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Sample records for white rose development

  1. White Rose sustains east coast development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.

    2004-11-01

    The White Rose Oil Project, located in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin 350 km east of St. John's, is reported to continue paying benefits for the oil and gas industry in eastern Canada. The operator, Husky Energy, is said to be on target and expects first oil from the project in late 2005 or early 2006. Peak production for the White Rose Field is projected at 100,000 bbl/d. The project has a total capital cost of $2.35 billion. The first phase of the project, comprised of four wells, including an oil producer, was completed in July. The estimated productive capacity of this well is between 25,000 and 35,000 bbl/d. Other major milestones achieved at the White Rose project include movement of the topside modules onto the Sea Rose floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel, consisting of 17 lifts during the seven-week program. Individual lifts up to 1,250 tons were carried by the Lampson 2600 Trans-lift crane at the Cow Head Fabrication Facility in Marystown. Towing of the riser buoy from Bay Bulls to the White Rose Field has also been accomplished, and Husky Energy has commenced a program to evaluate the viability of producing and transporting natural gas from the White Rose Field. Several dozen expressions of interest have been received from contractors and engineering firms to assess the key technical, economic and regulatory issues critical to a safe and reliable natural gas development on the Grand Banks. Reserves and resources in the Newfoundland and Labrador offshore region have been estimated by the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board at approximately 2.1 billion barrels of oil and 9.6 trillion cubic feet of gas. The White Rose Field alone is estimated to have natural gas reserves of 2.7 trillion cubic feet. Husky expects the White Rose project to bring in 5.8 million person hours of direct employment in Newfoundland and Labrador and in excess of 1.3 million person hours of direct employment elsewhere in Canada. Approximately 375 long

  2. White Rose Development Plan amendment South White Rose extension tie back : supplemental information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-12-15

    Husky Energy submitted an amendment to its White Rose Development Plan entitled White Rose Development Plan Amendment, the South White Rose Extension Tie-back to the Canada Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB) on September 29, 2006. In addition, Husky submitted supporting documents entitled Review of the White Rose Benefits Plan and its Application to the SWRX Tie-back and Safety Assessment of the South White Rose Expansion Project. Following submission of the these documents, the C-NLOPB conducted a completeness review. On October 26, 2006, the C-NLOPB requested additional information from Husky. This supplemental report addressed the request for additional information received from the C-NLOPB. For example, the C-NLOPB stated that the discussion of research and development and education and training in subsections 3.4 and 4.5 was not adequate as a commitment by Husky to comply with the Board's Guidelines for Research and Development Expenditures October 2004 is not stated and is required. It also stated that the document references increased dimensions resulting from enhancements to the original White Rose Development glory hole design. There were approximately 19 items that Husky was requested to provide more information, to which it has provided responses in this document. 10 tabs., 7 figs., 1 appendix.

  3. White Rose Development Plan amendment South White Rose extension tie back

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-09-15

    In January 2001, Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky), in joint-venture with Petro-Canada submitted a Development Application (DA) to the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB) for the White Rose Development. This DA was prepared following the Canada-Newfoundland Atlantic Accord Implementation Act and the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Atlantic Accord Implementation Newfoundland and Labrador Act. In December 2001, the C-NLOPB approved the White Rose DA. This document outlined a proposed amendment to the original Development Plan involving an expansion of its White Rose Development in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin on the Grand Bank. The expansion will consist of a subsea tie-back to the Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel through the existing Southern Glory Hole (SGH) and utilizing a new glory hole constructed approximately 4 km south of the SGH. The document presented an overview of the development; geology, geophysics and petrophysics; reservoir engineering; facilities design criteria; operations and maintenance; safety analysis; and development costs. 8 tabs., 16 figs.

  4. White Rose development plan amendment production volume increase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-09-15

    In January 2001, Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky), in joint-venture with Petro-Canada, submitted a Benefits Plan for the White Rose Development to the Canada- Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB). This revised document provided the case for requesting an increase in the facility maximum daily production rate and the average annual production rate for the White Rose field from 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) as stated in the approved White Rose Development Plan to 140,000 bpd. In order to determine the potential for increasing oil production through the Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel, two things were considered, namely the proper reservoir management of the White Rose field to ensure optimum resource recovery, and the capacity of the FPSO topsides processing system and supporting utilities to accommodate increased production. This document presented a detailed review of all the implications of increased production on the South White Rose Reservoir. In addition, the results from FPSO performance testing were reviewed, including a study of options for de-bottlenecking the process plant on the topsides and capacity testing of selected process streams and support systems. Vibration analysis was conducted before and during performance testing in July 2006 and a small number of areas addressed. The document also addressed flow metering, resource management, certifying authority review, safety plan revisions, environmental effects, as well as benefits to Canada and Newfoundland. 21 tabs., 60 refs.

  5. White Rose Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, W. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The status of Husky's White Rose Project in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland was presented with particular focus on the province of Newfoundland, resource development applications and project challenges. Husky Energy merged with Renaissance Energy in August 2000. It is publicly traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Its Q1 2000 production was 270 mboe/d with a clear strategy to deliver an additional 200 mboe/d by 2005. The 5 major projects which represent 80 per cent of Husky's growth are the White Rose, Tucker Lake, Wenchang, Terra Nova and Lloyd Project. This presentation included a map showing the land holdings related to Husky's White Rose Project. The development plans include the drilling of 15-20 wells in the basin which holds an estimated 230 mm/bbls of oil reserves. The presentation also described the Canada-Newfoundland benefits that White Rose will bring in terms of direct person-hours and spin off employment. No gas export infrastructure is currently in place. It is believed that between 7 and 10 tcf of discovered gas reserves is required and there is not enough White Rose gas on which to base an economic gas development. The White Rose challenge will be to deliver a technically and commercially viable project that meets the needs of the owners, governments, unions and supply community. The successful completion of the White Rose Project will demonstrate that the Grand Banks can be developed effectively and efficiently and will contribute to Newfoundland's offshore petroleum industry. tabs., figs.

  6. White Rose oilfield development application: Response to additional information requests from the White Rose Public Review Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    This documents contains the responses by Husky Oil as the operator of the White Rose Project in offshore Atlantic Canada to the White Rose Public Review Commission. The responses address questions concerning the development plan, showing that the economic projections meet investment criteria, provide requested details about engineering and management plans, and discuss the financial and economic considerations. Specifically, the Company offers a defence of the proposed floating platform production, storing and offloading (FPSO) system as opposed to the gravity-based structure (GBS) used in the Hibernia development; it also provides employment projections associated with the White Rose development. In this regard, the Company forecasts that 60 to 80 per cent of direct employment will be undertaken in Newfoundland and up to 75 per cent of the engineering for White Rose will likely be carried out in Newfoundland, depending on the result of the competitive bidding process for topsides. Benefits of long-term operations to Newfoundland are estimated at several hundred million dollars as a result of some 400 direct, long-term, high quality jobs associated with the operation and the support of the FPSO; the incremental indirect and induced jobs have been estimated to be about 2.5 times the number of direct jobs. Data is also provided to support the rationale for the deferred development of the North Avalon and West Avalon oil pools. 2 refs., 9 tabs., 4 figs.

  7. White Rose oilfield development application. CD-ROM ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    Located approximately 350 km east of Newfoundland, on the eastern edge of the Jeanne d'Arc Basin, and approximately 50 km from both the Terra Nova and Hibernia oilfields, the White Rose oilfield is considered the main oil producing basin off the eastern coast of North America. Husky Oil is very active in the region and holds almost 32 per cent net working interest in the Significant Discovery License areas in the Jeanne d'Arc basin. The development of an economically significant oil discovery in the White Rose Significant Discovery Area is being proposed jointly by Husky Oil and Petro-Canada. It is estimated that the project would enable the recovery of an estimated 36 million cubic meters (230 million barrels) of recoverable oil in this area that covers approximately 40 square kilometers. The operators propose to use a ship-shaped floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) facility which could store up to 135,000 cubic meters (850,000 barrels) of oil or the equivalent of ten days of oil production. The facility would also provide topside processing units, accommodations and a turret. Both companies are seeking the appropriate regulatory approvals for the development of the White Rose oilfield. The document details the Development Application submitted by Husky Oil Operations Limited on behalf of both itself and the other party involved in the co-venture, Petro-Canada. This Development Application is divided in five volumes and a Project Summary. The five volumes each deal with a separate topic. Volume 1 describes the Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan and is divided into 7 sections describing everything from labour requirements to procurement requirements, development and production scenarios and more. Volume 2 details the Development Plan, which is divided into 14 sections such as project overview, geology and geophysics, petrophysics, reservoir engineering, original hydrocarbons in place, reservoir exploitation, development drilling and

  8. Application for Approval : White Rose Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan and White Rose Development Plan : Decision 2001.01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, H.H.

    2001-11-26

    The White Rose offshore oil development project is located in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin 350 km east of Newfoundland. It is a co-venture between Husky Oil Operations Ltd. and Petro-Canada. The project is expected to recover 230 million barrels of oil over a 12 year period. This report explains the decision of the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board regarding the application by Husky Oil and its partner for approval of its plans for the development of the White Rose oil field. The White Rose Development Plan describes the proponent's interpretation of the geology and reservoir characteristics of the oil field and provides estimates of hydrocarbon reserves. The drilling approach that the proponents plan to use at their facilities were also described along with the environmental parameters of the facilities. The Board's responsibility is to ensure that hydrocarbons are produced in accordance with good oil field practice including efficient recovery, prevention of waste and safe operational practices. The White Rose Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan addresses issues in the areas that will benefit the province, including: an East Coast Regional Office in St. John's, Newfoundland; employment; research and development; goods and services; disadvantaged individuals and groups; and monitoring and reporting. In terms of protection of the environment, the Board makes its assessment under the guidance of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act which deals with issues such as the effects of routine releases of greenhouse gas emissions, drilling discharges, production discharges and accidental discharges. It also sets rules for decommissioning and abandonment of floating production, storage and off loading vessels and underwater facilities. The Board considered the application and has decided to approve the Benefits Plan, subject to certain conditions described in this report. tabs., figs., appendices.

  9. White Rose project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, W. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The status of Husky's White Rose Project off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland was presented with particular focus on project achievements from October 2000 to March 2002, execution strategy and the challenge of delivering the project safely, in an environmentally sensitive manner, both on schedule and within budget. The project is the third oil development offshore Newfoundland and Labrador where recoverable reserves are estimated at 884 MMbbls for Hibernia, 40 MMbbls for Terra Nova, and 200 to 250 MMbbls for the White Rose project. Cost competitive methods can be used to develop White Rose, which will then stimulate more exploration activity and expand the base of experienced individuals. This presentation included computer generated images of the field layout depicting 3 glory holes or drill centres. The well count is currently at 21 wells of which 10 are at the stage of first oil. Production capacity is 100 bbls per day. Graphs depicting drilling performance were also included, along with the FPSO execution strategy, turret schematics, and the project schedule. tabs., figs.

  10. Report of the Public Review Commissioner for the White Rose Development Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, H.M. [Public Review Commission, St. John' s, NF (Canada)

    2001-09-01

    The White Rose offshore oil development is located in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin 350 km east of Newfoundland. It is a co-venture between Husky Oil Operations Ltd (72.5 per cent) and Petro-Canada (27.5 per cent). The project is expected to recover 230 million barrels of oil over a 12 year period. The area also contains significant quantities of natural gas, but there are currently no plans to develop the gas resources. The Project is unique because it is the first under Newfoundland's generic royalty regime and the first with benefit provisions being put forward solely by developers, as submitted in their Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan. It is also the first offshore development to undergo a stand-alone public review. This report is the outcome of that review process which took place over a 6-month period. It deals with the application submitted by Husky and Petro-Canada and contains the Commissioner's review of the project, including comments received from the public. It also includes recommendations of the Commissioner who heard 35 presentations from 29 different groups, in addition to several presentations by the Proponents. This report will be considered by the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board in its decision-making process regarding the Development Application. The report covers all relevant aspects of the proposed development of the White Rose Significant Discovery Area including: (1) the general approach to the proposed and potential development and exploitation of the petroleum resources, (2) the resulting benefits expected for Newfoundland and Labrador and to Canada, with particular emphasis on the requirements for a Canada-Newfoundland benefits plan, and (3) considerations of human safety and environmental protection incorporated into the proposed design and operation of the Project. refs., tabs., figs., appendices.

  11. White Rose oilfield comprehensive study report : final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    The potential environmental effects, including those resulting from malfunctions or accidents as well as any cumulative environmental effects of the White Rose oilfield development project are described in this Comprehensive Study Report. The report was prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. The White Rose oilfield development project is a proposed energy project aimed at recovering approximately 36 million cubic meters (230 million barrels) of recoverable oil. The deposits are contained in an area that covers approximately 40 square kilometers. It is located approximately 350 km east of Newfoundland on the eastern edge of the Jeanne d'Arc Basin. The oilfield is also located 50 km from both the Terra Nova and Hibernia oilfields. Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky Oil), a major presence in the region, is working in a co-venture with Petro-Canada. Husky Oil submitted the Comprehensive Study Report on behalf of both partners. Both companies are seeking the appropriate regulatory approvals for the development of the White Rose oilfield. The document describes the regulatory context, scope of the project and the scope of the environmental assessment. Section 2 details the proposed White Rose oilfield development, while section 3 describes the assessment methodology. Section 4 is concerned with the environmental effects assessment and section 5 discusses the socio-economic effects assessment. 53 refs., 11 tabs., 8 figs.

  12. White Rose Project : preparing for first oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoon, R. [Husky Energy Inc., East Coast Development, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    An update of Husky Energy's participation in the White Rose Project was presented with reference to the remaining steps to first oil, final development challenges, the lasting legacy of benefits and relevant issues beyond first oil. The White Rose Project is located 350 km southeast of St. John's, Newfoundland and has recoverable reserves of 200 to 250 million bbls. Production life is estimated to be 12 to 15 years with a total development cost of $2.35 billion. The project development schedule was included along with an update on the glory hole excavation, the floating production storage and off-loading (FPSO) system and subsea production system. Five of the 10 development wells have been completed. Completion of the subsea installation program involves the installation of the riser, flowline, buoy and glory hole tie-ins. The ongoing challenges include safety performance at work sites, final regulatory approvals, and offshore environmental conditions. The White Rose Project has demonstrated local capabilities in engineering, fabrication and research and development for the province of Newfoundland. Husky East Coast employment trends were illustrated. It was also noted that Husky Energy currently holds 15 significant discovery licenses and signed 3 new exploration blocks in 2004. The largest gas areas in Newfoundland and Labrador include the White Rose Project (2.7 Tcf); Hibernia (1.3 Tcf); and Terra Nova (0.5 Tcf). The Grand Banks total gas reserves are estimated at 5.4 Tcf. Potential gas markets include Nova Scotia and the New England States. An evaluation of gas development and gas export options were listed with reference to the technical and economic feasibility of compressed natural gas; subsea pipelines; onshore liquid natural gas; offshore liquid natural gas; onshore or offshore gas to liquid; and, onshore or offshore methanol conversion. figs.

  13. Oil flows during White Rose test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2004-11-01

    During a test conducted this summer, the White Rose test well, with a horizontal section of approximately 1,200 metres, has produced 9,000 barrels per day from a horizontal oil producer, the maximum allowed by the testing facilities aboard the submersible drill rig Glomar Grand Bank. The test indicates that the oil well can pump between 25,000 to 30,000 barrels per day when production begins in late 2005 or early 2006. Initial development involves 7 or 8 oil production wells, 10 or 11 water injection wells, and two gas injection wells in the North Avalon pool. Husky Energy is aiming for initial production of 100,000 barrels per day from four production wells when full production begins from the Sea Rose floating production, storage and off-loading vessel. The floating production, storage and off-loading (FPSO) vessel, currently under construction at the Marystown Fabrication Facility, is expected to head to the oilfield during the fourth quarter of 2005 for final testing of various systems. First official production is expected to commence soon after final testing is completed. The White Rose project has a site-specific environmental protection plan, and environmental compliance monitoring will be conducted on a regular basis to ensure that project activities comply with environmental legislation and standards, to assess performance, and identify areas where improvements are needed.

  14. Review of the White Rose Development Project : environmental impact statement with emphasis on concerns regarding marine birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M. [Canadian Nature Federation, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The Canadian Nature Federal (CNF) works in partnership with other environmental organizations, governments and industry to promote the development of ecologically sound solutions to conservation problems. This paper was prepared by the Important Bird Areas Program within the CNF and submitted to the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board to make them aware of the threats that offshore oil and gas activity pose to marine birds. In particular, the CNF has taken the opportunity offered by the Public Review of Husky Oil's proposed White Rose Development Application. This submission is not intended as a comprehensive review of the development application, but rather to identify specific concerns regarding the impact the project will have on marine birds. Of the 43 coastal important bird areas that have been identified in Newfoundland, 6 are located within the White Rose Study Area. All of the bird species spend their time on the water and forage by diving into the water column. This makes them particularly vulnerable to oil or any other water pollution. The CNF is concerned about the effects that flaring operations, drill cuttings, and oil spills will have on the birds. Since there is no way to mitigate the effects of oil on seabirds, prevention is the only realistic approach to minimizing the effects on marine birds from offshore oil activity. 1 append.

  15. Review of White Rose Benefits Plan and its application to the South White Rose extension tie-back

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-09-15

    In January 2001, Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky), in joint-venture with Petro-Canada, submitted a Benefits Plan for the White Rose Development to the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB). It was prepared following the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Atlantic Accord Implementation Act and the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Atlantic Accord Implementation (Newfoundland) Act. In December 2001, the C-NLOPB approved the White Rose Benefits Plan. This document described the work that Husky proposes to undertake within its significant discovery license areas 1043 and 1044 for the development of the South White Rose Extension (SWRX) Tie-back to the White Rose Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel as it will require an amendment to the original White Rose Development Plan and is subject to the review and approval of the C-NLOPB. The statutory requirements as well as the actual policies and procedures were identified and discussed in detail. Policies and procedures around the following topics were also presented: project management, supplier development, procurement and contracting strategy, employment and training, research and development, and disadvantaged individuals and groups. The report also discussed the capacity of Newfoundland and Labrador and Canadian economies. It was concluded that, after re-examining the original White Rose Benefits Plan, Husky has determined that the basic principles and philosophy that applied in the base development also apply to the tie-back development. 2 tabs., 7 figs., 3 appendices.

  16. White Rose: the weight of the local content; White Rose: le poids du contenu local

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2002-12-01

    Technip-Coflexip company announced on September 4, 2002, that its daughter company Technip CSO Canada ltd (the former Coflexip Stena Offshore Newfoundland ltd) based at St John's in Newfoundland (Canada), obtained from Husky Oil Operations ltd, an integrated contract for the development of the White Rose field in the Newfoundland offshore. This contract, of 165 Meuro, represents an important reference for the offshore industry of Newfoundland, because for the very first time the project control and the underwater engineering of a project of this size will be entirely performed locally. (J.S.)

  17. Safety assessment of South White Rose expansion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, G.; Jenkins, J. [Atkins, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-05

    Husky Oil Operations Ltd (Husky) is considering the development of the South White Rose Expansion (SWRX) area, located approximately 4 km south of the current Southern Glory Hole (SGH) in approximately 120 m of water. Within the new glory hole, one new drill centre will be constructed with wells tied back and into the SGH manifolds. The SWRX drill centre will comprise three horizontal production wells and two horizontal water injection wells with expansion capacity for eight wells. Husky is intending to submit a Development Plan Amendment to the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB) as part of the development. This document presented the results of a study that assessed the potential impact of the new development on existing White Rose safety studies. The study reviewed existing safety studies that were developed for the White Rose project to determine the potential impact of the new SWRX development. These studies included Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU) Blowout Risk Assessment; MODU Dropped Object Analysis; and MODU Risk Assessment. This report also detailed the hazards and risks associated with Diving Support Vessel (DSV) operations. The report also contained a review of Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel modifications. 25 refs., 41 tabs., 15 figs., 2 appendices.

  18. Axillary bud development in rose

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelis - van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Axillary buds form the basis of flower production of a rose crop. Within a rose crop there exists an undesired large variation in shoot number and size, which affects flower yield. Part of this variation may be traced back to early variation in axillary buds. The aim of the research reported in this thesis was to enlarge the knowledge and insight in the development of axillary buds. It was investigated to what extent the growth of an axillary bud into a shoot can be influenced during...

  19. Axillary bud development in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis - van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Axillary buds form the basis of flower production of a rose crop. Within a rose crop there exists an undesired large variation in shoot number and size, which affects flower yield. Part of this variation may be traced back to early variation in axillary buds. The aim of the research

  20. Offshore intelligence : new telemetry system helps drill White Rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, D.

    2005-08-01

    The development of a new telemetry system designed by AMEC Earth and Environment Services was discussed. The system will provide real-time information from the rig and the ocean floor for the White Rose project in Newfoundland. It will help operators assess the status of the drill pipe as it moves through the water and will help ensure that drilling is not interrupted. The real-time oceanographic monitoring system (ROMAN) uses acoustic modem technology to relay data on the water column's current speed and direction to a surface buoy. The buoy then sends the information to the rig, which sends it to the company, as well as to AMEC through a high-speed Internet connection. The acoustic technology is capable of sending the data through up to 5 km of water. The information can be incorporated into engineering designs, mooring advisory systems, ice management programs and emergency response, including oil-spill and man-overboard models. A background of the system's design was provided. AMEC is also using the technology to help with a project called SmartBay, part of an initiative by Fisheries and Oceans Canada to foster integrated management of Placentia Bay, an environmentally sensitive area located on the south coast of Newfoundland. The area has many users, as well as substantial oil tanker traffic. The system will be used to provide users with simple access to information about the ocean, in order to better manage resources. 1 fig.

  1. First oil expected at White Rose in 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, A.

    2002-04-01

    Husky Oil received approval from the government to begin development of its White Rose properties located in the Jean d'Arc Basin, 350 km east of St. John's, offshore Newfoundland and Labrador. First oil is expected by the end of 2005. The South Avalon Pool was discovered in 1988 and is estimated to contain approximately 200-250 million barrels of oil. Husky Oil and Petro-Canada filed a development application with the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board in January 2001. Approval of the $2.35 billion project was received in December 2001. The development plan is based on a newly-built floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel. Initial development will focus on the South Avalon Pool that has been tested in excess of 5,000 barrels per day. The pool will be developed using eight production wells, 11 water injection wells and two gas injection wells. An estimated 150 million cubic feet per day of gas will also be produced from the field. It will be used to fuel production facilities and as an artificial lift into production wells when required. Any excess gas will be preserved by injection into two wells in the North Avalon field. Peak production rates of 100,000 bbl/d of 30 degree API oil is expected for a four-year period. Estimated total production life of the field is 15 years. Aker Maritime Kiewit Contractors landed the contract to complete topside fabrication, with Samsung supplying the hull. Other key contracts will be confirmed shortly with SM/Imodco lined up for the turret and mooring system, Technip-Coflexip for the subsea production system and Boskalis for glory hole excavation.

  2. Atlantic Canada: third catch --White Rose keeps bloom on Grand Banks oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, W.

    2001-02-05

    Subject to receiving regulatory approvals, Husky Oil expects to drill and trench subsea lines during summer 2001 and build a floating production, storage and off-loading (FPSO) vessel by the end of the year at its White Rose oilfield, covering about 40 square kilometres of the northern edge of Newfoundland's Grand Banks, about 350 km east of St. John's. Despite heated demands by local politicians for Husky to deploy a gravity-based structure and exploit the field's two trillion cubic feet of natural gas by building a 650 km pipeline system, Husky Oil and its partner PetroCanada, consider the FPSO to be the safest and most reliable production facility considering the location in the Iceberg Alley corridor of spring icebergs, pack ice, water depth and climate. Oil price hovering at US$30 per barrel and development costs within the economic framework of the project contributed to launching the project. According to current estimates the White Rose field will earn a return on investment as long as oil prices stay above US$15. The White Rose field has about 230 million barrels of recoverable reserves, compared to the Terra Nova field at 400 million barrels and the Hibernia at 600 to 700 million barrels. The smaller size of the field presents a different economic prospect and requires close attention to costs, say Husky Oil officials. In reviewing the Husky Oil application, the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board plans to conduct public hearings, promising to pay close attention to the company's proposals regarding its efforts to foster Canadian participation.

  3. White Rose oilfield comprehensive study and comprehensive study report. CD-ROM ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-01

    Husky Oil Operations Limited (Husky Oil) is proposing to develop the White Rose oilfield, located approximately 350 km east of Newfoundland on the eastern edge of the Jeanne d'Arc Basin. The oilfield is also located approximately 50 km from both the Hibernia and Terra Nova oilfields. This project proposes the recovery of 36 million cubic meters (230 million barrels) of recoverable oil from the Jeanne d'Arc Basin, considered the main producing basin off the eastern coast of North America. The deposits are contained within an area that covers approximately 40 square kilometers. Husky Oil is involved in a co-venture with Petro-Canada and presented this Comprehensive Study on behalf of both partners. Both companies are seeking the appropriate regulatory approvals for the development of the White Rose oilfield. This CD-ROM contains an introduction and the project description. Part One details the Environmental Impact Statement, with sections touching on regional setting (physical environment), regional setting (biological environment), effects assessment, oil spills, mitigation measures and contingency planning, monitoring and reporting, and environmental management. Part Two of the document outlines the Socio-Economic Impact Statement. This part describes the assessment scope and methodology, economic and demographic context, business and employment, community social infrastructure and services, community physical infrastructure, and fisheries. This project will be assessed under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, as well as by the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NOPB) under the Atlantic Accord Implementation Act. refs., tabs., figs.

  4. Genetics and genomics of flower initiation and development in roses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendahmane, Mohammed; Dubois, Annick; Raymond, Olivier; Bris, Manuel Le

    2013-02-01

    Roses hold high symbolic value and great cultural importance in different societies throughout human history. They are widely used as garden ornamental plants, as cut flowers, and for the production of essential oils for the perfume and cosmetic industries. Domestication of roses has a long and complex history, and the rose species have been hybridized across vast geographic areas such as Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. The domestication processes selected several flower characters affecting floral quality, such as recurrent flowering, double flowers, petal colours, and fragrance. The molecular and genetic events that determine some of these flower characters cannot be studied using model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana, or at least only in a limited manner. In this review, we comment on the recent development of genetic, genomic, and transcriptomic tools for roses, and then focus on recent advances that have helped unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying several rose floral traits.

  5. Husky Oil's White Rose gets ready to bloom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-06-01

    The South White Rose oilfield, offshore Newfoundland, owned jointly by Husky Oil (82.5 per cent ) and Petro-Canada (17.5 per cent) is being developed using a floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) system. Some industry stakeholders claim that the oil should be produced using a concrete gravity base system as used in the Hibernia Field. However, Husky Oil officials are confident that the choice of the FPSO is well justified, based on its cost effectiveness and economic viability. Several production facility options have been assessed, taking into account feasibility, deliverability, economic attributes. risk and safety . The assessment results clearly pointed to FPSO as the preferred system based on its commercial and technical flexibility, proven track record in harsh environments, its ability to produce both oil and gas in sequential development, its promise of production at full capacity earlier than a gravity base system, and easier decommissioning than a GBS-type fixed platform. The facility at White Rose will be an ice-strengthened vessel, supporting a top-sides processing plant with a capacity of 100,000 barrels a day and oil storage capacity of around 800,000 barrels. A shuttle-tanker will be used every five-to-six days at peak periods. The FPSO will also have a turret, allowing it to disconnect and move off location to address operational and/or emergency situations. Development plans are scheduled to be submitted to the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board during the summer of 2000; 'first oil' is expected in 2003 or 2004. The possibility of producing natural gas in the future is also taken into account. Exploratory work to date indicates 350 billion cubic feet of gas, with probable additional volumes of around 500 billion cubic feet. Total gas in place could reach 2.3 trillion cubic feet. Development of the field will require 10 to 14 production wells; an additional eight to ten water injection wells will be drilled to

  6. Sea change: Multi-component seismic survey designed for White Rose using ocean bottom seismometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, S.

    2001-12-01

    The first multi-component seismic survey in Canadian waters of the Scotian Shelf and the Grand Banks is being planned for the summer of 2002. A consortium of university and government scientists will join forces with industry geophysicists to carry out the survey. The specialized multi-component seismic data will be recorded on the seafloor using ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) built by Dalhousie University. The survey will be done on a grid pattern of 21 OBSs, on a layout of 42 sq km four-component (4-C) 3-D survey at the White Rose oil and gas fields. The objective is to resolve seismic exploration problems such as problems with properly imaging and mapping the top of the main reservoir using conventional 2-D and 3-D seismic data. If successful, these multi-component data will help Husky Oil in the production and development of the White Rose Field's 230 million bbls reserves. Husky Oil's geophysicists would prefer to use a commercially proven technology in place of the Dalhousie built OBSs --- an ocean bottom cable (OBC) which is a recording cable containing 4-C geophones laid out on the seafloor by a vessel, as opposed to deploying the 4-C OBS sensors in a grid pattern on the sea floor. However, the OBS survey proposed by academia will cost about one-tenth of the cost that would be involved in mobilizing a commercial OBC seismic acquisition boat from the North Sea or from the Gulf of Mexico, the reason being that 4-C OBS ssurvey will be piggybacked on a related 4-C 2-D scientific survey being conducted next summer on the Scotian Shelf and the Grand Bank Flemish Cap area. The 4-C 2-D seismic survey will consist of 1,250 km of regional transects designed to increase knowledge of the structural origins and make-up of Canada's hydrocarbon-bearing continental shelf and margins. This program, aptly named MARIPROBE, is the continuation of the successful GSC/NSERC-funded LITHOPROBE program that saw deep crustal seismic data shot across Canada. 4 figs.

  7. Topical liposomal Rose Bengal for photodynamic white hair removal: randomized, controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Nevien; Fadel, Maha

    2014-04-01

    Blond and white hair removal by laser is a complicated task with weak satisfactory results due to the deficiency in laser-absorbing chromophore. To investigate if repetitive sessions of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using external application of liposomal Rose bengal (RB) photosensitizer followed by intense pulsed light (IPL) exposure enables removal of gray and white hair. Rose bengal loaded in liposomes (LRB) was constructed, prepared in hydrogel, and was studied for some pharmaceutical properties. Penetration and selective hair follicle damage in mice skin were studied. Topical gel containing LRB was used for treating fifteen adult females who were complaining of facial white terminal hair. Unwanted facial hair was treated for three sessions at intervals of 4-6 weeks using intense pulsed light (IPL). At each session, the treatment area was pre-treated with topical LRB gel, while a control group of another 15 patients applied placebo gel before IPL treatment. Evaluations included hair regrowth, which was measured 4 weeks after each treatment session and at 6 months follow-up by counting the number of terminal hair compared with baseline pretreatment values. Treatment outcomes and complications if any were also reported. Average hair regrowth in the LRB group was 56% after 3 treatment cycles. After six-months follow up, average terminal hair count compared with baseline pretreatment showed 40% reduction and no recorded side effects. A significant difference (Phair removal using rose bengal-encapsulated liposomal gel in combination with IPL treatment showed significant efficacy in the treatment of white hair compared with a control group.

  8. Growth and flower development in roses as affected by light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, F.M.; Bakx, E.

    1997-01-01

    Growth and flowering of shoots of rose ‘Mercedes’ were investigated as a function of the level and spectral quality of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Experiments were performed with single-shoot plants decapitated above the two most basal leaves with five leaflets. The development of

  9. Enhancing the Antioxidant Activities of Wines by Addition of White Rose Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Hyunbin; Heo, Jieun; Lee, Kyun Hee; Lee, Yoon Bok; Kim, Yun Bae; Han, Nam Soo

    2017-09-28

    White rose petal extract (WRE) contains large amounts of phenolic compounds and is considered edible. In this study, red and white wines were prepared by the addition of WRE (0.10% or 0.25% (w/v)), followed by fermentation at 25°C for 15 days. The fermentation profiles, colors, sensory test results, and antioxidant activities of the wines were compared. As reported herein, the fermentation profiles of the pH, CO₂ production rate, and final ethanol concentration were not affected by the addition of WRE, but a slow consumption rate of sugar was observed in 0.25% WRE-added wine. In contrast, the total polyphenol concentrations in WRE-added wines increased significantly ( p wines. Chromaticity tests showed slight changes in the redness and yellowness, but sensory tests showed that the overall flavor qualities of the WRE-added wines were acceptable to the panels. This study demonstrates that addition of WRE to wine confers beneficial health effects and this treatment results in better outcome in white wine.

  10. Development of blue rose; Aoi bara wa sakuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, T. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Yoshida, K.

    1998-06-01

    Precise crystalline structures of pigments in petals have been elucidated by structural analysis of the blue pigment in Commelinaceae petals using X-ray analysis. It is found that the Mg ion is coordinated with the oxygen atom on the B-nucleus in the base nucleus of delphinidin (belonging to anthocyanidine, a pigment obtained by separating sugar from anthocyanin by hydrolysis) to develop a blue color, and that the complex is a stable supermolecule in which 6 pigment molecules are associated regularly with 6 flavone molecules. The similar mechanisms are responsible for development of blue color for flowers, and widely occurring in nature. Biosynthesis of anthocyanin, beginning with phenylalanine, undergoes virtually common processes; cyclization of the flavonoide skeleton, reduction to the anthocyanidine nucleus, hydroxylation of the B-nucleus in the base nucleus and glycoside formation at the 3-site. It will be possible to shift rose color to blue, if anthocyanin belonging to anthocyanidine could be bio-synthesized by introducing the gene of enzyme for 3`, 5`-hydroxylation on the base nucleus, which the rose lacks. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  11. [Development of new SSR markers from EST of SSH cDNA libraries on rose fragrance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Hao; Xie, Ji-Rong; Li, Shu-Fa; Jian, Hong-Ying; Qiu, Xian-Qin; Wang, Qi-Gang; Wang, Ji-Hua; Tang, Kai-Xue

    2009-09-01

    The new SSR markers of rose related fragrance were developed based on the SSH cDNA libraries of rose floral scent mutant. In this study, 10 EST-SSRs (2.6%) from 391 ESTs in the libraries were identified. Six EST-SSRs primers were designed to sequence flanking SSRs. The primer pairs designed were screened on the wild-type Jinyindao, which has flowers full of pleasant scent, and the mutant-type Wangriqinghuai without perceivable floral scent. Five primer pairs were amplified effectively in Jinyindao and Wangriqinghuai, and 3 were polymorphic between Jinyindao and Wangriqinghuai. Eighteen rose cultivars including fragrant roses and nonfragrant roses were identified by the five prime pairs. These results proved that EST-SSR markers are effective markers to identify the polymorphism of the rose.

  12. Development and growth potential of axillary buds in roses as affected by bud age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of axillary bud age on the development and potential for growth of the bud into a shoot was studied in roses. Age of the buds occupying a similar position on the plant varied from 'subtending leaf just unfolded' up to 1 year later. With increasing age of the axillary bud its dry mass,

  13. Development of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to Rose rosette virus nucleoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden roses, which form the cornerstone of the multi-billion dollar landscape industry, annually generate wholesale US domestic production valued at ca. $400 million. Over the past few decades Rose rosette disease, caused by Rose rosette virus (RRV; genus Emaravirus), has become a major threat to t...

  14. Salinity in rose production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Reis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rose is one of the most important ornamental plants in the world. However, the cultivation systems used for roses often impose salt stress. Saline conditions occur naturally in some regions or by human activity in others with use of low quality water or excessive fertilizer application. In general, roses are considered sensitive to salinity. However, tolerance levels can be different among roses species and cultivars. Therefore, studies are needed that take into account characteristics of each species and how the exposure to salinity occurs. Management of water and nutrients can be important tools for mitigating the effects of high salt concentrations. Also, advances in biotechnology can be used for a better understanding of the physiological responses to salinity and to develop more salt tolerant rose cultivars. Thus, this paper aims to review the progress made and future prospects of salinity tolerance in commercial rose production.

  15. Rose bush leaf and internode expansion dynamics: analysis and development of a model capturing interplant variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eDemotes-Mainard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bush rose architecture, among other factors, such as plant health, determines plant visual quality. The commercial product is the individual plant and interplant variability may be high within a crop. Thus, both mean plant architecture and interplant variability should be studied. Expansion is an important feature of architecture, but it has been little studied at the level of individual organs in bush roses. We investigated the expansion kinetics of primary shoot organs, to develop a model reproducing the organ expansion of real crops from non destructive input variables. We took interplant variability in expansion kinetics and the model’s ability to simulate this variability into account. Changes in leaflet and internode dimensions over thermal time were recorded for primary shoot expansion, on 83 plants from three crops grown in different climatic conditions and densities. An empirical model was developed, to reproduce organ expansion kinetics for individual plants of a real crop of bush rose primary shoots. Leaflet or internode length was simulated as a logistic function of thermal time. The model was evaluated by cross-validation. We found that differences in leaflet or internode expansion kinetics between phytomer positions and between plants at a given phytomer position were due mostly to large differences in time of organ expansion and expansion rate, rather than differences in expansion duration. Thus, in the model, the parameters linked to expansion duration were predicted by values common to all plants, whereas variability in final size and organ expansion time was captured by input data. The model accurately simulated leaflet and internode expansion for individual plants (RMSEP = 7.3% and 10.2% of final length, respectively. Thus, this study defines the measurements required to simulate expansion and provides the first model simulating organ expansion in rosebush to capture interplant variability.

  16. Rose Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increase the chance of blood clots or another heart attack. Sickle cell disease: It is rare, but the vitamin C in rose hip might make blood more acidic. This could bring on a sickle cell crisis. It's best to avoid use. Stroke: Rose hip ...

  17. Development of Newfoundland Power`s Rose Blanche hydroelectric power project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, M.C.

    1999-08-01

    The 6.0 Mw Rose Blanche hydroelectric development is located on the southwest portion of the island of Newfoundland. This is the first new development by Newfoundland Power since 1983 and was a learning experience because of changes in regulatory requirements, available technologies and the working relationships between suppliers and contractors. Environmental issues dealt with included a five year assessment process, fisheries compensation/enhancement, minimum streamflow requirements, and construction and emergency preparedness plans. Technical issues included the use of spiral welded steel penstock, design and construction of an earthfill concrete face dam, and turbine generator design and control systems. There was a necessity to build the plant in one construction season and the plant was synchronized to the system in December 1998. The approach taken by the design and construction team was cooperative as they worked together with suppliers and contractors to develop the most expedient and cost effective methods of construction.

  18. Developing tools to eradicate ecologically destructive ants on Rose Atoll: effectiveness and attractiveness of formicidal baits

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A key factor contributing to the decline in the population of Pisonia grandis on Rose Atoll is an infestation of the non-native scale, Pulvinaria urbicola...

  19. Postharvest aspects of roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka Fabiana Aparecida Almeida

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate respiratory activity, color changes and fresh weight variation of ‘Carola’ (red, ‘Avalanche’ (white and ‘Avalanche Chá’ (tea roses for seven days after harvest. Respiratory activity, coloration of petals and fresh weight loss were evaluated. Treatments were composed of three rose cultivars and seven days of evaluation, in a 3 x 7 factorial and a completely randomized design with four replicates of two flowers per plot. To determine the respiratory activity, in addition to the four replicates, an “experimental control” was used as a fifth replicate without roses. ‘Avalanche’ and ‘Avalanche Chá’ roses with petals of similar luminosity showed no browning during days after harvest, but are distinct in terms of chromaticity. ‘Carola’ rose has less shiny petals. On harvest day, the respiratory activity is elevated and reduces later until the fourth day, in which there is elevation of this parameter again coinciding with high fresh weight loss. During days after harvest, small changes in the color of petals were observed; however, the main changes were observed in respiratory activity and fresh weight loss.

  20. Radiation hard silicon detectors - developments by the RD48 (ROSE) collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, G. E-mail: gunnar.lindstroem@desy.de; Ahmed, M.; Albergo, S.; Allport, P.; Anderson, D.; Andricek, L.; Angarano, M.M.; Augelli, V.; Bacchetta, N.; Bartalini, P.; Bates, R.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Borchi, E.; Botila, T.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Bruzzi, M.; Budzynski, T.; Burger, P.; Campabadal, F.; Casse, G.; Catacchini, E.; Chilingarov, A.; Ciampolini, P.; Cindro, V.; Costa, M.J.; Creanza, D.; Clauws, P.; Da Via, C.; Davies, G.; De Boer, W.; Dell' Orso, R.; De Palma, M.; Dezillie, B.; Eremin, V.; Evrard, O.; Fallica, G.; Fanourakis, G.; Feick, H.; Focardi, E.; Fonseca, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabathuler, K.; Glaser, M.; Grabiec, P.; Grigoriev, E.; Hall, G.; Hanlon, M.; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Holmes-Siedle, A.; Horisberger, R.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Jones, B.K.; Jungermann, L.; Kaminsky, A.; Kohout, Z.; Kramberger, G.; Kuhnke, M.; Kwan, S.; Lemeilleur, F.; Leroy, C.; Letheren, M.; Li, Z.; Ligonzo, T.; Linhart, V.; Litovchenko, P.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, M.; Luczynski, Z.; Lutz, G.; MacEvoy, B.; Manolopoulos, S.; Markou, A.; Martinez, C.; Messineo, A.; Mikuz, M.; Moll, M.; Nossarzewska, E.; Ottaviani, G.; Oshea, V.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Petre, D.; Pickford, A.; Pintilie, I.; Pintilie, L.; Pospisil, S.; Potenza, R.; Raine, C.; Rafi, J.M.; Ratoff, P.N.; Richter, R.H.; Riedler, P.; Roe, S.; Roy, P.; Ruzin, A.; Ryazanov, A.I.; Santocchia, A.; Schiavulli, L.; Sicho, P.; Siotis, I.; Sloan, T.; Slysz, W.; Smith, K.; Solanky, M.; Sopko, B.; Stolze, K.; Sundby Avset, B.; Svensson, B.; Tivarus, C.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Valvo, G.; Vasilescu, A.; Vayaki, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; Verdini, P.; Vrba, V.; Watts, S.; Weber, E.R.; Wegrzecki, M.; Wegrzecka, I.; Weilhammer, P.; Wheadon, R.; Wilburn, C.; Wilhelm, I.; Wunstorf, R.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wyss, J.; Zankel, K.; Zabierowski, P.; Zontar, D

    2001-07-01

    The RD48 (ROSE) collaboration has succeeded to develop radiation hard silicon detectors, capable to withstand the harsh hadron fluences in the tracking areas of LHC experiments. In order to reach this objective, a defect engineering technique was employed resulting in the development of Oxygen enriched FZ silicon (DOFZ), ensuring the necessary O-enrichment of about 2x10{sup 17} O/cm{sup 3} in the normal detector processing. Systematic investigations have been carried out on various standard and oxygenated silicon diodes with neutron, proton and pion irradiation up to a fluence of 5x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} (1 MeV neutron equivalent). Major focus is on the changes of the effective doping concentration (depletion voltage). Other aspects (reverse current, charge collection) are covered too and the appreciable benefits obtained with DOFZ silicon in radiation tolerance for charged hadrons are outlined. The results are reliably described by the 'Hamburg model': its application to LHC experimental conditions is shown, demonstrating the superiority of the defect engineered silicon. Microscopic aspects of damage effects are also discussed, including differences due to charged and neutral hadron irradiation.

  1. Development of green tea scented with organic roses "Vitality" from Nevado Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Beltrán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2014/11/03 - Accepted: 2014/12/15The aim of this study was to obtain a flavored green tea with organic rose petals "Vitality" from Nevado Ecuador. Green tea, purchased from a private company, it was subjected to analysis to verify compliance with the requirements of standard INEN 2381: 2005. The Characterization of fresh rose petals was to made and for the dehydration was used two temperatures and two geometries. Analysis of total polyphenol content (Folin-Ciocalteu and antioxidant capacity (TEACmethod were performed. The dried petals, with a higher content of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity, were used in the preparation to flavored tea. Three formulations with different amounts of dried rose petals (10, 17.5 and 25% were tested sensorially by 100 judges to determine the aroma rose in the tea. The final product was analyzed to determine compliance of the requirements of the standard INEN of the tea. Finally acceptability and purchase intention of the product is evaluated. The values of content total polyphenol in the extracts of rose petals were superior to fruits such as blackberries, and strawberries.

  2. Investigating the effect of ecommerce on export development of rose water and essences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nataghi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There are some issues in marketing, supply and after-sales services for customers in global markets for production of rose water and essences extracts. Despite the fact that the products are genuine, there is a downward trend for the production of rose water and essences extracts in recent years. The present study aims to evaluate the identified structural barriers affecting exports of rose water and essences of Kashan to United Arabic Emirates. The population consisted of 77 managers of exporter companies in Kashan. Self-made questionnaire approved by supervisor to be valid and reliable, were distributed. The study tried to deliver a model for barriers to e-commerce in the context of Iran's rose water and essences extracts Export by examining different models of and studied in the field of electronic commerce and the application and advantages of systems based on it. The study also tried to identify current obstacles in the way of electronic commerce in export of rose water and essences extracts by using the questionnaire as an indicator in five-point Likert scale. There were three factors associated with the proposed model. Barriers to electronic commerce in export of rose water and essences extracts were determined in the order of priority as follows: 1 Problems and obstacles related to information infrastructure, 2 problems related to legislative, legal and secure infrastructure, 3 problems and obstacles to human, educational, cultural and behavioral infrastructure, 4 problems related to infrastructure of customs, trade and taxation, 5 internet problem, 6 Problems related to technical and hardware infrastructure, 7 Problems related to financial and software infrastructure.

  3. Morphological study of the formation and development of basal shoots in roses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Basal shoots are the vigorous shoots at the base of the plant. In roses, basal shoots determine the potential flower production of the plant. Although many attempts have been made to promote the formation of basal shoots for commercial production, little attention has been paid to the origin and

  4. Towards marker assisted breeding in garden roses: from marker development to QTL detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukosavljev, M.

    2014-01-01

      Over the last few decades the rose market in Eastern Europe showed a steady growth, which indicates that there is increasing demand for new cultivars that are adapted to the climate as well as to the customs and beauty criterion of that region. One of the possibilities to speed up breeding is

  5. Temperature effect on rose downy mildew development under environmental controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Filgueira D.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The rose downy mildew disease, caused by Peronospora sparsa Berkeley, is one of the most important that affect rose crops in Colombia. To manage this disease, flower growers must deal with high-costs due to the excessive application of fungicides, but without good results. Studies on P. sparsa behavior have shown its narrow relationship with environmental conditions. In this study, the temperature effect was evaluated during the infection and sporulation of P. sparsa in Charlotte leaflets, a susceptible commercial variety, through an environmental controlled conditions system. Infection and sporulation were observed at different temperatures in a range of from 4 to 40°C. Infection with the absence of or very low sporulation was observed at 4°C. The most favorable pathogen responses were between 15 and 18°C in terms of inoculum concentration and sporulation percentage. There was no infection or leaflet change above 35°C. According to the results, sporulation can occur from 4 to 33°C, confirming the fact that P. sparsa is able to reproduce throughout a wide temperature range.

  6. Polymer OLED White Light Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homer Antoniadis; Vi-En Choong; Stelios Choulis; Brian Cumpston; Rahul Gupta; Mathew Mathai; Michael Moyer; Franky So

    2005-12-19

    OSRAM Opto Semiconductors (OSRAM) successfully completed development, fabrication and characterization of the large area, polymer based white light OLED prototype at their OLED Research and Development (R&D) facility in San Jose, CA. The program, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), consisted of three key objectives: (1) Develop new polymer materials and device architectures--in order to improve the performance of organic light emitters. (2) Develop processing techniques--in order to demonstrate and enable the manufacturing of large area, white light and color tunable, solid state light sources. (3) Develop new electronics and driving schemes for organic light sources, including color-tunable light sources. The key performance goals are listed. A world record efficiency of 25 lm/W was established for the solution processed white organic device from the significant improvements made during the project. However, the challenges to transfer this technology from an R&D level to a large tile format such as, the robustness of the device and the coating uniformity of large area panels, remain. In this regard, the purity and the blend nature of the materials are two factors that need to be addressed in future work. During the first year, OSRAM's Materials and Device group (M&D) worked closely with the major polymer material suppliers to develop the polymer emissive technology. M&D was successful in demonstrating a 7-8 lm/W white light source which was based on fluorescent materials. However, it became apparent that the major gains in efficiency could only be made if phosphorescent materials were utilized. Thus, in order to improve the performance of the resulting devices, the focus of the project shifted towards development of solution-processable phosphorescent light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) and device architectures. The result is a higher efficiency than the outlined project milestone.

  7. Cloning and expression analysis of transcription factor RrTTG1 related to prickle development in rose (Rosa Rugosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A prickle is an acuminate protuberance formed by the deformation of plant trichomes together with a few cortical cells. It is a type of multicellular eglandular trichome with special morphology, which originates from the phloem but is not connected to the xylem. Rosa rugosa is an important ornamental/commercial plant and an important raw material in the food and perfume industries. However, the firm prickles on its stems are inconvenient to field management, the harvesting of flowers and garden management. The TTG1 transcription factor related to the development of prickle was isolated from R. rugosa in the present study. Its expression patterns in different tissues and varieties were analyzed. Results showed the expression level of the RrTTG1 gene was highest in the leaves, followed by the stems, but was lower in the pericarps and petals. Moreover, the higher expression level of the RrTTG1 gene in all tissues of the ‘Ciguo rose’, as compared with that of the ‘Weihai wild rose’, follows the results of field morphological observation. Therefore, the RrTTG1 transcription factor is likely to regulate the development of rose prickles. This study allows for further discussion on the molecular mechanisms of prickle formation and development in R. rugosa and provides a molecular basis for the cultivation of roses with fewer or no prickles via genetic engineering.

  8. Biotechnological approaches to rose breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Marchant, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The production of new rose cultivars by sexual crossing is problematic and time consuming due to sexual incompatibility. the failure of seeds to genninate. and to a limited gene pool. Biotechnology provides an obvious alternative for the creation of genetic novelty in rose. This thesis focuses on the development of novel approaches, based on embryo rescue, pollen cryopreservation, protoplast and transformation technologies. A reproducible embryo rescue technique was developed in which embr...

  9. Effect of temperature on development and growth potential of axillary buds in roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of temperature during axillary bud formation on axillary bud development and subsequent shoot growth was investigated. Growth potential of the axillary buds was studied either in situ, by pruning the parent shoot above the bud, or in isolation, by grafting the bud or by culturing the bud

  10. “I Am the Wolf: Queering ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ and ‘Snow White and Rose Red’ in the Television Show Once Upon a Time”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Warman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In season one, episode 15 of the television show Once Upon a Time, viewers are given a glimpse into the history of Ruby/Red, the series’ version of Red Riding Hood. The episode reveals that, contrary to most oral and written versions of the ATU 333 tale, Red herself is the wolf: a werewolf who must wear an enchanted red cloak in order to keep from turning into a monster. The episode also features the beginnings of the close friendship between Red and Snow White. The sisterly bond that quickly forms between the two women, combined with the striking images of their respective red and white cloaks, easily calls to mind a less familiar fairy tale not explicitly referenced in the series: “Snow White and Rose Red” (ATU 426. Taking queer readings of this text as starting points, I argue that this allusion complicates the bond between the two women, opening up space for a compelling reading of Red’s werewolf nature as a coded depiction of her then latent but later confirmed bisexuality.

  11. Robots in the Roses

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    2014-04 Robots in the Roses A CRUSER Sponsored Event. The 4th Annual Robots in the Roses provides a venue for Faculty & NPS Students to showcase unmanned systems research (current or completed) and recruit NPS Students to join in researching on your project. Posters, robots, vehicles, videos, and even just plain humans welcome! Families are welcome to attend Robots in the Roses as we'll have a STEM activity for children to participate in.

  12. Teacher Professional Development Site and Community College Course: Lessons learned from an institutional NASA ROSES E/PO supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Walker, A.; Schultz, G.; Oieroset, M.; Frey, H.; Phan, T.

    2008-12-01

    NASA has provided several opportunities to apply for funding of education and outreach programs. One such opportunity was as a supplement to successful scientific proposed efforts under the ROSES program. NASA funded our institutional E/PO program as a supplement to a combination of three scientists' grants in the fields of Earth's magnetosphere and aurora. This effort launched a Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) teacher professional development site while also starting an introductory-level community college science seminar course. The goals were to provide effective and relevant curriculum for teachers of underserved rural children and to inspire urban community college adults. The GEMS site was launched in South Dakota in 2006 for teachers of grades 1-8, the first such site in this state. Two years later, we went back to present a follow-up teacher workshop, introducing several new teachers to the resources of this new GEMS site. At the community college, we brought in scientists from the Space Sciences Lab (UC Berkeley) to discuss space weather and astronomy at an accessible level, in 2006 and 2007. This type of introductory- level science seminar course is unusual, especially in a community college. We provide a description of the design of the community college seminar and GEMS site, lessons learned, and many of our evaluation results from this program. The success of this proposed effort is in a large part due to our partnerships with the Lawrence Hall of Science, the South Dakota Discovery Center and Aquarium, and Berkeley City College (formerly known as Vista Community College), part of the Peralta Community College District. We hope other scientists and E/PO professionals can learn from our efforts and apply some of the ideas to future E/PO efforts.

  13. White Matter Development in Adolescence: A DTI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Asato, M. R.; Terwilliger, R.; Woo, J.; B. Luna

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence is a unique period of physical and cognitive development that includes concurrent pubertal changes and sex-based vulnerabilities. While diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies show white matter maturation throughout the lifespan, the state of white matter integrity specific to adolescence is not well understood as are the contributions of puberty and sex. We performed whole-brain DTI studies of 114 children, adolescents, and adults to identify age-related changes in white matter in...

  14. White Matter Development in Early Puberty: A Longitudinal Volumetric and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Twin Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, R.M.; Mandl, R.C.W.; Schnack, H.G.; van Soelen, I.L.C.; van Baal, G.C.M.; Peper, J.S.; Kahn, R.S.; Boomsma, D.I.; Hulshoff Pol, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    White matter microstructure and volume show synchronous developmental patterns in children. White matter volume increases considerably during development. Fractional anisotropy, a measure for white matter microstructural directionality, also increases with age. Development of white matter volume and

  15. Characteristics of rose mosaic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek S. Szyndel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Presented review of rose diseases, associated with the mosaic symptoms, includes common and yellow rose mosaic, rose ring pattern, rose X disease, rose line pattern, yellow vein mosaic and rose mottle mosaic disease. Based on symptomatology and graft transmissibility of causing agent many of those rose disorders are called "virus-like diseases" since the pathogen has never been identified. However, several viruses were detected and identified in roses expressing mosaic symptoms. Currently the most prevalent rose viruses are Prunus necrotic ringspot virus - PNRSV, Apple mosaic virus - ApMV (syn. Rose mosaic virus and Arabis mosaic virus - ArMV Symptoms and damages caused by these viruses are described. Tomato ringspot virus, Tobacco ringspot virus and Rose mottle mosaic virus are also mentioned as rose pa thogcns. Methods of control of rose mosaic diseases are discussed.

  16. Rose breeding: past, present, prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de D.P.; Dubois, L.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this review the PAST, PRESENT and PROSPECT will be considered as three separate periods in the history of the breeding and development of rose cultivars. The recurring theme is the genetic variation. This theme was chosen because there is justified doubt as to sufficient genetic variation

  17. Rose's Life Lessons: Signed and Spoken

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Chris

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the experiences of his wife, Cheryl, and his 5-year-old daughter, Rose, when they visited their local high school's child development class. Cheryl and Rose met with over a 100 teenagers teenagers in eight different classes to talk about their family, raising a child with Down syndrome, and their experiences with…

  18. Encyclopedia of Rose Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberts, A.; Debener, T.; Gudin, S.; Byrne, D.B.; Cairns, T.; Vries, de D.P.; Dubois, L.A.M.; Forkmann, G.; Fruchter, M.; Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Horst, R.K.; Jay, M.; Kwakkenbosch, T.A.M.; Pemberton, B.; Put, H.M.C.; Rajapakse, S.; Reid, M.; Schum, A.; Shorthouse, J.D.; Ueda, Y.; Vainstein, A.; Pol, van de P.A.; Zieslin, N.

    2003-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Rose Science brings together a wealth of information on the rose, long treasured for its captivating perfumes and splendid colors. Now, more than ever, science plays a central place in the production of this flower at the center of one of the world's biggest floricultural

  19. White Historical Activity Theory: Toward a Critical Understanding of White Zones of Proximal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, Zeus; Manning, Logan

    2017-01-01

    Best known for arguing that individual development is part of social and historical development Vygotsky's entry into education may be captured by his concept of the "zone of proximal development" (ZPD). ZPD has not yet been synthesized with a critical study of whiteness. When ZPD is used to explain racial disparities in the service of…

  20. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference White Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Victor A Levin; Tonge, Peter J.; Gallo, James M.; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Dar, Arvin C.; Iavarone, Antonio; Paddison, Patrick J.; Heffron, Timothy P.; Elmquist, William F.; Lachowicz, Jean E.; Johnson, Ted W.; White, Forest M.; Sul, Joohee; Smith, Quentin R.; Shen, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Following the first CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference, the speakers from the first 4 sessions and organizers of the conference created this White Paper hoping to stimulate more and better CNS anticancer drug discovery and development. The first part of the White Paper reviews, comments, and, in some cases, expands on the 4 session areas critical to new drug development: pharmacological challenges, recent drug approaches, drug targets and discovery, and clinical paths. F...

  1. ROSE MIU Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Overview of work done by Rebekah Austin during Pathways Internship work tour. Describes ROSE MIU (Reconfigurable Operational Spacecraft for Science and Exploration Module Interface Unit) features and test plan.

  2. Developments for radiation hard silicon detectors by defect engineering - results by the CERN RD48 (ROSE) Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, G. E-mail: gunnar@sesam.desy.de; Ahmed, M.; Albergo, S.; Allport, P.; Anderson, D.; Andricek, L.; Angarano, M.M.; Augelli, V.; Bacchetta, N.; Bartalini, P.; Bates, R.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Borchi, E.; Botila, T.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Bruzzi, M.; Budzynski, T.; Burger, P.; Campabadal, F.; Casse, G.; Catacchini, E.; Chilingarov, A.; Ciampolini, P.; Cindro, V.; Costa, M.J.; Creanza, D.; Clauws, P.; Da Via, C.; Davies, G.; De Boer, W.; Dell' Orso, R.; De Palma, M.; Dezillie, B.; Eremin, V.; Evrard, O.; Fallica, G.; Fanourakis, G.; Feick, H.; Focardi, E.; Fonseca, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabathuler, K.; Glaser, M.; Grabiec, P.; Grigoriev, E.; Hall, G.; Hanlon, M.; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Holmes-Siedle, A.; Horisberger, R.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Jones, B.K.; Jungermann, L.; Kaminsky, A.; Kohout, Z.; Kramberger, G.; Kuhnke, M.; Kwan, S.; Lemeilleur, F.; Leroy, C.; Letheren, M.; Li, Z.; Ligonzo, T.; Linhart, V.; Litovchenko, P.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, M.; Luczynski, Z.; Lutz, G.; MacEvoy, B.; Manolopoulos, S.; Markou, A.; Martinez, C.; Messineo, A.; Miku, M.; Moll, M.; Nossarzewska, E.; Ottaviani, G.; Oshea, V.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Petre, D.; Pickford, A.; Pintilie, I.; Pintilie, L.; Pospisil, S.; Potenza, R.; Radicci, V.; Raine, C.; Rafi, J.M.; Ratoff, P.N.; Richter, R.H.; Riedler, P.; Roe, S.; Roy, P.; Ruzin, A.; Ryazanov, A.I.; Santocchia, A.; Schiavulli, L.; Sicho, P.; Siotis, I.; Sloan, T.; Slysz, W.; Smith, K.; Solanky, M.; Sopko, B.; Stolze, K.; Sundby Avset, B.; Svensson, B.; Tivarus, C.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tzamarias, S.; Valvo, G.; Vasilescu, A.; Vayaki, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; Verdini, P.; Vrba, V.; Watts, S.; Weber, E.R.; Wegrzecki, M.; Wegrzecka, I.; Weilhammer, P.; Wheadon, R.; Wilburn, C.; Wilhelm, I.; Wunstorf, R.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wyss, J.; Zankel, K.; Zabierowski, P.; Zontar, D

    2001-06-01

    This report summarises the final results obtained by the RD48 collaboration. The emphasis is on the more practical aspects directly relevant for LHC applications. The report is based on the comprehensive survey given in the 1999 status report (RD48 3rd Status Report, CERN/LHCC 2000-009, December 1999), a recent conference report (Lindstroem et al. (RD48)), and some latest experimental results. Additional data have been reported in the last ROSE workshop (5th ROSE workshop, CERN, CERN/LEB 2000-005). A compilation of all RD48 internal reports and a full publication list can be found on the RD48 homepage (http://cern.ch/RD48/). The success of the oxygen enrichment of FZ-silicon as a highly powerful defect engineering technique and its optimisation with various commercial manufacturers are reported. The focus is on the changes of the effective doping concentration (depletion voltage). The RD48 model for the dependence of radiation effects on fluence, temperature and operational time is verified; projections to operational scenarios for main LHC experiments demonstrate vital benefits. Progress in the microscopic understanding of damage effects as well as the application of defect kinetics models and device modelling for the prediction of the macroscopic behaviour has also been achieved but will not be covered in detail.

  3. White space communication advances, developments and engineering challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, David

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents a collection of major developments leading toward the implementation of white space technology - an emerging wireless standard for using wireless spectrum in locations where it is unused by licensed users. Some of the key research areas in the field are covered. These include emerging standards, technical insights from early pilots and simulations, software defined radio platforms, geo-location spectrum databases and current white space spectrum usage in India and South Africa.

  4. 2016 Rose Ojowhoh Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OJOHWOH ROSE

    ) 2016. Rose Ojowhoh. Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro, Nigeria. Abstract. The study examined staff development and library services in academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta States. Descriptive survey research design was used for this study, ...

  5. White Identity Development In A Multicultural Age

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunne-Cascio, Colleen A

    2010-01-01

    In an era of increased multicultural awareness and competence, student affairs administrators and other helping professionals are tasked with developing programs and centers that promote inclusiveness...

  6. White matter development in adolescence: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asato, M R; Terwilliger, R; Woo, J; Luna, B

    2010-09-01

    Adolescence is a unique period of physical and cognitive development that includes concurrent pubertal changes and sex-based vulnerabilities. While diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies show white matter maturation throughout the lifespan, the state of white matter integrity specific to adolescence is not well understood as are the contributions of puberty and sex. We performed whole-brain DTI studies of 114 children, adolescents, and adults to identify age-related changes in white matter integrity that characterize adolescence. A distinct set of regions across the brain were found to have decreasing radial diffusivity across age groups. Region of interest analyses revealed that maturation was attained by adolescence in broadly distributed association and projection fibers, including those supporting cortical and brain stem integration that may underlie known enhancements in reaction time during this period. Maturation after adolescence included association and projection tracts, including prefrontal-striatal connections, known to support top-down executive control of behavior and interhemispheric connectivity. Maturation proceeded in parallel with pubertal changes to the postpubertal stage, suggesting hormonal influences on white matter development. Females showed earlier maturation of white matter integrity compared with males. Together, these findings suggest that white matter connectivity supporting executive control of behavior is still immature in adolescence.

  7. White Matter Volume Predicts Language Development in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Caitlin K; Asaro, Lisa A; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Kussman, Barry D; Rivkin, Michael J; Bellinger, David C; Warfield, Simon K; Wypij, David; Newburger, Jane W; Soul, Janet S

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether brain volume is reduced at 1 year of age and whether these volumes are associated with neurodevelopment in biventricular congenital heart disease (CHD) repaired in infancy. Infants with biventricular CHD (n = 48) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurodevelopmental testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II and the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories at 1 year of age. A multitemplate based probabilistic segmentation algorithm was applied to volumetric MRI data. We compared volumes with those of 13 healthy control infants of comparable ages. In the group with CHD, we measured Spearman correlations between neurodevelopmental outcomes and the residuals from linear regression of the volumes on corrected chronological age at MRI and sex. Compared with controls, infants with CHD had reductions of 54 mL in total brain (P = .009), 40 mL in cerebral white matter (P Development-II scores but did correlate positively with MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory language development. Infants with biventricular CHD show total brain volume reductions at 1 year of age, driven by differences in cerebral white matter. White matter volume correlates with language development, but not broader developmental indices. These findings suggest that abnormalities in white matter development detected months after corrective heart surgery may contribute to language impairment. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00006183. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mobile light in roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, A.; Snel, J.F.H.; Elings, A.; Warmenhoven, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    In order to quantify the claimed differences between mobile and static lighting, and to clarify the mechanisms causing these differences, an experiment with rose `First Red¿ was carried out. In a greenhouse compartment half of the area was equipped with mobile lamps, and the other half with static

  9. Two unnamed Turkish roses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Kit; Zielinski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Rosa ‘Professor Turhan Baytop’ and Rosa ‘Asuman’, two different morphotypes of the fragrant double whiteflowered cultivar of Rosa beggeriana, are formally named and described. They stem from old roses once cultivated in gardens of Central and East Anatolia and now gradually disappearing when...

  10. Astrocytes in oligodendrocyte lineage development and white matter pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiasi eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in grey matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica. In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  11. Pesticide analysis in rose wines by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelo-Pérez, Lidia M; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Borges-Miquel, Teresa M; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2007-12-01

    In this work, the determination of 11 pesticides (pirimicarb, metalaxyl, pyrimethanil, procymidone, nuarimol, azoxystrobin, tebufenozide, fenarimol, benalaxyl, penconazole, and tetradifon) in rose wines by micellar EKC (MEKC) using reversed electrode polarity stacking mode (REPSM) as online preconcentration strategy is described. The MEKC buffer consisted of 100 mM sodium tetraborate and 30 mM SDS at pH 8.5 with 6% v/v 1-propanol. A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) procedure using PDMS/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibers was applied to extract the selected pesticides from the rose wine samples. The comparison between the calibration curves obtained from hydroalcoholic solutions (12% v/v ethanol) and from rose wines (matrix matched calibration) showed the existence of a strong matrix effect. Furthermore, a comparison with calibration curves obtained with white wine samples also showed significant differences for most of the analyzed pesticides. As a result, a matrix matched calibration was developed. Quantitative extraction from spiked wine samples was carried out in triplicate at two levels of concentration (range 0.18-6.00 mg/L). LODs between 0.040 and 0.929 mg/L were achieved, which are below the maximum residue limits (MRLs) established for wine grapes (except for pirimicarb) by the EU and Spain legislation as well as by the Codex Alimentarius. The established method - which is solvent free, cost effective, and fast - was also applied to the analysis of several homemade rose wine samples and a commercial one. Two of the selected pesticides were found in some of the analyzed samples.

  12. Helms's White Racial Identity Development (WRID) Theory: Another Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chalmer E.

    1994-01-01

    Responds to recent article in "Counseling Psychologist" (Rowe, Bennett, and Atkinson, 1994) that criticized white racial identity development (WRID) conceptualizations. Contends that Rowe et al.'s criticisms were based on misrepresentations of Helms's (1990) WRID theory and, therefore, were unsubstantiated. Attempts to correct misrepresentations…

  13. Development and Performance Assessment of White LED Dimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Pradip Kr.; Roy, Biswanath

    2017-10-01

    A microcontroller based electronic dimmer is developed using pulse width modulation technique. This dimmer is controllable by infra-red remote within a distance of 4 m and can be electrically connected between LED module and its driver. The performance of a developed LED dimmer is assessed on basis of variation of the photometric parameters of commercially available warm white and cool white LED luminaire used in indoor lighting applications. Four equally spaced dimming levels are considered to measure luminous efficacy, spectral power distribution, CIE 1931 chromaticity coordinates, CIE 1976 CIELUV color difference, correlated color temperature, general color rendering index and one specific color rendering index for saturated red color sample. Variations of above parameters are found out with reference to the values measured at rated voltage without the developed dimmer. Analysis of experimentally measured data shows that the developed LED dimmer is capable to vary light output of the WLED luminaire within a range of 25-100% without appreciable variation of its photometric and color parameters. The only exception is observed for the luminous efficacy parameter where it shows about 17 and 14.7% reduction for warm white and cool white LED luminaire at 25% dimming level.

  14. Early dynamics of white matter deficits in children developing dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolijn Vanderauwera

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural anomalies have been demonstrated in dyslexia. Recent studies in pre-readers at risk for dyslexia and in pre-readers developing poor reading suggest that these anomalies might be a cause of their reading impairment. Our study goes one step further by exploring the neurodevelopmental trajectory of white matter anomalies in pre-readers with and without a familial risk for dyslexia (n = 61 of whom a strictly selected sample develops dyslexia later on (n = 15. We collected longitudinal diffusion MRI and behavioural data until grade 3. The results provide evidence that children with dyslexia exhibit pre-reading white matter anomalies in left and right long segment of the arcuate fasciculus (AF, with predictive power of the left segment above traditional cognitive measures and familial risk. Whereas white matter differences in the left AF seem most strongly related to the development of dyslexia, differences in the left IFOF and in the right AF seem driven by both familial risk and later reading ability. Moreover, differences in the left AF appeared to be dynamic. This study supports and expands recent insights into the neural basis of dyslexia, pointing towards pre-reading anomalies related to dyslexia, as well as underpinning the dynamic character of white matter.

  15. White matter development and early cognition in babies and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Dean, Douglas C; Ginestet, Cedric E; Walker, Lindsay; Waskiewicz, Nicole; Lehman, Katie; Dirks, Holly; Piryatinsky, Irene; Deoni, Sean C L

    2014-09-01

    The normal myelination of neuronal axons is essential to neurodevelopment, allowing fast inter-neuronal communication. The most dynamic period of myelination occurs in the first few years of life, in concert with a dramatic increase in cognitive abilities. How these processes relate, however, is still unclear. Here we aimed to use a data-driven technique to parcellate developing white matter into regions with consistent white matter growth trajectories and investigate how these regions related to cognitive development. In a large sample of 183 children aged 3 months to 4 years, we calculated whole brain myelin volume fraction (VFM ) maps using quantitative multicomponent relaxometry. We used spatial independent component analysis (ICA) to blindly segment these quantitative VFM images into anatomically meaningful parcels with distinct developmental trajectories. We further investigated the relationship of these trajectories with standardized cognitive scores in the same children. The resulting components represented a mix of unilateral and bilateral white matter regions (e.g., cortico-spinal tract, genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, white matter underlying the inferior frontal gyrus) as well as structured noise (misregistration, image artifact). The trajectories of these regions were associated with individual differences in cognitive abilities. Specifically, components in white matter underlying frontal and temporal cortices showed significant relationships to expressive and receptive language abilities. Many of these relationships had a significant interaction with age, with VFM becoming more strongly associated with language skills with age. These data provide evidence for a changing coupling between developing myelin and cognitive development. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The effects of puberty on white matter development in boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Menzies

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies demonstrate considerable changes in white matter volume and microstructure during adolescence. Most studies have focused on age-related effects, whilst puberty-related changes are not well understood. Using diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated the effects of pubertal status on white matter mean diffusivity (MD and fractional anisotropy (FA in 61 males aged 12.7–16.0 years. Participants were grouped into early-mid puberty (≤Tanner Stage 3 in pubic hair and gonadal development; n = 22 and late-post puberty (≥Tanner Stage 4 in pubic hair or gonadal development; n = 39. Salivary levels of pubertal hormones (testosterone, DHEA and oestradiol were also measured. Pubertal stage was significantly related to MD in diverse white matter regions. No relationship was observed between pubertal status and FA. Regression modelling of MD in the significant regions demonstrated that an interaction model incorporating puberty, age and puberty × age best explained our findings. In addition, testosterone was correlated with MD in these pubertally significant regions. No relationship was observed between oestradiol or DHEA and MD. In conclusion, pubertal status was significantly related to MD, but not FA, and this relationship cannot be explained by changes in chronological age alone.

  17. Mobile light in roses

    OpenAIRE

    Marissen, A.; Snel, J.F.H.; Elings, A.; Warmenhoven, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    In order to quantify the claimed differences between mobile and static lighting, and to clarify the mechanisms causing these differences, an experiment with rose `First Red¿ was carried out. In a greenhouse compartment half of the area was equipped with mobile lamps, and the other half with static lamps. By mounting the lamps in the centre of the greenhouse, a light gradient was achieved in both treatments. Experimental plots were chosen with daily light integrals of 1 to 3 and 3 to 5 mol m-2...

  18. A Trail of Roses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2015-01-01

    and reality as as well as about what is endlessly the same and endlessly different. And thus the text is seen to voice an entire ontology which, in its utter simplicity, exemplifies the poetical power and philosophical depth of Gertrude Stein’s writing. From this point Gertrude Stein’s influence is visible...... Davidsen who devoted an entire year to roses. While the conceptual artist Stig Brøgger used his reading of Stein’s How To Write to work out textual fields, films and film scripts. Ecchoes of Stein’s writing can also be heard in recent Danish poetry such as Pia Juul’s Radioteateret (2010)....

  19. Developing an Invisible Message about Relative Acidities of Alcohols in the Natural Products Henna, Turmeric, Rose Petals, and Vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo; Hadir, Latifa

    2010-01-01

    An engaging and colorful demonstration was developed that illustrates the utility of resonance theory in predicting the relative acidities of alcohols. The demonstration can be used as an introduction to exercises that provide students with practice in writing resonance structures and in predicting relative acidities. The demonstration exploits…

  20. Those who pull a rose of sharon off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Yeong

    2011-06-15

    The contents of this book are going over the U. S. policy on nuclear issue, to bloom a rose of sharon, people who pull a rose of sharon off discharge out of appointment and participation into administration and trial on election law, over the farm hardship period, the story about development of nuclear energy. The report and the contract and the related articles.

  1. System development of glasshouse roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.T.N.

    1996-01-01


    Apart from the progress in control of environmental factors and optimization of the technical equipment with respect to an increase in productivity during the last decades, little attention has been paid to reveal the significance of plant structure and plant management on the growth and

  2. The Purple Rose of Virgo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Until now NGC 5584 was just one galaxy among many others, located to the West of the Virgo Cluster. Known only as a number in galaxy surveys, its sheer beauty is now revealed in all its glory in a new VLT image. Since 1 March, this purple cosmic rose also holds the brightest stellar explosion of the year, known as SN 2007af. Located about 75 million light years away towards the constellation Virgo ('the Virgin'), NGC 5584 is a galaxy slightly smaller than the Milky Way. It belongs, however, to the same category: both are barred spirals. ESO PR Photo 16/07 ESO PR Photo 16/07 The Purple Rose of Virgo Spiral galaxies are composed of a 'bulge' and a flat disc. The bulge hosts old stars and usually a central supermassive black hole. Younger stars reside in the disc, forming the characteristic spiral structures from which the galaxies get their name. Barred spirals are crossed by a bright band of stars. In 2000, using ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers discovered the smallest, faintest, and most massive spirals (see ESO PR 12/00 and 25/00). In this amazing new image of NGC 5584 two dominant spiral arms are clearly visible, while the others are deformed, probably due to interactions with other galaxies. Luminous patches are spread all over the disc, indicating that stars are being formed in this gigantic rose at a frantic pace. Something even brighter, however, catches the eye in this picture. Any image taken before the end of February would not have shown the luminous spot located at the lower right of the galaxy's centre. As can be seen, the newly found object is much brighter than the centre of the galaxy itself. Its name? SN 2007af, the 32nd supernova discovered this year. Its presence signals the dramatic death of a star with a mass comparable to that of the Sun. SN 2007af, the brightest supernova of the year (so far), was discovered on 1 March by the Japanese supernova hunter Koichi Itagaki. He pointed his 60-centimetre telescope towards the Virgo constellation

  3. Rose, a rotating system for 4D emittance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Michael; Groening, Lars; Xiao, Chen; Mickat, Sascha; Du, Xiaonan; Gerhard, Peter; Vormann, Hartmut [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    A ROtating System for Emittance measurements ROSE, to measure the full 4 dimensional transverse beam matrix of a heavy ion beam has been developed and commissioned. Different heavy ion beams behind the HLI at GSI have been used in two commissioning beam times. All technical aspects of Rose have been tested, Rose has been benchmarked against existing emittance scanners for horizontal and vertical projections and the method, hard- and software to measure the 4D beam matrix has been upgraded, refined and successfully commissioned. The inter plane correlations of the HLI beam have been measured, yet as no significant initial correlations were found to be present, controlled coupling of the beam by using a skew triplet has been applied and confirmed with Rose. The next step is to use ROSE to measure and remove the known inter plane correlations of a Uranium beam before SIS18 injection.

  4. White LEDs for lighting remote communities in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, Stewart; Irvine-Halliday, Dave

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 5 years, the application of white LEDs for ambient lighting has been investigated in the remote villages of Nepal. Currently, lighting is often met using kerosene wick lamps, which emit unhealthy levels of fumes, or by burning sap-filled pine sticks, which are worse than the kerosene lamps. A team of students from Calgary University developed some LED lamps that could easily be fabricated in Nepal using local materials and personnel. To generate power, a pedal DC generator was developed to charge batteries, as well as a simple wind turbine. The Nepal Light Project implemented a series of many projects over the last 2 years in several villages across Nepal, using several different power generating systems. A total of 142 households, two schools and a temple were fitted with lamps in 2000, and more will follow in 2001. A research project has also been undertaken in Nepal for the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) to investigate the potential for energy efficient lamps in the micro hydro industry. The R&D project was very small, and conducted basic testing on locally available compact fluorescent lamps and LED lamps. The report concluded that encouraging the use of CFLs would decrease costs by 30-50%, and that they should be included in the subsidy policy, along with power factor correcting capacitors. LED lamps should not be overly encouraged as the development of the diodes was advancing very rapidly. The real advantage of LED lamps lies in extremely low maintenance costs due to the low power requirements and long life, which is just as important for remote villages as it is for traffic lights and exit signs. It is estimated that these low ongoing costs could be as low as $3/household/year for a rural lighting project. Pilot projects should be encouraged to demonstrate and investigate the potential of WLEDs for lighting in remote communities in developing countries. With 2 billion people without access to electricity, and lighting being

  5. 1999 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  6. 2002 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  7. 2002 Rose Site 8P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 8P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 1999. The site was originally...

  8. 1999 Rose Site 27P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 27P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 24, 1999. The site was...

  9. 2002 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  10. 2004 Rose Site 4P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 4P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 9, 2004. With a start point...

  11. 2004 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  12. 1999 Rose Site 13P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 13P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 25, 1999. The site was...

  13. 2004 Rose Site 13P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 13P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 25, 1999. The site was...

  14. 2006 Rose Site 13P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 13P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 25, 1999. The site was...

  15. 2005 Rose Site 26P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 26P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish (5) = between meters 4 and 5). Quantitative analysis of the...

  16. 2004 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  17. 2006 Rose Site 31P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  18. 2006 Rose Site 26P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 26P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 2004. With a start point...

  19. 2012 Rose Site 25P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 25P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 30, 1999. The site was originally...

  20. 2004 Rose Site 23P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 23P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 10, 2004. With a start point...

  1. 2005 Rose Site 27P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 27P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish (5) = between meters 4 and 5). Quantitative analysis of the...

  2. 2012 Rose Site 4P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 4P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 9, 2004. With a start point...

  3. Properties of Rose Hip Marmalades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Yildiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose hip, also known as wild rose, is a summer fruit. The aim of this research is to present physical, chemical, rheological, sensory and antioxidant properties of rose hip marmalades. Rose hips cultivated in Turkey are processed into pulp and then marmalade is made by using vacuum evaporator or classical method. For the purposes of this investigation, marmalades produced on a factory scale using two methods were compared to commercial marmalades purchased on market. The marmalades exhibited high levels of antioxidant activity as well as total phenolic content. The consistency indices for the marmalades were determined to be between 64.2 and 321 Pa·s^n. Colour parameters, namely L, a, b, were measured and correlations between the examined parameters were calculated.

  4. 2012 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  5. 2004 Rose Site 14P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 14P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 25, 2002. With a start point...

  6. 2005 Rose Site 13P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 13P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish (5) = between meters 4 and 5). Quantitative analysis of the...

  7. 2012 Rose Site 27P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 27P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 24, 1999. The site was...

  8. 2006 Rose Site 10P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 10P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  9. 2002 Rose Site 7P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 7P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 24, 2002. With a start point...

  10. 1999 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  11. 2006 Rose Site 29P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 29P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 2004. With a start point...

  12. 2012 Rose Site 31P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  13. 2004 Rose Site 32P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 32P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 2, 2004. With a start point...

  14. 2012 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  15. 1999 Rose Site 31P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  16. 2002 Rose Site 5P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 5P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on February 20, 2002. With a start point...

  17. 2006 Rose Site 9P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 9P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 31, 1999. The site was originally...

  18. 2006 Rose Site 27P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 27P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 24, 1999. The site was...

  19. 1999 Rose Site 25P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 25P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 30, 1999. The site was originally...

  20. 1999 Rose Site 8P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 8P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 1999. The site was originally...

  1. 2004 Rose Site 26P

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 26P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on July 29, 2004. With a start point...

  2. Too Korean to be White and Too White to Be Korean: Ethnic Identity Development among Transracial Korean American Adoptees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Joy; Pena, Edlyn Vallejo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore how lived experiences affect ethnic identity development of transracial Korean American adoptees raised by White parents with the intent of informing higher education practice. Participants included 12 recently college-graduated transracial Korean American adoptees who were raised in the…

  3. White Toenails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. White Toenails White toenails can develop for several reasons. Trauma, such ... trauma does not cause broken blood vessels, a white spot may appear under the nail. The spot ...

  4. Genetic dissection of scent metabolic profiles in diploid rose populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, M; Berger, R G; Debener, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The scent of flowers is a very important trait in ornamental roses in terms of both quantity and quality. In cut roses, scented varieties are a rare exception. Although metabolic profiling has identified more than 500 scent volatiles from rose flowers so far, nothing is known about the inheritance of scent in roses. Therefore, we analysed scent volatiles and molecular markers in diploid segregating populations. We resolved the patterns of inheritance of three volatiles (nerol, neryl acetate and geranyl acetate) into single Mendelian traits, and we mapped these as single or oligogenic traits in the rose genome. Three other volatiles (geraniol, beta-citronellol and 2-phenylethanol) displayed quantitative variation in the progeny, and we mapped a total of six QTLs influencing the amounts of these volatiles onto the rose marker map. Because we included known scent related genes and newly generated ESTs for scent volatiles as markers, we were able to link scent related QTLs with putative candidate genes. Our results serve as a starting point for both more detailed analyses of complex scent biosynthetic pathways and the development of markers for marker-assisted breeding of scented rose varieties.

  5. Obituary: William K. Rose (1935-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    Stellar astrophysicist William Kenneth Rose died near his home in Potomac, Maryland, on September 30, 2010, after an extended illness. Rose was the son of pharmacist Kenneth William Rose and Shirley Near Rose and was born in Ossining, New York, on August 10, 1935. He received an AB from Columbia College in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Columbia University in 1963, with a thesis on "measurements of linear polarization in discrete radio sources using a 9.4 cm maser," under the direction of Charles H. Townes. Rose played a major role in designing and constructing the maser and used it at a radio telescope at Maryland Point that belonged to the Naval Research Lab. He observed Jupiter and Saturn and a number of extra-solar-system sources, and also diffuse centimeter emission (see appendix). The thesis was not published in an archival journal, but can be found under Library of Congress code QB 475.R67. While in graduate School, Bill married Sheila Tuchman, whose primary scientific interests were biological. None of their three children chose to be scientists, but two are CPAs. Bill moved successfully through the academic hurdles) from a research position at Princeton (1963-67), where a collaboration with Nick Woolf and Martin Schwarzchild on the infrared spectra of giant stars became one of his most-cited papers, to assistant and associate professorships at MIT (1967-71), and then associate and full professorships at the University of Maryland (1971 to retirement in 2005). His most innovative work was probably that on nova explosions arising from degenerate ignition of hydrogen accreted on white dwarfs in close binary systems, published in 1968. The same idea occurred to others at about the same time, and Bill did not, perhaps, get quite his fair share of the credit. I first met Sheila and Bill in summer 1969 at the Stony Brook summer school on stellar evolution (not published until 1972). He lectured on the nature of nova explosions and on nuclear burning in thin

  6. An opinion paper: emphasis on white muscle development and growth to improve farmed fish flesh quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videler, J J

    2011-06-01

    Due to rapid depletion of wild stocks, the necessity to cultivate fish is eminent. Current fish farming practices seek to improve flesh quality. The notion that white muscles are the main target of the fishing industry is emphasized. A novel approach is suggested based on the development of white muscles in wild fish from eggs to adults. A compilation of facts about white muscle structure, function and ontogeny is followed by an account of the changes in swimming behaviour and performance related to the use of white muscle during growth from larva to adult. Ecological data narrate early swimming performance with white muscle development and growth, unveiling some of the important natural selection factors eliminating weak swimmers and poor growers from the breeding stock. A comparison between fish culture practise and natural conditions reveals fundamental differences. New approaches following wild breeding processes promise several important advantages regarding the quality of white muscle.

  7. An opinion paper: emphasis on white muscle development and growth to improve farmed fish flesh quality

    OpenAIRE

    Videler, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Due to rapid depletion of wild stocks, the necessity to cultivate fish is eminent. Current fish farming practices seek to improve flesh quality. The notion that white muscles are the main target of the fishing industry is emphasized. A novel approach is suggested based on the development of white muscles in wild fish from eggs to adults. A compilation of facts about white muscle structure, function and ontogeny is followed by an account of the changes in swimming behaviour and performance rel...

  8. Development of Tract-Specific White Matter Pathways During Early Reading Development in At-Risk Children and Typical Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingying; Mauer, Meaghan V; Raney, Talia; Peysakhovich, Barbara; Becker, Bryce L C; Sliva, Danielle D; Gaab, Nadine

    2017-04-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a strong genetic basis. Previous studies observed white matter alterations in the left posterior brain regions in adults and school-age children with dyslexia. However, no study yet has examined the development of tract-specific white matter pathways from the pre-reading to the fluent reading stage in children at familial risk for dyslexia (FHD+) versus controls (FHD-). This study examined white matter integrity at pre-reading, beginning, and fluent reading stages cross-sectionally ( n = 78) and longitudinally (n = 45) using an automated fiber-tract quantification method. Our findings depict white matter alterations and atypical lateralization of the arcuate fasciculus at the pre-reading stage in FHD+ versus FHD- children. Moreover, we demonstrate faster white matter development in subsequent good versus poor readers and a positive association between white matter maturation and reading development using a longitudinal design. Additionally, the combination of white matter maturation, familial risk, and psychometric measures best predicted later reading abilities. Furthermore, within FHD+ children, subsequent good readers exhibited faster white matter development in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus compared with subsequent poor readers, suggesting a compensatory mechanism. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of white matter pathway maturation in the development of typical and atypical reading skills. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Analysis of rose crop production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.T.N.; Koning, de J.C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Measured and simulated dry-matter production of two rose crops different in cultivar and growing conditions were compared. Differences in dry-matter production between the two crops could be explained to a large extend by differences in harvest index, leaf area index, supplementary lighting and

  10. Numerical prediction of rose growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernsen, E.; Bokhove, Onno; van der Sar, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A new mathematical model is presented for the prediction of rose growth in a greenhouse. Given the measured ambient environmental conditions, the model consists of a local photosynthesis model, predicting the photosynthesis per unit leaf area, coupled to a global greenhouse model, which predicts the

  11. Numerical prediction of rose growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno; Bernsen, E.; van der Sar, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A new mathematical model is presented for the prediction of rose growth in a greenhouse. Given the measured ambient environmental conditions, the model consist of a local photosynthesis model, predicting the photosynthesis per unit leaf area, coupled to a global greenhouse model, which predicts the

  12. The Rose Art Museum Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Paul

    2010-01-01

    On January 26, 2009, the Brandeis University Board of Trustees voted unanimously to close the Rose Art Museum (Waltham, Massachusetts). The proceeds from the subsequent auction were to be reinvested in the university to ensure its long-term financial health. The reaction to the decision by campus constituencies provides a case study to show the…

  13. The Fishes of Rose Atoll - Supplement I

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A previous paper titled THE FISHES OF ROSE ATOLL discusses the results of a fish survey conducted November 12-13, 1980 within the four lagoon habitats of Rose Atoll,...

  14. Differential development of human brain white matter tracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imperati

    Full Text Available Neuroscience is increasingly focusing on developmental factors related to human structural and functional connectivity. Unfortunately, to date, diffusion-based imaging approaches have only contributed modestly to these broad objectives, despite the promise of diffusion-based tractography. Here, we report a novel data-driven approach to detect similarities and differences among white matter tracts with respect to their developmental trajectories, using 64-direction diffusion tensor imaging. Specifically, using a cross-sectional sample comprising 144 healthy individuals (7 to 48 years old, we applied k-means cluster analysis to separate white matter voxels based on their age-related trajectories of fractional anisotropy. Optimal solutions included 5-, 9- and 14-clusters. Our results recapitulate well-established tracts (e.g., internal and external capsule, optic radiations, corpus callosum, cingulum bundle, cerebral peduncles and subdivisions within tracts (e.g., corpus callosum, internal capsule. For all but one tract identified, age-related trajectories were curvilinear (i.e., inverted 'U-shape', with age-related increases during childhood and adolescence followed by decreases in middle adulthood. Identification of peaks in the trajectories suggests that age-related losses in fractional anisotropy occur as early as 23 years of age, with mean onset at 30 years of age. Our findings demonstrate that data-driven analytic techniques may be fruitfully applied to extant diffusion tensor imaging datasets in normative and neuropsychiatric samples.

  15. Integrating Helms's White Racial Identity Development Model with Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory: Implications for Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthakaran, V.

    2012-01-01

    With the increased focus on multicultural education in colleges and universities, there is a need for educators to have a profound knowledge of White racial identity development to better understand White students' resistance to multicultural topics and to facilitate their racial identity development. An integration of Helms's White racial…

  16. Biodegradation of hazardous waste using white rot fungus: Project planning and concept development document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luey, J.; Brouns, T.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1990-11-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been shown to effectively degrade pollutants such as trichlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins and other halogenated aromatic compounds. These refractory organic compounds and many others have been identified in the tank waste, groundwater and soil of various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The treatment of these refractory organic compounds has been identified as a high priority for DOE's Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT E) waste treatment programs. Unlike many bacteria, the white rot fungus P. chrysosporium is capable of degrading these types of refractory organics and may be valuable for the treatment of wastes containing multiple pollutants. The objectives of this project are to identify DOE waste problems amenable to white rot fungus treatment and to develop and demonstrate white rot fungus treatment process for these hazardous organic compounds. 32 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Using Rose and Compass for Authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G

    2009-07-09

    Many recent non-proliferation software projects include a software authentication component. In this context, 'authentication' is defined as determining that a software package performs only its intended purpose and performs that purpose correctly and reliably over many years. In addition to visual inspection by knowledgeable computer scientists, automated tools are needed to highlight suspicious code constructs both to aid the visual inspection and to guide program development. While many commercial tools are available for portions of the authentication task, they are proprietary, and have limited extensibility. An open-source, extensible tool can be customized to the unique needs of each project. ROSE is an LLNL-developed robust source-to-source analysis and optimization infrastructure currently addressing large, million-line DOE applications in C, C++, and FORTRAN. It continues to be extended to support the automated analysis of binaries (x86, ARM, and PowerPC). We continue to extend ROSE to address a number of security specific requirements and apply it to software authentication for non-proliferation projects. We will give an update on the status of our work.

  18. General Appearances of Turkish Roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan ÖZÇELİK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is carried out in between 2006-2012 years. Materials of it collected from all over the country and identified by the classic systematic literatures. Voucher specimens are deposited in GUL Herbarium of Süleyman Demirel University in Isparta. In this paper, important new systematic, geographical and ecological characters, and also economical usage values of all Türkiye’s roses were determined by literature and field observations. In addition to this, some known characters in the genus were broadened

  19. Development of Northern White-Cedar Regeneration Following Partial Cutting, with and without Deer Browsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Larouche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis L. is an important commercial species with a high wildlife value, both as a food source and habitat for many bird and mammal species. Concerns have been expressed about its decreasing abundance across its range, and especially in mixedwood stands, where it has to compete with several other species and can suffer from heavy browsing. In this study, we quantified the development of natural northern white-cedar seedlings and saplings under various partial cutting regimes, with and without white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virgianus Zimmerman browsing, in three selected sites in Quebec (Canada and in Maine (USA. Our data show that northern white-cedar regeneration was present in all studied stands, but that only a few stems were taller than 30 cm on the two sites with high densities of deer. In the absence of heavy browsing, stems reached a height of 30 cm in 11 years, and 130 cm in 28 years. Height growth of northern white-cedar regeneration increased with canopy light transmittance, while ground-level diameter increment increased after partial cutting. This suggests that partial cutting can be used in mixedwood stands to release natural northern white-cedar regeneration, but also that the recruitment of northern white-cedar seedlings to larger size classes constitutes a major challenge in stands subject to heavy deer browsing.

  20. Back to Hegel? On Gillian Rose's critique of sociological reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Brian W

    2017-08-22

    Thirty-five years ago, Gillian Rose articulated a significant critique of classical sociological reason, emphasizing its relationship to its philosophical forebears. In a series of works, but most significantly in her Hegel contra Sociology, Rose worked to specify the implications of sociology's failure, both in its critical Marxist and its 'scientific' forms, to move beyond Kant and to fully come to terms with the thought of Hegel. In this article, I unpack and explain the substance of her criticisms, developing the necessary Hegelian philosophical background on which she founded them. I argue that Rose's attempted recuperation of 'speculative reason' for social theory remains little understood, despite its continued relevance to contemporary debates concerning the nature and scope of sociological reason. As an illustration, I employ Rose to critique Chernilo's recent call for a more philosophically sophisticated sociology. From the vantage point of Rose, this particular account of a 'philosophical sociology' remains abstract and rooted in the neo-Kantian contradictions that continue to characterize sociology. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  1. Design of a Model Execution Framework: Repetitive Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (ROSE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Justin S.; Briggs, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    The ROSE framework was designed to facilitate complex system analyses. It completely divorces the model execution process from the model itself. By doing so ROSE frees the modeler to develop a library of standard modeling processes such as Design of Experiments, optimizers, parameter studies, and sensitivity studies which can then be applied to any of their available models. The ROSE framework accomplishes this by means of a well defined API and object structure. Both the API and object structure are presented here with enough detail to implement ROSE in any object-oriented language or modeling tool.

  2. Network topology of the desert rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigmund Mongstad Hope

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Desert roses are gypsum crystals that consist of intersecting disks. We determine their geometrical structure using computer assisted tomography. By mapping the geometrical structure onto a graph, the topology of the desert rose is analyzed and compared to a model based on diffusion limited aggregation. By comparing the topology, we find that the model gets a number of the features of the real desert rose right, whereas others do not fit so well.

  3. Network topology of the desert rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Sigmund; Kundu, Sumanta; Roy, Chandreyee; Manna, Subhrangshu; Hansen, Alex

    2015-09-01

    Desert roses are gypsum crystals that consist of intersecting disks. We determine their geometrical structure using computer assisted tomography. By mapping the geometrical structure onto a graph, the topology of the desert rose is analyzed and compared to a model based on diffusion limited aggregation. By comparing the topology, we find that the model gets a number of the features of the real desert rose right, whereas others do not fit so well.

  4. The Development of White-Asian Categorization: Contributions from Skin Color and Other Physiognomic Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Dotsch, Ron; Clark, Amelia R; Stepanova, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European-East Asian ("White-Asian") categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial physiognomy, allowing the contribution of each to be assessed independently and in interaction with each other. Results demonstrated substantial development across this age range in children's ability to draw on both sorts of cue, with over twice as much variance explained by stimulus variation in adults than children. Nonetheless, children were clearly sensitive to both skin color and other aspects of facial physiognomy, suggesting that understanding of the White-Asian category boundary develops in a somewhat different way than understanding of the White-Black category boundary, in which attention to features other than skin color appear only somewhat later. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for theories of social categorization.

  5. White Matter and Development in Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak-Fan, Kathleen M.; Morris, Drew; Vidal, Julie; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Roberts, Wendy; Taylor, Margot J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that brain development follows an abnormal trajectory in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study examined changes in diffusivity with age within defined white matter tracts in a group of typically developing children and a group of children with an ASD, aged 6 to 14 years. Age by group interactions…

  6. Television White Space (TVWS) Access Framework for Developing Regions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masonta, MT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available in space, time and frequency (especially in remote rural areas), makes GLSDB most suitable for incumbent or PU protection non the TV band. Since the wireless microphones or Program Making and Special Events (PMSE) shares the TV spectrum, a static GLSDB may... not be sufficient to protect them. Its either a dedicated regional or national band is used for PMSE or a different database need to be developed only for PMSE. Both these approaches have been considered in the US and Europe. IV. TECHNOLOGY AND STANDARDS Technology...

  7. In vitro germination of desert rose varieties(

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Lemos Varella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The drought stress resistance is a characteristic of the desert rose and its estimable beauty flowers, which gave it great relevance in the ornamental market. However, the desert rose production and germination is hampered by possible sterility of their male and female flowers and frequent problems in pollination, so the tissue culture is a promising alternative to the propagation of these plants. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of gibberellic acid on four commercial varieties of desert rose (Adenium obesum cultivated in vitro. The seeds of the varieties ‘Orange Pallet’, ‘Carnation violet’, ‘Diamond ring’ and ‘Vermiliont’ were sterilized and inoculated on Water + Agar (T0, medium MS (T1, ½ MS (T2, MS + 0.25 mg L-1 GA3 (T3, MS + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 (T4, ½ MS + 0.25 mg L-1 GA3 (T5, ½ MS 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 (T6. The seeds germination of A. obesum was initiated on the fourth day of cultivation and on the tenth day was possible to observe the expansion of the cotyledons and leaf expansion with subsequent development of early secondary root. The ‘Orange pallet’ variety germinated 100% of seeds on water + agar and MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 of GA3. For ‘Diamond Ring’ and ‘Carnation violet’ the highest rate of germination occurred in treatments MS ½; 0.25 mg L-1 GA3; MS + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 averaging 80% and 70%, respectively. For ‘Vermiliont’ the best response was in MS and MS ½ + 0.5 mg L-1 GA3 ranging between 70-90% germinated embryos. It was registered different malformations in all treatments like absence of roots and apexes during seedling development. The concentrations of GA3 did not affect significantly the seed germination.

  8. Tips From Former Smokers – Rose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    Rose developed lung cancer from smoking cigarettes and needed surgery. She talks about the difficulties she faced recovering from surgery.  Created: 7/7/2014 by Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  9. Transcript and proteomic analysis of developing white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li; Peel, Gregory J; Lei, Zhentian; Aziz, Naveed; Dai, Xinbin; He, Ji; Watson, Bonnie; Zhao, Patrick X; Sumner, Lloyd W; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-01-05

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) roots efficiently take up and accumulate (heavy) metals, adapt to phosphate deficiency by forming cluster roots, and secrete antimicrobial prenylated isoflavones during development. Genomic and proteomic approaches were applied to identify candidate genes and proteins involved in antimicrobial defense and (heavy) metal uptake and translocation. A cDNA library was constructed from roots of white lupin seedlings. Eight thousand clones were randomly sequenced and assembled into 2,455 unigenes, which were annotated based on homologous matches in the NCBInr protein database. A reference map of developing white lupin root proteins was established through 2-D gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. High quality peptide mass spectra were obtained for 170 proteins. Microsomal membrane proteins were separated by 1-D gel electrophoresis and identified by LC-MS/MS. A total of 74 proteins were putatively identified by the peptide mass fingerprinting and the LC-MS/MS methods. Genomic and proteomic analyses identified candidate genes and proteins encoding metal binding and/or transport proteins, transcription factors, ABC transporters and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic enzymes. The combined EST and protein datasets will facilitate the understanding of white lupin's response to biotic and abiotic stresses and its utility for phytoremediation. The root ESTs provided 82 perfect simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with potential utility in breeding white lupin for enhanced agronomic traits.

  10. Transcript and proteomic analysis of developing white lupin (Lupinus albus L. roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background White lupin (Lupinus albus L. roots efficiently take up and accumulate (heavy metals, adapt to phosphate deficiency by forming cluster roots, and secrete antimicrobial prenylated isoflavones during development. Genomic and proteomic approaches were applied to identify candidate genes and proteins involved in antimicrobial defense and (heavy metal uptake and translocation. Results A cDNA library was constructed from roots of white lupin seedlings. Eight thousand clones were randomly sequenced and assembled into 2,455 unigenes, which were annotated based on homologous matches in the NCBInr protein database. A reference map of developing white lupin root proteins was established through 2-D gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. High quality peptide mass spectra were obtained for 170 proteins. Microsomal membrane proteins were separated by 1-D gel electrophoresis and identified by LC-MS/MS. A total of 74 proteins were putatively identified by the peptide mass fingerprinting and the LC-MS/MS methods. Genomic and proteomic analyses identified candidate genes and proteins encoding metal binding and/or transport proteins, transcription factors, ABC transporters and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic enzymes. Conclusion The combined EST and protein datasets will facilitate the understanding of white lupin's response to biotic and abiotic stresses and its utility for phytoremediation. The root ESTs provided 82 perfect simple sequence repeat (SSR markers with potential utility in breeding white lupin for enhanced agronomic traits.

  11. Transcript and proteomic analysis of developing white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li; Peel, Gregory J; Lei, Zhentian; Aziz, Naveed; Dai, Xinbin; He, Ji; Watson, Bonnie; Zhao, Patrick X; Sumner, Lloyd W; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    Background White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) roots efficiently take up and accumulate (heavy) metals, adapt to phosphate deficiency by forming cluster roots, and secrete antimicrobial prenylated isoflavones during development. Genomic and proteomic approaches were applied to identify candidate genes and proteins involved in antimicrobial defense and (heavy) metal uptake and translocation. Results A cDNA library was constructed from roots of white lupin seedlings. Eight thousand clones were randomly sequenced and assembled into 2,455 unigenes, which were annotated based on homologous matches in the NCBInr protein database. A reference map of developing white lupin root proteins was established through 2-D gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. High quality peptide mass spectra were obtained for 170 proteins. Microsomal membrane proteins were separated by 1-D gel electrophoresis and identified by LC-MS/MS. A total of 74 proteins were putatively identified by the peptide mass fingerprinting and the LC-MS/MS methods. Genomic and proteomic analyses identified candidate genes and proteins encoding metal binding and/or transport proteins, transcription factors, ABC transporters and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic enzymes. Conclusion The combined EST and protein datasets will facilitate the understanding of white lupin's response to biotic and abiotic stresses and its utility for phytoremediation. The root ESTs provided 82 perfect simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with potential utility in breeding white lupin for enhanced agronomic traits. PMID:19123941

  12. Improving rooting uniformity in rose cuttings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telgen, van H.J.; Eveleens-Clark, B.A.; Garcia Victoria, N.

    2007-01-01

    Studies to improve rooting uniformity of single node stem cuttings for rose are reported. We found that the variation in shoot growth in a young rose crop depended on the variation in root number of the cuttings, which, in turn, was related to the auxin concentration applied to the cutting before

  13. White lupin cluster root acclimation to phosphorus deficiency and root hair development involve unique glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases

    Science.gov (United States)

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is a phosphate (Pi) deficiency tolerant legume which develops short, densely clustered tertiary lateral roots (cluster/proteoid roots) in response to Pi limitation. In this report we characterize two glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GPX-PDE) genes (GPX-PDE1 and...

  14. Effect of apical meristem clipping on carbon allocation and morphological development of white oak seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean S. Sung; T.L. Kormanik; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    1994-01-01

    Seedlings from three open-pollinated half-sib white oak seedlots were clipped in mid-July and their development was compared to nonclipped controls after one growing season.In general when data were analyzed by family, clipped seedlings were significantly less desirable in three to six of the eight variables tested.Numerically, in all families seedlots, the clipped...

  15. Development of a Code to Analyze the Solar White-Light Images ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 37; Issue 1. Development of a Code to Analyze the Solar White-Light Images from the Kodaikanal Observatory: Detection of Sunspots, Computation of Heliographic Coordinates and Area. Ragadeepika Pucha K. M. Hiremath Shashanka R. Gurumath. Volume ...

  16. The Development of White-Asian Categorization : Contributions from Skin Color and Other Physiognomic Cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Dotsch, Ron|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328554197; Clark, Amelia R; Stepanova, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European-East Asian ("White-Asian") categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial

  17. The development of White-Asian categorization: Contributions from skin color and other physiognomic cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunham, Y.; Dotsch, R.; Clark, A.R.; Stepanova, E.V.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European-East Asian ("White-Asian") categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial

  18. Development of a Spectrophotometric System to Detect White Striping Physiopathy in Whole Chicken Carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traffano-Schiffo, Maria Victoria; Castro-Giraldez, Marta; Colom, Ricardo J.; Fito, Pedro J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the high intensification of poultry production in recent years, white chicken breast striping is one of the most frequently seen myopathies. The aim of this research was to develop a spectrophotometry-based sensor to detect white striping physiopathy in chicken breast meat in whole chicken carcasses with skin. Experiments were carried out using normal and white striping breasts. In order to understand the mechanism involved in this physiopathy, the different tissues that conform each breast were analyzed. Permittivity in radiofrequency (40 Hz to 1 MHz) was measured using two different sensors; a sensor with two flat plates to analyze the whole breast with skin (NB or WSB), and a two needles with blunt-ended sensor to analyze the different surface tissues of the skinless breast. In the microwave range (500 MHz to 20 GHz), permittivity was measured as just was described for the two needles with blunt-ended sensor. Moreover, fatty acids composition was determined by calorimetry techniques from −40 °C to 50 °C at 5 °C/min after previously freeze-drying the samples, and pH, microstructure by Cryo-SEM and binocular loupe structure were also analyzed. The results showed that the white striping physiopathy consists of the partial breakdown of the pectoral muscle causing an increase in fatty acids, reducing the quality of the meat. It was possible to detect white striping physiopathy in chicken carcasses with skin using spectrophotometry of radiofrequency spectra. PMID:28471378

  19. Development of the Cell Population in the Brain White Matter of Young Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigaard, Rasmus Krarup; Kjær, Majken; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2014-01-01

    While brain gray matter is primarily associated with sensorimotor processing and cognition, white matter modulates the distribution of action potentials, coordinates communication between different brain regions, and acts as a relay for input/output signals. Previous studies have described...... morphological changes in gray and white matter during childhood and adolescence, which are consistent with cellular genesis and maturation, but corresponding events in infants are poorly documented. In the present study, we estimated the total number of cells (neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes......, and microglia) in the cerebral white matter of 9 infants aged 0-33 months, using design-based stereological methods to obtain quantitative data about brain development. There were linear increases with age in the numbers of oligodendrocytes (7-28 billion) and astrocytes (1.5-6.7 billion) during the first 3...

  20. Development of Advanced Manufacturing Methods for Warm White LEDs for General Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Anirudha; Kolodin, Boris; Jacob, Cherian; Chowdhury, Ashfaqul; Kuenzler, Glenn; Sater, Karen; Aesram, Danny; Glaettli, Steven; Gallagher, Brian; Langer, Paul; Setlur, Anant; Beers, Bill

    2012-03-31

    GE Lighting Solutions will develop precise and efficient manufacturing techniques for the “remote phosphor” platform of warm-white LED products. In volume, this will be demonstrated to drive significant materials, labor and capital productivity to achieve a maximum possible 53% reduction in overall cost. In addition, the typical total color variation for these white LEDs in production will be well within the ANSI bins and as low as a 4-step MacAdam ellipse centered on the black body curve. Achievement of both of these objectives will be demonstrated while meeting a performance target of > 75 lm/W for a warm-white LED and a reliability target of <30% lumen drop / <2-step MacAdam ellipse shift, estimated over 50,000 hrs.

  1. Postharvest quality of essential oil treated roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Mariano Manfredini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The loss of commercial quality during storage and transportation of roses is one of the factors that reflect on production costs, leading producers to preventively apply harmful chemicals, mainly to hamper Botrytis cinerea development and reduce further losses. An alternative to increase flower longevity without contaminating the environment with harmful chemicals is the use of natural products, such as essential oils, which have fungistatic and insecticide properties, as well as low toxicity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of essential oils on the vase life of Rosa cv. Avalanche: 12 treatments were tested, resulting from the combination of 5 types of essential oils plus the control in two cold storage periods (2 to 6 days at 1 °C, 90-95% RH. The essential oils tested were eucalyptus, cinnamon, lemongrass and peppermint (1%, clove (0.1%, plus a control with distilled water. Application was made by spraying the flower buds. After storage at low temperatures, the flower stems were kept in a room (16 °C, 70% RH during 10 days for evaluation. Flower stems stored for 2 days in a cold chamber showed better means for darkening, turgor and bent neck, as well as a lower weight loss by the stems. The application of lemongrass essential oil at 1% caused burns on the petals, compromising quality and pot life. The essential oils of peppermint and eucalyptus allowed flower quality maintenance until the 10th day of evaluation. It is possible to conclude that post-harvest spraying with peppermint or eucalyptus essential oil at 1%, combined with cold storage for 2 days, provided greater longevity and quality for cv. Avalanche roses.

  2. White matter and development in children with an autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak-Fan, Kathleen M; Morris, Drew; Vidal, Julie; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Roberts, Wendy; Taylor, Margot J

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that brain development follows an abnormal trajectory in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study examined changes in diffusivity with age within defined white matter tracts in a group of typically developing children and a group of children with an ASD, aged 6 to 14 years. Age by group interactions were observed for frontal, long distant, interhemispheric and posterior tracts, for longitudinal, radial and mean diffusivity, but not for fractional anisotropy. In all cases, these measures of diffusivity decreased with age in the typically developing group, but showed little or no change in the ASD group. This supports the hypothesis of an abnormal developmental trajectory of white matter in this population, which could have profound effects on the development of neural connectivity and contribute to atypical cognitive development in children with ASD.

  3. Development and assessment of a lysophospholipid-based deep learning model to discriminate geographical origins of white rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nguyen Phuoc; Lim, Dong Kyu; Mo, Changyeun; Kim, Giyoung; Kwon, Sung Won

    2017-08-17

    Geographical origin determination of white rice has become the major issue of food industry. However, there is still lack of a high-throughput method for rapidly and reproducibly differentiating the geographical origins of commercial white rice. In this study, we developed a method that employed lipidomics and deep learning to discriminate white rice from Korea to China. A total of 126 white rice of 30 cultivars from different regions were utilized for the method development and validation. By using direct infusion-mass spectrometry-based targeted lipidomics, 17 lysoglycerophospholipids were simultaneously characterized within minutes per sample. Unsupervised data exploration showed a noticeable overlap of white rice between two countries. In addition, lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs) were prominent in white rice from Korea while lysophosphatidylethanolamines (lysoPEs) were enriched in white rice from China. A deep learning prediction model was built using 2014 white rice and validated using two different batches of 2015 white rice. The model accurately discriminated white rice from two countries. Among 10 selected predictors, lysoPC(18:2), lysoPC(14:0), and lysoPE(16:0) were the three most important features. Random forest and gradient boosting machine models also worked well in this circumstance. In conclusion, this study provides an architecture for high-throughput classification of white rice from different geographical origins.

  4. Sex differences in white matter development during adolescence: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingying; Adamson, Chris; Yuan, Weihong; Altaye, Mekibib; Rajagopal, Akila; Byars, Anna W; Holland, Scott K

    2012-10-10

    Adolescence is a complex transitional period in human development, composing physical maturation, cognitive and social behavioral changes. The objective of this study is to investigate sex differences in white matter development and the associations between intelligence and white matter microstructure in the adolescent brain using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). In a cohort of 16 typically-developing adolescents aged 13 to 17 years, longitudinal DTI data were recorded from each subject at two time points that were one year apart. We used TBSS to analyze the diffusion indices including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD). Our results suggest that boys (13-18 years) continued to demonstrate white matter maturation, whereas girls appeared to reach mature levels earlier. In addition, we identified significant positive correlations between FA and full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus when both sexes were looked at together. Only girls showed significant positive correlations between FA and verbal IQ in the left cortico-spinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus. The preliminary evidence presented in this study supports that boys and girls have different developmental trajectories in white matter microstructure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Den danske ROSE-undersøgelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Annemarie Møller; Allerup, Peter; Arnvig, Birgitte

    ROSE (Relevance of Science Education) er en international komparativ undersøgelse af 15-åriges holdninger til og interesse for naturfagsundervisning, naturvidenskab og teknologi med deltagelse af ca. 40. lande. Dataindsamlingen til den danske del af ROSE-undersøgelsen blev gennemført i 2003....... Antologien giver et overblik over  og forskellige perspektiver på de danske 15-åriges besvarelser af de ca. 280 spørgsmål i det danske ROSE-skema....

  6. Use of stabilization pond sludge in cultivation of roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. da Paixão Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One option for the increasing production of sewage sludge (SS is its agricultural use in crops with high nutritional demand, such as the rose. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the application of SS from primary stabilization pond in roses of the variety 'Carola'. For the experiment, the roses were planted in 20 L recipients using increasing doses of sludge (T2 - 12 Mg ha-1, T3 - 24 Mg ha-1 and T4 - 36 Mg ha-1, mineral fertilizer (T5 and control treatment (T1, without N in a randomized block design. The evaluated parameters were: roots dry mass, aerial dry mass, total biomass, leaflets area and nitrogen concentration in the leaf. The SS application resulted in better development of the rose, increasing the roots and the aerial biomasses, the leaflets area, and nitrogen content in the leaves compared to the control (T1. There was no statistical difference between the use of mineral fertilizer (T5, and the SS under the highest dose (T4. With these benefits, the use in agriculture of sewage sludge derived from stabilization ponds proved to be an adequate option for its disposal.

  7. Parenting and Children's Socioemotional and Academic Development among White, Latino, Asian, and Black families

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hannah Soo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATIONParenting and Children's Socioemotional and Academic Development among White, Latino, Asian, and Black familiesByHannah S. KangDoctor of Philosophy in Psychology and Social BehaviorUniversity of California, Irvine 2014Professor Chuansheng Chen, ChairA large body of research has demonstrated the crucial role of parenting in children's socioemotional and academic development (Maccoby & Martin, 1983). This literature, however, has major limitations in the following th...

  8. Rose Atoll 1993 Shipwreck Restoration Status Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summarizes efforts undertaken to remove grounded shipwreck at Rose Atoll and monitor impacts to community composition between 1993 and 2012.

  9. Uudised : Guns N' Roses Soomes. Valmis ulmeraadio

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Ameerika hard-rock-bändi Guns N' Roses kontserdist 5. juulil Hartwall Areenal Soomes. Kord kuus on Ulmeplaatide kodulehekülel www. ulmeplaadid.ee võimalus kuulata ulmeraadiot, kus esitusel eesti kergemuusika

  10. Exploring the Relationships between White Racial Consciousness, Feminist Identity Development and Family Environment for White Undergraduate Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kara E.; Munley, Patrick H.

    2012-01-01

    A sample of 394 White undergraduate females completed a demographic questionnaire and three assessment measures: the Oklahoma Racial Attitudes Scale-Revised (ORAS-R) (Vandiver & Leach, 2005), the Feminist Identity Composite (FIC) (Fischer et. al., 2000) and the Family Environment Scale-Real Form (FES-R) (Moos & Moos, 1974, 1994, 2002). Four…

  11. Development of the Cell Population in the Brain White Matter of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigaard, Rasmus Krarup; Kjær, Majken; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2016-01-01

    While brain gray matter is primarily associated with sensorimotor processing and cognition, white matter modulates the distribution of action potentials, coordinates communication between different brain regions, and acts as a relay for input/output signals. Previous studies have described morphological changes in gray and white matter during childhood and adolescence, which are consistent with cellular genesis and maturation, but corresponding events in infants are poorly documented. In the present study, we estimated the total number of cells (neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia) in the cerebral white matter of 9 infants aged 0-33 months, using design-based stereological methods to obtain quantitative data about brain development. There were linear increases with age in the numbers of oligodendrocytes (7-28 billion) and astrocytes (1.5-6.7 billion) during the first 3 years of life, thus attaining two-thirds of the corresponding numbers in adults. The numbers of neurons (0.7 billion) and microglia (0.2 billion) in the white matter did not increase during the first 3 years of life, but showed large biological variation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. In vitro germination of desert rose varieties(

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiane Lemos Varella; Gizelly Mendes Silva; Kaliane Zaira Camacho Maximiliano da Cruz; Andréia Izabel Mikovski; Josué Ribeiro da Silva Nunes; Ilio Fealho de Carvalho; Maurecilne Lemes Silva

    2015-01-01

    The drought stress resistance is a characteristic of the desert rose and its estimable beauty flowers, which gave it great relevance in the ornamental market. However, the desert rose production and germination is hampered by possible sterility of their male and female flowers and frequent problems in pollination, so the tissue culture is a promising alternative to the propagation of these plants. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of gibberellic acid on four commercial varieties of dese...

  13. Fetal development of subcutaneous white adipose tissue is dependent on Zfp423

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengle Shao

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results reveal that Zfp423 is essential for the terminal differentiation of subcutaneous white adipocytes during fetal adipose tissue development. Moreover, our data highlight the striking adverse effects of pathological subcutaneous adipose tissue remodeling on visceral adipose function and systemic nutrient homeostasis in obesity. Importantly, these data reveal the distinct phenotypes that can occur when adiponectin driven transgenes are activated in fetal vs. adult adipose tissue.

  14. Fetal development of subcutaneous white adipose tissue is dependent on Zfp423.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mengle; Hepler, Chelsea; Vishvanath, Lavanya; MacPherson, Karen A; Busbuso, Napoleon C; Gupta, Rana K

    2017-01-01

    Zfp423 is a multi zinc-finger transcription factor expressed in preadipocytes and mature adipocytes in vivo. Our recent work has revealed a critical role for Zfp423 in maintaining the fate of white adipocytes in adult mice through suppression of the beige cell thermogenic gene program; loss of Zfp423 in mature adipocytes of adult mice results in a white-to-beige phenotypic switch. However, the exact requirements of Zfp423 in the fetal stages of early adipose development in vivo have not been clarified. Here, we utilize two models that confer adipose-specific Zfp423 inactivation during fetal adipose development (Adiponectin-Cre; Zfp423loxP/loxP and Adiponectin-rtTA; TRE-Cre; Zfp423loxP/loxP). We assess the impact of fetal adipose Zfp423 deletion on the initial formation of adipose tissue and evaluate the metabolic consequences of challenging these animals with high-fat diet feeding. Deletion of Zfp423 during fetal adipose development results in a different phenotype than is observed when deleting Zfp423 in adipocytes of adult mice. Inactivation of Zfp423 during fetal adipose development results in arrested differentiation, specifically of inguinal white adipocytes, rather than a white-to-beige phenotypic switch that occurs when Zfp423 is inactivated in adult mice. This is likely explained by the observation that adiponectin driven Cre expression is active at an earlier stage of the adipocyte life cycle during fetal subcutaneous adipose development than in adult mice. Upon high-fat diet feeding, obese adipose Zfp423-deficient animals undergo a pathological adipose tissue expansion, associated with ectopic lipid deposition and systemic insulin resistance. Our results reveal that Zfp423 is essential for the terminal differentiation of subcutaneous white adipocytes during fetal adipose tissue development. Moreover, our data highlight the striking adverse effects of pathological subcutaneous adipose tissue remodeling on visceral adipose function and systemic nutrient

  15. White matter correlates of cognitive inhibition during development: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treit, S; Chen, Z; Rasmussen, C; Beaulieu, C

    2014-09-12

    Inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility are two key executive functions that develop in childhood and adolescence, increasing one's capacity to respond dynamically to changing external demands and refrain from impulsive behaviors. These gains evolve in concert with significant brain development. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified numerous frontal and cingulate cortical areas associated with performance on inhibition tasks, but less is known about the involvement of the underlying anatomical connectivity, namely white matter. Here we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine correlations between a DTI-derived parameter, fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter, and performance on the NEPSY-II Inhibition test (Naming, Inhibition and Switching conditions) in 49 healthy children aged 5-16years (20 females; 29 males). First, whole brain voxel-based analysis revealed several clusters in the frontal projections of the corpus callosum, where higher FA was associated with worse inhibitory performance, as well as several clusters in posterior brain regions and one in the brainstem where higher FA was associated with better cognitive flexibility (in the Switching task), suggesting a dichotomous relationship between FA and these two aspects of cognitive control. Tractography through these clusters identified several white matter tracts, which were then manual traced in native space. Pearson's correlations confirmed associations between higher FA of frontal projections of the corpus callosum with poorer inhibitory performance (independent of age), though associations with Switching were not significant. Post-hoc evaluation suggested that FA of orbital and anterior frontal projections of the corpus callosum also mediated performance differences across conditions, which may reflect differences in self-monitoring or strategy use. These findings suggest a link between the development of inhibition and cognitive control with that of the underlying white

  16. Perspectives and Insights from Preservice Teachers of Color on Developing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy at Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tambra O.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings from the first phase of a longitudinal study that explored the influence of teacher education at a predominantly White institution (PWI) on the development of preservice teachers' of Color culturally responsive pedagogy. Despite the overwhelming presence of White preservice teachers enrolled in teacher preparation…

  17. The Racial Identity Development of Male Student-Athletes when Blacks Are the Majority and Whites Are the Minority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Wilma J.; Closson, Rosemary B.

    2012-01-01

    Focus groups were used in the present study to explore the racial identity development of Black male and White male student-athletes on a predominantly Black, Division IA football team at a predominantly White institution (PWI). Findings indicate that the Black male football players demonstrated positive indicators of Black racial identity. The…

  18. Post-fledging movements of white-tailed eagles: Conservation implications for wind-energy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balotari-Chiebao, Fabio; Villers, Alexandre; Ijäs, Asko; Ovaskainen, Otso; Repka, Sari; Laaksonen, Toni

    2016-11-01

    The presence of poorly sited wind farms raises concerns for wildlife, including birds of prey. Therefore, there is a need to extend the knowledge of the potential human-wildlife conflicts associated with wind energy. Here, we report on the movements and habitat use of post-fledging satellite-tagged white-tailed eagles in Finland, where wind-energy development is expected to increase in the near future. In particular, we examine the probability of a fledgling approaching a hypothetical turbine that is placed at different distances from the nest. We found that this probability is high at short distances but considerably decreases with increasing distances to the nest. A utilisation-availability analysis showed that the coast was the preferred habitat. We argue that avoiding construction between active nests and the shoreline, as well as adopting the currently 2-km buffer zone for turbine deployment, can avoid or minimise potential impacts on post-fledging white-tailed eagles.

  19. ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION WITH ROSE NIAGARA GRAPE MUST AND YEASTS OF THE SAME FRUIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Esteban Miño Valdés

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to get technology information, it has been developed common white wine, with musts of Niagara rose (Vitis labrusca grew in Misiones and native yeasts of its berries. Isothermal alcoholic fermentation was used at 24 ± 1 °C in the flask scale procedure, in enological conditions, with native yeasts and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae bayanus as reference. The analytical techniques applied were those of the National Institute of Viticulture (INV of Argentina. For the analysis of statistical data, packet 1993 Statgraphic Plus® for Windows Version 5.1 Statistical Graphics Corporation was used. The physicochemical characteristics of the grapes and musts were obtained for agricultural use as raw material. In the fermentation, work of native yeasts was evaluated with respect to S. bayanus with: the residual sugar, alcohol produced, the process time, activity, power, and the fermentation performance. It was found that dry white wines are fit for consumption, complied with the requirements of INV from the standpoint of: ethanol, dry matter content, pH, density, sulfur dioxide (free and total and acidity (volatile and total.

  20. Graft-accelerated virus-induced gene silencing facilitates functional genomics in rose flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huijun; Shi, Shaochuan; Ma, Nan; Cao, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Xianqin; Wang, Qigang; Jian, Hongying; Zhou, Ningning; Zhang, Zhao; Tang, Kaixue

    2018-01-01

    Rose has emerged as a model ornamental plant for studies of flower development, senescence, and morphology, as well as the metabolism of floral fragrances and colors. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has long been used in functional genomics studies of rose by vacuum infiltration of cuttings or seedlings with an Agrobacterium suspension carrying TRV-derived vectors. However, VIGS in rose flowers remains a challenge because of its low efficiency and long time to establish silencing. Here we present a novel and rapid VIGS method that can be used to analyze gene function in rose, called 'graft-accelerated VIGS', where axillary sprouts are cut from the rose plant and vacuum infiltrated with Agrobacterium. The inoculated scions are then grafted back onto the plants to flower and silencing phenotypes can be observed within 5 weeks, post-infiltration. Using this new method, we successfully silenced expression of the RhDFR1, RhAG, and RhNUDX1 in rose flowers, and affected their color, petal number, as well as fragrance, respectively. This grafting method will facilitate high-throughput functional analysis of genes in rose flowers. Importantly, it may also be applied to other woody species that are not currently amenable to VIGS by conventional leaf or plantlet/seedling infiltration methods. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Preventive effect of ozone on the development of white spot lesions during multibracket appliance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Otmar; Lussi, Adrian; Ruf, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    To test the null hypotheses: (1) there is no difference in the caries protective effect of ozone and Cervitec/Fluor Protector during multibracket (MB) appliance therapy, and (2) DIAGNOdent and quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) are not superior to a visual evaluation of initial caries lesions. Twenty right-handed patients with a very poor oral hygiene who required full MB appliance therapy were analyzed during 26 months. In a split-mouth-design, the four quadrants of each patient were either treated with ozone, a combination of Cervitec and Fluor Protector, or served as untreated controls. The visible plaque index (VPI) and white spot formation were analyzed clinically. DIAGNOdent and QLF were used for a quantitative assessment of white spot formation. The average VPI in all four dental arch quadrants amounted to 55.6% and was independent of the preventive measure undertaken. In the quadrants treated with Cervitec/Fluor Protector, only 0.7% of the areas developed new, clinically visible white spots. This was significantly (P Fluor Protector during MB therapy was superior to ozone, and a visual evaluation of initial caries lesions was superior to both DIAGNOdent and QLF.

  2. INFLUENCE OF PHOTOACTIVATED ROSE BENGAL ON MICROCIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Gryshachova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of mean blood velocity changes in rat mesenteric venules (15–30 µm due to photoactivation (λ = 532 nm, 0,175 W/cm2, 300 s of i.v. injected Rose Bengal (17 mg/kg is represented in the article. Using in vivo biomicroscopy the progressive decrease of mean blood velocity both during the laser irradiation and after it was registered. The calculation of thermal effects in the irradiated part of microvessel due to laser absorption by hemoglobin and Rose Bengal showed the rise of temperature was not exceed 0.2оC as compared to initial level. Thus, thermal effect has nearly no significant influence on microvascular disturbances caused by Rose Bengal photoactivation.

  3. [Using physiological tests on the selection of cut roses' varieties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudin, Serge; Crespel, Laurent; Le Bris, Manuel

    2007-09-01

    We have observed that the evolution of the senescence in vase can be appreciated by the measures of pH, conductivity, or osmolarity of the petal cell sap of a rose variety. We wanted to check whether these physiological tests could be used to select the post-harvest quality of varieties in process of evaluation. Whereas the measures of pH and osmolarity do not seem to be correlated with the flower's vase life, those of conductivity seem to be linked to it (r=-0.74). As far as the pH is concerned, when the correlation is tested on varieties grouped in colours (white, yellow and ochre; pink and red; multicoloured) and not on the whole mixed varieties, then the correlation seems to be satisfactory, being characterized by r coefficients between -0.78 and -0.91.

  4. Inter-Parietal White Matter Development Predicts Numerical Performance in Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlon, Jessica F; Davis, Simon W; Libertus, Melissa E; Kahane, Jill; Brannon, Elizabeth M; Pelphrey, Kevin A

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to understand the role of interhemispheric transfer in numerical development, we investigated the relationship between children's developing knowledge of numbers and the integrity of their white matter connections between the cerebral hemispheres (the corpus callosum). We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography analyses to test the link between the development of the corpus callosum and performance on symbolic and non-symbolic numerical judgment tasks. We were especially interested in the interhemispheric connections of parietal cortex in 6-year-old children, because regions of parietal cortex have been implicated in the development of numerical skills by several prior studies. Our results revealed significant structural differences between children and adults in the fibers of the corpus callosum connecting the left and right parietal lobes. Importantly, these structural differences were predictive of individual differences among children in performance on numerical judgment tasks: children with poor numerical performance relative to their peers exhibited reduced white matter coherence in the fibers passing through the isthmus of the corpus callosum, which connects the parietal hemispheres.

  5. Rose: an island of stereotypes on Lost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério de Almeida

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of research made on Geifec and has as a goal to analyze the modes of representation of the character Rose Nadler, from the American series Lost. Woman, African-American, close to 60s, overweight, Rose is in the intersection of a series of minority groups and her presence occurs as an overlapping of unusual stereotypes in the series. The theoretical references use the contributions of Mazzara (1998 and Mittell (2010 and the methodology takes the apparitions of the character in the first three seasons of the series, with images and dialogues transcriptions.

  6. Cell autonomous lipin 1 function is essential for development and maintenance of white and brown adipose tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadra, K.; Medard, J.J.; Mul, J.D.; Han, G.S.; Gres, S.; Pende, M.; Metzger, D.; Chambon, P.; Cuppen, E.; Saulnier-Blache, J.S.; Carman, G.M.; Desvergne, B.; Chrast, R.

    2012-01-01

    Through analysis of mice with spatially and temporally restricted inactivation of Lpin1, we characterized its cell autonomous function in both white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipocyte development and maintenance. We observed that the lipin 1 inactivation in adipocytes of

  7. Recovery of polyphenols from rose oil distillation wastewater using adsorption resins--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, Krasimir; Garo, Eliane; Rusanova, Mila; Fertig, Orlando; Hamburger, Matthias; Atanassov, Ivan; Butterweck, Veronika

    2014-11-01

    The production of rose oil from rose flowers by water steam distillation leaves a water fraction of the distillate as main part of the waste. Therefore, the rose oil distillation wastewater represents a serious environmental problem due to the high content of polyphenols which are difficult to decompose and have to be considered as biopollutants when discarded into the drainage system and rivers. On the other hand, natural polyphenols are valuable compounds with useful properties as bioactive substances. Until now there is no established practice for processing of rose oil distillation wastewater and utilization of contained substances. Thus, it was the aim of this study to develop a strategy to separate this wastewater into a polyphenol depleted water fraction and a polyphenol enriched fraction which could be developed into innovative value-added products. In a first step, the phytochemical profile of rose oil distillation wastewater was determined. Its HPLC-PDA-MS analysis revealed the presence of flavan-3-ols, flavanones, flavonols and flavones. In a second step, the development of a stepwise concentration of rose oil distillation wastewater was performed. The concentration process includes a filtration process to eliminate suspended solids in the wastewater, followed by adsorption of the contained phenolic compounds onto adsorption resins (XAD and SP). Finally, desorption of the polyphenol fraction from the resin matrix was achieved using ethanol and/or aqueous ethanol. The result of the process was a wastewater low in soluble organic compounds and an enriched polyphenol fraction (RF20 SP-207). The profile of this fraction was similar to that of rose oil distillation wastewater and showed the presence of flavonols such as quercetin and kaempferol glycosides as major metabolites. These compounds were isolated from the enriched polyphenol fraction and their structures confirmed by NMR. In summary, a pilot medium scale system was developed using adsorption resins

  8. Partial preferential chromosome pairing is genotype dependent in tetraploid rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Peter M; Arens, Paul; Voorrips, Roeland E; Esselink, G Danny; Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F S; Van't Westende, Wendy P C; Santos Leonardo, Tiago; Wissink, Patrick; Zheng, Chaozhi; van Geest, Geert; Visser, Richard G F; Krens, Frans A; Smulders, Marinus J M; Maliepaard, Chris

    2017-04-01

    It has long been recognised that polyploid species do not always neatly fall into the categories of auto- or allopolyploid, leading to the term 'segmental allopolyploid' to describe everything in between. The meiotic behaviour of such intermediate species is not fully understood, nor is there consensus as to how to model their inheritance patterns. In this study we used a tetraploid cut rose (Rosa hybrida) population, genotyped using the 68K WagRhSNP array, to construct an ultra-high-density linkage map of all homologous chromosomes using methods previously developed for autotetraploids. Using the predicted bivalent configurations in this population we quantified differences in pairing behaviour among and along homologous chromosomes, leading us to correct our estimates of recombination frequency to account for this behaviour. This resulted in the re-mapping of 25 695 SNP markers across all homologues of the seven rose chromosomes, tailored to the pairing behaviour of each chromosome in each parent. We confirmed the inferred differences in pairing behaviour among chromosomes by examining repulsion-phase linkage estimates, which also carry information about preferential pairing and recombination. Currently, the closest sequenced relative to rose is Fragaria vesca. Aligning the integrated ultra-dense rose map with the strawberry genome sequence provided a detailed picture of the synteny, confirming overall co-linearity but also revealing new genomic rearrangements. Our results suggest that pairing affinities may vary along chromosome arms, which broadens our current understanding of segmental allopolyploidy. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Nutritional influences on early white matter development: response to Anderson and Burggren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, Douglas C; Walker, Lindsay; Dirks, Holly; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan

    2014-10-15

    Does breastfeeding alter early brain development? In a recent retrospective study, our group examined the cross-sectional relationship between early infant feeding practice and white matter maturation and cognitive development. In groups matched for child and mother age, gestation duration, birth weight, gender distribution, and socio-economic status; we observed that children who were breastfed exclusively for at least 3 months showed, on average, increased white matter myelin development compared to children who either were exclusively formula-fed, or received a mixture of breast milk and formula. In secondary analysis on sub-sets of these children, again matched for important confounding variables, we found improved cognitive test scores of receptive language in the exclusively breast-fed children compared to formula or formula+breast-fed children; and that prolonged breastfeeding was associated with increased motor, language, and visual functioning in exclusively breast-fed children. In response to this work, Anderson and Burggren have questioned our methodology and, by association, our findings. Further, they use their critique as a platform for advancing an alternative interpretation of our findings: that observed results were not associated with prolonged breast-feeding, but rather delayed the introduction of cow's milk. In this response, we address and clarify some of the misconceptions presented by Anderson and Burggren. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. FinROSE - middle atmospheric chemistry transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damski, J.; Thoelix, L.; Backman, L. (Research and Development, Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (FI)); Taalas, P. (Regional and Technical Cooperation for Development Dept. World Meteorological Organization, Geneve (CH)); Kulmala, M. (Helsinki Univ. (FI). Div. of Atmospheric Sciences)

    2007-07-01

    The development and performance of a three-dimensional global middle atmospheric chemistry transport model FinROSE is described. The FinROSE chemistry transport model includes a numerical scheme for stratospheric chemistry with parameterizations for heterogeneous processing on polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) and on liquid binary aerosols together with a parameterisation of large nitric acid trihydrate particles (i.e. NAT-rocks) and PSC sedimentation. The total number of trace species in the model is 34 and the total number of gas-phase reactions, photodissociation processes and heterogeneous reactions is about 150. The model is forced by external wind and temperature fields. The simulations are normally performed in a 5 deg x 10 deg (lat. x long.) grid from the surface up to around 0.1 hPa, with a vertical resolution of ca. 1.5 km in the stratosphere. Long-term simulations (40 to 50 years) have been done using winds and temperatures from ECMWF ERA40 analyses. The performance of the model in describing the stratospheric composition and chemistry is shown and evaluated in this paper. In general, the FinROSE results show a good comparison with measured total ozone. Also the timing, the depth and the deepening of the Antarctic ozone hole, and the responsible processes are captured well in the model simulations. (orig.)

  11. Bioclimatic lessons from James C. Rose's architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vissilia, A.M. [Department of Structural Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Kodrou 13, 105 58 Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    This paper attempts to interpret three residences designed by landscape architect James Rose, focusing on their bioclimatic concepts (layout of the buildings: orientation in relation to sun and wind, geometry of the building form; spacing: site planning-landscape; air movement; openings: size, position and orientation, protection; and building envelope: choice of building materials and construction detailing). James Rose (1913-1991) was one of the three pioneer landscape architects who established modern landscape design in the United States. He had the opportunity to design three residences and their landscapes which constitute the clearest expression of his views about environmental design. Residences conceived in Rose's design philosophy result to the creation of an ''environment'' instead of the ordinary approach of architecture plus landscape, exhibiting his contribution to the development of a less aggressive architecture, more attentive and integrated to the environment. This is a rare approach where the design is product of one single mind that of the landscape architect. Several bioclimatic concepts are apparent in the landscape architect's works, showing a deep concern with the integration between construction and environment. The three cases explored are: the landscape architect's environment (1952, 1970), the Zheutlin environment (1956), and the Slutzker environment (1964). (author)

  12. Spectral effects of supplementary lighting on the secondary metabolites in roses, chrysanthemums, and campanulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the light spectrum on photosynthesis, growth, and secondary metabolites Rosa hybrida ‘Scarlet’, Chrysanthemum morifolium ‘Coral Charm’, and Campanula portenschlagiana ‘BluOne’ were grown at 24/18 ◦C day/night temperature under purpose-built LED arrays yielding...... approximately 200 mol m−2 s−1 at plant height for 16 h per day. The four light treatments were (1) 40% Blue/60% Red, (2) 20% Blue/80% Red, (3) 100% Red, and (4) 100% White (Control). The plant height was smallest in 40% Blue/60% Red in roses and chrysanthemums, while the biomass was smallest in the white...... control in roses and in 100% Red in chrysanthemums. The total biomass was unaffected by the spectrum in campanulas, while the leaf area was smallest in the 40% Blue/60% Red treatment. In 100% Red curled leaves and other morphological abnormalities were observed. Increasing the blue to red ratio increased...

  13. Automated rose cutting in greenhouses with 3D vision and robotics : analysis of 3D vision techniques for stem detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, J.C.; Hemming, J.; Heerde, van C.J.E.; Golbach, F.B.T.F.; Soest, van R.; Wekking, E.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of labour cost is the major motivation to develop a system for robot harvesting of roses in greenhouses that at least can compete with manual harvesting. Due to overlapping leaves, one of the most complicated tasks in robotic rose cutting is to locate the stem and trace the stem down

  14. Perfect roses and energy efficient cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelder, De A.

    2017-01-01

    How to grow roses with a constant quality year round in an energy efficient manner? That is the question for an applied research in which assimilation lighting, existing of HPS lamps and inter lighting LED, and cooling equipment and forced ventilation for semi-closed cultivation are combined. The

  15. Locally active Hindmarsh-Rose neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Paolo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy); Fortuna, Luigi [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: lfortuna@diees.unict.it; Frasca, Mattia [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: mfrasca@diees.unict.it; Rosa, Manuela La [SST Group, Corporate R and D, STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: manuela.la-rosa@st.com

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the locally active and the edge of chaos regions of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) model for neuron dynamics are studied. From these regions parameters are chosen to set emergent phenomena both in 2D and 3D grids of HR neurons.

  16. The Rose Report [Continued]: "The Invisible Worm"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Mary Jane

    2009-01-01

    While Colin Richards' article is a trenchant analysis of the big themes and missed opportunities of the Rose Report, this response examines some of the small print. It concludes that the document is disfigured by many minor blemishes, and is also fatally flawed by a crude misapprehension of the nature of progress and the purpose of education.

  17. Impact of breast milk on intelligence quotient, brain size, and white matter development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Elizabeth B; Fischl, Bruce R; Quinn, Brian T; Chong, Wui K; Gadian, David G; Lucas, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Although observational findings linking breast milk to higher scores on cognitive tests may be confounded by factors associated with mothers' choice to breastfeed, it has been suggested that one or more constituents of breast milk facilitate cognitive development, particularly in preterms. Because cognitive scores are related to head size, we hypothesized that breast milk mediates cognitive effects by affecting brain growth. We used detailed data from a randomized feeding trial to calculate percentage of expressed maternal breast milk (%EBM) in the infant diet of 50 adolescents. MRI scans were obtained (mean age=15 y 9 mo), allowing volumes of total brain (TBV) and white and gray matter (WMV, GMV) to be calculated. In the total group, %EBM correlated significantly with verbal intelligence quotient (VIQ); in boys, with all IQ scores, TBV and WMV. VIQ was, in turn, correlated with WMV and, in boys only, additionally with TBV. No significant relationships were seen in girls or with gray matter. These data support the hypothesis that breast milk promotes brain development, particularly white matter growth. The selective effect in males accords with animal and human evidence regarding gender effects of early diet. Our data have important neurobiological and public health implications and identify areas for future mechanistic study.

  18. TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT TO ELABORATE COMMON WHITE WINE IN MISIONES, WITH ECONOMIC EVALUATION AT INDUSTRIAL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miño Valdés, Juan Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to develop a sustainable technology on an industrial scale to produce common white wine with non viniferous grapes cultivated in Misiones. This technological project was initiated at a laboratory scale, continued in the pilot plant and industrial-scale project. It was considered as a productive unit to 12 rural families with 27 hectares of vines each. The 8 stages followed with inductive and deductive methodology were: The development of dry white wine at laboratory scale. The evaluation of process variables in the vivification. The mathematical modeling of the alcoholic fermentation in oenological conditions. The valuation of the aptitude of wines for human consumption. The establishment of a technological procedure for wine in the pilot plant. The evaluation of the pilot plant in technological procedure established. The calculation and selection of industrial equipment. The estimate of the costs and profitability of industrial technological process. It reached a technology for a production capacity of 5,834 L day-1, with dynamic economic indicators whose values were: net present value of 6,602,666 U$D, an internal rate of return of 60 % for a period of recovery of investment to net present value of 3 years.

  19. White biotechnology: State of the art strategies for the development of biocatalysts for biorefining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heux, S; Meynial-Salles, I; O'Donohue, M J; Dumon, C

    2015-12-01

    White biotechnology is a term that is now often used to describe the implementation of biotechnology in the industrial sphere. Biocatalysts (enzymes and microorganisms) are the key tools of white biotechnology, which is considered to be one of the key technological drivers for the growing bioeconomy. Biocatalysts are already present in sectors such as the chemical and agro-food industries, and are used to manufacture products as diverse as antibiotics, paper pulp, bread or advanced polymers. This review proposes an original and global overview of highly complementary fields of biotechnology at both enzyme and microorganism level. A certain number of state of the art approaches that are now being used to improve the industrial fitness of biocatalysts particularly focused on the biorefinery sector are presented. The first part deals with the technologies that underpin the development of industrial biocatalysts, notably the discovery of new enzymes and enzyme improvement using directed evolution techniques. The second part describes the toolbox available by the cell engineer to shape the metabolism of microorganisms. And finally the last part focuses on the 'omic' technologies that are vital for understanding and guide microbial engineering toward more efficient microbial biocatalysts. Altogether, these techniques and strategies will undoubtedly help to achieve the challenging task of developing consolidated bioprocessing (i.e. CBP) readily available for industrial purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. White Matter Tracts Connected to the Medial Temporal Lobe Support the Development of Mnemonic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelken, Carter; Lee, Joshua K; Pospisil, Jacqueline; Sastre, Marcos; Ross, Julia M; Bunge, Silvia A; Ghetti, Simona

    2015-09-01

    One of the most important factors driving the development of memory during childhood is mnemonic control, or the capacity to initiate and maintain the processes that guide encoding and retrieval operations. The ability to selectively attend to and encode relevant stimuli is a particularly useful form of mnemonic control, and is one that undergoes marked improvement over childhood. We hypothesized that structural integrity of white matter tracts, in particular those connecting medial temporal lobe memory regions to other cortical areas, and/or those connecting frontal and parietal control regions, should contribute to successful mnemonic control. To test this hypothesis, we examined the relationship between structural integrity of selected white matter tracts and an experimental measure of mnemonic control, involving enhancement of memory by attention at encoding, in 116 children aged 7-11 and 25 young adults. We observed a positive relationship between integrity of uncinate fasciculus and mnemonic enhancement across age groups. In adults, but not in children, we also observed an association between mnemonic enhancement and integrity of ventral cingulum bundle and ventral fornix/fimbria. Integrity of fronto-parietal tracts, including dorsal cingulum and superior longitudinal fasciculus, was unrelated to mnemonic enhancement. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the development of white matter volume and change in executive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure can cause a wide range of deficits in executive function that persist throughout life, but little is known about how changes in brain structure relate to cognition in affected individuals. In the current study, we predicted that the rate of white matter volumetric development would be atypical in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD when compared to typically developing children, and that the rate of change in cognitive function would relate to differential white matter development between groups. Data were available for 103 subjects [49 with FASD, 54 controls, age range 6–17, mean age = 11.83] with 153 total observations. Groups were age-matched. Participants underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and an executive function (EF battery. Using white matter volumes measured bilaterally for frontal and parietal regions and the corpus callosum, change was predicted by modeling the effects of age, intracranial volume, sex, and interactions with exposure status and EF measures. While both groups showed regional increases in white matter volumes and improvement in cognitive performance over time, there were significant effects of exposure status on age-related relationships between white matter increases and EF measures. Specifically, individuals with FASD consistently showed a positive relationship between improved cognitive function and increased white matter volume over time, while no such relationships were seen in controls. These novel results relating improved cognitive function with increased white matter volume in FASD suggest that better cognitive outcomes could be possible for FASD subjects through interventions that enhance white matter plasticity.

  2. QTL analysis of variation for vigour in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Visser, P.B.; Hendriks, T.; Prins, T.W.; Stam, P.; Dolstra, O.

    2007-01-01

    The improvement of energy efficiency in the greenhouse production of cut rose and pot rose can be achieved through the use of rose cultivars having vigorous growth. A better understanding of the inheritance of vigour and its related traits will assist the breeding activities. Quantitative trait

  3. They rose to the challenge!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    The Challenge-Based Innovation programme is a Masters-level initiative developed at CERN in collaboration with many universities around the world. The first programme saw 45 students take part, and their final results were presented at an official "gala" held on 26 February.   On 26 February, after their official presentations, the six CBI teams presented their prototypes to the public in the IdeaSquare building.   As part of the IdeaSquare project, the Challenge-Based Innovation (CBI) programme is based on a very pragmatic question: can the tools and results produced by basic research (like that being carried out at CERN) be used to solve societal problems? If so, how? To answer this question, 45 students from very different professional and cultural backgrounds formed six teams, each with a specific societal challenge to solve (see here). Over a six-month period – from September 2014 to February 2015 – the six teams worked on the challenge in o...

  4. Les Brulures Chimiques Par Le Laurier Rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkali, H.; Ababou, M.; Nassim Sabah, T.; Moussaoui, A.; Ennouhi, A.; Fouadi, F.Z.; Siah, S.; Ihrai, H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Le laurier rose ou Nerium oleander est un arbuste qui pousse naturellement dans les régions méditerranéennes. Au Maroc on le trouve dans les lieux humides. Il est réputé par ses risques de toxicité systémique en cas d'empoisonnement à cause de la présence de deux alcaloïdes, surtout l'oléandrine. La littérature illustre des cas d'utilisation locale des feuilles de cette plante contre la gale, les hémorroïdes et les furoncles. Nous rapportons deux cas de brûlures chimiques par le laurier rose de gravité différente. Cela doit aboutir à une information élargie de la population, ainsi qu'une réglementation stricte de sa commercialisation. PMID:21991211

  5. Les Brulures Chimiques Par Le Laurier Rose

    OpenAIRE

    Bakkali, H.; Ababou, M.; Nassim Sabah, T.; Moussaoui, A.; Ennouhi, A.; Fouadi, F.Z.; Siah, S.; Ihrai, H.

    2010-01-01

    Le laurier rose ou Nerium oleander est un arbuste qui pousse naturellement dans les régions méditerranéennes. Au Maroc on le trouve dans les lieux humides. Il est réputé par ses risques de toxicité systémique en cas d'empoisonnement à cause de la présence de deux alcaloïdes, surtout l'oléandrine. La littérature illustre des cas d'utilisation locale des feuilles de cette plante contre la gale, les hémorroïdes et les furoncles. Nous rapportons deux cas de brûlures chimiques par le laurier rose ...

  6. Solar drying of rose (Rosa sp.) petals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balladin, D.A.; Headley, Oliver [University of the West Indies, Center for Resource Management and Environmental Studies, St. Michael (Barbados)

    1999-10-01

    The rose (Rosa sp.) petals can be dried after 2 days at about 30degC reaching an equilibrium moisture content after 16 h using the solar wire basket dryer. The initial moisture content (wet wt basis) and final moisture content (dry wt basis), determined by the Dean-Stark toluene were 65.7 and 25.2% respectively. The intensity of the rose red coloured pigment (pelargonidin) decreased by a factor of 2.5 after drying. The pelargonidin ethanoic extract as an acid-base indicator, has a K{sub 4} value of 1 x 10{sup -4} mol 1{sup -1} and pH of end point 4 and imbibed on filter paper and allowed to air dry for 5 min showed excellent properties as acid-based test tapes. (Author)

  7. Effect of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri on white spot lesion development in orthodontic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gizani, Sotiria; Petsi, Georgia; Twetman, Svante

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of daily intake of lozenges containing probiotic bacteria on white spot lesion (WSL) formation as well as on salivary lactobacilli (LB) and mutans streptococci (MS) counts, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment...... and randomly allocated to a test or placebo group. Subjects in the test group were instructed to take one probiotic lozenge containing two strains of Lactobacillus reuteri once daily. An identical lozenge without active bacteria was used in the placebo group. Dental plaque, WSL, and salivary MS and LB levels....../CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Daily intake of probiotic lozenges did not seem to affect the development of WSL during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances....

  8. Development of algorithms for detection of mechanical injury on white mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowen, A. A.; O'Donnell, C. P.

    2009-05-01

    White mushrooms were subjected to mechanical injury by controlled shaking in a plastic box at 400 rpm for different times (0, 60, 120, 300 and 600 s). Immediately after shaking, hyperspectral images were obtained using two pushbroom line-scanning hyperspectral imaging instruments, one operating in the wavelength range of 400 - 1000 nm with spectroscopic resolution of 5 nm, the other operating in the wavelength range of 950 - 1700 nm with spectroscopic resolution of 7 nm. Different spectral and spatial pretreatments were investigated to reduce the effect of sample curvature on hyperspectral data. Algorithms based on Chemometric techniques (Principal Component Analysis and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis) and image processing methods (masking, thresholding, morphological operations) were developed for pixel classification in hyperspectral images. In addition, correlation analysis, spectral angle mapping and scaled difference of sample spectra were investigated and compared with the chemometric approaches.

  9. Multiplication of Patio roses by cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denysko Iryna Leonidivna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment involved plants of 10 Patio rose cultivars of the National Dendrological Park "Sofiyivka" collection. The methods of propagation by cuttings worked out by Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy were assumed as a basis. Callogenesis and regenerative capacity were estimated in accordance with Z.J. Ivanova scale (1982. The fact is ascertained that the success of rooting substantially depends on particularities of certain Patio rose cultivar. It is advisable to use cuttings from basal and medial parts of stems, with remaining leaves, taken within the last ten-day period of May – the first ten-day period of June. The pretreatment with rhizogenic medium "Kornevin" (reactant — indolebutyric acid is the most effective for rooting cuttings. The optimal for rooting is the two-layered substrate: the lower layer is a multicomponent soil compound of peat, perlite, sod soil and humus in ratio 1:1:1:1; the upper layer consists of sand. Seedlings of Patio roses cultivated in open ground during vegetation period form stems 1.8 times more vigorously than ones grown on the same place where they were rooted. The optimal period to transfer into bed is May. It is reasonable to use top removal in order to form vigorous stem system.

  10. Strengthening Software Authentication with the ROSE Software Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G

    2006-06-15

    Many recent nonproliferation and arms control software projects include a software authentication regime. These include U.S. Government-sponsored projects both in the United States and in the Russian Federation (RF). This trend toward requiring software authentication is only accelerating. Demonstrating assurance that software performs as expected without hidden ''backdoors'' is crucial to a project's success. In this context, ''authentication'' is defined as determining that a software package performs only its intended purpose and performs said purpose correctly and reliably over the planned duration of an agreement. In addition to visual inspections by knowledgeable computer scientists, automated tools are needed to highlight suspicious code constructs, both to aid visual inspection and to guide program development. While many commercial tools are available for portions of the authentication task, they are proprietary and not extensible. An open-source, extensible tool can be customized to the unique needs of each project (projects can have both common and custom rules to detect flaws and security holes). Any such extensible tool has to be based on a complete language compiler. ROSE is precisely such a compiler infrastructure developed within the Department of Energy (DOE) and targeted at the optimization of scientific applications and user-defined libraries within large-scale applications (typically applications of a million lines of code). ROSE is a robust, source-to-source analysis and optimization infrastructure currently addressing large, million-line DOE applications in C and C++ (handling the full C, C99, C++ languages and with current collaborations to support Fortran90). We propose to extend ROSE to address a number of security-specific requirements, and apply it to software authentication for nonproliferation and arms control projects.

  11. Frontostriatal White Matter Integrity Predicts Development of Delay of Gratification: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Michelle; Peper, Jiska S; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Mandl, René C W; Crone, Eveline A

    2016-02-10

    The ability to delay gratification increases considerably across development. Here, we test the hypothesis that this impulse control capacity is driven by increased maturation of frontostriatal circuitry using a fiber-tracking approach combined with longitudinal imaging. In total, 192 healthy volunteers between 8 and 26 years underwent diffusion tensor imaging scanning and completed a delay-discounting task twice, separated by a 2-year interval. We investigated dynamic associations between frontostriatal white matter (WM) integrity and delay of gratification skills. Moreover, we examined the predictive value of frontostriatal WM integrity for future delay of gratification skills. Results showed that delay discounting increases with age in a quadratic fashion, with greatest patience during late adolescence. Data also indicated nonlinear development of frontostriatal WM, with relative fast development during childhood and early adulthood and--on average--little change during mid-adolescence. Furthermore, the positive association between age and delay discounting was further increased in individuals with higher WM integrity of the frontostriatal tracts. Predictive analysis showed that frontostriatal WM development explained unique variance in current and future delay of gratification skills. This study adds to a descriptive relation between WM integrity and delay of gratification by showing that maturation of frontostriatal connectivity predicts changes in delay of gratification skills. These findings have implications for studies examining deviances in impulse control by showing that the developmental path between striatum and prefrontal cortex may be an important predictor for when development goes astray. During the transition from childhood to adulthood, individuals generally show increased patience and become better in delaying gratification. The exact neural correlates of delay of gratification, however, remain poorly understood. By measuring both frontostriatal

  12. RNA-seq analysis identifies an intricate regulatory network controlling cluster root development in white lupin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Highly adapted plant species are able to alter their root architecture to improve nutrient uptake and thrive in environments with limited nutrient supply. Cluster roots (CRs) are specialised structures of dense lateral roots formed by several plant species for the effective mining of nutrient rich soil patches through a combination of increased surface area and exudation of carboxylates. White lupin is becoming a model-species allowing for the discovery of gene networks involved in CR development. A greater understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms driving these developmental processes is important for the generation of smarter plants for a world with diminishing resources to improve food security. Results RNA-seq analyses for three developmental stages of the CR formed under phosphorus-limited conditions and two of non-cluster roots have been performed for white lupin. In total 133,045,174 high-quality paired-end reads were used for a de novo assembly of the root transcriptome and merged with LAGI01 (Lupinus albus gene index) to generate an improved LAGI02 with 65,097 functionally annotated contigs. This was followed by comparative gene expression analysis. We show marked differences in the transcriptional response across the various cluster root stages to adjust to phosphate limitation by increasing uptake capacity and adjusting metabolic pathways. Several transcription factors such as PLT, SCR, PHB, PHV or AUX/IAA with a known role in the control of meristem activity and developmental processes show an increased expression in the tip of the CR. Genes involved in hormonal responses (PIN, LAX, YUC) and cell cycle control (CYCA/B, CDK) are also differentially expressed. In addition, we identify primary transcripts of miRNAs with established function in the root meristem. Conclusions Our gene expression analysis shows an intricate network of transcription factors and plant hormones controlling CR initiation and formation. In addition

  13. RNA-seq analysis identifies an intricate regulatory network controlling cluster root development in white lupin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secco, David; Shou, Huixia; Whelan, James; Berkowitz, Oliver

    2014-03-25

    Highly adapted plant species are able to alter their root architecture to improve nutrient uptake and thrive in environments with limited nutrient supply. Cluster roots (CRs) are specialised structures of dense lateral roots formed by several plant species for the effective mining of nutrient rich soil patches through a combination of increased surface area and exudation of carboxylates. White lupin is becoming a model-species allowing for the discovery of gene networks involved in CR development. A greater understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms driving these developmental processes is important for the generation of smarter plants for a world with diminishing resources to improve food security. RNA-seq analyses for three developmental stages of the CR formed under phosphorus-limited conditions and two of non-cluster roots have been performed for white lupin. In total 133,045,174 high-quality paired-end reads were used for a de novo assembly of the root transcriptome and merged with LAGI01 (Lupinus albus gene index) to generate an improved LAGI02 with 65,097 functionally annotated contigs. This was followed by comparative gene expression analysis. We show marked differences in the transcriptional response across the various cluster root stages to adjust to phosphate limitation by increasing uptake capacity and adjusting metabolic pathways. Several transcription factors such as PLT, SCR, PHB, PHV or AUX/IAA with a known role in the control of meristem activity and developmental processes show an increased expression in the tip of the CR. Genes involved in hormonal responses (PIN, LAX, YUC) and cell cycle control (CYCA/B, CDK) are also differentially expressed. In addition, we identify primary transcripts of miRNAs with established function in the root meristem. Our gene expression analysis shows an intricate network of transcription factors and plant hormones controlling CR initiation and formation. In addition, functional differences between the

  14. Development of an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and abscisic acid in rose leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Renato; Daeseleire, Els; Van Pamel, Els; Scariot, Valentina; Leus, Leen

    2014-07-09

    This paper describes a method to detect and quantitate the endogenous plant hormones (±)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid, (-)-jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid by means of ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) in hybrid rose leaf matrices. Deuterium-labeled [(2)H6] (+)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid, [(2)H6] (±)-jasmonic acid, and [(2)H4]-salicylic acid were used as internal standards. Rose samples (10 mg) were extracted with methanol/water/acetic acid (10:89:1) and subsequently purified on an Oasis MCX 1 cm(3) Vac SPE cartridge. Performance characteristics were validated according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Recovery, repeatability, and within-laboratory reproducibility were acceptable for all phytohormones tested at three different concentrations. The decision limit and detection capability for (±)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid, (-)-jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid were 0.0075 and 0.015 μg/g, 0.00015 and 0.00030 μg/g, and 0.0089 and 0.018 μg/g, respectively. Matrix effects (signal suppression or enhancement) appeared to be high for all substances considered, implying the need for quantitation based on matrix-matched calibration curves.

  15. A carotenogenic mini-pathway introduced into white corn does not affect development or agronomic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanga, Daniela; Capell, Teresa; Slafer, Gustavo A; Christou, Paul; Savin, Roxana

    2016-12-06

    High-carotenoid corn (Carolight®) has been developed as a vehicle to deliver pro-vitamin A in the diet and thus address vitamin A deficiency in at-risk populations in developing countries. Like any other novel crop, the performance of Carolight® must be tested in different environments to ensure that optimal yields and productivity are maintained, particularly in this case to ensure that the engineered metabolic pathway does not attract a yield penalty. Here we compared the performance of Carolight® with its near isogenic white corn inbred parental line under greenhouse and field conditions, and monitored the stability of the introduced trait. We found that Carolight® was indistinguishable from its near isogenic line in terms of agronomic performance, particularly grain yield and its main components. We also established experimentally that the functionality of the introduced trait was indistinguishable when plants were grown in a controlled environment or in the field. Such thorough characterization under different agronomic conditions is rarely performed even for first-generation traits such as herbicide tolerance and pest resistance, and certainly not for complex second-generation traits such as the metabolic remodeling in the Carolight® variety. Our results therefore indicate that Carolight® can now be incorporated into breeding lines to generate hybrids with locally adapted varieties for further product development and assessment.

  16. Nano-scale composition of commercial white powders for development of latent fingerprints on adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B J; Reynolds, A J; Richardson, M; Sears, V G

    2010-09-01

    Titanium dioxide based powders are regularly used in the development of latent fingerprints on dark surfaces. For analysis of prints on adhesive tapes, the titanium dioxide can be suspended in a surfactant and used in the form of a powder suspension. Commercially available products, whilst having nominally similar composition, show varying levels of effectiveness of print development, with some powders adhering to the background as well as the print. X-ray fluorescence (XRF), analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and laser particle sizing of the fingerprint powders show TiO(2) particles with a surrounding coating, tens of nanometres thick, consisting of Al and Si rich material, with traces of sodium and sulphur. Such aluminosilicates are commonly used as anti-caking agents and to aid adhesion or functionality of some fingerprint powders; however, the morphology, thickness, coverage and composition of the aluminosilicates are the primary differences between the white powder formulations and could be related to variation in the efficacy of print development. Copyright © 2009 Forensic Science Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of White and Norway Spruce Trees from Several Seed Sources 29 Years After Planting

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. King; Paul O. Rudolf

    1969-01-01

    A 29-year-old test of trees grown from seven white spruce and six Norway spruce seed sources and planted in Wisconsin and Minnesota demonstrates the importance of seed-source selection and indicates that trees from some Norway spruce sources equal or surpass the native white spruce.

  18. Developing a new supplemental lighting device with ultra-bright white LED for vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongguang; Li, Pingping; Jiang, Jianghai

    2007-02-01

    It has been proved that monochromatic or compound light-emitting diode (LED) or laser diode (LD) can promote the photosynthesis of horticultural crops, but the promotion of polychromatic light like white LED is unclear. A new type of ultra-bright white LED (LUW56843, InGaN, \

  19. White Matter Maturation Supports the Development of Reasoning Ability through Its Influence on Processing Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Emilio; Whitaker, Kirstie J.; Steele, Joel S.; Green, Chloe T.; Wendelken, Carter; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the human brain changes in several ways throughout childhood and adolescence. Perhaps the most salient of these changes is the strengthening of white matter tracts that enable distal brain regions to communicate with one another more quickly and efficiently. Here, we sought to understand whether and how white matter changes…

  20. Development of a Code to Analyze the Solar White-Light Images ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the focal plane a green color filter is used to improve the quality of the solar image. More detailed ... The solar white-light images were stored on the photographic plates of size 25.4 sq. cm till 1975. From Jan. ... image and then. Figure 1. Digitized white-light image of the Sun obtained from Kodaikanal Solar Observatory.

  1. Development and testing of a new disposable sterile device for labelling white blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, A.; Glaudemans, A. W. J. M.; Malviya, G.; Lazzeri, E.; Prandini, N.; Viglietti, A. L.; De Vries, E. F. J.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.

    Aim. White blood cell (WBC) labelling requires isolation of cells from patient's blood under sterile conditions using sterile materials, buffers and disposables under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. Till now, this limited the use of white blood cell scintigraphy (WBC-S) only to well

  2. Photochemical Thrombosis Of Retinal And Choroidal Vessels Using Rose Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Lou; Winward, Kirk; Watson, Brant D.; Hernandez, Eleut

    1989-09-01

    Rose bengal is an effective photosensitizing agent which interacts with argon green light to induce photochemical thrombosis of irradiated vessels. We used focal, low energy irradiation to occlude retinal and choroidal vessels in both albino and pigmented rabbits. Immediately after intravenous injection of rose bengal at concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/kg, irradiation was performed via a slit lamp-delivered argon green laser (514.5 nm) with the aid of fundus contact lens. In 11 eyes, arteries were treated with 50-100 interrupted bursts of 75u spot size at 0.2 sec and 40-100 mW (9 developed massive closure of retinal and choroidal vessels, serous elevation of the retina, and disc neovascularization. In eight eyes choroidal vessels were irradiated with 10-20 mW, 15-60 sec, 500u spot size (31 rose bengal, demonstrated no evidence of thermal injury.

  3. The use of rose hips in the technology of alcoholic beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Ivanchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of developing beer drinks with added fruits, berries or extract's of plant is very actual problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using syrup and rose hips in technology Ales. In the work explored the form of the introduction of rose hips, as well as the stage of application, and the maximum allowable amount of additive. The proportion of syrup in different dose was 20 25 and 30% by weight of malt. Syrup made at the stage of wort boiling with hops. Rose hips were added to the number 15,20 and 25 g/l for 5 minutes before the end of wort boiling. The influence of introduced additives on the activity of yeast were studied. It is shown that the biomass growth and activity of yeast in all the variants of the experiment are practically the same. The article discusses the effect of different concentrations of rose hip syrup and insertion of the fruit on the fermentation and quality of final beer. The introduction of the investigated concentrations of the syrup does not impact greatly on the course of fermentation, physico-chemical parameters and organoleptic characteristics of the beverage. Samples with the addition of syrup to the basic characteristics are similar to control sample. They are distinguished caramel taste, aggravated by the increasing share of the syrup. It is shown that the optimal form to make the herbal supplement of rose hips in the technology of production of Ales are rose hips. The most balanced organoleptic characteristics was the sample with the rose hips in a quantity of 0,4 kg on 1 dal Ale.

  4. Characteristics of virus and virus-like rose degeneration and dieback diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek S. Szyndel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Presented review of rose diseases, associated with the plant degeneration symptoms, includes rose streak, rose colour break, rose rosette or rose witches' broom, rose dieback, rose wilt, rose stunt, rose leaf curl, rose spring dwarf, rose little leaf, rose "frisure", rose bud proliferation and rose flower proliferation. Most of these disorders are characterized by stunting or dwarfing of plants accompanied by a partial wilt and dieback of shoots. Proliferation and epinasty often occurred. Apart from detected viruses (TSV. SLRSV parts of degeneration syndrome have been transmitted by grafting other have failed to achieve any transmission of the causal agent. It seems likely that rose degeneration disorders in spite of symptom similarities are due to a complex of interacting factors including probably viruses.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Volumetric Analysis: Novel Tools to Study Thyroid Hormone Disruption and Its Effect on White Matter Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humans and wildlife are exposed to environmental pollutants that have been shown to interfere with the thyroid hormone system and thus may affect brain development. Our goal was to expose pregnant rats to propylthiouracil (PTU) to measure the effects of a goitrogen on white matte...

  6. Navigating Guilt, Shame, and Fear of Appearing Racist: A Conceptual Model of Antiracist White Feminist Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this study, I employed narrative inquiry supported by intersectionality theory to explore the experiences of 6 antiracist, White, feminist undergraduate women. A conceptual model of antiracist identity development emerged from the data. Participants described vivid experiences with guilt, shame, and fear that kept them from engaging in allied…

  7. Altered Development of White Matter in Youth at High Familial Risk for Bipolar Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versace, Amelia; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Romero, Soledad; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study white matter (WM) development in youth at high familial risk for bipolar disorder (BD). WM alterations are reported in youth and adults with BD. WM undergoes important maturational changes in adolescence. Age-related changes in WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics in healthy…

  8. Limitations on the Developing Preterm Brain: Impact of Periventricular White Matter Lesions on Brain Connectivity and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A.; Krageloh-Mann, Ingeborg

    2013-01-01

    Brain lesions to the white matter in peritrigonal regions, periventricular leukomalacia, in children who were born prematurely represent an important model for studying limitations on brain development. The lesional pattern is of early origin and bilateral, that constrains the compensatory potential of the brain. We suggest that (i) topography and…

  9. Physiological Properties of Zebrafish Embryonic Red and White Muscle Fibers During Early Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert R. Buss; Pierre Drapeau

    2000-01-01

    .... However, an understanding of fish muscle physiology during this period is limited. We examined the membrane, contractile, electrical coupling, and synaptic properties of embryonic red (ER) and white (EW...

  10. Hormonal interactions during cluster-root development in phosphate-deficient white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengrui; Rahman, A B M Moshiur; Wang, Guoying; Ludewig, Uwe; Shen, Jianbo; Neumann, Günter

    2015-04-01

    This study addresses hormonal interactions involved in cluster-root (CR) development of phosphate (Pi)-deficient white lupin (Lupinus albus), which represents the most efficient plant strategy for root-induced mobilisation of sparingly soluble soil phosphorus (P) sources. Shoot-to-root translocation of auxin was unaffected by P-limitation, while strong stimulatory effects of external sucrose on CR formation, even in P-sufficient plants, suggest sucrose, rather than auxins, acts as a shoot-borne signal, triggering the induction of CR primordia. Ethylene may act as mediator of the sucrose signal, as indicated by moderately increased expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis in pre-emergent clusters and by strong inhibitory effects of the ethylene antagonist CoCl2 on CR formation induced by sucrose amendments or P-limitation. As reported in other plants, moderately increased production of brassinosteroids (BRs) and cytokinin, in pre-emergent clusters, may be required for the formation of auxin gradients necessary for induction of CR primordia via interference with auxin biosynthesis and transport. The well-documented inhibition of root elongation by high doses of ethylene may be involved in the growth inhibition of lateral rootlets during CR maturation, indicated by a massive increased expression of gene involved in ethylene production, associated with a declined expression of transcripts with stimulatory effects (BR and auxin-related genes). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  12. Development of a Zealand white rabbit deposition model to study inhalation anthrax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-28

    Despite using rabbits in several inhalation exposure experiments to study diseases such as anthrax, there is a lack of understanding regarding deposition characteristics and fate of inhaled particles (bio-aerosols and viruses) in the respiratory tracts of rabbits. Such information allows dosimetric extrapolation to humans to inform human outcomes. The lung geometry of the New Zealand white rabbit (referred to simply as rabbits throughout the article) was constructed using recently acquired scanned images of the conducting airways of rabbits and available information on its acinar region. In addition, functional relationships were developed for the lung and breathing parameters of rabbits as a function of body weight. The lung geometry and breathing parameters were used to extend the existing deposition model for humans and several other species to rabbits. Evaluation of the deposition model for rabbits was made by comparing predictions with available measurements in the literature. Deposition predictions in the lungs of rabbits indicated smaller deposition fractions compared to those found in humans across various particle diameter ranges. The application of the deposition model for rabbits was demonstrated by extrapolating deposition predictions in rabbits to find equivalent human exposure concentrations assuming the same dose-response relationship between the two species. Human equivalent exposure concentration levels were found to be much smaller than those for rabbits.

  13. Characterisation of flower bud opening in roses; a comparison of Madelon and Sonia roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, D.; Reenen, van H.S.; Ribôt, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Cut cv. Madelon rose buds do not open satisfactorily when kept under low light (LL) conditions, in contrast to cv. Sonia buds. Adding sucrose to the keeping solution or storage in high light (HL) helped Madelon buds to open, but probably two different mechanisms were involved. Satisfactory

  14. White Matter Microstructure Correlates of Narrative Production in Typically Developing Children and Children with High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brian; Lai, Janie; Brown, Timothy T.; Erhart, Matthew; Halgren, Eric; Reilly, Judy; Dale, Anders; Appelbaum, Mark; Moses, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between white matter microstructure and the development of morphosyntax in a spoken narrative in typically developing children (TD) and in children with high functioning autism (HFA). Autism is characterized by language and communication impairments, yet the relationship between morphosyntactic development in spontaneous discourse contexts and neural development is not well understood in either this population or typical development. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to assess multiple parameters of diffusivity as indicators of white matter tract integrity in language-related tracts in children between 6 and 13 years of age. Children were asked to spontaneously tell a story about at time when someone made them sad, mad, or angry. The story was evaluated for morphological accuracy and syntactic complexity. Analysis of the relationship between white matter microstructure and language performance in TD children showed that diffusivity correlated with morphosyntax production in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), a fiber tract traditionally associated with language. At the anatomical level, the HFA group showed abnormal diffusivity in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) relative to the TD group. Within the HFA group, children with greater white matter integrity in the right ILF displayed greater morphological accuracy during their spoken narrative. Overall, the current study shows an association between white matter structure in a traditional language pathway and narrative performance in TD children. In the autism group, associations were only found in the ILF, suggesting that during real world language use, children with HFA rely less on typical pathways and instead rely on alternative ventral pathways that possibly mediate visual elements of language. PMID:23810972

  15. Role of Petal-Specific Orcinol O-Methyltransferases in the Evolution of Rose Scent1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalliet, Gabriel; Lionnet, Claire; Le Bechec, Mickaël; Dutron, Laurence; Magnard, Jean-Louis; Baudino, Sylvie; Bergougnoux, Véronique; Jullien, Frédéric; Chambrier, Pierre; Vergne, Philippe; Dumas, Christian; Cock, J. Mark; Hugueney, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Orcinol O-methyltransferase (OOMT) 1 and 2 catalyze the last two steps of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the phenolic methyl ether 3,5-dimethoxytoluene (DMT), the major scent compound of many rose (Rosa x hybrida) varieties. Modern roses are descended from both European and Chinese species, the latter being producers of phenolic methyl ethers but not the former. Here we investigated why phenolic methyl ether production occurs in some but not all rose varieties. In DMT-producing varieties, OOMTs were shown to be localized specifically in the petal, predominanty in the adaxial epidermal cells. In these cells, OOMTs become increasingly associated with membranes during petal development, suggesting that the scent biosynthesis pathway catalyzed by these enzymes may be directly linked to the cells' secretory machinery. OOMT gene sequences were detected in two non-DMT-producing rose species of European origin, but no mRNA transcripts were detected, and these varieties lacked both OOMT protein and enzyme activity. These data indicate that up-regulation of OOMT gene expression may have been a critical step in the evolution of scent production in roses. PMID:16361520

  16. Anti-prediabetic effect of rose hip (Rosa canina) extract in spontaneously diabetic Torii rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si Jing; Aikawa, Chiwa; Yoshida, Risa; Kawaguchi, Tomoaki; Matsui, Toshiro

    2017-09-01

    Prediabetes, a high-risk state for developing diabetes showing impaired glucose tolerance but a normal fasting blood glucose level, has an increasing prevalence worldwide. However, no study investigating the prevention of impaired glucose tolerance at the prediabetic stage by anti-diabetic functional foods has been reported. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the anti-prediabetic effect of rose hip in a prediabetic rat model. Spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) rats were supplemented with hot-water extract of rose hip at a dose of 100 mg kg-1 body weight day-1 for 12 weeks. The results obtained showed that the supplementation of rose hip extract improved impaired glucose tolerance, promoted insulin secretion, preserved pancreatic beta-cell function and suppressed plasma advanced glycation end-products formation of methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1) residue and Nϵ -carboxymethyl-lysine residues (e.g. MG-H1, control: 465.5 ± 43.8 versus rose hip: 59.1 ± 13.0 pmol mg protein-1 , P < 0.05) in SDT rats at the prediabetic stage (12-20 weeks old). The present study provides the first evidence showing that a hot-water extract of rose hip could exert an anti-prediabetic effect in a rat model. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. The white collar complex is involved in sexual development of Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Kim

    Full Text Available Sexual spores (ascospores of Fusarium graminearum, a homothallic ascomycetous fungus, are believed to be the primary inocula for epidemics of the diseases caused by this species in cereal crops. Based on the light requirement for the formation of fruiting bodies (perithecia of F. graminearum under laboratory conditions, we explored whether photoreceptors play an important role in sexual development. Here, we evaluated the roles of three genes encoding putative photoreceptors [a phytochrome gene (FgFph and two white collar genes (FgWc-1 and FgWc-2] during sexual development in F. graminearum. For functional analyses, we generated transgenic strains lacking one or two genes from the self-fertile Z3643 strain. Unlike the wild-type (WT and add-back strains, the single deletion strains (ΔFgWc-1 and ΔFgWc-2 produced fertile perithecia under constant light on complete medium (CM, an unfavorable medium for sexual development as well as on carrot agar (a perithecial induction condition. The expression of mating-type (MAT genes increased significantly in the gene deletion strains compared to the WT under both conditions. Deletion of FgFph had no significant effect on sexual development or MAT gene expression. In contrast, all of the deletion strains examined did not show significant changes in other traits such as hyphal growth, mycotoxin production, and virulence. A split luciferase assay confirmed the in vivo protein-protein interactions among three photoreceptors along with FgLaeA, a global regulator of secondary metabolism and fungal development. Introduction of an intact copy of the A. nidulans LreA and LreB genes, which are homologs of FgWc-1 and FgWc-2, into the ΔFgWc-1 and ΔFgWc-2 strains, respectively, failed to repress perithecia formation on CM in the gene deletion strains. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FgWc-1 and FgWc-2, two central components of the blue-light sensing system, negatively regulate sexual development in F

  18. White-matter development is different in bilingual and monolingual children: a longitudinal DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Seyede Ghazal; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Rosseel, Yves; Van De Craen, Piet; Luypaert, Robert; Baeken, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous people grow up speaking more than one language, the impact of bilingualism on brain developing neuroanatomy is still poorly understood. This study aimed to determine whether the changes in the mean fractional-anisotropy (MFA) of language pathways are different between bilingual and monolingual children. Simultaneous-bilinguals, sequential-bilinguals and monolingual, male and female 10-13 years old children participated in this longitudinal study over a period of two years. We used diffusion tensor tractography to obtain mean fractional-anisotropy values of four language related pathways and one control bundle: 1-left-inferior-occipitofrontal fasciculus/lIFOF, 2-left-arcuate fasciculus/lAF/lSLF, 3-bundle arising from the anterior part of corpus-callosum and projecting to orbital lobe/AC-OL, 4-fibres emerging from anterior-midbody of corpus-callosum (CC) to motor cortices/AMB-PMC, 5- right-inferior-occipitofrontal fasciculus rIFOF as the control pathway unrelated to language. These values and their rate of change were compared between 3 groups. FA-values did not change significantly over two years for lAF/lSLF and AC-OL. Sequential-bilinguals had the highest degree of change in the MFA value of lIFOF, and AMB-PMC did not present significant group differences. The comparison of MFA of lIFOF yielded a significantly higher FA-value in simultaneous bilinguals compared to monolinguals. These findings acknowledge the existing difference of the development of the semantic processing specific pathway between children with different semantic processing procedure. These also support the hypothesis that age of second language acquisition affects the maturation and myelination of some language specific white-matter pathways.

  19. White-matter development is different in bilingual and monolingual children: a longitudinal DTI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Ghazal Mohades

    Full Text Available Although numerous people grow up speaking more than one language, the impact of bilingualism on brain developing neuroanatomy is still poorly understood. This study aimed to determine whether the changes in the mean fractional-anisotropy (MFA of language pathways are different between bilingual and monolingual children. Simultaneous-bilinguals, sequential-bilinguals and monolingual, male and female 10-13 years old children participated in this longitudinal study over a period of two years. We used diffusion tensor tractography to obtain mean fractional-anisotropy values of four language related pathways and one control bundle: 1-left-inferior-occipitofrontal fasciculus/lIFOF, 2-left-arcuate fasciculus/lAF/lSLF, 3-bundle arising from the anterior part of corpus-callosum and projecting to orbital lobe/AC-OL, 4-fibres emerging from anterior-midbody of corpus-callosum (CC to motor cortices/AMB-PMC, 5- right-inferior-occipitofrontal fasciculus rIFOF as the control pathway unrelated to language. These values and their rate of change were compared between 3 groups. FA-values did not change significantly over two years for lAF/lSLF and AC-OL. Sequential-bilinguals had the highest degree of change in the MFA value of lIFOF, and AMB-PMC did not present significant group differences. The comparison of MFA of lIFOF yielded a significantly higher FA-value in simultaneous bilinguals compared to monolinguals. These findings acknowledge the existing difference of the development of the semantic processing specific pathway between children with different semantic processing procedure. These also support the hypothesis that age of second language acquisition affects the maturation and myelination of some language specific white-matter pathways.

  20. Development of human white matter fiber pathways: From newborn to adult ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew H; Wang, Rongpin; Wilkinson, Molly; MacDonald, Patrick; Lim, Ashley R; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-05-01

    Major long-range white matter pathways (cingulum, fornix, uncinate fasciculus [UF], inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus [IFOF], inferior longitudinal fasciculus [ILF], thalamocortical [TC], and corpus callosal [CC] pathways) were identified in eighty-three healthy humans ranging from newborn to adult ages. We tracked developmental changes using high-angular resolution diffusion MR tractography. Fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient, number, length, and volume were measured in pathways in each subject. Newborns had fewer, and more sparse, pathways than those of the older subjects. FA, number, length, and volume of pathways gradually increased with age and reached a plateau between 3 and 5 years of age. Data were further analyzed by normalizing with mean adult values as well as with each subject's whole brain values. Comparing subjects of 3 years old and under to those over 3 years old, the studied pathways showed differential growth patterns. The CC, bilateral cingulum, bilateral TC, and the left IFOF pathways showed significant growth both in volume and length, while the bilateral fornix, bilateral ILF and bilateral UF showed significant growth only in volume. The TC and CC took similar growth patterns with the whole brain. FA values of the cingulum and IFOF, and the length of ILF showed leftward asymmetry. The fornix, ILF and UF occupied decreased space compared to the whole brain during development with higher FA values, likely corresponding to extensive maturation of the pathways compared to the mean whole brain maturation. We believe that the outcome of this study will provide an important database for future reference. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of Key Technologies for White Lighting Based on Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner Goetz; Bill Imler; James Kim; Junko Kobayashi; Andrew Kim; Mike Krames; Rick Mann; Gerd Mueller-Mach; Anneli Munkholm; Jonathan Wierer

    2004-03-31

    This program was organized to focus on materials development issues critical to the acceleration of solid-state lighting, and was split into three major thrust areas: (1) study of dislocation density reduction for GaN grown on sapphire using 'cantilever epitaxy', and the impact of dislocation density on the performance of state-of-the-art high-power LEDs; (2) the evaluation of in situ techniques for monitoring gas phase chemistry and the properties of GaN-based layers during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD), and (3) feasibility for using semiconductor nanoparticles ('quantum dots') for the down-conversion of blue or ultraviolet light to generate white light. The program included a partnership between Lumileds Lighting (epitaxy and device fabrication for high power LEDs) and Sandia National Laboratories (cantilever epitaxy, gas phase chemistry, and quantum dot synthesis). Key findings included: (1) cantilever epitaxy can provide dislocation density reduction comparable to that of more complicated approaches, but all in one epitaxial growth step; however, further improvements are required to realize significant gains in LED performance at high drive currents, (2) in situ tools can provide detailed knowledge about gas phase chemistry, and can be used to monitor and control epitaxial layer composition and temperature to provide improved yields (e.g., a fivefold increase in color targeting is demonstrated for 540nm LEDs), and (3) quantum efficiency for quantum dots is improved and maintained up to 70% in epoxy thin films, but further work is necessary to increase densification (absorption) and robustness before practical application to LEDs.

  2. Lysophosphatidic acid produced by hen egg white lysophospholipase D induces vascular development on extraembryonic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Junichi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Yoshiomoto, Tanihiro; Tokumura, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (lysoPtdOH), a lysophospholipid mediator, exerts diverse physiological effects, including angiogenesis, through its specific G-protein-coupled receptors. Previously, we showed that unfertilized hen egg white contains polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich lysoPtdOH and lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD). Here, we examined whether lysoPtdOH was produced by lysoPLD in the presence and absence of a hen fertilized ovum and what the physiological role of lysoPtdOH in hen egg white is. Mass spectrometry showed that fertilized hen egg white contained about 8 μM lysoPtdOH before incubation with an ovum, mainly comprised of 18:1- (12.6 %), 18:2- (37.8 %) and 20:4-molecular species (41.5 %). In an early gestation period, the lysoPtdOH was increased up to 9.6 μM, concomitant with a decrease in the level of polyunsaturated lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPtdCho). Moreover, lysoPtdOH-degrading activities were found in egg white and the vitelline membrane, showing that these enzymes control lysoPtdOH levels in egg white. In an egg yolk angiogenesis assay, two lysoPtdOH receptor antagonists, Ki16425 and N-palmitoyl serine phosphoric acid (NASP), inhibited blood vessel formation induced by exogenously added 18:1-lysoPtdOH and its precursor lysoPtdCho on the hen yolk sac. Ki16425 and NASP also inhibited blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Furthermore, the relatively higher levels of LPA₁, LPA₂, LPA₄ and LPA₆ mRNA were present in the yolk sac and CAM. These results suggest that lysoPtdOH produced from lysoPtdCho by the action of lysoPLD in hen egg white is involved in the formation of blood vessel networks through several lysoPtdOH receptors on various extraembryonic membranes, including the yolk sac membrane and CAM.

  3. Development and Utilization of Host Materials for White Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ching; Chen, Shaw

    2013-05-31

    Our project was primarily focused on the MYPP 2015 goal for white phosphorescent organic devices (PhOLEDs or phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes) for solid-state lighting with long lifetimes and high efficiencies. Our central activity was to synthesize and evaluate a new class of host materials for blue phosphors in the PhOLEDs, known to be a weak link in the device operating lifetime. The work was a collaborative effort between three groups, one primarily responsible for chemical design and characterization (Chen), one primarily responsible for device development (Tang) and one primarily responsible for mechanistic studies and degradation analysis (Rothberg). The host materials were designed with a novel architecture that chemically links groups with good ability to move electrons with those having good ability to move “holes” (positive charges), the main premise being that we could suppress the instability associated with physical separation and crystallization of the electron conducting and hole conducting materials that might cause the devices to fail. We found that these materials do prevent crystallization and that this will increase device lifetimes but that efficiencies were reduced substantially due to interactions between the materials creating new low energy “charge transfer” states that are non-luminescent. Therefore, while our proposed strategy could in principle improve device lifetimes, we were unable to find a materials combination where the efficiency was not substantially compromised. In the course of our project, we made several important contributions that are peripherally related to the main project goal. First, we were able to prepare the proposed new family of materials and develop synthetic routes to make them efficiently. These types of materials that can transport both electrons and holes may yet have important roles to play in organic device technology. Second we developed an important new method for controlling the

  4. Microstructure Aspects of a Newly Developed, Low Cost, Corrosion-Resistant White Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, P. K.; Sharma, C. P.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the influence of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of a newly developed white cast iron, basically suitable for corrosion- and wear-resistant applications, and to attain a microstructure that is most suitable from the corrosion resistance point of view. The composition was selected with an aim to have austenitic matrix both in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The difference in electrochemical potential between austenite and carbide is less in comparison to that between austenite and graphite. Additionally, graphitic corrosion which is frequently encountered in gray cast irons is absent in white cast irons. These basic facts encouraged us to undertake this work. Optical metallography, hardness testing, X-ray diffractometry, and SEM-EDX techniques were employed to identify the phases present in the as-cast and heat-treated specimens of the investigated alloy and to correlate microstructure with corrosion resistance and hardness. Corrosion testing was carried out in 5 pct NaCl solution (approximate chloride content of sea water) using the weight loss method. In the investigated alloy, austenite was retained the in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The same was confirmed by X-ray and EDX analysis. The stability and volume fraction of austenite increased with an increase of heat-treated temperature/time with a simultaneous decrease in the volume fraction of massive carbides. The decrease in volume fraction of massive carbides resulted in the availability of alloying elements. These alloying elements, on increasing the heat treatment temperature or increasing the soaking period at certain temperatures, get dissolved in austenite. As a consequence, austenite gets enriched as well as becomes more stable. On cooling from lower soaking period/temperature, enriched austenite decomposes to lesser enriched austenite and to a dispersed phase due to decreasing solid solubility of alloying elements with decreasing temperature

  5. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

  6. Racial Arrested Development: A Critical Whiteness Analysis of the Campus Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Watson, Jesse S.; Franklin, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the campus ecology (Renn, 2003, 2004) literature from the perspective of Critical Whiteness specifically problematizing perceptions of safety and inclusion on the college campus. Relying upon Sullivan's (2006) ontological expansiveness, Mills's (1997) epistemology of ignorance, and Leonardo and Porter's (2010) Fanonian…

  7. White Mountain Apache Language: Issues in Language Shift, Textbook Development, and Native Speaker-University Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adley-SantaMaria, Bernadette

    This paper is an overview of topics covered at two sessions of the Fourth Annual Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium, from the perspective of a native speaker of an indigenous language and member of a university academic community. The first section describes a Master's thesis on White Mountain Apache (WMA) language shift. Interviews with…

  8. Head to head battle of TV white space and WiFi for connecting developing regions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johnson, David

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available performs better or worse than alternative low-cost wire-less technology such as WiFi. This paper analyzes the performance of 5 GHz WiFi links and TV White space links using down-converted WiFi, typically used as wireless backhaul for poorly connected...

  9. Framework for TV white space spectrum access in Southern African Development Community (SADC)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masonta, MT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The global migration of television (TV) from analogue to digital broadcast will see a large amount of TV spectrum available (called TV white space - TVWS) for other services such as mobile and broadband wireless access (BWA). Leading spectrum...

  10. Who's that Girl: Television's Role in the Body Image Development of Young White and Black Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooler, Deborah; Ward, L. Monique; Merriwether, Ann; Caruthers, Allison

    2004-01-01

    Although findings indicate a connection between frequent media use and greater body dissatisfaction, little attention has focused on the role of race. Accordingly, this study investigates the relation between television viewing and body image among 87 Black and 584 White women. Participants reported monthly viewing amounts of mainstream and…

  11. White Lupin Cluster Root Acclimation to Phosphorus Deficiency and Root Hair Development Involve Unique Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterases1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lingyun; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Liu, Junqi; Zinn, Kelly; Miller, Susan; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Allan, Deborah; Shen, Jianbo; Vance, Carroll P.

    2011-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus) is a legume that is very efficient in accessing unavailable phosphorus (Pi). It develops short, densely clustered tertiary lateral roots (cluster/proteoid roots) in response to Pi limitation. In this report, we characterize two glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GPX-PDE) genes (GPX-PDE1 and GPX-PDE2) from white lupin and propose a role for these two GPX-PDEs in root hair growth and development and in a Pi stress-induced phospholipid degradation pathway in cluster roots. Both GPX-PDE1 and GPX-PDE2 are highly expressed in Pi-deficient cluster roots, particularly in root hairs, epidermal cells, and vascular bundles. Expression of both genes is a function of both Pi availability and photosynthate. GPX-PDE1 Pi deficiency-induced expression is attenuated as photosynthate is deprived, while that of GPX-PDE2 is strikingly enhanced. Yeast complementation assays and in vitro enzyme assays revealed that GPX-PDE1 shows catalytic activity with glycerophosphocholine while GPX-PDE2 shows highest activity with glycerophosphoinositol. Cell-free protein extracts from Pi-deficient cluster roots display GPX-PDE enzyme activity for both glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoinositol. Knockdown of expression of GPX-PDE through RNA interference resulted in impaired root hair development and density. We propose that white lupin GPX-PDE1 and GPX-PDE2 are involved in the acclimation to Pi limitation by enhancing glycerophosphodiester degradation and mediating root hair development. PMID:21464471

  12. " That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 3. “That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as ... Biotechnology student in Anna University, Chennai. Department of Molecular Reproduction, Development and Genetics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 56 0012. India.

  13. Stenting of roses; a method for quick propagation by simultaneously cutting and grafting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van de P.A.; Breukelaar, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    A method was developed for quick propagation of roses under conditions prevailing in The Netherlands, based on cutting and grafting in one action and called “stenting” (to stent), being a contraction of the dutch words “stekken” (to strike a cutting) and “enten” (to graft). A piece of stem of the

  14. Identification of cut-rose (Rosa hybrida) and rootstock varieties using robust Sequence Tagged Microsatellite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, D.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Vosman, B.

    2003-01-01

    In this study a DNA fingerprinting protocol was developed for the identification of rose varieties based on the variability of microsatellites. Microsatellites were isolated from Rosa hybrida L. using enriched small insert libraries. In total 24 polymorphic sequenced tagged microsatellite site

  15. Acaricide resistance and resistance mechanisms in Tetranychus urticae populations from rose greenhouses in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khajehali, J.; Van Nieuwenhuyse, P.; Demaeght, P.; Tirry, L.; Van Leeuwen, T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spider mites are important crop pests that rapidly develop resistance to acaricides. To investigate whether acaricide resistance is a threat to greenhouse rose culture in the Netherlands, the susceptibility of 15 strains of Tetranychus urticae was tested to several currently used

  16. Genetic diversity and differentiation in roses: A gardenrose perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukosavljev, M.; Zhang, J.; Esselink, G.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Cox, P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Arens, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    tFor the first time genetic diversity among modern garden rose cultivars has been evaluated using a setof 24 microsatellite markers covering most chromosomes. A total of 518 different alleles were obtainedin the set of 138 rose cultivars and this led to the conclusion that in terms of genetic

  17. Pomological and phenological characteristics of promising rose hip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    production is the standardization of improved fruit cultivars. However, this standardization has not yet been accom- plished in many fruit species, and some, such as rose hips, are still collected from the wild in many countries. Studies on the selection and improvement of rose hip are at the initial stage in Turkey as in some ...

  18. Cytokinins and bud break in rose combination plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the rose is the most important glasshouse cut flower. Approximately 50% of the glasshouse roses are combination plants, consisting of a scion cultivar and a rootstock of a different genotype. Rootstocks inducing differences in the vigour of the scion are suggested to

  19. Breaking seed dormancy in oil rose ( Rosa damascena Mill.) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of microbial inoculation in breaking seed dormancy and on the germination of Rosa damascena Mill. Seeds of R. damascena Mill. are the most used scented rose species in rose oil production. The most important production centers around the world are Turkey and ...

  20. Vigour evaluation for genetics and breeding in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Dolstra, O.; Hendriks, T.; Prins, T.W.; Stam, P.; Visser, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Breeding of cut and pot rose cultivars for efficient production under low-energy conditions in greenhouses will be facilitated by understanding the inheritance of vigour. To get insight into the genetic variation of vigour-related traits, a diploid rose population was employed for an evaluation

  1. Genetic diversity and genetic similarities between Iranian rose species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samiei, L.; Naderi, R.; Khalighi, A.; Shahnejat-Bushehri, A.A.; Mozaffarian, V.; Esselink, G.D.; Kazempour Osaloo, S.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Wild rose species were collected from different regions of Iran for a rose breeding programme. They included accessions from Rosa persica, R. foetida, R. pimpinellifolia, R. hemisphaerica, R. canina, R. iberica, R. damascena, R. beggeriana, and R. orientalis. Ten microsatellite (simple sequence

  2. Pollutant roses for daily averaged ambient air pollutant concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosemans, Guido; Kretzschmar, Jan; Mensink, Clemens

    Pollutant roses are indispensable tools to identify unknown (fugitive) sources of heavy metals at industrial sites whose current impact exceeds the target values imposed for the year 2012 by the European Air Quality Daughter Directive 2004/207/EC. As most of the measured concentrations of heavy metals in ambient air are daily averaged values, a method to obtain high quality pollutant roses from such data is of practical interest for cost-effective air quality management. A computational scheme is presented to obtain, from daily averaged concentrations, 10° angular resolution pollutant roses, called PRP roses, that are in many aspects comparable to pollutant roses made with half-hourly concentrations. The computational scheme is a ridge regression, based on three building blocks: ordinary least squares regression; outlier handling by weighting based on expected values of the higher percentiles in a lognormal distribution; weighted averages whereby observed values, raised to a power m, and daily wind rose frequencies are used as weights. Distance measures are used to find the optimal value for m. The performance of the computational scheme is illustrated by comparing the pollutant roses, constructed with measured half-hourly SO 2 data for 10 monitoring sites in the Antwerp harbour, with the PRP roses made with the corresponding daily averaged SO 2 concentrations. A miniature dataset, made up of 7 daily concentrations and of half-hourly wind directions assigned to 4 wind sectors, is used to illustrate the formulas and their results.

  3. Alternaria toxin-induced resistance in rose plants against rose aphid (Macrosiphum rosivorum): effect of tenuazonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-zhong; Yang, Bin; Li, Bei-bei; Xiao, Chun

    2015-04-01

    Many different types of toxins are produced by the fungus, Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler. Little is known, however, regarding the influence of these toxins on insects. In this study, we investigated the toxin-induced inhibitory effects of the toxin produced by A. alternata on the rose aphid, Macrosiphum rosivorum, when the toxin was applied to leaves of the rose, Rosa chinensis. The results demonstrated that the purified crude toxin was non-harmful to rose plants and rose aphids, but had an intensive inhibitory effect on the multiplication of aphids. The inhibitory index against rose aphids reached 87.99% when rose plants were sprayed with the toxin solution at a low concentration. Further results from bioassays with aphids and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses demonstrated that tenuazonic acid (TeA) was one of the most important resistance-related active components in the crude toxin. The content of TeA was 0.1199% in the crude toxin under the HPLC method. Similar to the crude toxin, the inhibitory index of pure TeA reached 83.60% 15 d after the rose plants were sprayed with pure TeA solution at the lower concentration of 0.060 μg/ml, while the contents of residual TeA on the surface and in the inner portion of the rose plants were only 0.04 and 0.00 ng/g fresh weight of TeA-treated rose twigs, respectively, 7 d after the treatment. Our results show that TeA, an active component in the A. alternata toxin, can induce the indirect plant-mediated responses in rose plants to intensively enhance the plant's resistances against rose aphids, and the results are very helpful to understand the plant-mediated interaction between fungi and insects on their shared host plants.

  4. Alternaria toxin-induced resistance in rose plants against rose aphid (Macrosiphum rosivorum): effect of tenuazonic acid*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-zhong; Yang, Bin; Li, Bei-bei; Xiao, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Many different types of toxins are produced by the fungus, Alternaria alternata (Fr.) Keissler. Little is known, however, regarding the influence of these toxins on insects. In this study, we investigated the toxin-induced inhibitory effects of the toxin produced by A. alternata on the rose aphid, Macrosiphum rosivorum, when the toxin was applied to leaves of the rose, Rosa chinensis. The results demonstrated that the purified crude toxin was non-harmful to rose plants and rose aphids, but had an intensive inhibitory effect on the multiplication of aphids. The inhibitory index against rose aphids reached 87.99% when rose plants were sprayed with the toxin solution at a low concentration. Further results from bioassays with aphids and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses demonstrated that tenuazonic acid (TeA) was one of the most important resistance-related active components in the crude toxin. The content of TeA was 0.1199% in the crude toxin under the HPLC method. Similar to the crude toxin, the inhibitory index of pure TeA reached 83.60% 15 d after the rose plants were sprayed with pure TeA solution at the lower concentration of 0.060 μg/ml, while the contents of residual TeA on the surface and in the inner portion of the rose plants were only 0.04 and 0.00 ng/g fresh weight of TeA-treated rose twigs, respectively, 7 d after the treatment. Our results show that TeA, an active component in the A. alternata toxin, can induce the indirect plant-mediated responses in rose plants to intensively enhance the plant’s resistances against rose aphids, and the results are very helpful to understand the plant-mediated interaction between fungi and insects on their shared host plants. PMID:25845360

  5. Determination of volatile compounds of the first rose oil and the first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proff.Adewunmi

    Background: Rose water and rose oil are used in the perfume, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and food industries. The determination of volatile compounds in rose oil and rose water obtained from oil-bearing rose is highly important in terms of availability in the industry and in human health. Materials and Methods: Twenty four ...

  6. Kepustakawanan dalam The Name of The Rose karya Umberto Eco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laksmi Laksmi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The Name of the Rose, a detective novel, is set by some issues on librarianship during the Middle Age in Europe. By using discourse analysis approach, I try to know how far the concept of the librarianship was understood at that time—in the novel—based on the understanding of some concepts, starting from “library”, “development system”, “collection handling”, which includes “classification”, “censorship system” and “librarians’ professionalism”, until some matters on borrowing and using collection. Besides, this analysis is aimed at identifying cultural values related to the librarianship. The conclusion shows that the librarianship has an important role in providing suspense elements in a detective novel.

  7. Development of snake-directed antipredator behavior by wild white-faced capuchin monkeys: I. Snake-species discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meno, Whitney; Coss, Richard G; Perry, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Young animals are known to direct alarm calls at a wider range of species than adults. Our field study examined age-related differences in the snake-directed antipredator behavior of infant, juvenile, and adult white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus) in terms of alarm calling, looking behavior, and aggressive behavior. In the first experiment, we exposed infant and juvenile white-faced capuchins to realistic-looking inflatable models of their two snake predators, the boa constrictior (Boa constrictor) and neotropical rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus) and a white airplane as a novel control. In the second experiment, infants, juveniles, and adults were presented photographic models of a coiled boa constrictor, rattlesnake, indigo snake (Drymarchon corais), a noncapuchin predator, and a white snake-like model. We found that antipredator behavior changed during the immature stage. Infants as young as 4 months old were able to recognize snakes and display antipredator behavior, but engaged in less snake-model discrimination than juveniles. All age classes exhibited a lower response to the white snake-like model, indicating that the absence of color and snake-scale patterns affected snake recognition. Infants also showed a higher level of vigilance after snake-model detection as exhibited by a higher proportion of time spent looking and head cocking at the models. Aggressive antipredator behavior was found in all age classes, but was more prevalent in juveniles and adults than infants. This study adds to the knowledge of development of antipredator behavior in primates by showing that, although alarm calling behavior and predator recognition appear at a very young age in capuchins, snake-species discrimination does not become apparent until the juvenile stage. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Effect of leptin on long-term spatial memory of rats with white matter damage in developing brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Er-Cui; Jiang, Li

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective effect of leptin by observing its effect on spatial memory of rats with white matter damage in developing brain. A total of 80 neonatal rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: sham-operation (n=27), model (n=27) and leptin intervention (n=27). The rats in the model and leptin intervention groups were used to prepare a model of white matter damage in developing brain, and the rats in the leptin intervention group were given leptin (100 μg/kg) diluted with normal saline immediately after modelling for 4 consecutive days. The survival rate of the rats was observed and the change in body weight was monitored. When the rats reached the age of 21 days, the Morris water maze test was used to evaluate spatial memory. There was no significant difference in the survival rate of rats between the three groups (P>0.05). Within 10 days after birth, the leptin intervention group had similar body weight as the sham-operation group and significantly lower body weight than the model group (P0.05). The results of place navigation showed that from the second day of experiment, there was a significant difference in the latency period between the three groups (Pmemory impairment of rats with white matter damage in developing brain. It thus exerts a neuroprotective effect, and is worthy of further research.

  9. Padrões de liberação de urediniósporos e desenvolvimento da ferrugem do jambeiro Patterns of urediniospores release and development of rose apple rust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Bassay Blum

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar padrões epidemiológicos de campo do fungo (Puccinia psidii Winter que causa a ferrugem em jambeiro (Syzygium jambos. Entre 29/3 e 31/12/1988, levantou-se a incidência da doença e a população aérea de urediniósporos, na Universidade de Brasília, DF. Avaliaram-se dez plantas, sendo que, entre duas delas, instalou-se uma armadilha Burkard caça-esporos de sete dias. A maior quantidade de urediniósporos capturada foi de 23 de junho a 6 de julho. A principal carga de esporos ocorreu de maio a julho, entre as 10h e as 13 horas. Os maiores números de brotos de jambeiro com pústulas esporulantes ocorreram entre 28 de abril e 20 de julho. O número de brotos terminais infectados foi positivamente correlacionado com a quantidade de esporos. A temperatura (às 12h foi negativamente correlacionada com a quantidade de urediniósporos dispersos no ar. O número de dias com umidade relativa (UR do ar (às 24h > ou = 80% foi positivamente correlacionado com a quantidade de brotos deformados. A quantidade de urediniósporos foi positivamente correlacionada com o número de dias com temperatura ou = 80%. Ao maior pico de urediniósporos capturados precedeu um período sem precipitação, porém com vários dias de UR(24h > ou = 80% e temperatura ou = 80%.This research was conducted to evaluate some epidemiological features of the rose apple (Syzygium jambos rust (Puccinia psidii Winter under field conditions at the Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil, from March 29 through December 31, 1988. Data for the amount of airborne urediniospores were collected in ten plants, using a Burkard's seven-day volumetric spore trap set between two rose apple trees. Most of the airborne urediniospores were collected between June 23 and July 6, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The major quantity of S. jambos affected shoots occurred between April 28 and July 20. There was a positive correlation between the amount of trapped

  10. Nanoencapsulation of Rose-Hip Oil Prevents Oil Oxidation and Allows Obtainment of Gel and Film Topical Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contri, Renata V; Kulkamp-Guerreiro, Irene C; da Silva, Sheila Janine; Frank, Luiza A; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Silvia S

    2016-08-01

    The rose-hip oil holds skin regenerating properties with applications in the dermatological and cosmetic area. Its nanoencapsulation might favor the oil stability and its incorporation into hydrophilic formulations, besides increasing the contact with the skin and prolonging its effect. The aim of the present investigation was to develop suitable rose-hip-oil-loaded nanocapsules, to verify the nanocapsule effect on the UV-induced oxidation of the oil and to obtain topical formulations by the incorporation of the nanocapsules into chitosan gel and film. The rose-hip oil (500 or 600 μL), polymer (Eudragit RS100®, 100 or 200 mg), and acetone (50 or 100 mL) contents were separately varied aiming to obtain an adequate size distribution. The results led to a combination of the factors acetone and oil. The developed formulation showed average diameter of 158 ± 6 nm with low polydispersity, pH of 5.8 ± 0.9, zeta potential of +9.8 ± 1.5 mV, rose-hip oil content of 54 ± 1 μL/mL and tendency to reversible creaming. No differences were observed in the nanocapsules properties after storage. The nanoencapsulation of rose-hip oil decreased the UVA and UVC oxidation of the oil. The chitosan gel and film containing rose-hip-oil-loaded nanocapsules showed suitable properties for cutaneous use. In conclusion, it was possible to successfully obtain rose-hip-oil-loaded nanocapsules and to confirm the nanocapsules effect in protecting the oil from the UV rays. The chitosan gel and film were considered interesting alternatives for incorporating the nanoencapsulated rose-hip oil, combining the advantages of the nanoparticles to the advantages of chitosan.

  11. Dieback of rose caused by Acremonium sclerotigenum as a new causal agent of rose dieback in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirtalebi, M.; Banihashemi, Z.; Sabahi, F.; Mafakheri, H.

    2016-07-01

    Severe dieback of rose has been recently observed in several rose greenhouses in Fars province of Iran. During 2014 and 2015, stems of rose plants showing yellow to brown discoloration and dieback were collected from rose greenhouses. Coniothyrium fuckelii, Botrytis cinerea and Acremonium were subsequently isolated from the margin between healthy and symptomatic tissue. B. cinerea and C. fuckelii isolates were similar to those previously reported for dieback of rose worldwide. Morphological and cultural characters along with molecular analysis based on partial sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA genome allowed confirming the affiliation of the Acremonium isolates, corresponding to A. sclerotigenum as a new causal agent of rose dieback. To determine its pathogenicity on rose, Koch's postulates were fulfilled by stem inoculation of nine rose cultivars under greenhouse conditions. While A. sclerotigenum is considered as a soil-born pathogen, and produces sclerotia that are resistant to adverse conditions enables the fungus to survive extended period in soil, propagule trapping in our study revealed that conidia can become airborn, imply that an aerial phase, forms an important component of the disease cycle.

  12. Volatile constituents of essential oil and rose water of damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) cultivars from North Indian hills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ram Swaroop; Padalia, Rajendra Chandra; Chauhan, Amit; Singh, Anand; Yadav, Ajai Kumar

    2011-10-01

    Rosa damascena Mill. is an important aromatic plant for commercial production of rose oil, water, concrete and absolute. The rose water and rose oil produced under the mountainous conditions of Uttarakhand were investigated for their chemical composition. The major components of rose water volatiles obtained from the bud, half bloom and full bloom stages of cultivar 'Ranisahiba' were phenyl ethyl alcohol (66.2-79.0%), geraniol (3.3-6.6%) and citronellol (1.8-5.5%). The rose water volatiles of cultivar 'Noorjahan' and 'Kannouj' also possessed phenyl ethyl alcohol (80.7% and 76.7%, respectively) as a major component at full bloom stage. The essential oil of cultivar 'Noorjahan' obtained from two different growing sites was also compared. The major components of these oils were citronellol (15.9-35.3%), geraniol (8.3-30.2%), nerol (4.0-9.6%), nonadecane (4.5-16.0%), heneicosane (2.6-7.9%) and linalool (0.7-2.8%). This study clearly showed that the flower ontogeny and growing site affect the composition of rose volatiles. The rose oil produced in this region was comparable with ISO standards. Thus, it was concluded that the climatic conditions of Uttarakhand are suitable for the production of rose oil of international standards.

  13. USE OF CELL ENGINEERING FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONSTANT INITIAL BREEDING MATERIAL OF WHITE HEAD CABBAGE CV. NADZEJA AND CMS SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Yakimovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The anther derived androgenic plants of white head cabbage cv. Nadzeja and CMS samples were obtained. The cytological analysis of ploidy level of regenerated plants and doubled haploids obtained by treatment of meristems with colchicine was performed. On the basis of androgenic doubled hap loids of white head cabbage genotypes the seed plants were developed.

  14. Microsatellite analysis of Rosa damascena Mill. accessions reveals genetic similarity between genotypes used for rose oil production and old Damask rose varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, K; Kovacheva, N; Vosman, B; Zhang, L; Rajapakse, S; Atanassov, A; Atanassov, I

    2005-08-01

    Damask roses are grown in several European and Asiatic countries for rose oil production. Twenty-six oil-bearing Rosa damascena Mill. accessions and 13 garden Damask roses were assayed by molecular markers. Microsatellite genotyping demonstrated that R. damascena Mill. accessions from Bulgaria, Iran, and India and old European Damask rose varieties possess identical microsatellite profiles, suggesting a common origin. At the same time, the data indicated that modern industrial oil rose cultivation is based on a very narrow genepool and that oil rose collections contain many genetically identical accessions. The study of long-term vegetative propagation of the Damask roses also reveals high somatic stability for the microsatellite loci analyzed.

  15. Development and application of the near-infrared and white-light thoracoscope system for minimally invasive lung cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yamin; Wang, Kun; He, Kunshan; Ye, Jinzuo; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Jian; Li, Hao; Chen, Xiuyuan; Wang, Jun; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2017-06-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, the white-light thoracoscope as a standard imaging tool is facing challenges of the low contrast between important anatomical or pathological regions and surrounding tissues. Recently, the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging shows superior advantages over the conventional white-light observation, which inspires researchers to develop imaging systems to improve overall outcomes of endoscopic imaging. We developed an NIR and white-light dual-channel thoracoscope system, which achieved high-fluorescent signal acquisition efficiency and the simultaneously optimal visualization of the NIR and color dual-channel signals. The system was designed to have fast and accurate image registration and high signal-to-background ratio by optimizing both software algorithms and optical hardware components for better performance in the NIR spectrum band. The system evaluation demonstrated that the minimally detectable concentration of indocyanine green (ICG) was 0.01 μM, and the spatial resolution was 35 μm. The in vivo feasibility of our system was verified by the preclinical experiments using six porcine models with the intravenous injection of ICG. Furthermore, the system was successfully applied for guiding the minimally invasive segmentectomy in three lung cancer patients, which revealed that our system held great promise for the clinical translation in lung cancer surgeries.

  16. Development of an Automatic Program to Analyze Sunspot Groups on White Light Images using OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Moon, Y.; Choi, S.

    2011-12-01

    Sunspots usually appear in a group which can be classified by certain morphological criteria. In this study we examine the moments which are statistical parameters computed by summing over every pixels of contours, for quantifying the morphological characteristics of a sunspot group. The moments can be another additional characteristics to the sunspot group classification such as McIntosh classification. We are developing a program for image processing, detection of contours and computation of the moments using white light full disk images from Big Bear Solar Observatory. We apply the program to count the sunspot number from 530 white light images in 2003. The sunspot numbers obtained by the program are compared with those by SIDC. The comparison shows that they have a good correlation (r=84%). We are extending this application to automatic sunspot classification (e.g., McIntosh classification) and flare forecasting.

  17. Report of transparency and nuclear safety 2007 CEA Fontenay aux Roses; Rapport transparence et securite nucleaire 2007 CEA Fontenay aux Roses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the activities of the CEA Center of Fontenay aux roses for the year 2007. After many years of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations, the Center is now devoted (since 2005) to the development of research programmes on biology and biomedical technologies. The actions concerning the safety, the radiation protection, the significant events, the release control and the environmental impacts and the wastes stored on the center are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  18. Evapotranspiration of rose cultivated in protected environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo C. Oliveira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the evapotranspiration and crop coefficient for the cut rose (cv. Carola cultivated in protected environment and the coefficient of small tank installed inside the greenhouse during the period of one year. Five rows of plants were planted with spacing of 1.20 m between rows and 0.20 m between plants. Each line consisted of five plots with five plants per plot. Plants of the second and fourth rows and of the second and fourth plots were installed in four drainage lysimeters with dimensions of 1.20 x 1.20 x 0.80 m. The plants of the remaining plots were considered as border plants. A drip irrigation system was used. An automatic weather station was installed in the greenhouse and the data were collected and stored daily at an interval of one hour in a data-logger. The crop coefficient (Kc showed mean values of 0.75 in the vegetative phase and 1.18 during the productive phase. The small pan (tank coefficient (Ktr was 0.72.

  19. Decorative values of selected cultivars of climbing roses (Rosa L. with regard to thermal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Włodarczyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2004-2006 in Kraków, phenological observations of climbing roses were conducted in order to determine the length and dates of their flowering period. The diameters of their flowers were also compared. Eight flowering repeating cultivars were selected for the experiment: 'Climbing Souvenir de la Malmaison', 'Dortmund', 'Golden Showers', 'Goldstern', 'New Dawn', 'Parade', 'Sympathie' and 'White New Dawn'. During the studies, the shrub roses were not artificially watered in order to create conditions similar to those prevailing in public green areas. It was observed that irrespective of the air temperature pattern in a given year, the studied cultivars did not bloom before 15 June. In 2006 high temperatures (above 20oC, which continued throughout the whole flowering period, caused its shortening, and the interval between the first and the next flowering in the season lasted longer than in the previous years. In the years 2004-2006, the cultivar 'New Dawn' bloomed the longest. In 2005 the studied cultivars produced larger flowers than the next year. The cultivars 'Dortmund' and 'White New Dawn' were characterised by the smallest diameter of flowers, whereas 'Climbing Souvenir de la Malmaison', 'Golden Showers' and 'Parade' were marked by the largest diameter.

  20. White Ring; White ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, H.; Yuzawa, H. [Nikken Sekkei Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    White Ring is a citizen`s gymnasium used for figure skating and short track speed skating games of 18th Winter Olympic Games in 1998. White Ring is composed of a main-arena and a sub-arena. For the main-arena with an area 41mtimes66m, an ice link can be made by disengaging the potable floor and by flowing brine in the bridged polystyrene pipes embedded in the concrete floor. Due to the fortunate groundwater in this site, well water is used for the outside air treatment energy in 63% during heating and in 35% during cooling. Ammonia is used as a cooling medium for refrigerating facility. For the heating of audience area in the large space, heat load from the outside is reduced by enhancing the heat insulation performance of the roof of arena. The audience seats are locally heated using heaters. For the White Ring, high quality environment is realized for games through various functions of the large-scale roof of the large space. Success of the big event was expected. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. White-matter tract abnormalities and antisocial behavior: A systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies across development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Waller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisocial behavior (AB, including aggression, violence, and theft, is thought be underpinned by abnormal functioning in networks of the brain critical to emotion processing, behavioral control, and reward-related learning. To better understand the abnormal functioning of these networks, research has begun to investigate the structural connections between brain regions implicated in AB using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, which assesses white-matter tract microstructure. This systematic review integrates findings from 22 studies that examined the relationship between white-matter microstructure and AB across development. In contrast to a prior hypothesis that AB is associated with greater diffusivity specifically in the uncinate fasciculus, findings suggest that adult AB is associated with greater diffusivity across a range of white-matter tracts, including the uncinate fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, cingulum, corticospinal tract, thalamic radiations, and corpus callosum. The pattern of findings among youth studies was inconclusive with both higher and lower diffusivity found across association, commissural, and projection and thalamic tracts.

  2. Magnetic resonance signal intensity ratio of gray/white matter in children; Quantitative assessment in developing brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maezawa, Mariko (Tokyo Saiseikai Central Hospital (Japan)); Seki, Tohru; Imura, Soichi; Akiyama, Kazunori; Takikawa, Itsuro; Yuasa, Yuji

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 87 children with various clinical entities were used to determine the signal intensity ratio of gray/white matter in T[sub 1]-weighted and T[sub 2]-weighted images using a 1.5 T MR scanner. Signal intensity ratio changes in both T[sub 1]- and T[sub 2]-weighted images correlated well with advancing age (y=0.9349-0.001575, r=0.584, P<0.0001 in T[sub 1]-weighted images; y=0.9798+0.002854, r=0.723, P<0.0001 in T[sub 2]-weighted images), but the correlation was more linear when we included only normally developed (34) children (y=0.9689-0.001967, r=-0.654, P<0.0001 in T[sub 1]-weighted images; y=0.9882+0.002965, r=0.747, P<0.0001 in T[sub 2]-weighted images). Abnormal ratios were observed in patients with congenital hydrocephalus, inherited metabolic diseases and cerebral palsy. Although the gray/white matter differentiation would not delineate the myelination itself, measurement of the signal intensity ratio of gray/white matters is a practical way to evaluate delayed myelination in a busy MR center. (author).

  3. Effect of early institutionalization and foster care on long-term white matter development: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Johanna; Zhu, Tong; Stamoulis, Catherine; Fox, Nathan A; Zeanah, Charles; Nelson, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Severe neglect in early life is associated with compromises in brain development and associated behavioral functioning. Although early intervention has been shown to support more normative trajectories of brain development, specific improvements in the white matter pathways that underlie emotional and cognitive development are unknown. To examine associations among neglect in early life, early intervention, and the microstructural integrity of white matter pathways in middle childhood. The Bucharest Early Intervention Project is a randomized clinical trial of high-quality foster care as an intervention for institutionally reared children in Bucharest, Romania, from 2000 through the present. During infancy, children were randomly selected to remain in an institution or to be placed in foster care. Those who remained in institutions experienced neglect, including social, emotional, linguistic, and cognitive impoverishment. Developmental trajectories of these children were compared with a group of sociodemographically matched children reared in biological families at baseline and several points throughout development. At approximately 8 years of age, 69 of the original 136 children underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging scans. Four estimates of white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy [FA] and mean [MD], radial [RD], and axial [AD] diffusivity) for 48 white matter tracts throughout the brain were obtained through diffusion tensor imaging. Significant associations emerged between neglect in early life and microstructural integrity of the body of the corpus callosum (FA, β = 0.01 [P = .01]; RD, β = -0.02 [P = .005]; MD, β = -0.01 [P = .02]) and tracts involved in limbic circuitry (fornix crus [AD, β = 0.02 (P = .046)] and cingulum [RD, β = -0.01 (P = .02); MD, β = -0.01 (P = .049)]), frontostriatal circuitry (anterior [AD, β = -0.01 (P = .02)] and superior [AD, β = -0.02 (P = .02); MD, β = -0.01 (P = .03)] corona

  4. Luminescence dating at Rose cottage cave: a progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Woodborne, S

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Deal with infrared-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence dates from Rose Cottage Cave in South Africa. Discrepancy between luminescence and radiocarbon dates; Concentration of radioactive elements in sediments before and after leaching...

  5. Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Rose Atoll NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  6. Optically stimulated luminescence dating at Rose Cottage Cave

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pienaar, M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Six Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates are compared with stratigraphically associated C-14 dates from Rose Cottage Cave. The OSL dates overlap the accepted C-14 chronology except for one sample that overestimates the expected age...

  7. Temporal variation of essential oils in dried flower of two genotypes of Damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami, Akbar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Damask rose (Rosa damascena Mill. is the most important species in the production of rose water, perfumes and essential oils (EOs, perfumery and pharmaceutical industry applications. In order to exploit the most of this precious Iranian flower, research was conducted on two damask rose genotypes (Fars 1 and Fars 2 in six development stages in terms of EOs content and composition analysis. Results showed that all development stages of damask rose genotypes had significant differences in the EOs content. The highest EOs content was obtained from "Fars 2" genotype. It was found that the oil obtained from the dried petals of Fars 2 genotype contained a higher percentage of citronellol (C, geraniol (G and phenylethyl alcohol (PEA as well as a suitable ratio of C/G with the value of 2.464 as compared with Fars 1 genotype (5.546. In the last stages of flower bud development in both genotypes, the sum of the main hydrocarbons increased while citronellol content decreased, therefore essential oil quality dramatically declined. EO quantity was lower in the middle stages of flower bud development (stages 3 and 4 as compared to the final stages (stage 5 and 6, but its quality was superior in the former stages. Generally, it seems that "Fars 2" damask rose, as a promising genotype, can be used for EO production.

  8. Water Control in Cut Stems of Rose and Carnation

    OpenAIRE

    Di Stasio, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    This PhD Thesis address, on cut flowers vase life, physiological mechanisms aimed at maintaining and regulating tissues hydration, cellular turgor, water use and senescence phenomena. Specifically we considered the effect of compatible solutes (osmoregulation) on water status, hydration state and vase life of cut stems of rose and carnation (chapter 1). In the second chapter we evaluated the application of anti-transpirant compounds that may act indirectly or directly on rose cut stems trans...

  9. Bekæmpelse af rynket rose II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, Rita M.; Ransijn, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Rynket rose er en invasiv art, der har spredt sig voldsomt gennem de seneste år – ikke kun i Danmark men i hele Europa. Den er svær at bekæmpe, og derfor har Naturstyrelsen Thy og Thisted Kommune i perioden 2010-2013 gennemført en række kontrollerede forsøg med slåning, græsning og kemisk...... bekæmpelse af rynket rose....

  10. An alternative bifurcation analysis of the Rose-Hindmarsh model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 4, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: s.nikolov@imbm.bas.bg

    2005-03-01

    The paper presents an alternative study of the bifurcation behavior of the Rose-Hindmarsh model using Lyapunov-Andronov's theory. This is done on the basis of the obtained analytical formula expressing the first Lyapunov's value (this is not Lyapunov exponent) at the boundary of stability. From the obtained results the following new conclusions are made: Transition to chaos and the occurrence of chaotic oscillations in the Rose-Hindmarsh system take place under hard stability loss.

  11. Visual fixation in human newborns correlates with extensive white matter networks and predicts long-term neurocognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjerna, Susanna; Sairanen, Viljami; Gröhn, Riitta; Andersson, Sture; Metsäranta, Marjo; Lano, Aulikki; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2015-03-25

    Infants are well known to seek eye contact, and they prefer to fixate on developmentally meaningful objects, such as the human face. It is also known, that visual abilities are important for the developmental cascades of cognition from later infancy to childhood. It is less understood, however, whether newborn visual abilities relate to later cognitive development, and whether newborn ability for visual fixation can be assigned to early microstructural maturation. Here, we investigate relationship between newborn visual fixation (VF) and gaze behavior (GB) to performance in visuomotor and visual reasoning tasks in two cohorts with cognitive follow-up at 2 (n = 57) and 5 (n = 1410) years of age. We also analyzed brain microstructural correlates to VF (n = 45) by voxel-based analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) in newborn diffusion tensor imaging. Our results show that newborn VF is significantly related to visual-motor performance at both 2 and 5 years, as well as to visual reasoning at 5 years of age. Moreover, good newborn VF relates to widely increased FA levels across the white matter. Comparison to motor performance indicated that early VF is preferentially related to visuocognitive development, and that early motor performance relates neither to white matter integrity nor to visuocognitive development. The present findings suggest that newborn VF is supported by brainwide subcortical networks and it represents an early building block for the developmental cascades of cognition. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354824-06$15.00/0.

  12. Improvement of survival and development of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei larvae by feeding taurine enriched rotifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Jusadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe objective of the present experiment was to study the most optimum taurine enrichment concentration of rotifers in improving Pacific white shrimp larva Litopenaeus vannamei survival and development. White shrimp larvae at sixth naupliar stage were reared in 12 units of 500 L fibre glass tanks with a stocking density of 125 ind/L. Starting from zoea two stage (Z-2, the larva was provided with rotifers with different taurine enrichment concentration according to the treatments, i.e. 0 mg/L enrichment medium (A, 25 mg/L (B, 50 mg/L(C, and 100 mg/L (D. The results show that different taurine concentration in the enrichment media increased taurine level in rotifers. Furthermore, the administration of taurine enriched rotifers up to 50 mg/L significantly improved larval survival and may accelerate larval development. The experimental results also concluded that a concentration of 50 mg/L is the most optimum taurine enrichment concentration of rotifers for the improvement of white shrimp larval survival and developmental stage.Keywords: taurine, rotifer, white shrimp, enrichmentABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengkaji konsentrasi optimum taurin melalui pengayaan pada rotifera terhadap tingkat kelangsungan hidup dan perkembangan stadia larva udang vaname Litopenaeus vannamei. Larva udang vaname stadia naupli-6 dipelihara dalam 12 tangki fiberglass volume 500 L dengan kepadatan 125 ind/L. Dimulai sejak stadia zoea 2 (Z-2 larva diberi rotifera yang diperkaya dengan taurin dengan konsentrasi yang berbeda sesuai dengan perlakuan, yaitu 0 mg/L media pengkaya (A, 25 mg/L (B, 50mg/L (C, dan 100mg/L (D. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan pengayaan taurin pada konsentrasi yang berbeda menyebabkan peningkatan kandungan taurin rotifera. Sementara pemberian rotifera yang diperkaya taurin hingga 50 mg/L meningkatkan kelangsungan hidup dan mempercepat perkembangan stadia larva udang. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa pemberian

  13. Influence of artificial mountain climate on development of pneumoconiosis and content of catecholamines in adrenals of white rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gridneva, N.V.

    1984-04-01

    The influence of mountain climate (moderate hypobaric hypoxia, negative aeroionization and ultraviolet radiation) on development of pneumoconiosis and content of catecholamines in adrenals of white rats is studied. One month after inducing pneumoconiosis by intratracheal exposure of group of white rats to dust, half the experimental animals were treated in an altitude chamber and exposed to aeroionization by AF-3-1 and to medical quartz lamps. Effect of hypobaric treatment on hydroxyproline and dust in lungs is shown in a table comparing treated and untreated subjects. Both hydroxyproline and dust were reduced in lungs of animals given curative therapy. A month after exposure to dust, amount of epinephrine and morepinephrine in adrenals increased. A figure shows dynamics of content of catecholamines (CAC) in glands of animals exposed to dust and treated with artifical mountain climate. Results document phasal changes in content of CAC. Hypoxia increases CAC to stimulate arteriovascular system subjected to reduced atmospheric pressure. Under conditions of artifical mountain climate, development of sclerosis slows and dust excretion is activated. One may propose antisclerotic effect of UVL and aeroionization predominates over prosclerotic action of hypoxia. Combined factors of mountain climate retard fibrosis, expedite excretion of dust, and facilitate normalization of functional activity of CAC. Therefore, their use is recommended in treatment of pneumoconiosis. 26 references.

  14. The models of Picasso's rose period: The Family of Saltimbanques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Harold P; Blum, Elsa J

    2007-06-01

    The word "model" in this context has a variety of meanings. The concept of "model" encompasses the external person who is represented by the artist, as well as the internal, conscious and unconscious, past and present mental representations of other individuals and the work of other artists. In all of these meanings, the relationships of artist and model have been quite specific to the artist under consideration and the historical-cultural period. For Picasso, the relationship of artist and model was particularly intense, reflecting myriad aspects of his personality and artistic development. The theme of artist and model was the subject of many of his paintings and graphic works. We focus particularly on his use of harlequins, saltimbanques, and circus performers during his blue and rose periods. The change in predominant models and moods between periods is noted. Among the issues considered is the relevance of these models in this particular period. Why were they especially salient objects for identification and for his artistic identity? Identification with the model may represent or be linked to earlier identifications of adolescence and childhood. We discuss the implications of these portrayals for his object relationships and the magical power, possession, and control in the development of his art. The painting "The Family of Saltimbanques," his most ambitious work to date, the integration and culmination of this theme during this period, is of particular interest.

  15. White lies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erat, S.; Gneezy, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we distinguish between two types of white lies: those that help others at the expense of the person telling the lie, which we term altruistic white lies, and those that help both others and the liar, which we term Pareto white lies. We find that a large fraction of participants are

  16. Effect of bioactive peptides (BPs) on the development of Pacific white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei Boone, 1931)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangjun; Yu, Ermeng; Li, Zhifei; Yu, Deguang; Wang, Haiying; Gong, Wangbao

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of replacing fish meal (FM) with bioactive peptides (BPs) in diet of white shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei). The changes in growth performance, body composition, non-specific immunity, and water quality were examined after the shrimp were fed four diets, in which 0% (control), 33.3%, 66.7% and 100% of FM was replaced by BPs, respectively. The groups were designated as Con, 1/3BPs, 2/3BPs, and 3/3BPs. A total of 720 shrimp with an initial body weight of 1.46 ± 0.78 g were fed the experimental diets for 56 days. The results revealed that: 1) the weight gain rate (WGR) in 1/3BPs, 2/3BPs, and 3/3BPs was significantly higher than that in Con ( P vannamei; it is able to effectively promote growth performance and improve immunity. Moreover, BPs in the diets had no negative impact on water quality.

  17. Qualitative comparison of Dutch and Ethiopian Rose production systems. Why Dutch rose growers move to African Nations and what consequences does this migration have?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries de, Willem

    2010-01-01

    Summary The rose cultivation is used as a study example in this report to facilitate the understanding of the overall differences between the cultivation of agricultural products in the Netherlands and those in warmer countries. The Dutch rose cultivat

  18. THE GENERATIVE REPRODUCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF RED DRAGON FRUIT (Hylocereus.polyrhizus (Web.) Britton & Rose, CACTACEAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Eniek Kriswiyanti

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the generative reproductive characteristics of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus (Web.) Britton & Rose), that is the characteristics and the development of male and female reproductive system and the embryo. The flowering morphology was observed through the gametogenesis process and the process of embryogenesis was observed using the methods of squash, cytolysis, and embedding of flower before anthesis, during and after anthesis. The results showed th...

  19. Variable White Matter Atrophy and Intellectual Development in a Family With X-linked Creatine Transporter Deficiency Despite Genotypic Homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussinger, Nicole; Saake, Marc; Mennecke, Angelika; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Trollmann, Regina

    2017-02-01

    The X-linked creatine transporter deficiency (CRTD) caused by an SLC6A8 mutation represents the second most common cause of X-linked intellectual disability. The clinical phenotype ranges from mild to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, short stature, poor language skills, and autism spectrum disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate phenotypic variability in the context of genotype, cerebral creatine concentration, and volumetric analysis in a family with CRTD. The clinical phenotype and manifestations of epilepsy were assessed in a Caucasian family with CRTD. DNA sequencing and creatine metabolism analysis confirmed the diagnosis. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) with voxel-based morphometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed in all family members. An SLC6A8 missense mutation (c.1169C>T; p.Pro390Leu, exon 8) was detected in four of five individuals. Both male siblings were hemizygous, the mother and the affected sister heterozygous for the mutation. Structural cMRI was normal, whereas voxel-based morphometry analysis showed reduced white matter volume below the first percentile of the reference population of 290 subjects in the more severely affected boy compared with family members and controls. Normalized creatine concentration differed significantly between the individuals (P < 0.005). There is a broad phenotypic variability in CRTD even in family members with the same mutation. Differences in mental development could be related to atrophy of the subcortical white matter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of Molecular Markers for Determining Continental Origin of Wood from White Oaks (Quercus L. sect. Quercus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Hilke; Cronn, Richard; Yanbaev, Yulai; Jennings, Tara; Mader, Malte; Degen, Bernd; Kersten, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    To detect and avoid illegal logging of valuable tree species, identification methods for the origin of timber are necessary. We used next-generation sequencing to identify chloroplast genome regions that differentiate the origin of white oaks from the three continents; Asia, Europe, and North America. By using the chloroplast genome of Asian Q. mongolica as a reference, we identified 861 variant sites (672 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 189 insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism) from representative species of three continents (Q. mongolica from Asia; Q. petraea and Q. robur from Europe; Q. alba from North America), and we identified additional chloroplast polymorphisms in pools of 20 individuals each from Q. mongolica (789 variant sites) and Q. robur (346 variant sites). Genome sequences were screened for indels to develop markers that identify continental origin of oak species, and that can be easily evaluated using a variety of detection methods. We identified five indels and one SNP that reliably identify continent-of-origin, based on evaluations of up to 1078 individuals representing 13 white oak species and three continents. Due to the size of length polymorphisms revealed, this marker set can be visualized using capillary electrophoresis or high resolution gel (acrylamide or agarose) electrophoresis. With these markers, we provide the wood trading market with an instrument to comply with the U.S. and European laws that require timber companies to avoid the trade of illegally harvested timber.

  1. Controlled preparation of aluminum borate powders for the development of defect-related phosphors for warm white LED lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Vinicius F.; Salaün, Mathieu; Burner, Pauline; Maia, Lauro J. Q.; Ferrier, Alban; Viana, Bruno; Gautier-Luneau, Isabelle; Ibanez, Alain

    2017-03-01

    The optimization of the elaboration conditions of a new family of highly emissive white phosphors based on glassy yttrium aluminum borates (g-YAB) compositions is presented. Their preparation from solutions is based on the polymeric precursor method (modified Pechini process), involving non-toxic and low cost precursors. The resulting resins were first dried at moderate temperatures followed by two-step annealing treatments of the obtain powders under controlled atmospheres: a first pyrolysis under nitrogen followed by a calcination under oxygen. This favored the gradual oxidation of organic moieties coming from starting materials, avoiding uncontrolled self-combustion reactions, which generate localized hot spots. This prevented phase segregations and the formation of pyrolytic carbon or carbonates, which are strongly detrimental to the luminescence properties. Thus, coupled chemical analyses and luminescence characterizations showed the high chemical homogeneity of the resulting powders and their intense emissions in the whole visible range. These emissions can be tuned from blue to warm white by adjusting the calcination temperature that is an important advantage for the development of LED devices. We showed that impurities of monovalent and divalent cations act as quenching emission centers for these phosphors. Therefore, by increasing the purity grade, we significantly enhanced the PL emissions leading to high internal quantum yields (80-90%). Finally, cathodoluminescence emissions showed the homogeneous dispersion of emitting centers in the g-YAB matrix.

  2. Indolbutyric acid on rooting of cuttings of mini rose bush

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kelli Pirola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The roses are considered as the main cut flowers exported from Brazil and also the most popular in the domestic market. Usually, roses can be propagated by grafting or cutting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cuttings’ size and IBA concentration on mini-cutting rooting of roses variety Mary Rose. Cuttings were obtained from mother plants grown in gardens, with sizes of 3, 5 and 7 cm of length, 1.0 cm in diameter, and treated with IBA, in the concentrations of 0; 500 and 1000 mg L-1. The experimental design was installed in randomized blocks, in a factorial 3 x 3 (mini-cutting sizes x IBA concentration, with 4 repetitions and 10 mini-cuttings per plot. After 60 days rooted cuttings (%, cuttings with callus (%, primary sprouting, leaves and roots numbers, length of the three major roots (cm and mortality (% were evaluated. It is recommended to propagate roses by the use of mini-cuttings with 7 cm treated with 500 mg L-1 of IBA.

  3. Production of desert rose seedlings in different potting media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Carlos Colombo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade the desert rose received fame in the flower market due to its striking and sculptural forms; however, the commercial production of these species is quite recent and little is known about its crop management, including substrates recommendation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of different substrates on desert rose seed germination and production of its seedlings. Experiment I: freshly harvested seeds of desert rose were sown in different substrates e.g. sand, coconut fiber, semi-composted pine bark, sand + coconut fiber, semi-composted pine bark + sand and coconut fiber + semicomposted pine bark. These substrates were evaluated to study the emergence percentage of seeds, initial growth of seedlings and seedling emergence speed index (ESI. Experiment II: desert rose from the experiment I were transferred to plastic pots filled with the same substrates as in experiment I. The pH and electrical conductivity (EC of the substrates were noted every 30 days while the growth parameters of seedlings were recorded after 240 days. Results from experiment I showed higher germination rate and seedling growth in substrates containing semi-composted pine bark. Similarly, in experiment II, better quality seedlings were observed in substrates containing semi-composted pine bark. Thus, for desert rose seed germination and seedling growth, it is recommended to use substrates containing semi-composted pine bark.

  4. ANTHEM2000{sup TM}: Integration of the ANTHEM Thermal Hydraulic Model in the ROSE{sup TM} Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boire, R.; Nguyen, M; Salim, G. [CAE Electronics Ltd., Quebec (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    ROSEN{sup TM} is an object oriented, visual programming environment used for many applications, including the development of power plant simulators. ROSE provides an integrated suite of tools for the creation, calibration, test, integration, configuration management and documentation of process, electrical and I and C models. CAE recently undertook an ambitious project to integrate its two phase thermal hydraulic model ANTHEM{sup TM} into the ROSE environment. ANTHEM is a non equilibrium, non-homogenous model based on the drift flux formalism. CAE has used the model in numerous two phase applications for nuclear and fossil power plant simulators. The integration of ANTHEM into ROSE brings the full power of visual based programming to two phase modeling applications. Features include graphical model building, calibration tools, a superior test environment and process visualisation. In addition the integration of ANTHEM into ROSE makes it possible to easily apply the fidelity of ANTHEM to BOP applications. This paper describes the implementation of the ANTHEM model within the ROSE environment and gives examples of its use. (author)

  5. White Paper Report of the 2011 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: Integrating Multidisciplinary Strategies for Imaging Services in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazal, Jonathan; Lexa, Frank; Starikovsky, Anna; Jimenez, Pablo; Jain, Sanjay; DeStigter, Kristen K.; Nathan, Robert; Krebs, Elizabeth; Noble, Vicki; Marks, William; Hirsh, Richard N.; Short, Brad; Sydnor, Ryan; Timmreck-Jackson, Emily; Lungren, Matthew P.; Maxfield, Charles; Azene, Ezana M.; Garra, Brian S.; Choi, Brian G.; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries discussed data, experiences and models pertaining to radiology in the developing world, where widespread shortages of imaging services significantly reduce health care quality and increase health care disparity. This white paper from the 2011 RAD-AID Conference represents consensus advocacy of multidisciplinary strategies to improve planning, accessibility and quality of imaging services in the developing world. Conference presenters and participants discussed numerous solutions to imaging and healthcare disparities including: (1) economic development for radiology service planning, (2) public health mechanisms to address disease and prevention at the population and community levels, (3) comparative clinical models to implement various clinical and workflow strategies adapted to unique developing world community contexts, (4) education to improve training and optimize service quality, and (5) technology innovation to bring new technical capabilities to limited-resource regions. PMID:22748790

  6. The joint influence of photoperiod and temperature during growth cessation and development of dormancy in white spruce (Picea glauca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jill A; El Kayal, Walid; Hart, Ashley T; Runcie, Daniel E; Arango-Velez, Adriana; Cooke, Janice E K

    2016-11-01

    Timely responses to environmental cues enable the synchronization of phenological life-history transitions essential for the health and survival of north-temperate and boreal tree species. While photoperiodic cues will remain persistent under climate change, temperature cues may vary, contributing to possible asynchrony in signals influencing developmental and physiological transitions essential to forest health. Understanding the relative contribution of photoperiod and temperature as determinants of the transition from active growth to dormancy is important for informing adaptive forest management decisions that consider future climates. Using a combination of photoperiod (long = 20 h or short = 8 h day lengths) and temperature (warm = 22 °C/16 °C and cool = 8 °C/4 °C day/night, respectively) treatments, we used microscopy, physiology and modeling to comprehensively examine hallmark traits of the growth-dormancy transition-including bud formation, growth cessation, cold hardiness and gas exchange-within two provenances of white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] spanning a broad latitude in Alberta, Canada. Following exposure to experimental treatments, seedlings were transferred to favorable conditions, and the depth of dormancy was assessed by determining the timing and ability of spruce seedlings to resume growth. Short photoperiods promoted bud development and growth cessation, whereas longer photoperiods extended the growing season through the induction of lammas growth. In contrast, cool temperatures under both photoperiodic conditions delayed bud development. Photoperiod strongly predicted the development of cold hardiness, whereas temperature predicted photosynthetic rates associated with active growth. White spruce was capable of attaining endodormancy, but its release was environmentally determined. Dormancy depth varied substantially across experimental treatments suggesting that environmental cues experienced within one season could affect growth

  7. Microsatellite analysis of Rosa damascena Mill. accessions reveals genetic similarity between genotypes used for rose oil production and old Damask rose varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusanov, K.; Kovacheva, N.; Vosman, B.J.; Zhang, L.; Rajapakse, S.; Atanassov, A.; Atanassov, I.

    2005-01-01

    Damask roses are grown in several European and Asiatic countries for rose oil production. Twenty-six oil-bearing Rosa damascena Mill. accessions and 13 garden Damask roses were assayed by molecular markers. Microsatellite genotyping demonstrated that R. damascena Mill. accessions from Bulgaria,

  8. Sealing of Corneal Lacerations Using Photoactivated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeken, Timothy A; Zhu, Hong; DeMartelaere, Sheri; Davies, Brett W; Kim, Mirang; Wang, Heuy-Ching; Aden, James; Grimm, Rose; Alt, Clemens; Kochevar, Irene E; Johnson, Anthony J

    2018-02-01

    Watertight closure of perforating corneoscleral lacerations is necessary to prevent epithelial ingrowth, infection, and potential loss of the eye. Complex lacerations can be difficult to treat, and repair with sutures alone is often inadequate. In this study, we evaluated a potentially sutureless technology for sealing complex corneal and scleral lacerations that bonds the amniotic membrane (AM) to the wound using only green light and rose bengal dye. The AM was impregnated with rose bengal and then sealed over lacerations using green light to bond the AM to the deepithelialized corneal surface. This process was compared with suture repair of 3 laceration configurations in New Zealand White rabbits in 3 arms of the study. A fourth study arm assessed the side effect profile including viability of cells in the iris, damage to the blood-retinal barrier, retinal photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and choriocapillaris in Dutch Belted rabbits. Analyses of the first 3 arms revealed a clinically insignificant increase in polymorphonuclear inflammation. In the fourth arm, iris cells appeared unaffected and no evidence of breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier was detected. The retina from green light laser-treated eyes showed normal retinal pigment epithelium, intact outer segments, and normal outer nuclear layer thickness. The results of these studies established that a light-activated method to cross-link AM to the cornea can be used for sealing complex penetrating wounds in the cornea and sclera with minimal inflammation or secondary effects.

  9. Development and validation of a duplex real-time PCR method for the simultaneous detection of celery and white mustard in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Magdalena; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Hochegger, Rupert

    2013-11-01

    The developed duplex real-time PCR method allows the simultaneous detection of traces of potentially allergenic white mustard (Sinapis alba) and celery roots (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum), celery stalks (A. g. var. dulce) and leaf celery (A. g. var. secalinum). The duplex assay does not show any cross-reactivity with 64 different biological species, including various members of the Brassicaceae and Apiaceae family. In raw model sausages spiked with white mustard and celery roots, the LOD was found to be 0.001% white mustard and 0.005% celery. In model sausages brewed at 75-78°C for 15 min the LOD was found to be 0.005% white mustard and 0.005% celery. The duplex real-time PCR assay was applied to check if commercial food products are labelled in compliance with the legal regulations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Brain Dynamics of Intellectual Development: Waxing and Waning White and Gray Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamnes, Christian K.; Fjell, Anders M.; Ostby, Ylva; Westlye, Lars T.; Due-Tonnessen, Paulina; Bjornerud, Atle; Walhovd, Kristine B.

    2011-01-01

    Distributed brain areas support intellectual abilities in adults. How structural maturation of these areas in childhood enables development of intelligence is not established. Neuroimaging can be used to monitor brain development, but studies to date have typically considered single imaging modalities. To explore the impact of structural brain…

  11. Rose hip (Rosa canina L: A functional food perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Fan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rose hip (Rosa canina L. is the pseudo-fruit of the rose plant, which is widely known as a valuable source of polyphenols and vitamin C. Both in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that this fruit exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiobesogenic activities. The health benefits of Rose hip (RH have been attributed to its wide range of bioactive compounds including the anti-inflammatory galactolipid: (2S-1,2-di-O-[(9Z,12Z,15Z-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoyl]-3-O-β-D galactopyranosyl glycerol (GOPO, vitamin C, phenolics, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and other carotenoids. As cyclooxygenase inhibitors, RH compounds may reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease, and various inflammatory conditions. The aim of this review is to present an overview of the functional, medical, and physiological properties of RH.

  12. [Endophytic fungi in rose (Rosa hybrida) in Bogota, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Cepero de Garcia, María Caridad

    2005-06-01

    We have investigated the presence of endophytic fungi associated with rose plants (Rosa hybrida) in Colombia. Endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy leaves of ten ornamental roses plants from gardens cultured in malt extract, peptone, yeast extract agar plates (MPY). We sampled 560 leaves fragments, 56 per sample. Endophytic fungi comprised 92 isolates (16.4%); of these isolates, 41 were classified as sterile mycelium (without reproductive structures that allowed their identification), 31 isolates were identified to genus or to species, and 20 isolates could not be identified at all. The identified endophytic fungi were as follow: Nigrospora oryzae, Aureobasidium spp, Acremonium spp. The fungi Nodulisporium sp, Gliocladium virens, Cladosporium sp, Alternaria sp, Phoma sp and Chaetomium globosum were represented by one isolate each. Since the endophytic fungi are known for their capacity to produce metabolites with biological activity, it is possible that the microorganisms found in this study have potential as antagonist of rose pathogens.

  13. Development of snake-directed antipredator behavior by wild white-faced capuchin monkeys: II. Influence of the social environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meno, Whitney; Coss, Richard G; Perry, Susan

    2013-03-01

    Young animals are known to direct alarm calls at a wider range of animals than adults. If social cues are safer and/or more reliable to use than asocial cues for learning about predators, then it is expected that the development of this behavior will be affected by the social environment. Our study examined the influence of the social environment on antipredator behavior in infant, juvenile, and adult wild white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus) at Lomas Barbudal Biological Reserve in Costa Rica during presentations of different species of model snakes and novel models. We examined (a) the alarm calling behavior of the focal animal when alone versus in the vicinity of conspecific alarm callers and (b) the latency of conspecifics to alarm call once the focal animal alarm called. Focal animals alarm called more when alone than after hearing a conspecific alarm call. No reliable differences were found in the latencies of conspecifics to alarm call based on age or model type. Conspecifics were more likely to alarm call when focal individuals alarm called at snake models than when they alarm called at novel models. Results indicate (a) that alarm calling may serve to attract others to the predator's location and (b) that learning about specific predators may begin with a generalized response to a wide variety of species, including some nonthreatening ones, that is winnowed down via Pavlovian conditioned inhibition into a response directed toward specific dangerous species. This study reveals that conspecifics play a role in the development of antipredator behavior in white-faced capuchins. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Luminescent, optical and color properties of natural rose quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibar, R. [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Cetin, A.; Selvi, S. [Department of Physics, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Karal, T. [Institute of Nuclear Science, Ege University, 35100 Bornova-Izmir (Turkey); Can, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey)], E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com

    2007-11-15

    Rose quartz is an interesting mineral with numerous impurities that have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cathodoluminescence (CL), ion beam luminescence (IBL), radioluminescence (RL), thermoluminescence (TL) and optical absorption (OA). After HF etching, rose quartz from Oliva de Plasencia (Caceres, Spain) shows under SEM the presence of other silicate phases such as dumortierite [Al{sub 6.5-7}(BO{sub 3})(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}(O,OH){sub 3}]. The OA spectrum of rose quartz suggests that these inclusions are the cause of coloration of rose quartz. The luminescence (CL, IBL, RL, TL) spectra behavior, at both room temperature and lower, confirms that the {approx}340nm emission could be associated with Si-O strain structures, including non-bridging oxygen or silicon vacancy-hole centers; the observed {approx}400nm emission could be associated with recombination of a hole trapped adjacent to a substitutional, charge-compensated aluminum alkali ion center; the {approx}500nm emission could be associated with substitutional Al{sup 3+} and the {approx}700nm peak could be associated with Fe{sup 3+} point defects in Si{sup 4+} sites. These results suggest that, while defect properties of rose quartz are not greatly dissimilar to those of purer forms of quartz and silica, further research seems necessary to determine criteria for the evolution of the newly-formed self-organized microstructures in the rose quartz lattice under irradiation.

  15. Model study of the enzymatic modification of natural extracts: peroxidase-based removal of eugenol from rose essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Charfeddine; Dolhem, Gwenn'Ann; Fernandez, Xavier; Antoniotti, Sylvain

    2012-02-01

    A protocol based on the use of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is proposed for the removal of allergenic eugenol from rose essential oil without loss of the organoleptic quality and with a good conservation of the chemical composition. For the first time, an enzyme-based strategy is proposed for essential oils treatment and opens new opportunities in the detoxification of natural extracts used in perfumery and cosmetics. Our results on eugenol in rose essential oil constitute a first step toward the development of efficient and mild processes for the removal of more toxic compounds of natural extracts.

  16. Normative development of white matter tracts: similarities and differences in relation to age, gender, and intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clayden, Jonathan D; Jentschke, Sebastian; Muñoz, Mónica; Cooper, Janine M; Chadwick, Martin J; Banks, Tina; Clark, Chris A; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2012-01-01

    .... In this study of typically developing 8- to 16-year-old children, we use a comprehensive data-driven approach based on principal components analysis to identify effects of age, gender, and brain...

  17. Description of Idiomatic Expression Found in Guns N’ Roses songs

    OpenAIRE

    Hutabarat, Chandra Xaverius Putra

    2011-01-01

    A paper with title “ Description of Idiomatic Expression Found in Guns N’ Roses Songs. Describing idiomatic expression in three songs of Guns N’ Roses, which are chosen randomly in Use Your Illusion I album. The method of reseach applies in this study is library reseach, and method of analysis the data is descriptive method. This study is analyzed because most of people can sing a English song, but most of them can not understand the meaning of the song. Describing idiomatic expression in a ...

  18. Adolescent Development of Cortical and White Matter Structure in the NCANDA Sample: Role of Sex, Ethnicity, Puberty, and Alcohol Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Rohlfing, Torsten; Pohl, Kilian M; Lane, Barton; Chu, Weiwei; Kwon, Dongjin; Nolan Nichols, B; Brown, Sandra A; Tapert, Susan F; Cummins, Kevin; Thompson, Wesley K; Brumback, Ty; Meloy, M J; Jernigan, Terry L; Dale, Anders; Colrain, Ian M; Baker, Fiona C; Prouty, Devin; De Bellis, Michael D; Voyvodic, James T; Clark, Duncan B; Luna, Beatriz; Chung, Tammy; Nagel, Bonnie J; Sullivan, Edith V

    2016-10-01

    Brain structural development continues throughout adolescence, when experimentation with alcohol is often initiated. To parse contributions from biological and environmental factors on neurodevelopment, this study used baseline National Consortium on Alcohol and NeuroDevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired in 674 adolescents meeting no/low alcohol or drug use criteria and 134 adolescents exceeding criteria. Spatial integrity of images across the 5 recruitment sites was assured by morphological scaling using Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative phantom-derived volume scalar metrics. Clinical MRI readings identified structural anomalies in 11.4%. Cortical volume and thickness were smaller and white matter volumes were larger in older than in younger adolescents. Effects of sex (male > female) and ethnicity (majority > minority) were significant for volume and surface but minimal for cortical thickness. Adjusting volume and area for supratentorial volume attenuated or removed sex and ethnicity effects. That cortical thickness showed age-related decline and was unrelated to supratentorial volume is consistent with the radial unit hypothesis, suggesting a universal neural development characteristic robust to sex and ethnicity. Comparison of NCANDA with PING data revealed similar but flatter, age-related declines in cortical volumes and thickness. Smaller, thinner frontal, and temporal cortices in the exceeds-criteria than no/low-drinking group suggested untoward effects of excessive alcohol consumption on brain structural development. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Allergy symptoms and IgE immune response to rose: an occupational and an environmental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, A U; Karakaya, Gül; Kalyoncu, A F

    2002-10-01

    Turkey is one of the four major producers of rose. Cultivation of rose is the main economic activity of many villagers in the Lakes region. Rose allergy has not been reported before. We investigated the prevalence of allergy symptoms and specific-IgE immune response due to rose in villagers who had been cultivating rose in Güneykent village in the Lakes region. A screening questionnaire including respiratory and allergic symptoms was administered to 290 villagers. The investigation team visited and studied 75 randomly selected villagers with an interviewer-administered questionnaire, pulmonary function testing, skin prick testing and serum total IgE. Specific IgE against Rosa rugosa was measured in 41 villagers. Villagers reported asthma/allergy symptoms outside the rose season (17.6%), during the rose season (6.2%), and both during the rose season and outside the rose season (whole the year) (17.6%). Atopy and specific IgE against Rosa rugosa were detected in 12 (19%), and 8 (19.5%) of the villagers tested. Villagers who had symptoms whole the year reported wheeze more frequently than those who reported symptoms only outside the rose season (41.2% vs 11.1%). IgE-mediated allergy could occur due to rose and/or its pollen. Symptoms mainly affect the upper airways. Further studies in the rose handlers, florists and workers of the rose industry would help elucidate the occurrence of rose allergy.

  20. Frontostriatal white matter integrity predicts development of delay of gratification : A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, Michelle; Peper, Jiska S.; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Mandl, René C W; Crone, Eveline A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to delay gratification increases considerably across development. Here, we test the hypothesis that this impulse control capacity is driven by increased maturation of frontostriatal circuitry using a fiber-tracking approach combined with longitudinal imaging. In total, 192 healthy

  1. Impaired dynamic cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia predicts development of white matter hyperintensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Sam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Vascular impairment in regions of NAWM that progresses to WMH consists not only of decreased magnitude of ssCVR, but also a pathological decrease in the speed of vascular response. These findings support the association between cerebrovascular dysregulation and the development of WMH.

  2. Developing Home-Based Early Learning Systems in East Yakima and White Center. Better Beginnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kristin; Paulsell, Diane; Del Grosso, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, the Gates Foundation launched the Early Learning Initiative to improve the school readiness of Washington State's children through three main strategies: (1) development of high-quality, community-wide early learning initiatives in two communities; (2) enhancement of statewide systems that support early learning; and (3) support for…

  3. Plasma potassium, diuretic use and risk of developing chronic kidney disease in a predominantly White population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieneker, Lyanne M.; Eisenga, Michele F.; Joosten, Michel M.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Both hypokalemia and hyperkalemia are associated with disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is unclear whether similar associations are present in the general population. Our aim was to examine the association of plasma potassium with risk of developing CKD

  4. Urbanistiс Image of New York in English Poetry by Rose Ausländer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Vikyrchak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available English poetry by Rose Ausländer is an interesting phenomenon in the biography and writing of the German-speaking author, associated with the practical aspects of life in exile and psychological traumas. Using the method of analysis of poetic texts created by her in English during the life in emigration in the United States between 1947 and 1956 (poetry collection “The Forbidden Tree” and some later prose texts, interviews, we conclude that Rose Ausländer had an ambiguous attitude to New York. The same attitude to the metropolis was shared by the American poet Marianne Moore, with whom Ausländer developed friendship, which played an important role for the creative life of the Bukovynian author in exile. We also consider the different perceptions of New York by Rose Ausländer during the two different periods of her residence there: the late 1920s when poetry was traditional in form and expressionist in style, written in German; and English free verse during the post-war period. Despite numerous topographical names that appear in the poetry collection “The Forbidden Tree”, the main New York motives remain the challenges to adapt to the rapid pace and rhythm of life, urge for the feeling of home, hope for a reunion with Bukovyna and German language etc.

  5. Pengembangan Modul Klasifikasi Apel Envy dan Pasific Rose Menggunakan Jaringan Saraf Tiruan (JST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Zakiyah Rahmanti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The variety of apple has similarity with each other, therefore it makes human visual perception difficult to differentiate some of them. The conventional way is often carried out human vision subjective perception, this way makes classification result becomes less. Apple classification using information technology is one step to classify apple more accurate and to help human in apple plantations processing. The goal of this research is developing classification stage on envy and pasific rose apple. The major goal is to classify envy and pacific rose apple using Artificial Neural Network (ANN. Doing feature extraction of training and testing apple images aims that images can be recognized as envy or pasific rose. The way of getting feature extraction is using statistical approach of RGB color histogram from an image. The feature extraction values of RGB color histogram of apple images are intensity, standard deviation, skewness, energy, entropy, and smoothness. Then, those values as an input of classification step using ANN feed-forward backpropagation. The results of this research are consists of three scenario of experiment, first skenario is using 50 training data 10 testing data, it has accuracy value 80%. Second scenario is using 70 training data 10 testing data, it also has accuracy value 80%. Third scenario is using 90 training data 10 testing data, it has accuracy value 90%. This experiment result shows that the highest accuracy value is in third scenario.

  6. XAS studies of the effectiveness of iron chelating treatments of Mary Rose timbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berko, A; Schofield, E J; Chadwick, A V [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); Smith, A D [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Jones, A M [The Mary Rose Trust, HM Naval Base, Portsmouth, PO1 3LX (United Kingdom); Mosselmans, J F W, E-mail: a.berko@kent.ac.u [Diamond Light Source, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    The oxidation of sulfur in marine archaeological timbers under museum storage conditions is a recently identified problem, particularly for major artefacts such as historic ships excavated from the seabed. Recent work on the Vasa has stressed the role of iron in catalysing the oxidative degradation of the wood cellulose and the polyethylene glycols used to restore mechanical integrity to the timbers. In developing new treatment protocols for the long term preservation of Henry VIII of England's flagship, the Mary Rose, we are investigating the potential of chelating agents to neutralise and remove the iron products from the ships timbers. We have explored the use of aqueous solutions of chelating agents of calcium phytate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and ammonium citrate to extract the iron compounds. All of these solutions exhibit some level of iron removal; however the key is to find the most effective concentration at pH of around 7 of the reagent solution, to minimise the treatment time and find the most cost-effective treatment for the whole of the Mary Rose hull. Fe K-edge XAFS data from samples of Mary Rose timbers, before and after treatment by the chelating agents mentioned has been collected. The data collected provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of the treatment solutions.

  7. One pot synthesis of opposing 'rose petal' and 'lotus leaf' superhydrophobic materials with zinc oxide nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Hornyak, Gabor L; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-02-01

    The synthesis in one pot(1) of opposing 'rose petal' and 'lotus leaf' superhydrophobic materials from commercially available superhydrophilic cloth substrates of varying texture is described for the first time. Surfaces of 'rough' textured cloth and 'smooth' textured cloth were simultaneously rendered superhydrophobic by growing zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods by a hydrothermal process in the same chemical bath. Contact angle hysteresis and water pendant drop tests revealed strong water adhesion to ZnO microrod-treated rough cloth. The combination of water contact angle >150° and strong adhesion is indicative of the 'rose petal effect' with potential for water pinning. Smooth cloth with ZnO nanorods exhibited no adhesion to water droplets with facilitative roll-off. The combination of water contact angle >150° and weak to no adhesion with water is indicative of the 'lotus leaf effect' with potential for self-cleaning. Pendant water drop tests indicated cohesive failure of water on rough cloth coated with ZnO nanorods. Natural rose petals demonstrated adhesive failure between the petal surface and water droplet. A parsimonious explanation is presented. We also describe the development of superhydrophobic clothes without the need for special conditions or further chemical modification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of superficial white matter and its structural interplay with cortical gray matter in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minjie; Lu, Lisa H; Lowes, Allison; Yang, Shaolin; Passarotti, Alessandra M; Zhou, Xiaohong J; Pavuluri, Mani N

    2014-06-01

    Healthy human brain undergoes significant changes during development. The developmental trajectory of superficial white matter (SWM) is less understood relative to cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter. In this study, a multimodal imaging strategy was applied to vertexwise map SWM microstructure and cortical thickness to characterize their developmental pattern and elucidate SWM-GM associations in children and adolescents. Microscopic changes in SWM were evaluated with water diffusion parameters including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) in 133 healthy subjects aged 10-18 years. Results demonstrated distinct maturational patterns in SWM and GM. SWM showed increasing FA and decreasing MD and RD underneath bilateral motor sensory cortices and superior temporal auditory cortex, suggesting increasing myelination. A second developmental pattern in SWM was increasing FA and AD in bilateral orbitofrontal regions and insula, suggesting improved axonal coherence. These SWM patterns diverge from the more widespread GM maturation, suggesting that cortical thickness changes in adolescence are not explained by the encroachment of SWM myelin into the GM-WM boundary. Interestingly, age-independent intrinsic association between SWM and cortical GM seems to follow functional organization of polymodal and unimodal brain regions. Unimodal sensory areas showed positive correlation between GM thickness and FA whereas polymodal regions showed negative correlation. Axonal coherence and differences in interstitial neuron composition between unimodal and polymodal regions may account for these SWM-GM association patterns. Intrinsic SWM-GM relationships unveiled by neuroimaging in vivo can be useful for examining psychiatric disorders with known WM/GM disturbances. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nitric oxide is involved in phosphorus deficiency-induced cluster root development and citrate exudation in white lupin

    Science.gov (United States)

    White lupin (Lupinus albus) forms specialized cluster roots characterized by exudation of organic anions under phosphorus (P) deficiency. Here, we evaluated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in P deficiency-induced cluster-root formation and citrate exudation in white lupin. Plants were treated with NO ...

  10. The Rose-comb mutation in chickens constitutes a structural rearrangement causing both altered comb morphology and defective sperm motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freyja Imsland

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rose-comb, a classical monogenic trait of chickens, is characterized by a drastically altered comb morphology compared to the single-combed wild-type. Here we show that Rose-comb is caused by a 7.4 Mb inversion on chromosome 7 and that a second Rose-comb allele arose by unequal crossing over between a Rose-comb and wild-type chromosome. The comb phenotype is caused by the relocalization of the MNR2 homeodomain protein gene leading to transient ectopic expression of MNR2 during comb development. We also provide a molecular explanation for the first example of epistatic interaction reported by Bateson and Punnett 104 years ago, namely that walnut-comb is caused by the combined effects of the Rose-comb and Pea-comb alleles. Transient ectopic expression of MNR2 and SOX5 (causing the Pea-comb phenotype occurs in the same population of mesenchymal cells and with at least partially overlapping expression in individual cells in the comb primordium. Rose-comb has pleiotropic effects, as homozygosity in males has been associated with poor sperm motility. We postulate that this is caused by the disruption of the CCDC108 gene located at one of the inversion breakpoints. CCDC108 is a poorly characterized protein, but it contains a MSP (major sperm protein domain and is expressed in testis. The study illustrates several characteristic features of the genetic diversity present in domestic animals, including the evolution of alleles by two or more consecutive mutations and the fact that structural changes have contributed to fast phenotypic evolution.

  11. [Effect of psychotropic substances on the development of alcoholic motivation in noninbred white rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Iu V; Kampov-Polevoĭ, A V; Nikitina, L N

    1986-03-01

    The experiments have shown the capacity of antidepressant amitriptylin (0.5 mg/kg, i. p.) and tranquilizer phenazepam (0.1 mg/kg i. p.) to normalize the adaptive behaviour and almost completely prevent the development of alcohol motivation in animals with insufficient adaptive behaviour. It was established that in animals initially rejecting alcohol, chronic treatment with these drugs as well as d-amphetamine promoted alcohol motivation. The results obtained have proved our earlier hypothesis that preclinical search for drugs for the prevention and treatment of early stages of alcoholism is possible only in animals pre-selected according to their inclination to experimental alcoholism.

  12. Distribution System White Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA worked with stakeholders and developed a series of white papers on distribution system issues ranked of potentially significant public health concern (see list below) to serve as background material for EPA, expert and stakeholder discussions.

  13. Factors affecting the germination of hybrid rose achenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, De D.P.; Dubois, L.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The smooth germination of mature Hybrid rose achenes is hampered by (i) hardseededness (HS), (ii) primary dormancy (PD) and (iii) germination polymorphism (GP). HS is owing to the hard pericarp. PD is, in principle, a natural phenomenon that protects the seeds from precocious germination. For

  14. Vascular occlusion in cut rose flowers - a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.

    1995-01-01

    The causes of low water uptake and water stress symptoms in cut rose flowers are briefly reviewed. Low water uptake is due to an occlusion, mainly located in the basal stem end. No evidence has been found for a reaction of the plant after cutting, in the formation of this occlusion. The blockage has

  15. Scion - rootstock relationships and root behaviour in glasshouse roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, H.W.M.

    1994-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the cultivation of cut roses in the glasshouse is commonly carried out yearround. Most cultivars are grown on a rootstock. The first part of this study investigates various rootstocks for their ability to influence production and quality throughout the year. The mutual influence

  16. Rose bengal-sensitized nanocrystalline ceria photoanode for dye ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quest for new materials and/or methods is continuous process in scientific investigation, for getting desired comparative results. The conduction band (CB) position of CeO 2 photoanode lies below lowest unoccupied molecular orbital level (LUMO) of rose bengal (RB) dye.Due to this, faster electron transfer from LUMO level ...

  17. Cultural and religious unification through music in Desert Rose's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Silence of the Musicis a musical theatre piece produced by Desert Rose in 2010. The production not only addresses themes of prejudice and intercultural discrepancies in post-apartheid South Africa, but also carries a message of love and unity. The unifying factor in the show is music – the fusing together of the musics of ...

  18. Genetic Diversity of Rose germplasm based on RAPD analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AHSAN IQBAL

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... The rose is the largest and most important ornamental crop in many countries. The genus ... management of plant genetic resources for any crop. Indo-Pak subcontinent has always been a sight of ... Floriculture, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. Morphological data collection. The plant descriptor for the ...

  19. Isolation, Molecular Characterization, and Mapping of Four Rose MLO Orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Helgard; Qiu, Xianqin; Wehmeyer, Juliane; Debener, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Powdery mildew is a major disease of economic importance in cut and pot roses. As an alternative to conventional resistance breeding strategies utilizing single-dominant genes or QTLs, mildew resistance locus o (MLO)-based resistance might offer some advantages. In dicots such as Arabidopsis, pea, and tomato, loss-of-function mutations in MLO genes confer high levels of broad-spectrum resistance. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of four MLO homologs from a large rose EST collection isolated from leaves. These genes are phylogenetically closely related to other dicot MLO genes that are involved in plant powdery mildew interactions. Therefore, they are candidates for MLO genes involved in rose powdery mildew interactions. Two of the four isolated genes contain all of the sequence signatures considered to be diagnostic for MLO genes. We mapped all four genes to three linkage groups and conducted the first analysis of alternative alleles. This information is discussed in regards to a reverse genetics approach aimed at the selection of rose plants that are homozygous for loss-of-function in one or more MLO genes.

  20. Isolation, molecular characterisation and mapping of four rose MLO orthologues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgard eKaufmann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Powdery mildew is a major disease of economic importance in cut and pot roses. As an alternative to conventional resistance breeding strategies utilising single-dominant genes or QTLs, mildew resistance locus o (MLO-based resistance might offer some advantages. In dicots such as Arabidopsis, pea and tomato, loss-of-function mutations in MLO genes confer high levels of broad-spectrum resistance. Here, we report the isolation and characterisation of four MLO homologues from a large rose EST collection isolated from leaves. These genes are phylogenetically closely related to other dicot MLO genes that are involved in plant powdery mildew interactions. Therefore, they are candidates for MLO genes involved in rose powdery mildew interactions. Two of the four isolated genes contain all of the sequence signatures considered to be diagnostic for MLO genes. We mapped all four genes to three linkage groups and conducted the first analysis of alternative alleles. This information is discussed in regards to a reverse genetics approach aimed at the selection of rose plants that are homozygous for loss of function in one or more MLO genes.

  1. Pomological and phenological characteristics of promising rose hip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine pomological and phenological characteristics of eleven promising rose hip (Rosa) genotypes chosen from wild populations in Tokat region of northern Anatolia, Turkey. Plants were propagated by cuttings and planted in 2000 at the research station of the Horticultural Department of ...

  2. Dried rose ( Rosa damascena Mill.) dreg: an alternative litter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to determine the effects of using dried rose dreg (DRD) as an alternative litter material for broiler performance and microbiological characteristics of litter. A total of 225 day-old broiler chicks was raised on pine wood shavings (PS), DRD and PS+DRD until 42 days. The effects of litter ...

  3. Interaction of rose bengal with mung bean aspartate transcarbamylase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. The fluorescein dye, rose bengal in the dark: (i) inhibited the activity of mung bean aspartate transcarbamylase (EC 2.1.3.2) in a non-competitive manner, when aspartate was the varied substrate; (ii) induced a lag in the time course of reaction and this hysteresis was abolished upon preincubation with carbamyl ...

  4. Genetic diversity of rose germplasm in Pakistan characterized by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers have been found to be very useful in studying the genetic variability of different species, including Rosa. Present studies were undertaken for the identification and analysis of genetic variation within a collection of 4 species and 30 accessions of rose using RAPD ...

  5. Growth analysis of four types of the rose cv. 'Motrea'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van de P.A.; Glorie, W.G.; Goudriaan, J.

    1988-01-01

    A growth analysis of the rose cv. 'Motrea' was carried out during 6 months after planting, in January. The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the effect of plant propagation: cutting, stenting, bench grafting or budding. During the first 5 weeks of plant growth, cuttings and stentlings

  6. Genetic mapping of QTLs associated with growth vigour in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.; Dolstra, O.; Denneboom, C.; Stam, P.; Visser, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    Parental linkage maps of a segregating population of diploid rose hybrids (2n=2x =14), composed of 365 uni-parental AFLP and SSR markers, have been constructed using a population (n=88) derived from a cross between two half-sib parents (P119 and P117). Of the markers, 157 P119 markers (85 %) mapped

  7. Recent results from the RD-48 (ROSE) Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzin, A. E-mail: aruzin@eng.tau.ac.il

    2000-06-01

    The current status of the research carried out by the RD-48 (ROSE) Collaboration is presented. Results of macroscopic and microscopic experimental studies are described as well as the progress in modeling. Detectors with improved radiation hardness were achieved by oxygen enrichment of silicon. The oxygen concentration required to obtain the improvement is {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}.

  8. Recent results from the RD48 (ROSE) Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzin, A

    2000-01-01

    The current status of the research carried out by the RD-48 (ROSE) Collaboration is presented. Results of macroscopic and microscopic experimental studies are described as well as the progress in modeling. Detectors with improved radiation hardness were achieved by oxygen enrichment of silicon. The oxygen concentration required to obtain the improvement is ~10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/. (10 refs).

  9. Erythrocyte Antioxidant Protection of Rose Hips (Rosa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Widén

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose hips are popular in health promoting products as the fruits contain high content of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health benefits are attributable to ascorbic acid, phenols, or other rose-hip-derived compounds. Freeze-dried powder of rose hips was preextracted with metaphosphoric acid and the sample was then sequentially eluted on a C18 column. The degree of amelioration of oxidative damage was determined in an erythrocyte in vitro bioassay by comparing the effects of a reducing agent on erythrocytes alone or on erythrocytes pretreated with berry extracts. The maximum protection against oxidative stress, 59.4±4.0% (mean ± standard deviation, was achieved when incubating the cells with the first eluted meta-phosphoric extract. Removal of ascorbic acid from this extract increased the protection against oxidative stress to 67.9±1.9%. The protection from the 20% and 100% methanol extracts was 20.8±8.2% and 5.0±3.2%, respectively. Antioxidant uptake was confirmed by measurement of catechin by HPLC-ESI-MS in the 20% methanol extract. The fact that all sequentially eluted extracts studied contributed to protective effects on the erythrocytes indicates that rose hips contain a promising level of clinically relevant antioxidant protection.

  10. Resurrecting the Feminine in "The Name of the Rose."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentz, Thomas S.

    1988-01-01

    Examines how the repressed feminine principle affects the four major discourses in Umberto Eco's "The Name of the Rose." Discusses the historical relationship between the masculine and the feminine in language and religion. Uses that historical frame to guide a close textual analysis of dialectical interplay between the masculine and the…

  11. Spreading tendencies of multiflora rose in the Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosene, W.

    1950-01-01

    In 1948-49 studies were made on the spreading of multiflora rose at the sites of three old plantings in Alabama and Georgia. The age of these plantings varied from 14-40 years. Roses were invading surrounding land at each site. Observations indicated that seeds are carried by water and birds. Seedlings were numerous in drainageways leading from old shrubs. Birds had deposited seed under trees, in thickets, and along hedgerows. Seedlings growing under a single tree varied in number from a few to 50. Two rose bushes were found under a tree a mile from the probable point of origin. Seedlings were spreading in unimproved pastures by growing in thickets where they were protected from grazing and mowing. Plants were not found in cultivated fields. Spreading was similar near all three locations in like plant communities. Competition from trees affected multiflora more than that of any other type of vegetation. Plants thrive in pine woodlands with an open canopy, but growth is weak in a thick hardwood stand. Control will be necessary if multiflora rose is to be kept from spreading in idle land and unimproved pastures.

  12. Development trends of white matter connectivity in the first years of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pew-Thian Yap

    Full Text Available The human brain is organized into a collection of interacting networks with specialized functions to support various cognitive functions. Recent research has reached a consensus that the brain manifests small-world topology, which implicates both global and local efficiency at minimal wiring costs, and also modular organization, which indicates functional segregation and specialization. However, the important questions of how and when the small-world topology and modular organization come into existence remain largely unanswered. Taking a graph theoretic approach, we attempt to shed light on this matter by an in vivo study, using diffusion tensor imaging based fiber tractography, on 39 healthy pediatric subjects with longitudinal data collected at average ages of 2 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years. Our results indicate that the small-world architecture exists at birth with efficiency that increases in later stages of development. In addition, we found that the networks are broad scale in nature, signifying the existence of pivotal connection hubs and resilience of the brain network to random and targeted attacks. We also observed, with development, that the brain network seems to evolve progressively from a local, predominantly proximity based, connectivity pattern to a more distributed, predominantly functional based, connectivity pattern. These observations suggest that the brain in the early years of life has relatively efficient systems that may solve similar information processing problems, but in divergent ways.

  13. PEMUNGUTAN MINYAK ATSIRI MAWAR (Rose Oil DENGAN METODE MASERASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrilia Damayanti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Minyak mawar merupakan salah satu produk minyak bunga yang memungkinkan diproduksi di Indonesia dengan kualitas ekspor. Manfaat dari minyak mawar adalah untuk parfum, kosmestik, dan obat-obatan. Minyak mawar dapat diproduksi dengan menggunakan metode diantaranya maserasi. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui rendemen minyak atsiri mawar merah (Rosa damascena dan komponen minyak atsiri yang terambil dengan etanol dan n-heksana. Bahan baku yang digunakan berupa mahkota bunga mawar sebanyak 50 gram yang dipotong kecil-kecil, kemudian direndam dalam pelarut dengan perbandingan 1:3. Pelarut yang digunakan yaitu etanol dan n-heksana. Proses maserasi dilakukan dengan pengadukan selama 1 menit secara manual pada suhu ruang dan didiamkan selama 12 jam di tempat tertutup dan gelap (tanpa terkena cahaya. Hasil maserasi berupa ekstrak mawar dipisahkan dengan cara penyaringan dan pemerasan bunga. Filtrat yang mengandung minyak bunga mawar dievaporasi dengan  rotary vacuum evaporator. Maserasi menggunakan etanol pada suhu 60ºC selama 20 menit, sedangkan maserasi menggunakan n-heksana pada suhu 55 ºC selama 10 menit. Minyak atsiri hasil maserasi bunga mawar merah dilakukan uji GC-MS. Komponen utama minyak atsiri dari bunga mawar dengan pelarut etanol dan pelarut n-heksana secara berurutan adalah phenyl ethyl alcohol (2,73% dan (31,69%. Rendemen hasil maserasi minyak bunga mawar dengan pelarut etanol adalah 8,76%, sedangkan pelarut n-heksana menghasilkan 0,34 %. Rose oil is one of the flower oil products which is potentially produced in Indonesia with export quality. The uses of rose oils are for perfume, cosmestics, and medicine. Rose oil can be produced using methods such as maceration. The purpose of this reasearch was to determine the yield of essential oil of red roses (Rosa damascena and the essential oil components taken using ethanol and n-hexane. The raw material used was 50 grams of red roses which subsequently soaked into solvent with

  14. Development, growth and integrity in the Danish organic sector, a white paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Niels; Alrøe, Hugo; Meldgaard, Mette

    '. The demand for organic food is connected with symbolic aspects and global responsibility by a relatively large consumer segment, which has a fundamental trust in the organic actors. 2. Retailing interest stimulates innovation and product development The knowledge synthesis shows that many retail businesses...... of organics in Denmark. The knowledge synthesis was commissioned by the Danish Ministry of Food to investigate the opportunities and barriers for a continued growth in the organic sector. This report synthesises the results of a comprehensive fact finding work, carried out by the International Centre...... The knowledge synthesis shows that organics has a strong foothold in Denmark: the consumers demand organic products, the retail business is very open to organic products, organic production gives good economic results for the producers, and there is room for much more organic agriculture in Denmark. A large...

  15. Growing in Antarctica, a challenge for white adipose tissue development in Adelie penguin chicks (Pygoscelis adeliae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccurt, Mireille; Baudimont, Fannie; Tirard, Julien; Rey, Benjamin; Moureaux, Elodie; Géloën, Alain; Duchamp, Claude

    2008-11-01

    Rapid growth is of crucial importance for Adélie penguin chicks reared during the short Antarctic summer. It partly depends on the rapid ontogenesis of fat stores that are virtually null at hatching but then develop considerably (x40) within a month to constitute both an isolative layer against cold and an energy store to fuel thermogenic and growth processes. The present study was aimed at identifying by RT-PCR the major transcriptional events that chronologically underlie the morphological transformation of adipocyte precursors into mature adipocytes from hatching to 30 days of age. The peak expression of GATA binding protein 3, a marker of preadipocytes, at day 7 posthatch indicates a key proliferation step, possibly in relation to the expression of C/EBPalpha (C/EBPalpha). High plasma total 3,5,3'-triiodo-l-thyronine (T(3)) levels and high levels of growth hormone receptor transcripts at hatching suggested that growth hormone and T(3) play early activating roles to favor proliferation of preadipocyte precursors. Differentiation and growth of preadipocytes may occur around day 15 in connection with increased abundance of transcripts encoding IGF-1, proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, and C/EBPbeta, gradually leading to functional maturation of metabolic features of adipocytes including lipid uptake and storage (lipoprotein lipase, fatty-acid synthase) and late endocrine functions (adiponectin) by day 30. Present results show a close correlation between adipose tissue development and chick biology and a difference in the scheduled expression of regulatory factors controlling adipogenesis compared with in vitro studies using cell lines emphasizing the importance of in vivo approaches.

  16. Tau Pathology and Parietal White Matter Lesions Have Independent but Synergistic Effects on Early Development of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim Hertze

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: White matter lesions (WMLs are a common finding in patients with dementia. This study investigates the relationship between WMLs, hyperphosphorylated tau (P-tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4 genotype in prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods: Baseline levels of tau, P-tau and β-amyloid 1-42 in CSF, the presence of WMLs in the brain, and the APOE genotype were ascertained in 159 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and 38 cognitively healthy controls. Results: After 5.7 years, 58 patients had developed AD. In this group, patients with normal levels of CSF P-tau had higher levels of WMLs in the parietal regions than those with pathological P-tau levels (p Conclusions: We suggest that WMLs in parietal lobes and tau pathology likely have independent but synergistic effects on the reduction of the cognitive reserve capacity of the brain. In patients with a more low-grade AD pathology, WMLs in the parietal lobes might increase the risk of developing dementia.

  17. Differences in the Structure of the Gut Bacteria Communities in Development Stages of the Chinese White Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus armandi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junning Ma

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese white pine beetle Dendroctonus armandi Tsai and Li, is arguably the most destructive forest insect in the Qinling Mountains in Northern China. Little is known about the structure of the bacterial communities associated with D. armandi even though this wood-boring insect plays important roles in ecosystem and biological invasion processes that result in huge economic losses in pine forests. The aim of this study was to investigate the composition of the bacterial communities present in the guts of D. armandi at different developmental stages using a culture-independent method involving PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. Analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments of bacteria from the guts of larvae, pupae, and male and female adults revealed bacterial communities of low complexity that differed according to the developmental stage. Citrobacter spp. and Pantoea spp. predominated in larvae and adults, whereas Methylobacterium was the dominant genus at the pupal stage. The main difference between the guts of male and female adults was the greater dominance of Citrobacter in females. Previous studies suggest that the bacterial community associated with D. armandi guts may influence insect development. The data obtained in this study regarding the phylogenetic relationships and the community structure of intestinal bacteria at different developmental stages of the D. armandi life cycle contribute to our understanding of D. armandi and could aid the development of new pest control strategies.

  18. Developmental Stages and Sex Differences of White Matter and Behavioral Development through Adolescence: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Daniel; Hallquist, Michael N.; Asato, Miya; Luna, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    White matter (WM) continues to mature through adolescence in parallel with gains in cognitive ability. To date, developmental changes in human WM microstructure have been inferred using analyses of cross-sectional or two time-point follow-up studies, limiting our understanding of individual developmental trajectories. The aims of the present longitudinal study were to characterize the timing of WM growth and investigate how sex and behavior are associated with different developmental trajectories. We utilized diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in 128 individuals ages 8-28, who received annual scans for up to 5 years and completed motor and cognitive tasks. Flexible nonlinear growth curves indicated a hierarchical pattern of WM development. By late childhood, posterior cortical-subcortical connections were similar to adults. During adolescence, WM microstructure reached adult levels, including frontocortical, frontosubcortical and cerebellar connections. Later to mature in adulthood were major corticolimbic association tracts and connections at terminal gray matter sites in cortical and basal ganglia regions. These patterns may reflect adolescent maturation of frontal connectivity supporting cognitive abilities, particularly the protracted refinement of corticolimbic connectivity underlying cognition-emotion interactions. Sex and behavior also played a large role. Males showed continuous WM growth from childhood through early adulthood, whereas females mainly showed growth during mid-adolescence. Further, earlier WM growth in adolescence was associated with faster and more efficient responding and better inhibitory control whereas later growth in adulthood was associated with poorer performance, suggesting that the timing of WM growth is important for cognitive development. PMID:24384150

  19. Activity of Ligninolytic Enzymes during Growth and Fruiting Body Development of White Rot Fungi Omphalina sp. and Pleurotus ostreatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAPPY WIDIASTUTI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The activity of ligninolytic enzymes of white rot fungi (WRF Omphalina sp. and Pleurotus ostreatus was observed during somatic and fruiting body development in solid substrate fermentation using empty fruit bunches of oil palm (EFB. The enzyme activity was dominated by laccase both of Omphalina sp. and P. ostreatus. The laccase activity on somatic phase (mycelium growth was higher compared to that of fruiting body formation phase. The laccase activity of Omphalina sp. was slightly higher compared to that of P. ostreatus. The peak activity of manganese peroxidase (MnP for Omphalina sp. was observed two weeks after inoculation, while P. ostreatus had two peaks i.e. two and four weeks after inoculation period. The MnP activity of P. ostreatus was higher compared to that of Omphalina sp. Omphalina sp. growth in EFB did not secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP in contrast to P. ostreatus. The peak of LiP activity of P. ostreatus was reached two and four weeks after inoculation. The MnP and LiP activities declined during the development of fruiting bodies while laccase increased both in Omphalina sp. and P. ostreatus. It seems that the activities of ligninolytic enzyme profile were regulated in line with developmental phase of growth both in Omphalina sp. and P. ostreatus.

  20. Application of 3.0T magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the evaluation on the development of normal brain white matter in infants and young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-li XU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To calculate the radios of peak area of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolites in brain white matter of normal infants and young children, to observe the features of metabolite spectra, and to explore the relations between their ratio with age. Methods The peak areas of metabolites, including N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, choline (Cho, creatine (Cr, and their ratio of NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, in paraventricular white matter of 180 normal infants and young children with different ages as evaluated by multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results In paraventricular white matter, spectrum of NAA increased, and that of Cho decreased gradually, while both of them were stabilized at 2 years old. Cr was increased obviously within 3 months, and stabilized after 4 months. Significant differences were found in ratio of different metabolites in paraventricular white matter in different ages (P<0.05. The ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr in paraventricular white mater were positively correlated with age (r=0.741, r=0.625, while that of Cho/Cr was negatively correlated with age (r=–0.552, P<0.05. Conclusion The ratios of different metabolites are different in brain white matter in infants of different ages. Metabolites concentrations in brain white matter are correlated to some extent with age, which may provide a diagnostic criterion for evaluation of normal brain development and abnormal brain metabolism. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.12.05

  1. Effects of Temperature Integration on Growth and Development of Roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Meinen, E.; Dueck, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    Dutch horticulture aims at a reduction of the energy use in greenhouses by 65% in 2010 compared to 1980. When temperature integration is applied, temperatures may be reduced, as long as they are compensated by higher temperatures within a pre-set time span. Applying temperature integration without

  2. Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology's Technology & Entrepreneurial Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbrother, Barry J.

    The era of economic dominance supported by the existence of a large and inexpensive labor pool, and expanding domestic market, and/or exploitation of natural resources is over in the United States. It's time to work smarter, not just work harder. Thus, the economic vitality of any region in a modern economy is dependent on the ability of its…

  3. A rose by any other name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Jodie; Desir, Janice; Bernstein, Jack M

    2007-01-01

    A 40-year-old man visited Haiti in the winter. His visit was uneventful, and he went swimming in the ocean. A week after his return he developed a small "pimple" on his right fifth finger. This condition progressed for several weeks, with new lesions developing over the extensor surface of his forearm and in the antecubital fossa. He had tender axillary adenopathy. The patient started a new job when he returned from Haiti, working 4 days per week in a greenhouse. He denied any fever, chills, or night sweats. He was in good health without any underlying chronic health problems. Physical examination revealed a small eschar over the distal phalanx of the patient's right fifth finger (Figure 1). There were 2 erythematous nodules over the extensor surface of his right forearm (Figure 2) as well as over the antecubital fossa (Figure 3). A punch biopsy was performed and results showed suppurative granulomatous dermatitis. Sporothrix schenckii was grown from the specimen.

  4. Examining the Relationship between Minority Status Stress, the Social Change Model of Leadership Development, and Persistence of Black Students at Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lesley-Ann

    2012-01-01

    Minority status stress, which is the stress Black college students experience at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) as a result of their racial minority status, has been found to negatively impact their persistence in college. Two manuscripts were developed for this dissertation. The first is a critical literature review which establishes the…

  5. High white blood cell count is associated with a worsening of insulin sensitivity and predicts the development of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Lindsay, Robert S

    2002-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. We examined whether a high white blood cell count (WBC), a marker of inflammation, predicts a worsening of insulin action, insulin secretory function, and the development of type 2 diabet...

  6. MATERIALS DEGRADATION ANALYSIS AND DEVELOPMENT TO ENABLE ULTRA LOW COST, WEB-PROCESSED WHITE P-OLED FOR SSL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DEVIN MACKENZIE

    2011-12-13

    Progress over Phase II of DE-FG02-07ER86293 'Materials Degradation Analysis and Development to Enable Ultra Low Cost, Web-Processed White P-OLED for SSL' was initially rapid in terms of device performance improvements. We exceeded our device luminance lifetime goals for printed flexible white OLEDs as laid out in our project proposal. Our Phase II performance target was to demonstrate >1500 hours luminance lifetime at 100 Cd/m2 from a printed flexible device. We now have R&D devices well in excess of 8000 hrs lifetime at 100 Cd/m2, tested in air. We also were able to produce devices which met the voltage target of >1500 hours below 15V operation. After completing the initial performance milestones, we went on to focus on color-related degradation issues which were cited as important to commercialization of the technology by our manufacturing partners. We also put additional focus on cathode work as the active material development that occurred over the STTR time period required an adaptation of the cathode from the original cathode formulations which were developed based on previous generation active layer materials. We were able to improve compatibility of the cathode with some of the newer generation active layer materials and improve device yield and voltage behavior. An additional objective of the initial Phase II was to further develop the underlying manufacturing technology and real-life product specifications. This is a key requirement that must be met to ensure eventual commercialization of this DOE-funded technology. The link between commercial investment for full commercialization and R&D efforts in OLED solid State Lighting is often a large one. Add-Vision's lower cost, printed OLED manufacturing approach is an attraction, but close engagement with manufacturing partners and addressing customer specifications is a very important link. Manufacturing technology encompasses development of moisture reduction encapsulation technology, improved

  7. Development of White-Light Emitting Active Layers in Nitride Based Heterostructures for Phosphorless Solid State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan Talbot; Kailash Mishra

    2007-12-31

    This report provides a summary of research activities carried out at the University of California, San Diego and Central Research of OSRAM SYLVANIA in Beverly, MA partially supported by a research contract from US Department of Energy, DE-FC26-04NT422274. The main objective of this project was to develop III-V nitrides activated by rare earth ions, RE{sup 3+}, which could eliminate the need for phosphors in nitride-based solid state light sources. The main idea was to convert electron-hole pairs injected into the active layer in a LED die to white light directly through transitions within the energy levels of the 4f{sup n}-manifold of RE{sup 3+}. We focused on the following materials: Eu{sup 3+}(red), Tb{sup 3+}(green), Er{sup 3+}(green), Dy{sup 3+}(yellow) and Tm{sup 3+}(blue) in AlN, GaN and alloys of AlN and GaN. Our strategy was to explore candidate materials in powder form first, and then study their behavior in thin films. Thin films of these materials were to be deposited on sapphire substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The photo- and cathode-luminescence measurements of these materials were used to investigate their suitability for white light generation. The project proceeded along this route with minor modifications needed to produce better materials and to expedite our progress towards the final goal. The project made the following accomplishments: (1) red emission from Eu{sup 3+}, green from Tb{sup 3+}, yellow from Dy{sup 3+} and blue from Tm{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (2) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN powder; (3) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} in alloys of GaN and AlN; (4) green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films by PLD; (5) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films deposited by MOVPE; (6) energy transfer from host to RE{sup 3+}; (7) energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (8) emission from AlN powder samples

  8. In quest of perfection in electron optics: A biographical sketch of Harald Rose on the occasion of his 80th birthday

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Knut W., E-mail: k.urban@fz-juelich.de

    2015-04-15

    This brief biographical sketch of Harald Rose on occasion of his 80th birthday describes some of the key events in an extraordinarily successful scientific life. Many of the theoretical concepts developed by him over the last 50 years have been fundamental for electron optics. Indeed, some of them have changed the whole complexion of this field and are fundamental to modern electron microscopy, both in TEM and in STEM mode. With this dedicated issue of Ultramicroscopy, the members of the electron microscopy community would like to thank Harald Rose for dedicating his professional life to their field and thereby enriching the life of those active in it. - Highlights: • A short biography of the professional life of Harald Rose is given. • We give a guide to some of Harald Rose's most important papers. • The impact of Harald Rose's work in the field of electron optics is described. • An introduction to a Special Issue of Ultramicroscopy dedicated to Harald Rose is given.

  9. Towards efficient improvement of greenhouse grown roses: genetic analysis of vigour and powdery mildew resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Rose (Rosa) is one of the important ornamental crops worldwide. Greenhouse production of cut rose and pot rose requires much fossil fuel for optimal plant growth and is adversely affected by infection with powdery mildew ( Podosphaera pannosa ). The heavy energy input and frequent

  10. Determination of volatile compounds of the first rose oil and the first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... respectively, whereas geraniol contents were 11.81% and 15.97%, respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that HS-SPME/GC/MS is a suitable technique for the determination of volatile compounds of rose oil and rose water. Keywords: Oil-bearing rose, Rosa damascena, HS-SPME/GC/MS, volatile compounds.

  11. Developmental stages and sex differences of white matter and behavioral development through adolescence: a longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Daniel J; Hallquist, Michael N; Asato, Miya; Luna, Beatriz

    2014-05-15

    White matter (WM) continues to mature through adolescence in parallel with gains in cognitive ability. To date, developmental changes in human WM microstructure have been inferred using analyses of cross-sectional or two time-point follow-up studies, limiting our understanding of individual developmental trajectories. The aims of the present longitudinal study were to characterize the timing of WM growth and investigate how sex and behavior are associated with different developmental trajectories. We utilized diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in 128 individuals aged 8-28, who received annual scans for up to 5 years and completed motor and cognitive tasks. Flexible nonlinear growth curves indicated a hierarchical pattern of WM development. By late childhood, posterior cortical-subcortical connections were similar to adults. During adolescence, WM microstructure reached adult levels, including frontocortical, frontosubcortical and cerebellar connections. Later to mature in adulthood were major corticolimbic association tracts and connections at terminal gray matter sites in cortical and basal ganglia regions. These patterns may reflect adolescent maturation of frontal connectivity supporting cognitive abilities, particularly the protracted refinement of corticolimbic connectivity underlying cognition-emotion interactions. Sex and behavior also played a large role. Males showed continuous WM growth from childhood through early adulthood, whereas females mainly showed growth during mid-adolescence. Further, earlier WM growth in adolescence was associated with faster and more efficient responding and better inhibitory control whereas later growth in adulthood was associated with poorer performance, suggesting that the timing of WM growth is important for cognitive development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic Applications of Rose Hips from Different Rosa Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Mármol

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rosa species, rose hips, are widespread wild plants that have been traditionally used as medicinal compounds for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. The therapeutic potential of these plants is based on its antioxidant effects caused by or associated with its phytochemical composition, which includes ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds and healthy fatty acids among others. Over the last few years, medicinal interest in rose hips has increased as a consequence of recent research that has studied its potential application as a treatment for several diseases including skin disorders, hepatotoxicity, renal disturbances, diarrhoea, inflammatory disorders, arthritis, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and cancer. In this review, the role of different species of Rosa in the prevention of treatment of various disorders related to oxidative stress, is examined, focusing on new therapeutic approaches from a molecular point of view.

  13. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal: Effect of operational parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Japinder; Singhal, Sonal

    2014-10-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal dye has been investigated using ZnO nanoparticles as photocatalyst. ZnO nanoparticles were found to be efficient catalyst for the degradation of dye and 98% degradation was observed in 90 min. Effect of various operational parameters such as amount of catalyst (0.25-2.00 g/L), concentration of dye (0.01-0.05 mM) and pH (3-11) of dye solution on the rate of dye degradation was studied. The most favorable results for the degradation of rose bengal were observed at pH 5 at a catalyst loading of 1 g/L. Moreover, hydroxyl radicals have been detected in the photocatalytic reaction mixture by using terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique. The reusability of the catalyst has also been studied and catalyst was found to be active even after being used for 5 times.

  14. Therapeutic Applications of Rose Hips from Different Rosa Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol, Inés; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Jiménez-Moreno, Nerea; Ancín-Azpilicueta, Carmen; Rodríguez-Yoldi, María Jesús

    2017-05-25

    Rosa species, rose hips, are widespread wild plants that have been traditionally used as medicinal compounds for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. The therapeutic potential of these plants is based on its antioxidant effects caused by or associated with its phytochemical composition, which includes ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds and healthy fatty acids among others. Over the last few years, medicinal interest in rose hips has increased as a consequence of recent research that has studied its potential application as a treatment for several diseases including skin disorders, hepatotoxicity, renal disturbances, diarrhoea, inflammatory disorders, arthritis, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia, obesity and cancer. In this review, the role of different species of Rosa in the prevention of treatment of various disorders related to oxidative stress, is examined, focusing on new therapeutic approaches from a molecular point of view.

  15. Heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal: Effect of operational parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Japinder, E-mail: jap.chawla@gmail.com; Singhal, Sonal, E-mail: sonal1174@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of rose bengal dye has been investigated using ZnO nanoparticles as photocatalyst. ZnO nanoparticles were found to be efficient catalyst for the degradation of dye and 98% degradation was observed in 90 min. Effect of various operational parameters such as amount of catalyst (0.25–2.00 g/L), concentration of dye (0.01–0.05 mM) and pH (3–11) of dye solution on the rate of dye degradation was studied. The most favorable results for the degradation of rose bengal were observed at pH 5 at a catalyst loading of 1 g/L. Moreover, hydroxyl radicals have been detected in the photocatalytic reaction mixture by using terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique. The reusability of the catalyst has also been studied and catalyst was found to be active even after being used for 5 times.

  16. 2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic acid promotes somatic embryogenesis in the rose cultivar "Livin' Easy" (Rosa sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, Tammy; Browne, Robin; Dong, Zhongmin

    2007-02-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) offers vast potential for the clonal propagation of high-value roses. However, some recalcitrant cultivars unresponsive to commonly employed SE-inducing agents and low induction rates currently hinder the commercialization of SE technology in rose. Rose SE technology requires improvement before it can be implemented as a production system on a commercial scale. In the present work, we assessed 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), a synthetic auxin not previously tested in rose, for its effectiveness to induce SE in the rose cultivar "Livin' Easy" (Rosa sp.). We ran a parallel comparison to the commonly used 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). We tested each auxin with two different basal media: Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium and woody plant medium (WPM). MS medium resulted in somatic embryo production, whereas WPM did not. 2,4,5-T induced SE over a greater concentration range than 2,4-D's and resulted in significantly greater embryo yields. 2,4,5-T at a concentration of 10 or 25 microM was better for embrygenic tissue initiation than 2,4,5-T at 5 microM. Further embryo development occurred when the tissue was transferred to plant growth regulator (PGR) free medium or media with 40% the original auxin concentration. However, the PGR-free medium resulted in a high percentage of abnormal embryos (32.31%) compared to the media containing auxins. Upon transfer to germination medium, somatic embryos successfully converted into plantlets at rates ranging from 33.3 to 95.2%, depending on treatment. Survival rates 3 months ex vitro averaged 14.0 and 55.6% for 2,4-D- and 2,4,5-T-derived plantlets, respectively. Recurrent SE was observed in 60.2% of the plantlets growing on germination medium. This study is the first report of SE in the commercially valuable rose cultivar 'Livin' Easy' (Rosa sp.) and a suitable methodology was developed for SE of this rose cultivar.

  17. In vitro propagation of oil-bearing rose (Rosa damascena Mill.)

    OpenAIRE

    V. Badzhelova

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. The purpose of this research is to develop effective protocol for clonal micro propagation of the oil-bearing rose (Rosa damascena Mill.). Explants used in the experiment are 1.0 to 1.5 cm long nodal segments from specially cultivated mother plants. These explants were subjected to a combined method of sterilization with 0.2% solution of HgCI for 3 minutes followed by 0.50% solution of NaClO for 20 minutes and 0.25% solution of NaClO for 30 minutes. The best 2 results of mu...

  18. Use of ade1 and ade2 mutations for development of a versatile red/white colour assay of amyloid-induced oxidative stress in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, Vidhya; Girdhar, Amandeep; Prasad, Archana; Verma, Meenkshi; Taneja, Vibha; Patel, Basant K

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in adenine biosynthesis pathway genes ADE1 and ADE2 have been conventionally used to score for prion [PSI + ] in yeast. If ade1-14 mutant allele is present, which contains a premature stop codon, [psi - ] yeast appear red on YPD medium owing to accumulation of a red intermediate compound in vacuoles. In [PSI + ] yeast, partial inactivation of the translation termination factor, Sup35 protein, owing to its amyloid aggregation allows for read-through of the ade1-14 stop codon and the yeast appears white as the red intermediate pigment is not accumulated. The red colour development in ade1 and ade2 mutant yeast requires reduced-glutathione, which helps in transport of the intermediate metabolite P-ribosylaminoimidazole carboxylate into vacuoles, which develops the red colour. Here, we hypothesize that amyloid-induced oxidative stress would deplete reduced-glutathione levels and thus thwart the development of red colour in ade1 or ade2 yeast. Indeed, when we overexpressed amyloid-forming human proteins TDP-43, Aβ-42 and Poly-Gln-103 and the yeast prion protein Rnq1, the otherwise red ade1 yeast yielded some white colonies. Further, the white colour eventually reverted back to red upon turning off the amyloid protein's expression. Also, the aggregate-bearing yeast have increased oxidative stress and white phenotype yeast revert to red when grown on media with reducing agent. Furthermore, the red/white assay could also be emulated in ade2-1, ade2Δ, and ade1Δ mutant yeast and also in an ade1-14 mutant with erg6 gene deletion that increases cell-wall permeability. This model would be useful tool for drug-screening against general amyloid-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Validation of PR interval length as a criterion for development of atrial fibrillation in non-Hispanic whites, African Americans and Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Eric; Aagaard, Philip; Kargoli, Faraj; Hoch, Ethan; Zheng, Laura; Di Biase, Luigi; Fisher, John; Gross, Jay; Kim, Soo; Ferrick, Kevin; Krumerman, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    PR interval prolongation on electrocardiogram (ECG) increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). Non-Hispanic Whites are at higher risk of AF compared to African Americans and Hispanics. However, it remains unknown if prolongation of the PR interval for the development of AF varies by race/ethnicity. Therefore, we determined whether race affects the PR interval length's ability to predict AF and if the commonly used criterion of 200 ms in AF prediction models can continue to be used for non-White cohorts. This is a retrospective epidemiological study of consecutive inpatient and outpatients. An ECG database was initially interrogated. Patients were included if their initial ECG demonstrated sinus rhythm and had two or more electrocardiograms and declared a race and/or ethnicity as non-Hispanic White, African American or Hispanic. Development of AF was stratified by race/ethnicity along varying PR intervals. Cox models controlled for age, gender, race/ethnicity, systolic blood pressure, BMI, QRS, QTc, heart rate, murmur, treatment for hypertension, heart failure and use of AV nodal blocking agents to assess PR interval's predictive ability for development of AF. 50,870 patients met inclusion criteria of which 5,199 developed AF over 3.72 mean years of follow-up. When the PR interval was separated by quantile, prolongation of the PR interval to predict AF first became significant in Hispanic and African Americans at the 92.5th quantile of 196-201 ms (HR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.09-1.86, p=0.01; HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.07-1.64, p=0.01, respectively) then in non-Hispanic Whites at the 95th quantile at 203-212 ms (HR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.24-1.53, p=0.04). For those with a PR interval above 200 ms, African Americans had a lower risk than non-Hispanic Whites to develop AF (HR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.64-0.95, p=0.012), however, no significant difference was demonstrated in Hispanics. This is the first study to validate a PR interval value of 200 ms as a criterion in African Americans and

  20. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of rose oil: A comprehensive review of clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safieh Mohebitabar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Rose oil is obtained from the petals of difference Rosa species especially Rosa centifolia L. and Rosa damascena Mill. Various pharmacological properties have been attributed to rose oil. The aim of the present study was to review the rose oil therapeutic effects which had been clinically evaluated in trial studies. Materials and Methods: Google scholar, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Scopus were searched for human studies which have evaluated the therapeutic effects of rose oil and published in English language until August 2015. Results: Thirteen clinical trials (772 participants were included in this review. Rose oil was administered via inhalation or used topically. Most of the studies (five trials evaluated the analgesic effect of rose oil. Five studies evaluated the physiological relaxation effect of rose oil. Anti-depressant, psychological relaxation, improving sexual dysfunction, and anti-anxiety effects were the other clinical properties reported for rose oil. Conclusion: Numerous studies on the pharmacological properties of rose oil have been done in animals, but studies in humans are few.  In this study, it was observed that rose oil had physiological and psychological relaxation, analgesic and anti-anxiety effects. To obtain conclusive results on the efficacy and safety of rose oil, further clinical trials with larger sample size and better designation are required.

  2. The impacts of ski slope development on stream channel morphology in the White River National Forest, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Gabrielle C. L.; Bledsoe, Brian P.; Merritt, David M.; Wohl, Ellen

    2009-02-01

    The combined influence of tree-clearing, road construction, snowmaking, and machine-grading can cause increased flow and sediment loads along streams in or adjacent to commercial ski resorts. These changes to stream channels can increase bank failures, bed material size, pool scour, and, in extreme cases, channel incision. We used field data from the White River National Forest in Colorado, which includes several major ski resorts, to test the hypothesis that ski slope development causes a significant difference in bank stability, undercut banks, fine sediment, wood load, pool residual depth, and particle size ( D84) between the ski area project streams and reference streams. We further hypothesize that the changes in a stream are mitigated by the density and type of vegetation growing along the banks. A significant difference is defined as a project stream that is outside the range of variability of the reference streams. To test these hypotheses, we surveyed channel conditions, channel dimensions, and vegetation along 47 stream reaches (200-300 m in length). Twenty-four of these streams are within ski areas (project streams), either adjacent to or downstream from ski slopes. Twenty-three reference streams with very little to no development in their basins are used to define reference conditions of bank stability, bank undercutting, bank height, wood load, pool residual depth, sediment size, and vegetation structure. A combination of statistical techniques, including Principal Components Analysis and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis, was used to assess the controls on stream channel morphology and to analyze the differences between project and reference streams. Project streams that are significantly different than reference streams have a combination of a higher percentage of fine sediment, smaller pool residual depth, and higher percentage of unstable banks. The impacted project streams have bed material derived from granitic rocks and a lower density

  3. Accelerated cerebral white matter development in preterm infants: a voxel-based morphometry study with diffusion tensor MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giménez, Mónica; Miranda, Maria J; Born, A Peter

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-seven preterm infants were compared to 10 full-term infants at term equivalent age using a voxel-based analysis of diffusion tensor imaging of the brain. Preterm infants exhibited higher fractional anisotropy values, which may suggest accelerated maturation, in the location of the sagittal...... to suggest that the increased intensity of stimulation associated with preterm birth may advance the process of white matter maturation in the human brain. Questions remain about whether these findings reflect acceleration of the process of white matter maturation generally, or localized alterations induced...

  4. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  5. Diet quality and weight gain among black and white young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study (1985-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Daisy; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Jacobs, David R; Popkin, Barry M

    2010-10-01

    Little is known about the long-term health consequences of following the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA; Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 2005). The objective was to examine the longitudinal association between diets consistent with the 2005 DGA and subsequent weight gain. We used data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study, a cohort of black and white men and women aged 18-30 y at baseline who attended ≤7 examinations from 1985-1986 to 2005-2006 (n = 4913). We created a 100-point Diet Quality Index (2005 DQI) to rate participants' diets based on meeting the 2005 DGA key recommendations. Longitudinal models of weight gain were adjusted for physical activity, smoking, energy intake, age, education, sex, and initial body mass index (BMI) and included interaction terms of DQI by race and initial BMI (if statistically significant). We found effect modification by race (likelihood ratio test, P whites with high diet quality (DQI >70) and +17.8 for blacks and +13.9 for whites with a DQI whites with an initial BMI (in kg/m(2)) diet consistent with the 2005 DGA benefits long-term weight maintenance in American young adults. Greater need for attention to obesity prevention in future DGAs is warranted.

  6. The Relationship between Media Influence and Ethnic Identity Development among Low-Income African American and White Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Kenycia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between media influence and ethnic identity among low-income African American and White adolescent girls. According to the U.S. Census (2008), 98% of Americans have a television in their home. Prior research suggests that low-income African American adolescents are exposed to more media…

  7. U.S. Forest Service Research and Development (USFS R/D) national science strategy on White Nose Syndrome (WNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybill Amelon; Robert T. Brooks; Jessie Glaeser; Megan Friggens; Daniel Lindner; Susan C. Loeb; Ann Lynch; Drew Minnis; Roger Perry; Mary M. Rowland; Monica Tomosy; Ted Weller

    2012-01-01

    The National Plan for Assisting States, Federal Agencies, and Tribes in Managing White-Nose Syndrome in Bats (National WNS Plan), is a document prepared jointly by the U.S. Departments of the Interior, Agriculture, and Defense, along with the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. This document provides a strategic framework for the investigation and management of...

  8. Development of molecular markers for determining continental origin of wood from White Oaks (Quercus L. sect. Quercus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilke Schroeder; Richard Cronn; Yulai Yanbaev; Tara Jennings; Malte Mader; Bernd Degen; Birgit Kersten; Dusan Gomory

    2016-01-01

    To detect and avoid illegal logging of valuable tree species, identification methods for the origin of timber are necessary. We used next-generation sequencing to identify chloroplast genome regions that differentiate the origin of white oaks from the three continents; Asia, Europe, and North America. By using the chloroplast genome of Asian Q. mongolica...

  9. White mould of sweet basil: conditions influencing its development in greenhouses and cultural measures for disease management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elad, Y; Fogel, M; Silverman, D; Biton, S; Yitzhak, S; Harari, D; Adler, U

    2015-01-01

    ...‐grown sweet basil plants and, in severe epidemics, it may also infect the shoots. Sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum , and the ascospores that are released from the apothecia that form on them, serve as the inoculum for white mould epidemics...

  10. Development of cerebral gray and white matter injury and cerebral inflammation over time after inflammatory perinatal asphyxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonestroo, Hilde J C; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Groenendaal, Floris|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073282596; Van Bel, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072811455; Nijboer, Cora H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311481000

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal inflammation is associated with increased severity of hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy and adverse outcome in human neonates and experimental rodents. We investigated the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the timing of HI-induced cerebral tissue loss and gray matter injury, white

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OFWASTE BIOMASS FROM GREENHOUSE ROSE CULTIVATION AND PACKAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cascone

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work a characterization of the waste biomass originating from a rose cultivation under greenhouse was carried out. Two types of biomass were examined: one made of both branches and leaves, and the other made up only of branches. For each type of biomass the following properties were determined: percentage of carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, content of moisture, volatile matter and ashes, gross and net calorific value. The results show that the biomass made of only branches has a better quality than the biomass with leaves for use in thermo-chemical processes.

  12. The effect of the feeding of Macrosiphum rosae (L. and Chaetosiphon tetrarhodus (Walk. on the flowering of roses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożenna Jaśkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning the effect of the feeding of aphids Macrosiphum rosae (L. and Chaetosiphon tetrarhodus (Walk. on the flowering of roses were carried out in four sites in the green area of Lublin in the years 2001-2003. The studies comprised the shrubs of the park rose 'Grandhotel', the Rugosa rose, the multiflorous rose and the flower-bed roses of various cultivars. Aphids Ch. tetrarhodus dominated on Rugosa rose, while M. rosae dominated on the other roses. Aphids M. rosae and Ch. tetrarhodus, when found in greater numbers, caused deformation of the leaf blades, the shortening of shoots and petioles, as well as deformation of the flowers.

  13. Acaricide resistance and resistance mechanisms in Tetranychus urticae populations from rose greenhouses in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajehali, Jahangir; Van Nieuwenhuyse, Pieter; Demaeght, Peter; Tirry, Luc; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    Spider mites are important crop pests that rapidly develop resistance to acaricides. To investigate whether acaricide resistance is a threat to greenhouse rose culture in the Netherlands, the susceptibility of 15 strains of Tetranychus urticae was tested to several currently used acaricides, and resistance mechanisms were investigated. Although the observed levels of susceptibility differed between strains and acaricides, resistance was detected in most strains. The activity of detoxifying enzymes was significantly increased in most field-collected strains, and a number of amino acid substitutions known to be involved in resistance were detected. Resistance levels to traditional acaricides such as bifenthrin and abamectin were prominent, and might result in control failure under field conditions. Resistance to more recently registered compounds was detected in several populations. Resistance levels were generally unstable in the laboratory without selection pressure. The toxicological, biochemical and genetic data in this study will be essential in devising an efficient resistant management for Dutch rose culture. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose and the process of painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hellen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available “One Object” is a British Art Studies series that uses an object from a collection as a starting point for collaborative research. Rebecca Hellen and Elaine Kilmurray have co-authored this essay based on their recent analysis of Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1885–86 by John Singer Sargent This “One Object” article on John Singer Sargent’s Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1885–86 brings together recent technical examination of the painting with the “patchwork” of moments, ideas, and themes that inform the history of its making. A variety of observations were recorded by artists and writers who were staying in or visiting Broadway in Worcestershire when Sargent was making his “big picture” there over the late summers and early autumns of 1885 and 1886. By connecting the research carried out in the conservation studio with research from the archive, we present new information about Sargent’s working methods. In considering technical information in tandem with Sargent’s preparatory work, this article explores the evolution of one of Sargent’s best-known paintings.

  15. François de Rose (1910 - 2014)

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2014-01-01

    One of CERN’s founding fathers has passed away.   François de Rose in the ATLAS cavern during his visit to CERN in 2013. Visionaries have the freedom of mind to shape the future when other people’s horizons are obstructed by the present. François de Rose was a visionary. In the aftermath of the Second World War, when Europe was in ruin, when absolutely everything had to be rebuilt, the diplomat understood the importance of reviving fundamental research and, above all, of cooperation on a continental scale as the driving force of this ambition. In a Europe that was just starting to get back on its feet, it would be no mean feat. Nonetheless, François, alongside the prominent physicists of the time, put his energy into making this vision a reality. They lobbied governments for the creation of a centre that would work towards this goal, winning support, and CERN was established in 1954, an achievement of which François was extremely...

  16. Pollen Grain Preservation and Fertility in Valuable Commercial Rose Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Annalisa; Macovei, Anca; Caser, Matteo; Mansuino, Andrea; Ghione, Gian Guido; Savona, Marco; Carbonera, Daniela; Scariot, Valentina; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2017-01-01

    In the cut flower market, traditional breeding is still the best way to achieve new rose cultivars. The geographical delocalization of cultivar constitution (generally made in Europe and North America) and plant cultivation (large areas in Africa and South America) represents a limit point for crossing and selection. Rose breeders often need to overcome geographical distances, resulting in asynchrony in flowering among crossing parents, by storing and sending pollen. Hence, a key aspect in breeding programs is linked to pollen availability and conservation, jointly with the identification of parameters related to pollen fertility. In this study we present the results of three different trials. In the first, pollen diameter and pollen viability were chosen as fertility predictors of 10 Rosa hybrida commercial cultivars. In the second trial, aliquots of dried pollen grains of six R. hybrida cultivar were stored under two different temperatures (freezer at T = −20 °C and deep freezer at T = −80 °C) and after a wide range of conservation period, their viability was measured. In the third trial, the effective fertilization capacity of frozen pollen of 19 pollen donor cultivars was evaluated during 2015 crossing breeding plan, performing 44 hybridizations and correlating the number of seeds and the ratio seeds/crossing, obtained by each cultivar, with in vitro pollen germination ability. PMID:28441780

  17. Pollen Grain Preservation and Fertility in Valuable Commercial Rose Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Giovannini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the cut flower market, traditional breeding is still the best way to achieve new rose cultivars. The geographical delocalization of cultivar constitution (generally made in Europe and North America and plant cultivation (large areas in Africa and South America represents a limit point for crossing and selection. Rose breeders often need to overcome geographical distances, resulting in asynchrony in flowering among crossing parents, by storing and sending pollen. Hence, a key aspect in breeding programs is linked to pollen availability and conservation, jointly with the identification of parameters related to pollen fertility. In this study we present the results of three different trials. In the first, pollen diameter and pollen viability were chosen as fertility predictors of 10 Rosa hybrida commercial cultivars. In the second trial, aliquots of dried pollen grains of six R. hybrida cultivar were stored under two different temperatures (freezer at T = −20 °C and deep freezer at T = −80 °C and after a wide range of conservation period, their viability was measured. In the third trial, the effective fertilization capacity of frozen pollen of 19 pollen donor cultivars was evaluated during 2015 crossing breeding plan, performing 44 hybridizations and correlating the number of seeds and the ratio seeds/crossing, obtained by each cultivar, with in vitro pollen germination ability.

  18. PARAMETRIC ROSE AS A SUBJECT OF MATHEMATICS, PROGRAMMING, AESTHETICS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeny Gayev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By using MATLAB we demonstrate a variety of parametric curves of the family "Parametric Rose" (Rhodonea, characterized by four factors. The article is intended to encourage students to study the parametric curves. The values of coefficients affect the shape of the curve and its period. Changes with time one of the curve parameters makes the effect of animation. Different versions of coloring the curve increase the aesthetic impact on results. A beautiful MATLAB-program with Graphical User Interface (GUI is suggested. It allows students to "play" with the curves on the computer screen and demonstrates amazing properties of the "Rose" parametric family depending on the values and the ratio of their coefficients. It may allow and teachers to inspire students by exploring these additional non-school materials. Students can see the beauty of mathematics and gain additional knowledge about parametric functions. From another side, the program provides an exercise example of algorithms and programming accessible for modern students. Animation of curves proposed can also serve as exercises both for mathematics and programming.

  19. ROSE: Compiler Support for Object-Oriented Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qainlant, D.

    1999-11-17

    ROSE is a preprocessor generation tool for the support of compile time performance optimizations in Overture. The Overture framework is an object-oriented environment for solving partial differential equations in two and three space dimensions. It is a collection of C++ libraries that enables the use of finite difference and finite volume methods at a level that hides the details of the associated data structures. Overture can be used to solve problems in complicated, moving geometries using the method of overlapping grids. It has support for grid generation, difference operators, boundary conditions, database access and graphics. In this paper we briefly present Overture, and discuss our approach toward performance within Overture and the A++P++ array class abstractions upon which Overture depends, this work represents some of the newest work in Overture. The results we present show that the abstractions represented within Overture and the A++P++ array class library can be used to obtain application codes with performance equivalent to that of optimized C and Fortran 77. ROSE, the preprocessor generation tool, is general in its application to any object-oriented framework or application and is not specific to Overture.

  20. Pollen Grain Preservation and Fertility in Valuable Commercial Rose Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Annalisa; Macovei, Anca; Caser, Matteo; Mansuino, Andrea; Ghione, Gian Guido; Savona, Marco; Carbonera, Daniela; Scariot, Valentina; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2017-04-24

    In the cut flower market, traditional breeding is still the best way to achieve new rose cultivars. The geographical delocalization of cultivar constitution (generally made in Europe and North America) and plant cultivation (large areas in Africa and South America) represents a limit point for crossing and selection. Rose breeders often need to overcome geographical distances, resulting in asynchrony in flowering among crossing parents, by storing and sending pollen. Hence, a key aspect in breeding programs is linked to pollen availability and conservation, jointly with the identification of parameters related to pollen fertility. In this study we present the results of three different trials. In the first, pollen diameter and pollen viability were chosen as fertility predictors of 10 Rosa hybrida commercial cultivars. In the second trial, aliquots of dried pollen grains of six R. hybrida cultivar were stored under two different temperatures (freezer at T = -20 °C and deep freezer at T = -80 °C) and after a wide range of conservation period, their viability was measured. In the third trial, the effective fertilization capacity of frozen pollen of 19 pollen donor cultivars was evaluated during 2015 crossing breeding plan, performing 44 hybridizations and correlating the number of seeds and the ratio seeds/crossing, obtained by each cultivar, with in vitro pollen germination ability.

  1. Sealing of Corneal Lacerations Using Photo-Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane presented at/published to Sun and Science, Galveston, Texas, 22 April 2017 & American Society of...Corneal Lacerations Using Photo-Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane 1. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED Sealing of...Corneal Lacerations Using Photo-Activated Rose Bengal Dye and Amniotic Membrane 2. FUNDING RECEIVED FOR THIS STUDY? [gl YES D NO FUNDING SOURCE: jus

  2. Alternaria toxin-induced resistance against rose aphids and olfactory response of aphids to toxin-induced volatiles of rose plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-zhong; Li, Li; Yang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The search for active toxins for managing weeds or plant diseases is believed to be a promising avenue of investigation. However, the effects of Alternaria toxins on insects have just begun to be investigated. Bioactivities of toxins from four strains of Alternaria alternata on Rosa chinensis and rose aphid Macrosiphum rosivorum were tested in the present study. At a concentration of 50.0 μg/ml, the crude extract (toxin) of strain 7484 was found not to be harmful to rose plants with excised leaf-puncture method (P≥0.079), and rose plants showed enhanced resistance to rose aphids when this Alternaria toxin was sprayed on the plants (P≤0.001). However, this toxin caused no detrimental effects on aphids in insecticidal bioassay at a concentration of 10.0 to 160.0 μg/ml (P≥0.096). Therefore, the Alternaria toxin had significantly induced the resistance of rose plants against rose aphids, demonstrating that the resistance mechanism triggered by the Alternaria toxin in the rose plant may also be used by the plant to defend itself against insects. Further bioassays aimed to discover the olfactory responses of aphids to the toxin-induced volatiles of host plants. The aphids were significantly more attracted to both volatiles emitted and collected from control rose plants than to both volatiles emitted and collected from the toxin-treated rose plants (P≤0.014). This result showed that the toxin-induced resistance related to the volatile changes of host plants. PMID:22302426

  3. New Spectrophotometric and Conductometric Methods for Macrolide Antibiotics Determination in Pure and Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms Using Rose Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania A. Sayed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two Simple, accurate, precise, and rapid spectrophotometric and conductometric methods were developed for the estimation of erythromycin thiocyanate (I, clarithromycin (II, and azithromycin dihydrate (III in both pure and pharmaceutical dosage forms. The spectrophotometric procedure depends on the reaction of rose bengal and copper with the cited drugs to form stable ternary complexes which are extractable with methylene chloride, and the absorbances were measured at 558, 557, and 560 nm for (I, (II, and (III, respectively. The conductometric method depends on the formation of an ion-pair complex between the studied drug and rose bengal. For the spectrophotometric method, Beer's law was obeyed. The correlation coefficient ( for the studied drugs was found to be 0.9999. The molar absorptivity (, Sandell’s sensitivity, limit of detection (LOD, and limit of quantification (LOQ were also calculated. The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of certain pharmaceutical dosage forms containing the studied drugs

  4. White Dialectics: A New Framework for Theory, Research, and Practice with White Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nathan R.; Abrams, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents White dialectics, or the tensions that White students experience as dominant group members in the United States, as a new framework to understand and intervene with White students and counselor trainees. Developed from and supported by our qualitative analysis, the authors present the six dialectics of (a) Whiteness and self,…

  5. Effects of Daffodil Flowers and Cobalt Chloride on Vase Life of Cut Rose

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Aslmoshtaghi; Moslem Jafari; Majid Rahemi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of postharvest application of cobalt chloride were investigated on vase life of rose stood individually in vials and the other ones placing daffodil flowers in a vase with a rose flower.  Therefore, roses were treated with: CoCl2 (100, 200, 300 mg L-1, respectively) or distilled water (control). The results showed that the decreased vase life of rose flowers, after daffodil was placed in their vase water, is due to daffodil mucilage, which blocks water up take, mainly as a result ...

  6. Comparative life table analysis of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) on ten rose cultivars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golizadeh, Ali; Ghavidel, Samira; Razmjou, Jabraeil; Fathi, Syed Ali Asghar; Hassanpour, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    .... This study compared population growth parameters of Tetranychus urticae Koch on 10 rose cultivars, including Bella Vita, Cool Water, Dolce Vita, Maroussia, Orange Juice, Pink Promise, Roulette, Tea...

  7. Replication of rose petal surfaces using a nickel electroforming process and UV nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sang-woo; Choo, Soyoung; Choi, Hak-Jong; Kim, Chae-Hyun; Lee, Heon

    2014-12-01

    In this research, we replicate the hierarchical structures of rose petals by using poly urethane acrylate (PUA) nanomolding technology. After a molding process, we use a PUA replica as the mother mold for nickel electroforming processes. By replicating the original rose petal hierarchical structure, we obtain the rose petal effect with nickel substrates. In order to make a negative-patterned nickel stamp, a second PUA replication was done using the first PUA mother mold and a nickel electroforming process was performed. Using these, the hierarchical structure of rose petals was imprinted in perfluoropolyether (PFPE), which exhibited the petal effect.

  8. Review of serious events in cases of (suspected) child abuse and/or neglect: A RoSE by any other name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Shanti; Maiese, Michelle; Vasquez, Viviana; Gordon, Paola; Jones, Jennifer M

    2017-08-01

    Child abuse and neglect (CAN) cases presenting to health-services may be complex; when things go seriously wrong such as a child death or near miss, cases are reviewed and health-services and professionals subject to intense scrutiny. While there are a variety of mechanisms to review critical incidents in health-services no formal process for the review of cases where child protection is the primary concern exists in Australia. We aimed to develop a systematic process to review serious events in cases of suspected CAN across two health districts in Sydney, so that shared learnings could fuel system change. Drawing upon mapping, case review, literature findings and using quality improvement methodology, we developed a model named Review of Serious Events (RoSE), in suspected cases of CAN. The RoSE model has the key features of: being child focused; seeking to examine care over a period of time; using child protection staff as lead reviewers; involving health professionals/services in the review who have been involved with the child; and actioning systems change at local levels. The RoSE model was trialled through 2014-2015. Eight cases were reviewed using RoSE; cases were similar to those reviewed prior to having a model. Participant feedback from RoSE group processes was overwhelmingly positive; outputs were transparent and accessible to key stakeholders, there was mixed progress with implementation. The RoSE model is a serious case review process that is strongly child-focused, is both investigative and reflective, led by child protection experts; and can be adapted to other settings and systems. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. One diffusion acquisition and different white matter models: how does microstructure change in human early development based on WMTI and NODDI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelescu, Ileana O; Veraart, Jelle; Adisetiyo, Vitria; Milla, Sarah S; Novikov, Dmitry S; Fieremans, Els

    2015-02-15

    White matter microstructural changes during the first three years of healthy brain development are characterized using two different models developed for limited clinical diffusion data: White Matter Tract Integrity (WMTI) metrics from Diffusional Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) and Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging (NODDI). Both models reveal a non-linear increase in intra-axonal water fraction and in tortuosity of the extra-axonal space as a function of age, in the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum and the posterior limb of the internal capsule. The changes are consistent with expected behavior related to myelination and asynchrony of fiber development. The intra- and extracellular axial diffusivities as estimated with WMTI do not change appreciably in normal brain development. The quantitative differences in parameter estimates between models are examined and explained in the light of each model's assumptions and consequent biases, as highlighted in simulations. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of a model with fewer assumptions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y.

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  11. The Risk-Stratified Osteoporosis Strategy Evaluation study (ROSE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Katrine Hass; Holmberg, Teresa; Rothmann, Mette Juel

    2015-01-01

    The risk-stratified osteoporosis strategy evaluation study (ROSE) is a randomized prospective population-based study investigating the effectiveness of a two-step screening program for osteoporosis in women. This paper reports the study design and baseline characteristics of the study population....... 35,000 women aged 65-80 years were selected at random from the population in the Region of Southern Denmark and-before inclusion-randomized to either a screening group or a control group. As first step, a self-administered questionnaire regarding risk factors for osteoporosis based on FRAX......(®) was issued to both groups. As second step, subjects in the screening group with a 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fractures ≥15 % were offered a DXA scan. Patients diagnosed with osteoporosis from the DXA scan were advised to see their GP and discuss pharmaceutical treatment according to Danish...

  12. The Electric Honeycomb; an investigation of the Rose window instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad Shaheer

    2017-10-01

    The Rose window instability is a little-explored electrohydrodynamic instability that manifests when a layer of low-conducting oil is placed in an electric field generated by corona discharge in a point-to-plane configuration. Above a critical voltage, the instability starts as a single dimple in the oil layer right below the point electrode and subsequently evolves into a characteristic pattern of polygonal cells. In this study, we experimentally explore governing parameters that guide the instability and document geometric attributes of the characteristic cellular pattern. The driving force for the instability has been attributed to the buildup of charged ions which in turn apply an electric pressure on the oil surface. We confirm the charged surface distribution using thermal imaging and demonstrate that the instability can be locally inhibited by preventing charge buildup under an ion shadow.

  13. Long-range patterns in Hindmarsh-Rose networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etémé, Armand Sylvin; Tabi, Conrad Bertrand; Mohamadou, Alidou

    2017-02-01

    Long-range diffusive effects are included in a discrete Hindmarsh-Rose neural network. Their impact on the emergence of nonlinear patterns is investigated via the modulational instability. The whole system is first shown to fully reduce to a single nonlinear differential-difference equation, which has plane wave solutions. The stability of such solutions is investigated and regions of instability are found to be importantly influenced by long-range parameters. The analytical results are confirmed through direct numerical simulations, where scattered and chaotic patterns illustrate the long-range effect. Synchronized states are described by quasi-periodic patterns for nearest-neighbor coupling. The external stimulus is also shown to efficiently control strong long-range effects via more regular spatiotemporal patterns.

  14. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H. E-mail: yhiroya@nias.affrc.go.jp; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  15. Chemical and Histochemical Analysis of ‘Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux’, a Moss Rose of the Rosa × damascena Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAISSARD, JEAN-CLAUDE; BERGOUGNOUX, VÉRONIQUE; MARTIN, MAGALI; MAURIAT, MÉLANIE; BAUDINO, SYLVIE

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Moss roses are old garden roses covered with a mossy growth on flower pedicel and calyx. This moss releases a pine-scented oleoresin that is very sticky and odoriferous. Rosa × centifolia ‘muscosa’ was the first moss rose to be obtained by bud-mutation but, interestingly, R. × damascena ‘Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux’ was the first repeat-blooming cultivar, thus interesting breeders. In the present study, the anatomy of these sports (i.e. bud-mutations) is characterized and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the moss versus the petals are identified. They are compared between the two lines and their respective parents. • Methods Anatomy of the moss is studied by environmental scanning electron microscopy and histochemical light microscopy. Sudan Red IV and Fluorol Yellow 088 are used to detect lipids, and 1-naphthol reaction with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine to detect terpenes (Nadi reaction). Head-space or solid/liquid extraction followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are used to identify VOCs in moss, trichomes and petals. • Key Results Moss of the two cultivars has the same structure with trichomes on other trichomes but not exactly the same VOCs. These VOCs are specific to the moss, with lots of terpenes. An identical VOC composition is found in leaves but not in petals. They are nearly the same in the moss mutants and in the respective wild types. • Conclusions Sepals of moss roses and their parents have a specific VOC pattern, different from that of the petals. The moss corresponds to a heterochronic mutation with trichomes developing on other trichomes. Such a mutation has probably appeared twice and independently in the two lines. PMID:16344264

  16. Chemical and histochemical analysis of 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux', a Moss Rose of the Rosa x damascena group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caissard, Jean-Claude; Bergougnoux, Véronique; Martin, Magali; Mauriat, Mélanie; Baudino, Sylvie

    2006-02-01

    Moss roses are old garden roses covered with a mossy growth on flower pedicel and calyx. This moss releases a pine-scented oleoresin that is very sticky and odoriferous. Rosa x centifolia 'muscosa' was the first moss rose to be obtained by bud-mutation but, interestingly, R. x damascena 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux' was the first repeat-blooming cultivar, thus interesting breeders. In the present study, the anatomy of these sports (i.e. bud-mutations) is characterized and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the moss versus the petals are identified. They are compared between the two lines and their respective parents. Anatomy of the moss is studied by environmental scanning electron microscopy and histochemical light microscopy. Sudan Red IV and Fluorol Yellow 088 are used to detect lipids, and 1-naphthol reaction with N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine to detect terpenes (Nadi reaction). Head-space or solid/liquid extraction followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are used to identify VOCs in moss, trichomes and petals. Moss of the two cultivars has the same structure with trichomes on other trichomes but not exactly the same VOCs. These VOCs are specific to the moss, with lots of terpenes. An identical VOC composition is found in leaves but not in petals. They are nearly the same in the moss mutants and in the respective wild types. Sepals of moss roses and their parents have a specific VOC pattern, different from that of the petals. The moss corresponds to a heterochronic mutation with trichomes developing on other trichomes. Such a mutation has probably appeared twice and independently in the two lines.

  17. Dietary rose hip exerts antiatherosclerotic effects and increases nitric oxide-mediated dilation in ApoE-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalera, Michele; Axling, Ulrika; Rippe, Catarina; Swärd, Karl; Holm, Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which atheromatous plaques develop inside arteries, leading to reduced or obstructed blood flow that in turn may cause stroke and heart attack. Rose hip is the fruit of plants of the genus Rosa, belonging to the Rosaceae family, and it is rich in antioxidants with high amounts of ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds. Several studies have shown that fruits, seeds and roots of these plants exert antidiabetic, antiobesity and cholesterol-lowering effects in rodents as well as humans. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which rose hip lowers plasma cholesterol and to evaluate its effects on atherosclerotic plaque formation. ApoE-null mice were fed either an HFD (CTR) or HFD with rose hip supplementation (RH) for 24 weeks. At the end of the study, we found that blood pressure and atherosclerotic plaques, together with oxidized LDL, total cholesterol and fibrinogen levels were markedly reduced in the RH group. Fecal cholesterol content, liver expression of Ldlr and selected reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) genes such as Abca1, Abcg1 and Scarb1 were significantly increased upon RH feeding. In the aorta, the scavenger receptor Cd36 and the proinflammatory Il1β genes were markedly down-regulated compared to the CTR mice. Finally, we found that RH increased nitric oxide-mediated dilation of the caudal artery. Taken together, these results suggest that rose hip is a suitable dietary supplement for preventing atherosclerotic plaques formation by modulating systemic blood pressure and the expression of RCT and inflammatory genes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reproductive features of the deep-water rose shrimp, Parapenaeus longirostris (Crustacea: Penaeidae, in the Strait of Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. BIANCHINI

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep‑water rose shrimp, Parapenaeus longirostris (Lucas, 1846, is one of the most valuable and heavily exploited demersal species of the Mediterranean bottom trawl fisheries. The basic life traits of this shrimp, in particular its reproductive aspects, are regularly monitored during experimental trawl surveys carried out in the Mediterranean Sea. Gonadic condition and maturity status for estimating the size at onset of sexual maturity are commonly assessed in females, using macroscopic color scales, histologically validated only in a few geographical areas. In this study, histological analyses were performed on rose shrimps collected from a trawl survey carried out in the Strait of Sicily, in order to support the empirical 4‑stage macroscopic scale locally employed. Ovaries from females of different sizes, ranging between 16 mm and 40 mm carapace length, were collected and used for microscopic examination of their structure, for oocytes counts and for oocyte diameter frequency distributions; oocytes diameter was measured by imaging analysis. The collected data were also used to estimate other basic vital parameters of the rose shrimp population. The histological observations show a broad correspondence between ovarian development and macroscopic features; therefore, the classifications derived by the empirical scale remain suitable for estimating the maturity parameters.

  19. Rosa x odorata “viridiflora” (green rose in Bali Botanical Garden: biological phenology and its propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSTAID SIREGAR

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Rosa x odorata “viridiflora” (green rose was one of rose collection in Bali Botanical Garden. This shrub had shiny, dark green leaves and sprays of rossete-shaped, double flowers, 4-5 cm across, green ageing to purplish green, with narrow petals that resemble sepals. Phenology flower research was begin from the growth phase and the development until the flower was fall, every phase was identified with one or more changing. Vegetative reproduction should take over for propagation purpose. Vegetative propagation was done by cutting about 15 cm long and 0.8-1.0 cm diameter. The study was carried out in the greenhouse of Bali Botanic Garden by using Completely Randomized Design with 5 treatments: rootone F powder, atonik 1 mL/L, atonik 2 mL/L, IBA 1 mg/L, NAA 1 mg/L and control. Each treatment was done 3 replication had 5 pieces of cutting. The result of research indicated that cutting more responsive to rootone F with highest cutting persentage (66,67%, highest to buds (25 days after planting and to fast flowering (147 days after planting. Green rose is one of more flowers is not interested by pollinator insect.

  20. RhNAC3, a stress-associated NAC transcription factor, has a role in dehydration tolerance through regulating osmotic stress-related genes in rose petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinqiang; Zhang, Changqing; Lü, Peitao; Jiang, Guimei; Liu, Xiaowei; Dai, Fanwei; Gao, Junping

    2014-01-01

    Petal cell expansion depends on cell wall metabolism, changes in cell turgor pressure and restructuring of the cytoskeleton, and recovery ability of petal cell expansion is defined as an indicator of dehydration tolerance in flowers. We previously reported that RhNAC2, a development-related NAC domain transcription factor, confers dehydration tolerance through regulating cell wall-related genes in rose petals. Here, we identify RhNAC3, a novel rose SNAC gene, and its expression in petals induced by dehydration, wounding, exogenous ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA). Expression studies in Arabidopsis protoplasts and yeast show that RhNAC3 has transactivation activity along its full length and in the carboxyl-terminal domain. Silencing RhNAC3 in rose petals by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) significantly decreased the cell expansion of rose petals under rehydration conditions. In total, 24 of 27 osmotic stress-related genes were down-regulated in RhNAC3-silenced rose petals, while only 4 of 22 cell expansion-related genes were down-regulated. Overexpression of RhNAC3 in Arabidopsis gave improved drought tolerance, with lower water loss of leaves in transgenic plants. Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray analysis showed that RhNAC3 regulated the expression of stress-responsive genes in overexpressing lines, and further analysis revealed that most of the RhNAC3-up-regulated genes were involved in the response to osmotic stress. Comparative analysis revealed that different transcription regulation existed between RhNAC3 and RhNAC2. Taken together, these data indicate that RhNAC3, as a positive regulator, confers dehydration tolerance of rose petals mainly through regulating osmotic adjustment-associated genes. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Towards a functional–structural plant model of cut-rose: simulation of light environment, light absorption, photosynthesis and interference with the plant structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Henke, M.; Sarlikioti, V.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Vos, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The production system of cut-rose (Rosa × hybrida) involves a complex combination of plant material, management practice and environment. Plant structure is determined by bud break and shoot development while having an effect on local light climate. The aim of the present study

  2. Reduce moisture with heat exchanger and air handling unit : research on moisture control in roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, J.; Gelder, de A.

    2015-01-01

    The method of rose production in the Netherlands guarantees top quality flowers. The down side to growing these high quality products is the large energy consumption. And therefore rose growers have been asking: Can production be more energy efficient while maintaining the quality? Arie de Gelder,

  3. Vegetative growth of rose flower in cocopeat and soil in Naivasha, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketter, N.C.; Kariuki, W.; Wesonga, J.M.; Elings, A.; Hoogerwerf, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roses in Kenya are mostly grown in soil with an open drip irrigation system which is inefficient as water and nutrients are lost through drainage. A study was carried out from January to December 2013 at a commercial rose farm in Naivasha, Kenya, to evaluate the potential of a cocopeat-based

  4. Inheritance and QTL analysis of the determinants of flower color in tetraploid cut roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gitonga, Virginia W.; Stolker, Robert; Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F.S.; Aelaei, Mitra; Visser, Richard G.F.; Maliepaard, Chris; Krens, Frans A.

    2016-01-01

    The success of cut rose cultivars is a direct result of their aesthetic value. The rose industry thrives on novelty, and the production of novel flower color has been extensively studied. The most popular color is red, and it is, therefore, important for breeders to produce a good red cultivar.

  5. Lichtspectrum als middel voor energiezuinige rozenteelt : praktijkproef bij Van der Arend Roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Victoria, N.; Pot, S.

    2015-01-01

    During the winter 2014-2015 a research was conducted at a commercial rose nursery to learn more about the influence of a special lamp light spectrum on the production and quality of the rose Avalanche. A “hybrid” lighting system was installed with 103 µmol /m2s PAR from High Pressure Sodium and from

  6. Algorithms to estimate the rose of directions of a spatial fibre system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Pfrang, A.

    2005-01-01

    The directional measure (which is up to normalization the rose of directions) is used to quantify anisotropy of stationary fibre processes in three-dimensional space. There exist a large number of approaches to estimate this measure from the rose of intersections (which is the mean number...

  7. Towards the rose genome sequence and its use in research and breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foucher, F.; Hilbrand-Saint Oyant, L.; Hamama, L.; Sakr, S.; Baudino, S.; Caissard, J.P.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Debener, T.; Riek, de J.; Torres, A.F.; Desnoyé, B.

    2015-01-01

    Rose is one of the most economically important ornamental crops worldwide. Rosa sp. can become a model for woody ornamentals. Its genome size is relatively small (560 Mb), its genetic history with ploïdy events is well documented, and rose has a short life for a woody plant. Furthermore, different

  8. Lifting All Boats? Finance Litigation, Education Resources, and Student Needs in the Post-"Rose" Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, David P.

    2011-01-01

    "Rose v. Council for Better Education" (1989) is often considered a transition point in education finance litigation, heralding an era of increasing concern for measurable adequacy of education across a broad spectrum of student needs. Prior research suggests that post-Rose lawsuits had less effect on the distribution of school spending…

  9. Conduction block and glial injury induced in developing central white matter by glycine, GABA, noradrenalin, or nicotine, studied in isolated neonatal rat optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Stavros; Fern, Robert

    2009-08-15

    The damaging effects of excessive glutamate receptor activation have been highlighted recently during injury in developing central white matter. We have examined the effects of acute exposure to four other neurotransmitters that have known actions on white matter. Eighty minutes of Glycine or GABA-A receptor activation produced a significant fall in the compound action potential recorded from isolated post-natal day 10 rat optic nerve. This effect was largely reversed upon washout. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) or adrenoreceptor activation with noradrenalin resulted in an approximately 35% block of the action potential that did not reverse during a 30-min washout period. While the effect of nAChR activation was blocked by a nAChR antagonist, the effect of noradrenalin was not ablated by alpha- or beta-adrenoreceptor blockers applied alone or in combination. In the absence of noradrenalin, co-perfusion with alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor blockers resulted in nonreversible nerve failure indicating that tonic adrenoreceptor activation is required for nerve viability, while overactivation of these receptors is also damaging. Nerves exposed to nAChR + adrenoreceptor activation showed no axon pathology but had extensive glial injury revealed by ultrastructural analysis. Oligodendroglia exhibited regions of membrane vacuolization while profound changes were evident in astrocytes and included the presence of swollen and expanded mitochondria, vacuolization, cell processes disintegration, and membrane breakdown. Blinded assessment revealed higher levels of astrocyte injury than oligodendroglial injury. The findings show that overactivation of neurotransmitter receptors other than those for glutamate can produce extensive injury to developing white matter, a phenomenon that may be clinically significant.

  10. Rose Bengal-decorated silica nanoparticles as photosensitizers for inactivation of gram-positive bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Yanyan; Zhang Peng [Department of Chemistry, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Rogelj, Snezna, E-mail: pzhang@nmt.edu [Department of Biology, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2010-02-10

    A new type of photosensitizer, made from Rose Bengal (RB)-decorated silica (SiO{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}-RB) nanoparticles, was developed to inactivate gram-positive bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with high efficiency through photodynamic action. The nanoparticles were characterized microscopically and spectroscopically to confirm their structures. The characterization of singlet oxygen generated by RB, both free and immobilized on a nanoparticle surface, was performed in the presence of anthracene-9,10-dipropionic acid. The capability of SiO{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}-RB nanoparticles to inactivate bacteria was tested in vitro on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that RB-decorated silica nanoparticles can inactivate MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis (both gram-positive) very effectively (up to eight-orders-of-magnitude reduction). Photosensitizers of such design should have good potential as antibacterial agents through a photodynamic mechanism.

  11. In vitro propagation of oil-bearing rose (Rosa damascena Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Badzhelova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The purpose of this research is to develop effective protocol for clonal micro propagation of the oil-bearing rose (Rosa damascena Mill.. Explants used in the experiment are 1.0 to 1.5 cm long nodal segments from specially cultivated mother plants. These explants were subjected to a combined method of sterilization with 0.2% solution of HgCI for 3 minutes followed by 0.50% solution of NaClO for 20 minutes and 0.25% solution of NaClO for 30 minutes. The best 2 results of multiplication were obtained in basic MS medium with added BAP quantity of 0.5 to 3.0 mg/L. After being separated from the mother plants the young shoots are placed directly in compost mixture for rooting and adaptation. Thus the process of multiplication is shortened, avoiding the period of in vitro rooting.

  12. ROSE: A numerical tool for the study of scattering events between photons and charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drebot, I.; Micieli, D.; Petrillo, V.; Tassi, E.; Serafini, L.

    2017-07-01

    We present the dimensioning of a photon-photon collider based on conventional Compton gamma sources for the observation of secondary γγ production. Two symmetric electron beams in collision with two high energy lasers produce two primary gamma rays pulses through Compton back scattering. Tuning the energy of the system to the energy of the photon-photon cross section maximum, a flux of secondary gamma photons is generated. The Monte Carlo code 'Rate Of Scattering Events' (ROSE) has been developed ad hoc for the counting of the QED events. The benchmark of the code for the Compton scattering process is presented. Realistic numbers of the secondary gamma yield, referring to existing or approved set-ups are presented.

  13. The Name of the Rose: A Path to Discuss the Birth of Modern Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Andreia; Braga, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Various science education researchers believe that science tuition should include some discussion about how science has developed over time. Therefore, deliberations about the nature of science should be integrated in the science curriculum. Many researchers argue that teaching the history of science is a good way to place the nature of science in science classes. This paper contributes to this debate and argues the importance of having young students study the birth of modern science. Such study could allow students to understand that some of the issues about the nature of science arose in the seventeenth century with the birth of modern science. To achieve this purpose, it is important to discuss the different factors that immersed the birth of modern science. To accomplish this goal, the novel The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco may be used. Beyond introducing issues surrounding the nature of science, this strategy could help overcome the separation between the arts and humanities in education.

  14. Effects of Daffodil Flowers and Cobalt Chloride on Vase Life of Cut Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aslmoshtaghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of postharvest application of cobalt chloride were investigated on vase life of rose stood individually in vials and the other ones placing daffodil flowers in a vase with a rose flower.  Therefore, roses were treated with: CoCl2 (100, 200, 300 mg L-1, respectively or distilled water (control. The results showed that the decreased vase life of rose flowers, after daffodil was placed in their vase water, is due to daffodil mucilage, which blocks water up take, mainly as a result of increased bacterial growth. Cobalt chloride inhibited vascular blockage in the stem of rose and maintained a high water flow rate through stems, leading to significantly water uptake by cut flowers.

  15. Effects of Daffodil Flowers and Cobalt Chloride on Vase Life of Cut Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Aslmoshtaghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of postharvest application of cobalt chloride were investigated on vase life of rose stood individually in vials and the other ones placing daffodil flowers in a vase with a rose flower. Therefore, roses were treated with: CoCl2 (100, 200, 300 mg L-1, respectively or distilled water (control. The results showed that the decreased vase life of rose flowers, after daffodil was placed in their vase water, is due to daffodil mucilage, which blocks water up take, mainly as a result of increased bacterial growth. Cobalt chloride inhibited vascular blockage in the stem of rose and maintained a high water flow rate through stems, leading to significantly water uptake by cut flowers.

  16. Identification of four functional NR3B isoforms in developing white matter reveals unexpected diversity among glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, António M de Jesus; Neugebauer, Karla M; Fern, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Functional neurotransmitter receptors are expressed in central white matter, where they mediate ischemic damage to glia and may be involved in cell-cell signalling. In this study, we analysed NMDA receptor NR1, NR2B-C and NR3A-B subunit expression in the brain and optic nerve by molecular cloning. In addition to the canonical forms of NR1 and NR2, four previously unknown NR3B variants, generated by alternative splicing, were identified. The variants encoded for isoforms with deletions of 8/15 amino acids in the N-terminal domain or 200/375 amino acids removing one or three transmembrane domains and part of the C-terminal domain, as compared with the previously characterized NR3B isoform. Co-expression of NR3B isoforms with NR1/NR2A-C modulated the amplitude and Mg(2+)-sensitivity of glutamate responses in a NR2 subunit-dependent fashion, with significant variations in the effects produced by different isoforms. These effects were not the result of reduced surface expression of the receptor complex since all NR3B isoforms reduced surface expression by a similar degree. These data reveal previously uncharacterized regulation of NMDA receptor function by alternative splicing of the NR3B subunit. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. A rapid assay for detection of Rose rosette virus using reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification using multiple gene targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Binoy; Washburn, Brian K; Miller, Steven H; Poduch, Kristina; Sarigul, Tulin; Knox, Gary W; Ochoa-Corona, Francisco M; Paret, Mathews L

    2017-02-01

    Rose rosette disease caused by Rose rosette virus (RRV; genus Emaravirus) is the most economically relevant disease of Knock Out® series roses in the U.S. As there are no effective chemical control options for the disease, the most critical disease management strategies include the use of virus free clean plants for propagation and early detection and destruction of infected plants. The current diagnostic techniques for RRV including end-point reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) are highly sensitive, but limited to diagnostic labs with the equipment and expertise; and is time consuming. To address this limitation, an isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-RPA) assay based on multiple gene targets for specific detection of RRV was developed. The assay is highly specific and did not cross react with other viruses belonging to the inclusive and exclusive genus. Dilution assays using the in vitro transcripts showed that the primer sets designed (RPA-267, RPA-131, and RPA-321) are highly sensitive, consistently detecting RRV with a detection limit of 1fg/μL. Testing of the infected plants using the primer sets indicated that the virus could be detected from leaves, stems and petals of roses. The primer pair RPA-267 produced 100% positive detection of the virus from infected leaf tissues, while primer set RPA-131 produced 100% detection from stems and petals. The primer set RPA-321 produced 83%, 87.5% and 75% positive detection from leaves, petals and stem tissues, respectively. In addition, the assay has been efficiently used in the detection of RRV infecting Knock Out® roses, collected from different states in the U.S. The assay can be completed in 20min as compared to the end-point RT-PCR assay (3-4h) and RT-qPCR (1.5h). The RT-RPA assay is reliable, rapid, highly sensitive, and can be easily used in diagnostic laboratories for detection of RRV with no need for any special equipment

  18. Tyrosinase inhibitory constituents from a polyphenol enriched fraction of rose oil distillation wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimine, Jessica; Garo, Eliane; Wedler, Jonas; Rusanov, Krasimir; Fertig, Orlando; Hamburger, Matthias; Atanassov, Ivan; Butterweck, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    During the water steam distillation process of rose flowers, the non-volatile phenolic compounds remain in the waste. We recently developed a strategy to separate rose oil distillation water (RODW) into a polyphenol depleted water fraction and a polyphenol enriched fraction (RF20-SP207). Bioassay-guided investigation of RF20-SP207 led to the isolation of quercetin, kaempferol and ellagic acid. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis as well as by comparison with literature data. Tyrosinase inhibition studies were performed with RF20-SP207, fractions I-IV, and the isolated compounds of the most active fraction. RF20-SP207 strongly inhibited the enzyme with an IC50 of 0.41 μg/mL. From the tested fractions only fraction IV (IC50=5.81 μg/mL) exhibited strong anti-tyrosinase activities. Quercetin, kaempferol and ellagic acid were identified in fraction IV and inhibited mushroom tyrosinase with IC50 values of 4.2 μM, 5.5 μM and 5.2 μM, respectively, which is approximately 10 times more potent than that of the positive control kojic acid (56.1μM). The inhibition kinetics, analyzed by Lineweaver-Burk plots, indicated that RF20-SP207 and fraction IV are uncompetitive inhibitors of tyrosinase when l-tyrosine is used as a substrate. A mixed inhibition was determined for ellagic acid, and a competitive inhibition for quercetin and kaempferol. In conclusion, the recovered polyphenol fraction RF20-SP207 from RODW was found to be a potent tyrosinase inhibitor. This value-added product could be used as an active ingredient in cosmetic products related to hyperpigmentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomass distribution efficiency of rose cv. Charlotte grown in soil and substrates at second production peak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Y González G

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Growing plants in substrates is an alternative for the production of roses under unfavorable soil conditions. The objective of this study was to determine the biomass distribution efficiency of rose cv. Charlotte grown in soil and substrates under greenhouse conditions until second production peak. In this trial, soil and substrates with 100% burned rice husk (100BR H; 65% burned rice husk: 35% coconut fiber (65BR H; 35% burned rice husk: 65% coconut fiber (35BR H; and 100% coconut fiber (100CF were used. The experimental design consisted of a randomized complete block design with three repetitions. Destructive sampling was carried out using whole plants and flowering stems at previously determined bud stages. Leaf area and dry matter in organs were measured and growth rate and physiological indexes were calculated. The assessed variables were fitted to logistic and exponential models. The plants grown in substrates with BR H (burned rice husk showed similar values regarding dry matter and fresh weight accumulation in organs. Plants in the soil treatment were the last ones to reach the different development stages of the flowering buds, while those that were grown in 100CF were the first ones. The treatments 35BR H and 100CF showed less growth of flowering stems, which was expressed in terms of relative dry matter increase per day. The plants grown in soil showed more dry matter in leaves and stems but less in flower buds. The 65BR H treatment showed some of the highest dry matter accumulations in leaves, stems and flower buds and also showed the highest leaf area ratio, leaf weight ratio, and specific leaf area values

  20. Characterization of white OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenbin; Lu, Lili

    2007-11-01

    White OLEDs (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention for several applications, such as backlights in LCD, full-color OLED display using on-chip color filters, and low cost illumination sources. OLEDs have typically very broad emissions, which makes them uniquely suitable for light source applications. In this paper, some fundamentals of the CIE colorimetry system including the color-rendering index are described. Given the spectral power distribution of WOLED, the parameters of a light source (chromaticity coordinate, CCT, CRI, and the luminous efficacy) can be calculated. A MATLAB program for this purpose is developed in this paper. WOLEDs utilizing two primary-color emitters are fabricated. NPB doped with 2% Rubrene is used as the red-emitting layer and anthracene derivative as the blue-emitting layer. With a structure of ITO/2TNATA(20nm)/NPB(20 nm)/ NPB:rubrene(2%)(10nm)/ anthracene (30 nm)/Alq 3(20nm)LiF(1nm)/Al(100nm), a white light with CIE coordinates of (0.34, 0.37) is generated. The color properties are presented in this paper. The results show that the white color can be created from numerous combinations of different spectra. Based upon this, the characterization of the WOLED is simulated and the design of WOLED for illumination is discussed. In contrary to light source applications where illumination quality white is the most important, all colors are equally important for display applications. The white spectrum of the two-emitter WOLED is transmitted through the typical red, blue and green color filters. The performance of this color display is simulated and the WOLED design for display application is discussed.

  1. Development of a Traceability System Based on a SNP Array for Large-Scale Production of High-Value White Spruce (Picea glauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Godbout

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biological material is at the forefront of research programs, as well as application fields such as breeding, aquaculture, and reforestation. While sophisticated techniques are used to produce this material, all too often, there is no strict monitoring during the “production” process to ensure that the specific varieties are the expected ones. Confidence rather than evidence is often applied when the time comes to start a new experiment or to deploy selected varieties in the field. During the last decade, genomics research has led to the development of important resources, which have created opportunities for easily developing tools to assess the conformity of the material along the production chains. In this study, we present a simple methodology that enables the development of a traceability system which, is in fact a by-product of previous genomic projects. The plant production system in white spruce (Picea glauca is used to illustrate our purpose. In Quebec, one of the favored strategies to produce elite varieties is to use somatic embryogenesis (SE. In order to detect human errors both upstream and downstream of the white spruce production process, this project had two main objectives: (i to develop methods that make it possible to trace the origin of plants produced, and (ii to generate a unique genetic fingerprint that could be used to differentiate each embryogenic cell line and ensure its genetic monitoring. Such a system had to rely on a minimum number of low-cost DNA markers and be easy to use by non-specialists. An efficient marker selection process was operationalized by testing different classification methods on simulated datasets. These datasets were generated using in-house bioinformatics tools that simulated crosses involved in the breeding program for which genotypes from hundreds of SNP markers were already available. The rate of misidentification was estimated and various sources of mishandling or contamination were

  2. Development of a Highly Efficient Hybrid White Organic-Light-Emitting Diode with a Single Emission Layer by Solution Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Yi; Chen, Show-An

    2018-02-07

    We use a mixed host, 2,6-bis[3-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]pyridine blended with 20 wt % tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine, to lower the hole-injection barrier, along with the bipolar and high-photoluminescence-quantum-yield (Φp= 84%), blue thermally activated delay fluorescence (TADF) material of 9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine-2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine (DMAC-TRZ) as a blue dopant to compose the emission layer for the fabrication of a TADF blue organic-light-emitting diode (BOLED). The device is highly efficient with the following performance parameters: maximum brightness (Bmax) = 57586 cd/m2, maximum current efficiency (CEmax) = 35.3 cd/A, maximum power efficiency (PEmax) = 21.4 lm/W, maximum external quantum efficiency (EQEmax) = 14.1%, and CIE coordinates (0.18, 0.42). This device has the best performance recorded among the reported solution-processed TADF BOLEDs and has a low efficiency roll-off: at brightness values of 1000 and 5000 cd/m2, its CEs are close, being 35.1 and 30.1 cd/A, respectively. Upon further doping of the red phosphor Ir(dpm)PQ2 (emission peak λmax = 595 nm) into the blue emission layer, we obtained a TADF-phosphor hybrid white organic-light-emitting diode (T-P hybrid WOLED) with high performance: Bmax = 43594 cd/m2, CEmax = 28.8 cd/A, PEmax = 18.1 lm/W, and CIE coordinates (0.38, 0.44). This Bmax = 43594 cd/m2 is better than that of the vacuum-deposited WOLED with a blue TADF emitter, 10000 cd/m2. This is also the first report on a T-P hybrid WOLED with a solution-processed emitting layer.

  3. White blood cell counts as risk markers of developing metabolic syndrome and its components in the PREDIMED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babio, Nancy; Ibarrola-Jurado, Núria; Bulló, Mònica; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Wärnberg, Julia; Salaverría, Itziar; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Estruch, Ramón; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Covas, Maria Isabel; Sorli, José Vicente; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    The Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that includes hyperglucemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and central obesity, conferring an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The white blood cell (WBC) count has been proposed as a marker for predicting cardiovascular risk. However, few prospective studies have evaluated the relationship between WBC subtypes and risk of MetS. Participants were recruited from seven PREDIMED study centers. Both a baseline cross-sectional (n = 4,377) and a prospective assessment (n = 1,637) were performed. Participants with MetS at baseline were excluded from the longitudinal analysis. The median follow-up was 3.9 years. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipid profile and WBC counts were assessed at baseline and yearly during the follow-up. Participants were categorized by baseline WBC and its subtype count quartiles. Adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to assess the risk of MetS and its components. Of the 4,377 participants, 62.6% had MetS at baseline. Compared to the participants in the lowest baseline sex-adjusted quartile of WBC counts, those in the upper quartile showed an increased risk of having MetS (OR, 2.47; 95%CI, 2.03-2.99; P-trendcomponents hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol. Likewise, lymphocyte counts were found to be associated with the incidence of the MetS components low HDL-cholesterol and high fasting glucose. An increase in the total WBC during the follow-up was also associated with an increased risk of MetS. Total WBC counts, and some subtypes, were positively associated with MetS as well as hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-cholesterol and high fasting glucose, all components of MetS. Controlled-Trials.comISRCTN35739639.

  4. Development and metabolism of the city of Khartoum (Republic of Sudan: spatial designing of the coastal territory of the Blue and White Nile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakurov Ilhomjeon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The given article reveals the development of the metabolism of the city of Khartoum, the problems of influence on the microclimate improvement elements built up coastal territory of the Blue and White Nile in Khartoum. The study shows the microclimate formation factors of Khartoum, gives an assessment of the modern state of the microclimate of the coastal zone and its changes. The article indicates that, depending on the nature of use and planning organization of coastal territories microclimatic influence of water areas can propagate over appreciable distances to the city or limitation depth in a narrow strip along the coast. In urban areas the air temperature is considerably higher and the humidity is lower than in the coastal area especially in summer, this is due to differences in physical properties of water and land. Water has a higher heat capacity, high reflectivity, the wind speed increases and increasing the humidity of air masses passing over it. Thus, in order to improve microclimatic and hygienic conditions of coastal territories in Khartoum there is the need to use the favorable impact of the Blue and White Nile.

  5. Development and aging of superficial white matter myelin from young adulthood to old age: Mapping by vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minjie; Kumar, Anand; Yang, Shaolin

    2016-05-01

    Superficial white matter (SWM) lies immediately beneath cortical gray matter and consists primarily of short association fibers. The characteristics of SWM and its development and aging were seldom examined in the literature and warrant further investigation. Magnetization transfer imaging is sensitive to myelin changes in the white matter. Using an innovative multimodal imaging analysis approach, vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS), the current study vertexwise mapped age-related changes of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in SWM from young adulthood to old age (30-85 years, N = 66). Results demonstrated regionally selective and temporally heterochronologic changes of SWM MTR with age, including (1) inverted U-shaped trajectories of SWM MTR in the rostral middle frontal, medial temporal, and temporoparietal regions, suggesting continuing myelination and protracted maturation till age 40-50 years and accelerating demyelination at age 60 and beyond, (2) linear decline of SWM MTR in the middle and superior temporal, and pericalcarine areas, indicating early maturation and less acceleration in age-related degeneration, and (3) no significant changes of SWM MTR in the primary motor, somatosensory and auditory regions, suggesting resistance to age-related deterioration. We did not observe similar patterns of changes in cortical thickness in our sample, suggesting the observed SWM MTR changes are not due to cortical atrophy. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1759-1769, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Female rose bitterling prefer MHC-dissimilar males: experimental evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichard

    Full Text Available The role of genetic benefits in female mate choice remains a controversial aspect of sexual selection theory. In contrast to "good allele" models of sexual selection, "compatible allele" models of mate choice predict that females prefer mates with alleles complementary to their own rather than conferring additive effects. While correlative results suggest complementary genetic effects to be plausible, direct experimental evidence is scarce. A previous study on the Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus demonstrated a positive correlation between female mate choice, offspring growth and survival, and the functional dissimilarity between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC alleles of males and females. Here we directly tested whether females used cues associated with MHC genes to select genetically compatible males in an experimental framework. By sequentially pairing females with MHC similar and dissimilar males, based on a priori known MHC profiles, we showed that females discriminated between similar and dissimilar males and deposited significantly more eggs with MHC dissimilar males. Notably, the degree of dissimilarity was an important factor for female decision to mate, possibly indicating a potential threshold value of dissimilarity for decision making, or of an indirect effect of the MHC.

  7. Losio Antioksidan Buah Naga Merah (Hylocereus polyrhizus Britton and Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Angelina Sinaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hylocereus polyrhizus Britton and Rose (Red dragon fruit has been shown to have antioxidant activity which contains vitamin C, polyphenol, and flavonoid. This research was aimed to investigate antioxidant effectivity from H. polyrhizus in form of lotion. Lotion were made with 5 concentrations from H. polyrhizus methanol extract which were 0.04; 0.08; 0.16; 0.32 and 0.64%. The antioxidant activity of lotion was measured using DPPH method. The research showed that H. polyrhizus methanol extract had antioxidant activity with inhibition concentration were 19.99±0.33; 25.01±0.08; 39.14±0.04; 66.69±0.12 and 83.37±0.05. The result showed significant differences on antioxidant activity. The physical stability observation of five formula with cycling test method showed unstability because of discolouration (oxidation. As well as the methods of mechanical test showed unstability of lotion because saponification process.

  8. In vitro propagation of Hylocereus monacanthus (Lem. Britton and Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Belem Montiel-Frausto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of tissue culture contributes to the rapid and massive propagation of economically important species and serves as a basic platform for production strategies. The objective of this work was to establish the in vitro propagation of Hylocereus monacanthus (Lem. Britton and Rose. The seeds were in vitro germinated and then the apical segments containing the apex and areoles were taken and placed in culture medium MS with BAP (1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg l-1 and IAA (0.5 mg l-1 separately and combined for the multiplication phase. For rooting an MS culture medium with different  concentrations of inorganic salts (50, 75 and 100% and IBA (0.1 mg l-1 was used. In vitro plants obtained were planted in greenhouse for their acclimatization. The percentage of seeds germination was 70% with 6% of microbial contamination. With 1 mg l-1 BAP, the best results were obtained for the in vitro multiplication of H. monacanthus. In all treatments 100% of rooted shoots were obtained and only a significant difference was observed for root length with the addition of 0.1 mg l-1 IBA. The average survival of plants transferred to substrate was 97.1%. The results of this work offer an alternative of propagation for H. monacanthus, which will contribute to the establishment of commercial plantations and other studies at the laboratory level.   Keywords: pitahaya, shoot tip, cacti

  9. The White Rabbit project

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, J; Gousiou, E; van der Bij, E; Wlostowski, T; Daniluk, G; Lipinski, M

    2013-01-01

    White Rabbit (WR) is a multi-laboratory, multi- company collaboration for the development of a new Ethernet-based technology which ensures sub-nanosecond synchronisation and deterministic data transfer. The project uses an open source paradigm for the development of its hardware, gateware and software components. This article provides an introduction to the technical choices and an explanation of the basic principles underlying WR. It then describes some possible applications and the current status of the project. Finally, it provides insight on current developments and future plans.

  10. 78 FR 33047 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe-Atoma Area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Forest Service Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe--Atoma Area... Ski Tahoe (Mt. Rose) to expand its lift and terrain network. The project is located approximately 12.... Fax to 775-355-5399. Please use a fax cover sheet and include ``Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe--Atoma Area EIS...

  11. Isolation of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids as COX-1 and -2 inhibitors in rose hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jäger, Anna; Petersen, K N; Thomasen, G.

    2008-01-01

    Rose hip has previously shown clinical efficacy in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and organic solvent extracts of rose hip have showed inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2. A petroleum ether extract of rose hip was fractioned by VLC on silica; on a C-18 column and by HPLC. Each step was COX-1...

  12. THE GENERATIVE REPRODUCTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF RED DRAGON FRUIT (Hylocereus.polyrhizus (Web. Britton & Rose, CACTACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniek Kriswiyanti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the generative reproductive characteristics of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus (Web. Britton & Rose, that is the characteristics and the development of male and female reproductive system and the embryo. The flowering morphology was observed through the gametogenesis process and the process of embryogenesis was observed using the methods of squash, cytolysis, and embedding of flower before anthesis, during and after anthesis. The results showed that the flower funnelled form with many calyxes, stamens and crowns. The pollen was circular, sulcus, trilate, reticulate, and spheroid. The development of microgametophyte was at the 2nd stages with three nucleuses and the pistil developed after anthesis.  Anthesis was taken place at night time, fertilization and pollen developed before anthesis and has not germinating. A single pistil, the head of pistil with many branches, the style longer than the stamen, open type.  Seeds anathrophus, endosperm and embryo with the globular shaped, developed 5 days after anthesis, the embryo torpedo likes and the differentiation of primer tissues seen in the seeds 7 days after anthesis, and arilus generated from development of megasporangium. Keywords: embedding, self incompatibility, sferoidal, anatrophus, arillus.

  13. Case Report: Compound heterozygous nonsense mutations in TRMT10A are associated with microcephaly, delayed development, and periventricular white matter hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Mohan; Ramsey, Keri; Grebe, Theresa; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Huentelman, Matthew; Craig, David; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    Microcephaly is a fairly common feature observed in children with delayed development, defined as head circumference less than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. It may be the result of an acquired insult to the brain, such prenatal or perinatal brain injury (congenital infection or hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy), or be a part of a genetic syndrome. There are over 1000 conditions listed in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) where microcephaly is a key finding; many of these are associated with specific somatic features and non-CNS anomalies. The term primary microcephaly is used when microcephaly and delayed development are the primary features, and they are not part of another recognized syndrome. In this case report, we present the clinical features of siblings (brother and sister) with primary microcephaly and delayed development, and subtle dysmorphic features. Both children had brain MRI studies that showed periventricular and subcortical T2/FLAIR hyperintensities, without signs of white matter volume loss, and no parenchymal calcifications by CT scan. The family was enrolled in a research study for whole exome sequencing of probands and parents. Analysis of variants determined that the children were compound heterozygotes for nonsense mutations, c.277C>T (p.Arg93*) and c.397C>T (p.Arg133*), in the TRMT10A gene. Mutations in this gene have only recently been reported in children with microcephaly and early onset diabetes mellitus. Our report adds to current knowledge of TRMT10A related neurodevelopmental disorders and demonstrates imaging findings suggestive of delayed or abnormal myelination of the white matter in this disorder. Accurate diagnosis through genomic testing, as in the children described here, allows for early detection and management of medical complications, such as diabetes mellitus.

  14. Case Report: Compound heterozygous nonsense mutations in TRMT10A are associated with microcephaly, delayed development, and periventricular white matter hyperintensities [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Narayanan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microcephaly is a fairly common feature observed in children with delayed development, defined as head circumference less than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender. It may be the result of an acquired insult to the brain, such prenatal or perinatal brain injury (congenital infection or hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, or be a part of a genetic syndrome. There are over 1000 conditions listed in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man where microcephaly is a key finding; many of these are associated with specific somatic features and non-CNS anomalies. The term primary microcephaly is used when microcephaly and delayed development are the primary features, and they are not part of another recognized syndrome.   In this case report, we present the clinical features of siblings (brother and sister with primary microcephaly and delayed development, and subtle dysmorphic features. Both children had brain MRI studies that showed periventricular and subcortical T2/FLAIR hyperintensities, without signs of white matter volume loss, and no parenchymal calcifications by CT scan. The family was enrolled in a research study for whole exome sequencing of probands and parents. Analysis of variants determined that the children were compound heterozygotes for nonsense mutations, c.277C>T (p.Arg93* and c.397C>T (p.Arg133*, in the TRMT10A gene. Mutations in this gene have only recently been reported in children with microcephaly and early onset diabetes mellitus.   Our report adds to current knowledge of TRMT10A related neurodevelopmental disorders and demonstrates imaging findings suggestive of delayed or abnormal myelination of the white matter in this disorder. Accurate diagnosis through genomic testing, as in the children described here, allows for early detection and management of medical complications, such as diabetes mellitus.

  15. Optical properties and switching of a Rose Bengal derivative: A spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerlind, C., E-mail: christina.akerlind@foi.s [Department of Information Systems, Swedish Defence Research Agency, SE 581 11 Linkoeping (Sweden); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, SE 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Arwin, H. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, SE 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Jakobsson, F.L.E. [Department of Science and Technology, Linkoeping University, SE 601 74 Norrkoeping (Sweden); Kariis, H. [Department of Information Systems, Swedish Defence Research Agency, SE 581 11 Linkoeping (Sweden); Jaerrendahl, K. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, SE 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2011-03-31

    Optical properties in terms of the complex-valued dielectric function were determined for spin-coated films of a Rose Bengal derivative using variable angle of incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry in the visible and infrared wavelength regions. In addition, the thickness and roughness of the films were determined and related to the solution concentration of Rose Bengal. Switching between two different oxidation states of the Rose Bengal derivative was investigated. The two states were chemically induced by exposure to vapors of hydrochloric acid and ammonia, respectively. A substantial and reversible change of the optical properties of the films was observed.

  16. Synthesis of rose-like boron nitride particles with a high specific surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hongming; Huang, Xiaoxiao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wen, Guangwu, E-mail: wgw@hitwh.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Tao; Bai, Hongwei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Novel rose-like BN nanostructures were synthesized on a large scale via a two-step procedure. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer and nitrogen porosimetry. The results show that the obtained rose-like nanostructures are composed of a large amount of h-BN crystalline flakes and have a surface area of 90.31 m{sup 2}/g. A mechanism was proposed to explain the formation process of the rose-like BN nanostructures.

  17. Development and field application of a molecular probe for the primary pathogen of the coral disease white plague type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie L Richardson

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the current problems in the field of coral disease research is that of tracking coral pathogens in the natural environment.A promising method to do this is by use of pathogen-specific molecular probes. However,this approach has been little used to date.We constructed,and validated in the laboratory,a fluoro-chrome-labeled molecular probe specific to Aurantimonas coralicida ,the bacterial pathogen of the Caribbean coral disease white plague type II (WPII.We then used the probe to test field samples of diseased coral tissue for the presence of this pathogen.Probe design was based on a unique subset (25 nucleotidesof the complete16S rRNA gene sequence derived from a pure culture of the pathogen.The pathogen-specific probe was labeled with the fluorochrome GreenStar*™FITC (fluorescein isothiocyanate,GeneDetect Ltd,New Zealand.As a control, we used the universal eubacterial probe EUB 338,labeled with a different fluorochrome (TRITC,tetra-methyl-rhodamine isothiocyanate.Both probes were applied to laboratory samples of pure cultures of bacteria, and field samples collected from the surface of the disease line of corals exhibiting signs of white plague (types I and II,healthy controls,and corals with an uncharacterized disease ("patchy necrosis ".All samples were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH.We have determined that the probe is specific to our laboratory culture of the coral pathogen,and does not react with other bacterial species (the eubacterial probe does.The WPII pathogen was detected in association with diseased coral samples collected from coral colonies on reefs of the Bahamas (n=9 samplesexhibiting signs of both WPI and WPII.Diseased (and healthytissue samples (n=4from corals exhibiting signs of "patchy necrosis "were also assayed.In this case the results were negative, indicating that the same pathogen is not involved in the two diseases.Incorporation and use of pathogen-specific probes can significantly

  18. RNA-Seq reveals the dynamic and diverse features of digestive enzymes during early development of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiankai; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Yang; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-09-01

    The Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), with high commercial value, has a typical metamorphosis pattern by going through embryo, nauplius, zoea, mysis and postlarvae during early development. Its diets change continually in this period, and a high mortality of larvae also occurs in this period. Since there is a close relationship between diets and digestive enzymes, a comprehensive investigation about the types and expression patterns of all digestive enzyme genes during early development of L. vannamei is of considerable significance for shrimp diets and larvae culture. Using RNA-Seq data, the types and expression characteristics of the digestive enzyme genes were analyzed during five different development stages (embryo, nauplius, zoea, mysis and postlarvae) in L. vannamei. Among the obtained 66,815 unigenes, 296 were annotated as 16 different digestive enzymes including five types of carbohydrase, seven types of peptidase and four types of lipase. Such a diverse suite of enzymes illustrated the capacity of L. vannamei to exploit varied diets to fit their nutritional requirements. The analysis of their dynamic expression patterns during development also indicated the importance of transcriptional regulation to adapt to the diet transition. Our study revealed the diverse and dynamic features of digestive enzymes during early development of L. vannamei. These results would provide support to better understand the physiological changes during diet transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Purification and some properties of rose (Fructus cynosbati) hips invertase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacan, Ozlem; Yanardag, Refiye

    2012-04-01

    Invertase was purified from rose (Fructus cynosbati) hips by ammonium sulfate fractionation and hydroxyapatite column chromatography. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 4.25% and about 10.48-fold purification and had a specific activity of 8.59 U/mg protein. The molecular mass of invertase was estimated to be 66.51 kDa by PAGE and 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE, indicating that the native enzyme was a homodimer. The enzyme was a glycoprotein and contained 5.86% carbohydrate. The K(m) for sucrose was 14.55 mM and the optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were 4.5 and 40 degrees C, respectively. Sucrose was the most preferred substrate of the enzyme. The enzyme also hydrolyzed D(+) raffinose, D(+) trehalose and inulin (activity 39.88, 8.12 and 4.94%, respectively of that of sucrose), while D(+) lactose, cellobiose and D(+) maltose showed no effect on the enzyme. The substrate specificity was consistent with that for a beta-fructofuranoside, which is the most popular type in the higher plants. The enzyme was completely inhibited by HgCl2, MnCl2, MnSO4, FeCl3, Pb(NO3)2, ammonium heptamolybdate, iodoacetamide and pyridoxine hydrochloride. It was also inhibited by Ba(NO3)2 (86.32%), NH4Cl (84.91%), MgCl2 (74.45%), urea (71.63%), I2 (69.64%), LiCl (64.99%), BaCl2 (50.30%), Mg(NO3)2 (49.90%), CrCl3 (31.90%) and CuSO4 (21.45%) and but was activated by Tris (73.99%) and methionine (12.47%).

  20. A RhABF2/Ferritin module affects rose (Rosa hybrida) petal dehydration tolerance and senescence by modulating iron levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jitao; Fan, Youwei; Zou, Jing; Fang, Yiqun; Wang, Linghao; Wang, Meng; Jiang, Xinqiang; Liu, Yiqing; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Changqing

    2017-12-01

    Plants often develop the capacity to tolerate moderate and reversible environmental stresses, such as drought, and to re-establish normal development once the stress has been removed. An example of this phenomenon is provided by cut rose (Rosa hybrida) flowers, which experience typical reversible dehydration stresses during post-harvest handling after harvesting at the bud stages. The molecular mechanisms involved in rose flower dehydration tolerance are not known, however. Here, we characterized a dehydration- and abscisic acid (ABA)-induced ferritin gene (RhFer1). Dehydration-induced free ferrous iron (Fe 2+ ) is preferentially sequestered by RhFer1 and not transported outside of the petal cells, to restrict oxidative stresses during dehydration. Free Fe 2+ accumulation resulted in more serious oxidative stresses and the induction of genes encoding antioxidant enzyme in RhFer1-silenced petals, and poorer dehydration tolerance was observed compared with tobacco rattle virus (TRV) controls. We also determined that RhABF2, an AREB/ABF transcription factor involved in the ABA signaling pathway, can activate RhFer1 expression by directly binding to its promoter. The silencing of RhABF2 decreased dehydration tolerance and disrupted Fe homeostasis in rose petals during dehydration, as did the silencing of RhFer1. Although both RhFer1 and Fe transporter genes are induced during flower natural senescence in plants, the silencing of RhABF2 or RhFer1 accelerates the petal senescence processes. These results suggest that the regulatory module RhABF2/RhFer1 contributes to the maintenance of Fe levels and enhances dehydration tolerance through the action of RhFer1 locally sequestering free Fe 2+ under dehydration conditions, and plays synergistic roles with transporter genes during flower senescence. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Historical Summary of Sea Turtle Observations at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 1839-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Compilation of 40 recorded observations of sea turtles at Rose Atoll between 1839 and 1991, with each observation consisting of the source, date, and brief notes.

  2. The survey and criterion of the compass rose in Chinese A-share market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wenzhao; Wang, Yanxiang; Huo, Zhao; Li, Yilin

    2018-02-01

    The compass rose is one of the few "recurring patterns" found in financial markets. In this paper, the compass rose in Chinese A-share market is comprehensively investigated. It is newly discovered that among the 1331 A-shares, which had been listed for more than 15 years by the end of 2015, only about 20 show the compass rose. The outcome of the analysis shows that there exists a threshold of the ratio of the data points on main rays to all data points. Only when this ratio is above the threshold, the compass rose appears. The reasons why such a threshold exists, and its interrelationship with the data frequency and the tick/volatility ratio are analyzed.

  3. Final Restoration Plan for Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, including Environmental Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Restoration Plan for Rose Atoll NWR consists of removing the metal debris remaining from the grounding of a Taiwanese fishing vessel in 1993, and monitoring the...

  4. Two species of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera) from Southeast Asia associated with downy rose myrtle, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Myrtaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two species of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera), Metharmostis multilineata Adamski, n. sp. (Cosmopterigidae), and Idiophantis soreuta Meyrick, 1906 (Gelechiidae), were collected in southeastern Asia for evaluation as potential biocontrol agents against downy rose myrtle, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hass...

  5. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Rose Atoll in American...

  6. CRED REA Algal Assessment at Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 2004 (NODC Accession 0010352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Rose Atoll in American...

  7. EDTA-assisted synthesis of rose-like ZnO architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhen [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Fang, Yaoguo [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Peng, Liwei; Wu, Minghong [Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Pan, Dengyu

    2010-10-15

    Rose-like ZnO nanostructures were prepared by a low-temperature solution route with assistance of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA-2Na). The morphology of ZnO nanostructures was found to change from nanowire arrays to rose- and tower-like architectures with increasing the molar ratio of EDTA-2Na/Zn{sup 2+}. Also, the shape evolution of ZnO nanostructures with time was observed from flat nanosheets to wrinkled nanosheets and to rose-like nanostructures. EDTA-2Na as a strong complexing agent was found to play a key role in the shape evolution. Photoluminescence spectra show that the rose-like ZnO architectures have more defects than the nanowire arrays. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Martha Rose Construction, Inc., Seattle, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-01-01

    Building America/Builders Challenge fact sheet on Martha Rose Construction, an energy-efficient home builder in marine climate using the German Passiv Haus design, improved insulation, and solar photovoltaics.

  9. Eradication of Polynesian Rats (rattus exulans) from Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A 38-day poison and trap campaign was conducted on Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge to eradicate Polynesian rats in order to reduce their impact of seabird eggs...

  10. Benthic Habitat Maps for Rose Atoll Marine National Monument in American Samoa from 2004 to 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps for Rose Atoll, American Samoa were derived from high resolution, multispectral satellite imagery for 2004, 2006, and 2010. The benthic habitat...

  11. Developing a community-academic partnership to improve recognition and treatment of depression in underserved African American and white elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobransky-Fasiska, Deborah; Brown, Charlotte; Pincus, Harold A; Nowalk, Mary P; Wieland, Melissa; Parker, Lisa S; Cruz, Mario; McMurray, Michelle L; Mulsant, Benoit; Reynolds, Charles F

    2009-11-01

    Reducing mental health disparities among underserved populations, particularly African American elders, is an important public health priority. The authors describe the process and challenges of developing a community/academic research partnership to address these disparities. The authors are using a Community-Based Participatory Research approach to gain access to underserved populations in need of depression treatment. The authors identify six stages: 1) Collaborating to Secure Funding; 2) Building a Communications Platform and Research Infrastructure; 3) Fostering Enduring Relationships; 4) Assessing Needs/Educating about Research Process; 5) Initiating Specific Collaborative Projects (meeting mutual needs/interests); and 6) Maintaining a Sustainable and Productive Partnership. Data from a needs assessment developed collaboratively by researchers and community agencies facilitated agreement on mutual research goals, while strengthening the partnership. A community/academic-based partnership with a solid research infrastructure has been established and maintained for 3 years. Using the results of a needs assessment, the working partnership prioritized and launched several projects. Through interviews and questionnaires, community partners identified best practices for researchers working in the community. Future research and interventional projects have been developed, including plans for sustainability that will eventually shift more responsibility from the academic institution to the community agencies. To reach underserved populations by developing and implementing models of more effective mental health treatment, it is vital to engage community agencies offering services to this population. A successful partnership requires "cultural humility," collaborative efforts, and the development of flexible protocols to accommodate diverse communities.

  12. Environment of developing countries. ; Centered around 1992 white paper or environment. Kaihatsu tojokoku no kankyo. ; 1992 nenban kankyo hakusho wo chushin ni shite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takiguchi, N. (Environment Agency, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    The present paper outlines the present situation of environment of developing countries, factors causing environmental devastation, and the influence in the international linkage as described in 1992 White Paper on Environment. The present environmental devastation is originated from national poverty. In general, as the results of imposing excessive pressure on the natural environment accompanying the increase of population or causing urban pollution due to the movement or densification of population, poverty brings about the reduction and devastation of forest, deterioration of soil, desertification, contamination of air and rivers, causing miserable situation. Prawn culture as primary export industry damages mangrove woods, and causes water pollution. Industrial development is rapidly spreading pollution of water and air. As for international relations, the net transfer amount of money in the flow of funds between advanced countries and developing countries is in the direction from the latter to the former due to payment of debts. In enforcing direct investment or overseas development aid projects, advanced countries must be aware of their responsibility, make efforts in grasping the situations of aided countries and perform sufficient environmental assessment. 5 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Development and microstructure of tooth histotypes in the blue shark, Prionace glauca (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae) and the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamniformes: Lamnidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Joshua K; Riccio, Mark L; Bemis, William E

    2015-07-01

    Elasmobranchs exhibit two distinct arrangements of mineralized tissues in the teeth that are known as orthodont and osteodont histotypes. Traditionally, it has been said that orthodont teeth maintain a pulp cavity throughout tooth development whereas osteodont teeth are filled with osteodentine and lack a pulp cavity when fully developed. We used light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution micro-computed tomography to compare the structure and development of elasmobranch teeth representing the two histotypes. As an example of the orthodont histotype, we studied teeth of the blue shark, Prionace glauca (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae). For the osteodont histotype, we studied teeth of the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamniformes: Lamnidae). We document similarities and differences in tooth development and the microstructure of tissues in these two species and review the history of definitions and interpretations of elasmobranch tooth histotypes. We discuss a possible correlation between tooth histotype and tooth replacement and review the history of histotype differentiation in sharks. We find that contrary to a long held misconception, there is no orthodentine in the osteodont teeth of C. carcharias. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Leaves Of Cut Rose Flower Convert Exogenously Applied Glucose To Sucrose And Translocate It To Petals

    OpenAIRE

    Horibe Takanori; Yamaki Shohei; Yamada Kunio

    2014-01-01

    To understand the role that the leaves play in the translocation of soluble carbohydrates in cut rose flowers, we first evaluated the effect of leaf removal on flower quality and the sugar content in petals. Cut rose flowers with leaves had higher soluble sugar content in petals compared with cut flower without leaves. Next, we treated cut flowers with radioactive glucose to clarify translocation routes of exogenously applied sugar. There was no significant difference between the specific rad...

  15. Effect of Bactericides and Sucrose Pulsing on Longevity and Vase Life of Rose Cut Flowers

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Yagi; Mohy eldeen; N. E. Elgemaby

    2014-01-01

    The vase life of rose cut flowers was determined by various Physiological factors that determine the rate of their senescence. The vase life of the rose cut flowers studied was pronged by the 8-HQS treatment. The best concentration was 100 ppm, when combined with sucrose 3% gave negative effect. AgNO3 in different concentration, significantly Result in maximum vase life compared to other treatment, while sucrose recorded the lowest vase life especially under lower concentration....

  16. Obesity and the development of insulin resistance and impaired fasting glucose in black and white adolescent girls - A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, DJ; Friedman, LA; Harlan, WR; Barton, BA; Schreiber, GB; Cohen, RM; Harlan, LC; Morrison, JA

    Objective-Age at onset of type 2 diabetes has decreased during the past 20 years, especially in black women. Studies of factors associated with insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in preadolescent and adolescent populations are essential to understanding diabetes development. Research Design and

  17. Epicormic development in pole-size white oak (Quercus Alba L.) progeny tests three years following crown release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Meier; Mike R. Saunders

    2016-01-01

    Epicormic development has been traditionally thought to be a response to increased light and to varying vigor and genetics among individuals within a species, but epicormic ontogeny has increasingly been shown to be a more fundamental factor. Previous studies have quantified the impact of tree vigor on epicormic sprouting and epicormic branch size following...

  18. An efficient transient expression system for gene function analysis in rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Bai, Mengjuan; Ren, Haoran; Liu, Jinyi; Wang, Changquan

    2017-01-01

    Roses are widely used as garden ornamental plants and cut flowers. Rosa chinensis cv 'Old Blush' has been used as a model genotype in rose studies due to its contribution to recurrent flowering and tea scent traits of modern roses. The deficiency of efficient genetic transformation systems is a handicap limiting functional genetics studies of roses. Agrobacterium -mediated transient transformation offers a powerful tool for the characterization of gene function in plants. A convenient and highly efficient Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation protocol using R. chinensis cv 'Old Blush' seedlings in vitro as an expression system is described in this paper. The most important factor affecting transformation efficiency in this system is seedling age; 3/4-week-old rose shoots with or without roots from sub-culturing are optimal for transformation, requiring no complicated inoculation media, supplements, or carefully tuned plant growth conditions. This transient expression system was successfully applied to analysis of the gene promoter activities, DNA binding capacity of transcription factors, protein-protein interaction in physiological contexts using luciferase as a reporter gene. This transient transformation system was validated as a robust and efficient platform, thus providing a new option for gene function and signaling pathway investigation in roses and further extending the utility of R. chinensis cv 'Old Blush' as a model plant to study diverse gene function and signaling pathways in Rosaceae.

  19. Green manure affects cut flower yield and quality of ‘Vegas’ rose bushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elka Fabiana Aparecida Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose cultivation requires many inputs for satisfactory production, making the process expensive. Nowadays, alternative practices have been used for sustainable crop production. Green manure is an agricultural practice that aims to maintain or improve soil fertility, increasing its yielding capacity. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of green manure with legumes on the yield and quality of ‘Vegas’ roses. Grafted rose seedlings were cultivated in open field for 30 months. Legumes used as green manure and planted intercropped with rose bushes were forage peanut (Arachis pintoi and jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis. Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan was grown in a separate area, cut, macerated, and applied in the rows between rose bushes every 3 months. Plants of control group received no green manure, only mineral fertilizer and cattle manure, as in all other treatments. The experimental design was randomized block with four treatments (three green manure species plus the control and seven replications. The highest yield and quality of flower stems in ‘Vegas’ occurred with addition of pigeon pea on the soil surface or chemically treated (control. Forage peanut and jack bean are not suitable for intercropping with ‘Vegas’ rose bushes due to possible nutrient and water competition.

  20. Rose Bengal Photodynamic Antimicrobial Therapy: A Novel Treatment for Resistant Fusarium Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amescua, Guillermo; Arboleda, Alejandro; Nikpoor, Neda; Durkee, Heather; Relhan, Nidhi; Aguilar, Mariela C; Flynn, Harry W; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of rose bengal PDAT for the management of a patient with multidrug-resistant Fusarium keratoplasticum keratitis unresponsive to standard clinical treatment. This case report presents a clinical case of F. keratoplasticum keratitis not responsive to standard medical care. In vitro studies from patients culture isolated responded to rose bengal PDAT. Patient received two treatments with rose bengal 0.1% and exposure to green light with a total energy of 2.7 J/cm. In vitro results demonstrated the efficacy of rose bengal PDAT a multidrug-resistant F. keratoplasticum species. There was complete fungal inhibition in our irradiation zone on the agar plates. In the clinical case, the patient was successfully treated with 2 sessions of rose bengal PDAT, and at 8-month follow-up, there was neither recurrence of infection nor adverse effects to report. Rose bengal PDAT is a novel treatment that may be considered in cases of aggressive infectious keratitis. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of PDAT in vivo.

  1. Impaired development of melanoblasts in the black-eyed white Mitf(mi-bw) mouse, a model for auditory-pigmentary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Hiroki; Takeda, Kazuhisa; Yoshida-Amano, Yasuko; Takemoto, Yuji; Kusumi, Ryota; Fukuzaki-Dohi, Urara; Higashitani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2012-06-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) is a regulator for differentiation of melanoblasts that are derived from the neural crest. The mouse homozygous for the black-eyed white (Mitf(mi-bw)) allele is characterized by the white coat color and deafness, with black eye that is associated with the lack of melanocytes in skin and inner ear. The Mitf(mi-bw) mutation is an insertion of the LINE1 retrotransposable element into intron 3 of the Mitf gene that causes the selective deficiency of the melanocyte-specific Mitf isoform, Mitf-M. Here, we show the expression of Mitf-M mRNA in the trunk region of the homozygous Mitf(mi-bw)(bw) mouse at embryonic days (E) 11.5 and E12.5, but Mitf-M mRNA is undetectable at E13.5. In addition, using bw mouse that carries the lacZ transgene under the control of a melanoblast-specific promoter, we show that the number of migrating melanoblasts in bw embryos was less than 10% of that in control embryos at E11.5 and E12.5, and melanoblasts disappear by E13.5. The loss of melanoblasts in bw embryos was probably caused by apoptosis. Finally, forced expression of Mitf-M in the cultured neural tube of bw embryos ensured the differentiation of melanoblasts. Therefore, the correct dose of Mitf-M is required for the normal development of melanoblasts. © 2012 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2012 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Presence of rose spring dwarf-associated virus in Chile: partial genome sequence and detection in roses and their colonizing aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Paulina A; Engel, Esteban A

    2010-10-01

    Rose is one of the most important cut flowers produced in the world. It is also grown in landscape plantings and public gardens for ornamental purposes. However, there is no detailed information available about viruses infecting roses in Chile. In order to gain insight about the viruses that could be present, a plant showing yellow vein chlorosis in its leaves was collected from a garden in Santiago. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was isolated and after a random primed RT-PCR amplification procedure followed by sequencing, Rose spring dwarf-associated virus (RSDaV) presence was established. In order to widen the survey, several additional symptomatic and asymptomatic plants as well as aphids were screened by RT-PCR using two different pairs of virus-specific primers. RSDaV was detected in 24% of the analyzed samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of RSDaV in Chilean rose plants and Rhodobium porosum (Sanderson) aphids.

  3. Shifting White Ideological Scripts: The Educational Benefits of Inter- and Intraracial Curricular Dialogues on the Experiences of White College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kristie A.

    2012-01-01

    What pedagogies and inter-/intragroup dynamics facilitate increased understanding of issues of race, white racial identity development, and racism in the U.S.? Can white students effectively learn about whiteness by themselves as well as in collaboration with students of diverse racial backgrounds? This project examines white student learning in…

  4. Evolution of the Rdr1 TNL-cluster in roses and other Rosaceous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terefe-Ayana Diro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The resistance of plants to pathogens relies on two lines of defense: a basal defense response and a pathogen-specific system, in which resistance (R genes induce defense reactions after detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS. In the specific system, a so-called arms race has developed in which the emergence of new races of a pathogen leads to the diversification of plant resistance genes to counteract the pathogens’ effect. The mechanism of resistance gene diversification has been elucidated well for short-lived annual species, but data are mostly lacking for long-lived perennial and clonally propagated plants, such as roses. We analyzed the rose black spot resistance gene, Rdr1, in five members of the Rosaceae: Rosa multiflora, Rosa rugosa, Fragaria vesca (strawberry, Malus x domestica (apple and Prunus persica (peach, and we present the deduced possible mechanism of R-gene diversification. Results We sequenced a 340.4-kb region from R. rugosa orthologous to the Rdr1 locus in R. multiflora. Apart from some deletions and rearrangements, the two loci display a high degree of synteny. Additionally, less pronounced synteny is found with an orthologous locus in strawberry but is absent in peach and apple, where genes from the Rdr1 locus are distributed on two different chromosomes. An analysis of 20 TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL genes obtained from R. rugosa and R. multiflora revealed illegitimate recombination, gene conversion, unequal crossing over, indels, point mutations and transposable elements as mechanisms of diversification. A phylogenetic analysis of 53 complete TNL genes from the five Rosaceae species revealed that with the exception of some genes from apple and peach, most of the genes occur in species-specific clusters, indicating that recent TNL gene diversification began prior to the split of Rosa from Fragaria in the Rosoideae and peach from apple in the Spiraeoideae and continued after the split in

  5. 'Snow White' in Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This color image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench dubbed 'Snow White,' after further digging on the 25th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (June 19, 2008). The lander's solar panel is casting a shadow over a portion of the trench. The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. RhMKK9, a rose MAP KINASE KINASE gene, is involved in rehydration-triggered ethylene production in rose gynoecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiwei; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Qigang; Feng, Ming; Li, Yang; Meng, Yonglu; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Guoqin; Ma, Zhimin; Wu, Hongzhi; Gao, Junping; Ma, Nan

    2017-02-23

    Flower opening is an important process in the life cycle of flowering plants and is influenced by various endogenous and environmental factors. Our previous work demonstrated that rose (Rosa hybrida) flowers are highly sensitive to dehydration during flower opening and the water recovery process after dehydration induced ethylene production rapidly in flower gynoecia. In addition, this temporal- and spatial-specific ethylene production is attributed to a transient but robust activation of the rose MAP KINASE6-ACC SYNTHASE1 (RhMPK6-RhACS1) cascade in gynoecia. However, the upstream component of RhMPK6-RhACS1 is unknown, although RhMKK9 (MAP KINASE KINASE9), a rose homologue of Arabidopsis MKK9, could activate RhMPK6 in vitro. In this study, we monitored RhMKK2/4/5/9 expression, the potential upstream kinase to RhMPK6, in rose gynoecia during dehydration and rehydration. We found only RhMKK9 was rapidly and strongly induced by rehydration. Silencing of RhMKK9 significantly decreased rehydration-triggered ethylene production. Consistently, the expression of several ethylene-responsive genes was down regulated in the petals of RhMKK9-silenced flowers. Moreover, we detected the DNA methylation level in the promoter and gene body of RhMKK9 by Chop-PCR. The results showed that rehydration specifically elevated the DNA methylation level on the RhMKK9 gene body, whereas it resulted in hypomethylation in its promoter. Our results showed that RhMKK9 possibly acts as the upstream component of the RhMKK9-RhMPK6-RhACS1 cascade and is responsible for water recovery-triggered ethylene production in rose gynoecia, and epigenetic DNA methylation is involved in the regulation of RhMKK9 expression by rehydration.

  7. Upconversion Nanoparticles/Hyaluronate-Rose Bengal Conjugate Complex for Noninvasive Photochemical Tissue Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seulgi; Hwang, Byung Woo; Jeon, Eun Young; Jung, Dooyup; Lee, Geon Hui; Keum, Do Hee; Kim, Ki Su; Yun, Seok Hyun; Cha, Hyung Joon; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2017-10-24

    The recent progress in photonic nanomaterials has contributed greatly to the development of photomedicines. However, the finite depth of light penetration is still a serious limitation, constraining their clinical applications. Here, we developed a poly(allylamine) (PAAm)-modified upconversion nanoparticle/hyaluronate-rose bengal (UCNP/PAAm/HA-RB) conjugate complex for photochemical bonding of deep tissue with near-infrared (NIR) light illumination. Compared to the conventional invasive treatment via suturing and stapling, the UCNP/PAAm/HA-RB conjugate complex could be noninvasively delivered into the deep tissue and accelerate the tissue bonding upon NIR light illumination. HA in the outer layer of the complex facilitated the penetration of RB into the collagen layer of the dermis. The NIR light triggered UCNP of NaYF4: Yb/Er (Y:Yb:Er = 78:20:2) in the complex to illuminate visible green light under the skin tissue. The activated RB in the HA-RB conjugate by the green light induced radical formation for the cross-linking of incised collagen matrix. An in vitro light propagation test and collagen fibrillogenesis analysis, an in vivo animal tissue bonding test, and an ex vivo tensile strength test of dissected skin tissues confirmed the successful photochemical tissue bonding effect of the UCNP/PAAm/HA-RB conjugate complex.

  8. Analyzing urban sprawl through rose map and thematic map based on GIS: a case in Wuhan City, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Yaolin; Liu, Yanfang; Nong, Yu

    2007-06-01

    Within the last decades urban sprawl being understood here as the conversion of non-urban to urban land has become an increasingly prominent theme. There are some urban models which are used to analyze and simulate urban sprawl, but it deserves study for urban planners to find a simple, effective and vivid method to analyze urban sprawl. In this study, built-up area is subdivided into sixteen parts which correspond to urban sprawl in sixteen directions based on overlay analysis of geographic information systems (GIS). The study provides a novel approach that expresses the direction and intensity of urban sprawl as "rose map of urban sprawl". And thematic map and animated map are made to show urban sprawl based on GIS. In presenting a case study on the Chinese city of Wuhan, this paper analyzes the sprawl in more than forty years. Moreover, according to practical development of Wuhan city, the reasons of urban sprawl are analyzed and the strategies of urban development are brought forward. The study thus shows that it is helpful for macro-planning and decision-making to have an analytical method available through rose map and thematic map of urban sprawl based on GIS.

  9. The Association between Cerebral White Matter Lesions and Plasma Omega-3 to Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Ratio to Cognitive Impairment Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Suwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Cerebral white matter hyperintensity (WMH with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has a potential for predicting cognitive impairment. Serum polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA levels are important for evaluating the extent of atherosclerosis. We investigated whether abnormal PUFA levels affected WMH grading and cognitive function in patients without significant cognitive impairment. Methods. Atherosclerotic risk factors, the internal carotid artery (ICA plaque, and serum ratios of eicosapentaenoic to arachidonic acids (EPA/AA and docosahexaenoic to arachidonic acids (DHA/AA were assessed in 286 patients. The relationship among these risk factors, WMH, and cognitive function was evaluated using WMH grading and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Results. The development of WMH was associated with aging, hypertension, ICA plaques, and a low serum EPA/AA ratio (<0.38, obtained as the median value but was not related to dyslipidemia, diabetes, smoking, and a low serum DHA/AA ratio (<0.84, obtained as the median value. In addition, the MMSE score deteriorated slightly with the progression of WMH (29.7 ± 1.0 compared to 28.4 ± 2.1, P<0.0001. Conclusions. The progression of WMH was associated with a low serum EPA/AA ratio and accompanied minimal deterioration in cognitive function. Sufficient omega-3 PUFA intake may be effective in preventing the development of cognitive impairment.

  10. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Vanishing White Matter Disease What is Vanishing White Matter Disease? ... of the genetic basis of VWM was a great step forward. First of all, it allows genetic ...

  11. Preparing superhydrophobic copper surfaces with rose petal or lotus leaf property using a simple etching approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talesh Bahrami, H. R.; Ahmadi, B.; Saffari, H.

    2017-05-01

    A facile chemical etching process is developed to fabricate superhydrophobic copper surfaces. In the first step, cleaned copper surfaces immersed in ferric chloride (FeCl3) solutions with specific concentrations for different times. Etched surfaces exhibit the maximum contact angle of 140°. They have large sliding angle and water droplets stuck to the surface even if they were turned upside down which is well-known as rose petal effect. After stearic acid modification of etched surfaces, their contact angle slightly increased to above 150° and sliding angle decreased to smaller than 10° in some cases, which is same as lotus plant leaves property against water. Inspecting SEM images of etched surfaces reveals that many micro-nano structures forming blossom like buildings with curved petals of nanoscale thicknesses are formed. The micro-nano structures sizes and shapes affecting surface hydrophobicity are regulated by controlling reaction times and etchant solution concentrations. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis is done on a sample before and after of the etching process where patterns indicate that the same compositions present on the sample.

  12. Environmental satisfaction and adaptability : the Physical Ambience Rose as a global comfort representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demers, C.M.H.; Potvin, A.; Dubois, M.C. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). GRAP Groupe de recherche en ambiances physiques; Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). School of Architecture

    2009-07-01

    This paper presented a new graphical tool for architects. The Physical Ambience Rose (PAR) provides a record of the occupants' global environmental satisfaction and adaptability. A PAR representation takes into account all senses commonly at play in spatial perception, namely thermal, visual, acoustical and olfactory. Each of these 4 environmental stimuli can be qualified by the user to provide a representation of the perceived environmental satisfaction of a building. PAR can be generated for either individuals or groups of occupants and their interaction with the building. The satisfaction scale therefore varies from very pleasant, to neutral, and intolerable according to the level of quality, scale and duration of the thermal, luminous, visual and olfactory stimuli. The paper presents the methodology that led to the development of this representation tool. The tool was used in a post-occupancy evaluation of a bioclimatic administrative building in Montreal. The overall environmental conditions at the building were highly praised, ranging from neutral to very pleasant. 7 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  13. An old dog and new tricks: Genetic analysis of a Tudor dog recovered from the Mary Rose wreck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouganelis, George D; Ogden, Rob; Nahar, Niru; Runfola, Valeria; Bonab, Maziar; Ardalan, Arman; Radford, David; Barnett, Ross; Larson, Greger; Hildred, Alex; Jones, Mark; Scarlett, Garry

    2014-12-01

    The Tudor warship the Mary Rose sank in the Solent waters between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight on the 19th of July 1545, whilst engaging a French invasion fleet. The ship was rediscovered in 1971 and between 1979 and 1982 the entire contents of the ship were excavated resulting in the recovery of over 25,000 objects, including the skeleton of a small to medium sized dog referred to as the Mary Rose Dog (MRD). Here we report the extraction and analysis of both mitochondrial and genomic DNA from a tooth of this animal. Our results show that the MRD was a young male of a terrier type most closely related to modern Jack Russell Terriers with a light to dark brown coat colour. Interestingly, given the antiquity of the sample, the dog was heterozygotic for the SLC2A9 gene variant that leads to hyperuricosuria when found in modern homozygotic animals. These findings help shed light on a notable historical artefact from an important period in the development of modern dog breeds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mosquito larvicidal activity of cadmium nanoparticles synthesized from petal extracts of marigold (Tagetes sp.) and rose (Rosa sp.) flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajra, Amita; Dutta, Snehali; Mondal, Naba Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Mosquitoes are blood-thirsty insects and serve as the most important vectors for spreading most notorious diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever, and filariasis. The extensive use of synthetic mosquito repellent has resulted in resistance in mosquitoes. Therefore, the development of a reliable, eco-friendly processes for the synthesis of nano dimensional materials is an utmost important aspect of nanotechnology. In the present study, authors report absolute green synthesis of cadmium nanoparticles using marigold and rose flower petal extract. The characterization of nanomaterials was done by using UV-Vis, SEM, FTIR and fluorescent spectrophotometer analysis. Finally cadmium nanoparticles were also evaluated for their larvicidal activity of mosquito. Marigold flower petal extract shows 100 % mortality after 72 h of incubation with 10 ppm of Cd-nanoparticles. No mortality was observed in the control. Therefore, out of two flower petal mediated nanoparticles, only marigold showed better performance towards mosquito larvicidal activity than rose petal extracts. This is the first report on mosquito larvicidal activity of flower-petal mediated cadmium nanoparticles. Thus, the use of marigold petal extract to synthesize cadmium nanoparticles is a rapid, ecofriendly, and a single-step approach and the CdNps formed can be potential mosquito larvicidal agents.

  15. Relationship between baseline white-matter changes and development of late-life depressive symptoms: 3-year results from the LADIS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorczuk, A; Firbank, M J; Pantoni, L

    2010-01-01

    -matter changes predicted future depressive outcomes, after controlling for confounding factors. RESULTS: Baseline severity of white-matter changes independently predicted depressive symptoms at both 2 (p...BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that cerebral white-matter changes and depressive symptoms are linked directly along the causal pathway. We investigated whether baseline severity of cerebral white-matter changes predict longer-term future depressive outcomes in a community sample of non...... volumetrically. Depressive outcomes were assessed in terms of depressive episodes and depressive symptoms, as measured by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Subjects were clinically reassessed annually for up to 3 years. Regression models were constructed to determine whether baseline severity of white...

  16. Local government pavement research, development, and implementation organization in several states : a white paper from the National Center for Sustainable Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This white paper presents the results of a survey administered by the University of California Pavement Research Center (UCPRC) exploring the successes, challenges, funding, and organizational structure of six centers in other states that share a sim...

  17. White Paper Report of the 2010 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries: Identifying Sustainable Strategies for Imaging Services in the Developing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Rodney D.; Azene, Ezana M.; Kalia, Vivek; Pongpirul, Krit; Starikovsky, Anna; Sydnor, Ryan; Lungren, Matthew P.; Johnson, Benjamin; Kimble, Cary; Wiktorek, Sarah; Drum, Tom; Short, Brad; Cooper, Justin; Khouri, Nagi F.; Mayo-Smith, William W.; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Goldberg, Barry B.; Garra, Brian S.; DeStigter, Kristen K.; Lewin, Jonathan S.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 RAD-AID Conference on International Radiology for Developing Countries was a multidisciplinary meeting to discuss data, experiences, and models pertaining to radiology in the developing world, where widespread shortages of imaging services reduce health care quality. The theme of this year’s conference was sustainability, with a focus on establishing and maintaining imaging services in resource-limited regions. Conference presenters and participants identified 4 important components of sustainability: (1) sustainable financing models for radiology development, (2) integration of radiology and public health, (3) sustainable clinical models and technology solutions for resource-limited regions, and (4) education and training of both developing and developed world health care personnel. PMID:21807349

  18. Petal Growth Physiology of Cut Rose Flowers: Progress and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horibe Takanori

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Roses are the most important crop in the floriculture industry and attract both pollinators and human admirers. Until now, a lot of research focusing on postharvest physiology including flower senescence has been conducted, leading to improvement in vase life. However, few studies have focused on the physiology of petal growth, the perception of light by petals, and the relationship between petal growth and environmental conditions. Regarding roses, whose ornamental value lies in the process of blooming from buds, it is also important to understand their flowering mechanisms and establish methods to control such mechanisms, as well as focus on slowing the aging process, in order to achieve high quality of postharvest cut roses. Elucidation of the mechanisms of rose flower opening would contribute to enhanced quality and commercial production of floricultural crops as well as greatly advance basic scientific knowledge regarding plant biology. In this review, we describe the progress and future prospects in the study of petal growth physiology of cut roses.

  19. Study on the Ascorbic Acid Content of rose Hip fruit Depending on Stationary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Ropciuc

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The dog rose area includes southern and central Europe, reaching southern Scandinavia; it is also found in Asia Minor, Central Asia and North Africa. In our country, Rosa canina is the most widespread of the many species of Rosa, common in all areas. The components of the station, known also as the „stationary factors” affect differently the plant life and their chemical composition. Cynosbati fructus is the false fruit of Rosa canina L. (Rosaceae, known in Romanian as rose hip. The rose hip contain as active ingredients 500-1000 % vitamin C, 600-10000 mg% carotenoids, pectin, dextrin, vitamins B2, E, PP, flavone, sugars, organic acids, tannins, volatile oil, vanillin, triterpenoid saponosides, beta-sitosterol, fat (lecithin, glycerides of fatty acids in seeds, minerals (potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid plays an important role in human body. The greatest amount is found in plants which reached maturity. It is concentrated in the rose hip flesh. Solutions easily destroyit in the presence of UV, of copper, silver, iron and oxidative enzymes traces. Vitamin C participates actively in all processes of oxidoreductions of the living cell. Its lack in food causes the disease called scurvy which manifests itself by inflammated and bleeding gums, tooth loss. Rose hip fruits are known as medicines since prehistoric times.

  20. Monitoring the infective process of the downy mildew causal agent within micropropagated rose plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Yamile Gómez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Downy mildew in the rose caused by a species of the Peronospora genus is a very restrictive disease for the Colombian greenhouse rose production. The damage observed in the susceptible varieties of commercial rose include symptoms affect young steams and tiny leaves causing reddish and brown spots and defoliation; leading to 10% production losses. The infective behavior of this pathogen was studied with the aim of increasing the knowledge about the biology of the rose downy mildew. The study of the infective process was performed on the Charlotte variety using micropropagated roses inoculated with suspensions of sporangia. A germinal tube was observed during the germination process, it came from a lateral papilla and reached up to 300 microns in length. During this study, the ability of the pathogen to use vascular sieves as communication systems within the plant was determined. Oogonia and antheridia were also observed inside the epidermal cells, and oospores inside the parenchymal tissue close to xylem vessels. To the best of our knowledge, these sexual structures have not been reported on in Colombia before. This study verifies the ability of the downy mildew causal agent to move through the xylem vessels and produce sexual structures, such as oogonia, antheridia and oospores within those tissues.