group compared with the nonexercise group. There was no difference in the occurrence of chest pain, but more patients in the exercise group developed ST-segment depression (26 vs 12%, p less than 0.0001). The exercise group had fewer noncardiac side effects (4 vs 12%, p less than 0.01) and a higher target (heart) to background (liver) count ratio (2.1 +/- 0.7 vs 1.2 +/- 0.3; p less than 0.01), due to fewer liver counts. There were no deaths, myocardial infarctions or sustained arrhythmias in either group. Combined treadmill exercise and dipyridamole testing is safe, associated with fewer noncardiac side effects, a higher target to background ratio and a higher incidence of clinical electrocardiographic ischemia than dipyridamole alone. Therefore, it is recommended whenever possible

  14. Signal characteristics of focal bone marrow lesions in patients with multiple myeloma using whole body T1w-TSE, T2w-STIR and diffusion-weighted imaging with background suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregor; Bongartz, Georg; Winter, Leopold [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Klarhoefer, Markus; Lenz, Claudia; Scheffler, Klaus [University of Basel Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-04-15

    This study analyses the diagnostic potential of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Background Suppression (DWIBS) in the detection of focal bone marrow lesions from multiple myeloma. The signal and contrast properties of DWIBS are evaluated in correlation with the serum concentration of M-component (MC) and compared with established T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Data from 103 consecutive studies in 81 patients are analysed retrospectively. Signal intensities and apparent Diffusion Coefficients (ADC) of 79 focal lesions in the lumbar spine or pelvis of 38 patients are determined and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) is calculated. Data from patients with low (<20 g/L) and high (>20 g/dL) MC are evaluated separately. Signal intensities of focal myeloma lesions on T2w-STIR vary significantly depending on the MC, which leads to a loss in CNR in patients with high MC. No signal variation is observed for T1w-TSE and DWIBS. The CNR values provided by DWIBS in patients with high MC are slightly higher than those of T2w-STIR. ADC values in patients with low MC are significantly higher than in patients with high MC. Whole-body DWIBS has the potential to improve the conspicuity of focal myeloma lesions and provides additional biological information by ADC quantification. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of diagnostic value of coronary artery disease between ATP-stress and exercise-stress thallium myocardial SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeo

    1994-01-01

    A study was made between adenosine triphosphate disodium (ATP)-stress thallium myocardial scintigrams and exercise-stress scintigrams to compare their respective extents and degree of defects. The subjects of the study were 33 ischemic heart disease patients, who received ATP stress and treadmill exercise stress with a mean interval of 25 days. ATP was infused for 5 minutes with an infusion rate of 0.16 or 0.18 mg per kg of body weight per minute. Thallium was injected three minutes after infusion. The percent-defect index (percentage of the extent and degree of the defects for all 33 patients), was calculated with visual scoring using a five-zone myocardial division method and semi-quantitative four-grade representation method for both the ATP and exercise SPECT images. The extent of the defects in ATP- and exercise-stress images was 51.5% and 44.2%, and that in redistribution images was 36.4% and 33.9%, respectively. The degree of defects in ATP- and exercise-stress images was 35.8% and 32.3%, while that in redistribution images was 20.8% and 17.2%, respectively (p=NS in all cases). In conclusion, the image quality of thallium SPECT with ATP stress was equivalent that of exercise stress, indicating identical diagnostic values for coronary lesions. (author)

  16. Left ventricular aneurysm in short axis: a comparison of magnetic resonance, ultrasound and thallium-201 SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Johnson, R.F. Jr.; Fawcett, H.D.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    Short axis magnetic resonance images of a left ventricular aneurysm were compared to similar views obtained by echocardiography and by thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography. Images of the dyskinetic left ventricular apex and the contractile left ventricular base were analyzed and compared. Unlike the previously reported orthogonal plane magnetic resonance images, short axis imaging provided representative and quantitative information in views comparable to those obtained by standard noninvasive imaging techniques. These data indicate that short axis magnetic resonance imaging is capable of identifying and sizing the aneurysmal and the residual segments of the left ventricle. The findings may be of prognostic value in patients with left ventricular aneurysm

  17. Comparison of {sup 131}I whole-body imaging, {sup 131}I SPECT/CT, and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of metastatic thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Chong, Ari; Kim, Jahae; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Song, Ho-Chun; Bom, Hee-Seung [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Medicine Research Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Byung-Hyun; Hong, Sun-Pyo; Yoo, Su-Woong [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Medicine Research Center, Hwasun, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Yeon [Dongguk University, Department of Chemistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Medicine Research Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung-Joon [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Medicine Research Center, Hwasun, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Center for Biomedical Human Resources at Chonnam National University, Brain Korea 21 Project, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to compare {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS), WBS with {sup 131}I single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of distant metastases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). A total of 140 patients with 258 foci of suspected distant metastases were evaluated. {sup 131}I WBS, {sup 131}I SPECT/CT, and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images were interpreted separately. The final diagnosis was obtained from histopathologic study, serum thyroglobulin level, other imaging modalities, and/or clinical follow-up. Of the 140 patients with 258 foci, 46 patients with 166 foci were diagnosed as positive for distant metastasis. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each imaging modality were 65, 55, and 59%, respectively, for {sup 131}I WBS; 65, 95, and 85% for {sup 131}I SPECT/CT, respectively; and 61, 98, and 86%, respectively, for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patient-based analyses. Lesion-based analyses demonstrated that both SPECT/CT and PET/CT were superior to WBS (p<0.001) in all patient groups. SPECT/CT was superior to WBS and PET/CT (p<0.001) in patients who received a single challenge of radioiodine therapy, whereas PET/CT was superior to WBS (p=0.005) and SPECT/CT (p=0.013) in patients who received multiple challenges. Both SPECT/CT and PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic performance in detecting metastatic thyroid cancer. SPECT/CT was highly accurate in patients who underwent a single challenge of radioiodine therapy. In contrast, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT presented the highest diagnostic performance in patients who underwent multiple challenges of radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  18. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  19. Myocardial imaging by direct injection of thallium-201 into coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Hiroki; Inagaki, Suetsugu; Kubota, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion images were evaluated by direct injection of Thallium (Tl)-201 into coronary artery. Approximately 0.5 - 1 mCi of Tl-201 were instilled into the right coronary artery and/or the left coronary artery after coronary arteriography. Three images were obtained in the anterior, left anterior oblique and left lateral projections. Myocardial perfusion images of single photon emission computed tomography were also acquired in some patients. An image of supreme quality could be obtained in spite of small dose of Tl-201 since there was a lack of interference from background activity. Myocardial perfusion images corresponded to areas which were supplied by left or right coronary artery respectively. And the regional myocardial blood flow distribution of a coronary artery bypass graft could be revealed by instilling Tl-201 into the graft. Further, contribution of collateral channels to myocardial perfusion was showed. Not only left ventricle but also right ventricle was clearly visualized by injection of Tl-201 into right coronary artery. But in a case with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, there was an area of decreased tracer uptake in the apex of the right ventricle which was identified as the site of dysplasia by electrophysiologic study. We conclude that direct injection of Tl-201 into coronary artery is an useful method to clarify the correlation between coronary anatomical findings and coronary perfusion and contribution of collaterals to myocardial perfusion, and also to detect the right ventricular myopathic site. (author)

  20. Whole-body monitoring: Goiania case, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.N. de; Lourenco, M.C.; Dantas, B.M.; Lucena, E.A. de; Becker, P.H.B.

    1988-01-01

    Due to the radiological Cs accident in Goiania, Goias in September 1987, it became necessary to evaluate internal contamination levels of: individuals from the general public that for any reason had direct or indirect involvement with the radioactive source (group 1); occupationally involved persons (group 2). For each of these groups, procedures of whole body monitoring were developped. In order to attend group 1 individuals, the IRD/CNEN installed a whole body unit in the INAMPS General Hospital of Goiania in 11.08.87, which was later transferred to 121, 57 street, Central Sector in Goiania in 2.06.88. In this unit 547 people were monitored, 356 from group 1 and 241 from group 2, until 04.13.88. In the IRD whole body counter installation, 194 individuals were counted, 185 from group 2 and 9 from group 1. The frequency of monitoring of each individual was stablished according to the Cs activity present in the body or to the job that will be done. Some body burden activity curves for Cs 137 as a function of the time elapsed from the first measurement, are presented. There people from group 1 were measured in both counters, the IRD and the Goiania ones. The values obtained in both installations are compatible with the body activity X time curve. (author) [pt

  1. The pacing stress test: thallium-201 myocardial imaging after atrial pacing. Diagnostic value in detecting coronary artery disease compared with exercise testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, G.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Parker, J.A.; McKay, R.G.; Silverman, K.J.; Als, A.V.; Come, P.C.; Kolodny, G.M.; Grossman, W.

    1984-01-01

    Many patients suspected of having coronary artery disease are unable to undergo adequate exercise testing. An alternate stress, pacing tachycardia, has been shown to produce electrocardiographic changes that are as sensitive and specific as those observed during exercise testing. To compare thallium-201 imaging after atrial pacing stress with thallium imaging after exercise stress, 22 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were studied with both standard exercise thallium imaging and pacing thallium imaging. Positive ischemic electrocardiographic changes (greater than 1 mm ST segment depression) were noted in 11 of 16 patients with coronary artery disease during exercise, and in 15 of the 16 patients during atrial pacing. One of six patients with normal or trivial coronary artery disease had a positive electrocardiogram with each test. Exercise thallium imaging was positive in 13 of 16 patients with coronary artery disease compared with 15 of 16 patients during atrial pacing. Three of six patients without coronary artery disease had a positive scan with exercise testing, and two of these same patients developed a positive scan with atrial pacing. Of those patients with coronary artery disease and an abnormal scan, 85% showed redistribution with exercise testing compared with 87% during atrial pacing. Segment by segment comparison of thallium imaging after either atrial pacing or exercise showed that there was a good correlation of the location and severity of the thallium defects (r . 0.83, p . 0.0001, Spearman rank correlation). It is concluded that the location and presence of both fixed and transient thallium defects after atrial pacing are closely correlated with the findings after exercise testing

  2. Comparison of early thallium-201 scintigraphy and gated blood pool imaging for predicting mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, L.C.; Silverman, K.J.; Bulkley, B.H.; Kallman, C.H.; Mellits, E.D.; Weisfeldt, M.

    1983-01-01

    The extent of abnormality in early thallium-201 and gated cardiac blood pool scintigrams has been reported to be useful for predicting mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To compare the two techniques, 91 patients admitted consecutively with evident or strongly suspected AMI underwent both imaging studies within 15 hours of the onset of symptoms. Patients with pulmonary edema or shock were excluded. AMI developed in 84% of patients, and 6-month mortality for the entire group was 16%. A thallium defect score of 7.0 or greater identified a subgroup of 14 patients with 64% 6-month mortality rate. Similarly, a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% or less identified a high-risk subgroup of 10 patients with a 6-month mortality of 60%. Mortality in the remaining patients was 8% for thallium score less than 7 and 11% for ejection fraction greater than 35%. The mortality rate was highest among patients who had concordant high-risk scintigrams (five of six, 83%), lowest in those with concordant low-risk studies (five of 64, 8%) and intermediate in those with discordant results (four of 11, 36%). Of a number of clinical variables, only the appearance of Q waves, peak creatine kinase greater than 1000 IU/I, and history of infarction were significantly associated with mortality. High-risk thallium or blood pool scintigraphic results were significantly more predictive and a thallium score of 7 or greater was more sensitive for detecting nonsurvivors than ejection fraction 35% or less at a similar level of specificity

  3. Value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients with diagnostic and nondiagnostic exercise electrocardiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Segal, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The role of exercise imaging with thallium-201 in the evaluation of patients suspected of having coronary artery disease was studied in 194 patients undergoing diagnostic coronary arteriography. Ninety-eight patients had 70 percent or more narrowing of one or more coronary vessels and 96 patients had either no or insignificant coronary artery disease. One hundren twenty-three of the 194 patients had conclusive treadmill exercise electrocardiograms (either positive or negative), and 71 had inconclusive exercise electrocardiograms. The specificity of exercise imaging (97 percent) was higher than that of exercise electrocardiograms (86 percent, p less than 0.02). The specificity of both tests combined was not significantly different from that of exercise electrocardiograms alone. The sensitivity (79 percent) and specificity (95 percent) of exercise imaging were not significantly different in patients with inconclusive exercise electrocardiograms when compared with those in patients whose exercise electrocardiograms were conclusive. These data indicate that exercise imaging is sensitive and specific in diagnosing coronary artery disease in the presence of diagnostic as well as nondiagnostic exercise electrocardiograms and that propranolol therapy does not affect the results

  4. Pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics of some thallium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tultaev, A.V.; Tarasenko, Yu.I.; Popov, V.I.; Korsunskij, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is studied, radiation doses to patients when using domestic thallium-201 chloride in diagnosis of the heart ischemic disease is estimated; contribution into the total dose of thallium-201 (1.5 %), thallium-201 (0.2 %) and lead-201 + lead-203 (0.05 %) radionuclide impurities is also determined. Internal doses were estimated for a heterogeneous phantom of a standard man; the calculations were carried out using a computer. Scanning of patients which were treated with radiopharmaceuticals to be diagnosed was carried out using a whole body counter and gamma-chamber. Large intestine, kidneys and thyroid are the critical organs when using thallium-201 chloride. The highest contribution into the dose to organs and the whole body from thallium-200 and thallium-202 impurities being contained in thallium-201, doesn't exceed 8.6 %. The contribution into the dose from lead-201 and lead-203 may be ignored. Doses from thallium-199 preparation per activity unit are ∼10 times less in comparison with those from thallium-201. 19 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs

  5. Whole-body gene expression pattern registration in Platynereis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadulina, Albina; Panzera, Aurora; Verasztó, Csaba; Liebig, Christian; Jékely, Gáspár

    2012-12-03

    Digital anatomical atlases are increasingly used in order to depict different gene expression patterns and neuronal morphologies within a standardized reference template. In evo-devo, a discipline in which the comparison of gene expression patterns is a widely used approach, such standardized anatomical atlases would allow a more rigorous assessment of the conservation of and changes in gene expression patterns during micro- and macroevolutionary time scales. Due to its small size and invariant early development, the annelid Platynereis dumerilii is particularly well suited for such studies. Recently a reference template with registered gene expression patterns has been generated for the anterior part (episphere) of the Platynereis trochophore larva and used for the detailed study of neuronal development. Here we introduce and evaluate a method for whole-body gene expression pattern registration for Platynereis trochophore and nectochaete larvae based on whole-mount in situ hybridization, confocal microscopy, and image registration. We achieved high-resolution whole-body scanning using the mounting medium 2,2'-thiodiethanol (TDE), which allows the matching of the refractive index of the sample to that of glass and immersion oil thereby reducing spherical aberration and improving depth penetration. This approach allowed us to scan entire whole-mount larvae stained with nitroblue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (NBT/BCIP) in situ hybridization and counterstained fluorescently with an acetylated-tubulin antibody and the nuclear stain 4'6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Due to the submicron isotropic voxel size whole-mount larvae could be scanned in any orientation. Based on the whole-body scans, we generated four different reference templates by the iterative registration and averaging of 40 individual image stacks using either the acetylated-tubulin or the nuclear-stain signal for each developmental stage. We then registered to these templates the

  6. Whole-body gene expression pattern registration in Platynereis larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadulina Albina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital anatomical atlases are increasingly used in order to depict different gene expression patterns and neuronal morphologies within a standardized reference template. In evo-devo, a discipline in which the comparison of gene expression patterns is a widely used approach, such standardized anatomical atlases would allow a more rigorous assessment of the conservation of and changes in gene expression patterns during micro- and macroevolutionary time scales. Due to its small size and invariant early development, the annelid Platynereis dumerilii is particularly well suited for such studies. Recently a reference template with registered gene expression patterns has been generated for the anterior part (episphere of the Platynereis trochophore larva and used for the detailed study of neuronal development. Results Here we introduce and evaluate a method for whole-body gene expression pattern registration for Platynereis trochophore and nectochaete larvae based on whole-mount in situ hybridization, confocal microscopy, and image registration. We achieved high-resolution whole-body scanning using the mounting medium 2,2’-thiodiethanol (TDE, which allows the matching of the refractive index of the sample to that of glass and immersion oil thereby reducing spherical aberration and improving depth penetration. This approach allowed us to scan entire whole-mount larvae stained with nitroblue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (NBT/BCIP in situ hybridization and counterstained fluorescently with an acetylated-tubulin antibody and the nuclear stain 4’6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI. Due to the submicron isotropic voxel size whole-mount larvae could be scanned in any orientation. Based on the whole-body scans, we generated four different reference templates by the iterative registration and averaging of 40 individual image stacks using either the acetylated-tubulin or the nuclear-stain signal for each developmental

  7. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in young adults with anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moodie, D.S.; Cook, S.A.; Gill, C.C.; Napoli, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (Bland-Garland-White syndrome) may produce myocardial ischemia, infarction, and frequently death in infancy. Some patients, however, develop satisfactory coronary artery collaterals and are relatively asymptomatic into adulthood. Very little is known about their myocardial perfusion patterns. We studied three young adults with this condition using stress thallium-201 myocardial imaging. Electrocardiograms in two patients demonstrated old arterolateral myocardial infarctions. Preoperative stress exercise tests were positive in all three patients. Marked perfusion abnormalities were found in the proximal anterolateral wall in all patients, and one patient also had a posterolateral defect. Postoperatively, all stress tests returned to normal. Thallium imaging demonstrated improvement in ischemic areas, but old scars persisted

  8. Whole-Body MRI versus PET in assessment of multiple myeloma disease activity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shortt, Conor P

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare FDG PET; whole-body MRI; and the reference standard, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, to determine the best imaging technique for assessment of disease activity in multiple myeloma.

  9. Whole-body MRI using a sliding table and repositioning surface coil approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas; Luijten, Peter; Kibune, Satoshi; Ochiai, Reiji; Sakamoto, Tetsuro; Niwa, Tetsu; Van Cauteren, Marc

    2010-01-01

    To introduce and assess a new way of performing whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a non-integrated surface coil approach as available on most clinical MRI systems worldwide. Ten consecutive asymptomatic subjects prospectively underwent whole-body MRI for health screening. Whole-body MRI included T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted sequences, and was performed using a non-integrated surface coil to image four different stations without patient repositioning. The four separately acquired stations were merged, creating seamless coronal whole-body T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted images. Anatomical alignment, image quality at the boundaries of adjacent stations, and overall image quality of all stations were qualitatively assessed. The average time (±SD) taken to change the surface coil from one station to the next station was 53.8 (±7.1) s. The average total extra examination time ± SD was 2 min 41.4 s (±15.3 s). Anatomical alignment, image quality at the boundaries of adjacent stations, and overall image quality of all stations of T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted whole-body MRI were overall graded as ''good'' to ''excellent''. This study shows that a time-efficient and high-quality whole-body MRI examination can easily be performed by using a non-integrated sliding surface coil approach. (orig.)

  10. Whole body measurements in Bavarian school children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmier, H.; Berg, D.

    1992-12-01

    On behalf of the Bavarian State Ministry for State Development and Environmental Affairs measurements were conducted using the whole body counters at the Institute for Radiation Hygiene (of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection), and the Institute for Radiation Biology (of the GSF Research Centre for Environment and Health). Between September 1988 and July 1990 about 1600 school children from all over Bavaria were investigated for incorporated radiocesium. The aim of these measurements was to evaluate the whole body activity due to regionally differing soil contaminations in Bavaria following the accident in the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl and to assess the effective dose from an intake of radionuclides for the pupils by comparing the results of their WBC measurements with those of reference groups of children which underwent WBC examinations at regular intervals at both institutes since the middle of the year 1986. The results of the WBC measurements of those pupils who had not eaten mushrooms in the days before the measurement are in good agreement with the results of comparative measurements in children living in the regions of Munich and Frankfurt-am-Main. Based on these results an effective dose of 0,2 mSv for the Munich region children and of 0,1 mSv for Nothern Bavarian children can be derived. For children living in the highest contaminated region of Bavaria, i.e. the counties adjacent to the Alps, no comparable reference group results are available, but the amount of incorporated radiocesium is only twice that for pupils in the Munich region. The mean value for the specific activity of radiocesium in South Bavarian school children who consumed mushrooms was found to be twice the value of pupils who did not. This is also true for that group of children whose parents had bought allegedly low contaminated foodstuffs. Other effecs of nutrition habits on the specific whole body activity could not be found. (orig.) [de

  11. Whole body counters: types, performance and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jales, R.L.C.

    1983-01-01

    The present monograph deals with Whole Counters, since its definition, evolution, performance, clinical indications and results. Scintillation crystals detection systems were described as well as scintillant solutions, plastic scintillations, and gaseous detectors, including its interplay forms and basal characteristics. Geometric arrangements of standard chair, arc and hammock, arrangements with scintillant solutions and plastic scintillations, as well as special geometric arrangements were equally commented. Clinic and experimental studies were also dealt with Whole Body Counters, giving examples with potassium, iron vitamin B 12 and albumin. (author)

  12. Value of 201-thallium serial myocardial imaging in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, E.; Sebening, H.; Dressler, J.; Lutilsky, L.; Ulm, K.; Hoer, G.; Papst, H.W.; Bloemer, H.; Technische Univ. Muenchen; Technische Univ. Muenchen

    1979-01-01

    There has been clinical evidence that a perfusion defect on a stress image fills overtime. The diagnostic value of initial and 120 min post exercise redistribution thallium-201 myocardial images (RMI) was determined in 120 pts, with suspected coronary heart disease (CAD), all of whom had coronary arteriography. Significant (>= 75%) lesions were present in 88 pts. 30 pts. without CAD showed a normal tracer uptake immediately after exercise. Scintigrams taken 120 min after exercise revealed a decrease of 201-Tl concentration in every area of the myocardium. 80 pts. with CAD showed an area of decreased tracer uptake in the inital scans. 120 min RMI in 51 pts. revealed a significant increase (p > 0.01) of countrate time ratio in previous underperfused areas. In 37 pts. persistent defects were present, in every case the defect correlated with the site of a myocardial infarction as determined by the finding of an akinetic area in the left ventricular angiogram. Thus RMI following a single dose of 201 Tl can differentiate between scar- and exercise-induced transient ischemia. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 MB [de

  13. Preoperative imaging in primary hyperparathyroidism. Role of thallium-technetium subtraction scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, G.S.; Bekerman, C.; Blend, M.J.; Byrom, E.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism, although often silent clinically, may lead to significant morbidity if it remains untreated. In more than 95% of all cases the cause is a parathyroid adenoma or glandular hyperplasia. Regression of disease follows successful surgical excision of the abnormal parathyroid gland. Recurrent or persistent hyperparathyroidism is most commonly caused by solitary adenomas, which may have an ectopic location. Preoperative localization of lesions may improve postoperative cure rates and decrease morbidity. Thallium T1 201 chloride-technetium Tc 99m pertechnetate subtraction scintigraphy was performed on 15 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. The sensitivity and specificity for detection of abnormal glands were 90% and 95%, respectively. False-positive or false-negative results were minimize by strict adherence to a protocol and by the use of well-defined diagnostic criteria. Because of the superior sensitivity and specificity, this modality should be the primary imaging method of choice for preoperative evaluation of primary hyperparathyroidism. The relative role of other imaging modalities is also discussed. 31 references

  14. The usefulness of planar thallium myocardial perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesen, K.A.; Andersen, K.; Foelling, M.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1991-01-01

    Stress thallium scintigraphy was performed in 60 patients with chest pain of uncertain origin. Myocardial ischemia was identified in 91% og the 47 patients who had angiographically significant coronary artery stenosis. Sensitivity of thallium scintigraphy was highest in patients with stenosis in the left descending coronary artery (LAD); 91% of the patients had abnormal thallium as compared with 67% of the patients with normal LAD, but significant stenosis in the circumflex artery and/or the right coronary artery. Perfusion defects in the circumflex or right coronary artery regions were detected in only 50% of the patients with multiple vessel disease. The authors conclude that stress thallium scintigraphy is a useful diagnostic procedure in patients with chest pain of uncertain origin and identifies the patients to be selected for coronary artery angiography. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Whole body detectors for clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silar, J.

    The requirements are presented on the parameters of whole-body detectors suitable for clinical retention assays and the detector-patient configuration described. A whole-body detector was developed with an axial configuration of two pairs of large-volume scintillation detectors with NaI(Tl) crystals. One pair is placed under the bed, the other above the bed on which the patient is being examined. The axes of the crystals are located at a distance of 90 cm apart. The field of vision of the detector is described for the application of a 137 Cs source in the air and in a 24 cm layer of water. The positive characteristics of the detector are listed as being homogeneous sensitivity, energy resolution, long-term stability of signal pulse amplitude and average pulse rate in the integral mode. The results obtained show that the detector may be used to evaluate the level of contamination of persons by gamma emitters within the region of approximately 800 Bq to 74 MBq. The error in converting the number of signal pulses in the integral mode does not exceed 50% for gamma emitters with a photon energy above 30O keV. (J.B.)

  16. Whole body acid-base modeling revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Troels; Nielsen, Søren

    2017-04-01

    The textbook account of whole body acid-base balance in terms of endogenous acid production, renal net acid excretion, and gastrointestinal alkali absorption, which is the only comprehensive model around, has never been applied in clinical practice or been formally validated. To improve understanding of acid-base modeling, we managed to write up this conventional model as an expression solely on urine chemistry. Renal net acid excretion and endogenous acid production were already formulated in terms of urine chemistry, and we could from the literature also see gastrointestinal alkali absorption in terms of urine excretions. With a few assumptions it was possible to see that this expression of net acid balance was arithmetically identical to minus urine charge, whereby under the development of acidosis, urine was predicted to acquire a net negative charge. The literature already mentions unexplained negative urine charges so we scrutinized a series of seminal papers and confirmed empirically the theoretical prediction that observed urine charge did acquire negative charge as acidosis developed. Hence, we can conclude that the conventional model is problematic since it predicts what is physiologically impossible. Therefore, we need a new model for whole body acid-base balance, which does not have impossible implications. Furthermore, new experimental studies are needed to account for charge imbalance in urine under development of acidosis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Conjugate whole-body scanning system for quantitative measurement of organ distribution in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, B.M.W.; Chen, C.T.; Yasillo, N.J.; Ortega, C.J.; Charleston, D.B.; Lathrop, K.A.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of accurate, quantitative, biokinetic distribution of an internally dispersed radionuclide in humans is important in making realistic radiation absorbed dose estimates, studying biochemical transformations in health and disease, and developing clinical procedures indicative of abnormal functions. In order to collect these data, a whole-body imaging system is required which provides both adequate spatial resolution and some means of absolute quantitation. Based on these considerations, a new whole-body scanning system has been designed and constructed that employs the conjugate counting technique. The conjugate whole-body scanning system provides an efficient and accurate means of collecting absolute quantitative organ distribution data of radioactivity in vivo

  18. Qualification of viable myocardium in the infarcted area by dual isotope In-111 antimyosin Fab and thallium SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitani, Isao; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Hayashida, Kouhei; Kumita, Shin-ichirou; Oka, Hisatsugu; Haze, Kazuo; Nonoki, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    Dual isotope In-111 antimyosin (AM) Fab and thallium SPECT imaging was performed in 33 patients with acute myocardial infarction. Thirteen patients in whom coronary reperfusion could successfully be achieved at the acute stage had higher AM uptake parameters, including AM SCORE, AM AREA, and SCORE/AREA, and the maximum CPK value than the other 20 patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction had a stronger correlation with AM AREA than with AM SCORE (0.601 vs 0.387). Overlap phenomenon was seen in 18 patients (55%). In 28 patients followed up with coronary arteriography, 10 patients had a ≥75% coronary stenosis in the infarct-related vessel; 5 of these 10 had ischemic events. In 13 patients undergoing subsequent thallium-201 scintigraphy at rest, 6 (46%) were found to have marked reduction of perfusion defect (the improved group). Regarding thallium-201 DEFECT SCORE early after the onset of myocardial infarction, there was no significant difference between the aforementioned improved group (15±5) and the non-improved group (17±7). However, In-111 AM uptake in the infarct area was smaller in the improved group than the non-improved group, which means that the infarcted area did not become necrotic early after the onset of myocardial infarction. This may have been responsible for the improvement of perfusion defect in cases of myocardial infarction. (N.K.)

  19. Interpolation method by whole body computed tomography, Artronix 1120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Kyoichi; Koga, Issei; Tokunaga, Mitsuo

    1981-01-01

    Reconstruction of the whole body CT images by interpolation method was investigated by rapid scanning. Artronix 1120 with fixed collimator was used to obtain the CT images every 5 mm. X-ray source was circully movable to obtain perpendicular beam to the detector. A length of 150 mm was scanned in about 15 min., with the slice width of 5 mm. The images were reproduced every 7.5 mm, which was able to reduce every 1.5 mm when necessary. Out of 420 inspection in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, 5 representative cases for which this method was valuable were described. The cases were fibrous histiocytoma of upper mediastinum, left adrenal adenoma, left ureter fibroma, recurrence of colon cancer in the pelvis, and abscess around the rectum. This method improved the image quality of lesions in the vicinity of the ureters, main artery, and rectum. The time required and exposure dose were reduced to 50% by this method. (Nakanishi, T.)

  20. Benefits of adopting good radiation practices in reducing the whole body radiation dose to the nuclear medicine personnel during (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shashwat; Kheruka, Subhash Chand; Maurya, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Narvesh; Gambhir, Sanjay; Kumari, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography has been established as an important imaging modality in the management of patients, especially in oncology. The higher gamma radiation energy of positron-emitting isotopes poses an additional radiation safety problem. Those working with this modality may likely to receive higher whole body doses than those working only in conventional nuclear medicine. The radiation exposure to the personnel occurs in dispensing the dose, administration of activity, patient positioning, and while removing the intravenous (i.v.) cannula. The estimation of radiation dose to Nuclear Medicine Physician (NMP) involved during administration of activity to the patient and technical staff assisting in these procedures in a positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) facility was carried out. An i.v access was secured for the patient by putting the cannula and blood sugar was monitored. The activity was then dispensed and measured in the dose calibrator and administered to the patient by NMP. Personnel doses received by NMP and technical staff were measured using electronic pocket dosimeter. The radiation exposure levels at various working locations were assessed with the help of gamma survey meter. The radiation level at working distance while administering the radioactivity was found to be 106-170 μSv/h with a mean value of 126.5 ± 14.88 μSv/h which was reduced to 4.2-14.2 μSv/h with a mean value of 7.16 ± 2.29 μSv/h with introduction of L-bench for administration of radioactivity. This shows a mean exposure level reduction of 94.45 ± 1.03%. The radiation level at working distance, while removing the i.v. cannula postscanning was found to be 25-70 μSv/h with a mean value of 37.4 ± 13.16 μSv/h which was reduced to 1.0-5.0 μSv/h with a mean value of 2.77 ± 1.3 μSv/h with introduction of L-bench for removal of i.v cannula. This shows a mean exposure level reduction of 92.85 ± 1.78%. This study shows that good radiation practices are

  1. Myelopoiesis in whole-body-irradiated beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, A.F.G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of dose-rate (DR) (either 5.2 or 52 cGy/min.) on the regeneration of bone marrow (BM) myelopoietic progenitor cells was studied in beagles after exposure to whole-body-irradiation (235, 375 and 1500 cGy + autologous BM-transplantation). Myelopoietic progenitor cells were assayed as colony-forming units in agar cultures (GM-CFU), in correlation with the colony-stimulation activity (CSA) in serum. At 235 cGy, the influence of DR on the recovery of GM-CFU was insignificant. However, at 375 cGy, the recovery was critically dependent on the DR. Depletion of GM-CFU numbers elevated CSA levels above pre-irradiation values. The DR determines the regenerative ability when the dose itself is critical to survival of the least number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) necessary for restitution. (author)

  2. Prognostic utility of intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging and exercise testing after an acute infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppo, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    To define the prognosis in asymptomatic survivors of acute infarcts (MI), coronary vasodilation was induced with I.V. dipyridamole, followed by Thallium-201 (T1) imaging in 26 patients just prior to discharge. All patients (pts) also had a modified exercise treadmill (MET) test. During the imaging protocol, 10 (39%) pts experienced transient adverse effects and 12 (46%) pts had either angina or ST depression with MET. During a mean follow-up of 17 months, 13 (50%) pts had a cardiac event defined as readmission for control of angina, MI or death. In the 13 pts having cardiac events, 4 (31%) had ST depression and 2 (15%) had angina during MET, but 12 (92%) demonstrated T1 redistribution (RD) as determined by at least 1 segment/scan having a transient defect. A logistic regression analysis using several exercise, scintigraphic and general clinical parameters, showed that the presence of T1 RD was the only significant (p <0.001) predictor for future cardiac events. The predicted probability for events in pts with T1 RD was 80 +- 10% (SD) and was 9 +- 9% in those without T1 RD. The mean number of defects per scan was similar in pts with and without cardiac events, but compared to persistent defects, transient ones are associated with potentially ischemic myocardium. Although the pt population is relatively small, dipyridamole T1 imaging after MI appears to be safe and has demonstrated prognostic value. It also offers an alternative and/or addition to exercise testing in the predischarge evaluation after acute MI

  3. Usefulness of Thallium Scan for Differential Diagnosis of Breast Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sang Kyun; Yum, Ha Yong; Lee, Chung Han; Choi, Kyung Hyun [Kosin University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate thallium scanning as a potential test in differentiating malignant from benign lesions of breast. Thirty-one female patients underwent thallium scan of the breast. After intravenous injection of 74-111 MBq(2-3 mCi)of thallium-201, anterior and lateral images were obtained. We compared thallium scans with pathological results. Of 11 patients with breast cancers, 10 cases (90.9%) were detected using thallium scan. Thallium scan obtained in one patient who had breast cancer but received several cycles of chemotherapy did not show thallium uptake. The smallest detectable cancer was 1.5 cm in diameter. In contrast, there is no thallium accumulation in breasts of 17 of 20 patients with benign disease (85%), Three cases of 13 fibrocystic disease show thallium uptake in their breast. In conclusion, thallium scan is an effective test in differentiating benign from malignant lesion.

  4. Usefulness of Thallium Scan for Differential Diagnosis of Breast Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Sang Kyun; Yum, Ha Yong; Lee, Chung Han; Choi, Kyung Hyun

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate thallium scanning as a potential test in differentiating malignant from benign lesions of breast. Thirty-one female patients underwent thallium scan of the breast. After intravenous injection of 74-111 MBq(2-3 mCi)of thallium-201, anterior and lateral images were obtained. We compared thallium scans with pathological results. Of 11 patients with breast cancers, 10 cases (90.9%) were detected using thallium scan. Thallium scan obtained in one patient who had breast cancer but received several cycles of chemotherapy did not show thallium uptake. The smallest detectable cancer was 1.5 cm in diameter. In contrast, there is no thallium accumulation in breasts of 17 of 20 patients with benign disease (85%), Three cases of 13 fibrocystic disease show thallium uptake in their breast. In conclusion, thallium scan is an effective test in differentiating benign from malignant lesion.

  5. Possibilities of whole-body MRI for investigating musculoskeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, S.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Fischer, S.; Koetter, I.

    2004-01-01

    This contribution outlines possibilities and limitations of whole-body MRI for investigating musculoskeletal diseases. Benefits and drawbacks of the novel whole-body MRI technology are discussed and a possible whole-body MRI sequence protocol for musculoskeletal examinations is proposed. Muscle, joint and bone diseases are discussed in which the application of whole-body MRI may be of advantage. Particularly, polymyositis, muscledystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, spondylitis ancylosans, multiple trauma, skeletal metastases, multiple myeloma and malignant lymphoma are mentioned. Whole-body MRI opens new advantages for the examination of multifocal musculoskeletal diseases. The clinical benefit of this method for particular diseases has to be evaluated in further studies, however. (orig.) [de

  6. Diagnostic imaging in polytrauma: comparison of radiation exposure from whole-body MSCT and conventional radiography with organ-specific CT; Radiologische Bildgebung beim Polytrauma: Dosisvergleich von Ganzkoerper-MSCT und konventionellem Roentgen mit organspezifischer CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedegaertner, U.; Lorenzen, M.; Weber, C.; Adam, G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Nagel, H.D. [Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose of whole-body multislice CT (MSCT) and conventional radiography with organ-specific CT in polytrauma. Materials and Methods: The whole-body MSCT encompassing brain, neck and midface, chest, abdomen and pelvis was performed on a Somatom Volume Zoom (Siemens). Conventional radiography consisted of chest and cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine in two views as well as pelvis. Polymat, Siemens. Three combinations of organ specific CT were chosen: CT examination of (1) head and cervical spine, (2) head, cervical spine and chest, (3) head, cervical spine and abdomen. The effective doses of whole-body MSCT and conventional radiography with organ-specific CT were calculated. Results: Effective doses were 20 mSv for whole-body MSCT, 2 mSv for conventional x-ray, and 5 mSv for combination (1), 8 mSv for combination (2) and (3) 16 mSv for combination (3) of the organ-specific CT. The ratio of radiation dose between whole-body MSCT and radiography was 10: 1. This ratio was reduced to 3: 1, 2: 1 and 1: 1 when a combination of radiography and CT was performed. Conclusions: Whole-body MSCT in polytrauma compared to conventional radiography with organ-specific CT induces a threefold increased dose in unfavorable situations and no increased dose in favorable situations. Nevertheless, routine use of whole-body MSCT should be critically evaluated and should be adapted to the clinical benefit. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Dosisvergleich von Ganzkoerper-MSCT und konventioneller Basisdiagnostik mit organspezifischen Ct-Untersuchungen beim Polytrauma. Material und Methoden: Die Ganzkoerper-MSCT-Untersuchung von Schaedel, Mittelgesicht, HWS sowie Thorax, Abdomen und Becken erfolgte an einem Somatom-Volume-Zoom (Siemens). Die konventionelle Bildgebung, bestehend aus Thorax, Becken, HWS, BWS und LWs, wurde an einem Siemens-Polymat durchgefuehrt. Fuer die organspezifischen CT-Untersuchungen wurden 3 Kombinationen ausgewaehlt: (1) CCT + HWS, (2) CCT + HWS

  7. Whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Minarchick, Valerie C; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-05-07

    Inhalation is the most likely exposure route for individuals working with aerosolizable engineered nano-materials (ENM). To properly perform nanoparticle inhalation toxicology studies, the aerosols in a chamber housing the experimental animals must have: 1) a steady concentration maintained at a desired level for the entire exposure period; 2) a homogenous composition free of contaminants; and 3) a stable size distribution with a geometric mean diameter generation of aerosols containing nanoparticles is quite challenging because nanoparticles easily agglomerate. This is largely due to very strong inter-particle forces and the formation of large fractal structures in tens or hundreds of microns in size (6), which are difficult to be broken up. Several common aerosol generators, including nebulizers, fluidized beds, Venturi aspirators and the Wright dust feed, were tested; however, none were able to produce nanoparticle aerosols which satisfy all criteria (5). A whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposure system was fabricated, validated and utilized for nano-TiO2 inhalation toxicology studies. Critical components: 1) novel nano-TiO2 aerosol generator; 2) 0.5 m(3) whole-body inhalation exposure chamber; and 3) monitor and control system. Nano-TiO2 aerosols generated from bulk dry nano-TiO2 powders (primary diameter of 21 nm, bulk density of 3.8 g/cm(3)) were delivered into the exposure chamber at a flow rate of 90 LPM (10.8 air changes/hr). Particle size distribution and mass concentration profiles were measured continuously with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI). The aerosol mass concentration (C) was verified gravimetrically (mg/m(3)). The mass (M) of the collected particles was determined as M = (Mpost-Mpre), where Mpre and Mpost are masses of the filter before and after sampling (mg). The mass concentration was calculated as C = M/(Q*t), where Q is sampling flowrate (m(3)/min), and t is the sampling

  8. Rest thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in a patient with leukaemic infiltration of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civelek, A.C.; Camargo, E.E.; Links, J.M.; Brinker, J.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of leukaemic infiltration of the heart, only 8 cases of atrioventricular block due to leukemia have been reported in the literature. Improvement in the heart block associated with disappearance of the leukaemic infiltrate has not been reported. A rest thallium-201 study was used in a 65-year-old man to demonstrate leukaemic infiltration of the heart which was associated with complete heart block. After chemotherapy, when the tumour burden was reduced and the leukaemia in remission, his heart block resolved, and a follow-up thallium scan was normal. (orig.)

  9. Accuracy of whole-body low-dose multidetector CT (WBLDCT) versus skeletal survey in the detection of myelomatous lesions, and correlation of disease distribution with whole-body MRI (WBMRI).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, T G

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the feasibility of whole-body low-dose computed tomography (WBLDCT) in the diagnosis and staging of multiple myeloma and compare to skeletal survey (SS), using bone marrow biopsy and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMRI; where available) as gold standard.

  10. A prototype PET/SPECT/X-rays scanner dedicated for whole body small animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouchota, Maritina; Georgiou, Maria; Fysikopoulos, Eleftherios; Fragogeorgi, Eirini; Mikropoulos, Konstantinos; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Kagadis, George; Loudos, George

    2017-01-01

    To present a prototype tri-modal imaging system, consisting of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPET), a positron emission tomography (PET), and a computed tomography (CT) subsystem, evaluated in planar mode. The subsystems are mounted on a rotating gantry, so as to be able to allow tomographic imaging in the future. The system, designed and constructed by our group, allows whole body mouse imaging of competent performance and is currently, to the best of our knowledge, unequaled in a national and regional level. The SPET camera is based on two Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes (PSPMT), coupled to a pixilated Sodium Iodide activated with Thallium (NaI(Tl)) scintillator, having an active area of 5x10cm 2 . The dual head PET camera is also based on two pairs of PSPMT, coupled to pixelated berillium germanium oxide (BGO) scintillators, having an active area of 5x10cm 2 . The X-rays system consists of a micro focus X-rays tube and a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) detector, having an active area of 12x12cm 2 . The scintigraphic mode has a spatial resolution of 1.88mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and a sensitivity of 107.5cpm/0.037MBq at the collimator surface. The coincidence PET mode has an average spatial resolution of 3.5mm (FWHM) and a peak sensitivity of 29.9cpm/0.037MBq. The X-rays spatial resolution is 3.5lp/mm and the contrast discrimination function value is lower than 2%. A compact tri-modal system was successfully built and evaluated for planar mode operation. The system has an efficient performance, allowing accurate and informative anatomical and functional imaging, as well as semi-quantitative results. Compared to other available systems, it provides a moderate but comparable performance, at a fraction of the cost and complexity. It is fully open, scalable and its main purpose is to support groups on a national and regional level and provide an open technological platform to study different detector components and

  11. Biphasic thallium 201 SPECT-imaging for the noninvasive diagnosis of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in a child with Kawasaki disease--a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausdorf, G.; Nienaber, C.A.; Spielman, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    The mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (Kawasaki disease) is of increasing importance for the pediatric cardiologist, for coronary aneurysms with the potential of thrombosis and subsequent stenosis can develop in the course of the disease. The authors report a 2 1/2-year-old female child in whom, fourteen months after the acute phase of Kawasaki disease, myocardial infarction occurred. Biphasic thallium 201 SPECT-imaging using dipyridamole depicted anterior wall ischemia and inferolateral infarction. This case demonstrates that noninvasive vasodilation-redistribution thallium 201 SPECT-imaging has the potential to predict reversible myocardial perfusion defects and myocardial necrosis, even in small infants with Kawasaki disease

  12. Exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging in left main coronary artery disease: sensitive but not specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, T.; Griffith, L.S.; Achuff, S.C.; Bailey, I.K.; Bulkley, B.H.; Burow, R.; Pitt, B.; Becker, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of thallium-201 scintigraphy for identifying left main coronary artery disease, the results of scintigraphy at rest and during exercise were compared in 24 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of the left main coronary artery and 80 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of one or more of the major coronary arteries but without left main coronary involvement. By segmental analysis of the scintigrams, perfusion defects were assigned to the left anterior descending, left circumflex or right coronary artery, singly or in combination, and the pattern of simultaneous left anterior descending and circumflex arterial defects was used to identify left main coronary artery disease. Of the 24 patients with left main coronary artery disease, 22 (92 percent) had abnormal exercise scintigrams. Despite this high sensitivity, the pattern of perfusion defects was not specific; the ''left main pattern'' was found in 3 patients (13 percent) with left main coronary artery disease but also in 3 (33 percent) of 9 patients with combined left anterior descending and left circumflex arterial disease, 4 (19 percent) of 21 patients with three vessel disease and 3 (6 percent) of 50 patients with one or two vessel disease but excluding the group with left anterior descending plus left circumflex arterial disease. The pattern of perfusion defects in the patients with left main coronary artery disease was determined by the location and severity of narrowings in the coronary arteries downstream from the left main arterial lesion. Concomitant lesions in other arteries were found in all patients with left main coronary disease (one vessel in 1 patient, two vessels in 7 patients and three vessels in 16). For this reason, it is unlikely that even with improvements in radiopharmaceutical agents and imaging techniques, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy will be sufficiently specific for definitive identification of left main coronary artery disease

  13. Whole body interaction with public displays

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This book develops valuable new approaches to digital out-of-home media and digital signage in urban environments. It offers solutions for communicating interactive features of digital signage to passers-by. Digital out-of-home media and digital signage screens are becoming increasingly interactive thanks to touch input technology and gesture recognition. To optimize their conversion rate, interactive public displays must 1) attract attention, 2) communicate to passers-by that they are interactive, 3) explain the interaction, and 4) provide a motivation for passers-by to interact. This book highlights solutions to problems 2 and 3 above. The focus is on whole-body interaction, where the positions and orientations of users and their individual body parts are captured by specialized sensors (e.g., depth cameras). The book presents revealing findings from a field study on communicating interactivity, a laboratory on analysing visual attention, a field study on mid-air gestures, and a field study on using mid-air...

  14. A clinical study of thallium-201 SPECT in the diagnostic imaging of oral squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    Recently the usefulness of thallium 201 chloride (201Tl) as a tumor imaging agent for various tumors has been reported. However, the application of 201Tl SPECT to oral squamous cell carcinomas has not been established. The purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of 201Tl SPECT in the assessment of malignancy or in the differential diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinomas from inflammatory diseases. Thirty-two patients with 33 primary oral squamous cell carcinomas and 4 patients with inflammatory disease were studied. SPECT images were acquired 15 minutes (early image) and 3 hours (delayed image) after the intravenous injection with 74 MBq 201Tl, and then early uptake ratio (ER), delayed uptake ratio (DR), and retention index (RI) were measured. The relations between these parameters and the size, the site, the degree of differentiation and the mode of invasion of the primary tumor were analyzed statistically. 201Tl SPECT correctly identified 32 of the 33 tumors, with 32 patients having oral squamous cell carcinoma, making the positive rate 97%. Significant negative correlation was observed between RI and major or minor axis of tumors; therefore, this study revealed that RI was influenced by the size of a tumor. In comparison with the average value of RI according to histopathological diagnosis, there was statistically significant difference (p=0.011) between carcinomas (0.80±0.16, n=30) and inflammatory diseases (0.58±0.04, n=4); thus, it was supposed that differential diagnosis between them could be possible. About the tumors with the range of minor-axis 20 mm-40 mm for little influence of tumor size to the RI, the tendency to decrease for the RI of well-differentiated group or low-invasive group was seen. For oral squamous cell carcinomas, 201Tl SPECT had a high positive rate. The application was suggested for use in the differential diagnosis between inflammatory disease and carcinomas, where clinical usefulness could be expected. (author)

  15. IQ-SPECT for thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging: effect of normal databases on quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Takahiro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Okuda, Koichi; Yoneyama, Hiroto; Matsuo, Shinro; Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Kinuya, Seigo

    2017-07-01

    Although IQ-single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides rapid acquisition and attenuation-corrected images, the unique technology may create characteristic distribution different from the conventional imaging. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of IQ-SPECT using Japanese normal databases (NDBs) with that of the conventional SPECT for thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). A total of 36 patients underwent 1-day 201 Tl adenosine stress-rest MPI. Images were acquired with IQ-SPECT at approximately one-quarter of the standard time of conventional SPECT. Projection data acquired with the IQ-SPECT system were reconstructed via an ordered subset conjugate gradient minimizer method with or without scatter and attenuation correction (SCAC). Projection data obtained using the conventional SPECT were reconstructed via a filtered back projection method without SCAC. The summed stress score (SSS) was calculated using NDBs created by the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group, and scores were compared between IQ-SPECT and conventional SPECT using the acquisition condition-matched NDBs. The diagnostic performance of the methods for the detection of coronary artery disease was also compared. SSSs were 6.6 ± 8.2 for the conventional SPECT, 6.6 ± 9.4 for IQ-SPECT without SCAC, and 6.5 ± 9.7 for IQ-SPECT with SCAC (p = n.s. for each comparison). The SSS showed a strong positive correlation between conventional SPECT and IQ-SPECT (r = 0.921 and p IQ-SPECT with and without SCAC was also good (r = 0.907 and p IQ-SPECT without SCAC; and 88.5, 86.8, and 87.3%, respectively, for IQ-SPECT with SCAC, respectively. The area under the curve obtained via receiver operating characteristic analysis were 0.77, 0.80, and 0.86 for conventional SPECT, IQ-SPECT without SCAC, and IQ-SPECT with SCAC, respectively (p = n.s. for each comparison). When appropriate NDBs were used, the diagnostic performance of 201 Tl IQ

  16. Assessment of myocardial viability in patients with myocardial infarction using twenty-four hour thallium-201 late redistribution imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiangjun; He Yongming; Zhang Bin; Wu Yiwei; Hui Jie; Jiang Tingbo; Song Jianping; Liu Zhihua; Jiang Wenping

    2006-01-01

    Rest thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial perfusion imaging has been widely used for evaluation of myocardial ischemia/viability after myocardial infarction, but the ideal timing for imaging after injection to maximally estimate viability is not well established. Thirty-six patients with myocardial infarction underwent the initial, 3 h, and 24 h redistribution imaging after intravenous injection of 148-185 MBq 201 Tl. The initial and 3 h images, the initial and 24 h images, and the 3 and 24 h images were compared double-blinded. Out of the 184 abnormal segments based on the initial imaging, 56 (30%) segments improved by at least 1 grade on the 3 h imaging while 78 (42%) segments improved by at least 1 grade on the 24 h imaging. The 24 h late imaging detected more viable myocardium than the 3 h imaging did, with a significant difference (χ 2 =5.680, p=0.017). There were 158 abnormal segments on the 3 h imaging, with average 28% (44) segments improved by at least 1 grade on the 24 h imaging. There were 128 initial abnormal segments with no improvement on the 3 h imaging. Out of these segments, the 24 h late redistribution imaging detected additional redistribution in 26 segments, taking up 20%. Twenty-four hour late 201 Tl imaging will demonstrated additional redistribution in patients who have incompletely reversible defects on early redistribution imaging at 3 h. (author)

  17. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  18. Simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomogra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian S Pugmire; Alexander R Guimaraes; Ruth Lim; Alison M Friedmann; Mary Huang; David Ebb; Howard Weinstein; Onofrio A Catalano; Umar Mahmood; Ciprian Catana; Michael S Gee

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose(18F-FDG)positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging(PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients.METHODS: This prospective, observational, singlecenter study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to:(1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis;(2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and(3) be scheduled for clinically indicated 18F-FDG PETCT examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PETMRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PETMRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value(SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient(ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard.RESULTS: A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years(range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions(R = 0.93). PETMRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-computed tomography(CT) reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions(780.2 + 326.6) was significantly

  19. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging at rest and during exercise. Comparative sensitivity to electrocardiography in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, I.K.; Griffith, L.S.C.; Rouleau, J.; Strauss, H.W.; Pitt, B.

    1977-01-01

    The sensitivity of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using thallium-201 injected both at rest and during peak exercise was compared to simultaneously recorded 12 lead electrocardiography (ECG) for the detection of transient ischemia in 20 normal subjects and 63 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). No significant perfusion defects or ECG changes were seen on either the rest or exercise studies in any of the normal subjects. Fifty-six percent of patients with CAD developed new perfusion defects with exercise compared to 38 percent who developed ischemic ST-segment depression (P < 0.02). However, when chest pain and/or ST depression were considered indices of ischemia, the sensitivity of exercise testing and thallium-201 MPI was similar. The increased sensitivity of MPI compared to ST-segment depression on the ECG was due to patients with baseline ECG abnormalities and those who failed to achieve 85 percent of predicted maximum heart rate with exercise. Analysis of the exercise results according to the extent of coronary artery disease revealed a progressive increase in both positive ECGs and MPI with the number of vessels involved. In patients with single vessel disease the MPI was more sensitive than the ECG (P < 0.02). The combination of the rest and exercise ECG, MPI and chest pain during exercise failed to identify 11 percent of patients with CAD. Exercise thallium-201 MPI is a useful adjunct to conventional exercise testing particularly when evaluating patients with abnormal resting ECGs, those who develop ventricular conduction defects or arrhythmias during exercise, and those who fail to achieve their predicted heart rate because of fatigue or breathlessness

  20. Comparison of atlas-based techniques for whole-body bone segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabi, Hossein; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-01-01

    out in terms of estimating bone extraction accuracy from whole-body MRI using standard metrics, such as Dice similarity (DSC) and relative volume difference (RVD) considering bony structures obtained from intensity thresholding of the reference CT images as the ground truth. Considering the Dice....../MRI. To this end, a variety of atlas-based segmentation strategies commonly used in medical image segmentation and pseudo-CT generation were implemented and evaluated in terms of whole-body bone segmentation accuracy. Bone segmentation was performed on 23 whole-body CT/MR image pairs via leave-one-out cross...... validation procedure. The evaluated segmentation techniques include: (i) intensity averaging (IA), (ii) majority voting (MV), (iii) global and (iv) local (voxel-wise) weighting atlas fusion frameworks implemented utilizing normalized mutual information (NMI), normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and mean...

  1. Detection of bone metastasis of prostate cancer. Comparison of whole-body MRI and bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, D.; Roethke, M.; Aschoff, P.; Lichy, M.P.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Merseburger, A.S.; Reimold, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: prostate cancer continues to be the third leading cancer-related mortality of western men. Early diagnosis of bone metastasis is important for the therapy regime and for assessing the prognosis. The standard method is bone scintigraphy. Whole-body MRI proved to be more sensitive for early detection of skeletal metastasis. However, studies of homogenous tumor entities are not available. The aim of the study was to compare bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI regarding the detection of bone metastasis of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: 14 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer and a bone scintigraphy as well as whole-body MRI within one month were included. The mean age was 68 years. Scintigraphy was performed using the planar whole-body technique (ventral and dorsal projections). Suspect areas were enlarged. Whole-body MRI was conducted using native T1w and STIR sequences in the coronary plane of the whole body, sagittal imaging of spine and breath-hold STIR and T1w-Flash-2D sequences of ribs and chest. Bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI were evaluated retrospectively by experienced radiologists in a consensus reading on a lesion-based level. Results: whole-body MRI detected significantly more bone metastasis (p = 0.024). 96.4% of the demonstrated skeletal metastases in bone scintigraphy were founded in whole-body MRI while only 58.6% of the depicted metastases in MRI were able to be located in scintigraphy. There was no significant difference regarding bone metastasis greater than one centimeter (p = 0.082) in contrast to metastasis less than one centimeter (p = 0.035). Small osteoblastic metastases showed a considerably higher contrast in T1w sequences than in STIR imaging. Further advantages of whole-body MRI were additional information about extra-osseous tumor infiltration and their complications, for example stenosis of spinal canal or vertebral body fractures, found in 42.9% of patients. (orig.)

  2. Noninvasive detection and assessment of coronary artery disease by dipyridamloe thallium-201 imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Maosong

    1988-01-01

    Dipyridamole (DP) thallium-201 perfusion scintigraphy was performed in 73 patients. IV DP (0.56 mg/kg) infused over 4 min. resulted in an increases in mean HR from 74 +- 12 bpm to a peak of 86 +- 12 bpm (p 201 Tl scintigraphy appears highly sensitive for the diagnosis of coronary artery highly sensitive for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and provides a useful alternative test for patients who are unable to perform maximal exercise

  3. Whole-body MRI in paediatric oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Littooij, Annemieke S.

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and follow-up of paediatric malignancies. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has been the imaging technique of choice in children with cancer, but nowadays there is an increasing interest in the use of functional imaging techniques like positron

  4. Whole body MR in patients with multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekarek, A.; Sosnowski, P.; Nowicki, A.; Komarnicki, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells which leads to bone marrow infiltration. Aim: Whole-body MR is the most sensitive imaging method available to detect multiple myeloma lesions. Ma terial and methods: MR scans were performed in 100 patients with multiple myeloma who were receiving treatment in the Haematology Clinic in Poznan in the years 2005 - 2006. Whole-body MR scans were performed with general coil 1.0 T in STIR sequences and T1 sequences, in coronal and sagittal planes with scanning area covering the head, neck, trunk and the limbs (FOV for specific regions was 36 -48 cm). The bone lesions were classified as focal (monofocal/multifocal lesions), infiltrative, mixed and 'salt and pepper' type. Depending on the size of the lesions the patients were included in one of three groups according to Salmon-Durie Plus classification. Results: Four main types of multiple myeloma were distinguished based on MR scans: focal (48 patients; monofocal in 10 patients), infiltrative (17 patients), mixed type (19 patients) and 'salt and pepper' type (4 patients). The remaining 12 patients had no multiple myeloma lesions in the bone marrow. Additionally, in 18% of patients a soft tissue mass could be observed. According to Salmon-Durie Plus categorisation 27 subjects were classified as having stage I, 16 patients stage and 57 patients stage III disease. In 12% of patients MR data changed the disease staging. Conclusions: WB MR is a sensitive and effective diagnostic method with an important impact on staging and further treatment of multiple myeloma. (authors)

  5. Whole-body cryotherapy in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Giovanni; Colombini, Alessandra; Melegati, Gianluca

    2010-06-01

    Cold therapy is commonly used as a procedure to relieve pain symptoms, particularly in inflammatory diseases, injuries and overuse symptoms. A peculiar form of cold therapy (or stimulation) was proposed 30 years ago for the treatment of rheumatic diseases. The therapy, called whole-body cryotherapy (WBC), consists of exposure to very cold air that is maintained at -110 degrees C to -140 degrees C in special temperature-controlled cryochambers, generally for 2 minutes. WBC is used to relieve pain and inflammatory symptoms caused by numerous disorders, particularly those associated with rheumatic conditions, and is recommended for the treatment of arthritis, fibromyalgia and ankylosing spondylitis. In sports medicine, WBC has gained wider acceptance as a method to improve recovery from muscle injury. Unfortunately, there are few papers concerning the application of the treatment on athletes. The study of possible enhancement of recovery from injuries and possible modification of physiological parameters, taking into consideration the limits imposed by antidoping rules, is crucial for athletes and sports physicians for judging the real benefits and/or limits of WBC. According to the available literature, WBC is not harmful or detrimental in healthy subjects. The treatment does not enhance bone marrow production and could reduce the sport-induced haemolysis. WBC induces oxidative stress, but at a low level. Repeated treatments are apparently not able to induce cumulative effects; on the contrary, adaptive changes on antioxidant status are elicited--the adaptation is evident where WBC precedes or accompanies intense training. WBC is not characterized by modifications of immunological markers and leukocytes, and it seems to not be harmful to the immunological system. The WBC effect is probably linked to the modifications of immunological molecules having paracrine effects, and not to systemic immunological functions. In fact, there is an increase in anti

  6. Visualization of atrial myocardium with thallium-201: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, M.J.; Coghlan, H.C.; Logic, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    An adult patient evaluated for cyanotic congenital heart disease was found to have pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum, hypoplastic right ventricle, and right atrial enlargement. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging before surgical correction showed thallium activity in the right atrium. Following the establishment of a conduit from the right atrium to pulmonary artery, the right-atrial thallium uptake was even more prominent

  7. Whole body vibration exercise training for fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidonde, Julia; Busch, Angela J; van der Spuy, Ina; Tupper, Susan; Kim, Soo Y; Boden, Catherine

    2017-09-26

    Exercise training is commonly recommended for adults with fibromyalgia. We defined whole body vibration (WBV) exercise as use of a vertical or rotary oscillating platform as an exercise stimulus while the individual engages in sustained static positioning or dynamic movements. The individual stands on the platform, and oscillations result in vibrations transmitted to the subject through the legs. This review is one of a series of reviews that replaces the first review published in 2002. To evaluate benefits and harms of WBV exercise training in adults with fibromyalgia. We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PEDro, Thesis and Dissertation Abstracts, AMED, WHO ICTRP, and ClinicalTrials.gov up to December 2016, unrestricted by language, to identify potentially relevant trials. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in adults with the diagnosis of fibromyalgia based on published criteria including a WBV intervention versus control or another intervention. Major outcomes were health-related quality of life (HRQL), pain intensity, stiffness, fatigue, physical function, withdrawals, and adverse events. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted data, performed risk of bias assessments, and assessed the quality of evidence for major outcomes using the GRADE approach. We used a 15% threshold for calculation of clinically relevant differences. We included four studies involving 150 middle-aged female participants from one country. Two studies had two treatment arms (71 participants) that compared WBV plus mixed exercise plus relaxation versus mixed exercise plus relaxation and placebo WBV versus control, and WBV plus mixed exercise versus mixed exercise and control; two studies had three treatment arms (79 participants) that compared WBV plus mixed exercise versus control and mixed relaxation placebo WBV. We judged the overall risk of bias as low for selection (random sequence generation), detection (objectively

  8. Whole body MRI in the diagnosis of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennedy, M T

    2012-06-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a diagnosis of exclusion primarily in children and adolescents. As part of the essential criteria for the diagnosis of CRMO, multifocal lesions must be identified. We present the case of an 11-year-old boy with CRMO, whose diagnosis was facilitated by the use of whole body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMR), but not isotope bone scanning.

  9. Automatic aortic root segmentation in CTA whole-body dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xinpei; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Scholte, Arthur J. H. A.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2016-03-01

    Trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an evolving technique for patients with serious aortic stenosis disease. Typically, in this application a CTA data set is obtained of the patient's arterial system from the subclavian artery to the femoral arteries, to evaluate the quality of the vascular access route and analyze the aortic root to determine if and which prosthesis should be used. In this paper, we concentrate on the automated segmentation of the aortic root. The purpose of this study was to automatically segment the aortic root in computed tomography angiography (CTA) datasets to support TAVR procedures. The method in this study includes 4 major steps. First, the patient's cardiac CTA image was resampled to reduce the computation time. Next, the cardiac CTA image was segmented using an atlas-based approach. The most similar atlas was selected from a total of 8 atlases based on its image similarity to the input CTA image. Third, the aortic root segmentation from the previous step was transferred to the patient's whole-body CTA image by affine registration and refined in the fourth step using a deformable subdivision surface model fitting procedure based on image intensity. The pipeline was applied to 20 patients. The ground truth was created by an analyst who semi-automatically corrected the contours of the automatic method, where necessary. The average Dice similarity index between the segmentations of the automatic method and the ground truth was found to be 0.965±0.024. In conclusion, the current results are very promising.

  10. Whole-body MRI in children and juveniles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, J.F.; Kramer, U.

    2011-01-01

    The imaging of systemic disorders without radiation exposure by whole-body MRI (wb-MRI) represents a paradigm shift for pediatric radiology. The reduction of multiple regional examinations, if necessary under sedation, results in a faster treatment start. Modern scanner techniques using automatic table movement and allowing the combination of multiple coil elements and synchronized signal recording with numerous independent receiving channels are the basic prerequisite for high-resolution wb-MRI. The main indications are the evaluation of multifocal bone involvement in different disorders, rheumatic disorders including fever of unknown origin or metastatic spread in solid tumors. Based on the research, there is currently no absolute indication. However, wb-MRI has been shown to yield a higher diagnostic performance than bone scintigraphy and comparable results to FDG-PET for the detection of bone metastases. Due to the low number of published studies, it is uncertain for which entity of solid tumors wb-MRI is the modality of choice and for which tumors wb-MRI will play only a complementary role in the diagnostic work-up. Methodical strategies, pitfalls in image analysis, indications and diagnostic accuracy will be discussed based on already published results as well as our own experience from over 400 examinations, thus providing an overview of the recent research as well as supplying relevant aspects of the daily routine in pediatric wb-MRI. (orig.)

  11. WE-FG-207B-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Abdominal CT with Three K-Edge Contrast Materials Using a Whole-Body Photon-Counting Scanner: Initial Results of a Large Animal Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmanan, M; Symons, R; Cork, T; Davies-Venn, C; Rice, K; Malayeri, A; Sandfort, V; Bluemke, D; Pourmorteza, A [National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo three-material decomposition techniques using photon-counting CT (PCCT) with possible advantage of resolving arterial and venous flow of an organ simultaneously. Methods: Abdominal PCCT scans were acquired using a prototype whole-body PCCT with four energy thresholds (25/50/75/90keV) in a canine. Bismuth subsalicylate (60 mg) was administered orally one day prior to scanning. Immediately prior to CT scan, gadoteric acid (60 ml, Dotarem, Guerbet) was intravenously injected, followed in ten minutes by a 20mL injection of iodinated contrast (iopamidol 370 mg/mL, Bracco). Scans were acquired every ∼20 seconds, starting from the time of iodine injection. Linear material decomposition was performed using the least mean squares method to create concentration maps of iodine, gadolinium, and bismuth. The method was calibrated to vials with known concentrations of materials placed next to the animal. The accuracy of this method was tested on vials with known concentrations. Results: The material decomposition algorithm’s accuracy was confirmed to be within ±4mM in the test vials. In the animal, we could estimate the concentration of gadolinium in delayed-enhanced phase (10 minutes post-injection) in the abdomen. We could follow the wash-in and wash-out of iodine in arterial, venous, and excretory flow of the kidneys (20s, 80s, and 120s post-iodine injection) while gadolinium was present in the delayed-enhanced phase. Bismuth, which was used as a contrast agent for the gastro-intestinal tract, was easily differentiable from the other two contrast agents in the small intestine. Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of using photon-counting CT with four energy thresholds to differentiate three k-edge contrast agents in vivo. This can potentially reduce radiation dose to patients by combining arterial and venous phases into a single acquisition.

  12. Combined early dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT and conventional whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT provide one-stop imaging for detecting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Bo; Wu, Hu-Bing; Wang, Quan-Shi; Zhou, Wen-Lan; Tian, Ying; Li, Hong-Sheng; Ji, Yun-Hai; Lv, Liang

    2015-06-01

    It is widely accepted that conventional (18)F-FDG PET/CT (whole-body static (18)F-FDG PET/CT, WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT) has a low detection rate for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We prospectively assessed the role of early dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT (ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT) and WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT in detecting HCC, and we quantified the added value of ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT to WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Twenty-two patients with 37 HCC tumors (HCCs) who underwent both a liver ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT (performed simultaneously with a 5.5 MBq/kg (18)F-FDG bolus injection and continued for 240 s) and a WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT were enrolled in the study. The WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT and ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were positive in 56.7% (21/37) and 78.4% (29/37) HCCs, respectively (PPET/CT in conjunction with WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT (one-stop (18)F-FDG PET/CT) improved the positive detection rates of WB and ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT alone from 56.7% and 78.4% to 91.9% (34/37) (P0.05, respectively). One-stop (18)F-FDG PET/CT appears to be useful to improve WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT for HCC detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for staging and follow-up of pediatric patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma: comparison of different sequences; Aplicacao da ressonancia magnetica de corpo inteiro para o estadiamento e acompanhamento de pacientes com linfoma de Hodgkin na faixa etaria infanto-juvenil: comparacao entre diferentes sequencias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, Daniel; Oliveira, Heverton Cesar de, E-mail: daniel@centrus.com.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Luisi, Flavio Augusto; Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/IOP/GRAACC), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Oncologia Pediatrica. Grupo de Apoio ao Adolescente e a Crianca com Cancer; Ximenes, Andrea Regina da Silveira [Clinica Centrus, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Objective: to compare the performance of the T1, T2, STIR and DWIBS (diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression) sequences in the staging and follow-up of pediatric patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma in lymph node chains, parenchymal organs and bone marrow, and to evaluate interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: the authors studied 12 patients with confirmed diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma. The patients were referred for whole body magnetic resonance imaging with T1-weighted, T2-weighted, STIR and DWIBS sequences. Results: the number of lymph node sites characterized as affected by the disease on T1- and T2-weighted sequences showed similar results (8 sites for both sequences), but lower than DWIBS and STIR sequences (11 and 12 sites, respectively). The bone marrow involvement by lymphoma showed the same values for the T1-, T2-weighted and DWIBS sequences (17 lesions), higher than the value found on STIR (13 lesions). A high rate of interobserver agreement was observed as the four sequences were analyzed. Conclusion: STIR and DWIBS sequences detected the highest number of lymph node sites characterized as affected by the disease. Similar results were demonstrated by all the sequences in the evaluation of parenchymal organs and bone marrow. A high interobserver agreement was observed as the four sequences were analyzed. (author)

  14. Whole body autoradiography with mice using 14C-thymidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hruby, R. et al

    1982-06-01

    Whole body autoradiography was performed using common histology equipment. Results were useful with some restrictions. 14C-thymidine and/or itsmetabolites were found in those tissues with high rate of mitosis. (Author)

  15. Patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can safely undergo intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, J; Simbartl, L; Render, M L; Snow, E; Chaney, C; Nishiyama, H; Rauf, G C; Wexler, L F

    1998-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are usually excluded from intravenous dipyridamole thallium-201 testing. We developed a nurse-administered protocol to screen and pretreat patients so they could be safely tested. We prospectively screened patients referred for intravenous dipyridamole thallium testing and retrospectively reviewed a comparison group of patients who had undergone intravenous dipyridamole testing before our bronchospasm protocol. We studied 492 consecutive patients referred for intravenous dipyridamole thallium testing, separating those with complete data (n = 451) into two groups: group A (n = 72), patients assessed to be at risk for intravenous dipyridamole-induced bronchospasm who received our bronchospasm treatment protocol; and group B (n = 379), patients assessed to be free of risk, who did not receive our bronchospasm protocol. Group C (n = 89) was a retrospective comparison group of patients who had undergone intravenous dipyridamole testing before initiation of the protocol. Patients were considered at risk for an adverse event if any of the following were present: peak flow 400 ml after bronchodilator treatment, wheezing audible with stethoscope, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma or dyspnea on exertion at less than four blocks, or resting respiratory rate >18 breaths/min. The test was considered contraindicated if resting oxygen saturation was respiratory rate stethoscope but without marked respiratory distress), (2) marked events (severe bronchospasm or severe ischemia defined as wheezing audible with or without stethoscope, respiratory rate >20 breaths/min or increased by 10 from pretest evaluation, oxygen desaturation to respiratory rate with decreased mental status], respiratory arrest, chest pain, horizontal ST-segment depression > or =1 mm on the electrocardiogram in any lead, symptomatic hypotension), or (3) other intravenous dipyridamole-induced side effects (persistent headache, dizziness

  16. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging during adenosine-induced coronary vasodilation in patients with ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Chiba, Junya; Abe, Shinya

    1992-01-01

    Thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial perfusion imaging during adenosine infusion was performed in consecutive 55 patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Adenosine was infused intravenously at a rate of 0.14 mg/kg/min for 6 minutes and a dose of 111 MBq of 201 Tl was administered in a separate vein at the end of third minutes of infusion. Myocardial SPECT imaging was begun 5 minutes and 3 hours after the end of adenosine infusion. For evaluating the presence of perfusion defects, 2 short axis images at the basal and spical levels and a vertical long axis image at the mid left ventricle were used. The regions with decreased 201 Tl uptake were assessed semi-quantitatively. Adenosine infusion caused a slight reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in heart rate. The rate pressure products increased slightly (9314±2377 vs. 10360±2148, p 201 Tl myocardial imaging during adenosine infusion was considered to be safe and useful for evaluating the patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  17. Myocardial perfusion imaging with Technetium-99m Sestamibi and Thallium-201. Results of the phase III clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giering, L.; Haber, S.; Joseph, J.L.; Neacy, W.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Technetium-99m-Sestamibi (MIBI) has been compared to 201 TI and coronary angiography in a large Phase III clinical trial to assess diagnostic accuracy. Exercise and rest planar (P) and SPECT (S) MIBI, and exercise and redistribution thallium-201 studies were performed in 150 healthy volunteers and 396 patients (379 males; mean age 51.3 years). Prior myocardial infarction was present in 50% of the patients. Sensitivity and specificity for angiographically defined cardiovascular diseases - CAD (>70% stenosis) for planar imaging was 90.3% and 81.3% for MIBI and 91.6% and 50.0% for 201 TI. Agreement was 88.7% MIBI and 84.0% for 201 TI. For SPECT imaging, sensitivity and specificity were 95.1% and 46.0% for MIBI and 92.3% and 39.7% for 201 TI. Agreement was 80.0% for MIBI and 76.1% for 201 TI. Tomographic normality rates were 91.4% and 92.9% for MIBI and 201 TI. Agreement for characterisation of defect type by MIBI and 201 TI SPECT was 82.5%. In females, sensitivity was comparable for both agents. Specificity of MIBI planar and SPECT imaging was higher then for 201 TI (P: 90.9% v. 66.7%; S: 76.2% v. 61.9%). The improved imaging characteristics of MIBI results in better diagnostic confidence when interpreting myocardial perfusion studies especially in women and obese patients

  18. Whole body effective dose measurements in a fan beam bone mineral densitometer, Lunar expert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiakumar, C.; Griffiths, M.; Cross, P.; Pocock, N.; Freund, J. [St Vincents Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia) Department of Nuclear Medicine; Kron, T.; Duggan, L. [Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology; Holley, L. [University of Technology, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Health Services

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The most recent generation of DXA machines employ a fan beam geometry and high resolution imaging detector, resulting in decreased scanning time and increased image resolution compared to previous rectilinear scanners, but with higher radiation burden to the patient because of an increasing number of bone mineral density scans, it was felt that independent evaluation of the radiation dose was necessary. The whole body effective dose for an AP lumbar spine scan and femur scan using the EXPERT bone densitometer was calculated for the fast and turbo scanning modes, using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). A method was developed to determine the absorbed dose of the irradiated volume of an organ by summing the dose for each of the coronal areas, which results in a volume dose. The Whole Body Effective dose for AP lumbar spine fast scanning mode is 84.1 {mu}Sv and turbo scanning mode is 56.4 {mu}Sv. The Whole Body Effective dose for femur fast scanning mode is 6.6 {mu}Sv and turbo scanning mode is 4.2 {mu}Sv, with no ovary exposure. A theoretical method has been developed to calculate the organ dose from which whole body effective dose was calculated

  19. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging as a selection method for the coronary care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackers, F.J.Th.; Lie, K.I.; Sokole, E.B.; Samson, G.; Schoot, J.B. van der

    1980-01-01

    In many patients admitted to the coronary care unit, the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction is evident at the time of arrival at the hospital. Nevertheless, a substantial group of patients still remains in whom initial evaluation provides a questionable history and a nondiagnostic electrocardiogram. Results suggested that 201 Tl scintigraphy may have potential value to serve as an appropriate means of selecting patients for admission to the coronary care unit. In order to evaluate this possibility, the authors performed a prospective study from September 1975 to September 1976. During this period 1861 patients were refered to the coronary care unit because of presumed acute myocardial infarction. The study concludes that for patients in whom the history and the electrocardiogram are of little help in decision making, thallium-201 scintigraphy can be viewed as an additional and important diagnostic method, which improves efficient management of patients with potential coronary artery disease syndrome. (Auth.)

  20. Identification of viable myocardium in patients with chronic coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Comparison of thallium scintigraphy with reinjection and PET imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonow, R.O.; Dilsizian, V.; Cuocolo, A.; Bacharach, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    In patients with chronic coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction, the distinction between ventricular dysfunction arising from myocardial fibrosis and ischemic, but viable, myocardium has important clinical implications. By positron emission tomography (PET), enhanced fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in myocardial segments with impaired function and reduced blood flow is evidence of myocardial viability. Reinjection of thallium-201 at rest immediately after stress-redistribution imaging may also provide evidence of myocardial viability by demonstrating thallium uptake in regions with apparently irreversible defects. To compare these two methods, we studied 16 patients with chronic coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction, all of whom had irreversible defects on standard exercise-redistribution thallium single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Thallium was reinjected immediately after the redistribution study, and SPECT images were reacquired. The patients also underwent PET imaging with FDG and oxygen-15-labeled water. A total of 432 myocardial segments were analyzed from comparable transaxial tomograms, of which 166 (38%) had irreversible thallium defects on redistribution images before reinjection. FDG uptake was demonstrated in 121 (73%) of these irreversible defects. Irreversible defects were then subgrouped according to the degree of thallium activity, relative to peak activity in normal regions. Irreversible defects with only mild (60-85% of peak activity) or moderate (50-59% of peak) reduction in thallium activity were considered viable on the basis of FDG uptake in 91% and 84% of these segments, respectively. In contrast, in irreversible defects with severe reduction in thallium activity (less than 50% of peak), FDG uptake was present in 51% of segments

  1. Influence of arm positioning on tomographic thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging and the effect of attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prvulovich, E.M.; Jarritt, P.H.; Vorontsova, E.; Bomanji, J.B.; Ell, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Lateral attenuation in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has been attributed to the left arm if it is held by the patient's side during data acquisition. As a result MPI data are conventionally acquired with the arms held above the head. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of imaging arms down on reconstructed tomographic images depicting regional myocardial thallium-201 distribution and to assess whether attenuation-corrected (AC) myocardial perfusion images acquired arms down could replace uncorrected (NC) images acquired arms up for routine clinical service. Twenty-eight patients referred for routine MPI underwent sequential 180 emission/transmission imaging for attenuation correction using an L-shaped dual-headed gamma camera (GE Optima) fitted with two gadolinium-153 scanning line sources. Delay data were acquired twice: once supine with the arms up and then supine with the arms down. Detector radius of rotation (ROR) for arms up and arms-down studies was recorded. For each data set, count density was measured in 17 segments of a polar plot and segmental uptake expressed relative to study maximum. Oblique images were assessed qualitatively by two observers blinded to study type for tracer distribution and overall quality. Transmission maps were assessed for truncation. Mean detector ROR was 190 mm for arms-up studies and 232 mm for arms-down studies (P 201 Tl distribution, particularly anterolaterally. There is lateral undercorrection in approximately 10% of AC arms-down studies, possibly because of attenuation map truncation. Image quality is reduced in about one-third of AC arms-down studies compared with NC arms-up studies. These data suggest that this attenuation correction method is not sufficiently robust to allow routine acquisition of MPI data with the arms down. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative comparison of technetium-99m tetrofosmin and thallium-201 images of the thyroid and abnormal parathyroid glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, A.; Meduri, G.; Calcagni, M.L.; Marozzi, P.; Ficola, U.; Vaccaro, A.; Rubini, G.; Attard, M.; Li Puma, M.; Ricci, R.; Corsello, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to quantitatively compare the scintigraphic images of the thyroid and abnormal parathyroid glands obtained with technetium-99m tetrofosmin and thallium-201 in patients with hyperparathyroidism. Forty-six patients with hyperparathyroidism underwent 201 Tl (74 MBq), 99m Tc-pertechnetate (74 MBq) and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin (555-740 MBq) scintigraphy in a single session. Image analysis included the computation of the thyroid/background ratio in the whole study population and the parathyroid/background ratio, parathyroid/thyroid ratio and diagnostic sensitivity in 17 patients who underwent parathyroid surgery. The pertechnetate subtraction technique was used. 201 Tl and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin showed a similar thyroid/background ratio (1.79±0.41 and 1.81±0.47, respectively, P=NS); however, 99m Tc-tetrofosmin showed a higher parathyroid/background ratio than 201 Tl (2.06±0.54 vs 1.79± 0.50, P=0.007). Despite the superior quality of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin images, both tracers showed identical sensitivity in detecting enlarged parathyroid glands in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (89%) and in those with secondary hyperparathyroidism (50%). (orig.)

  3. Whole-body impedance control of wheeled humanoid robots

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introducing mobile humanoid robots into human environments requires the systems to physically interact and execute multiple concurrent tasks. The monograph at hand presents a whole-body torque controller for dexterous and safe robotic manipulation. This control approach enables a mobile humanoid robot to simultaneously meet several control objectives with different pre-defined levels of priority, while providing the skills for compliant physical contacts with humans and the environment. After a general introduction into the topic of whole-body control, several essential reactive tasks are developed to extend the repertoire of robotic control objectives. Additionally, the classical Cartesian impedance is extended to the case of mobile robots. All of these tasks are then combined and integrated into an overall, priority-based control law. Besides the experimental validation of the approach, the formal proof of asymptotic stability for this hierarchical controller is presented. By interconnecting the whole-body ...

  4. The whole-body counter of the radiation centre Giessen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobelt, W.

    1976-01-01

    The layout of the whole-body counter at the institute for biophysics of the Giessen radiation centre is decribed. With suitable collimators, the whole-body counter may be used to determine the radioactivity in human and animal organs. The shielding and the measuring and waiting rooms for the patients are described with regard to their technical details. The whole-body counting system enables the radioactivity and the retention of various radioisotopes (e.g. 58 Co-vitamin B 12 , 40 K, 54 Mn, 137 Co, 131 J, 22 Na) to be measured. The estimation of the radiation exposure due to different types of examinations in nuclear medicine, in terms of the critical organs for each type of examination, is very accurate with this counting device. (GSE) [de

  5. Measurement of whole body cellular and collagen nitrogen, potassium, and other elements by neutron activation and whole body counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, H.M.; Fabricius, P.J.; Dykes, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    Whole body nitrogen can be measured by neutron activation analysis with an acceptable radiation dose; it is an index of body protein which, in normal subjects, is 65% cellular protein and 35% extracellular connective collagen. Whole body potassium can be measured by whole body counting without irradiating the subject; it is an index of body cell mass. We measured whole body nitrogen, potassium, extracellular water, intracellular water, and fat-folds. The differences between 37 malnourished patients and five normal subjects suggested that the patients had 9 kg less cell mass than normal, but no difference in extracellular mass. Measurements were made on eight patients before and after 14 days of total parenteral nutrition; balance of nitrogen intake and excretion also was measured. The changes were consistent with mean increases of 3 kg of cellular mass and 3 kg of fat with no change of extracellular mass. The accuracy and sensitivity of the whole body measurements need further confirmation for use in patients with changing body composition. Where tissue wasting is largely from the cellular compartment, potassium could be a more sensitive index of wasting than nitrogen. Multielement analysis of nitrogen, potassium, chlorine, and carbon will probably be valuable in elucidating body composition in malnutrition

  6. Intercalibration of CDTN and IRD whole body counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, B.M.; Dantas, A.L.A.; Alonso, T.C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Intercalibration exercises are designed to harmonize analytical techniques and ensure reliability of measurement results performed in a laboratory network. Such strategy helps to improve laboratory performance among participants in future intercomparison exercises, when it is verified the metrological capacity, by determining accuracy, precision and reproducibility of data produced by each laboratory. In Brazil, there are currently four in vivo monitoring systems, located in IRD, in Rio de Janeiro, CDTN, in Belo Horizonte, IPEN, in Sao Paulo and CNAAA, in Angra dos Reis. Such systems, generically referred as whole body counters, aim to detect and quantify radionuclides in organs and tissues for radiological protection purposes and to provide useful information for studies on biokinetic behavior of radionuclides in humans and animals. The objective of this work is to establish a methodology to be applied for intercalibration of whole body counters. The IRD whole body counter is installed in a 15 cm steel shielded room where two NaI(Tl) and four HPGe detectors are calibrated for the determination of radionuclides in the energy range from 10 to 3000 keV. The CDTN whole body counter has one NaI detector set up in a shadow shield configuration, and is able to determine radionuclides emitting photons from 100 to 2000 keV. The intercalibration exercise described in this work was planed for whole body geometry using the scintillation detectors available in both laboratories. It was used a thin glass vial containing 2,6615 g of a solution of four gamma emitters ( 57 Co, 137 Cs, 54 Mn, 65 Zn), supplied by the National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LNMRI-IRD). The glass vial was measured in the same geometry in both IRD and CDTN whole body counters, being positioned at 31,5 cm distance from the NaI(Tl) detector of each laboratory. The calibration curves (photo peak channel and Efficiency vs Energy) of each detection system were compared. The

  7. Whole-body microvascular permeability of small molecules in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H

    1985-01-01

    In order to estimate whole-body permeability-surface area (PS) product, the initial slope of the plasma disappearance curve was determined after simultaneous i.v. injection of 24Na+ (mol.wt 24) and 51Cr-EDTA (mol.wt 342). Twelve subjects were studied. Plasma volume (PV) was measured by the indica......In order to estimate whole-body permeability-surface area (PS) product, the initial slope of the plasma disappearance curve was determined after simultaneous i.v. injection of 24Na+ (mol.wt 24) and 51Cr-EDTA (mol.wt 342). Twelve subjects were studied. Plasma volume (PV) was measured...

  8. Anesthesia and monitoring during whole body radiation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Nilsson, A; Hök, B

    1990-01-01

    During whole body radiation therapy of children, treatment may be done in places not equipped with acceptable scavenging systems for anesthetic gases and where clinical observation of the patient may be impossible. In order to solve this problem, the authors have used a total intravenous (IV) ane....... This anesthetic technique and the stethoscope have been used in seven children. The total IV anesthesia proved to be a useful method for children during whole body radiation. The modified stethoscope functioned very well and was a useful complement to the monitoring equipment....

  9. Anesthesia and monitoring during whole body radiation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Nilsson, A; Hök, B

    1991-01-01

    During whole body radiation therapy of children, treatment may be done in places not equipped with acceptable scavenging systems for anesthetic gases and where clinical observation of the patient may be impossible. In order to solve this problem, the authors have used a total intravenous (IV) ane....... This anesthetic technique and the stethoscope have been used in seven children. The total IV anesthesia proved to be a useful method for children during whole body radiation. The modified stethoscope functioned very well and was a useful complement to the monitoring equipment....

  10. Diagnostic value of visualization of the right ventricle using thallium-201 myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaja, F.; Alam, M.; Goldstein, S.; Anbe, D.T.; Marks, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    The diagnostic significance of visualizing the right ventricle on thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scans (T-scan) at rest was studied in 53 patients. In 33 patients, the right ventricle was visualized clearly on the T-scan (group A). Hemodynamic evidence of right ventricular hypertension with systolic pressure greater than or equal to 30 mm Hg was present in 28 of 33 (85%) of these patients. Right ventricular volume overload with left-to-right shunt > 2:1 was present in three patients. Other tests were diagnostic for right ventricular enlargement and or pulmonary hypertension as follows: chest x-ray (58%), echocardiogram (36%), and electrocardiogram (15%). In an unselected group of 20 patients (group B) where resting T-scan did not show visualization of the right ventricle, the right ventricular systolic pressure was < 30 mm Hg in all. The other noninvasive tests did not reveal presence of right ventricular hypertrophy or enlargement. T-scan appears to be a useful and sensitivie test in detecting right ventricular pressure or volume overload compared with other noninvasive tests. This may be useful in detection of patients with right ventricular hypertrophy or enlargement secondary to pulmonary hypertension or other causes

  11. Scintigraphic anatomy of coronary artery disease in digital thallium-201 myocardial images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainwright, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and eight patients with single and multiple vessel coronary artery disease confirmed by arteriography were evaluated by exercise thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial scintigraphy to determine the scintigraphic appearances of specific coronary stenoses. In general proximal stenoses caused more widespread, but not necessarily more severe, myocardial tracer deficit, than distal stenoses. In particular, proximal dominant right coronary artery disease was specifically associated with extensive inferior wall tracer deficit in the anterior scintigram, whereas proximal left circumflex disease caused similar tracer depletion best visualised in the left lateral scintigram. A triad of uptake defects was caused by left anterior descending coronary artery disease; one of these defects called 'diagonal window tracer deficit' was the most useful scintigraphic sign distinguishing proximal from distal disease in the left anterior descending coronary artery. Certain scintigraphic patterns of 201 Tl myocardial accumulation appear invaluable in the noninvasive localisation of stenoses within specific coronary arteries and thus may be useful in predicting life-threatening coronary artery disease which should be confirmed by definitive coronary arteriography. The digital 201 Tl myocardial scintigram also provides an independent functional guide to the interpretation of coronary arteriograms and may be helpful in the planning of aortocoronary bypass graft surgery. (author)

  12. Significance of increased lung thallium-201 activity on serial cardiac images after dipyridamole treatment in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, R.D.; Dai, Y.H.; Boucher, C.A.; Pohost, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Increased lung thallium-201 (Tl-201) activity occurs in patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD) on initial postexercise images. To determine the significance of assessing lung Tl-201 on serial imaging after dipyridamole therapy, initial and delayed (2 to 3 hours) Tl-201 imaging was performed in 40 patients with CAD and 26 normal control subjects. Lung Tl-201 activity was quantitated as a percentage of maximal myocardial activity for each imaging time (lung Tl-201 index). The mean initial lung Tl-201 activity was 42 +/- 2% (+/- standard error of the mean) in 26 control subjects, 56 +/- 2% in 25 patients with 2- or 3-vessel CAD (p less than 0.001) and 53 +/- 2% in 15 patients with 1-vessel CAD (p less than 0.005 compared with control subjects) (difference not significant between 1-vessel and multivessel CAD). Dipyridamole lung Tl-201 activity decreased relative to the myocardium from initial to delayed images (p less than 0.001) in patients with CAD but not in control subjects. When a dipyridamole lung Tl-201 index of 58% (mean +/- 2 standard deviations for control subjects) was chosen as the upper limit of normal, 14 of 40 of the CAD patients (35%) had abnormal values and all control patients had values within normal limits. These 14 patients with CAD and abnormal initial lung Tl-201 indexes had rest ejection fractions that were not significantly different from those in patients with CAD, and normal initial dipyridamole lung Tl-201 index (58 +/- 4% and 63 +/- 2%, respectively)

  13. Metabolite localization by atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging in whole-body sections and individual organs of the rove beetle Paederus riparius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Schott, Matthias; Römpp, Andreas; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging provides for non-targeted, label-free chemical imaging. In this study, atmospheric pressure high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (AP-SMALDI MSI) was used for the first time to describe the chemical distribution of the defensive compounds pederin, pseudopederin, and pederon in tissue sections (16 μm thick) of the rove beetle Paederus riparius. The whole-insect tissue section was scanned with a 20-μm step size. Mass resolution of the orbital trapping mass spectrometer was set to 100,000 at m/z 200. Additionally, organ-specific compounds were identified for brain, nerve cord, eggs, gut, ovaries, and malpighian tubules. To confirm the distribution of the specific compounds, individual organs from the insect were dissected, and MSI experiments were performed on the dissected organs. Three ganglia of the nerve cord, with a dimension of 250-500 μm, were measured with 10-μm spatial resolution. High-quality m/z images, based on high spatial resolution and high mass accuracy were generated. These features helped to assign mass spectral peaks with high confidence. Mass accuracy of the imaging experiments was section. Without any labeling, we assigned key lipids for specific organs to describe their location in the body and to identify morphological structures with a specificity higher than with staining or immunohistology methods.

  14. Comparison of exercise radionuclide angiography with thallium SPECT imaging for detection of significant narrowing of the left circumflex coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilsizian, V.; Perrone-Filardi, P.; Cannon, R.O. III; Freedman, N.M.; Bacharach, S.L.; Bonow, R.O.

    1991-01-01

    Although quantitation of exercise thallium tomograms has enhanced the noninvasive diagnosis and localization of coronary artery disease, the detection of stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery remains suboptimal. Because posterolateral regional wall motion during exercise is well assessed by radionuclide angiography, this study determined whether regional dysfunction of the posterolateral wall during exercise radionuclide angiography is more sensitive in identifying left circumflex disease than thallium perfusion abnormalities assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). One hundred ten consecutive patients with CAD were studied, of whom 70 had a significant stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery or a major obtuse marginal branch. Both regional function and segmental thallium activity of the posterolateral wall were assessed using visual and quantitative analysis. Left ventricular regional function was assessed objectively by dividing the left ventricular region of interest into 20 sectors; the 8 sectors corresponding to the posterolateral free wall were used to assess function in the left circumflex artery distribution. Similarly, using circumferential profile analysis of short-axis thallium tomograms, left ventricular myocardial activity was subdivided into 64 sectors; the 16 sectors corresponding to the posterolateral region were used to assess thallium perfusion abnormalities in the left circumflex artery territory. Qualitative posterolateral wall motion analysis detected 76% of patients with left circumflex coronary artery stenosis, with a specificity of 83%, compared with only 44% by qualitative thallium tomography (p less than 0.001) and a specificity of 92%

  15. The A.R.L. whole body monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotler, L.H.

    1990-02-01

    This report describes a Whole Body Monitor based on four uncollimated NaI(Tl) detectors in a static geometry i